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Sample records for modeling coupled flow

  1. Coupled continuum and molecular model of flow through fibrous filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunliu; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    A coupled approach combining the continuum boundary singularity method (BSM) and the molecular direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is developed and validated using Taylor-Couette flow and the flow about a single fiber confined between two parallel walls. In the proposed approach, the DSMC is applied to an annular region enclosing the fiber and the BSM is employed in the entire flow domain. The parameters used in the DSMC and the coupling procedure, such as the number of simulated particles, the cell size, and the size of the coupling zone are determined by inspecting the accuracy of pressure drop obtained for the range of Knudsen numbers between zero and unity. The developed approach is used to study flowfield of fibrous filtration flows. It is observed that in the partial-slip flow regime, Kn ⩽ 0.25, the results obtained by the proposed coupled BSM-DSMC method match the solution by BSM combined with the heuristic partial-slip boundary conditions. For transition molecular-to-continuum Knudsen numbers, 0.25 < Kn ⩽ 1, the difference in pressure drop and velocity between these two approaches is significant. This difference increases with the Knudsen number that confirms the usefulness of coupled continuum and molecular methods in numerical modeling of transition low Reynolds number flows in fibrous filters.

  2. A coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, Daniel; Martineau, Rick; James, Mark; Brown, Don

    1991-01-01

    We present a fully coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock, where the fluid flow depends on the joint openings and the joint openings depend on the fluid pressure. The joints and rock blocks are modeled discretely using the finite element method. Solutions for the fluid and rock are obtained and iteration is performed until both solutions converge. Example applications include an examination of the effects of back-pressure on flow in a geothermal reservoir and transient fluid injection into a reservoir.

  3. A coupled model for solid deformation and gas leak flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peide; Wan, Huagen

    2004-09-01

    From the viewpoint of interaction mechanics of solid and gas, a coupled mathematical model is presented for solid coal/rock-mass deformation and gas leak flow in parallel deformable coal seams. Numerical solutions using the strong implicit procedure (SIP) method to the coupled mathematical model for double parallel coal seams are also developed in detail. Numerical simulations for the prediction of safety range using protection layer mining are performed with experimental data from a mine with potential danger of coal/gas outbursts. Analyses show that the numerical simulation results are consistent with the measured data on the spot. The coupled model shows a positive future for applications in a wide range of gas-leak-flow-related problems in mining engineering, gas drainage engineering and mining safety engineering. Copyright

  4. Model coupling for multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Rainer; Flemisch, Bernd; Wolff, Markus; Ebigbo, Anozie; Class, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Numerical models for flow and transport in porous media are valid for a particular set of processes, scales, levels of simplification and abstraction, grids etc. The coupling of two or more specialised models is a method of increasing the overall range of validity while keeping the computational costs relatively low. Several coupling concepts are reviewed in this article with a focus on the authors’ work in this field. The concepts are divided into temporal and spatial coupling concepts, of which the latter is subdivided into multi-process, multi-scale, multi-dimensional, and multi-compartment coupling strategies. Examples of applications for which these concepts can be relevant include groundwater protection and remediation, carbon dioxide storage, nuclear-waste disposal, soil dry-out and evaporation processes as well as fuel cells and technical filters.

  5. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations.

  6. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations. PMID:26821785

  7. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  8. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  9. A numerical method for a model of two-phase flow in a coupled free flow and porous media system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we study two-phase fluid flow in coupled free flow and porous media regions. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the porous medium region. We propose a Robin-Robin domain decomposition method for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  10. Vertically integrated models for coupled two-phase flow and geomechanics in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørnarâ, Tore I.; Nordbotten, Jan M.; Park, Joonsang

    2016-02-01

    Models of reduced dimensionality have been found to be particularly attractive in simulating the fate of injected CO2 in supercritical state in the context of carbon capture and storage. This is motivated by the confluence of three aspects: the strong buoyant segregation of the lighter CO2 phase above water, the relatively long time scales associated with storage, and finally the large aspect ratios that characterize the geometry of typical storage aquifers. However, to date, these models have been confined to considering only the flow problem, as the coupling between reduced dimensionality models for flow and models for geomechanical response has previously not been developed. Herein, we develop a fully coupled, reduced dimension, model for multiphase flow and geomechanics. It is characterized by the aquifer(s) being of lower dimension(s), while the surrounding overburden and underburden being of full dimension. The model allows for general constitutive functions for fluid flow (relative permeability and capillary pressure) and uses the standard Biot coupling between the flow and mechanical equations. The coupled model retains all the simplicities of reduced-dimensional models for flow, including less stiff nonlinear systems of equations (since the upscaled constitutive functions are closer to linear), longer time steps (since the high grid resolution in the vertical direction can be avoided), and less degrees of freedom. We illustrate the applicability of the new coupled model through both a validation study and a practical computational example.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    PubMed

    Soltani, M; Chen, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  12. A Tightly Coupled Particle-Fluid Model for DNA-Laden Flows in Complex Microscale Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Colella, P; Graves, D T; Martin, D F; Schwartz, P O

    2004-11-18

    We present a stable and convergent method for the computation of flows of DNA-laden fluids in microchannels with complex geometry. The numerical strategy combines a ball-rod model representation for polymers tightly coupled with a projection method for incompressible viscous flow. We use Cartesian grid embedded boundary methods to discretize the fluid equations in the presence of complex domain boundaries. A sample calculation is presented showing flow through a packed array microchannel in 2D.

  13. MODELING COUPLING OF EEL GRASS ZOSTRA MARINA AND WATER FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological effects caused by submerged aquatic vegetation not only depend on the plants and their morphology but also on the flow and transport patterns of dissolved and suspended constituents near the canopy. The height of the canopy is a major parameter in any quantitative an...

  14. Modeling the coupling between flow and transport developed by chemical reactions and density differences using TOUGHREACT.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongkon; Scwartz, Franklin W.; Shi, Jianyou; Xu, Tianfu

    2003-04-01

    A complex pattern of coupling between fluid flow and mass transport develops when heterogeneous reactions occur. For instance, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change the physical properties of a medium, such as permeability and pore geometry. These changes influence fluid flow, which in turn impact the composition of dissolved constituents and solid-phase, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Two-dimensional modeling studies using TOUGHREACT were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport developed as a consequence of difference in density, dissolution/precipitation, and medium heterogeneity. The model includes equilibrium reactions for aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid phases and aqueous constituents, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes resulting from precipitation and dissolution reactions in porous media. Generally, the evolutions in the concentrations of the aqueous phase are intimately related to the reaction-front dynamics. Plugging of the medium contributed to significant transients in patterns of flow and mass transport.

  15. A general kinetic-flow coupling model for FCC riser flow simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-05-18

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code has been developed for fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser flow simulation. Depending on the application of interest, a specific kinetic model is needed for the FCC flow simulation. This paper describes a method to determine a kinetic model based on limited pilot-scale test data. The kinetic model can then be used with the CFD code as a tool to investigate optimum operating condition ranges for a specific FCC unit.

  16. 3D hydro-mechanically coupled groundwater flow modelling of Pleistocene glaciation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Bense, Victor F.; Sass, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    Pleistocene glaciation led to temporal and spatial variations of sub-surface pore fluid pressure. In basins covered by ice sheets, fluid flow and recharge rates are strongly elevated during glaciations as compared to inter-glacial periods. Present-day hydrogeological conditions across formerly glaciated areas are likely to still reflect the impact of glaciations that ended locally more than 10 thousand years before present. 3D hydro-mechanical coupled modelling of glaciation can help to improve the management of groundwater resources in formerly glaciated basins. An open source numerical code for solving linear elasticity, which is based on the finite element method (FEM) in 3D, has been developed. By coupling this code with existing 3D flow codes it is possible to enable hydro-mechanical coupled modelling. Results of two benchmark simulations are compared to existing analytical solutions to demonstrate the performance of the newly developed code. While the result for a fluid-structure coupled case is in reasonable agreement with the analytical model, the result for a classical structure-fluid coupled benchmark showed that the analytical solution only matches the numerical result when the relevant coupling parameter (loading efficiency) is known in advance. This indicates that the applicability of widely applied approaches using an extra term in the groundwater flow equation for vertical stress to simulate hydro-mechanical coupling might have to be re-evaluated. A case study with the commercial groundwater simulator FEFLOW demonstrates the newly developed solution.

  17. A fully coupled numerical modeling for regional unsaturated-saturated water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan; Shi, Liangsheng; Lin, Lin; Yang, Jinzhong; Ye, Ming

    2012-12-01

    SummaryIt is a long-lasting challenge in subsurface hydrologic modeling to develop numerically efficient algorithm for coupling unsaturated and saturated flow, especially in regional-scale modeling. In this study, a new scheme is developed for coupled numerical simulation of unsaturated-saturated water flow at the regional scale. The modeling domain is divided into sub-areas in horizon according to spatially distributed inputs, flow characteristics, and topography conditions. The unsaturated zone of each sub-area is represented by individual one-dimensional soil column. Water balance analysis method is employed to formulate the three-dimensional groundwater model. The unsaturated and saturated zones are implicitly coupled in space and time through the vertical flow between the unsaturated soil columns and the saturated aquifers in that the heads in the unsaturated and saturated zones are integrated in a single matrix equation. The coupling scheme is verified and computational efficiency is evaluated in several hypothetical examples by comparing the simulation results with those of widely used software, including Hydrus1D, SWMS2D, FEFLOW and HydroGeoSphere. In the real-world application, numerical results show that the coupling model can obtain satisfactory simulation results with fairly little computational cost. Compared with existing models, the new numerical scheme is more suitable to regional-scale modeling with complex domain geometry and alternating recharge or discharge fluxes. However, due to the assumptions involved in the method development, the coupling method has its intrinsic limitations and should be used with caution in cases where the lateral flow is predominant in the unsaturated zone.

  18. A Coupled Plasma Dynamics and Gas Flow Model for Semiconductor Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A continuum modeling approach by self-consistently coupling plasma dynamics and gas flow will be presented for the analysis of high density plasma reactors. Experimental data shows that gas flow distribution affects the etch rate uniformity even at low pressures (6-20 mTorr) and flow rates (20-70 sccm). This study will investigate the effects of gas flow and gas energy on bulk plasma densities and temperatures using a continuum model. The model solves multidimensional equations of mass balance for neutrals and ions, gas momentum, separate energy equations for electrons and neutrals and Maxwell's equations for power coupling. A test case of N2 plasma in a 300mm TCP etch reactor, for which hybrid model and Langmuir probe data are available, is chosen for this analysis. Our preliminary results show that modeling gas flow and energy improves the predictions of electron density and its spatial variation in the reactor when compared with the experimental data. The aim of this study is to identify the operating conditions for the TCP reactor when a self-consistent modeling of gas flow is important.

  19. A fully coupled porous flow and geomechanics model for fluid driven cracks: a peridynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Hisanao; Katiyar, Amit; York, Jason; Foster, John T.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    2015-03-01

    A state-based non-local peridynamic formulation is presented for simulating fluid driven fractures in an arbitrary heterogeneous poroelastic medium. A recently developed peridynamic formulation of porous flow has been coupled with the existing peridynamic formulation of solid and fracture mechanics resulting in a peridynamic model that for the first time simulates poroelasticity and fluid-driven fracture propagation. This coupling is achieved by modeling the role of pore pressure on the deformation of porous media and vice versa through porosity variation with medium deformation, pore pressure and total mean stress. The poroelastic model is verified by simulating the one-dimensional consolidation of fluid saturated rock. An additional porous flow equation with material permeability dependent on fracture width is solved to simulate fluid flow in the fractured region. Finally, single fluid-driven fracture propagation with a two-dimensional plane strain assumption is simulated and verified against the corresponding classical analytical solution.

  20. Flow variability in the Scandinavian ice sheet: modelling the coupling between ice sheet flow and hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Neil; Sharp, Martin

    2002-02-01

    There is increasing geologic evidence for periodic flow variability within large ice sheets, manifested as spatially and temporally variable areas of fast ice flow, and resulting in the very complex patterns of lineations observed in formerly glaciated areas. However, many ice sheet models do not replicate this behaviour. A possible reason for this is that such models do not include a detailed treatment of basal hydrology. Changes in the character of sub-glacial drainage systems are believed to cause surges in valley glaciers. Recent ice sheet models, which have included basal hydrology or at least a link between basal velocity and the presence of water at the bed, often show flow variability. However, these models have typically assumed a deformable bed, or have made no assumptions about the nature of the bed. Whilst these assumptions seem applicable to areas close to the former margins of Quaternary ice sheets, they are less applicable to interior areas. These areas typically show thin or scanty till cover over eroded bedrock, and the presence of eskers, which are indicative of drainage in sub-glacial tunnels. We have developed a two-dimensional time-dependent ice sheet model that includes hard-bed basal hydrology. This allows calculation of sub-glacial water pressures and the use of a water pressure dependent sliding law to calculate ice sheet velocities. When used to simulate the Weichselian Scandinavian ice sheet, with late Quaternary climate and sea level as forcing functions, this model develops localised areas of fast-flowing ice, which vary in extent and in distance of penetration into the interior of the ice sheet both spatially and temporally. The behaviour of these lobes depends crucially on the influence of the evolving ice sheet topography on the routing of subglacial water flow, due to the resulting variations in the subglacial hydraulic potential which drive the water flow. Bedrock topography also has some influence, but fast flow areas are not

  1. Coupling lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of thermal flows on standard lattices.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; He, Y L; Gao, Y J; Tao, W Q

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating thermal flows on the standard two-dimensional nine-velocity (D2Q9) lattice is developed in the framework of the double-distribution-function (DDF) approach in which the viscous heat dissipation and compression work are considered. In the model, a density distribution function is used to simulate the flow field, while a total energy distribution function is employed to simulate the temperature field. The discrete equilibrium density and total energy distribution functions are obtained from the Hermite expansions of the corresponding continuous equilibrium distribution functions. The pressure given by the equation of state of perfect gases is recovered in the macroscopic momentum and energy equations. The coupling between the momentum and energy transports makes the model applicable for general thermal flows such as non-Boussinesq flows, while the existing DDF LB models on standard lattices are usually limited to Boussinesq flows in which the temperature variation is small. Meanwhile, the simple structure and general features of the DDF LB approach are retained. The model is tested by numerical simulations of thermal Couette flow, attenuation-driven acoustic streaming, and natural convection in a square cavity with small and large temperature differences. The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical solutions and/or other numerical results reported in the literature.

  2. Updating an equivalent porous medium karst aquifer model using the coupled continuum pipe-flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, S. P.; Ronayne, M. J.; Long, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Karst conduits are commonly treated as high-conductivity zones in equivalent porous medium (EPM) models. In this study, an EPM model for a Paleozoic age carbonate aquifer was updated to include discrete conduits, and flow was simulated using the coupled continuum pipe-flow method. The modeled area, encompassing 2000 square km of the Madison aquifer in western South Dakota (USA), includes four karst springs with contributing conduit networks. The updated model considered the same observation data that were used to calibrate the EPM model: measured hydraulic heads at matrix observation wells and estimated springflow. Adjusted parameters included the conduit locations and hydraulic properties, as well as the matrix hydraulic conductivity distribution. Inferred karst pathways from environmental tracer analysis were used to guide the placement of conduits. The new coupled continuum pipe-flow model is characterized by a simpler conductivity distribution; extreme high-K values used in the EPM model are not necessary when conduit flow is explicitly simulated. Results are presented to illustrate the influence of conduits on simulated flow behavior.

  3. Inverse model of fully coupled fluid flow and stress in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to reflect the real behavior of the seepage field and deformation field during the environment change and construction process£¬the basic equations and FEM methods for fully coupled analysis of fluid flow and stress are developed£¬based on the assumptions of small deformation and incompressible water flow in complicated fractured rock masses. Both the equivalent continuum media model and the discrete media model are adopted. And the modified initial flow method is used to deal with the free surface of unconfined seepage. Due to the difficulty in determining the parameters of water flow field, stress field and their coupling relations, an inverse model is presented for the fully coupled problem in which both the data of water head and displacement are taken into consideration. Objective function is defined based on sensitivity analysis of parameters, and the relative values of water head, displacement on parameters are adopted in the establishment of objective function. A hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed as optimization method. The probability of crossover and mutation is determined according to chromosome fitness and a concept of self- adaptive probability is given. In addition, simplex method is also applied to increase the ability of local search, the operation of accelerated cycle is used in order to decrease optimization time.

  4. Were the May 2012 Emilia-Romagna earthquakes induced? A coupled flow-geomechanics modeling assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Jha, B.; Hager, B. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Astiz, L.; Dieterich, J. H.; Frohlich, C.

    2016-07-01

    Seismicity induced by fluid injection and withdrawal has emerged as a central element of the scientific discussion around subsurface technologies that tap into water and energy resources. Here we present the application of coupled flow-geomechanics simulation technology to the post mortem analysis of a sequence of damaging earthquakes (Mw = 6.0 and 5.8) in May 2012 near the Cavone oil field, in northern Italy. This sequence raised the question of whether these earthquakes might have been triggered by activities due to oil and gas production. Our analysis strongly suggests that the combined effects of fluid production and injection from the Cavone field were not a driver for the observed seismicity. More generally, our study illustrates that computational modeling of coupled flow and geomechanics permits the integration of geologic, seismotectonic, well log, fluid pressure and flow rate, and geodetic data and provides a promising approach for assessing and managing hazards associated with induced seismicity.

  5. Coupling of FVCOM and CFD Model for Simulation of Multiscale Coastal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Qu, K.

    2013-12-01

    In correspondence with the need to simulate many emerging problems, especially those in nearshore regions such as deepwater oil spill, it is necessary to develop capabilities to predict small-scale, fully 3D phenomena in coastal ocean flows. A feasible as well as effective approach for the development is a hybrid method that couples different models designed for physics at different scales. We have developed a two-way coupling between a fully 3D CFD model and the FVCOM, in which the former captures small-scale 3D flows and the latter predicts large-scale background currents. In this presentation, a few new applications of such approach will be illustrated. The following figures show a result on tidal flow in a bay and past bridge peers. Tests and analysis are made on solution accuracy and computation efficiency, and discussions are presented on how to achieve seamless solution transition at the model interfaces. Computed large-scale background flow Simulated flow past a brigde

  6. A Coupled Model of Multiphase Flow, Reactive Biogeochemical Transport, Thermal Transport and Geo-Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. H.; Yeh, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    In this investigation, a coupled model of multiphase flow, reactive biogeochemical transport, thermal transport and geo-mechanics in subsurface media is presented. It iteratively solves the mass conservation equation for fluid flow, thermal transport equation for temperature, reactive biogeochemical transport equations for concentration distributions, and solid momentum equation for displacement with successive linearization algorithm. With species-based equations of state, density of a phase in the system is obtained by summing up concentrations of all species. This circumvents the problem of having to use empirical functions. Moreover, reaction rates of all species are incorporated in mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Formation enthalpy of all species is included in the law of energy conservation as a source-sink term. Finite element methods are used to discretize the governing equations. Numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results demonstrate the feasibility and capability of present model in subsurface media.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Soil and Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleners, T.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Both liquid water flow and water vapor flow are included. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from a high-elevation rangeland soil that is subject to significant soil freezing and a mountainous forest soil that is snow-covered for about 8 months of the year. Soil hydraulic parameters are mostly based on measurements and only vegetation parameters are fine-tuned to match measured and calculated soil water content, soil & snow temperature, and snow height. Modeling statistics for both systems show good performance for temperature, intermediate performance for snow height, and relatively low performance for soil water content, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  8. Coupled dam-break flow and bed load modelling using HLLC-WAF scheme.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh-Tabrizi, Alireza; Ghaeini-Hessaroeyeh, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model predicting flow over a mobile bed has been developed. Governing equations consist of the shallow water equations and the Exner equation. The finite volume method on an unstructured triangular grid was deployed to discretize the governing equations. The local Riemann problem is solved by the Harten, Lax and van Leer-contact (HLLC) method in the interface of the cells and the equations are solved using a fully coupled method. Then the flux modelling has been deployed by the total variation diminishing (TVD) version of the weighted average flux (WAF) scheme. The model was verified by comparison of the results and available experimental data for dam-break flow, in a laboratory test, via a channel with sudden enlargement and erodible bed conditions. Comparison of these two sets of results shows that increasing the accuracy of flux modelling caused the model results to have a reasonable agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26398031

  9. A coupled model tree genetic algorithm scheme for flow and water quality predictions in watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Ami; Ostfeld, Avi

    2008-02-01

    SummaryThe rapid advance in information processing systems along with the increasing data availability have directed research towards the development of intelligent systems that evolve models of natural phenomena automatically. This is the discipline of data driven modeling which is the study of algorithms that improve automatically through experience. Applications of data driven modeling range from data mining schemes that discover general rules in large data sets, to information filtering systems that automatically learn users' interests. This study presents a data driven modeling algorithm for flow and water quality load predictions in watersheds. The methodology is comprised of a coupled model tree-genetic algorithm scheme. The model tree predicts flow and water quality constituents while the genetic algorithm is employed for calibrating the model tree parameters. The methodology is demonstrated through base runs and sensitivity analysis for daily flow and water quality load predictions on a watershed in northern Israel. The method produced close fits in most cases, but was limited in estimating the peak flows and water quality loads.

  10. Flow-radiation coupling for atmospheric entries using a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucasse, Laurent; Scoggins, James B.; Rivière, Philippe; Magin, Thierry E.; Soufiani, Anouar

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band (HSNB) model is implemented to make fast and accurate predictions of radiative transfer effects on hypersonic entry flows. The HSNB model combines a Statistical Narrow Band (SNB) model for optically thick molecular systems, a box model for optically thin molecular systems and continua, and a Line-By-Line (LBL) description of atomic radiation. Radiative transfer calculations are coupled to a 1D stagnation-line flow model under thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. Earth entry conditions corresponding to the FIRE 2 experiment, as well as Titan entry conditions corresponding to the Huygens probe, are considered in this work. Thermal nonequilibrium is described by a two temperature model, although non-Boltzmann distributions of electronic levels provided by a Quasi-Steady State model are also considered for radiative transfer. For all the studied configurations, radiative transfer effects on the flow, the plasma chemistry and the total heat flux at the wall are analyzed in detail. The HSNB model is shown to reproduce LBL results with an accuracy better than 5% and a speed up of the computational time around two orders of magnitude. Concerning molecular radiation, the HSNB model provides a significant improvement in accuracy compared to the Smeared-Rotational-Band model, especially for Titan entries dominated by optically thick CN radiation.

  11. Modeling flow in nanoporous, membrane reservoirs and interpretation of coupled fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geren, Filiz

    The average pore size in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this pore size, Darcy flow is no longer the dominating flow mechanism and a combination of diffusive flows determines the flow characteristics. Concentration driven self-diffusion has been well known and included in the flow and transport models in porous media. However, when the sizes of the pores and pore-throats decrease down to the size of the hydrocarbon molecules, the porous medium acts like a semi-permeable membrane, and the size of the pore openings dictates the direction of transport between adjacent pores. Accordingly, characterization of flow and transport in tight unconventional plays requires understanding of their membrane properties. This Master of Science thesis first highlights the membrane properties of nanoporous, unconventional reservoirs and then discusses how filtration effects can be incorporated into the models of transport in nanoporous media within the coupled flux concept. The effect of filtration on fluid composition and its impact on black-oil fluid properties like bubble point pressure is also demonstrated. To define filtration and filtration pressure in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs, analogy to chemical osmosis is applied two pore systems connected with a pore throat, which shows membrane properties. Because the pore throat selectivity permits the passage of fluid molecules by their sizes, given a filtration pressure difference between the two pore systems, the concentration difference between the systems is determined by flash calculations. The results are expressed in the form of filtration (membrane) efficiency, which is essential parameter to define coupled fluxes for porous media flow.

  12. Surface models for coupled modelling of runoff and sewer flow in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Ettrich, N; Steiner, K; Thomas, M; Rothe, R

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods fail for the purpose of simulating the complete flow process in urban areas as a consequence of heavy rainfall and as required by the European Standard EN-752 since the bi-directional coupling between sewer and surface is not properly handled. The new methodology, developed in the EUREKA-project RisUrSim, solves this problem by carrying out the runoff on the basis of shallow water equations solved on high-resolution surface grids. Exchange nodes between the sewer and the surface, like inlets and manholes, are located in the computational grid and water leaving the sewer in case of surcharge is further distributed on the surface. Dense topographical information is needed to build a model suitable for hydrodynamic runoff calculations; in urban areas, in addition, many line-shaped elements like houses, curbs, etc. guide the runoff of water and require polygonal input. Airborne data collection methods offer a great chance to economically gather densely sampled input data.

  13. Monthly river flow forecasting using artificial neural network and support vector regression models coupled with wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalteh, Aman Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Reliable and accurate forecasts of river flow is needed in many water resources planning, design development, operation and maintenance activities. In this study, the relative accuracy of artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector regression (SVR) models coupled with wavelet transform in monthly river flow forecasting is investigated, and compared to regular ANN and SVR models, respectively. The relative performance of regular ANN and SVR models is also compared to each other. For this, monthly river flow data of Kharjegil and Ponel stations in Northern Iran are used. The comparison of the results reveals that both ANN and SVR models coupled with wavelet transform, are able to provide more accurate forecasting results than the regular ANN and SVR models. However, it is found that SVR models coupled with wavelet transform provide better forecasting results than ANN models coupled with wavelet transform. The results also indicate that regular SVR models perform slightly better than regular ANN models.

  14. Hybrid Modeling of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media: Coupling Darcy and Pore-Scale Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomin, P.; Lunati, I.

    2012-12-01

    Flow through porous media is usually modeled employing Darcy's law to relate the macroscopic velocity (volumetric flux density) to the pressure gradient. This relationship represents the momentum balance equation and provides a reliable description under the assumptions of short relaxation times and scale separation. In case of multiphase flow, however, the interaction between the nonlinear interface dynamics and the complexity of pore structure generates a variety of flow regimes and can lead to situations, in which these assumptions are not satisfied and Darcy's law might become inadequate. In this case, multiphysics models that combine the Darcy and pore-scale description become attractive. Here, we use the Multiscale Finite Volume method (MsFV) as a framework for construction a hybrid algorithm that couples a Darcy description of the flow with a pore-scale description. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved to compute the velocity field in the pore geometry; the dynamics of the fluid-fluid interface is described by the Volume Of Fluid method (VOF) in combination with the Continuum Surface Force model (a classic diffuse-interface model for surface tension). A Darcy-like model based on conservation principles is used to construct the approximate coarse-scale problem. The results of the hybrid algorithm (Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume method, HMsFV) are compared with full pore-scale simulations for several flow regimes to assess the robustness of the method with respect to changes in the morphology of fluid distribution. As the reconstruction of the fine-scale details can be done adaptively, the HMsFV method offers a flexible framework for hybrid modeling of different coexisting flow regimes.

  15. Numerical Modeling on Two phase Fluid flow in a Coupled Fracture-Skin-Matrix System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsala Kumari, R.; G, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow modeling studies below the ground surface is very essential for designing suitable remediation strategies for contaminated aquifers and for the development of petroleum and geothermal reservoirs. Presence of fractured bedrock beneath the ground surface will make multiphase flow process more complex due to its highly heterogeneous nature. A major challenge in modeling flow within a fractured rock is to capture the interaction between the high permeability fracture and the low permeability rock-matrix. In some instances, weathering and mineral depositions will lead to formation of an additional layer named fracture-skin at the fracture-matrix interface. Porosity and permeability of fracture-skin may significantly vary from the adjacent rock matrix and this variation will result in different flow and transport behavior within the fracture-skin. In the present study, an attempt has been made to model simultaneous flow of two immiscible phases (water and LNAPL) in a saturated coupled fracture-skin-matrix system. A fully-implicit finite difference model has been developed to simulate the variation of pressure and saturation of fluid phases along the fracture and within the rock-matrix. Sensitivity studies have been done to analyze the effect of change of various fracture-skin parameters such as porosity, diffusion coefficient and thickness on pressure and saturation distribution of both wetting and non-wetting fluid phases. It can be concluded from the study that the presence of fracture-skin is significantly affecting the fluid flow at the fracture-matrix interface and it can also be seen from the study that the flow behavior of both fluid phases is sensitive to fracture-skin parameters.

  16. Generic Procedure for Coupling the PHREEQC Geochemical Modeling Framework with Flow and Solute Transport Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmeier, L. C.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Computer simulations of water availability and quality play an important role in state-of-the-art water resources management. However, many of the most utilized software programs focus either on physical flow and transport phenomena (e.g., MODFLOW, MT3DMS, FEFLOW, HYDRUS) or on geochemical reactions (e.g., MINTEQ, PHREEQC, CHESS, ORCHESTRA). In recent years, several couplings between both genres of programs evolved in order to consider interactions between flow and biogeochemical reactivity (e.g., HP1, PHWAT). Software coupling procedures can be categorized as ‘close couplings’, where programs pass information via the memory stack at runtime, and ‘remote couplings’, where the information is exchanged at each time step via input/output files. The former generally involves modifications of software codes and therefore expert programming skills are required. We present a generic recipe for remotely coupling the PHREEQC geochemical modeling framework and flow and solute transport (FST) simulators. The iterative scheme relies on operator splitting with continuous re-initialization of PHREEQC and the FST of choice at each time step. Since PHREEQC calculates the geochemistry of aqueous solutions in contact with soil minerals, the procedure is primarily designed for couplings to FST’s for liquid phase flow in natural environments. It requires the accessibility of initial conditions and numerical parameters such as time and space discretization in the input text file for the FST and control of the FST via commands to the operating system (batch on Windows; bash/shell on Unix/Linux). The coupling procedure is based on PHREEQC’s capability to save the state of a simulation with all solid, liquid and gaseous species as a PHREEQC input file by making use of the dump file option in the TRANSPORT keyword. The output from one reaction calculation step is therefore reused as input for the following reaction step where changes in element amounts due to advection

  17. Simultaneous parameter estimation and contaminant source characterization for coupled groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Parameter estimation and contaminant source characterization are key steps in the development of a coupled groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation model. Here a methodologyfor simultaneous model parameter estimation and source characterization is presented. The parameter estimation/source characterization inverse model combines groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation with non-linear maximum likelihood estimation to determine optimal estimates of the unknown model parameters and source characteristics based on measurements of hydraulic head and contaminant concentration. First-order uncertainty analysis provides a means for assessing the reliability of the maximum likelihood estimates and evaluating the accuracy and reliability of the flow and transport model predictions. A series of hypothetical examples is presented to demonstrate the ability of the inverse model to solve the combined parameter estimation/source characterization inverse problem. Hydraulic conductivities, effective porosity, longitudinal and transverse dispersivities, boundary flux, and contaminant flux at the source are estimated for a two-dimensional groundwater system. In addition, characterization of the history of contaminant disposal or location of the contaminant source is demonstrated. Finally, the problem of estimating the statistical parameters that describe the errors associated with the head and concentration data is addressed. A stage-wise estimation procedure is used to jointly estimate these statistical parameters along with the unknown model parameters and source characteristics. ?? 1992.

  18. Modeling velocity in gradient flows with coupled-map lattices with advection.

    PubMed

    Lind, Pedro G; Corte-Real, João; Gallas, Jason A C

    2002-07-01

    We introduce a simple model to investigate large scale behavior of gradient flows based on a lattice of coupled maps which, in addition to the usual diffusive term, incorporates advection, as an asymmetry in the coupling between nearest neighbors. This diffusive-advective model predicts traveling patterns to have velocities obeying the same scaling as wind velocities in the atmosphere, regarding the advective parameter as a sort of geostrophic wind. In addition, the velocity and wavelength of traveling wave solutions are studied. In general, due to the presence of advection, two regimes are identified: for strong diffusion the velocity varies linearly with advection, while for weak diffusion a power law is found with a characteristic exponent proportional to the diffusion.

  19. Auroral signatures of Bursty Bulk Flows from magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, M.; de Keyser, J. M.; Roth, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetospheric tail and the activation of auroral forms is well established from satellite and ground-based observations. Starting from a self-consistent description of BBFs based on a Vlasov equilibrium we provide a quantitative evaluation of the associated auroral effects by using a quasi-stationary magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling model. The self-consistent BBF model is based on a kinetic description of a 1-D plasma slab moving in background plasma and electromagnetic field. The model considers two exact constants of motion and one adiabatic invariant (the magnetic moment). It solves the coupled Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations in one spatial dimension (perpendicular to the BBFs plasma bulk velocity and the main magnetic field) assuming the BBF is a 1D structure elongated in the direction of the background magnetic field. The BBF model provides the self-consistent profile of Φm, the electric potential, showing the formation of convergent electric fields at the dawnward flank of the Earth-ward oriented BBFs. It has been shown that magnetospheric convergent electric fields drive field-aligned (FA) potential drops, FA currents and electron precipitation and acceleration. A stationary MI coupling model developed for discontinuity-like magnetospheric generators with convergent electric fields developed earlier is adapted to describe the coupling between the BBFs and the auroral ionosphere. The kernel of the MI coupling model is the condition of current continuity at the topside ionosphere, from which we compute the electric potential in the ionosphere for a given Φm. The MI coupling model is based on a Knight-type current-voltage relationship and a height-integrated conductivity model that depends on the energy deposited in the ionosphere by precipitating electrons. We show that the convergent electric field formed at the flanks of the BBF drive a FA potential drop and downward electron acceleration

  20. Numerical modelling of convection dominated transport coupled with density driven flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolkovič, Peter; De Schepper, Hennie

    In this paper, we present a numerical model for a problem of coupled flow and transport in porous media. We use a barycentre based finite volume method (FVM), which, in the case of convection dominated transport, is combined with suitable upwind methods, in order to avoid numerical instabilities. We present some relevant and new numerical results for the Elder problem, which offer a better understanding of mutually non-compatible results in other papers, by showing the dependence of the recirculating patterns on the level of grid refinement and on the numerical scheme, as well as on (numerical) perturbations.

  1. MODELING COUPLED PROCESSES OF MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wu; S. Mukhopadhyay; K. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-02-28

    A mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is developed for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. The TH model, consisting of three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the unsaturated zone, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, and thermal loading scenario under estimated current and future climate conditions. More specifically, the TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the most updated, best-estimated input parameters. This mountain-scale TH model simulates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale multiphase fluid flow, and evaluates the impact of radioactive waste heat on the hydrogeological system, including thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. For a better description of the ambient geothermal condition of the unsaturated zone system, the TH model is first calibrated against measured borehole temperature data. The ambient temperature calibration provides the necessary surface and water table boundary as well as initial conditions. Then, the TH model is used to obtain scientific understanding of TH processes in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone under the designed schedule of repository thermal load.

  2. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  3. Applying coupled flow and sediment-transport models to understanding habitat requirements and availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, R. R.; Nelson, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between habitat requirements and the magnitude and duration of flow and sediment supply is an important component of both habitat assessment and restoration strategies. Fish habitat is often defined in terms of velocity, depth or substrate composition; locations where combinations of these factors meet habitat requirements depend on channel morphology, flow magnitude, and, in rivers with mobile beds, time-varying change in channel morphology. Because coupled multi-dimensional flow and sediment transport models provide spatially distributed information on flow and other hydraulic quantities, they permit detailed delineation of habitat. Furthermore, they can be used directly to understand how flow magnitude and duration and sediment supply control channel change and habitat availability. We present an example to illustrate how such models can be used in investigations of fish spawning habitat and availability. In the Kootenai River, Idaho, comparison of observed spawning locations with model derived spatial distributions of depths and velocities suggests that white sturgeon utilize the largest available velocity and depth within an 18-kilometer spawning reach over a range of discharges. This is a somewhat more selective criterion than a simple specification of a range of velocity or depth magnitudes, which illustrates the importance of evaluating habitat over a full range of discharge magnitudes. Observations also suggest that spawning currently occurs over a sandy substrate resulting in suffocation of eggs and little to no recruitment of juvenile sturgeon since closure of Libby Dam in 1974. Extending flow modeling to incorporate sediment- transport and bed evolution suggests that a relatively high magnitude long duration discharge can remove sandy substrate, thereby exposing a coarse gravel lag deposit in some areas and providing needed spawning substrate. These results were qualitatively validated through video surveys of channel

  4. Analogue and numerical models coupled with structural analysis to investigate the runout of dry granular flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Céline, Longchamp; Irène, Manzella; Abellan, Antonio; Caspar, Olivier; Podladchikov, Yury; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research is to better understand the propagation of dry granular flows by coupling analogue modelling, structural analysis of deposit and numerical modelling, as follows: (a) The analogue modelling use laboratory experiments to investigate both the fluid-like flow of a granular mass falling down a slope and the influence of certain parameters such as the basal roughness, mobilized volume and slope angle. The experimental setup allows unconfined flow which spreads freely on a horizontal surface. Different grainsizes (115, 545 and 2605 μm) and substratum roughness (simulates by aluminium and sandpapers with grainsize from 16 to 425 μm) were used in order to understand their influence on the motion of a granular mass. During our experiments, the runout varied between 4.5cm and 11cm, with an increase of the basal roughness. When the volume varied between 300 and 600cm3 the runout was comprised between 9.2cm and 11.7cm. Finally when the slope angle was increased from 35° to 60°, the observed runout was between 5.3cm and 20cm. (b) Rock avalanche dynamic is analysed by means of a detailed structural analysis of the analogue modelling deposits. A series of 3D measurements were carried out on the deposit and a median filter and a gradient operator along the direction of propagation were applied to the 3D datasets. Treatment yield a more precise mapping of the longitudinal and transversal displacement features observed at the surface of the deposits. (c) The numerical modelling performed during this research is based both on continuum mechanics approach and on solving the shallow water equations. The avalanche was described from an Eulerian point of view within a continuum framework as single phase of incompressible granular material following Mohr-Coulomb friction law. The results obtained with the numerical model resemble those observed with the analogue modelling mentioned above. By coupling these three approaches, we obtained a complete scheme

  5. Coupled flow-polymer dynamics via statistical field theory: Modeling and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceniceros, Hector D.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Mohler, George O.

    2009-03-01

    Field-theoretic models, which replace interactions between polymers with interactions between polymers and one or more conjugate fields, offer a systematic framework for coarse-graining of complex fluids systems. While this approach has been used successfully to investigate a wide range of polymer formulations at equilibrium, field-theoretic models often fail to accurately capture the non-equilibrium behavior of polymers, especially in the early stages of phase separation. Here the "two-fluid" approach serves as a useful alternative, treating the motions of fluid components separately in order to incorporate asymmetries between polymer molecules. In this work we focus on the connection of these two theories, drawing upon the strengths of each of the approaches in order to couple polymer microstructure with the dynamics of the flow in a systematic way. For illustrative purposes we work with an inhomogeneous melt of elastic dumbbell polymers, though our methodology will apply more generally to a wide variety of inhomogeneous systems. First we derive the model, incorporating thermodynamic forces into a two-fluid model for the flow through the introduction of conjugate chemical potential and elastic strain fields for the polymer density and stress. The resulting equations are composed of a system of fourth order PDEs coupled with a non-linear, non-local optimization problem to determine the conjugate fields. The coupled system is severely stiff and with a high degree of computational complexity. Next, we overcome the formidable numerical challenges posed by the model by designing a robust semi-implicit method based on linear asymptotic behavior of the leading order terms at small scales, by exploiting the exponential structure of global (integral) operators, and by parallelizing the non-linear optimization problem. The semi-implicit method effectively removes the fourth order stability constraint associated with explicit methods and we observe only a first order time

  6. Predictive Modeling of the Evolution of Fault Structure: 3-D Modeling and Coupled Geomechanical/Flow Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, D. A.; Crook, A. J. L.

    2014-09-01

    Reconstruction of geological structures has the potential to provide additional insight into the effect of the depositional history on the current-day geomechanical and hydro-geologic state. Accurate modeling of the reconstruction process is, however, complex, necessitating advanced procedures for the prediction of fault formation and evolution within fully coupled geomechanical, fluid flow and temperature fields. In this paper, a 3-D computational approach is presented that is able to forward model complex structural evolution with multiple intersecting faults that exhibit large relative movement within a coupled geomechanical/flow environment. The approach adopts the Lagrangian method, complemented by robust and efficient automated adaptive meshing techniques, an elasto-plastic constitutive model based on critical state concepts, and global energy dissipation regularized by inclusion of fracture energy in the equations governing state variable evolution. The proposed model is validated by comparison of 2-D plane strain and 3-D thin-slice predictions of a bench-scale experiment, and then applied to two conceptual coupled geomechanical/fluid flow field-scale benchmarks.

  7. Discontinuous finite volume element discretization for coupled flow-transport problems arising in models of sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, Raimund; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    The sedimentation-consolidation and flow processes of a mixture of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers can be described by a nonlinear transport equation for the solids concentration coupled with the Stokes problem written in terms of the mixture flow velocity and the pressure field. Here both the viscosity and the forcing term depend on the local solids concentration. A semi-discrete discontinuous finite volume element (DFVE) scheme is proposed for this model. The numerical method is constructed on a baseline finite element family of linear discontinuous elements for the approximation of velocity components and concentration field, whereas the pressure is approximated by piecewise constant elements. The unique solvability of both the nonlinear continuous problem and the semi-discrete DFVE scheme is discussed, and optimal convergence estimates in several spatial norms are derived. Properties of the model and the predicted space accuracy of the proposed formulation are illustrated by detailed numerical examples, including flows under gravity with changing direction, a secondary settling tank in an axisymmetric setting, and batch sedimentation in a tilted cylindrical vessel.

  8. Coupled flow and salinity transport modelling in semi-arid environments: The Shashe River Valley, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Peter; Held, Rudolf J.; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Linn, Flenner; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Numerical groundwater modelling is used as the base for sound aquifer system analysis and water resources assessment. In many cases, particularly in semi-arid and arid regions, groundwater flow is intricately linked to salinity transport. A case in point is the Shashe River Valley in Botswana. A freshwater aquifer located around an ephemeral stream is depleted by the combined effect of transpiration and pumping. Quantitative system analysis reveals that the amount of water taken by transpiration is far more than the quantities pumped for water supply. Furthermore, the salinity distribution in and around Shashe River Valley as well as its temporal dynamics can be satisfactorily reproduced if the transpiration is modelled as a function of groundwater salinity. The location and dynamics of the saltwater-freshwater interface are highly sensitive to the parameterization of evaporative and transpirative salt enrichment. An existing numerical code for coupled flow/transport simulations (SEAWAT) was adapted to this situation. Model results were checked against a large set of field data including water levels, water chemistry, isotope data and ground and airborne geophysical data. The resulting groundwater model was able to reproduce the long-term development of the freshwater lens located in Shashe River Valley as well as the decline in piezometric heads observed over the last decade. Furthermore, the old age of the saline water surrounding the central freshwater lens could be explained.

  9. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  10. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    SciTech Connect

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus

  11. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  12. Modeling transient streaming potentials in coupled saturated-unsaturated zone flow to a pumping well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.

    2012-12-01

    A semi-analytical model for transient response of streaming potentials (SP) to pumping in an unconfined aquifer, taking into account unsaturated zone flow, is presented. Flow in the unsaturated zone is modeled with a linearized Richards' equation with the moisture retention curve and unsaturated hydraulic conduc- tivity assumed to be exponential functions of matric potential. For the case presented here, the same sorption number is assumed for moisture retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The ratio of the unsaturated to satu- rated electrokinetic coupling coefficient is described by Cℓ,r = kr Sw-(d+1), where kr is relative hydraulic conductivity, Sw is saturation, and d is Archie's second exponent. Hence, based on the assumption of an exponential moisture retention curve, Cℓ,r is also an exponential function of matric potential. Model predicted responses in the saturated and unsaturated zones are compared with measured SP responses to pumping in a bench-scale experimental setup that simulates a radially bounded unconfined aquifer. Potential for using SP responses to esti- mate saturated and unsaturated hydraulic parameters is evaluated. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  13. Coupled Model for CO2 Leaks from Geological Storage: Geomechanics, Fluid Flow and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, G.; Prevost, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deep saline aquifers are considered as a promising option for long-term storage of carbon dioxide. However, risk of CO2 leakage from the aquifers through faults, natural or induced fractures or abandoned wells cannot be disregarded. Therefore, modeling of various leakage scenarios is crucial when selecting a site for CO2 sequestration and choosing proper operational conditions. Carbon dioxide is injected into wells at supercritical conditions (t > 31.04 C, P > 73.82 bar), and these conditions are maintained in the deep aquifers (at 1-2 km depth) due to hydrostatic pressure and geothermal gradient. However, if CO2 and brine start to migrate from the aquifer upward, both pressure and temperature will decrease, and at the depth of 500-750 m, the conditions for CO2 will become subcritical. At subcritical conditions, CO2 starts boiling and the character of the flow changes dramatically due to appearance of the third (vapor) phase and latent heat effects. When modeling CO2 leaks, one needs to couple the multiphase flow in porous media with geomechanics. These capabilities are provided by Dynaflow, a finite element analysis program [1]; Dynaflow has already showed to be efficient for modeling caprock failure causing CO2 leaks [2, 3]. Currently we have extended the capabilities of Dynaflow with the phase transition module, based on two-phase and three-phase isenthalpic flash calculations [4]. We have also developed and implemented an efficient method for solving heat and mass transport with the phase transition using our flash module. Therefore, we have developed a robust tool for modeling CO2 leaks. In the talk we will give a brief overview of our method and illustrate it with the results of simulations for characteristic test cases. References: [1] J.H. Prevost, DYNAFLOW: A Nonlinear Transient Finite Element Analysis Program. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. http://www.princeton.edu/~dynaflow/ (last update 2013

  14. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  15. Coupled thermodynamic and two-phase flow modelling of partially melting crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, Nicolas; Bouilhol, Pierre; Magni, Valentina; van Hunen, Jeroen; Velic, Mirko

    2016-04-01

    How magmas are formed, transferred and interact in the lower crust to form mid-crust plutonic belts remain a fundamental question to understand the chemical and mechanical evolution of continents. To assess this question we developed a 2-D two-phase flow code using finite volume method. Our formulation takes into account: (i) an extended Darcy's law for fluid flow with first order temperature- and fluid-content dependency for the host-rock viscosity and silica-dependent viscosity for the fluid, (ii) the heat equation assuming thermal equilibrium for both solid and liquid and temperature-dependent diffusivity, (iii) thermodynamic modelling of stable phases via a dynamic coupling with Perple_X, and (iv) chemical advection of both the solid and liquid composition. To model chemical interactions with the host rock during magma transport, the melt is assumed to be either in thermodynamic equilibrium or in thermodynamic disequilibrium, or as function of these two endmembers. We applied our modelling approach to investigate the behaviour and composition of magma during lower crust melting. Our goal is to better understand the formation of felsic crust through melting, segregation and assimilation of lower crustal lithologies, applied to Archaean systems. Our preliminary results show the ascend of silica-rich magmas is slow, occurring on the timescale of millions of years, and is highly controlled by (i) the melting curve of the protolith and (ii) by its chemical degree of interaction with the host rock. The resulting transferred magmas are in good accordance with observed composition forming the grey gneisses of Archean terranes (i.e SiO2-rich > 62%, Mg# = 40-50, Na2O ~6%, MgO = 0.5-1%).

  16. Simulating Diffusive and Preferential Water Flow in Soils with a Coupled Source-Responsive/Richards-Equation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Water movement through soils is often dominated by preferential flow processes such as fingering and macropore flow. Traditional models of flow in the unsaturated zone are based on the diffusion or Richards equation and assume that diffusive (surface-tension viscous) flow is the only flow process. These models are incapable of accurately simulating preferential flow. Several alternative approaches, including kinematic wave, transfer function, and water-content wave models, have been suggested for simulating water movement through preferential flow paths. The source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010) and Nimmo and Mitchell (2013) is unique among such models in that water transfer from land surface to depth is controlled by the water-application rate at land surface. The source-responsive model has been coupled with a one-dimensional version of the Richards-equation based model of variably saturated flow, VS2DT. The new model, can simulate flow within the preferential (S) domain alone, within the diffuse (D) domain alone, or within both the S and D domains simultaneously. Water exchange between the two domains is treated as a first-order diffusive process, with the exchange coefficient being a function of soil-water content. The new model was used to simulate field and laboratory infiltration experiments described in the literature. Simulations were calibrated against measured soil water contents with the PEST parameter estimation package; values for hydraulic conductivity and 3 van Genuchten and 3 source-responsive parameters were optimized. Although exact matches between measured and simulated water contents were not obtained, the simulation results captured the salient characteristics of the published data sets, including features typical of preferential as well as diffusive flow. Results obtained from simulating flow simultaneously in both the S and D domain provided better matches to measured data than results obtained from simulating flow independently

  17. Numerical Simulation of 3D particulate flow by Coupling Multi-Fluid Model with Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liancheng; Morita, Koji; Tagami, Hirotaka; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2014-06-01

    The postulated core disruptive accidents (CDAs) are regarded as particular difficulties in the safety analysis of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs). In CDAs, the motions and interactions of solid particles, such as refrozen fuels, disrupted pellets, etc., not only dominate fundamental behaviors of multiphase flows, but also drastically influence the process of CDAs. The fast reactor safety analysis code, SIMMER-IV, which is a 3D, multi-velocity-field, multiphase, multicomponent, Eulerian, fluid dynamics code coupled with a fuel-pin model and a space- and energy-dependent neutron kinetics model, was successfully applied to a series of CDA assessments. However, strong interactions among solid particles as well as particle characteristics in multiphase flows with rich solid particles were not taken into consideration for fluid-dynamics models of SIMMER-IV. In this article, a hybrid method for multiphase flow analysis is developed by coupling the discrete element method (DEM) with the multi-fluid model of SIMMER-IV. In the coupling algorithm, motions of liquid and gas phases are solved by a time-factorization (time-splitting) method. For the solid phases, contacts among particles and interactions with fluid phases are considered through DEM. Numerical simulations of dam-break behavior with rich solid particles show reasonable agreements with corresponding experimental results. It is expected that SIMMER-IV coupled with DEM could provide a promising and useful computational tool for complicated multiphase-flow phenomena with high concentration of solid particles.

  18. Mathematical model for blood flow through a bifurcated artery using couple stress fluid.

    PubMed

    Srinivasacharya, D; Madhava Rao, G

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the blood flow through a bifurcated artery with mild stenosis is investigated taking blood as couple stress fluid. The artery configuring bifurcation is assumed to be symmetric about the axis of the artery and straight cylinders of finite length. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and coordinate transformation is used to convert the irregular boundary to a regular boundary. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The variation of shear stress, flow rate and impedance near the apex with pertinent parameters are studied graphically. It has been noticed that shear stress, flow rate and impedance have been changing suddenly with all the parameters on both sides of the apex. This occurs because of the backflow of the streaming blood at the onset of the lateral junction and secondary flow near the apex in the daughter artery. PMID:27235925

  19. Mathematical model for blood flow through a bifurcated artery using couple stress fluid.

    PubMed

    Srinivasacharya, D; Madhava Rao, G

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the blood flow through a bifurcated artery with mild stenosis is investigated taking blood as couple stress fluid. The artery configuring bifurcation is assumed to be symmetric about the axis of the artery and straight cylinders of finite length. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and coordinate transformation is used to convert the irregular boundary to a regular boundary. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The variation of shear stress, flow rate and impedance near the apex with pertinent parameters are studied graphically. It has been noticed that shear stress, flow rate and impedance have been changing suddenly with all the parameters on both sides of the apex. This occurs because of the backflow of the streaming blood at the onset of the lateral junction and secondary flow near the apex in the daughter artery.

  20. Coupled reactive flow modeling with declining reactivity in fractured geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palguta, J.; Williams, C. F.; Ingebritsen, S.; Hickman, S.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in permeability and fluid flow within geothermal systems are driven by geochemical reactions, advective and diffusive transport of heat and solute mass, and evolving thermal and mechanical environments. Representation of these simultaneous processes in numerical models is required for the characterization and simulation of natural geothermal systems. However, identifying and developing mathematical representations for all of the relevant mechanisms that control system behavior presents a major challenge. We have developed two-dimensional simulations of physical and chemical evolution in fractured granite under geothermal conditions with temperatures ranging from 150-300 °C. The goal of this study is to help identify possible sources for existing discrepancies between model results and laboratory-based measurements by adding a new mathematical formulation to the code TOUGHREACT. The revised code is designed to further quantify the link between the progressive evolution of reaction rates and alteration mineralogy. We explicitly couple reaction rates to mineral precipitation/dissolution effects by using an exponential function that defines evolving reactive surface areas in terms of each of the following (i) the accumulated total secondary mineral volume fraction, (ii) the accumulated clay (smectite) portion of the secondary mineral volume fraction, and (iii) the net change in mineral volume fraction (combined effects of dissolution and precipitation). We evaluate the performance of these three modified approaches by comparing simulation results to detailed laboratory measurements of fluid compositions, mineral abundances, and permeability changes in fractured Westerly granite and to previous one-dimensional simulations in which reactive surface areas were adjusted with time to match the observed fracture permeability history. The simulation results offer a potentially useful means of quantifying reactivity loss and of examining the extent to which secondary

  1. A Model to Couple Flow, Thermal and Reactive Chemical Transport, and Geo-mechanics in Variably Saturated Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, G. T.; Tsai, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the development of a THMC (thermal-hydrology-mechanics-chemistry) process model in variably saturated media. The governing equations for variably saturated flow and reactive chemical transport are obtained based on the mass conservation principle of species transport supplemented with Darcy's law, constraint of species concentration, equation of states, and constitutive law of K-S-P (Conductivity-Degree of Saturation-Capillary Pressure). The thermal transport equation is obtained based on the conservation of energy. The geo-mechanic displacement is obtained based on the assumption of equilibrium. Conventionally, these equations have been implicitly coupled via the calculations of secondary variables based on primary variables. The mechanisms of coupling have not been obvious. In this paper, governing equations are explicitly coupled for all primary variables. The coupling is accomplished via the storage coefficients, transporting velocities, and conduction-dispersion-diffusion coefficient tensor; one set each for every primary variable. With this new system of equations, the coupling mechanisms become clear. Physical interpretations of every term in the coupled equations will be discussed. Examples will be employed to demonstrate the intuition and superiority of these explicit coupling approaches. Keywords: Variably Saturated Flow, Thermal Transport, Geo-mechanics, Reactive Transport.

  2. A coupled surface-water and ground-water flow model (MODBRANCH) for simulation of stream-aquifer interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water flow models traditionally have been developed separately, with interaction between subsurface flow and streamflow either not simulated at all or accounted for by simple formulations. In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well-connected ground-water and surface-water systems, stream-aquifer interaction should be simulated using deterministic responses of both systems coupled at the stream-aquifer interface. Accordingly, a new coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH; the interfacing code is referred to as MODBRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference ground-water model, and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate unsteady flow in open- channel networks. MODFLOW was originally written with the River package, which calculates leakage between the aquifer and stream, assuming that the stream's stage remains constant during one model stress period. A simple streamflow routing model has been added to MODFLOW, but is limited to steady flow in rectangular, prismatic channels. To overcome these limitations, the BRANCH model, which simulates unsteady, nonuniform flow by solving the St. Venant equations, was restructured and incorporated into MODFLOW. Terms that describe leakage between stream and aquifer as a function of streambed conductance and differences in aquifer and stream stage were added to the continuity equation in BRANCH. Thus, leakage between the aquifer and stream can be calculated separately in each model, or leakages calculated in BRANCH can be used in MODFLOW. Total mass in the coupled models is accounted for and conserved. The BRANCH model calculates new stream stages for each time interval in a transient simulation based on upstream boundary conditions, stream properties, and initial estimates of aquifer heads. Next, aquifer heads are calculated in MODFLOW based on stream

  3. Sand Production Modeling Using Superquadric Discrete Elements and Coupling of Fluid Flow and Particle Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S. Perkins, E.D.

    1999-02-10

    Techniques for modeling oil well sand production have been developed using the formulations for superquadric discrete elements and Darcy fluid flow. Discrete element models are generated using the new technique of particle cloning. Discrete element sources and sinks allow simulation of sand production from the initial state through the transition to an equilibrium state where particles are created and removed at the same rate.

  4. Coupling 1D Navier Stokes equation with autoregulation lumped parameter networks for accurate cerebral blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is critical to cerebral blood flow modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries that includes coupling of autoregulatory lumped parameter networks. The model is tested to reproduce a common clinical test to assess autoregulatory function - the carotid artery compression test. The change in the flow velocity at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during carotid compression and release demonstrated strong agreement with published measurements. The model is then used to investigate vasospasm of the MCA, a common clinical concern following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm was modeled by prescribing vessel area reduction in the middle portion of the MCA. Our model showed similar increases in velocity for moderate vasospasms, however, for serious vasospasm (~ 90% area reduction), the blood flow velocity demonstrated decrease due to blood flow rerouting. This demonstrates a potentially important phenomenon, which otherwise would lead to false-negative decisions on clinical vasospasm if not properly anticipated.

  5. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  6. Multi-scale coupling strategy for fully two-dimensional and depth-averaged models for granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Domnik, Birte; Miller, Stephen A.

    2013-04-01

    We developed a full two-dimensional Coulomb-viscoplastic model and applied it for inclined channel flows of granular materials from initiation to their deposition. The model includes the basic features and observed phenomena in dense granular flows like the exhibition of a yield strength and a non-zero slip velocity. A pressure-dependent yield strength is proposed to account for the frictional nature of granular materials. The yield strength can be related to the internal friction angle of the material and plays an important role, for example, in deposition processes. The interaction of the flow with the solid boundary is modelled by a pressure and rate-dependent Coulomb-viscoplastic sliding law. We developed an innovative multi-scale strategy to couple the full two-dimensional, non depth-averaged model (N-DAM) with a one-dimensional, depth-averaged model (DAM). The coupled model reduces computational complexity dramatically by using DAM only in regions with smooth changes of flow variables. The numerics uses N-DAM in regions where depth-averaging becomes inaccurate, for instance, in the initiation and deposition regions, and (particularly) when the flow hits an obstacle or a defense structure. In these regions, momentum transfer must be, and is, considered in all directions. We observe very high coupling performance, and show that the numerical results deviate only slightly from results of the much more cumbersome full two-dimensional model. This shows that the coupled model, which retains all the basic physics of the flow, is an attractive alternative to an expensive, full two-dimensional simulations. We compare simulation results with different experimental data for shock waves appearing in rapid granular flows down inclined channels and impacting a wall. The model predicts the evolution of the strong shock wave and the impact force on a rigid wall for different inclination angles and sliding surfaces. It is demonstrated that the internal friction angle plays an

  7. A two-dimensional coupled flow-mass transport model based on an improved unstructured finite volume algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Song, Lixiang; Kursan, Suncana; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional coupled water quality model is developed for modeling the flow-mass transport in shallow water. To simulate shallow flows on complex topography with wetting and drying, an unstructured grid, well-balanced, finite volume algorithm is proposed for numerical resolution of a modified formulation of two-dimensional shallow water equations. The slope-limited linear reconstruction method is used to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The algorithm adopts a HLLC-based integrated solver to compute the flow and mass transport fluxes simultaneously, and uses Hancock's predictor-corrector scheme for efficient time stepping as well as second-order temporal accuracy. The continuity and momentum equations are updated in both wet and dry cells. A new hybrid method, which can preserve the well-balanced property of the algorithm for simulations involving flooding and recession, is proposed for bed slope terms approximation. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm are validated by the reasonable good agreement between numerical and reference results of several benchmark test cases. Results show that the proposed coupled flow-mass transport model can simulate complex flows and mass transport in shallow water.

  8. A two-dimensional coupled flow-mass transport model based on an improved unstructured finite volume algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Song, Lixiang; Kursan, Suncana; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional coupled water quality model is developed for modeling the flow-mass transport in shallow water. To simulate shallow flows on complex topography with wetting and drying, an unstructured grid, well-balanced, finite volume algorithm is proposed for numerical resolution of a modified formulation of two-dimensional shallow water equations. The slope-limited linear reconstruction method is used to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The algorithm adopts a HLLC-based integrated solver to compute the flow and mass transport fluxes simultaneously, and uses Hancock's predictor-corrector scheme for efficient time stepping as well as second-order temporal accuracy. The continuity and momentum equations are updated in both wet and dry cells. A new hybrid method, which can preserve the well-balanced property of the algorithm for simulations involving flooding and recession, is proposed for bed slope terms approximation. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm are validated by the reasonable good agreement between numerical and reference results of several benchmark test cases. Results show that the proposed coupled flow-mass transport model can simulate complex flows and mass transport in shallow water. PMID:25686488

  9. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  10. Validation of a coupled wave-flow model in a high-energy setting: the mouth of the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Edwin P.L.; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Andre van de Wethusen,

    2012-01-01

     A monthlong time series of wave, current, salinity, and suspended-sediment measurements was made at five sites on a transect across the Mouth of Columbia River (MCR). These data were used to calibrate and evaluate the performance of a coupled hydrodynamic and wave model for the MCR based on the Delft3D modeling system. The MCR is a dynamic estuary inlet in which tidal currents, river discharge, and wave-driven currents are all important. Model tuning consisted primarily of spatial adjustments to bottom drag coefficients. In combination with (near-) default parameter settings, the MCR model application is able to simulate the dominant features in the tidal flow, salinity and wavefields observed in field measurements. The wave-orbital averaged method for representing the current velocity profile in the wave model is considered the most realistic for the MCR. The hydrodynamic model is particularly effective in reproducing the observed vertical residual and temporal variations in current structure. Density gradients introduce the observed and modeled reversal of the mean flow at the bed and augment mean and peak flow in the upper half of the water column. This implies that sediment transport during calmer summer conditions is controlled by density stratification and is likely net landward due to the reversal of flow near the bed. The correspondence between observed and modeled hydrodynamics makes this application a tool to investigate hydrodynamics and associated sediment transport.

  11. Congestion phenomenon analysis and delayed-feedback control in a modified coupled map traffic flow model containing the velocity difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ya-Ling; Shi, Zhong-Ke; Cao, Jin-Liang

    2015-06-01

    Based on the coupled map car-following model which was presented by Konishi et al. (1999), a modified coupled map car-following model is proposed. Specifically, the velocity difference between two successive vehicles is included in the model. The stability condition is given for the change of the speed of the preceding vehicle on the base of the control theory. We derive a condition under which the traffic jam never occurs in our model. Furthermore, in order to suppress traffic jams, we use static and dynamic version of decentralized delayed-feedback control for each vehicle, respectively, and provide a systematic procedure for designing the controller. In addition, the controller of each vehicle does not include any other vehicle information in real traffic flows.

  12. Resolved granular debris-flow simulations with a coupled SPH-DCDEM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjukovs Canelas, Ricardo; Domínguez, José M.; Crespo, Alejandro J. C.; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows represent some of the most relevant phenomena in geomorphological events. Due to the potential destructiveness of such flows, they are the target of a vast amount of research (Takahashi, 2007 and references therein). A complete description of the internal processes of a debris-flow is however still an elusive achievement, explained by the difficulty of accurately measuring important quantities in these flows and developing a comprehensive, generalized theoretical framework capable of describing them. This work addresses the need for a numerical model applicable to granular-fluid mixtures featuring high spatial and temporal resolution, thus capable of resolving the motion of individual particles, including all interparticle contacts. This corresponds to a brute-force approach: by applying simple interaction laws at local scales the macro-scale properties of the flow should be recovered by upscaling. This methodology effectively bypasses the complexity of modelling the intermediate scales by resolving them directly. The only caveat is the need of high performance computing, a demanding but engaging research challenge. The DualSPHysics meshless numerical implementation, based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), is expanded with a Distributed Contact Discrete Element Method (DCDEM) in order to explicitly solve the fluid and the solid phase. The model numerically solves the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations for the liquid phase and Newton's motion equations for solid bodies. The interactions between solids are modelled with classical DEM approaches (Kruggel-Emden et al, 2007). Among other validation tests, an experimental set-up for stony debris flows in a slit check dam is reproduced numerically, where solid material is introduced trough a hopper assuring a constant solid discharge for the considered time interval. With each sediment particle undergoing tens of possible contacts, several thousand time-evolving contacts are efficiently treated

  13. Coupling of river flow and inundation analysis in a distributed water circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Masumoto, T.; Horikawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    The increasing recognition of the importance of inundation hazards has stimulated recent progress in distributed hydrological models in analyzing flood inundation with basin-scale hydrological cycles. One of the major handicaps facing inundation analysis, however, is the lack of precise topographical and river course data to describe inundated areas especially in low-lying areas in developing countries. On the other hand, high-resolution raster Digital Elevation Models, which are becoming available on a global scale, provide practical information on detailed topographical features in grid-cells of distributed hydrological models. In this study, we developed a model of inundation process integrated with a basin-scale distributed hydrological model that incorporates a sub-model of cropping area and agricultural water use analysis. First, we configured a distributed water circulation model. The model was based on grid-cells of approximately 2 km, each of which consisted of 3 soil layers for runoff calculation. The surface flow model consists of a one-dimensional kinematic wave approximation of channel flow and a simple representation of inundated area. In addition to calculation of river discharges, the model explicitly represents water cycles in paddy areas, which enables us to assess cropping situation in the basin. The procedure applied to assess the flood hazard uses simple model that assumes the inundated area is a reservoir, in which water levels for the inundation in the surrounding areas are equivalent. Because the inundated area is almost flat, no active flood movement is assumed in the inundated area. The inundated volume is calculated with a continuous equation with H-V relations in the area, in which excess rate of surface flow above the maximum capacity of conveyance of rivers is input by utilization the distributed water circulation model. To apply this inundation model, we used ASTER GDEM. We applied the model to the Xebanfai River in the Laos PDR

  14. Low-Dimensional Models for Physiological Systems: Nonlinear Coupling of Gas and Liquid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, A. E.; Oran, E. S.; Boris, J. P.; Kailasanath, K.

    2006-11-01

    Current computational models of biological organisms focus on the details of a specific component of the organism. For example, very detailed models of the human heart, an aorta, a vein, or part of the respiratory or digestive system, are considered either independently from the rest of the body, or as interacting simply with other systems and components in the body. In actual biological organisms, these components and systems are strongly coupled and interact in complex, nonlinear ways leading to complicated global behavior. Here we describe a low-order computational model of two physiological systems, based loosely on a circulatory and respiratory system. Each system is represented as a one-dimensional fluid system with an interconnected series of mass sources, pumps, valves, and other network components, as appropriate, representing different physical organs and system components. Preliminary results from a first version of this model system are presented.

  15. Scalable parallel methods for monolithic coupling in fluid-structure interaction with application to blood flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T. Cai Xiaochuan

    2010-02-01

    We introduce and study numerically a scalable parallel finite element solver for the simulation of blood flow in compliant arteries. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to model the fluid and coupled to an incompressible linear elastic model for the blood vessel walls. Our method features an unstructured dynamic mesh capable of modeling complicated geometries, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework that allows for large displacements of the moving fluid domain, monolithic coupling between the fluid and structure equations, and fully implicit time discretization. Simulations based on blood vessel geometries derived from patient-specific clinical data are performed on large supercomputers using scalable Newton-Krylov algorithms preconditioned with an overlapping restricted additive Schwarz method that preconditions the entire fluid-structure system together. The algorithm is shown to be robust and scalable for a variety of physical parameters, scaling to hundreds of processors and millions of unknowns.

  16. Using a multiphase flow code to model the coupled effects of repository consolidation and multiphase brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.; Webb, S.W.

    1995-10-01

    Long-term repository assessment must consider the processes of (1) gas generation, (2) room closure and expansions due to salt creep, and (3) multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the complex coupling between these three processes. The mechanical creep closure code SANCHO was used to simulate the closure of a single, perfectly sealed disposal room filled with water and backfill. SANCHO uses constitutive models to describe salt creep, waste consolidation, and backfill consolidation, Five different gas-generation rate histories were simulated, differentiated by a rate multiplier, f, which ranged from 0.0 (no gas generation) to 1.0 (expected gas generation under brine-dominated conditions). The results of the SANCHO f-series simulations provide a relationship between gas generation, room closure, and room pressure for a perfectly sealed room. Several methods for coupling this relationship with multiphase fluid flow into and out of a room were examined. Two of the methods are described.

  17. GSFLOW - Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW-2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Regan, R. Steven; Prudic, David E.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The need to assess the effects of variability in climate, biota, geology, and human activities on water availability and flow requires the development of models that couple two or more components of the hydrologic cycle. An integrated hydrologic model called GSFLOW (Ground-water and Surface-water FLOW) was developed to simulate coupled ground-water and surface-water resources. The new model is based on the integration of the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW). Additional model components were developed, and existing components were modified, to facilitate integration of the models. Methods were developed to route flow among the PRMS Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) and between the HRUs and the MODFLOW finite-difference cells. This report describes the organization, concepts, design, and mathematical formulation of all GSFLOW model components. An important aspect of the integrated model design is its ability to conserve water mass and to provide comprehensive water budgets for a location of interest. This report includes descriptions of how water budgets are calculated for the integrated model and for individual model components. GSFLOW provides a robust modeling system for simulating flow through the hydrologic cycle, while allowing for future enhancements to incorporate other simulation techniques.

  18. A simple analytical model of coupled single flow channel over porous electrode in vanadium redox flow battery with serpentine flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2015-08-01

    A simple analytical model of a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer) is proposed. This analytical model is derived from Navier-Stokes motion in the flow channel and Darcy-Brinkman model in the porous layer. The continuities of flow velocity and normal stress are applied at the interface between the flow channel and the porous layer. The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, thickness of the flow channel and thickness of a typical carbon fiber paper porous layer on the volumetric flow rate within this porous layer are studied. The maximum current density based on the electrolyte volumetric flow rate is predicted, and found to be consistent with reported numerical simulation. It is found that, for a mean inlet flow velocity of 33.3 cm s-1, the analytical maximum current density is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experimental result reported by others of ∼400 mA cm-2.

  19. A Coupled Multiphase Fluid Flow And Heat And Vapor Transport Model For Air-Gap Membrane Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2010-05-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is emerging as a viable desalination technology because of its low energy requirements that can be provided from low-grade, waste heat and because it causes less fouling. In MD, desalination is accomplished by transporting water vapour through a porous hydrophobic membrane. The vapour transport process is governed by the vapour pressure difference between the two sides of a membrane. A variety of configurations have been tested to impose this vapour pressure gradient, however, the air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD) has been found to be the most efficient. The separation mechanism of AGMD and its overall efficiency is based on vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE). At present, little knowledge is available about the optimal design of such a transmembrane VLE-based evaporation, and subsequent condensation processes. While design parameters for MD have evolved mostly through experimentations, a comprehensive mathematical model is yet to be developed. This is primarily because the coupling and non-linearity of the equations, the interactions between the flow, heat and mass transport regimes, and the complex geometries involved pose a challenging modelling and simulation problem. Yet a comprehensive mathematical model is needed for systematic evaluation of the processes, design parameterization, and performance prediction. This paper thus presents a coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transfer model to investigate the main processes and parameters affecting the performance of an AGMD.

  20. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  1. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-04-15

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes.

  2. Coupling Strontium Isotope and Trace Metal Geochemistry With a Watershed Flow Path Model in the Lamprey River Watershed, New Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.; Bryce, J.; Davis, J.

    2007-12-01

    2006 show a decrease in 87Sr/86Sr in the downstream direction as the water generally flows from the magmatic series to the gneiss complex, indicating that low 87Sr/86Sr groundwater is infiltrating the river. These results also indicate groundwater inputs from extrabasinal flow. Further refinements of the model, coupled with forthcoming trace element analyses, will provide a stronger means to quantify these contributions along the gradient of the river.

  3. Experiments performed with bubbly flow in vertical pipes at different flow conditions covering the transition region: simulation by coupling Eulerian, Lagrangian and 3D random walks models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José; Chiva, Sergio; El Aziz Essa, Mohamed; Mendes, Santos

    2012-08-01

    Two phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and water were performed in a vertical upward isothermal cocurrent air-water flow column with conditions ranging from bubbly flow, with very low void fraction, to transition flow with some cap and slug bubbles and void fractions around 25%. The superficial velocities of the liquid and the gas phases were varied from 0.5 to 3 m/s and from 0 to 0.6 m/s, respectively. Also to check the effect of changing the surface tension on the previous experiments small amounts of 1-butanol were added to the water. These amounts range from 9 to 75 ppm and change the surface tension. This study is interesting because in real cases the surface tension of the water diminishes with temperature, and with this kind of experiments we can study indirectly the effect of changing the temperature on the void fraction distribution. The following axial and radial distributions were measured in all these experiments: void fraction, interfacial area concentration, interfacial velocity, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity. The range of values of the gas superficial velocities in these experiments covered the range from bubbly flow to the transition to cap/slug flow. Also with transition flow conditions we distinguish two groups of bubbles in the experiments, the small spherical bubbles and the cap/slug bubbles. Special interest was devoted to the transition region from bubbly to cap/slug flow; the goal was to understand the physical phenomena that take place during this transition A set of numerical simulations of some of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions has been performed by coupling a Lagrangian code, that tracks the three dimensional motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates inside the field of the carrier liquid, to an Eulerian model that computes the magnitudes of continuous phase and to a 3D random walk model that takes on account the fluctuation in the velocity field of the

  4. Inverse methods-based estimation of plate coupling in a plate motion model governed by mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnaswamy, V.; Stadler, G.; Gurnis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Plate motion is primarily controlled by buoyancy (slab pull) which occurs at convergent plate margins where oceanic plates undergo deformation near the seismogenic zone. Yielding within subducting plates, lateral variations in viscosity, and the strength of seismic coupling between plate margins likely have an important control on plate motion. Here, we wish to infer the inter-plate coupling for different subduction zones, and develop a method for inferring it as a PDE-constrained optimization problem, where the cost functional is the misfit in plate velocities and is constrained by the nonlinear Stokes equation. The inverse models have well resolved slabs, plates, and plate margins in addition to a power law rheology with yielding in the upper mantle. Additionally, a Newton method is used to solve the nonlinear Stokes equation with viscosity bounds. We infer plate boundary strength using an inexact Gauss-Newton method with line search for backtracking. Each inverse model is applied to two simple 2-D scenarios (each with three subduction zones), one with back-arc spreading and one without. For each case we examine the sensitivity of the inversion to the amount of surface velocity used: 1) full surface velocity data and 2) surface velocity data simplified using a single scalar average (2-D equivalent to an Euler pole) for each plate. We can recover plate boundary strength in each case, even in the presence of highly nonlinear flow with extreme variations in viscosity. Additionally, we ascribe an uncertainty in each plate's velocity and perform an uncertainty quantification (UQ) through the Hessian of the misfit in plate velocities. We find that as plate boundaries become strongly coupled, the uncertainty in the inferred plate boundary strength decreases. For very weak, uncoupled subduction zones, the uncertainty of inferred plate margin strength increases since there is little sensitivity between plate margin strength and plate velocity. This result is significant

  5. A comparison of the coupled fresh water-salt water flow and the Ghyben-Herzberg sharp interface approaches to modeling of transient behavior in coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional finite difference model which simulates coupled, fresh water and salt water flow, separated by a sharp interface, is used to investigate the effects of storage characteristics, transmissivity, boundary conditions and anisotropy on the transient responses of such flow systems. The magnitude and duration of the departure of aquifer response from the behavior predicted using the Ghyben-Herzberg, one-fluid approach is a function of the ease with which flow can be induced in the salt water region. In many common hydrogeologic settings short-term fresh water head responses, and transitional responses between short-term and long-term, can only be realistically reproduced by including the effects of salt water flow on the dynamics of coastal flow systems. The coupled fresh water-salt water flow modeling approach is able to reproduce the observed annual fresh water head response of the Waialae aquifer of southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. ?? 1986.

  6. Residence Times and Pathway Analysis Using a Coupled Three-Dimensional Variably Saturated Groundwater Flow and Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2007-12-01

    The analysis of residence times and pathways of solutes in the subsurface is important in the characterization of biogeochemical processes and contaminant transport. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have shown power law (fractal) residence time distributions because of the fractal character of the topography. The theoretical studies focused on a steady-state analysis of the flow field utilizing an undulating water table boundary condition that follows the topography. However, processes of the vadose zone including root water uptake and evaporation have been neglected until this work. In this study, the three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater flow model ParFlow, coupled to a land surface model, is used to study the influence of processes of the vadose zone on pathways and residence time distributions. A small catchment is simulated incorporating topography; land and soil cover information; and one year of realistic atmospheric forcing. Transient Lagrangian transport simulations of a conservative tracer are performed, also including dispersion (i.e. heterogeneity), to develop spectral transforms of the arrival time distributions. The resulting power spectra show power law behavior over a wide range of scales. While the spectral scaling exponent (SSP) decreases with increasing heterogeneity, the influence of the vadose zone appears to cause an increase in the SSP. Additionally, the effect of explicit representation of subsurface heterogeneity and spatial model resolution on the scaling behavior is studied. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under contract W-7405-Eng-48. This project was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL.

  7. Numerical simulation of the stokes wave for the flow around a ship hull coupled with the VOF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengtao, Chen; Jingjun, Zhong; Peng, Sun

    2015-06-01

    The surface wave generated by flow around a ship hull moving near free surface of water is simulated numerically in this study. The three-dimensional implicit finite volume method (FVM) is applied to solve Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation. The realizable k-e turbulence model has been implemented to capture turbulent flow around the ship hull in the free surface zone. The volume of fluid (VOF) method coupled with the Stokes wave theory has been used to determine the free surface effect of water. By using is a six degrees of freedom model, the ship hull's movement is numerically solved with the Stokes wave together. Under the action of Stokes waves on the sea, the interface between the air and water waves at the same regular pattern and so does the pressure and the vertical velocity. The ship hull moves in the same way as the wave. The amplitude of the ship hull's heave is less than the wave height because of the viscosity damping. This method could provide an important reference for the study of ships' movement, wave and hydrodynamics.

  8. A multilayered sharp interface model of coupled freshwater and saltwater flow in coastal systems: model development and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1990-01-01

    The model allows for regional simulation of coastal groundwater conditions, including the effects of saltwater dynamics on the freshwater system. Vertically integrated freshwater and saltwater flow equations incorporating the interface boundary condition are solved within each aquifer. Leakage through confining layers is calculated by Darcy's law, accounting for density differences across the layer. The locations of the interface tip and toe, within grid blocks, are tracked by linearly extrapolating the position of the interface. The model has been verified using available analytical solutions and experimental results and applied to the Soquel-Aptos basin, Santa Cruz County, California. -from Author

  9. Coupled modeling of non-isothermal multiphase flow, solutetransport and reactive chemistry in porous and fractured media: 1. ModelDevelopment and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-09-01

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposition, waste disposal sites, hydrothermal convection, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here they present a numerical simulation model, TOUGHREACT, which considers non-isothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered. The model can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions is considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, cation exchange, and surface complexation. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. The coupled model employs a sequential iteration approach with reasonable computing efficiency. The development of the governing equations and numerical approach is presented along with the discussion of the model implementation and capabilities. The model is verified for a wide range of subsurface physical and chemical processes. The model is well suited for flow and reactive transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media. In the second of this two-part paper, three applications covering a variety of problems are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Bubbly Flow and Slag Layer Behavior in Ladle with Discrete Phase Model (DPM)-Volume of Fluid (VOF) Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Liu, Zhongqiu; Cao, Maoxue; Li, Baokuan

    2015-07-01

    In the ladle metallurgy process, the bubble movement and slag layer behavior is very important to the refining process and steel quality. For the bubble-liquid flow, bubble movement plays a significant role in the phase structure and causes the unsteady complex turbulent flow pattern. This is one of the most crucial shortcomings of the current two-fluid models. In the current work, a one-third scale water model is established to investigate the bubble movement and the slag open-eye formation. A new mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed for the bubble-liquid-slag-air four-phase flow in the ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) model is used for tracking the liquid-slag-air free surfaces and the Lagrangian discrete phase model (DPM) is used for describing the bubble movement. The turbulent liquid flow is induced by bubble-liquid interactions and is solved by LES. The procedure of bubble coming out of the liquid and getting into the air is modeled using a user-defined function. The results show that the present LES-DPM-VOF coupled model is good at predicting the unsteady bubble movement, slag eye formation, interface fluctuation, and slag entrainment.

  11. A hybrid method for hydrodynamic-kinetic flow - Part II - Coupling of hydrodynamic and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaia, Alessandro; Puppo, Gabriella

    2012-06-01

    In this work we present a non stationary domain decomposition algorithm for multiscale hydrodynamic-kinetic problems, in which the Knudsen number may span from equilibrium to highly rarefied regimes. Our approach is characterized by using the full Boltzmann equation for the kinetic regime, the Compressible Euler equations for equilibrium, with a buffer zone in which the BGK-ES equation is used to represent the transition between fully kinetic to equilibrium flows. In this fashion, the Boltzmann solver is used only when the collision integral is non-stiff, and the mean free path is of the same order as the mesh size needed to capture variations in macroscopic quantities. Thus, in principle, the same mesh size and time steps can be used in the whole computation. Moreover, the time step is limited only by convective terms. Since the Boltzmann solver is applied only in wholly kinetic regimes, we use the reduced noise DSMC scheme we have proposed in Part I of the present work. This ensures a smooth exchange of information across the different domains, with a natural way to construct interface numerical fluxes. Several tests comparing our hybrid scheme with full Boltzmann DSMC computations show the good agreement between the two solutions, on a wide range of Knudsen numbers.

  12. Adjoint-based estimation of plate coupling in a non-linear mantle flow model: theory and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnaswamy, Vishagan; Stadler, Georg; Gurnis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We develop and validate a systematic approach to infer plate boundary strength and rheological parameters in models of mantle flow from surface velocity observations. Based on a realistic rheological model that includes yielding and strain rate weakening from dislocation creep, we formulate the inverse problem in a Bayesian inference framework. To study the distribution of parameters that are consistent with the observations, we compute the maximum a posteriori (MAP) point, Gaussian approximations of the parameter distribution around that MAP point, and employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The computation of the MAP point and the Gaussian approximation require first and second derivatives of an objective function subject to non-linear Stokes equations; these derivatives are computed efficiently using adjoint Stokes equations. We set up 2-D numerical experiments with many of the elements expected in a global geophysical inversion. This setup incorporates three subduction zones with slab and weak zone (interplate fault) geometry consistent with average seismic characteristics. With these experiments, we demonstrate that when the temperature field is known, we can recover the strength of plate boundaries, the yield stress and strain rate exponent in the upper mantle. When the number of uncertain parameters increases, there are trade-offs between the inferred parameters. These trade-offs depend on how well the observational data represents the surface velocities, and on the weakness of plate boundaries. As the plate boundary coupling drops below a threshold, the uncertainty of the inferred parameters increases due to insensitivity of plate motion to plate coupling. Comparing the trade-offs between inferred rheological parameters found from the Gaussian approximation of the parameter distribution and from MCMC sampling, we conclude that the Gaussian approximation-which is significantly cheaper to compute-is often a good approximation, in particular

  13. Development of a sharp interface model that simulates coastal aquifer flow with the coupled use of GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemitzi, Alexandra; Tolikas, Demetrios

    A simulation program, which works seamlessly with GIS and simulates flows in coastal aquifers, is presented in the present paper. The model is based on the Galerkin finite element discretization scheme and it simulates both steady and transient freshwater and saltwater flow, assuming that the two fluids are separated by a sharp interface. The model has been verified in simple cases where analytical solutions exist. The simulation program works as a tool of the GIS program, which is the main database that stores and manages all the necessary data. The combined use of the simulation and the GIS program forms an integrated management tool offering a simpler way of simulating and studying saline intrusion in coastal aquifers. Application of the model to the Yermasogia aquifer illustrates the coupled use of modeling and GIS techniques for the examination of regional coastal aquifer systems. Pour étudier un système aquifère côtier, nous avons développé un modèle aux éléments finis en quasi 3-D qui simule les écoulements d'eau douce et d'eau salée en régime aussi bien permanent que transitoire. Les équations qui les régissent sont discrétisées par un schéma de discrétisation de Garlekin aux éléments finis. Le modèle a été vérifié dans des cas simples où il existe des solutions analytiques. Toutes les données nécessaires sont introduites et gérées grâce à un logiciel de gestion de SIG. Le programme de simulation est utilisé comme un outil du logiciel de SIG, constituant ainsi un outil de gestion intégrée dont le but est de simuler et d'étudier l'intrusion saline dans les aquifères côtiers. L'application du modèle à l'aquifère de Yermasogia illustre l'utilisation couplée de la modélisation et des techniques de SIG pour l'étude des systèmes aquifères côtiers régionaux. Se ha desarrollado un modelo casi tridimensional de elementos finitos para simular el flujo de agua dulce y salada, tanto en régimen estacionario como en

  14. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  15. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  16. Regional coupling of unsaturated and saturated flow and transport modeling - implementation at an alpine foothill aquifer in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, G.; Rock, G.; Kupfersberger, H.; Fank, J.

    2012-04-01

    interval of every hydrotope vertical profile until the lowest observed groundwater table is reached. The fluctuation range of the phreatic surface is also discretized in 10 cm intervals and used as outflow boundary condition. By this procedure, the influence of the groundwater table on the water and nitrate mass leaving the unsaturated can be considered taken into account varying soil horizons. To cover saturated flow in the WLF aquifer a 2-dimensional transient horizontal flow and solute transport model is set up. A sequential coupling between the two models is implemented, i.e. a unidirectional transfer of recharge and nitrate mass outflow from the hydrotopes to the saturated compartment. For this purpose, a one-time assignment between the spatial discretization of the hydrotopes and the finite element mesh has to be set up. The resulting groundwater table computed for a given time step with the input from SIMWASER/STOTRASIM is then used to extract the corresponding water and nitrate mass values from the look-up table to be used for the consecutive time step. This process is being repeated until the end of the simulation period. Within this approach there is no direct feedback between the unsaturated and the saturated aquifer compartment, i.e. there is no simultaneous (within the same time step) update of the pressure head - unsaturated head relationship at the soil and the phreatic surface (like is shown e.g. in Walsum and Groedendijk, 2008). For the dominating coarse sand conditions of the WLF aquifer we believe that this simplification is not of further relevance. For higher soil moisture contents (i.e. almost full saturation near the groundwater table) the curve returns to specific retention within a short vertical distance. Thus, there might only be mutual impact between soil and phreatic surface conditions for shallow groundwater tables. However, it should be mentioned here that all other processes in the two compartments (including capillary rise due to clay rich

  17. Coupled Flow and Deformation Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration in the Presence of a Caprock Fracture during Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Hema J; Gondle, Raj K; Bromhal, Grant S

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the transport of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) during long-term CO{sub 2} injection into a typical geologic reservoir, such as a saline aquifer, could be complicated because of changes in geochemical, hydrogeological, and hydromechanical behavior. While the caprock layer overlying the target aquifer is intended to provide a tight, impermeable seal in securing injected CO{sub 2}, the presence of geologic uncertainties, such as a caprock fracture or fault, may provide a channel for CO{sub 2} leakage. There could also be a possibility of the activation of a new or existing dormant fault or fracture, which could act as a leakage pathway. Such a leakage event during CO{sub 2} injection may lead to a different pressure and ground response over a period of time. In the present study, multiphase fluid flow simulations in porous media coupled with geomechanics were used to investigate the overburden geologic response and plume behavior during CO{sub 2} injection in the presence of a hypothetical permeable fractured zone in a caprock, existing or activated. Both single-phase and multiphase fluid flow simulations were performed. The CO{sub 2} migration through an existing fractured zone leads to changes in the fluid pressure in the overburden geologic layers and could have a significant impact on ground deformation behavior. Results of the study show that pressure signatures and displacement patterns are significantly different in the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock layer. The variation in pressure and displacement signatures because of the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock at different locations may be useful in identifying the presence of a fault/fractured zone in the caprock. The pressure signatures can also serve as a mechanism to identify the activation of leakage pathways through the caprock during CO{sub 2} injection. Pressure response and ground deformation behavior from sequestration modeling could be useful in the development of

  18. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0-100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa-1 for the best devices.

  19. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0–100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa‑1 for the best devices.

  20. Cenozoic thermal history of the Bohai Bay Basin: constraints from heat flow and coupled basin?mountain modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lijuan; Wang, Jiyang

    Heat flow measurements show a moderate thermal background (∼61 mW/m 2) in the Bohai Bay Basin, which although experienced multi-phase rifting in the Cenozoic era. In contrast, its surrounding mountain areas are characterized by low heat flow. Constraint by heat flow measurements, the thermal evolution of the Bohai Bay Basin during the Cenozoic era was performed by a numerical basin-mountain model. The model incorporates differential lithosphere stretching and shortening by finite-element method in the Lagrangian frame. The predicted heat flow in the center of the three depressions of the Bohai Bay Basin is calculated to have varied between 51 and 63 mW/m 2 through the Cenozoic evolution, indicating a rather smooth variation of basin thermal state, and a cooling trend from the Oligocene to present-day. Model results also suggest that the Taihang Mountains probably uplifted in the Quaternary, which resulted in low heat flow in the mountain area. Both heat flow constraints and modeling imply that a new phase of rifting in the Pliocene existed in the Huanghua and Bozhong Depressions, which was suggested by tectonic subsidence analysis.

  1. Cenozoic thermal history of the Bohai Bay Basin: constraints from heat flow and coupled basin-mountain modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L.; Wang, J.

    2003-04-01

    Bohai Bay Basin is located in the east of North China Craton. Heat flow measurements show a moderate thermal background (~ 61 mW/m2) in the Bohai Bay Basin, which although experienced multi-phase rifting in the Cenozoic era. In contrast, its surrounding mountain areas are characterized by low heat flow. Constraint by heat flow measurements, the thermal evolution of the Bohai Bay Basin during the Cenozoic era was performed by a numerical basin-mountain model. The model incorporates differential lithosphere stretching and shortening by finite-element method in the Lagrangian frame. The predicted heat flow in the center of the three depressions of the Bohai Bay Basin is calculated to have varied between 51 mW/m2 and 63 mW/m2 through the Cenozoic evolution, indicating a rather smooth variation of basin thermal state, and a cooling trend from the Oligocene to present-day. Model results also suggest that the Taihang Mountains probably uplifted in the Quaternary, which resulted in low heat flow in the mountain area. Both heat flow constraints and modeling imply that a new phase of rifting in the Pliocene existed in the Huanghua and Bozhong Depressions, which was suggested by tectonic subsidence analysis.

  2. Coupling WEPP and 3ST1D models for improved prediction of flow and sediment transport at watershed scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed modeling is a key component of watershed management that involves the simulation of hydrological and fluvial processes for predicting flow and sediment transport within a watershed. For practical purposes, most numerical models have been developed to simulate either runoff and soil erosion...

  3. Nuclear-Coupled Flow Instabilities and Their Effects on Dryout

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ishii; X. Sunn; S. Kuran

    2004-09-27

    Nuclear-coupled flow/power oscillations in boiling water reactors (BWRs) are investigated experimentally and analytically. A detailed literature survey is performed to identify and classify instabilities in two-phase flow systems. The classification and the identification of the leading physical mechanisms of the two-phase flow instabilities are important to propose appropriate analytical models and scaling criteria for simulation. For the purpose of scaling and the analysis of the nonlinear aspects of the coupled flow/power oscillations, an extensive analytical modeling strategy is developed and used to derive both frequency and time domain analysis tools.

  4. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  5. Atmospheric Flow over a Mountainous Region by a One-Way Coupled Approach Based on Reynolds-Averaged Turbulence Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, C. Veiga; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Rodrigues, Á. H.

    2016-05-01

    The atmospheric flow over a mountainous region has been simulated using a model-chain approach, whereby the flow in a larger region was simulated using a mesoscale model with three nesting levels, down to a 3-km horizontal resolution, within which a fourth nesting level was set with a microscale flow solver and a domain with varying horizontal resolution, around 300 m at the site of interest. Two periods in the summer (July) and autumn (November-December) 2005, each with a duration of two weeks, were selected to test the present approach. Two sites were chosen, comprising a total of seven meteorological masts with wind vanes and anemometers at two heights. The microscale solver improved the wind-speed prediction of the mesoscale model in 10 of the 14 anemometers and replicated the high wind speeds, which were under-predicted in the mesoscale model. The wind conditions in summer varied with the daily cycle, related to regional-scale sea breezes and their interaction with local circulations induced by the topography. Regarding the turbulence intensity, the predicted decay with wind-speed increase was in agreement with the measurements. This study shows the need of both models: the microscale model captures the details of the boundary-layer physics, which would not be possible without the boundary conditions provided by the mesoscale model.

  6. Modeling coupled water flow, solute transport and geochemical reactions affecting heavy metal migration in a podzol soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many or most subsurface pollution problems at the field scale involve such simultaneous processes as water flow, multicomponent solute transport, heat transport and biogeochemical processes and reactions. Process-based models that integrate these various processes can be valuable tools for investiga...

  7. A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Kollet, S; Chow, F; Granvold, P; Duan, Q

    2007-02-23

    This final report is organized in four sections. Section 1 is the project summary (below), Section 2 is a submitted manuscript that describes the offline, or spinup simulations in detail, Section 3 is also a submitted manuscript that describes the online, or fully-coupled simulations in detail and Section 3, which is report that describes work done via a subcontract with UC Berkeley. The goal of this project was to develop and apply a coupled regional climate, land-surface, groundwater flow model as a means to further understand important mass and energy couplings between regional climate, the land surface, and groundwater. The project involved coupling three distinct submodels that are traditionally used independently with abstracted and potentially oversimplified (inter-model) boundary conditions. This coupled model lead to (1) an improved understanding of the sensitivity and importance of coupled physical processes from the subsurface to the atmosphere; (2) a new tool for predicting hydrologic conditions (rainfall, temperature, snowfall, snowmelt, runoff, infiltration and groundwater flow) at the watershed scale over a range of timeframes; (3) a simulation of hydrologic response of a characteristic watershed that will provide insight into the certainty of hydrologic forecasting, dominance and sensitivity of groundwater dynamics on land-surface fluxes; and (4) a more realistic model representation of weather predictions, precipitation and temperature, at the regional scale. Regional climate models are typically used for the simulation of weather, precipitation and temperature behavior over 10-1000 km domains for weather or climate prediction purposes, and are typically driven by boundary conditions derived from global climate models (GCMs), observations or both. The land or ocean surface typically represents a bottom boundary condition of these models, where important mass (water) and energy fluxes are approximated. The viability and influence of these

  8. Solid-State Constitutive Modelling of Glassy Polymers: Coupling the Rolie-Poly Equations for Melts with Anisotropic Viscoplastic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    De Focatiis, Davide S. A.; Buckley, C. Paul; Embery, John

    2008-07-07

    This paper investigates the behaviour of a well-characterised monodisperse grade of entangled atactic polystyrene across a very wide temperature and strain rate range through linear and non-linear melt rheology and solid-state deformation. In an effort to construct a constitutive model for large deformations able to describe rheological response right across this wide timescale, two well-established rheological models are combined: the well known RoliePoly (RP) conformational melt model and the Oxford glass-rubber constitutive model for glassy polymers. Comparisons between experimental data and simulations from a numerical implementation of the model illustrate that the model can cope well with the range of deformations in which orientation is limited to length-scales longer than an entanglement length. One approach in which the model can be expanded to incorporate the effects of orientation on shorter length scales using anisotropic viscoplastic flow is briefly discussed.

  9. A Fully-Coupled, Fully-Implicit, Finite Element Model for Solving Multiphase Fluid Flow, Heat Transport and Rock Deformation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Deng, S.; Podgorney, R. K.; Huang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Reliable reservoir performance predictions of enhanced geothermal reservoir systems require accurate and robust modeling for the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes. Conventionally, in order to reduce computational cost, these types of problems are solved using operator splitting method, usually by sequentially coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulator with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. However, such operator splitting approaches are applicable only to loosely coupled problems and usually converge slowly. As in most enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), fluid flow, heat transport, and rock deformation are typically strongly nonlinearly coupled, an alternative is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern the system simultaneously using a fully coupled solution procedure for fluid flow, heat transport, and solid mechanics. This procedure solves for all solution variables (fluid pressure, temperature and rock displacement fields) simultaneously, which leads to one large nonlinear algebraic system that needs to be solved by a strongly convergent nonlinear solver. Development over the past 10 years in the area of physics-based conditioning, strongly convergent nonlinear solvers (such as Jacobian Free Newton methods) and efficient linear solvers (such as GMRES, AMG), makes such an approach competitive. In this presentation, we will introduce a continuum-scaled parallel physics-based, fully coupled, modeling tool for predicting the dynamics of fracture initiation and propagation, fluid flow, rock deformation, and heat transport in a single integrated code named FALCON (Fracturing And Liquid-steam CONvection). FALCON is built upon a parallel computing framework developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for solving coupled systems of nonlinear equations with finite element method with unstructured and adaptively refined/coarsened grids. Currently, FALCON contains poro- and thermal- elastic models

  10. Radiative coupled viscous flow with massive blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Y. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of the fully-coupled viscous, radiating flow past an ablating blunt body at hyperbolic entry conditions is presented. A detailed thermodynamics computation, as well as a realistic radiation transport model, is included. A locally nonsimilar approach is employed to solve the conservation equations away from the stagnation point. The validity of the locally nonsimilar approach is demonstrated for some nonablating cases. Sample calculations are made for the typical flight condition of a Jovian entry probe. The effects of the downstream injection of the ablation products of a carbon heat shield on the flux distribution around the body are discussed in detail. It is found that most of the radiative energy is absorbed by the injected carbon gas and dumped into the wake.

  11. Modeling of Interior Ballistic Gas-Solid Flow Using a Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2013-05-01

    In conventional models for two-phase reactive flow of interior ballistic, the dynamic collision phenomenon of particles is neglected or empirically simplified. However, the particle collision between particles may play an important role in dilute two-phase flow because the distribution of particles is extremely nonuniform. The collision force may be one of the key factors to influence the particle movement. This paper presents the CFD-DEM approach for simulation of interior ballistic two-phase flow considering the dynamic collision process. The gas phase is treated as a Eulerian continuum and described by a computational fluid dynamic method (CFD). The solid phase is modeled by discrete element method (DEM) using a soft sphere approach for the particle collision dynamic. The model takes into account grain combustion, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, interphase drag and heat transfer between gas and solid phases. The continuous gas phase equations are discretized in finite volume form and solved by the AUSM+-up scheme with the higher order accurate reconstruction method. Translational and rotational motions of discrete particles are solved by explicit time integrations. The direct mapping contact detection algorithm is used. The multigrid method is applied in the void fraction calculation, the contact detection procedure, and CFD solving procedure. Several verification tests demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this approach. The simulation of an experimental igniter device in open air shows good agreement between the model and experimental measurements. This paper has implications for improving the ability to capture the complex physics phenomena of two-phase flow during the interior ballistic cycle and to predict dynamic collision phenomena at the individual particle scale.

  12. Evaluation of a coupled model for numerical simulation of a multiphase flow system in a porous medium and a surface fluid.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among atmosphere, water, and groundwater, including saltwater intrusion along coasts. Coupled numerical simulations of such problems must consider both vertical flow between the surface fluid and the porous medium and complicated boundary conditions at their interface. In this study, a numerical simulation method coupling Navier-Stokes equations for surface fluid flow and Darcy equations for flow in a porous medium was developed. Then, the basic ability of the coupled model to reproduce (1) the drawdown of a surface fluid observed in square-pillar experiments, using pillars filled with only fluid or with fluid and a porous medium and (2) the migration of saltwater (salt concentration 0.5%) in the porous medium using the pillar filled with fluid and a porous medium was evaluated. Simulations that assumed slippery walls reproduced well the results with drawdowns of 10-30 cm when the pillars were filled with packed sand, gas, and water. Moreover, in the simulation of saltwater infiltration by the method developed in this study, velocity was precisely reproduced because the experimental salt concentration in the porous medium after saltwater infiltration was similar to that obtained in the simulation. Furthermore, conditions across the boundary between the porous medium and the surface fluid were satisfied in these numerical simulations of square-pillar experiments in which vertical flow predominated. Similarly, the velocity obtained by the simulation for a system coupling flow in surface fluid with that in a porous medium when horizontal flow predominated satisfied the conditions across the boundary. Finally, it was confirmed that the present simulation method was able to simulate a practical-scale surface fluid and porous medium system. All of these numerical simulations, however, required a great deal of

  13. Flow noise source-resonator coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    This paper investigates the coupling mechanism between flow noise sources and acoustic resonators. Analytical solutions are developed for the classical cases of monopole and dipole types of flow noise sources. The effectiveness of the coupling between the acoustic resonator and the noise source is shown to be dependent on the type of noise source as well as its location on the acoustic pressure mode shape. For a monopole source, the maximum coupling occurs when the noise source is most intense near an acoustic pressure antinode (i.e., location of maximum acoustic pressure). A numerical study with the impedance method demonstrates this effect. A dipole source couples most effectively when located near an acoustic pressure node.

  14. Coupled Monte Carlo Probability Density Function/ SPRAY/CFD Code Developed for Modeling Gas-Turbine Combustor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The success of any solution methodology for studying gas-turbine combustor flows depends a great deal on how well it can model various complex, rate-controlling processes associated with turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation and spreading rates of the spray, convective and radiative heat transfer, and other phenomena. These phenomena often strongly interact with each other at disparate time and length scales. In particular, turbulence plays an important role in determining the rates of mass and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and evaporation in many practical combustion devices. Turbulence manifests its influence in a diffusion flame in several forms depending on how turbulence interacts with various flame scales. These forms range from the so-called wrinkled, or stretched, flamelets regime, to the distributed combustion regime. Conventional turbulence closure models have difficulty in treating highly nonlinear reaction rates. A solution procedure based on the joint composition probability density function (PDF) approach holds the promise of modeling various important combustion phenomena relevant to practical combustion devices such as extinction, blowoff limits, and emissions predictions because it can handle the nonlinear chemical reaction rates without any approximation. In this approach, mean and turbulence gas-phase velocity fields are determined from a standard turbulence model; the joint composition field of species and enthalpy are determined from the solution of a modeled PDF transport equation; and a Lagrangian-based dilute spray model is used for the liquid-phase representation with appropriate consideration of the exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy between the two phases. The PDF transport equation is solved by a Monte Carlo method, and existing state-of-the-art numerical representations are used to solve the mean gasphase velocity and turbulence fields together with the liquid-phase equations. The joint composition PDF

  15. Stability of an overland flow scheme in the framework of a fully coupled eco-hydrological model based on the Macroscopic Cellular Automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendicino, Giuseppe; Pedace, Jessica; Senatore, Alfonso

    2015-04-01

    Cellular Automata are often used for modeling the evolution in time of environmental systems mainly because they are directly compatible with parallel programming. Nevertheless, defining the optimal time step criterion for integrating forward in time numerical processes can further enhance model computational efficiency. To this aim, a numerical stability analysis of an original overland flow model, within the framework of a fully coupled eco-hydrological system based on the Macroscopic Cellular Automata paradigm, is performed. According to the other modules of the system describing soil water flow, soil-surface-atmosphere fluxes and vegetation dynamics, overland flow model equations were derived through a direct discrete formulation (i.e. no differential equations were discretized), adopting the diffusion wave model as an approximation of the full De Saint Venant equations and including the capability of accounting for specific processes, such as the increasing roughness effects due to vegetation growth or surface-soil water exchanges. Suitable formulations of robust tools usually applied in the stability analyses, such as Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy and von Neumann conditions, were initially derived for the CA-based overland flow model. Afterwards, the theoretical stability conditions were compared to experimental time step constraints through several numerical simulations of a 5-h rain event. Specifically, adopting a constant (i.e. not adaptive) time step for simulations, and discretizing head losses in a way that increases model stability, experimental upper limits preventing numerical instability were found for 13 test cases with different slopes, precipitation intensities, vegetation densities and depths of surface depressions. Even though von Neumann condition and experimental values were well positively correlated, the latter were almost always sensibly lower, excluding cases when free surface gradients tended to zero. Therefore, based on the original method

  16. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  17. Description and field analysis of a coupled ground-water/surface-water flow model (MODFLOW/BRANCH) with modifications for structures and wetlands in southern Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.; Howie, Barbara; Dixon, Joann

    1996-01-01

    A coupled surface-water model (BRANCH) and ground-water model (MODFLOW) model were tested to simulate the interacting wetlands/surface-water/ ground-water system of southern Dade County. Several options created for the MODFLOW ground- ground-water model were used in representing this field situation. The primary option is the MODBRANCH interfacing software, which allows leakage to be accounted for between the MODFLOW ground-water model and the BRANCH dynamic model for simulation of flow in an interconnected network of open channels. A modification to an existing software routine, which is referred to as BCF2, allows cells in MODFLOW to rewet when dry--a requirement in representing the seasonal wetlands in Dade County. A companion to BCF2 is the modified evapotranspiration routine EVT2. The EVT2 routine changes the cells where evapotranspiration occurs, depending on which cells are wet. The Streamlink package represents direct connections between the canals and wetlands at locations where canals open directly into overland flow. Within the BRANCH model, the capability to represent the numerous hydraulic structures, gated spillways, gated culverts, and pumps was added. The application of these modifications to model surface-water/ground-water interactions in southern Dade County demonstrated the usefulness of the coupled MODFLOW/BRANCH model. Ground-water and surface-water flows are both simulated with dynamic models. Flow exchange between models, intermittent wetting and drying, evapotranspiration, and hydraulic structure operations are all represented appropriately. Comparison was made with a simulation using the RIV1 package instead of MODBRANCH to represent the canals. RIV1 represents the canals by user-defined stages, and computes leakage to the aquifer. Greater accuracy in reproducing measured ground- water heads was achieved with MODBRANCH, which also computes dynamic flow conditions in the canals, unlike RIV1. The surface-water integrated flow and transport

  18. Hydraulic jumps in inhomogeneous strongly coupled toroidal dust flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Wilms, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The inhomogeneous flow of strongly coupled dust particles in a toroidal particle trap with harmonic radial confinement is analyzed in the incompressible fluid limit. It is shown that the flow can spontaneously generate shock-like events, which are similar to the hydraulic jump in open channel flows. A definition of the Froude number for this model is given and the critical speed is recovered as the group velocity of surface waves. This hydraulic model is compared with molecular-dynamics simulations, which show that a sudden bifurcation of the flow lines and a localized temperature peak appear just at the point where the critical condition for the hydraulic jump is located.

  19. Static Aeroelastic Predictions for a Transonic Transport Model Using an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver Coupled With a Structural Plate Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Cavallo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    An equivalent-plate structural deformation technique was coupled with a steady-state unstructured-grid three-dimensional Euler flow solver and a two-dimensional strip interactive boundary-layer technique. The objective of the research was to assess the extent to which a simple accounting for static model deformations could improve correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients at transonic speeds. Results were computed and compared to test data for a wing-fuselage model of a generic low-wing transonic transport at a transonic cruise condition over a range of Reynolds numbers and dynamic pressures. The deformations significantly improved correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients. This method provided a means of quantifying the role of dynamic pressure in wind-tunnel studies of Reynolds number effects for transonic transport models.

  20. Using the Model Coupling Toolkit to couple earth system models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Perlin, N.; Skyllingstad, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Continued advances in computational resources are providing the opportunity to operate more sophisticated numerical models. Additionally, there is an increasing demand for multidisciplinary studies that include interactions between different physical processes. Therefore there is a strong desire to develop coupled modeling systems that utilize existing models and allow efficient data exchange and model control. The basic system would entail model "1" running on "M" processors and model "2" running on "N" processors, with efficient exchange of model fields at predetermined synchronization intervals. Here we demonstrate two coupled systems: the coupling of the ocean circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to the surface wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the coupling of ROMS to the atmospheric model Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS). Both coupled systems use the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) as a mechanism for operation control and inter-model distributed memory transfer of model variables. In this paper we describe requirements and other options for model coupling, explain the MCT library, ROMS, SWAN and COAMPS models, methods for grid decomposition and sparse matrix interpolation, and provide an example from each coupled system. Methods presented in this paper are clearly applicable for coupling of other types of models. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    PubMed

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  2. Coupled dynamics of flow, microstructure, and conductivity in sheared suspensions.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Tyler; Helal, Ahmed; McKinley, Gareth H; Kamrin, Ken

    2016-09-28

    We propose a model for the evolution of the conductivity tensor for a flowing suspension of electrically conductive particles. We use discrete particle numerical simulations together with a continuum physical framework to construct an evolution law for the suspension microstructure during flow. This model is then coupled with a relationship between the microstructure and the electrical conductivity tensor. Certain parameters of the joint model are fit experimentally using rheo-electrical conductivity measurements of carbon black suspensions under flow over a range of shear rates. The model is applied to the case of steady shearing as well as time-varying conductivity of unsteady flow experiments. We find that the model prediction agrees closely with the measured experimental data in all cases. PMID:27532243

  3. Modeling of Calcite Precipitation Driven by Bacteria-facilitated Urea Hydrolysis in A Flow Column Using A Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Parallel Reactive Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    One approach for immobilizing subsurface metal contaminants involves stimulating the in situ production of mineral phases that sequester or isolate contaminants. One example is using calcium carbonate to immobilize strontium. The success of such approaches depends on understanding how various processes of flow, transport, reaction and resulting porosity-permeability change couple in subsurface systems. Reactive transport models are often used for such purpose. Current subsurface reactive transport simulators typically involve a de-coupled solution approach, such as operator-splitting, that solves the transport equations for components and batch chemistry sequentially, which has limited applicability for many biogeochemical processes with fast kinetics and strong medium property-reaction interactions. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit reactive transport simulator has been developed based on a parallel multi-physics object oriented software environment computing framework (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, the system of transport and reaction equations is solved simultaneously in a fully coupled manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with preconditioning. The simulator was applied to model reactive transport in a one-dimensional column where conditions that favor calcium carbonate precipitation are generated by urea hydrolysis that is catalyzed by urease enzyme. Simulation results are compared to both laboratory column experiments and those obtained using the reactive transport simulator STOMP in terms of: the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitates and reaction rates and other major species in the reaction system; the changes in porosity and permeability; and the computing efficiency based on wall clock simulation time.

  4. A New Computational Model for Neuro-Glio-Vascular Coupling: Astrocyte Activation Can Explain Cerebral Blood Flow Nonlinear Response to Interictal Events.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Solenna; Saillet, Sandrine; Ivanov, Anton; Benquet, Pascal; Bénar, Christian-George; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Benali, Habib; Wendling, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Developing a clear understanding of the relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) response and neuronal activity is of significant importance because CBF increase is essential to the health of neurons, for instance through oxygen supply. This relationship can be investigated by analyzing multimodal (fMRI, PET, laser Doppler…) recordings. However, the important number of intermediate (non-observable) variables involved in the underlying neurovascular coupling makes the discovery of mechanisms all the more difficult from the sole multimodal data. We present a new computational model developed at the population scale (voxel) with physiologically relevant but simple equations to facilitate the interpretation of regional multimodal recordings. This model links neuronal activity to regional CBF dynamics through neuro-glio-vascular coupling. This coupling involves a population of glial cells called astrocytes via their role in neurotransmitter (glutamate and GABA) recycling and their impact on neighboring vessels. In epilepsy, neuronal networks generate epileptiform discharges, leading to variations in astrocytic and CBF dynamics. In this study, we took advantage of these large variations in neuronal activity magnitude to test the capacity of our model to reproduce experimental data. We compared simulations from our model with isolated epileptiform events, which were obtained in vivo by simultaneous local field potential and laser Doppler recordings in rats after local bicuculline injection. We showed a predominant neuronal contribution for low level discharges and a significant astrocytic contribution for higher level discharges. Besides, neuronal contribution to CBF was linear while astrocytic contribution was nonlinear. Results thus indicate that the relationship between neuronal activity and CBF magnitudes can be nonlinear for isolated events and that this nonlinearity is due to astrocytic activity, highlighting the importance of astrocytes in the

  5. A New Computational Model for Neuro-Glio-Vascular Coupling: Astrocyte Activation Can Explain Cerebral Blood Flow Nonlinear Response to Interictal Events

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Solenna; Saillet, Sandrine; Ivanov, Anton; Benquet, Pascal; Bénar, Christian-George; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Benali, Habib; Wendling, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Developing a clear understanding of the relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) response and neuronal activity is of significant importance because CBF increase is essential to the health of neurons, for instance through oxygen supply. This relationship can be investigated by analyzing multimodal (fMRI, PET, laser Doppler…) recordings. However, the important number of intermediate (non-observable) variables involved in the underlying neurovascular coupling makes the discovery of mechanisms all the more difficult from the sole multimodal data. We present a new computational model developed at the population scale (voxel) with physiologically relevant but simple equations to facilitate the interpretation of regional multimodal recordings. This model links neuronal activity to regional CBF dynamics through neuro-glio-vascular coupling. This coupling involves a population of glial cells called astrocytes via their role in neurotransmitter (glutamate and GABA) recycling and their impact on neighboring vessels. In epilepsy, neuronal networks generate epileptiform discharges, leading to variations in astrocytic and CBF dynamics. In this study, we took advantage of these large variations in neuronal activity magnitude to test the capacity of our model to reproduce experimental data. We compared simulations from our model with isolated epileptiform events, which were obtained in vivo by simultaneous local field potential and laser Doppler recordings in rats after local bicuculline injection. We showed a predominant neuronal contribution for low level discharges and a significant astrocytic contribution for higher level discharges. Besides, neuronal contribution to CBF was linear while astrocytic contribution was nonlinear. Results thus indicate that the relationship between neuronal activity and CBF magnitudes can be nonlinear for isolated events and that this nonlinearity is due to astrocytic activity, highlighting the importance of astrocytes in the

  6. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the

  7. Translation-vibration-dissociation coupling in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    A new simple and computationally efficient model was developed, describing the evolution of vibrational states during relaxation and dissociation. The model is based on dividing the nitrogen molecules into two types, those in the vibrational states at a lower level, whose vibrational energy is below a cutoff energy, and those in an upper level, with vibrational energy above the cutoff. Dissociation occurs at the upper level, and recombination returns molecules to the lower level. The model was applied to two flows of engineering interest, the flow through a normal Mach 15 shock wave at 60 km, and a supersonic quasi-one-dimensional flow in a nozzle. Results are compared to those obtained by existing translation-vibration-dissociation coupling models, with results indicating significant differences between the models.

  8. Simulating groundwater-surface water interactions in the Canadian Prairies using a coupled land-atmosphere model (ParFlow-CLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. A.; Ireson, A. M.; Keim, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Canadian prairies are cold and dry. Surface depressions are ubiquitous, and contain permanent or ephemeral ponds. The ponds are filled by snowmelt and precipitation on the ponds and lose a significant portion of their water to evaporation, but also, depending on their landscape position, may spill to other ponds or channels, recharge groundwater, or received groundwater discharge. Since precipitation and actual evaporation are closely balanced, the pond water balances are very sensitive to change in climate, and the prairies in general have been subject to damaging floods and droughts, in particular in the last decade or two. A 2.25 km2 field site at St Denis, central Saskatchewan, contains over 100 ponds, some permanent, some ephemeral, some saline, some fresh, some recharging groundwater, some receiving groundwater discharge. The site has been extensively studied for almost 50 years, with about one decade of continuous meteorological data, and three years of detailed pond level, soil moisture and temperature, and groundwater data. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of PARFLOW-CLM (a coupled land-atmosphere model) in simulating the pond-groundwater interactions at this site. Our conceptual model of the site includes soil properties that are progressively weathered with depth, and we implement this in a simplified dual permeability mathematical model of the soil hydraulic properties, whereby storage is dominated by the matrix and flow is dominated by macropores. The model performance was surprisingly good, doing quite a good job of capturing the observed groundwater and pond level dynamics. The soil freezing regime is also captured reasonably well, though the timing and pattern of the zero degree isotherm during soil thaw, which is critically important for runoff generation processes, was not captured as well. The model provides credible insights into the spatial patterns of evapotranspiration, and the seasonal dynamics of subsurface

  9. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  10. Combined assimilation of soil moisture and streamflow data by an ensemble Kalman filter in a coupled model of surface-subsurface flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Paniconi, C.; Putti, M.; Salandin, P.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrologic models can largely benefit from the use of data assimilation algorithms, which allow to update the modeled system state incorporating in the solution of the model itself information coming from experimental measurements of various quantities, as soon as the data become available. In this context, data assimilation seems to be well fit for coupled surface--subsurface models, which, considering the watershed as the ensemble of surface and subsurface domains, allow a more accurate description of the hydrological processes at the catchment scale, where soil moisture largely influences the partitioning of rain between runoff and infiltration and thus controls the flow at the outlet. The need for a better determination of the variables of interest (streamflow at the outlet section, water table, soil water content, etc.) has led to a many efforts focused on the development of coupled numerical models, together with field and laboratory observations. Nevertheless, uncertainty in the schematic description of physical processes and inaccuracies on source data collection induce errors in the model predictions. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) represents an extension to nonlinear problems of the classic Kalman filter by means of a Monte Carlo approach. A sequential assimilation procedure based on EnKF is developed and integrated in a process-based numerical model, which couples a three-dimensional finite element Richards equation solver for variably saturated porous media and a finite difference diffusion wave approximation based on a digital elevation data for surface water dynamics. A detailed analysis of the data assimilation algorithm behavior within the coupled model has been carried out on a synthetic 1D test case in order to verify the correct implementation and derive a series of fundamental parameters, such as the minimum ensemble size that can ensure a sufficient accuracy in the statistical estimates. The assimilation frequency, as well as the effects

  11. Global-scale carbon and energy flows through the marine planktonic food web: An analysis with a coupled physical-biological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Charles A.; Dunne, John P.; John, Jasmin G.

    2014-01-01

    Global-scale planktonic ecosystem models exhibit large differences in simulated net primary production (NPP) and assessment of planktonic food web fluxes beyond primary producers has been limited, diminishing confidence in carbon flux estimates from these models. In this study, a global ocean-ice-ecosystem model was assessed against a suite of observation-based planktonic food web flux estimates, many of which were not considered in previous modeling studies. The simulation successfully captured cross-biome differences and similarities in these fluxes after calibration of a limited number of highly uncertain yet influential parameters. The resulting comprehensive carbon budgets suggested that shortened food webs, elevated growth efficiencies, and tight consumer-resource coupling enable oceanic upwelling systems to support 45% of pelagic mesozooplankton production despite accounting for only 22% of ocean area and 34% of NPP. In seasonally stratified regions (42% of ocean area and 40% of NPP), weakened consumer-resource coupling tempers mesozooplankton production to 41% and enhances export below 100 m to 48% of the global total. In oligotrophic systems (36% of ocean area and 26% of NPP), the dominance of small phytoplankton and low consumer growth efficiencies supported only 14% of mesozooplankton production and 17% of export globally. Bacterial production, in contrast, was maintained in nearly constant proportion to primary production across biomes through the compensating effects of increased partitioning of NPP to the microbial food web in oligotrophic ecosystems and increased bacterial growth efficiencies in more productive areas. Cross-biome differences in mesozooplankton trophic level were muted relative to those invoked by previous work such that significant differences in consumer growth efficiencies and the strength of consumer-resource coupling were needed to explain sharp cross-biome differences in mesozooplankton production. Lastly, simultaneous

  12. Coupled Heat and Fluid Flow Modeling of the Earth's Largest Zinc Ore Deposit at Red Dog, Alaska: Implications for Structurally-Focused, Free Convection in Submarine Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.; Dumoulin, J. A.; Bradley, D. A.; Young, L. E.; Kelley, K. D.; Leach, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Crustal heat flow can provide a strong mechanism for driving groundwater flow, particularly in submarine basins where other mechanisms for driving pore fluid flow such as topography, compaction and crustal deformation are too weak or too slow to have a significant effect on disturbing conductive heat flow. Fault zones appear to play a crucial role in focusing fluid migration in basins, as inferred in ancient rocks by many examples of hydrothermal deposits of sediment-hosted ores worldwide. Many rift-hosted deposits of lead, zinc, and barite ore appear to have formed at or near the seafloor by focused venting of hot basinal fluids and modified seawater, although the geophysical nature of these systems is not so well known. For example, the upper Kuna Formation, a finely laminated, black, organic-rich siliceous mudstone and shale in the Western Brooks Range of northwest Alaska, is host to the largest resources of zinc yet discovered in the Earth's crust, containing ore reserves in excess of 175 Mt averaging about 16% Zn and 5% Pb. Although situated today in a highly-deformed series of structural allocthonous plates thrusted during the Jurassic to Cretaceous Brookian Orogeny, the stratiform ores are thought to have formed much earlier in the anoxic, mud-rich Carboniferous-age Kuna Basin when adjacent carbonate platforms were drowned by rifting and tectonic subsidence. Fluid inclusion studies of ore-stage sphalerite and gangue minerals indicate sub-seafloor mineralization temperatures less than 200oC and most likely between 120 to 150 oC, during a period of sediment diagenesis and extensional faulting. We have constructed fully-coupled numerical models of heat and fluid flow to test hydrologic theories for free convection, submarine venting and subsequent ore formation, as constrained by paleoheat flow and petrologic observations. A finite element grid was designed and adapted for a cross section of the Kuna Basin, geologically restored to latest Mississippian time

  13. A coupled heat and water flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Caporouscio, F.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, C.H. ); Kjartanson, B.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires isolation of a number of diverse chemical elements form the environment. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of disposing of waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the ground surface in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The temperatures and hydraulic potential in the buffer and back fill material were investigated. To study the performance of a compacted buffer material under thermal and isothermal conditions, a coupled heat and water flow apparatus is designed and presented. In the preliminary design, a one-dimensional flow of heat and water was not achieved. however, control of temperature gradient, existence of one-dimensional flow, and uniformity of temperature and volumetric water content distributions at any cross section within the specimen are achieved in the modified design. Experimental results have shown that the temperature stabilizes very rapidly after a period of approximately 0. 107 days. The moisture moves away from the hot end along the longitudinal direction of the specimen due to imposed thermal gradient. The time required for moisture to stabilize is in order of days. 17 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Seasonal-scale abrasion and quarrying patterns from a two-dimensional ice-flow model coupled to distributed and channelized subglacial drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Pimentel, Sam

    2014-08-01

    Field data and numerical modeling show that glaciations have the potential either to enhance relief or to dampen topography. We aim to model the effect of the subglacial hydraulic system on spatiotemporal patterns of glacial erosion by abrasion and quarrying on time scales commensurate with drainage system fluctuations (e.g., seasonal to annual). We use a numerical model that incorporates a dual-morphology subglacial drainage system coupled to a higher-order ice-flow model and process-specific erosion laws. The subglacial drainage system allows for a dynamic transition between two morphologies: the distributed system, characterized by an increase in basal water pressure with discharge, and the channelized system, which exhibits a decrease in equilibrium water pressure with increasing discharge. We apply the model to a simple synthetic glacier geometry, drive it with prescribed meltwater input variations, and compute sliding and erosion rates over a seasonal cycle. When both distributed and channelized systems are included, abrasion and sliding maxima migrate ~ 20% up-glacier compared to simulations with distributed drainage only. Power-law sliding generally yields to a broader response of abrasion to water pressure changes along the flowline compared to Coulomb-friction sliding. Multi-day variations in meltwater input elicit a stronger abrasion response than either diurnal- or seasonal variations alone for the same total input volume. An increase in water input volume leads to increased abrasion. We find that ice thickness commensurate with ice sheet outlet glaciers can hinder the up-glacier migration of abrasion. Quarrying patterns computed with a recently published law differ markedly from calculated abrasion patterns, with effective pressure being a stronger determinant than sliding speeds of quarrying rates. These variations in calculated patterns of instantaneous erosion as a function of hydrology-, sliding-, and erosion-model formulation, as well as model

  15. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3  MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50 kW DC power and 3 MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  16. Agni: Coupling Model Analysis Tools and High-Performance Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulators for Risk and Performance Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Pau, George; Finsterle, Stefan

    2012-06-28

    Agni is open source /community /multi platform framework for model-based analyses (SA, UQ, PE, RA, DS). Agni can be applied independently from other Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) modules. Agni will be available as Mercurial repository (hg clone https://akuna.labworks.org/hg/Platform) including source code, manual, test and verification examples.

  17. Flow Behavior Around Coupled, Rotating Turbines in Steady Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Matthew; Dabiri, John

    2012-11-01

    Counter-rotating vertical axis turbines (VATs) have been shown to yield increased power density in wind farms as compared to typical horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) farms. However, the governing physical mechanisms remain poorly understood. Scale model experiments in a free-surface water tunnel were conducted to characterize the effect of parameters such as turbine separation, tip speed ratio, and flow speed on the downstream flow field and the resulting vortex shedding from VATs. The flow field was visualized using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence. The results are compared and contrasted with recent studies of counter-rotating circular cylinders to determine if suppression of vortex shedding plays a similarly important role in dictating the overall wake dynamics. This research was made possible through the generosity of Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Caltech SURF Program.

  18. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  19. Coupling Flow and Thermal and Reactive Geochemical Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, G.

    2004-12-01

    The couplings among fluid flows, thermal transport, geochemical reactions, advective and diffusive transport of solutes in fractured media or soils, and changes in hydraulic properties due to precipitation and dissolution along fractures and rock matrix are important for understanding interplays between fluid flows and dynamic transport processes. This paper describes the development and demonstrative applications of a mechanistic-based numerical model of coupled fluid flow and thermal and reactive geochemical transport, including both fast and slow reactions, in variably saturated media. Theoretical bases, numerical implementations, and two numerical experiments using the model will be presented. The first example deals with the effect of precipitation-dissolution on fluid flow and matrix diffusion in a two-dimensional fractured media. Because of the precipitation and decreased diffusion of solute from the fracture into the matrix, retardation in the fractured medium is not as large as the case wherein interactions between geochemical reactions and transport are not considered. The second example focuses on a complicated but realistic advective-dispersive-reactive transport problem. This example exemplifies the need for innovative numerical algorithms to solve problems involving stiff geochemical reactions.

  20. Coupled Petrological and Geodynamic Models of Mantle Flow in Subduction Zones; the Importance of Chlorite in the Emergence of a Low-Viscosity Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. M.; Baker, L. J.; Asimow, P. D.; Gurnis, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation studies have shown that 5-20 km thick low velocity layers exist above seismically fast slabs and are associated with broad zones of high attenuation in many subduction zones. These observations are generally interpreted as formation of hydrous phases by dehydration of the slab, although the impact of water in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) on seismic wave propagation is largely unknown. Recent petrological experiments on hydrous peridotite at subduction zone conditions suggest that chlorite will be stable adjacent to the subducting slab in sufficient quantities to be a significant water sink. We use a scheme that couples a petrological model (pHMELTS) with a 2-D thermal and variable viscosity flow model (ConMan) to model energy and mass transfer within a subduction zone. By varying input parameters including the convergence rate and slab dip we have developed models for cases in the Costa-Rica and Izu- Bonin-Marianas arc systems and are able to predict major and trace element compositions of primary melts, as well as geophysical observables, such as the topography and geoid. We find that the emergence of a slab- adjacent low-viscosity channel (LVC) is a natural consequence of the thermal and chemical controls on mantle dynamics and feedback between them. In our earlier models, as the LVC is dragged downwards by the subducting slab, hornblende breaks down at about 2.5 GPa and other hydrous phases such as serpentine are secondary in importance to the NAM water reservoir. The spatial limit of the LVC is the water-saturated solidus of the hydrated peridotite; the LVC thickens as the peridotite is progressively depleted by melting and the solidus migrates into the warmer wedge, despite water replenishment at depth. pHMELTS is a hybrid of the pMELTS model of Ghiorso and co-workers and includes amphiboles, serpentines and micas. Chlorite was lacking but we have recently rectified this omission. Following De Capitani and co- workers, we

  1. Flow visualization study of close-coupled canard wing and strake wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, D. D.; Gloss, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Langley 1/8-scale V/STOL model tunnel was used to qualitatively determine the flow fields associated with semi-span close coupled canard wing and strake wing models. Small helium filled bubbles were injected upstream of the models to make the flow visible. Photographs were taken over the angle-of-attack ranges of -10 deg to 40 deg.

  2. Role of Runoff-Infiltration Partitioning and Resolved Overland Flow on Land-Atmosphere Feedbacks: A Case-Study with the WRF-Hydro Coupled Modeling System for West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, J.; Wagner, S.; Rummler, T.; Fersch, B.; Bliefernicht, J.; Andresen, S.; Kunstmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of land-atmosphere feedbacks requires detailed representation of land processes in atmospheric models. Our focus here is on runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow. In the standard version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, coupled with the Noah Land Surface Model, runoff-infiltration partitioning is described as a purely vertical process. In the WRF-Hydro coupled modeling system, runoff is enhanced with lateral water flows. The study region is the Sissili catchment (12800 km2) in West Africa, and the period of investigation is March 2003 - February 2004. Our WRF setup includes an outer and inner domain at 10 and 2 km resolution, respectively. In our WRF-Hydro setup the inner domain is coupled with a sub-grid at 500 m resolution to compute overland and river flow. Model results are compared with TRMM precipitation, MTE evapotranspiration, CCI soil moisture, CRU temperature, and streamflow observation. In the outer domain, a sensitivity analysis to runoff-infiltration partitioning gives a range of simulated annual precipitation of one sixth of the annual amount. In the inner domain, where precipitation patterns are mainly prescribed by lateral boundary conditions, sensitivity is small, but additionally resolved overland flow here clearly increases infiltration and evapotranspiration at the beginning of the wet season when soils are still dry. Our WRF-Hydro setup shows the potential of this fully coupled modeling system for joint atmospheric and terrestrial water balance studies, and reproduces observed daily discharge with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient of 0.43.

  3. Long line coupling models.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2004-03-01

    This report assembles models for the response of a wire interacting with a conducting ground to an electromagnetic pulse excitation. The cases of an infinite wire above the ground as well as resting on the ground and buried beneath the ground are treated. The focus is on the characteristics and propagation of the transmission line mode. Approximations are used to simplify the description and formulas are obtained for the current. The semi-infinite case, where the short circuit current can be nearly twice that of the infinite line, is also examined.

  4. Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, R. Joy, Ashwin

    2014-07-15

    Undriven, incompressible Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional doubly periodic strongly coupled dusty plasma is modelled using generalised hydrodynamics, both in linear and nonlinear regime. A complete stability diagram is obtained for low Reynolds numbers R and for a range of viscoelastic relaxation time τ{sub m} [0 < τ{sub m} < 10]. For the system size considered, using a linear stability analysis, similar to Navier Stokes fluid (τ{sub m} = 0), it is found that for Reynolds number beyond a critical R, say R{sub c}, the Kolmogorov flow becomes unstable. Importantly, it is found that R{sub c} is strongly reduced for increasing values of τ{sub m}. A critical τ{sub m}{sup c} is found above which Kolmogorov flow is unconditionally unstable and becomes independent of Reynolds number. For R < R{sub c}, the neutral stability regime found in Navier Stokes fluid (τ{sub m} = 0) is now found to be a damped regime in viscoelastic fluids, thus changing the fundamental nature of transition of Kolmogorov flow as function of Reynolds number R. A new parallelized nonlinear pseudo spectral code has been developed and is benchmarked against eigen values for Kolmogorov flow obtained from linear analysis. Nonlinear states obtained from the pseudo spectral code exhibit cyclicity and pattern formation in vorticity and viscoelastic oscillations in energy.

  5. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  6. Strongly coupled turbulent gas-particle flows in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) simulations of strongly coupled (high mass loading) gas-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of exploring the fundamental physics of fully developed, wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. An adaptive spatial filter is developed that accurately decomposes the total granular energy of the particles into correlated and uncorrelated components at each location in the wall-normal direction of the flow. In this manner, Reynolds- and phase-averaged (PA) two-phase turbulence statistics up to second order are reported for both phases and for three values of the PA mean fluid velocity. As expected due to the high mass loading, in all cases the turbulence production due to mean drag dominates production due to mean shear. A multiphase LRR-IP Reynolds-stress turbulence model is developed to predict the turbulent flow statistics as a function of the wall-normal distance. Using a correlation for the vertical drift velocity developed from the EL data, the turbulence model predictions agree satisfactorily with all of one-point EL statistics for the vertical channel flows, as well as for the homogeneous cluster-induced turbulence (CIT) statistics reported previously. Funded by U.S. National Science Foundation (CBET-1437865).

  7. Modeling and flow theory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    (1) We recommend the establishment of an experimental test facility, appropriately instrumented, dedicated to research on theoretical modeling concepts. Validation of models for the various flow regimes, and establishment of the limitations or concepts used in the construction of models, are sorely needed areas of research. There exists no mechanism currently for funding of such research on a systematic basis. Such a facility would provide information fundamental to progress in the physics of turbulent multi-phase flow, which would also have impact on the understanding of coal utilization processes; (2) combustion research appears to have special institutional barriers to information exchange because it is an established, commercial ongoing effort, with heavy reliance on empirical data for proprietary configurations; (3) for both gasification and combustion reactors, current models appear to handle adequately some, perhaps even most, gross aspects of the reactors such as overall efficiency and major chemical output constituents. However, new and more stringent requirements concerning NOX, SOX and POX (small paticulate) production require greater understanding of process details and spatial inhomogenities, hence refinement of current models to include some greater detail is necessary; (4) further progress in the theory of single-phase turbulent flow would benefit our understanding of both combustors and gasifiers; and (5) another area in which theoretical development would be extremely useful is multi-phase flow.

  8. T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-24

    T2Well/ECO2N is a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO2 injection and leakage through wellbores. It can be seen as an extension to standard TOUGH/ECO2N V2.0, and can be applied to situations relevant to geologic CO2 storage involving upward flow (e.g., leakage) and downward flow (injection). The new simulator integrates a wellbore-reservoir system by assigning the wellbore and reservoir to two different sub-domains in which flow is controlled by appropriate physical laws. In the reservoir, we model flow using a standard multiphase Darcy flow approach. In the wellbores, we use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO2-water mixtures. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme.

  9. T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water

    2011-08-24

    T2Well/ECO2N is a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO2 injection and leakage through wellbores. It can be seen as an extension to standard TOUGH/ECO2N V2.0, and can be applied to situations relevant to geologic CO2 storage involving upward flow (e.g., leakage) and downward flow (injection). The new simulator integrates a wellbore-reservoir system by assigning the wellbore and reservoir to two different sub-domains in which flow is controlled by appropriate physicalmore » laws. In the reservoir, we model flow using a standard multiphase Darcy flow approach. In the wellbores, we use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO2-water mixtures. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme.« less

  10. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  11. Radiation-Spray Coupling for Realistic Flow Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam; Iannetti, Anthony C.

    2011-01-01

    Three Large Eddy Simulations (LES) for a lean-direct injection (LDI) combustor are performed and compared. In addition to the cold flow simulation, the effect of radiation coupling with the multi-physics reactive flow is analyzed. The flame let progress variable approach is used as a subgrid combustion model combined with a stochastic subgrid model for spray atomization and an optically thin radiation model. For accurate chemistry modeling, a detailed Jet-A surrogate mechanism is utilized. To achieve realistic inflow, a simple recycling technique is performed at the inflow section upstream of the swirler. Good comparison is shown with the experimental data mean and root mean square profiles. The effect of combustion is found to change the shape and size of the central recirculation zone. Radiation is found to change the spray dynamics and atomization by changing the heat release distribution and the local temperature values impacting the evaporation process. The simulation with radiation modeling shows wider range of droplet size distribution by altering the evaporation rate. The current study proves the importance of radiation modeling for accurate prediction in realistic spray combustion configurations, even for low pressure systems.

  12. Modelling pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Burrowes, Kelly S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational model analysis is a method that has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity. PMID:18434260

  13. Activation-flow coupling during graded cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark G; Detre, John A; Greenberg, Joel H

    2005-06-14

    Most functional neuroimaging techniques rely on activation-flow coupling (AFC) to detect changes in regional brain function, but AFC responses may also be altered during pathophysiological conditions such as ischemia. To define the relationship between progressive ischemia and the AFC response, graded levels of cerebral blood flow reduction were produced using a rat compression ischemia model, and the cerebral hemodynamic response to forepaw stimulation was measured. Graded levels of cortical ischemia of the somatosensory cortex were induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 16) by compressing the intact dura with a 4-mm-diameter cylinder equipped with a laser-Doppler probe, combined with ipsilateral common carotid artery occlusion. At each level of CBF reduction, electric forepaw stimulation was conducted, and signal-averaged laser Doppler and evoked potential responses were recorded. A visible AFC response was present at all levels of CBF reduction (0-90% reduction from baseline), and the temporal characteristics of the response appeared largely preserved. However, the amplitude of the AFC response began to decline at levels of mild ischemia (10% flow reduction) and progressively decreased with further CBF reduction. The amplitude of the evoked response appeared to decrease in concert with the AFC amplitude and appeared to be equally sensitive to ischemia. AFC appears to be a sensitive marker for cerebral ischemia, and alterations in the AFC response occur at CBF reductions above the accepted thresholds for infarction. However, the AFC response is also preserved when flow is reduced below ischemic thresholds. PMID:15893740

  14. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  15. Standard model with gravity couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lay Nam; Soo, Chopin

    1996-05-01

    In this paper we examine the coupling of matter fields to gravity within the framework of the standard model of particle physics. The coupling is described in terms of Weyl fermions of a definite chirality, and employs only (anti-)self-dual or left-handed spin connection fields. We review the general framework for introducing the coupling using these fields, and show that conditions ensuring the cancellation of perturbative chiral gauge anomalies are not disturbed. We also explore a global anomaly associated with the theory, and argue that its removal requires that the number of fundamental fermions in the theory must be multiples of 16. In addition, we investigate the behavior of the theory under discrete transformations P, C, and T, and discuss possible violations of these discrete symmetries, including CPT, in the presence of instantons and the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly.

  16. Session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    1993-01-01

    The session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models is reviewed. Current model limitations, current issues and critical unknowns, and modeling activity are addressed. Specific recommendations and experimental strategies on the following are given: multiscale surface layer - planetary boundary layer - chemical flux measurements; Eulerian budget study; and Langrangian experiment. Nonprecipitating cloud studies, organized convective systems, and aerosols - heterogenous chemistry are also discussed.

  17. Multiphysics and Multiscale Model Coupling Using Gerris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, T. R.; Dykes, J. D.; Campbell, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    This work is implementing oceanographic processes encompassing multiple physics and scales using the Gerris Flow Solver (GFS) in order to examine their interdependence and sensitivity to changes in the physical environment. The processes include steady flow due to tides and the wind, phase-averaged wave-forced flow and oscillatory currents, and sediment transport. The 2D steady flow is calculated by the Ocean module contained within GFS. This model solves the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations using the finite volume method. The model domain is represented by quad-tree adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). A stationary wave field is computed for a specified wave spectrum is uniformly distributed over the domain as a tracer with local wind input parameterized as a source, and dissipation by friction and breaking as a sink. Alongshore flow is included by a radiation stress term; this current is added to the steady flow component from tides and wind. Wave-current interaction is parameterized using a bottom boundary layer model. Sediment transport as suspended and bed load is implemented using tracers that are transported via the advection equations. A bed-conservation equation is implemented to allow changes in seafloor elevation to be used in adjusting the AMR refinement. These processes are being coupled using programming methods that are inherent to GFS and that do not require modification or recompiling of the code. These techniques include passive tracers, C functions that operate as plug-ins, and user-defined C-type macros included with GFS. Our results suggest that the AMR model coupling method is useful for problems where the dynamics are governed by several processes. This study is examining the relative influence of the steady currents, wave field, and sedimentation. Hydrodynamic and sedimentation interaction in nearshore environments is being studied for an idealized beach and for the Sandy Duck storm of Oct. 1998. The potential behavior of muddy sediments on the

  18. Multiple steady states in coupled flow tank reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Katharine L. C.; Kottalam, J.; Hatlee, Michael D.; Ross, John

    1992-05-01

    Coupling between continuous-flow, stirred tank reactors (CSTR's), each having multiple steady states, can produce new steady states with different concentrations of the chemical species in each of the coupled tanks. In this work, we identify a kinetic potential ψ that governs the deterministic time evolution of coupled tank reactors, when the reaction mechanism permits a single-variable description of the states of the individual tanks; examples include the iodate-arsenous acid reaction, a cubic model suggested by Noyes, and two quintic models. Stable steady states correspond to minima of ψ, and unstable steady states to maxima or saddle points; marginally stable states typically correspond to saddle-node points. We illustrate the variation in ψ due to changes in the rate constant for external material intake (k0) and for exchange between tanks (kx). For fixed k0 values, we analyze the changes in numbers and types of steady states as kx increases from zero. We show that steady states disappear by pairwise coalescence; we also show that new steady states may appear with increasing kx, when the reaction mechanism is sufficiently complex. For fixed initial conditions, the steady state ultimately reached in a mixing experiment may depend on the exchange rate constant as a function of time, kx(t) : Adiabatic mixing is obtained in the limit of slow changes in kx(t) and instantaneous mixing in the limit as kx(t)→∞ while t remains small. Analyses based on the potential ψ predict the outcome of mixing experiments for arbitrary kx(t). We show by explicit counterexamples that a prior theory developed by Noyes does not correctly predict the instability points or the transitions between steady states of coupled tanks, to be expected in mixing experiments. We further show that the outcome of such experiments is not connected to the relative stability of steady states in individual tank reactors. We find that coupling may effectively stabilize the tanks. We provide

  19. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2014-11-14

    A multiscale linear-solver framework for the pressure equation associated with flow in highly heterogeneous porous formations was developed. The multiscale based approach is cast in a general algebraic form, which facilitates integration of the new scalable linear solver in existing flow simulators. The Algebraic Multiscale Solver (AMS) is employed as a preconditioner within a multi-stage strategy. The formulations investigated include the standard MultiScale Finite-Element (MSFE) andMultiScale Finite-Volume (MSFV) methods. The local-stage solvers include incomplete factorization and the so-called Correction Functions (CF) associated with the MSFV approach. Extensive testing of AMS, as an iterative linear solver, indicate excellent convergence rates and computational scalability. AMS compares favorably with advanced Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) solvers for highly detailed three-dimensional heterogeneous models. Moreover, AMS is expected to be especially beneficial in solving time-dependent problems of coupled multiphase flow and transport in large-scale subsurface formations.

  20. Coupled heat and fluid flow modeling of the Carboniferous Kuna Basin, Alaska: Implications for the genesis of the Red Dog Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba ore district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garven, G.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Dumoulin, J.A.; Bradley, D.A.; Young, L.E.; Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Red Dog deposit is a giant 175 Mton (16% Zn, 5% Pb), shale-hosted Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba ore district situated in the Carboniferous Kuna Basin, Western Brooks Range, Alaska. These SEDEX-type ores are thought to have formed in calcareous turbidites and black mudstone at elevated sub-seafloor temperatures (120-150??C) within a hydrogeologic framework of submarine convection that was structurally organized by large normal faults. The theory for modeling brine migration and heat transport in the Kuna Basin is discussed with application to evaluating flow patterns and heat transport in faulted rift basins and the effects of buoyancy-driven free convection on reactive flow and ore genesis. Finite element simulations show that hydrothermal fluid was discharged into the Red Dog subbasin during a period of basin-wide crustal heat flow of 150-160 mW/m2. Basinal brines circulated to depths as great as 1-3 km along multiple normal faults flowed laterally through thick clastic aquifers acquiring metals and heat, and then rapidly ascended a single discharge fault zone at rates ??? 5 m/year to mix with seafloor sulfur and precipitate massive sulfide ores. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Aquarius - A Modelling Package for Groundwater Flow and Coupled Heat Transport in the Range 0.1 to 100 MPa and 0.1 to 1000 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.

    2009-05-01

    Aquarius is a Windows application that models fluid flow and heat transport under conditions in which fluid buoyancy can significantly impact patterns and magnitudes of fluid flow. The package is designed as a visualization tool through which users can examine flow systems in environments, both low temperature aquifers and regions with elevated PT regimes such as deep sedimentary basins, hydrothermal systems, and contact thermal aureoles. The package includes 4 components: (1) A finite-element mesh generator/assembler capable of representing complex geologic structures. Left-hand, right-hand and alternating linear triangles can be mixed within the mesh. Planer horizontal, planer vertical and cylindrical vertical coordinate sections are supported. (2) A menu-selectable system for setting properties and boundary/initial conditions. The design retains mathematical terminology for all input parameters such as scalars (e.g., porosity), tensors (e.g., permeability), and boundary/initial conditions (e.g., fixed potential). This makes the package an effective instructional aide by linking model requirements with the underlying mathematical concepts of partial differential equations and the solution logic of boundary/initial value problems. (3) Solution algorithms for steady-state and time-transient fluid flow/heat transport problems. For all models, the nonlinear global matrix equations are solved sequentially using over-relaxation techniques. Matrix storage design allows for large (e.g., 20000) element models to run efficiently on a typical PC. (4) A plotting system that supports contouring nodal data (e.g., head), vector plots for flux data (e.g., specific discharge), and colour gradient plots for elemental data (e.g., porosity), water properties (e.g., density), and performance measures (e.g., Peclet numbers). Display graphics can be printed or saved in standard graphic formats (e.g., jpeg). This package was developed from procedural codes in C written originally to

  2. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1990-01-01

    Because of the complexity of helicopter flow field, a zonal method of analysis of computational aerodynamics is required. Here, a new procedure for coupling potential and viscous flow is proposed. An overlapping, velocity coupling technique is to be developed with the unique feature that the potential flow surface singularity strengths are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes at a smoother inner fluid boundary. The closed-loop iteration method proceeds until the velocity field is converged. This coupling should provide the means of more accurate viscous computations of the near-body and rotor flow fields with resultant improved analysis of such important performance parameters as helicopter fuselage drag and rotor airloads.

  3. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  4. The Challenges to Coupling Dynamic Geospatial Models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N

    2006-06-23

    Many applications of modeling spatial dynamic systems focus on a single system and a single process, ignoring the geographic and systemic context of the processes being modeled. A solution to this problem is the coupled modeling of spatial dynamic systems. Coupled modeling is challenging for both technical reasons, as well as conceptual reasons. This paper explores the benefits and challenges to coupling or linking spatial dynamic models, from loose coupling, where information transfer between models is done by hand, to tight coupling, where two (or more) models are merged as one. To illustrate the challenges, a coupled model of Urbanization and Wildfire Risk is presented. This model, called Vesta, was applied to the Santa Barbara, California region (using real geospatial data), where Urbanization and Wildfires occur and recur, respectively. The preliminary results of the model coupling illustrate that coupled modeling can lead to insight into the consequences of processes acting on their own.

  5. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  6. Coupled transport in rotor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, S.; Lepri, S.; Livi, R.; Politi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Steady nonequilibrium states are investigated in a one-dimensional setup in the presence of two thermodynamic currents. Two paradigmatic nonlinear oscillators models are investigated: an XY chain and the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Their distinctive feature is that the relevant variable is an angle in both cases. We point out the importance of clearly distinguishing between energy and heat flux. In fact, even in the presence of a vanishing Seebeck coefficient, a coupling between (angular) momentum and energy arises, mediated by the unavoidable presence of a coherent energy flux. Such a contribution is the result of the ‘advection’ induced by the position-dependent angular velocity. As a result, in the XY model, the knowledge of the two diagonal elements of the Onsager matrix suffices to reconstruct its transport properties. The analysis of the nonequilibrium steady states finally allows to strengthen the connection between the two models.

  7. Using the Flow-3D General Moving Object Model to Simulate Coupled Liquid Slosh - Container Dynamics on the SPHERES Slosh Experiment: Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Richard; Kirk, Daniel; Marsell, Brandon; Roth, Jacob; Schallhorn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The SPHERES Slosh Experiment (SSE) is a free floating experimental platform developed for the acquisition of long duration liquid slosh data aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The data sets collected will be used to benchmark numerical models to aid in the design of rocket and spacecraft propulsion systems. Utilizing two SPHERES Satellites, the experiment will be moved through different maneuvers designed to induce liquid slosh in the experiment's internal tank. The SSE has a total of twenty-four thrusters to move the experiment. In order to design slosh generating maneuvers, a parametric study with three maneuvers types was conducted using the General Moving Object (GMO) model in Flow-30. The three types of maneuvers are a translation maneuver, a rotation maneuver and a combined rotation translation maneuver. The effectiveness of each maneuver to generate slosh is determined by the deviation of the experiment's trajectory as compared to a dry mass trajectory. To fully capture the effect of liquid re-distribution on experiment trajectory, each thruster is modeled as an independent force point in the Flow-3D simulation. This is accomplished by modifying the total number of independent forces in the GMO model from the standard five to twenty-four. Results demonstrate that the most effective slosh generating maneuvers for all motions occurs when SSE thrusters are producing the highest changes in SSE acceleration. The results also demonstrate that several centimeters of trajectory deviation between the dry and slosh cases occur during the maneuvers; while these deviations seem small, they are measureable by SSE instrumentation.

  8. Off-centered stagnation point flow of a couple stress fluid towards a rotating disk.

    PubMed

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Riaz, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    An investigation has been made to study the off-centered stagnation flow of a couple stress fluid over a rotating disk. The model developed for the governing problem in the form of partial differential equations has been converted to ordinary differential equations with the use of suitable similarity transformation. The analytical approximation has been made with the most promising analytical approach, homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence region of the obtained solution is determined and plotted. The effects of couple stress and nondimensional parameters have been observed on the flows of couple stress fluid. Also comparison has been made with the Newtonian fluid as the special case of considered problem.

  9. Documentation of a restart option for the U.S. Geological Survey coupled Groundwater and Surface-Water Flow (GSFLOW) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Regan, Robert S.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2015-10-02

    The spin-up simulation should be run for a sufficient length of time necessary to establish antecedent conditions throughout a model domain. Each GSFLOW application can require different lengths of time to account for the hydrologic stresses to propagate through a coupled groundwater and surface-water system. Typically, groundwater hydrologic processes require many years to come into equilibrium with dynamic climate and other forcing (or stress) data, such as precipitation and well pumping, whereas runoff-dominated surface-water processes respond relatively quickly. Use of a spin-up simulation can substantially reduce execution-time requirements for applications where the time period of interest is small compared to the time for hydrologic memory; thus, use of the restart option can be an efficient strategy for forecast and calibration simulations that require multiple simulations starting from the same day.

  10. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  11. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  12. T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

    2011-02-14

    At its most basic level, the injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites involves a system comprising the wellbore and the target reservoir. The wellbore is the only conduit available to emplace CO{sub 2} into reservoirs for long-term storage. At the same time, wellbores in general have been identified as the most likely conduit for CO{sub 2} and brine leakage from geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites, especially those in sedimentary basins with historical hydrocarbon production. We have developed a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO{sub 2} injection and leakage through wellbores. The model describes the following processes: (1) upward or downward wellbore flow of CO{sub 2} and variable salinity water with transition from supercritical to gaseous CO{sub 2} including Joule-Thomson cooling, (2) exsolution of CO{sub 2} from the aqueous phase as pressure drops, and (3) cross flow into or interaction with layers of surrounding rock (reservoirs). We use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO{sub 2}-water mixtures under different flow regimes and interacting with surrounding rock. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme. This manual provides instructions for compilation and use of the new model, and presents some example problems to demonstrate its use.

  13. Coupled chemo(enzymatic) reactions in continuous flow

    PubMed Central

    Yuryev, Ruslan; Strompen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of coupled chemo(enzymatic) reactions in continuous flow. Three different approaches to such reaction systems are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages and disadvantages as well as trends for their future development. PMID:22238518

  14. Turbomachinery Flows Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Last year, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the average passage code APNASA to complete the largest three-dimensional simulation of a multistage axial flow compressor to date. Consisting of 29 blade rows, the configuration is typical of those found in aeroengines today. The simulation, which was executed on the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program IBM SP2 parallel computer located at the NASA Ames Research Center, took nearly 90 hr to complete. Since the completion of this activity, a fine-grain, parallel version of APNASA has been written by a team of researchers from General Electric, NASA Lewis, and NYMA. Timing studies performed on the SP2 have shown that, with eight processors assigned to each blade row, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of six. For this configuration, the simulation time would be 15 hr. The reduction in computing time indicates that an overnight turnaround of a multistage configuration simulation is feasible. In addition, average passage forms of two-equation turbulence models were formulated. These models are currently being incorporated into APNASA.

  15. Coupled parametric design of flow control and duct shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan (Inventor); Bertuccioli, Luca (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for designing gas turbine engine components using a coupled parametric analysis of part geometry and flow control is disclosed. Included are the steps of parametrically defining the geometry of the duct wall shape, parametrically defining one or more flow control actuators in the duct wall, measuring a plurality of performance parameters or metrics (e.g., flow characteristics) of the duct and comparing the results of the measurement with desired or target parameters, and selecting the optimal duct geometry and flow control for at least a portion of the duct, the selection process including evaluating the plurality of performance metrics in a pareto analysis. The use of this method in the design of inter-turbine transition ducts, serpentine ducts, inlets, diffusers, and similar components provides a design which reduces pressure losses and flow profile distortions.

  16. Coupling catchment hydrology and transient storage to model the fate of solutes during low-flow conditions of an upland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trévisan, D.; Periáñez, R.

    2016-03-01

    The residence time of solutes in catchments is longer during low-flow conditions, due to the lengthening of transport routes and the decrease in transfer velocities. In rivers, transient storage depends largely on exchanges with channel storage and the hyporheic zone and reflects the capacity of the river to buffer pollutant loads before they enter the aquatic environment of final receptors. Our objective was to evaluate the fate of solutes along a typical confined river of upland catchments. First, we calculate lateral inflows using a variable-source hydrology approach. Then, water motion and quality in the river channel are predicted by combining hydrodynamics and exchanges with channel storage and the hyporheic zone. The model is mainly parametrized from literature data during baseflow conditions to mimic the fate of adsorptive and non-persistent pollutants. Residence time in surface water, channel storage and the hyporheic zone were found to be sensitive to lateral inflows from groundwater seepage. Channel storage is the main process controlling residence time in upstream conditions, where the riverbed is mainly composed of stones and bedrock. Downstream, along with the formation of sediment deposits and riffle-pool units, hyporheic exchanges also control the lag time in the transfer of solutes. By integrating physically-based processes, the number of parameters is small, but the model still requires a detailed description of stream geometry and morphology. It can be used to evaluate stream restoration or catchment-river management when detailed data of stream geometry and morphology are available.

  17. Coupling compositional liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at porous and free-flow domains interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, R.; Trenty, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an efficient splitting algorithm to solve coupled liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at the interface between a porous medium and a free-flow domain. This model is compared to the reduced model introduced in [6] using a 1D approximation of the gas free flow. For that purpose, the gas molar fraction diffusive flux at the interface in the free-flow domain is approximated by a two point flux approximation based on a low-frequency diagonal approximation of a Steklov-Poincaré type operator. The splitting algorithm and the reduced model are applied in particular to the modelling of the mass exchanges at the interface between the storage and the ventilation galleries in radioactive waste deposits.

  18. Role of runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow on land-atmosphere feedbacks: A case-study with the WRF-Hydro coupled modeling system for West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Wagner, Seven; Rummler, Thomas; Fersch, Benjamin; Bliefernicht, Jan; Andresen, Sabine; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of land-atmosphere feedbacks requires detailed representation of land processes in atmospheric models. Our focus here is on runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow. In the standard version of WRF, runoff-infiltration partitioning is described as a purely vertical process. In WRF-Hydro, runoff is enhanced with lateral water flows. The study region is the Sissili catchment (12800 km2) in West Africa and the study period March 2003 - February 2004. Our WRF setup includes an outer and inner domain at 10 and 2 km resolution covering the West African and Sissili region, respectively. In our WRF-Hydro setup the inner domain is coupled with a sub-grid at 500 m resolution to compute overland and river flow. Model results are compared with TRMM precipitation, MTE evapotranspiration, CCI soil moisture, CRU temperature, and streamflow observation. The role of runoff infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow on land-atmosphere feedbacks is addressed with a sensitivity analysis of WRF results to the runoff-infiltration partitioning parameter and a comparison between WRF and WRF-Hydro results, respectively. In the outer domain, precipitation is sensitive to runoff-infiltration partitioning at the scale of the Sissili area (~100x100 km2), but not of area A (500x2500 km2). In the inner domain, where precipitation patterns are mainly prescribed by lateral boundary conditions, sensitivity is small, but additionally resolved overland flow here clearly increases infiltration and evapotranspiration at the beginning of the wet season when soils are still dry. Our WRF-Hydro setup shows potential for joint atmospheric and terrestrial water balance studies, and reproduces observed daily discharge with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient of 0.43.

  19. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  20. The Los Alamos coupled climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.W.; Malone, R.C.; Lai, C.A.

    1998-12-31

    To gain a full understanding of the Earth`s climate system, it is necessary to understand physical processes in the ocean, atmosphere, land and sea ice. In addition, interactions between components are very important and models which couple all of the components into a single coupled climate model are required. A climate model which couples ocean, sea ice, atmosphere and land components is described. The component models are run as autonomous processes coupled to a flux coupler through a flexible communications library. Performance considerations of the model are examined, particularly for running the model on distributed-shared-memory machine architectures.

  1. Coupled assimilation for an intermediated coupled ENSO prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhu, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    The value of coupled assimilation is discussed using an intermediate coupled model in which the wind stress is the only atmospheric state which is slavery to model sea surface temperature (SST). In the coupled assimilation analysis, based on the coupled wind-ocean state covariance calculated from the coupled state ensemble, the ocean state is adjusted by assimilating wind data using the ensemble Kalman filter. As revealed by a series of assimilation experiments using simulated observations, the coupled assimilation of wind observations yields better results than the assimilation of SST observations. Specifically, the coupled assimilation of wind observations can help to improve the accuracy of the surface and subsurface currents because the correlation between the wind and ocean currents is stronger than that between SST and ocean currents in the equatorial Pacific. Thus, the coupled assimilation of wind data can decrease the initial condition errors in the surface/subsurface currents that can significantly contribute to SST forecast errors. The value of the coupled assimilation of wind observations is further demonstrated by comparing the prediction skills of three 12-year (1997-2008) hindcast experiments initialized by the ocean-only assimilation scheme that assimilates SST observations, the coupled assimilation scheme that assimilates wind observations, and a nudging scheme that nudges the observed wind stress data, respectively. The prediction skills of two assimilation schemes are significantly better than those of the nudging scheme. The prediction skills of assimilating wind observations are better than assimilating SST observations. Assimilating wind observations for the 2007/2008 La Niña event triggers better predictions, while assimilating SST observations fails to provide an early warning for that event.

  2. A Coupled Thermal, Fluid Flow, and Solidification Model for the Processing of Single-Crystal Alloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Bansal, Rohan; Gambone, Justin J.; Das, Suman

    2014-12-01

    Scanning laser epitaxy (SLE) is a new laser-based additive manufacturing technology under development at the Georgia Institute of Technology. SLE is aimed at the creation of equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal deposits of nickel-based superalloys through the melting of alloy powders onto superalloy substrates using a fast scanning Nd:YAG laser beam. The fast galvanometer control movement of the laser (0.2 to 2 m/s) and high-resolution raster scanning (20 to 200 µm line spacing) enables superior thermal control over the solidification process and allows the production of porosity-free, crack-free deposits of more than 1000 µm thickness. Here, we present a combined thermal and fluid flow model of the SLE process applied to alloy CMSX-4 with temperature-dependent thermo-physical properties. With the scanning beam described as a moving line source, the instantaneous melt pool assumes a convex hull shape with distinct leading edge and trailing edge characteristics. Temperature gradients at the leading and trailing edges are of order 2 × 105 and 104 K/m, respectively. Detailed flow analysis provides insights on the flow characteristics of the powder incorporating into the melt pool, showing velocities of order 1 × 10-4 m/s. The Marangoni effect drives this velocity from 10 to 15 times higher depending on the operating parameters. Prediction of the solidification microstructure is based on conditions at the trailing edge of the melt pool. Time tracking of solidification history is incorporated into the model to couple the microstructure prediction model to the thermal-fluid flow model, and to predict the probability of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition. Qualitative agreement is obtained between simulation and experimental result.

  3. Lattice-based flow field modeling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Zhao, Ye; Fan, Zhe; Li, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Yoakum-Stover, Suzanne; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach for simulating the natural dynamics that emerge from the interaction between a flow field and immersed objects. We model the flow field using the Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) with boundary conditions appropriate for moving objects and accelerate the computation on commodity graphics hardware (GPU) to achieve real-time performance. The boundary conditions mediate the exchange of momentum between the flow field and the moving objects resulting in forces exerted by the flow on the objects as well as the back-coupling on the flow. We demonstrate our approach using soap bubbles and a feather. The soap bubbles illustrate Fresnel reflection, reveal the dynamics of the unseen flow field in which they travel, and display spherical harmonics in their undulations. Our simulation allows the user to directly interact with the flow field to influence the dynamics in real time. The free feather flutters and gyrates in response to lift and drag forces created by its motion relative to the flow. Vortices are created as the free feather falls in an otherwise quiescent flow. PMID:15527053

  4. Surge dynamics coupled to pore-pressure evolution in debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, S.B.; Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Temporally and spatially varying pore-fluid pressures exert strong controls on debris-flow motion by mediating internal and basal friction at grain contacts. We analyze these effects by deriving a one-dimensional model of pore-pressure diffusion explicitly coupled to changes in debris-flow thickness. The new pore-pressure equation is combined with Iverson's (1997) extension of the depth-averaged Savage-Hutter (1989, 1991) granular avalanche equations to predict motion of unsteady debris-flow surges with evolving pore-pressure distributions. Computational results illustrate the profound effects of pore-pressure diffusivities on debris-flow surge depths and velocities. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  5. Coupling of couette flow and crystal morphologies in directional freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Liu, Shan; Yang, Yong; Lu, Deyang; Zhou, Yaohe

    1993-03-01

    Experiment has focused on momentum transport effects on planar interface instability growth and morphologies, the presence of Couette flow and the flow over cells and dendrites in succinonitrille-acetone model alloy during directional solidification. The flow can inhance the planar growth stability strikingly and even induce the transition from cell to planar. The cell or dendrite will modify its arm growth direction without changing its crystallographic orientation and produce asymmetrical growth tips. Based on in-situ observation, plane Couette flow over curved surfaces is used to model the flow near the solid-liquid interface. The results explain qualitatively the experimental phenomena of the interaction between the melt flow and crystal morphologies.

  6. Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhanli

    2015-08-01

    Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks is investigated in this paper. As one crucial factor to determine the processing ability of nodes, the information flow with potential time lag is modeled by co-processing diffusion which couples the continuous time processing and the discrete diffusing dynamics. Exact results on master equation and stationary state are achieved to disclose the formation. In order to understand the evolution of the co-processing and design the optimal routing strategy according to the maximal entropic diffusion on networks, we propose the coupling entropy comprehending the structural characteristics and information propagation on social network. Based on the analysis of the co-processing model, we analyze the coupling impact of the structural factor and information propagating factor on the coupling entropy, where the analytical results fit well with the numerical ones on scale-free social networks.

  7. Effects of coil location and injection flow rate in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, D.; Apelian, D.; Farouk, B.

    1985-07-01

    A numerical model has been developed to investigate the effects of central carrier gas flow rate and coil location in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch. Solution algorithm is based on the primitive variable formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and includes a pseudo two-dimensional electromagnetic field model. Computational results have shown that with increasing carrier gas flow rate, the plasma plume is penetrated and the back flow due to the magnetic pumping effects is diminished. This facilitates the delivery of powder particles into the discharge region. However, the plasma plume is also disturbed significantly thus enhancing power loss.

  8. Power flow analysis of two coupled plates with arbitrary characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    In the last progress report (Feb. 1988) some results were presented for a parametric analysis on the vibrational power flow between two coupled plate structures using the mobility power flow approach. The results reported then were for changes in the structural parameters of the two plates, but with the two plates identical in their structural characteristics. Herein, limitation is removed. The vibrational power input and output are evaluated for different values of the structural damping loss factor for the source and receiver plates. In performing this parametric analysis, the source plate characteristics are kept constant. The purpose of this parametric analysis is to determine the most critical parameters that influence the flow of vibrational power from the source plate to the receiver plate. In the case of the structural damping parametric analysis, the influence of changes in the source plate damping is also investigated. The results obtained from the mobility power flow approach are compared to results obtained using a statistical energy analysis (SEA) approach. The significance of the power flow results are discussed together with a discussion and a comparison between the SEA results and the mobility power flow results. Furthermore, the benefits derived from using the mobility power flow approach are examined.

  9. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Poedts, S.; Rogava, A.D. |; Mahajan, S.M. |

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  10. A new hybrid redox flow battery with multiple redox couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-10-01

    A redox flow battery using V4+/V5+ vs. V2+/V3+ and Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples in chloric/sulfuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions and operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency ˜80% and negligible capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previously reported Fe/V cell using only Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples.

  11. A New Hybrid Redox Flow Battery with Multiple Redox Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-05-19

    A redox flow battery using V{sup 4+}/V{sup 5+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples in chloric/sulphuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency {approx}80% and no capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previous reported Fe/V cell using only Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples.

  12. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  13. Statistical equilibria of the coupled barotropic flow and shallow water flow on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xueru

    The motivation of this research is to build equilibrium statistical models that can apply to explain two enigmatic phenomena in the atmospheres of the solar system's planets: (1) the super-rotation of the atmospheres of slowly-rotating terrestrial planets---namely Venus and Titan, and (2) the persistent anticyclonic large vortex storms on the gas giants, such as the Great Red Spot (GRS) on Jupiter. My thesis is composed of two main parts: the first part focuses on the statistical equilibrium of the coupled barotropic vorticity flow (non-divergent) on a rotating sphere; the other one has to do with the divergent shallow water flow rotating sphere system. The statistical equilibria of these two systems are simulated in a wide range of parameter space by Monte Carlo methods based on recent energy-relative enstrophy theory and extended energy-relative enstrophy theory. These kind of models remove the low temperatures defect in the old classical doubly canonical energy-enstrophy theory which cannot support any phase transitions. The other big difference of our research from previous work is that we work on the coupled fluid-sphere system, which consists of a rotating high density rigid sphere, enveloped by a thin shell of fluid. The sphere is considered to have infinite mass and angular momentum; therefore, it can serve as a reservoir of angular momentum. Unlike the fluid sphere system itself, the coupled fluid sphere system allows for the exchange of angular momentum between the atmosphere and the solid planet. This exchange is the key point in any model that is expected to capture coherent structures such as the super-rotation and GRS-like vortices problems in planetary atmospheres. We discovered that slowly-rotating planets can have super-rotation at high energy state. All known slowly-rotating cases in the solar system---Venus and Titan---have super-rotation. Moreover, we showed that the anticyclonicity in the GRS-like structures is closely associated with the

  14. Comparison of Coupled Radiative Flow Solutions with Project Fire 2 Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olynick, David R.; Henline, W. D.; Chambers, Lin Hartung; Candler, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    A nonequilibrium, axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes flow solver with coupled radiation has been developed for use in the design or thermal protection systems for vehicles where radiation effects are important. The present method has been compared with an existing now and radiation solver and with the Project Fire 2 experimental data. Good agreement has been obtained over the entire Fire 2 trajectory with the experimentally determined values of the stagnation radiation intensity in the 0.2-6.2 eV range and with the total stagnation heating. The effects of a number of flow models are examined to determine which combination of physical models produces the best agreement with the experimental data. These models include radiation coupling, multitemperature thermal models, and finite rate chemistry. Finally, the computational efficiency of the present model is evaluated. The radiation properties model developed for this study is shown to offer significant computational savings compared to existing codes.

  15. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  16. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Liu

    2000-03-03

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models.

  17. Laminar-flow torch for helium inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.; Chan, S.K.; Montaser, A.

    1988-11-15

    Helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) operated at atmospheric pressure, possess two advantages compared to Ar ICPs for atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). First, for the elements tested so far, the detection powers for the He ICPs are superior to those for an Ar discharge. Second, the emission background spectra of the He ICPs are quite simple in the red and the near-infrared regions, thus reducing the spectral interference problems encountered with the determination of halogens and other nonmetals. Relatedly, certain mass spectral interferences noted in the detection of monoisotopic elements are eliminated when helium is used as the plasma gas instead of argon. For the most recent studies of He ICPs, the authors used a tangential-flow torch to form an annular plasma at forward power of 1500 W with a total helium gas flow of 8 L/min. The present study is concerned with the formation and preliminary characterization of a He ICP using a laminar-flow torch. The total helium gas flow for this torch is less than 2 L/min. Studies of plasmas formed in laminar-flow torches are important because of the possibility to reduce one major source of noise resulting from the rotation of the plasma gas in tangential-flow torches.

  18. A Dynamic Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Ring Current Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pembroke, Asher

    In this thesis we describe a coupled model of Earth's magnetosphere that consists of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, the MIX ionosphere solver and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). We report some results of the coupled model using idealized inputs and model parameters. The algorithmic and physical components of the model are described, including the transfer of magnetic field information and plasma boundary conditions to the RCM and the return of ring current plasma properties to the LFM. Crucial aspects of the coupling include the restriction of RCM to regions where field-line averaged plasma-beta ¡=1, the use of a plasmasphere model, and the MIX ionosphere model. Compared to stand-alone MHD, the coupled model produces a substantial increase in ring current pressure and reduction of the magnetic field near the Earth. In the ionosphere, stronger region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents are seen in the coupled model but with no significant change in the cross polar cap potential drop, while the region-2 currents shielded the low-latitude convection potential. In addition, oscillations in the magnetic field are produced at geosynchronous orbit with the coupled code. The diagnostics of entropy and mass content indicate that these oscillations are associated with low-entropy flow channels moving in from the tail and may be related to bursty bulk flows and bubbles seen in observations. As with most complex numerical models, there is the ongoing challenge of untangling numerical artifacts and physics, and we find that while there is still much room for improvement, the results presented here are encouraging. Finally, we introduce several new methods for magnetospheric visualization and analysis, including a fluid-spatial volume for RCM and a field-aligned analysis mesh for the LFM. The latter allows us to construct novel visualizations of flux tubes, drift surfaces, topological boundaries, and bursty-bulk flows.

  19. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  20. Circuit Model for Capacitive Coupling in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Shaw, D. M.; Collins, G. J.; Sugai, H.

    1998-10-01

    A crude circuit model has been developed to illustrate and account for capacitive coupling between the rf coil and the bulk plasma in a stove top inductively coupled plasma source. The circuit model is composed of three levels of capacitance: the dielectric window capacitance, sheath capacitance contiguous to the dielectric window, and the chamber to ground sheath capacitance. The model is verified by quantitative comparison with the measured rf plasma potential in the bulk plasma body, plasma feedstock gas (argon) pressures below 2 mTorr. At higher pressures above 5 mTorr, the measured results diverge from the circuit model due to the transition from a spatially uniform electron density throughout the bulk plasma at pressures less than 2 mTorr to a less spatially uniform electron density at pressures above 5 mTorr.

  1. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in

  2. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sonnenthale

    2001-04-16

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are required

  3. Aperiodicity resulting from two-cycle coupling in the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction. III. Analysis of a model of the effect of spatial inhomogeneities at the input ports of a continuous-flow, stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Györgyi, László; Field, Richard J.

    1989-11-01

    Deterministic chaos is a well-established phenomenon in continuous-flow, stirred tank reactor (CSTR) experiments with the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction. However, it has not yet been possible to reproduce the experimentally observed, robust chaos in simulations using realistic models of the homogeneous chemical kinetics of the BZ reaction. That it may be necessary to consider spatial inhomogeneities in modeling the BZ chaos is suggested by the existence of strong stirring effects on the aperiodic behavior and by the difficulty of reproducing chaos under the same conditions in reactors of different physical configuration. Such inhomogeneity might result from a lack of perfect mixing in the CSTR, especially near the inlets, or from diffusion of species at low flow rates from the CSTR reaction mixture into the tips of the inlets. The presence of spatial inhomogeneities allows coupling between essentially independent oscillators, a well-known source of chaos. Such a model using a realistic representation of the BZ kinetics leads to an eight-variable set of ordinary differential equations. Numerical analysis of these equations by continuation methods and by numerical integration shows the existence of broad regions of chaos and various hysteresis effects involving limit cycles, a steady state and/or a strange attractor. Tristability was found in calculations in a narrow flow rate range. The computed behavior appears for parameter values closely related to the values used experimentally to obtain similar phenomena, and the visual similarity of the computed and experimental strange attractors is striking. The experimental routes to chaos, period doubling, intermittency, and secondary Hopf bifurcations are all reproduced in the simulations. The computed and experimental structures of periodic windows observed within chaotic regions also are very similar.

  4. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  5. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in CMIP5 coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Tim

    2016-04-01

    This study provided a quantitative evaluation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) over the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean simulated by 20 coupled climate models that participated in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. The two leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of filtered daily precipitation anomalies are used to represent the eastward propagating CCKWs in both observations and simulations. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the EOF modes represent the spatial patterns and intensity of CCKWs respectively, and the lead-lag relationship between the two EOF principle components describe the phase propagation of CCKWs. A non-dimensional metric was designed in consideration of all the three factors (i.e., pattern, amplitude and phase propagation) for evaluation. The relative rankings of the models based on the skill scores calculated by the metric are conducted for the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively. Two models (NorESM1-M and MPI-ESM-LR) are ranked among the best 20 % for both the regions. Three models (inmcm4, MRI-CGCM3 and HadGEM2-ES) are ranked among the worst 20 % for both the regions. While the observed CCKW amplitude is greater north of the equator in the Pacific, some models overestimate the CCKW ampliutde in the Southern Hemisphere. This bias is related to the mean state precipitation bias along the south Pacific convergence zone.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Rapidly Rotating Boundary-Coupled Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Michael Andrew

    Many of the large-scale fluid systems present on and within the Earth, other planetary bodies in the Solar System, and throughout our universe are characterized by large length scales, weak viscous forces, and a rapid background rotation. The combination of these attributes with various forcing mechanisms results in unique fluid dynamical phenomena that dictate the evolutionary path of our universe. However, even for relatively small fluid velocities (e.g. 10-4 m s-1), these systems are often characterized by large Reynolds numbers and the presence of localized boundary layers due to sharp hydrodynamic, thermal, chemical, or magnetic gradients that render laboratory or numerical modeling difficult. Furthermore, geophysical and planetary fluid flows often interact in a complex manner with bounding solid surfaces that result in further difficulties. Physical and mathematical simplifications are thus paramount for advancing our understanding of these fluid systems. In this document we explain our approach at attempting to understand two problems in the field of geophysical fluid dynamics using simplified, two-dimensional numerical simulations. Studies have shown that angular momentum is exchanged between the Earth's liquid outer core and solid mantle, resulting in measurable changes in the rotation rate of the Earth. The physical mechanism responsible for this exchange is not currently understood. One possibility is the interaction of flow in the core with topography present along the core-mantle boundary. Towards this end, we employ a quasi-two-dimensional thermal convection model in a spherical shell to carry out the first detailed study on the effects of core-mantle boundary topography. We find that the presence of topography can generate a spatially heterogeneous flow field and azimuthally dependent heat flux along the inner and outer boundaries. The total heat transfer and azimuthal velocities are typically enhanced in the presence of the topography. These

  7. HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M

    2006-09-28

    The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

  8. Groundwater flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Mercer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic, distributed-parameter, numerical simulation models for analyzing groundwater flow and transport problems have come to be used almost routinely during the past decade. A review of the theoretical basis and practical use of groundwater flow and solute transport models is used to illustrate the state-of-the-art. Because of errors and uncertainty in defining model parameters, models must be calibrated to obtain a best estimate of the parameters. For flow modeling, data generally are sufficient to allow calibration. For solute-transport modeling, lack of data not only limits calibration, but also causes uncertainty in process description. Where data are available, model reliability should be assessed on the basis of sensitivity tests and measures of goodness-of-fit. Some of these concepts are demonstrated by using two case histories. ?? 1988.

  9. Benchmark initiative on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisch, K.; Annewandter, R.; Olden, P.; Mackay, E.; Bauer, S.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers involves multiple strongly interacting processes such as multiphase flow and geomechanical deformation, which threat to the seal integrity of CO2 repositories. Coupled simulation codes are required to establish realistic prognoses of the coupled process during CO2 injection operations. International benchmark initiatives help to evaluate, to compare and to validate coupled simulation results. However, there is no published code comparison study so far focusing on the impact of coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics on the long-term integrity of repositories, which is required to obtain confidence in the predictive capabilities of reservoir simulators. We address this gap by proposing a benchmark study. A wide participation from academic and industrial institutions is sought, as the aim of building confidence in coupled simulators become more plausible with many participants. Most published benchmark studies on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes have been performed within the field of nuclear waste disposal (e.g. the DECOVALEX project), using single-phase formulation only. As regards CO2 injection scenarios, international benchmark studies have been published comparing isothermal and non-isothermal multiphase flow processes such as the code intercomparison by LBNL, the Stuttgart Benchmark study, the CLEAN benchmark approach and other initiatives. Recently, several codes have been developed or extended to simulate the coupling of hydraulic and geomechanical processes (OpenGeoSys, ELIPSE-Visage, GEM, DuMuX and others), which now enables a comprehensive code comparison. We propose four benchmark tests of increasing complexity, addressing the coupling between multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection. In the first case, a horizontal non-faulted 2D model consisting of one reservoir and one cap rock is considered, focusing on stress and strain regime changes in the storage formation and the

  10. Coupled vertical and lateral preferential flow on a forested slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttle, J. M.; McDonald, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    Coupling of vertical and lateral preferential flow paths was examined on a forested slope with thin soil cover during artificial irrigations. Point-scale infiltration was measured at sites with differing soil macroporosities using vertical profiles of time domain reflectometry probes and suction samplers. Lateral fluxes of water and solutes from the slope were determined at a through flow trench. Sites with greater macroporosities tended to exhibit vertical preferential flow, while infiltration at sites with relatively small macroporosities was largely by vertical propagation of a well defined wetting front through the soil profile. Generation of vertical preferential flow at sites with relatively large macroporosities increased with input intensity. Lateral macropores made a minor contribution to slope runoff. Instead, runoff largely occurred in a thin saturated layer at the soil-bedrock interface, both in a highly conductive zone at the bedrock surface and in the overlying saturated soil matrix. Some assumptions underlying the use of isotopic and geochemical tracers to study runoff generation are called into question by complex mixing of event and pre-event water in this saturated layer. Soil depth, bedrock topography, and antecedent soil wetness determine the thickness, connectivity, and upslope extent of the pre-event saturated layer above the bedrock surface. These, in turn, control whether vertical preferential and matrix flow reaching the bedrock surface participate in slope runoff.

  11. Hydromechanical Modeling of Tectonically Driven Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. K.; Liang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater flow in bedrock is mainly controlled by the distribution of fractures and faults formed by tectonics. Understanding the formation of fractures and faults due to crust movement and their effects on groundwater flow are important in assessment and development of the groundwater resources in fractured rocks. A three-dimensional solid-fluid coupling model of a homogeneous or heterogeneous cubic bedrock was built with the finite difference model FLAC3D to simulate the rock deformation and fluid flow induced by the crust movement during 10000 years. Two opposite velocity boundary conditions on the left and right part of model were used to simulate the shear stress due to the crust movement. The results indicate that for the homogeneous formation the high compressive stresses and thus the maximum pore pressure concentrate along the middle of formation as time progresses. The pore pressure along the middle of formation increases at early time, then approaches a peak value, and finally decreases as time progresses, indicating that the plastic failure of the formation may happen along the middle of formation where the fluid flow is changed by stresses. The heterogeneous case considered is that the mechanical and hydrological properties are different in one half of the formation from the other half. In this case the distribution and change of the stresses and pore pressure are similar with the homogeneous case while the magnitudes are smaller. The results of this study can help one to understand the effects of tectonics on the groundwater flow in fractured rocks. Keywords: solid-fluid coupling model, stresses, pore pressure, groundwater flow

  12. Flow Coupling Effects in Jet-in-Crossflow Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Liscinsky, D. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    The combustor designer is typically required to design liner orifices that effectively mix air jets with crossflow effluent. CFD combustor analysis is typically used in the design process; however the jets are usually assumed to enter the combustor with a uniform velocity and turbulence profile. The jet-mainstream flow coupling is usually neglected because of the computational expense. This CFD study was performed to understand the effect of jet-mainstream flow coupling, and to assess the accuracy of jet boundary conditions that are commonly used in combustor internal calculations. A case representative of a plenum-fed quick-mix section of a Rich Burn/Quick Mix/Lean Burn combustor (i.e. a jet-mainstream mass-flow ratio of about 3 and a jet-mainstream momentum-flux ratio of about 30) was investigated. This case showed that the jet velocity entering the combustor was very non-uniform, with a low normal velocity at the leading edge of the orifice and a high normal velocity at the trailing edge of the orifice. Three different combustor-only cases were analyzed with uniform inlet jet profile. None of the cases matched the plenum-fed calculations. To assess liner thickness effects, a thin-walled case was also analyzed. The CFD analysis showed the thin-walled jets had more penetration than the thick-walled jets.

  13. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  14. Internal thermal coupling in direct-flow coaxial vacuum tube collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Glembin, J.; Rockendorf, G.; Scheuren, J.

    2010-07-15

    This investigation covers the impact of low flow rates on the efficiency of coaxial vacuum tube collectors. Measurements show an efficiency reduction of 10% if reducing the flow rate from 78 kg/m{sup 2} h to 31 kg/m{sup 2} h for a collector group with 60 parallel vacuum tubes with a coaxial flow conduit at one-sided connection. For a more profound understanding a model of the coaxial tube was developed which defines the main energy fluxes including the internal thermal coupling. The tube simulations show a non-linear temperature profile along the tube with the maximum temperature in the outer pipe. Due to heat transfer to the entering flow this maximum is not located at the fluid outlet. The non-linearity increases with decreasing flow rates. The experimentally determined flow distribution allows simulating the measured collector array. The simulation results confirm the efficiency decrease at low flow rates. The flow distribution has a further impact on efficiency reduction, but even at an ideal uniform flow, a considerable efficiency reduction at low flow rates is to be expected. As a consequence, low flow rates should be prevented for coaxial tube collectors, thus restricting the possible operation conditions. The effect of constructional modifications like diameter or material variations is presented. Finally the additional impact of a coaxial manifold design is discussed. (author)

  15. Modeling Reactive Transport in Coupled Groundwater-Conduit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiessl, S. M.; Sauter, M.; Zheng, C.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2002-05-01

    Modeling reactive transport in coupled groundwater-conduit systems requires consideration of two transport time scales in the flow and transport models. Consider for example a subsurface mine consisting of a network of highly conductive shafts, drifts or ventilation raises (i.e., conduits) within the considerably less permeable ore material (i.e., matrix). In the conduits, potential contaminants can travel much more rapidly than in the background aquifer (matrix). Since conduits cannot necessarily be regarded as a continuum, double continuum models are only of limited use for simulation of contaminant transport in such coupled groundwater-conduit systems. This study utilizes a "hybrid" flow and transport model in which contaminants can in essence be transported at a slower time scale in the matrix and at a faster time scale in the conduits. The hybrid flow model uses an approach developed by Clemens et al. (1996), which is based on the modelling of flow in a discrete pipe network, coupled to a continuum representing the low-permeability inter-conduit matrix blocks. Laminar or turbulent flow can be simulated in the different pipes depending on the flow conditions in the model domain. The three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow model MODFLOW (Harbaugh and McDonald, 1996) is used to simulate flow in the continuum. Contaminant transport within the matrix is simulated with a continuum approach using the three-dimensional multi-species solute transport model MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999), while that in the conduit system is simulated with a one-dimensional advective transport model. As a first step for reactive transport modeling in such systems, only equilibrium reactions among multiple species are considered by coupling the hybrid transport model to a geochemical speciation package. An idealized mine network developed by Viswanathan and Sauter (2001) is used as a test problem in this study. The numerical experiment is based on reference date collected from

  16. Modeling jets in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches to the modeling of jets in cross flow are reviewed. These are grouped into four classes, namely: empirical models, integral models, perturbation models, and numerical models. Empirical models depend largely on the correlation of experimental data and are mostly useful for first-order estimates of global properties such as jet trajectory and velocity and temperature decay rates. Integral models are based on some ordinary-differential form of the conservation laws, but require substantial empirical calibration. They allow more details of the flow field to be obtained; simpler versions have to assume similarity of velocity and temperature profiles, but more sophisticated ones can actually calculate these profiles. Perturbation models require little empirical input, but the need for small parameters to ensure convergent expansions limits their application to either the near-field or the far-field. Therefore, they are mostly useful for the study of flow physics. Numerical models are based on conservation laws in partial-differential form. They require little empirical input and have the widest range of applicability. They also require the most computational resources. Although many qualitative and quantitative features of jets in cross flow have been predicted with numerical models, many issues affecting accuracy such as grid resolution and turbulence model are not completely resolved.

  17. Hopfield model with self-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manoranjan P.

    2001-11-01

    We have studied analytically the retrieval performance of a Hopfield model in the presence of self-coupling in the synaptic matrix. We find, contrary to expectations from some earlier studies based on the counting of fixed points, that negative self-coupling causes deterioration in the retrieval performance of the network. On the other hand, it is possible to enhance the retrieval performance by having a positive self-coupling of appropriate magnitude.

  18. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  19. Coupling surface and subsurface flows with curved interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pu; Yotov, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A mortar multiscale method is developed for the coupled Stokes andDarcy flows with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition in irregular domains. Conforming Stokes elements and multipoint flux mixed finite elements in Darcy are used to discretize the subdomains on the fine scale. A coarse scale mortar finite element space is used to approximate interface stresses and pressures and impose weakly continuity of velocities and fluxes. Matching conditions on curved interfaces are imposed by mapping the physical grids to reference grids with flat interfaces.

  20. Novel Quinone-Based Couples for Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huskinson, Brian; Nawar, Saraf; Aziz, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Flow batteries are of interest for low-cost grid-scale electrical energy storage in the face of rising electricity production from intermittent renewables like wind and solar. We will report on investigations of redox couples based on the reversible protonation of small organic molecules called quinones. We will report half-cell measurements of current density vs. potential for aqueous solutions of various quinones and hydroquinones in sulfuric acid, facilitated by a variety of electrocatalysts. For a subset of these we will report full fuel cell measurements as well.

  1. Coupling Sediment Transport with the Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Duffy, C. J.; Qu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) was developed by Qu and Duffy (2004) for multi-process simulation. As a further work, a physically-based non-equilibrium non-uniform sediment transport modeling component is developed and coupled with PIHM. It combines the hillslope and channel processes, and accounts for sediment yield as well as morphological evolution. For hillslope, the rain splash erosion, hydraulic erosion, and sediment transport by overland flow are simulated; for channel, it takes into account the hydraulic detachment and sediment transport by channel flow. An algorithm for bed armoring is proposed and incorporated in the component. And it also includes a river bank erosion submodel which is modified from Darby et al. (2002). The coupling system is solved using a semi-discrete finite volume approach. It is being tested based on three types of flow routing schemes: dynamic wave, diffusion wave and kinematic wave using different scales of watershed data.

  2. Integrated Coupling of Surface and Subsurface Flow with HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Anne; Šimůnek, Jirka; Wöhling, Thomas; Schütze, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Describing interactions between surface and subsurface flow processes is important to adequately define water flow in natural systems. Since overland flow generation is highly influenced by rainfall and infiltration, both highly spatially heterogeneous processes, overland flow is unsteady and varies spatially. The prediction of overland flow needs to include an appropriate description of the interactions between the surface and subsurface flow. Coupling surface and subsurface water flow is a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed during the last few years, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. A new approach by Weill et al. (2009) to couple overland flow and subsurface flow based on a generalized Richards equation was implemented into the well-known subsurface flow model HYDRUS-2D (Šimůnek et al., 2011). This approach utilizes the one-dimensional diffusion wave equation to model overland flow. The diffusion wave model is integrated in HYDRUS-2D by replacing the terms of the Richards equation in a pre-defined runoff layer by terms defining the diffusion wave equation. Using this approach, pressure and flux continuity along the interface between both flow domains is provided. This direct coupling approach provides a strong coupling of both systems based on the definition of a single global system matrix to numerically solve the coupled flow problem. The advantage of the direct coupling approach, compared to the loosely coupled approach, is supposed to be a higher robustness, when many convergence problems can be avoided (Takizawa et al., 2014). The HYDRUS-2D implementation was verified using a) different test cases, including a direct comparison with the results of Weill et al. (2009), b) an analytical solution of the kinematic wave equation, and c) the results of a benchmark test of Maxwell et al. (2014), that included several known coupled surface subsurface flow models. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects

  3. On the coupled evolution of oceanic internal waves and quasi-geostrophic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Gregory LeClaire

    Oceanic motion outside thin boundary layers is primarily a mixture of quasi-geostrophic flow and internal waves with either near-inertial frequencies or the frequency of the semidiurnal lunar tide. This dissertation seeks a deeper understanding of waves and flow through reduced models that isolate their nonlinear and coupled evolution from the Boussinesq equations. Three physical-space models are developed: an equation that describes quasi-geostrophic evolution in an arbitrary and prescribed field of hydrostatic internal waves; a three-component model that couples quasi-geostrophic flow to both near-inertial waves and the near-inertial second harmonic; and a model for the slow evolution of hydrostatic internal tides in quasi-geostrophic flow of near-arbitrary scale. This slow internal tide equation opens the path to a coupled model for the energetic interaction of quasi-geostrophic flow and oceanic internal tides. Four results emerge. First, the wave-averaged quasi-geostrophic equation reveals that finite-amplitude waves give rise to a mean flow that advects quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity. Second is the definition of a new material invariant: Available Potential Vorticity, or APV. APV isolates the part of Ertel potential vorticity available for balanced-flow evolution in Eulerian frames and proves necessary in the separating waves and quasi-geostrophic flow. The third result, hashed out for near-inertial waves and quasi-geostrophic flow, is that wave-flow interaction leads to energy exchange even under conditions of weak nonlinearity. For storm-forced oceanic near-inertial waves the interaction often energizes waves at the expense of flow. We call this extraction of balanced quasi-geostrophic energy 'stimulated generation' since it requires externally-forced rather than spontaneously-generated waves. The fourth result is that quasi-geostrophic flow can encourage or 'catalyze' a nonlinear interaction between a near-inertial wave field and its second harmonic

  4. Advances in Coupling Environmental Models: Land, Atmosphere and Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Haitjema, H.; Coats, C. J.; McHenry, J. N.; Trayanov, A.; Pan, F.; Keel, B.

    2001-05-01

    The ability to simulate complex land-atmosphere interactions with high spatial resolution might be required for (i) adequate simulation of certain weakly forced mesoscale episodes, (ii) assimilation of remotely-sensed land surface states; and (iii) detailed simulation of biogeochemical transport processes in multiple media (air, land, and water). We will present results from the application of a novel approach to the coupling of a catchment-scale hydrologically based land surface model (TOPLATS) with a non-hydrostatic mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). The coupled modeling system takes advantage of (i) hydrological similarity, (ii) efficient and parallel communication and I/O, including a NetCDF-based I/O API with PVM extensions, and (iii) sparse-matrix based aggregation and disaggregation techniques to simulate the land-atmosphere system. Application to field sites in Oklahoma and North Carolina shows that by modifying the land surface model and its coupling design to take advantage of similarities in hydrological behavior, the land surface model can be applied with computational performance approaching that of a much simpler model while retaining the complex soil-vegetation-topographical details of the original fully distributed model. One important aspect of this design is that the land surface model retains the notion of the fundamental hydrologic unit-the watershed-and operates on a grid that is independent of the mesoscale model grid. Further, the model communication and I/O design allows for complete flexibility in the coupling configuration, such that coupling might be loose (1-way), intermediate (1.5-way, as in the Land Data Assimilation System project), or full (2-way). The above approach has been recently extended to support coupling of the land surface model with a saturated groundwater flow model. Conceptual issues related to an efficient coupling design for both grid-based and analytic element groundwater models will be discussed.

  5. Effects of dynamically variable saturation and matrix-conduit coupling of flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimann, T.; Geyer, T.; Shoemaker, W.B.; Liedl, R.; Sauter, M.

    2011-01-01

    Well-developed karst aquifers consist of highly conductive conduits and a relatively low permeability fractured and/or porous rock matrix and therefore behave as a dual-hydraulic system. Groundwater flow within highly permeable strata is rapid and transient and depends on local flow conditions, i.e., pressurized or nonpressurized flow. The characterization of karst aquifers is a necessary and challenging task because information about hydraulic and spatial conduit properties is poorly defined or unknown. To investigate karst aquifers, hydraulic stresses such as large recharge events can be simulated with hybrid (coupled discrete continuum) models. Since existing hybrid models are simplifications of the system dynamics, a new karst model (ModBraC) is presented that accounts for unsteady and nonuniform discrete flow in variably saturated conduits employing the Saint-Venant equations. Model performance tests indicate that ModBraC is able to simulate (1) unsteady and nonuniform flow in variably filled conduits, (2) draining and refilling of conduits with stable transition between free-surface and pressurized flow and correct storage representation, (3) water exchange between matrix and variably filled conduits, and (4) discharge routing through branched and intermeshed conduit networks. Subsequently, ModBraC is applied to an idealized catchment to investigate the significance of free-surface flow representation. A parameter study is conducted with two different initial conditions: (1) pressurized flow and (2) free-surface flow. If free-surface flow prevails, the systems is characterized by (1) a time lag for signal transmission, (2) a typical spring discharge pattern representing the transition from pressurized to free-surface flow, and (3) a reduced conduit-matrix interaction during free-surface flow. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. Q.; Peng, Z. L.

    2015-08-01

    Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit is studied to illuminate qualitatively and quantitatively the energy relation of this basic MHD flow system with energy input and output. Energy structure are analytically derived based on the Navier-Stocks equations for two-dimensional fully-developed flow and generalized Ohm's Law. The influences of applied magnetic field, Hall parameter and conductivity on energy structure are discussed based on the analytical results. Associated energies in MHD flow are deduced and validated by energy conservation. These results reveal that energy structure consists of two sub structures: electrical energy structure and internal energy structure. Energy structure and its sub structures provide an integrated theoretical energy path of the MHD system. Applied magnetic field and conductivity decrease the input energy, dissipation by fluid viscosity and internal energy but increase the ratio of electrical energy to input energy, while Hall parameter has the opposite effects. These are caused by their different effects on Bulk velocity, velocity profiles, voltage and current in outer circuit. Understanding energy structure helps MHD application designers to actively adjust the allocation of different parts of energy so that it is more reasonable and desirable.

  7. Gyral parcellation of cortical surfaces via coupled flow field tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Guo, Lei; Li, Kaiming; Nie, Jingxin; Liu, Tianming

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method for parcellation of the cortical surface of human brain into gyral based regions via coupled flow field tracking. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, the cortical surface is automatically parcellated into sulcal based regions using several procedures: estimating principal curvatures and principal directions; applying the hidden Markov random field and the Expectation-Maximization (HMRF-EM) framework for sulcal region segmentation based on the maximum principal curvature; diffusing the maximum principal direction field in order to propagate reliable and informative principal directions at gyral crests and sulcal bottoms to other flat cortical regions with noisy principal directions by minimization of an energy function; tracking the flow field towards sulcal bottoms to parcellate the cortical surfaces into sulcal basins. The sulcal parcellation provides a very good initialization for the following steps of gyral parcellation on cortical surfaces. Second, based on the sulcal parcellation results, the cortical surface is further parcellated into gyral based regions using the following procedures: extracting gyral crest segments; dilating gyral crest segments; inverting the principal direction flow field and tracking the flow field towards gyral crests in order to partition the cortical surface into a collection of gyral patches; merging gyral patches to obtain gyral parcellation of the cortical surface. The proposed algorithm pipeline is applied to nine randomly selected cortical surfaces of normal brains and promising results are obtained. The accuracy of the semi-automatic gyral parcellation is comparable to that labeled manually by experts.

  8. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on water and gas

  9. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  10. Practical Modeling of Flow Connectivity in Intermittently Flowing Wetlands and Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Water flow above and below the ground surface are both important contributors to connectivity between intermittently flowing streams, wetlands and downstream waters. The physical controls on discharge and water depth are well represented by rate laws governing flow above and below the sediment interface; however, in the shallow flows of wetlands and streams, there is not necessarily a sharp threshold that determines when surface flow ceases and subsurface flow dominates. Instead there is a gradual transition between flows governed by surface and subsurface flow controls. We examined the effect of microtopography on flow connectivity by measuring and modeling the effect that a decreasing water level has on cross sectional area and tortuosity of surface water flow paths as microtopographic high points emerge above the flow. Several thresholds were determined as functions of the microtopographic distribution, including a major transition where surface flow ceases altogether and the surface water becomes connected by only subsurface flow between pools. We developed a coupled surface and subsurface model of flow connectivity for application in shallow, intermittently flowing wetlands and streams. This one-dimensional model uses a statistical distribution approach to characterize complex microtopography based on limited topographic surveying at appropriate scales. A test application of the model in the Everglades revealed a broad range of transitional conditions associated with relatively easily measured physical features of streams and wetlands.

  11. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  12. A coupled atmosphere-river flow simulation in California during the 1994-1995 winter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Miller, N.L.

    1995-09-28

    Calculation of river flow is important for managing reservoirs and flood forecasting. In the western United States, a complex terrain which is characterized by steep slopes and narrow valleys often cause a substantial rise of river levels in a short period during heavy precipitation events. Since flood control is one of the major tasks of reservoir operation, inaccurate predictions of precipitation and river flow may cause flooding or waste of water resources. Accurate calculations of river flow need accurate liquid water input to the river system at scales of individual watersheds. Precipitation and snowmelt are the most important natural source of water for a river. Reservoir operations significantly affect river flow in the western United States. Factors such as instantaneous soil water content, vegetation cover, terrain slope and ground water table structure are also crucial for river flow calculation. There are two types of precipitation: rain and snowfall. River flow quickly responds to rainfall while snowfall does not directly affect river flow until it melts afterwards. Therefore, these two types of precipitation must be separately provided to the river flow model for correct calculation of river flows. A large portion of snowfall is accumulated at high terrain during winter months in the western United States. Accumulation of snow causes the river flow to respond to instantaneous precipitation with a certain amount of time lag. During warm springs, large amounts of snowmelt can even cause local flooding. Hence, accurate estimation of snowmelt is another important step for calculating river flows. River flows are affected many different atmospheric and land surface processes. Therefore, a well-designed numerical modeling system which includes atmospheric-surface-hydrologic processes and is coupled to large-scale atmospheric data is an important tool for predicting and diagnosing local river flows and water resources.

  13. Fluid Coupling in a Discrete Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Ni, G.

    2011-11-01

    The interaction between the basilar membrane, BM, dynamics and the fluid coupling in the cochlea can be formulated using a discrete model by assuming that the BM is divided into a number of longitudinal elements. The form of the fluid coupling can then be understood by dividing it into a far field component, due to plane wave acoustic coupling, and a near field component, due to higher order evanescent acoustic modes. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the cross-sectional areas of the fluid chambers can also be accounted for within this formulation. The discrete model is used to calculate the effect on the coupled BM response of a short cochlear implant, which reduces the volume of one of the fluid chambers over about half its length. The passive response of the coupled cochlea at lower frequencies is shown to be almost unaffected by this change in volume.

  14. Preserving Flow Variability in Watershed Model Calibrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although watershed modeling flow calibration techniques often emphasize a specific flow mode, ecological conditions that depend on flow-ecology relationships often emphasize a range of flow conditions. We used informal likelihood methods to investig...

  15. Coupled Fracture and Flow in Shale in Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Mori, H.; Viswanathan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Production of hydrocarbon from shale requires creation and maintenance of fracture permeability in an otherwise impermeable shale matrix. In this study, we use a combination of triaxial coreflood experiments and x-ray tomography characterization to investigate the fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale at in situ reservoir conditions (25-50 oC and 35-120 bars). Initially impermeable shale core was placed between flat anvils (compression) or between split anvils (pure shear) and loaded until failure in the triaxial device. Permeability was monitored continuously during this process. Significant deformation (>1%) was required to generate a transmissive fracture system. Permeability generally peaked at the point of a distinct failure event and then dropped by a factor of 2-6 when the system returned to hydrostatic failure. Permeability was very small in compression experiments (< 1 mD), possibly because of limited fracture connectivity through the anvils. In pure share experiments, shale with bedding planes perpendicular to shear loading developed complex fracture networks with narrow apertures and peak permeability of 30 mD. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with large apertures and a peak permeability as high as 1 D. Fracture systems held at static conditions for periods of several hours showed little change in effective permeability at hydrostatic conditions as high as 140 bars. However, permeability of fractured systems was a function of hydrostatic pressure, declining in a pseudo-linear, exponential fashion as pressure increased. We also observed that permeability decreased with increasing fluid flow rate indicating that flow did not follow Darcy's Law, possibly due to non-laminar flow conditions, and conformed to Forscheimer's law. The coupled deformation and flow behavior of Utica shale, particularly the large deformation required to initiate flow, indicates the probable importance of activation of existing

  16. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Reaction-Coupled Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Schwartz, F. W.

    2004-12-01

    In some systems, it is possible to observe complex patterns of coupling between fluid and flow and mass transport when reactions involving a solid phase are operative. For example, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change a porous medium's physical properties such as porosity and permeability. These changes influence fluid flow, which affect the concentration of dissolved solids, the composition of solid phases, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Both experimental and modeling studies were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport due to effects of fluid density, dissolution/precipitation reactions, and heterogeneity in medium properties. The complex chemical system is created by pumping a dilute Fe(ClO4)3 solution through a medium created by mixing glass beads and crushed calcite. Fe3+ rapidly hydrolyzes to produce hydroxo complexes and H+. As pH increases through reaction with calcite, a poorly crystallized solid, ferric oxyhydroxide precipitates. Two-dimensional flow tank studies are use to verify a novel modeling approach. In the model, there is full coupling of flow and transport due to permeability changes from dissolution/precipitation reactions. Further, TOUGHREACT is used to study reaction-front dynamics, and how the aqueous phase concentrations depend upon this pattern of evolution. Both the experimental and theoretical results highlight the complexity of coupling in systems with heterogeneous reactions. The important implication of this study is that details of interactions between pore fluid and the porous medium need to be well characterized in order to predict the changing aqueous concentrations.

  18. Coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a thermoacoustic system with a mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zhao, Dan

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a one dimensional duct in the presence of a mean flow is considered. As acoustic disturbances impinge on a compact heat source enclosed in the duct, entropy disturbances are generated. The transfer function between the generated entropy waves and oncoming flow velocity fluctuations is deduced by conducting order analysis of the linearized governing equations. The effects of the mean flow are emphasized for different forms of unsteady heat release model. It is shown that there is a strong coupling between entropy, heat release, mean flow and acoustic impedance at the heat source. To validate our theoretical analysis, numerical investigation is conducted by using a low order model. Comparing the theoretical and the low order model's results reveals that a good agreement is observed. It is found that when the mean flow Mach number is not negligible, the term of O(M1) in the identified entropy transfer function is as important as that of O(M0). Neglecting the term of O(M1) may lead to wrong prediction of the entropy waves produced in the system.

  19. Strongly coupled single-phase flow problems: Effects of density variation, hydrodynamic dispersion, and first order decay

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1995-03-01

    We have developed TOUGH2 modules for strongly coupled flow and transport that include full hydrodynamic dispersion. T2DM models two-dimensional flow and transport in systems with variable salinity, while T2DMR includes radionuclide transport with firstorder decay of a parent-daughter chain of radionuclide components in variable salinity systems. T2DM has been applied to a variety of coupled flow problems including the pure solutal convection problem of Elder and the mixed free and forced convection salt-dome flow problem. In the Elder and salt-dome flow problems, density changes of up to 20% caused by brine concentration variations lead to strong coupling between the velocity and brine concentration fields. T2DM efficiently calculates flow and transport for these problems. We have applied T2DMR to the dispersive transport and decay of radionuclide tracers in flow fields with permeability heterogeneities and recirculating flows. Coupling in th ese problems occurs by velocity-dependent hydrodynamic dispersion. Our results show that the maximum daughter species concentration may occur fully within a recirculating or low-velocity region. In all of the problems, we observe very efficient handling of the strongly coupled flow and transport processes.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Bernard P.; Martin, Paul F.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  1. Comparison of sequentially coupled and fully implicitly coupled numerical models of Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, S.; Lewis, K. C.; Zyvoloski, G.; Rapaka, S.; Pawar, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Energy extraction from geothermal reservoirs is strongly influenced by fracture characteristics. This fact applies to both hydrothermal as well as engineered reservoirs. The connectivity and accessible flow areas of fractures are highly dependent on stresses in the reservoir. Stress changes due to fluid injection and circulation can cause both desirable and undesirable effects. For example, desirable effects include enhancement of heat exchange area and lowering of flow impedance while undesirable effects include fluid short circuiting and eventual premature thermal breakthrough - the rock contracts and the fracture aperture increases locally causing preferential flow in a relatively small area. Hence the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes including fracture-stress interactions in the presence of variations in temperature and fluid pressure is critical for effective reservoir management strategies. The locations of microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multi-phase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. Historically, coupled flow and mechanical processes have been modeled using different levels of coupling - i.e. sequential, iterative or fully implicit. We compare the predictions of the three methods on field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems.

  2. Unsteady Analysis of Turbine Main Flow Coupled with Secondary Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2006-01-01

    Two numerical approaches are used to model the interaction between the turbine main gas flow and the wheelspace cavity seal flow. The 3-D, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a CFD code based on a structured grid to study the interaction between the turbine main gas flow and the wheelspace cavity seal flow. A CFD code based on an unstructured grid is used to solve detailed flow feature in the cavity seal which has a complex geometry. The numerical results confirm various observations from earlier experimental studies under similar flow conditions. When the flow rate through the rim cavity seal is increased, the ingestion of the main turbine flow into the rim seal area decreases drastically. However, a small amount of main gas flow is ingested to the rim seal area even with very high level of seal flow rate. This is due to the complex nature of 3-D, unsteady flow interaction near the hub of the turbine stage.

  3. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christian D

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests. PMID:18384599

  4. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  5. Modeling flow and solute transport in irrigation furrows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an internally coupled flow and solute transport model for free-draining irrigation furrows. Furrow hydraulics is simulated with a numerical zero-inertia model and solute transport is computed with a model based on a numerical solution of the cross-section averaged advection-dispe...

  6. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC Model is used solely for the validation of the THC

  7. Modeling groundwater flow on MPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Smith, S.G.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1993-10-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media is examined. To enable detailed modeling of large contaminated sites, preconditioned iterative methods and massively parallel computing power are combined in a simulator called PARFLOW. After describing this portable and modular code, some numerical results are given, including one that demonstrates the code`s scalability.

  8. Coupled wake boundary layer model of windfarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We present a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a windfarm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall windfarm boundary layer structure. Wake models capture the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down approach represents the interaction between the windturbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the CWBL model requires specification of a parameter that is unknown a-priori. The wake model requires the wake expansion rate, whereas the top-down model requires the effective spanwise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion rate is obtained by matching the mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective spanwise turbine spacing is determined from the wake model. Coupling of the constitutive components of the CWBL model is achieved by iterating these parameters until convergence is reached. We show that the CWBL model predictions compare more favorably with large eddy simulation results than those made with either the wake or top-down model in isolation and that the model can be applied successfully to the Horns Rev and Nysted windfarms. The `Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter supported by NWO, and NSF Grant #1243482.

  9. Inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses important fundamental issues of inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows through scaling analysis. In typical point-particle or two-fluid approaches, the fluid motion and convective heat transfer at the particle scale are not resolved and the momentum and energy coupling between fluid and particles are provided by proper closure models. By examining the kinetic energy transfer due to the coupling forces from the macroscale to microscale fluid motion, closure models are obtained for the contributions of the coupling forces to the energy coupling. Due to the inviscid origin of the added-mass force, its contribution to the microscale kinetic energy does not contribute to dissipative transfer to fluid internal energy as was done by the quasi-steady force. Time scale analysis shows that when the particle is larger than a critical diameter, the diffusive-unsteady kernel decays at a time scale that is smaller than the Kolmogorov time scale. As a result, the computationally costly Basset-like integral form of diffusive-unsteady heat transfer can be simplified to a non-integral form. Conventionally, the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is used to evaluate the relative importance of the unsteady heat transfer to the energy balance of the particles. Therefore, for gas-particle flows, where the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is small, unsteady heat transfer is usually ignored. However, the present scaling analysis shows that for small fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio, the importance of the unsteady heat transfer actually depends on the ratio between the particle size and the Kolmogorov scale. Furthermore, the particle mass loading multiplied by the heat capacity ratio is usually used to estimate the importance of the thermal two-way coupling effect. Through scaling argument, improved estimates are established for the energy coupling parameters of each

  10. Thawing in a coupled quintessence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honardoost, M.; Sadjadi, H. Mohseni; Sepangi, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the thawing model in the framework of coupled quintessence model. The effective potential has Z_2 symmetry which is broken spontaneously when the dark matter density becomes less than a critical value leading the quintessence equation of state parameter to deviate from -1. Conditions required for this procedure are obtained and analytical solution for the equation of state parameter is derived.

  11. Image-Based Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillard, Seth; Mousel, John; Buchholz, James; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2009-11-01

    A preliminary method has been developed to model complex moving boundaries interacting with fluids in two dimensions using video files. Image segmentation techniques are employed to generate sharp object interfaces which are cast as level sets embedded in a Cartesian flow domain. In this way, boundary evolution is effected directly through imagery rather than by way of functional approximation. Videos of an American eel swimming in a water tunnel apparatus and a guinea pig duodenum undergoing peristaltic contractions in vitro serve as external and internal flow examples, which are evaluated for wake structure and mixing efficacy, respectively.

  12. An Appraisal of Coupled Climate Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K; Gleckler, P; Covey, C; Taylor, K; Bader, D; Phillips, T; Fiorino, M; Achutarao, K

    2004-02-24

    In 2002, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) proposed the concept for a state-of-the-science appraisal of climate models to be performed approximately every two years. Motivation for this idea arose from the perceived needs of the international modeling groups and the broader climate research community to document progress more frequently than provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Reports. A committee of external reviewers, which included senior researchers from four leading international modeling centers, supported the concept by stating in its review: ''The panel enthusiastically endorses the suggestion that PCMDI develop an independent appraisal of coupled model performance every 2-3 years. This would provide a useful 'mid-course' evaluation of modeling progress in the context of larger IPCC and national assessment activities, and should include both coupled and single-component model evaluations.''

  13. Modelling water flow under glaciers and ice sheets

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Gwenn E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of dynamic water systems beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have sparked renewed interest in modelling subglacial drainage. The foundations of today's models were laid decades ago, inspired by measurements from mountain glaciers, discovery of the modern ice streams and the study of landscapes evacuated by former ice sheets. Models have progressed from strict adherence to the principles of groundwater flow, to the incorporation of flow ‘elements’ specific to the subglacial environment, to sophisticated two-dimensional representations of interacting distributed and channelized drainage. Although presently in a state of rapid development, subglacial drainage models, when coupled to models of ice flow, are now able to reproduce many of the canonical phenomena that characterize this coupled system. Model calibration remains generally out of reach, whereas widespread application of these models to large problems and real geometries awaits the next level of development. PMID:27547082

  14. Numerical calculation of the transient behaviour of two pure cross-flow heat exchangers coupled by a circulating flow stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na Ranong, Chakkrit; Hapke, Jobst; Roetzel, Wilfried

    2010-11-01

    The transient thermal behaviour of a heat shifting system consisting of two pure cross-flow heat exchangers coupled by a circulating flow stream is studied theoretically. A suitable mathematical description of the system is based on the energy balance equation for general flow processes yielding a system of coupled hyperbolic partial differential equations in two dimensions. System responses to perturbations of inlet temperatures and mass flow rates are numerically calculated with an explicit finite difference method. A criterion for the generation of computational grids minimising effects of numerical dispersion and dissipation is applied to the system of coupled pure cross-flow heat exchangers which has not been considered up to now. Due to its internal circulation the coupled system shows a different behaviour compared to single cross-flow heat exchangers like inverse response and oscillatory behaviour to non-oscillating input signals.

  15. Flow-induced 2D protein crystallization: characterization of the coupled interfacial and bulk flows.

    PubMed

    Young, James E; Posada, David; Lopez, Juan M; Hirsa, Amir H

    2015-05-14

    Two-dimensional crystallization of the protein streptavidin, crystallizing below a biotinylated lipid film spread on a quiescent air-water interface is a well studied phenomenon. More recently, 2D crystallization induced by a shearing interfacial flow has been observed at film surface pressures significantly lower than those required in a quiescent system. Here, we quantify the interfacial and bulk flow associated with 2D protein crystallization through numerical modeling of the flow along with a Newtonian surface model. Experiments were conducted over a wide range of conditions resulting in a state diagram delineating the flow strength required to induce crystals for various surface pressures. Through measurements of the velocity profile at the air-water interface, we found that even in the cases where crystals are formed, the macroscopic flow at the interface is well described by the Newtonian model. However, the results show that even in the absence of any protein in the system, the viscous response of the biotinylated lipid film is complicated and strongly dependent on the strength of the flow. This observation suggests that the insoluble lipid film plays a key role in flow-induced 2D protein crystallization.

  16. A Boundary Condition Relaxation Algorithm for Strongly Coupled, Ablating Flows Including Shape Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2011-01-01

    Implementations of a model for equilibrium, steady-state ablation boundary conditions are tested for the purpose of providing strong coupling with a hypersonic flow solver. The objective is to remove correction factors or film cooling approximations that are usually applied in coupled implementations of the flow solver and the ablation response. Three test cases are considered - the IRV-2, the Galileo probe, and a notional slender, blunted cone launched at 10 km/s from the Earth's surface. A successive substitution is employed and the order of succession is varied as a function of surface temperature to obtain converged solutions. The implementation is tested on a specified trajectory for the IRV-2 to compute shape change under the approximation of steady-state ablation. Issues associated with stability of the shape change algorithm caused by explicit time step limits are also discussed.

  17. A coupled Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows through moving porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepona, Marianna; Favier, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we propose a numerical framework to simulate fluid flows in interaction with moving porous media of complex geometry. It is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method including porous effects via a Brinkman-Forchheimer-Darcy force model coupled to the Immersed Boundary method to handle complex geometries and moving structures. The coupling algorithm is described in detail and it is validated on well-established literature test cases for both stationary and moving porous configurations. The proposed method is easy to implement and efficient in terms of CPU cost and memory management compared to alternative methods which can be used to deal with moving immersed porous media, e.g. re-meshing at each time step or use of a moving/chimera mesh. An overall good agreement was obtained with reference results, opening the way to the numerical simulation of moving porous media for flow control applications.

  18. An isogeometric variational multiscale method for large-eddy simulation of coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Georg; Gamnitzer, Peter; Gravemeier, Volker; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We present a computational method for coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow. •The underlying formulation is a variational multiscale finite element method. •It is combined with the isogeometric concept for electrochemical systems. •Coupled multi-ion transport in fully turbulent Taylor–Couette flow is simulated. •This example is an important model problem for rotating cylinder electrodes. -- Abstract: Electrochemical processes, such as electroplating of large items in galvanic baths, are often coupled to turbulent flow. In this study, we propose an isogeometric residual-based variational multiscale finite element method for multi-ion transport in dilute electrolyte solutions under turbulent flow conditions. In other words, this means that the concepts of isogeometric discretization and variational multiscale methods are successfully combined for developing a method capable of simulating the challenging problem of coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow. We present a comprehensive three-dimensional computational method taking into account, among others, coupled convection–diffusion-migration equations subject to an electroneutrality constraint in combination with phenomenological electrode-kinetics modeling. The electrochemical subproblem is one-way coupled to turbulent incompressible flow via convection. Ionic mass transfer in turbulent Taylor–Couette flow is investigated, representing an important model problem for rotating-cylinder-electrode configurations. Multi-ion transport as considered here is an example for mass transport at high Schmidt number (Sc=1389). An isogeometric discretization is especially advantageous for the present problem, since (i) curved boundaries can be represented exactly, and (ii) it has been proven to provide very accurate solutions for flow quantities when being applied in combination with residual-based variational multiscale modeling. We demonstrate that the method is robust and provides

  19. Dynamic coupling of bulk chemistry, trace elements and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.; Heck, H. V.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully dynamical models that not only track the evolution of chemical heterogeneities through the mantle, but also incorporate the effect of chemical heterogeneities on the dynamics of mantle convection are now emerging. Since in general analytical solutions to these complex problems are lacking, careful testing and investigations of the effect and usefulness of these models is needed. We extend our existing numerical mantle convection code that can track fluid flow in 3D spherical geometry and tracks both bulk chemical components (basal fraction) and different trace elements. The chemical components fractionate upon melting when and where the solidus is crossed. Now, the chemical information will effect the flow of the fluid in the following ways: The bulk composition will link to density and the (radioactive) trace element abundance to heat production. Results will be reported of the effect of different density structures; either starting with a primordial dense layer at the base of the mantle, having all density variation originate from melting (basalt production), or a combination between these two end-member scenarios. In particular we will focus on the connection between large scale bulk chemical structures in the (deep) mantle and the evolution of the distribution of noble gasses (He and Ar). The distribution of noble gasses depend upon 1) assumptions on the initial distributions in the mantle, 2) the mantle flow, 3) radioactive production and, 4) outgassing to the atmosphere upon melting close to the surface.

  20. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  1. Continuum modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, L.; Lagrée, P.-Y.

    2011-10-01

    The continuum modelling of transient granular flows is of primary importance in the context of predicting the behaviour of many natural systems involving granular matter. In this perspective, the granular column collapse experiment provides an interesting benchmark due to its challenging complexity (Lajeunesse et al 2004, Lube et al 2004), and form a trying test for candidate rheological models. In this contribution, we present 2D continuum simulations of granular column collapse using Navier-Stokes solver Gerris (Popinet 2003). The rheology implemented to model the granular media is the so-called μ(I)-rheology, relating the frictional properties and the viscosity of the material to the pressure and shear rate. In addition, discrete simulations using the Contact Dynamics method are performed for systematic comparison between the granular flow dynamics and its continuum counterpart (Staron & Hinch 2005). We find a good agreement, recovering the shape of the flow in the course of time as well as experimental scaling laws for the run-out. A systematic underestimation of the latter is nevertheless observed, and discussed in terms of physical and numerical modeling.

  2. A coupled chemical burster: The chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction in two flow reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnik, Milos; Epstein, Irving R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction has been studied in a system consisting of two continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The reactors are coupled by computer monitoring of the electrochemical potential in each reactor, which is then used to control the input into the other reactor. Two forms of coupling are employed: reciprocally triggered, exponentially decreasing stimulation, and alternating mass exchange. The reaction, which exhibits oscillatory and excitable behavior in a single CSTR, displays neuronlike bursting behavior with both forms of coupling. Reciprocal stimulation yields bursting in both reactors, while with alternating mass exchange, bursting is observed in one reactor and complex oscillation in the other. A simple model of the reaction gives good agreement between the experimental observations and numerical simulations.

  3. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen, Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH3 plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH3, NHx+ ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar+ ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH3 and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH3 dissociates more readily and NHx+ ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH3 dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH4+ ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  4. Systematics of Coupling Flows in AdS Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2003-03-18

    We give an effective field theory derivation, based on the running of Planck brane gauge correlators, of the large logarithms that arise in the predictions for low energy gauge couplings in compactified AdS}_5 backgrounds, including the one-loop effects of bulk scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons. In contrast to the case of charged scalars coupled to Abelian gauge fields that has been considered previously in the literature, the one-loop corrections are not dominated by a single 4D Kaluza-Klein mode. Nevertheless, in the case of gauge field loops, the amplitudes can be reorganized into a leading logarithmic contribution that is identical to the running in 4D non-Abelian gauge theory, and a term which is not logarithmically enhanced and is analogous to a two-loop effect in 4D. In a warped GUT model broken by the Higgs mechanism in the bulk,we show that the matching scale that appears in the large logarithms induced by the non-Abelian gauge fields is m_{XY}^2/k where m_{XY} is the bulk mass of the XY bosons and k is the AdS curvature. This is in contrast to the UV scale in the logarithmic contributions of scalars, which is simply the bulk mass m. Our results are summarized in a set of simple rules that can be applied to compute the leading logarithmic predictions for coupling constant relations within a given warped GUT model. We present results for both bulk Higgs and boundary breaking of the GUT gauge

  5. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  6. Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Seasonally Frozen Soils with Snow Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Kasurak, A.; Kelly, R. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Derksen, C.

    2011-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Separate equations are used to describe both unsaturated and saturated soil water flow. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from an existing laboratory soil column freezing experiment and an ongoing field experiment in a high-elevation rangeland soil. A dimensionless impedance factor describing the effect of ice pore blocking on soil hydraulic conductivity is treated as a calibration parameter for both cases. Calculated values of total water content for the laboratory soil column freezing experiment compare well with measured values, especially during the early stages of the experiment, as is also found by others. Modeling statistics for the rangeland field experiment show varied performance for soil water content and excellent performance for soil temperature, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  7. Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Seasonally Frozen Soils with Snow Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kelleners, T.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Separate equations are used to describe both unsaturated and saturated soil water flow. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from an existing laboratory soil column freezing experiment and an ongoing field experiment in a high-elevation rangeland soil. A dimensionless impedance factor describing the effect of ice pore blocking on soil hydraulic conductivity is treated as a calibration parameter for both cases. Calculated values of total water content for the laboratory soil column freezing experiment compare well with measured values, especially during the early stages of the experiment, as is also found by others. Modeling statistics for the rangeland field experiment show varied performance for soil water content and excellent performance for soil temperature, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Flow Fields in Inductively Coupled Plasma Wind Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghao; Yusuke, Takahashi; Hisashi, Kihara; Ken-ichi, Abe; Kazuhiko, Yamada; Takashi, Abe

    2014-10-01

    Numerical simulations of 10 kW and 110 kW inductively coupled plasma (ICP) wind tunnels were carried out to study physical properties of the flow inside the ICP torch and vacuum chamber with air as the working gas. Two-dimensional compressible axisymmetric Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations that took into account 11 species and 49 chemical reactions of air, were solved. A heat source model was used to describe the heating phenomenon instead of solving the electromagnetic equations. In the vacuum chamber, a four-temperature model was coupled with N-S equations. Numerical results for the 10 kW ICP wind tunnel are presented and discussed in detail as a representative case. It was found that the plasma flow in the vacuum chamber tended to be in local thermochemical equilibrium. To study the influence of operation conditions on the flow field, simulations were carried out for different chamber pressures and/or input powers. The computational results for the above two ICP wind tunnels were compared with corresponding experimental data. The computational and experimental results agree well, therefore the flow fields of ICP wind tunnels can be clearly understood.

  9. Playing with fermion couplings in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, R.; De Curtis, S.; Dolce, D.; Dominici, D.

    2005-04-01

    We discuss the fermion couplings in a four dimensional SU(2) linear moose model by allowing for direct couplings between the left-handed fermions on the boundary and the gauge fields in the internal sites. This is realized by means of a product of nonlinear {sigma}-model scalar fields which, in the continuum limit, is equivalent to a Wilson line. The effect of these new nonlocal couplings is a contribution to the {epsilon}{sub 3} parameter which can be of opposite sign with respect to the one coming from the gauge fields along the string. Therefore, with some fine-tuning, it is possible to satisfy the constraints from the electroweak data.

  10. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  11. Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Modeling of Fluid Geological Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, N.; Garipov, T.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    The accurate modeling of the complex coupled physical processes occurring during the injection and the post-injection period is a key factor for assessing the safety and the feasibility of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in subsurface formations. In recent years, it has become widely accepted the importance of the coupling between fluid flow and geomechanical response in constraining the sustainable pressure buildup caused by fluid injection relative to the caprock sealing capacity, induced seismicity effects and ground surface stability [e.g., Rutqvist, 2012; Castelletto et al., 2013]. Here, we present a modeling approach based on a suitable combination of Finite Volumes (FVs) and Finite Elements (FEs) to solve the coupled system of partial differential equations governing the multiphase flow in a deformable porous medium. Specifically, a FV method is used for the flow problem while the FE method is adopted to address the poro-elasto-plasticity equations. The aim of the present work is to compare the performance and the robustness of unconditionally stable sequential-implicit schemes [Kim et al., 2011] and the fully-implicit method in solving the algebraic systems arising from the discretization of the governing equations, for both normally conditioned and severely ill-conditioned problems. The two approaches are tested against well-known analytical solutions and experimented with in a realistic application of CO2 injection in a synthetic aquifer. References: - Castelletto N., G. Gambolati, and P. Teatini (2013), Geological CO2 sequestration in multi-compartment reservoirs: Geomechanical challenges, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, 2417-2428, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50180. - Kim J., H. A. Tchelepi, and R. Juanes (2011), Stability, accuracy and efficiency of sequential methods for coupled flow and geomechanics, SPE J., 16(2), 249-262. - Rutqvist J. (2012), The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations, Geotech. Geol. Eng., 30, 525-551.

  12. A hybrid MD-DSMC coupling method to investigate flow characteristics of micro-devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watvisave, D. S.; Puranik, B. P.; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2015-12-01

    A new methodology is proposed to couple Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) methods to simulate high Knudsen number (Kn) flows. For this purpose a two-dimensional hybrid MD-DSMC code is developed. In this method gas-surface interactions are modeled using MD, and gas-gas interactions are modeled using DSMC method. Two-way coupling between MD and DSMC is implemented by employing buffer zones for both MD and DSMC regions. Bootstrap sampling and energy minimization algorithms are employed for dynamic coupling of these two methods since MD utilizes real number of molecules during simulation whereas DSMC utilizes a lesser number of simulated molecules. The hybrid methodology combines the advantages of both methods; it has the capability of modeling the gas-surface interaction accurately considering the effect of the presence of neighboring real number of gas molecules, while in the bulk it utilizes DSMC with only the simulated number of molecules thus increasing the computational efficiency significantly compared to pure MD codes. As a result comparatively large domain sizes can be simulated with realistic behavior at the walls. The utility of the hybrid method is demonstrated by simulating high Kn flows through a micro-channel, micro-nozzle and micro-scale shock tube. The effect of partial accommodation of gas molecules with the wall is seen to be captured dynamically with this approach.

  13. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jin

    2007-01-01

    force networks. This algorithm provides a possible route to constructing a continuum model with microstructural information supplied from it. Microstructures in gas fluidized beds are also analyzed using a hybrid method, which couples the discrete element method (DEM) for particle dynamics with the averaged two-fluid (TF) equations for the gas phase. Multi-particle contacts are found in defluidized regions away from bubbles in fluidized beds. The multi-particle contacts invalidate the binary-collision assumption made in the kinetic theory of granular flows for the defluidized regions. Large ratios of contact forces to drag forces are found in the same regions, which confirms the relative importance of contact forces in determining particle dynamics in the defluidized regions.

  14. Coupling TOUGH2 with CLM3: Developing a Coupled Land Surface andSubsurface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2006-05-19

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions among atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys to understanding the water cycling system that supports life on earth. The inherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures among subsystems make such interactions difficult to simulate. In this paper, we present a model that simulates the land surface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing. This model combines a state-of-the-art land-surface model, the NCAR Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variably saturated groundwater model, TOUGH2, through an internal interface that includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels. Specifically, TOUGH2 uses infiltration, evaporation, and root-uptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms in its simulation; CLM3 uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles, calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables in its simulation. This new model, CLMT2, preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state-of-the-art modeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes (including snow, runoff, freezing/melting, evapotranspiration, radiation, and biophysiological processes) from CLM3 and the more realistic physical-process-based modeling capability of subsurface hydrologic processes (including heterogeneity, three-dimensional flow, seamless combining of unsaturated and saturated zone, and water table) from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulation results show that the coupled model greatly improved the predictions of the groundwater table, evapotranspiration, and surface temperature at a real watershed, as evaluated using 18 years of observed data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with an atmospheric simulation model, to form one of the first top of the atmosphere to deep groundwater atmosphere-land-surface-subsurface models.

  15. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation in Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects On Contaminant Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Redden, George D.; Yoshiko Fujita; Scheibe, Tim; Smith, Robert; Reddy, Michael; Kelly, Shelly

    2006-06-01

    Reactive mixing fronts can occur at large scales, e.g. when chemical amendments are injected in wells, or at small scales (pore-scales) when reactive intermediates are being generated in situ at grain boundaries, cell surfaces and adjacent to biofilms. The product of the reactions such as mineral precipitates, biofilms or filtered colloids modifies permeability leading to the complex coupling between flow and reactions and precipitation. The objectives are to determine how precipitates are distributed within large and small scale mixing fronts, how permeability and flow is modified by precipitation, how the mobility of a representative contaminant, strontium, is affected by the precipitation of carbonates, and how subsequent dissolution of the carbonates result in mobilization of Sr and increased flow. The desired outcomes of the project are to help develop methods leading to sequestration of metal contaminants, and to determine how macroscopic field-scale modeling can be applied to predict the outcome of remediation activities.

  16. Parallelization of the Coupled Earthquake Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Gary; Li, P. Peggy; Song, Yuhe T.

    2007-01-01

    This Web-based tsunami simulation system allows users to remotely run a model on JPL s supercomputers for a given undersea earthquake. At the time of this reporting, predicting tsunamis on the Internet has never happened before. This new code directly couples the earthquake model and the ocean model on parallel computers and improves simulation speed. Seismometers can only detect information from earthquakes; they cannot detect whether or not a tsunami may occur as a result of the earthquake. When earthquake-tsunami models are coupled with the improved computational speed of modern, high-performance computers and constrained by remotely sensed data, they are able to provide early warnings for those coastal regions at risk. The software is capable of testing NASA s satellite observations of tsunamis. It has been successfully tested for several historical tsunamis, has passed all alpha and beta testing, and is well documented for users.

  17. MICROSCALE FLOW INJECTION AND MICROBORE HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATORGRAPHY COUPLED WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY VIA A HIGH-EFFICIENCY NEBULIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high-effeciency nebulizer has been used for coupling microscale flow injection and microbore high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The microscale flow injection system was configured to minimize band broadening between...

  18. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  19. Modeling Dissociation-Vibration Coupling with the Macroscopic Chemistry Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Charles R.; Macrossan, Michael N.

    2005-05-01

    We test the recently developed macroscopic approach to modeling chemistry in DSMC, by simulating the flow of rarefied dissociating nitrogen over a blunt cylinder. In this macroscopic method, chemical reactions are decoupled from the collision routine. Molecules are chosen to undergo dissociation at each time step, after the collisions are calculated. The required number of reaction events is calculated from macroscopic reaction rate expressions with macroscopic information taken from the time-averaged cell properties. One advantage of this method is that "state-of-the-art" macroscopic information about reaction rates can be used directly in DSMC in the same way as in continuum codes. Hybrid Navier-Stokes/DSMC codes can therefore easily use the same chemical models in both rarefied and continuum flow regions. Here we show that the macroscopic method can capture dissociation-vibration (DV) coupling, which is an important effect in vibrationally cold blunt body flows because it results in increased surface heat fluxes. We use the macroscopic method with Park's two-temperature rate model, often used in continuum studies, to capture DV coupling in DSMC. This produces a flowfield in reasonable agreement with that calculated using the conventional collision-based threshold line dissociation model.

  20. Vortical Inviscid Flows with Two-Way Solid-Fluid Coupling.

    PubMed

    Vines, Mauricio; Houston, Ben; Lang, Jochen; Lee, Won-Sook

    2013-06-21

    Vortex methods increasingly receive attention from the computer graphics community for simple and direct modeling of complex flow phenomena such as turbulence. The coupling between free-form solids, represented by arbitrary surface meshes, and fluids simulated with vortex methods, leads to visually rich simulations. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for simulating the interaction between solids and inviscid fluids for high-quality simulations using Lagrangian vortex particles. The key aspect of our method is simulating the creation of vorticity at a solid's surface. While previous vortex simulators only focus on modeling the solid as a boundary for the fluid, our approach allows the accurate simulation of two processes of visual interest. The first is the introduction of surface vorticity in the main flow as turbulence (vortex shedding). The second is the motion of the solid induced by fluid forces. Lastly, we introduce to computer graphics the concept of source panels to model non-turbulent flow around objects. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work on two-way coupling of 3D solids and fluids using Lagrangian vortex methods in computer graphics.

  1. Vortical inviscid flows with two-way solid-fluid coupling.

    PubMed

    Vines, Mauricio; Houston, Ben; Lang, Jochen; Lee, Won-Sook

    2014-02-01

    Vortex methods increasingly receive attention from the computer graphics community for simple and direct modeling of complex flow phenomena such as turbulence. The coupling between free-form solids, represented by arbitrary surface meshes, and fluids simulated with vortex methods, leads to visually rich simulations. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for simulating the interaction between solids and inviscid fluids for high-quality simulations using Lagrangian vortex particles. The key aspect of our method is simulating the creation of vorticity at a solid's surface. While previous vortex simulators only focus on modeling the solid as a boundary for the fluid, our approach allows the accurate simulation of two processes of visual interest. The first is the introduction of surface vorticity in the main flow as turbulence (vortex shedding). The second is the motion of the solid induced by fluid forces. We also introduce to computer graphics the concept of source panels to model nonturbulent flow around objects. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work on two-way coupling of 3D solids and fluids using Lagrangian vortex methods in computer graphics.

  2. Energy flow model for thin plate considering fluid loading with mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ju-Bum; Hong, Suk-Yoon; Song, Jee-Hun

    2012-11-01

    Energy Flow Analysis (EFA) has been developed to predict the vibration energy density of system structures in the high frequency range. This paper develops the energy flow model for the thin plate in contact with mean flow. The pressure generated by mean flow affects energy governing equation and power reflection-transmission coefficients between plates. The fluid pressure is evaluated by using velocity potential and Bernoulli's equation, and energy governing equations are derived by considering the flexural wavenumbers of a plate, which are different along the direction of flexural wave and mean flow. The derived energy governing equation is composed of two kinds of group velocities. To verify the developed energy flow model, various numerical analyses are performed for a simple plate and a coupled plate for several excitation frequencies. The EFA results are compared with the analytical solutions, and correlations between the EFA results and the analytical solutions are verified.

  3. Analytical model of internally coupled ears.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Christine; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2010-08-01

    Lizards and many birds possess a specialized hearing mechanism: internally coupled ears where the tympanic membranes connect through a large mouth cavity so that the vibrations of the tympanic membranes influence each other. This coupling enhances the phase differences and creates amplitude differences in the tympanic membrane vibrations. Both cues show strong directionality. The work presented herein sets out the derivation of a three dimensional analytical model of internally coupled ears that allows for calculation of a complete vibration profile of the membranes. The analytical model additionally provides the opportunity to incorporate the effect of the asymmetrically attached columella, which leads to the activation of higher membrane vibration modes. Incorporating this effect, the analytical model can explain measurements taken from the tympanic membrane of a living lizard, for example, data demonstrating an asymmetrical spatial pattern of membrane vibration. As the analytical calculations show, the internally coupled ears increase the directional response, appearing in large directional internal amplitude differences (iAD) and in large internal time differences (iTD). Numerical simulations of the eigenfunctions in an exemplary, realistically reconstructed mouth cavity further estimate the effects of its complex geometry.

  4. Analytical model of internally coupled ears.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Christine; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2010-08-01

    Lizards and many birds possess a specialized hearing mechanism: internally coupled ears where the tympanic membranes connect through a large mouth cavity so that the vibrations of the tympanic membranes influence each other. This coupling enhances the phase differences and creates amplitude differences in the tympanic membrane vibrations. Both cues show strong directionality. The work presented herein sets out the derivation of a three dimensional analytical model of internally coupled ears that allows for calculation of a complete vibration profile of the membranes. The analytical model additionally provides the opportunity to incorporate the effect of the asymmetrically attached columella, which leads to the activation of higher membrane vibration modes. Incorporating this effect, the analytical model can explain measurements taken from the tympanic membrane of a living lizard, for example, data demonstrating an asymmetrical spatial pattern of membrane vibration. As the analytical calculations show, the internally coupled ears increase the directional response, appearing in large directional internal amplitude differences (iAD) and in large internal time differences (iTD). Numerical simulations of the eigenfunctions in an exemplary, realistically reconstructed mouth cavity further estimate the effects of its complex geometry. PMID:20707461

  5. A coupling concept for two-phase compositional porous-medium and single-phase compositional free flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Baber, K.; Flemisch, B.; Helmig, R.; Leijnse, A.; Rybak, I.; Wohlmuth, B.

    2011-10-01

    Domains composed of a porous part and an adjacent free-flow region are of special interest in many fields of application. So far, the coupling of free flow with porous-media flow has been considered only for single-phase systems. Here we extend this classical concept to two-component nonisothermal flow with two phases inside the porous medium and one phase in the free-flow region. The mathematical modeling of flow and transport phenomena in porous media is often based on Darcy's law, whereas in free-flow regions the (Navier-) -Stokes equations are used. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the employed subdomain models. The main contribution is the developed coupling concept, which is able to deal with compositional (miscible) flow and a two-phase system in the porous medium. It is based on the continuity of fluxes and the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium, and uses the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition. The phenomenological explanations leading to a simple, solvable model, which accounts for the physics at the interface, are laid out in detail. Our model can account for evaporation and condensation processes at the interface and is used to model evaporation from soil influenced by a wind field in a first numerical example.

  6. Global scale groundwater flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  7. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  8. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  9. Numerical investigation of coupled density-driven flow and hydrogeochemical processes below playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Enrico; Post, Vincent; Kohfahl, Claus; Prommer, Henning; Simmons, Craig T.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical modeling approaches with varying complexity were explored to investigate coupled groundwater flow and geochemical processes in saline basins. Long-term model simulations of a playa system gain insights into the complex feedback mechanisms between density-driven flow and the spatiotemporal patterns of precipitating evaporites and evolving brines. Using a reactive multicomponent transport model approach, the simulations reproduced, for the first time in a numerical study, the evaporite precipitation sequences frequently observed in saline basins ("bull's eyes"). Playa-specific flow, evapoconcentration, and chemical divides were found to be the primary controls for the location of evaporites formed, and the resulting brine chemistry. Comparative simulations with the computationally far less demanding surrogate single-species transport models showed that these were still able to replicate the major flow patterns obtained by the more complex reactive transport simulations. However, the simulated degree of salinization was clearly lower than in reactive multicomponent transport simulations. For example, in the late stages of the simulations, when the brine becomes halite-saturated, the nonreactive simulation overestimated the solute mass by almost 20%. The simulations highlight the importance of the consideration of reactive transport processes for understanding and quantifying geochemical patterns, concentrations of individual dissolved solutes, and evaporite evolution.

  10. Multi-Scale Coupling in Ocean and Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengyu Liu, Leslie Smith

    2009-08-14

    We have made significant progress on several projects aimed at understanding multi-scale dynamics in geophysical flows. Large-scale flows in the atmosphere and ocean are influenced by stable density stratification and rotation. The presence of stratification and rotation has important consequences through (i) the conservation of potential vorticity q = {omega} {center_dot} {del} {rho}, where {omega} is the total vorticity and {rho} is the density, and (ii) the existence of waves that affect the redistribution of energy from a given disturbance to the flow. Our research is centered on quantifying the effects of potential vorticity conservation and of wave interactions for the coupling of disparate time and space scales in the oceans and the atmosphere. Ultimately we expect the work to help improve predictive capabilities of atmosphere, ocean and climate modelers. The main findings of our research projects are described.

  11. Impeller leakage flow modeling for mechanical vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.

    1996-01-01

    HPOTP and HPFTP vibration test results have exhibited transient and steady characteristics which may be due to impeller leakage path (ILP) related forces. For example, an axial shift in the rotor could suddenly change the ILP clearances and lengths yielding dynamic coefficient and subsequent vibration changes. ILP models are more complicated than conventional-single component-annular seal models due to their radial flow component (coriolis and centrifugal acceleration), complex geometry (axial/radial clearance coupling), internal boundary (transition) flow conditions between mechanical components along the ILP and longer length, requiring moment as well as force coefficients. Flow coupling between mechanical components results from mass and energy conservation applied at their interfaces. Typical components along the ILP include an inlet seal, curved shroud, and an exit seal, which may be a stepped labyrinth type. Von Pragenau (MSFC) has modeled labyrinth seals as a series of plain annular seals for leakage and dynamic coefficient prediction. These multi-tooth components increase the total number of 'flow coupled' components in the ILP. Childs developed an analysis for an ILP consisting of a single, constant clearance shroud with an exit seal represented by a lumped flow-loss coefficient. This same geometry was later extended to include compressible flow. The objective of the current work is to: supply ILP leakage-force impedance-dynamic coefficient modeling software to MSFC engineers, base on incompressible/compressible bulk flow theory; design the software to model a generic geometry ILP described by a series of components lying along an arbitrarily directed path; validate the software by comparison to available test data, CFD and bulk models; and develop a hybrid CFD-bulk flow model of an ILP to improve modeling accuracy within practical run time constraints.

  12. Modeling coupled avulsion and earthquake timescale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, M. D.; Steckler, M. S.; Paola, C.; Seeber, L.

    2014-12-01

    River avulsions and earthquakes can be hazardous events, and many researchers work to better understand and predict their timescales. Improvements in the understanding of the intrinsic processes of deposition and strain accumulation that lead to these events have resulted in better constraints on the timescales of each process individually. There are however several mechanisms by which these two systems may plausibly become linked. River deposition and avulsion can affect the stress on underlying faults through differential loading by sediment or water. Conversely, earthquakes can affect river avulsion patterns through altering the topography. These interactions may alter the event recurrence timescales, but this dynamic has not yet been explored. We present results of a simple numerical model, in which two systems have intrinsic rates of approach to failure thresholds, but the state of one system contributes to the other's approach to failure through coupling functions. The model is first explored for the simplest case of two linear approaches to failure, and linearly proportional coupling terms. Intriguing coupling dynamics emerge: the system settles into cycles of repeating earthquake and avulsion timescales, which are approached at an exponential decay rate that depends on the coupling terms. The ratio of the number of events of each type and the timescale values also depend on the coupling coefficients and the threshold values. We then adapt the model to a more complex and realistic scenario, in which a river avulses between either side of a fault, with parameters corresponding to the Brahmaputra River / Dauki fault system in Bangladesh. Here the tectonic activity alters the topography by gradually subsiding during the interseismic time, and abruptly increasing during an earthquake. The river strengthens the fault by sediment loading when in one path, and weakens it when in the other. We show this coupling can significantly affect earthquake and avulsion

  13. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton’s method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD–ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  14. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kuprat, A P; Kabilan, S; Carson, J P; Corley, R A; Einstein, D R

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton's Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple sets

  15. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprat, A. P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J. P.; Corley, R. A.; Einstein, D. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton's method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  16. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple

  17. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions. PMID:21216023

  18. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5 m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  19. Coupling nutrient uptake and energy flow in headwater streams

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Fellows, Christine; Valett, H. Maurice; Dahm, Cliff; Thomas, Steve

    2006-08-01

    Nutrient cycling and energy flow in ecosystems are tightly linked through the metabolic processes of organisms. Greater uptake of inorganic nutrients is expected to be associated with higher rates of metabolism [gross primary production (GPP) and respiration (R)], due to assimilatory demand of both autotrophs and heterotrophs. However, relationships between uptake and metabolism should vary with the relative contribution of autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter. To investigate the relationship between metabolism and nutrient uptake, we used whole-stream and benthic chamber methods to measure rates of nitrate-nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N) uptake and metabolism in four headwater streams chosen to span a range of light availability and therefore differing rates of GPP and contributions of autochthonous carbon. We coupled whole-stream metabolism with measures of NO{sub 3}-N uptake conducted repeatedly over the same stream reach during both day and night, as well as incubating benthic sediments under both light and dark conditions. NO{sub 3}-N uptake was generally greater in daylight compared to dark conditions, and although day-night differences in whole-stream uptake were not significant, light-dark differences in benthic chambers were significant at three of the four sites. Estimates of N demand indicated that assimilation by photoautotrophs could account for the majority of NO{sub 3}-N uptake at the two sites with relatively open canopies. Contrary to expectations, photoautotrophs contributed substantially to NO{sub 3}-N uptake even at the two closed-canopy sites, which had low values of GPP/R and relied heavily on allochthonous carbon to fuel R.

  20. Numerical modeling of fresh concrete flow through porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolařík, F.; Patzák, B.; Zeman, J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper focuses on a numerical modeling of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in a porous domain. It presents combination of a homogenization approach to obtain permeability from the underlying micro-structure with coupling of a Stokes and Darcy flow through the interface on the macro level. As a numerical method we employed the Finite Element method. The results obtained from the homogenization approach are validated against fully resolved solution computed by direct numerical simulation.

  1. Coupled wave model for large magnet coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A wave coupled model based on field theory is evolved for analysis of fast electromagnetic transients on superconducting coils. It is expected to play a useful role in the design of protection methods against damage due to high voltages or any adverse effects that might arise from unintentional transients. The significant parameters of the coil are identified to be the turn to turn wave coupling coefficients and the travel time of an electromagnetic disturbance around a single turn. Unlike circuit theoretic inductor, the coil response evolves in discrete steps having durations equal to this travel time. It is during such intervals that high voltages are likely to occur. The model also bridges the gap between the low and high ends of the frequency spectrum.

  2. Coupled turbulent flow, heat, and solute transport in continuous casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutalebi, M. Reza; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1995-08-01

    A fully coupled fluid flow, heat, and solute transport model was developed to analyze turbulent flow, solidification, and evolution of macrosegregation in a continuous billet caster. Transport equations of total mass, momentum, energy, and species for a binary iron-carbon alloy system were solved using a continuum model, wherein the equations are valid for the solid, liquid, and mushy zones in the casting. A modified version of the low-Reynolds number k-ɛ model was adopted to incorporate turbulence effects on transport processes in the system. A control-volume-based finite-difference procedure was employed to solve the conservation equations associated with appropriate boundary conditions. Because of high nonlinearity in the system of equations, a number of techniques were used to accelerate the convergence process. The effects of the parameters such as casting speed, steel grade, nozzle configuration on flow pattern, solidification profile, and carbon segregation were investigated. From the computed flow pattern, the trajectory of inclusion particles, as well as the density distribution of the particles, was calculated. Some of the computed results were compared with available experimental measurements, and reasonable agreements were obtained.

  3. Numerical simulation on macro-instability of coupling flow field structure in jet-stirred tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, D. Y.; Lu, J. P.; Bu, Q. X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zheng, S. X.

    2016-05-01

    The velocity field macro-instability (MI) can help to improve the mixing efficiency. In this work, the MI features of flow field induced by jet-stirred coupling action is studied by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The numerical simulation method of jet-stirred model was established based on standard turbulent equations, and the impeller rotation was modeled by means of the Sliding Mesh (SM) technology. The numerical results of test fluid (water) power consumption were compared with the data obtained by power test experiments. The effects of jet flow velocity and impeller speed on MI frequency were analyzed thoroughly. The results show that the calculated values of power consumption agree well with the experiment measured data, which validates the turbulent model, and the flow structure and MI frequency distribution are affected by both impeller speed and jet flow rate. The amplitude of MI frequency increases obviously with the increasing rotation speed of impeller and the eccentric jet rate, and it can be enhanced observably by eccentric jet rate, in condition of comparatively high impeller speed. At this time, the MI phenomenon disappears with the overall chaotic mixing.

  4. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: left-ventricular fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Krittian, Sebastian; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert; Böhlke, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    We present a 3D code-coupling approach which has been specialized towards cardiovascular blood flow. For the first time, the prescribed geometry movement of the cardiovascular flow model KaHMo (Karlsruhe Heart Model) has been replaced by a myocardial composite model. Deformation is driven by fluid forces and myocardial response, i.e., both its contractile and constitutive behavior. Whereas the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) of the Navier-Stokes equations is discretized by finite volumes (FVM), the solid mechanical finite elasticity equations are discretized by a finite element (FEM) approach. Taking advantage of specialized numerical solution strategies for non-matching fluid and solid domain meshes, an iterative data-exchange guarantees the interface equilibrium of the underlying governing equations. The focus of this work is on left-ventricular fluid-structure interaction based on patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging datasets. Multi-physical phenomena are described by temporal visualization and characteristic FSI numbers. The results gained show flow patterns that are in good agreement with previous observations. A deeper understanding of cavity deformation, blood flow, and their vital interaction can help to improve surgical treatment and clinical therapy planning.

  5. Thin-film coupled fluid-solid analysis of flow through the Ahmed glaucoma drainage device.

    PubMed

    Stay, Matthew S; Pan, Tingrui; Brown, J David; Ziaie, Babak; Barocas, Victor H

    2005-10-01

    The Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) is a popular glaucoma drainage device, allowing maintenance of normal intraocular pressure in patients with reduced trabecular outflow facility. The uniquely attractive feature of the AGV, in contrast to other available drainage devices, is its variable resistance in response to changes in flow rate. As a result of this variable resistance, the AGV maintains a pressure drop between 7 and 12 mm Hg for a wide range of aqueous humor flow rates. In this paper, we demonstrate that the nonlinear behavior of the AGV is a direct result of the flexibility of the valve material. Due to the thin geometry of the system, the leaflets of the AGV were modeled using the von Kármán plate theory coupled to a Reynolds lubrication theory model of the aqueous humor flow through the valve. The resulting two-dimensional coupled steady-state partial differential equation system was solved by the finite element method. The Poisson's ratio of the valve was set to 0.45, and the modulus was regressed to experimental data, giving a best-fit value 4.2 MPa. Simulation results compared favorably with previous experimental studies and our own pressure-drop/flow-rate data. For an in vitro flow of 1.6 microL/min, we calculated a pressure drop of 5.8 mm Hg and measured a pressure drop of 5.2 +/- 0.4 mm Hg. As flow rate was increased, pressure drop rose in a strongly sublinear fashion, with a flow rate of 20 microL/min giving a predicted pressure drop of only 10.9 mm Hg and a measured pressure drop of 10.5 +/- 1.1 mm Hg. The AGV model was then applied to simulate in vivo conditions. For an aqueous humor flow rate of 1.5-3.0 microL/min, the calculated pressure drops were 5.3 and 6.3 mm Hg.

  6. Towards Better Coupling of Hydrological Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penton, D.; Stenson, M.; Leighton, B.; Bridgart, R.

    2012-12-01

    Standards for model interoperability and scientific workflow software provide techniques and tools for coupling hydrological simulation models. However, model builders are yet to realize the benefits of these and continue to write ad hoc implementations and scripts. Three case studies demonstrate different approaches to coupling models, the first using tight interfaces (OpenMI), the second using a scientific workflow system (Trident) and the third using a tailored execution engine (Delft Flood Early Warning System - Delft-FEWS). No approach was objectively better than any other approach. The foremost standard for coupling hydrological models is the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI), which defines interfaces for models to interact. An implementation of the OpenMI standard involves defining interchange terms and writing a .NET/Java wrapper around the model. An execution wrapper such as OatC.GUI or Pipistrelle executes the models. The team built two OpenMI implementations for eWater Source river system models. Once built, it was easy to swap river system models. The team encountered technical challenges with versions of the .Net framework (3.5 calling 4.0) and with the performance of the execution wrappers when running daily simulations. By design, the OpenMI interfaces are general, leaving significant decisions around the semantics of the interfaces to the implementer. Increasingly, scientific workflow tools such as Kepler, Taverna and Trident are able to replace custom scripts. These tools aim to improve the provenance and reproducibility of processing tasks. In particular, Taverna and the myExperiment website have had success making many bioinformatics workflows reusable and sharable. The team constructed Trident activities for hydrological software including IQQM, REALM and eWater Source. They built an activity generator for model builders to build activities for particular river systems. The models were linked at a simulation level, without any daily time

  7. Coupling Hydrologic and Hydrodynamic Models to Estimate PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, G.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    Most sophisticated probable maximum flood (PMF) estimations derive the PMF from the probable maximum precipitation (PMP) by applying deterministic hydrologic models calibrated with observed data. This method is based on the assumption that the hydrological system is stationary, meaning that the system behaviour during the calibration period or the calibration event is presumed to be the same as it is during the PMF. However, as soon as a catchment-specific threshold is reached, the system is no longer stationary. At or beyond this threshold, retention areas, new flow paths, and changing runoff processes can strongly affect downstream peak discharge. These effects can be accounted for by coupling hydrologic and hydrodynamic models, a technique that is particularly promising when the expected peak discharge may considerably exceed the observed maximum discharge. In such cases, the coupling of hydrologic and hydraulic models has the potential to significantly increase the physical plausibility of PMF estimations. This procedure ensures both that the estimated extreme peak discharge does not exceed the physical limit based on riverbed capacity and that the dampening effect of inundation processes on peak discharge is considered. Our study discusses the prospect of considering retention effects on PMF estimations by coupling hydrologic and hydrodynamic models. This method is tested by forcing PREVAH, a semi-distributed deterministic hydrological model, with randomly generated, physically plausible extreme precipitation patterns. The resulting hydrographs are then used to externally force the hydraulic model BASEMENT-ETH (riverbed in 1D, potential inundation areas in 2D). Finally, the PMF estimation results obtained using the coupled modelling approach are compared to the results obtained using ordinary hydrologic modelling.

  8. Coupling SWAT and ANN models for enhanced daily streamflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, Navideh; Kalin, Latif

    2016-02-01

    To improve daily flow prediction in unmonitored watersheds a hybrid model was developed by combining a quasi-distributed watershed model and artificial neural network (ANN). Daily streamflow data from 29 nearby watersheds in and around the city of Atlanta, Southeastern United States, with leave-one-site-out jackknifing technique were used to build the flow predictive models during warm and cool seasons. Daily streamflow was first simulated with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and then the SWAT simulated baseflow and stormflow were used as inputs to ANN. Out of the total 29 test watersheds, 62% and 83% of them had Nash-Sutcliffe values above 0.50 during the cool and warm seasons, respectively (considered good or better). As the percent forest cover or the size of test watershed increased, the performances of the models gradually decreased during both warm and cool seasons. This indicates that the developed models work better in urbanized watersheds. In addition, SWAT and SWAT Calibration Uncertainty Procedure (SWAT-CUP) program were run separately for each station to compare the flow prediction accuracy of the hybrid approach to SWAT. Only 31% of the sites during the calibration and 34% of validation runs had ENASH values ⩾0.50. This study showed that coupling ANN with semi-distributed models can lead to improved daily streamflow predictions in ungauged watersheds.

  9. Nonlinear Walecka models and point-coupling relativistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lourenco, O.; Amaral, R. L. P. G.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.

    2009-10-15

    We study hadronic nonlinear point-coupling (NLPC) models which reproduce numerically the binding energy, the incompressibility, and the nucleon effective mass at the nuclear matter saturation obtained by different nonlinear Walecka (NLW) models. We have investigated their behaviors as functions of the nuclear matter density to observe how they deviate from known NLW models. In our study we present a meson-exchange modified nonlinear Walecka model (MNLW) which exactly underlies a nonlinear point-coupling model (NLPC) presenting third- and fourth-order scalar density self-couplings. A discussion about naive dimensional analysis (NDA) and naturalness is also provided for a large class of NLW and NLPC models. At finite temperature, critical and flash parameters of both approaches are presented.

  10. Coupling biology and oceanography in models.

    PubMed

    Fennel, W; Neumann, T

    2001-08-01

    The dynamics of marine ecosystems, i.e. the changes of observable chemical-biological quantities in space and time, are driven by biological and physical processes. Predictions of future developments of marine systems need a theoretical framework, i.e. models, solidly based on research and understanding of the different processes involved. The natural way to describe marine systems theoretically seems to be the embedding of chemical-biological models into circulation models. However, while circulation models are relatively advanced the quantitative theoretical description of chemical-biological processes lags behind. This paper discusses some of the approaches and problems in the development of consistent theories and indicates the beneficial potential of the coupling of marine biology and oceanography in models.

  11. Four mass coupled oscillator guitar model.

    PubMed

    Popp, John E

    2012-01-01

    Coupled oscillator models have been used for the low frequency response (50 to 250 Hz) of a guitar. These 2 and 3 mass models correctly predict measured resonance frequency relationships under various laboratory boundary conditions, but did not always represent the true state of a guitar in the players' hands. The model presented has improved these models in three ways, (1) a fourth oscillator includes the guitar body, (2) plate stiffnesses and other fundamental parameters were measured directly and effective areas and masses used to calculate the responses, including resonances and phases, directly, and (3) one of the three resultant resonances varies with neck and side mass and can also be modeled as a bar mode of the neck and body. The calculated and measured resonances and phases agree reasonably well.

  12. Four mass coupled oscillator guitar model.

    PubMed

    Popp, John E

    2012-01-01

    Coupled oscillator models have been used for the low frequency response (50 to 250 Hz) of a guitar. These 2 and 3 mass models correctly predict measured resonance frequency relationships under various laboratory boundary conditions, but did not always represent the true state of a guitar in the players' hands. The model presented has improved these models in three ways, (1) a fourth oscillator includes the guitar body, (2) plate stiffnesses and other fundamental parameters were measured directly and effective areas and masses used to calculate the responses, including resonances and phases, directly, and (3) one of the three resultant resonances varies with neck and side mass and can also be modeled as a bar mode of the neck and body. The calculated and measured resonances and phases agree reasonably well. PMID:22280705

  13. Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Multiscale Preferential Flow - 8/05-8/10 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph Showalter; Malgorzata Peszynska

    2012-07-03

    The research agenda of this project are: (1) Modeling of preferential transport from mesoscale to macroscale; (2) Modeling of fast flow in narrow fractures in porous media; (3) Pseudo-parabolic Models of Dynamic Capillary Pressure; (4) Adaptive computational upscaling of flow with inertia from porescale to mesoscale; (5) Adaptive modeling of nonlinear coupled systems; and (6) Adaptive modeling and a-posteriori estimators for coupled systems with heterogeneous data.

  14. Filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible thermal flows.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Congshan; Zhong, Chengwen; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann (FMLB) model is proposed and extended to include incompressible thermal flows. A new equilibrium solution is found in the improved FMLB model, which is derived from the Hermite expansion. As a result, the velocity-dependent pressure is removed, which is an inherent defect of Somers's FMLB model. In addition, the improved model is extended to include incompressible thermal flows by introducing a class of temperature-distribution function for evaluating the temperature field. Two different temperature-distribution functions are discussed. The improved FMLB model and the temperature-evaluation equation are combined into one coupled model. Numerical simulations are performed on the two-dimensional (2D) lid-driven square cavity flow and the 2D natural convection flow in a square cavity using the improved FMLB model and the two coupled models, respectively. The numerical results of the 2D lid-driven square cavity flow show that the improved FMLB model is superior to the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model in terms of both accuracy and stability. When compared with the multi-relaxation-time (MRT) model, the similar accuracy and slightly enhanced stability can be obtained by the improved model. The advantage of the improved model is that it no longer relies on difficult selection of the free parameters requested by the MRT model; in addition, the force term is already included in the collision operator of the improved model. In the case of 2D natural convection flow, the numerical results of the two present models are almost the same, and both exhibit good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  15. Filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible thermal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Congshan; Zhong, Chengwen; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann (FMLB) model is proposed and extended to include incompressible thermal flows. A new equilibrium solution is found in the improved FMLB model, which is derived from the Hermite expansion. As a result, the velocity-dependent pressure is removed, which is an inherent defect of Somers's FMLB model. In addition, the improved model is extended to include incompressible thermal flows by introducing a class of temperature-distribution function for evaluating the temperature field. Two different temperature-distribution functions are discussed. The improved FMLB model and the temperature-evaluation equation are combined into one coupled model. Numerical simulations are performed on the two-dimensional (2D) lid-driven square cavity flow and the 2D natural convection flow in a square cavity using the improved FMLB model and the two coupled models, respectively. The numerical results of the 2D lid-driven square cavity flow show that the improved FMLB model is superior to the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model in terms of both accuracy and stability. When compared with the multi-relaxation-time (MRT) model, the similar accuracy and slightly enhanced stability can be obtained by the improved model. The advantage of the improved model is that it no longer relies on difficult selection of the free parameters requested by the MRT model; in addition, the force term is already included in the collision operator of the improved model. In the case of 2D natural convection flow, the numerical results of the two present models are almost the same, and both exhibit good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  16. Discrete Flow Mapping in coupled two and three dimensional domains: a global interface problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajars, J.; Chappell, D.; Hartmann, T.; Tanner, G.

    2016-09-01

    Discrete Flow Mapping (DFM) was recently introduced as a mesh-based high frequency method for modelling structure-borne sound in complex structures comprised of two-dimensional shell and plate subsystems. The method has now been extended to model three-dimensional meshed structures, giving a wider range of applicability and also naturally leading to the question of how to couple the two- and three-dimensional substructures. We consider this problem for the case of a three dimensional interior fluid domain, enclosed by a two dimensional shell/plate system. In Discrete Flow Mapping, the transport of vibrational energy between substructures is typically described via a local interface treatment where wave theory is employed to generate reflection/transmission and mode coupling coefficients. In our case the entire two-dimensional substructure forms a global interface whose radiating properties will depend on both the geometry and the frequency. In this paper we discuss how such a model may be formulated, including both structural radiation and the back-loading of the fluid pressure on the structure.

  17. Ten organising principles for coupling in multiphysics and multiscale models.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J. W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Australian National Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Computational science faces new challenges posed by multiphysics and multiscale, or more generally put, coupled models. These systems are composites formed from separate subsystem models that interact via data exchanges. These data dependencies pose a coupling problem, and on distributed-memory computers, a parallel coupling problem. This paper presents a definition of terms and a set of organizing principles for the coupling and parallel coupling problems. It is meant as a first step towards creating a theory of coupled models. These principles are then employed in a case study of a coupled climate model and offer remarkable insight into its structure.

  18. A closed-form solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow using the Lambert-W function.

    PubMed

    Hall, A J; Minchin, P E H

    2013-12-01

    A closed-form solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow is presented. This incorporates the basic Münch flow model of phloem transport, the cohesion model of xylem flow, and local variation in the xylem water potential and lateral water flow along the transport pathway. Use of the Lambert-W function allows this solution to be obtained under much more general and realistic conditions than has previously been possible. Variation in phloem resistance (i.e. viscosity) with solute concentration, and deviations from the Van't Hoff expression for osmotic potential are included. It is shown that the model predictions match those of the equilibrium solution of a numerical time-dependent model based upon the same mechanistic assumptions. The effect of xylem flow upon phloem flow can readily be calculated, which has not been possible in any previous analytical model. It is also shown how this new analytical solution can handle multiple sources and sinks within a complex architecture, and can describe competition between sinks. The model provides new insights into Münch flow by explicitly including interactions with xylem flow and water potential in the closed-form solution, and is expected to be useful as a component part of larger numerical models of entire plants.

  19. A preferential flow model based on flow variability in macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2004-12-01

    Simulating infiltration in soils containing macropores still provides unsatisfactory results, as existing models seem not to capture all relevant processes. Recent studies of macropore flow initiation in natural soils containing earthworm channels revealed a distinct flow rate variability in the macropores depending on the initiation process (Weiler & Naef, 2003, J of Hydrology, 273: 139-154). When macropore flow was initiated at the soil surface, most of the macropores received very little water while a few macropores received a large proportion of the total inflow. In contrast, when macropore flow was initiated from a saturated or nearly saturated soil layer, macropore flow rate variation was much lower. The objective of this study was to develop and test a model, which combines the macropore flow variability with several established approaches to model dual permeability soils. We then evaluate the INfiltration-INitiation-INteraction Model (IN3M) as a tool to explore the influence of macropore flow variability on infiltration behavior by performing a sensitivity analysis and applying IN3M to sprinkling and dye tracer experiments at various field sites with different macropore and soil matrix properties. The sensitivity analysis showed that the flow variability in macropores reduces interaction between the macropores and the surrounding soil matrix and thus increases bypass flow, especially for surface initiation of macropore flow and at higher rainfall intensities. The model application shows reasonable agreement between IN3M simulations and field data in terms of water balance, water content change, and dye patterns. The influence of macropore flow variability on the hydrological response of the soil was considerable and especially pronounced for soils where initiation occurs at the soil surface.

  20. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new potential/viscous flow coupling procedure for reducing computational effort while maintaining solution accuracy. This closed-loop, overlapped velocity-coupling concept has been developed in a new two-dimensional code, ZAP2D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 2D), a three-dimensional code for wing analysis, ZAP3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 3D), and a three-dimensional code for isolated helicopter rotors in hover, ZAPR3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program for Rotors - 3D). Comparisons with large domain ARC3D solutions and with experimental data for a NACA 0012 airfoil have shown that the required domain size can be reduced to a few tenths of a percent chord for the low Mach and low angle of attack cases and to less than 2-5 chords for the high Mach and high angle of attack cases while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. This represents CPU time reductions by a factor of 2-4 compared with ARC2D. The current ZAP3D calculation for a rectangular plan-form wing of aspect ratio 5 with an outer domain radius of about 1.2 chords represents a speed-up in CPU time over the ARC3D large domain calculation by about a factor of 2.5 while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. A ZAPR3D simulation for a two-bladed rotor in hover with a reduced grid domain of about two chord lengths was able to capture the wake effects and compared accurately with the experimental pressure data. Further development is required in order to substantiate the promise of computational improvements due to the ZAPR3D coupling concept.

  1. A constitutive model for representing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a constitutive model for representing inelastic flow due to coupled creep, damage, and healing in rock salt is present in this paper. This model, referred to as Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, has been formulated by considering individual mechanisms that include dislocation creep, shear damage, tensile damage, and damage healing. Applications of the model to representing the inelastic flow and fracture behavior of WIPP salt subjected to creep, quasi-static loading, and damage healing conditions are illustrated with comparisons of model calculations against experimental creep curves, stress-strain curves, strain recovery curves, time-to-rupture data, and fracture mechanism maps.

  2. DYNAMIC COUPLING OF CONVECTIVE FLOWS AND MAGNETIC FIELD DURING FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Fang; Manchester IV, Ward; Van der Holst, Bart; Abbett, William P.

    2012-01-20

    We simulate the buoyant rise of a magnetic flux rope from the solar convection zone into the corona to better understand the energetic coupling of the solar interior to the corona. The magnetohydrodynamic model addresses the physics of radiative cooling, coronal heating, and ionization, which allow us to produce a more realistic model of the solar atmosphere. The simulation illustrates the process by which magnetic flux emerges at the photosphere and coalesces to form two large concentrations of opposite polarities. We find that the large-scale convective motion in the convection zone is critical to form and maintain sunspots, while the horizontal converging flows in the near-surface layer prevent the concentrated polarities from separating. The footpoints of the sunspots in the convection zone exhibit a coherent rotation motion, resulting in the increasing helicity of the coronal field. Here, the local configuration of the convection causes the convergence of opposite polarities of magnetic flux with a shearing flow along the polarity inversion line. During the rising of the flux rope, the magnetic energy is first injected through the photosphere by the emergence, followed by energy transport by horizontal flows, after which the energy is subducted back to the convection zone by the submerging flows.

  3. Coupling of geochemical and multiphase flow processes for validation of the MUFITS reservoir simulator against TOUGHREACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Afanasyev, Andrey; Melnik, Oleg; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Coupled reactive transport simulations, especially in heterogeneous settings considering multiphase flow, are extremely time consuming and suffer from significant numerical issues compared to purely hydrodynamic simulations. This represents a major hurdle in the assessment of geological subsurface utilization, since it constrains the practical application of reactive transport modelling to coarse spatial discretization or oversimplified geological settings. In order to overcome such limitations, De Lucia et al. [1] developed and validated a one-way coupling approach between geochemistry and hydrodynamics, which is particularly well suited for CO2 storage simulations, while being of general validity. In the present study, the models used for the validation of the one-way coupling approach introduced by De Lucia et al. (2015), and originally performed with the TOUGHREACT simulator, are transferred to and benchmarked against the multiphase reservoir simulator MUFITS [2]. The geological model is loosely inspired by an existing CO2 storage site. Its grid comprises 2,950 elements enclosed in a single layer, but reflecting a realistic three-dimensional anticline geometry. For the purpose of this comparison, homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios in terms of porosity and permeability were investigated. In both cases, the results of the MUFITS simulator are in excellent agreement with those produced with the fully-coupled TOUGHREACT simulator, while profiting from significantly higher computational performance. This study demonstrates how a computationally efficient simulator such as MUFITS can be successfully included in a coupled process simulation framework, and also suggests ameliorations and specific strategies for the coupling of chemical processes with hydrodynamics and heat transport, aiming at tackling geoscientific problems beyond the storage of CO2. References [1] De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., and Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations

  4. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  5. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries' roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading "trophic levels" have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  6. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries’ roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading “trophic levels” have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  7. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries' roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading "trophic levels" have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows.

  8. Hawaii Island Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Hawaii Island. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume II – Island of Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.

  9. East Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for East Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  10. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  11. A numerical model of hydro-thermo-mechanical coupling in a fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, K.M.

    1996-06-01

    Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical codes with the ability to model fractured materials are used for predicting groundwater flow behavior in fractured aquifers containing thermal sources. The potential applications of such a code include the analysis of groundwater behavior within a geothermal reservoir. The capability of modeling hydro-thermo systems with a dual porosity, fracture flow model has been previously developed in the finite element code, FEHM. FEHM has been modified to include stress coupling with the dual porosity feature. FEHM has been further developed to implicitly couple the dependence of fracture hydraulic conductivity on effective stress within two dimensional, saturated aquifers containing fracture systems. The cubic law for flow between parallel plates was used to model fracture permeability. The Bartin-Bandis relationship was used to determine the fracture aperture within the cubic law. The code used a Newton Raphson iteration to implicitly solve for six unknowns at each node. Results from a model of heat flow from a reservoir to the moving fluid in a single fracture compared well with analytic results. Results of a model showing the increase in fracture flow due to a single fracture opening under fluid pressure compared well with analytic results. A hot dry rock, geothermal reservoir was modeled with realistic time steps indicating that the modified FEHM code does successfully model coupled flow problems with no convergence problems.

  12. Coupled energetic models for incompressible nematic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiano, Andrea C.

    We investigate, through methods in the Calculus of Variations, mathematical energetic models for incompressible nematic elastomers. These models are based on the coupling between the neo-classical energy density, developed by Bladon, Warner and Terentjev as an extension of the rubber elasticity theory, with the classical energy density from the Landau-de Gennes theory for uniaxial nematic liquid crystals. A unit-length molecular director of the nematic elastomer and an incompressible deformation are the unknown functions, minimizers of the coupled energy. In contrast to previous mathematical work in this field, the molecular director is not assumed to be constant throughout the domain. After establishing a suitable generalized energetic model for working in Sobolev spaces, we prove lower semi-continuity of the energy. Considering generalized shear deformations motivated by physical experiments on thin film domains, we show the existence of minimizers, and keeping the restriction of incompressibility on the deformation and unit length of the director, we derive weak Euler Lagrange equations satisfied by the minimizers. Additionally, we consider the reduction of the model to a 2-dimensional one and deduce existence results for non-convex energy densities involving terms related to the constraint of volume's preservation . In this case we also find weak Euler-Lagrange equations and prove a partial regularity result.

  13. Application of partially-coupled hydro-mechanical schemes to multiphase flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Elena; Kempka, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of subsurface reservoirs by fluid storage or production generally triggers pore pressure changes and volumetric strains in reservoirs and cap rocks. The assessment of hydro-mechanical effects can be undertaken using different process coupling strategies. The fully-coupled geomechanics and flow simulation, constituting a monolithic system of equations, is rarely applied for simulations involving multiphase fluid flow due to the high computational efforts required. Pseudo-coupled simulations are driven by static tabular data on porosity and permeability changes as function of pore pressure or mean stress, resulting in a rather limited flexibility when encountering complex subsurface utilization schedules and realistic geological settings. Partially-coupled hydro-mechanical simulations can be distinguished into one-way and iterative two-way coupled schemes, whereby the latter one is based on calculations of flow and geomechanics, taking into account the iterative exchange of coupling parameters between the two respective numerical simulators until convergence is achieved. In contrast, the one-way coupling scheme is determined by the provision of pore pressure changes calculated by the flow simulator to the geomechanical simulator neglecting any feedback. In the present study, partially-coupled two-way schemes are discussed in view of fully-coupled single-phase flow and geomechanics, and their applicability to multiphase flow simulations. For that purpose, we introduce a comparison study between the different coupling schemes, using selected benchmarks to identify the main requirements for the partially-coupled approach to converge with the numerical solution of the fully-coupled one.

  14. Coupling a terrestrial biogeochemical model to the common land model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Wang, Yingping; Dai, Yongjiu; Tang, Xuli

    2011-01-01

    A terrestrial biogeochemical model (CASACNP) was coupled to a land surface model (the Common Land Model, CoLM) to simulate the dynamics of carbon substrate in soil and its limitation on soil respiration. The combined model, CoLM-CASACNP, was able to predict long-term carbon sources and sinks that CoLM alone could not. The coupled model was tested using measurements of belowground respiration and surface fluxes from two forest ecosystems. The combined model simulated reasonably well the diurnal and seasonal variations of net ecosystem carbon exchange, as well as seasonal variation in the soil respiration rate of both the forest sites chosen for this study. However, the agreement between model simulations and actual measurements was poorer under dry conditions. The model should be tested against more measurements before being applied globally to investigate the feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate change.

  15. Optimal schooling formations using a potential flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchieu, Andrew; Gazzola, Mattia; de Brauer, Alexia; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    A self-propelled, two-dimensional, potential flow model for agent-based swimmers is used to examine how fluid coupling affects schooling formation. The potential flow model accounts for fluid-mediated interactions between swimmers. The model is extended to include individual agent actions by means of modifying the circulation of each swimmer. A reinforcement algorithm is applied to allow the swimmers to learn how to school in specified lattice formations. Lastly, schooling lattice configurations are optimized by combining reinforcement learning and evolutionary optimization to minimize total control effort and energy expenditure.

  16. Computation of viscous flows over airfoils, including separation, with a coupling approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leballeur, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Viscous incompressible flows over single or multiple airfoils, with or without separation, were computed using an inviscid flow calculation, with modified boundary conditions, and by a method providing calculation and coupling for boundary layers and wakes, within conditions of strong viscous interaction. The inviscid flow is calculated with a method of singularities, the numerics of which were improved by using both source and vortex distributions over profiles, associated with regularity conditions for the fictitious flows inside of the airfoils. The viscous calculation estimates the difference between viscous flow and inviscid interacting flow, with a direct or inverse integral method, laminar or turbulent, with or without reverse flow. The numerical method for coupling determines iteratively the boundary conditions for the inviscid flow. For attached viscous layers regions, an underrelaxation is locally calculated to insure stability. For separated or separating regions, a special semi-inverse algorithm is used. Comparisons with experiments are presented.

  17. Modeling of nonequilibrium space plasma flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    1995-01-01

    Godunov-type numerical solution of the 20 moment plasma transport equations. One of the centerpieces of our proposal was the development of a higher order Godunov-type numerical scheme to solve the gyration dominated 20 moment transport equations. In the first step we explored some fundamental analytic properties of the 20 moment transport equations for a low b plasma, including the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of propagating disturbances. The eigenvalues correspond to wave speeds, while the eigenvectors characterize the transported physical quantities. In this paper we also explored the physically meaningful parameter range of the normalized heat flow components. In the second step a new Godunov scheme type numerical method was developed to solve the coupled set of 20 moment transport equations for a quasineutral single-ion plasma. The numerical method and the first results were presented at several national and international meetings and a paper describing the method has been published in the Journal of Computational Physics. To our knowledge this is the first numerical method which is capable of producing stable time-dependent solutions to the full 20 (or 16) moment set of transport equations, including the full heat flow equation. Previous attempts resulted in unstable (oscillating) solutions of the heat flow equations. Our group invested over two man-years into the development and implementation of the new method. The present model solves the 20 moment transport equations for an ion species and thermal electrons in 8 domain extending from a collision dominated to a collisionless region (200 km to 12,000 km). This model has been applied to study O+ acceleration due to Joule heating in the lower ionosphere.

  18. A Coupled Geodesic Ocean and Ice Model for Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakian, R.; Lipscomb, W.; Ringler, T.; Stark, D.

    2006-12-01

    A coupled ocean and sea ice model on a geodesic grid has been developed for use in climate studies. Over the years, different grid definitions and finite difference methods have been developed to solve the equations for fluid flow on a sphere. With the use of any traditional latitude/longitude grid, finite differencing methods encounter the "pole problem" where the lines of latitude and longitude converge at the poles. With the use of a quasi-uniform geodesic grid, the "pole problem" can be avoided (Randall et al. 2002, Ringer and Randall, 2002). The ocean model is a primitive equation model with 33 levels (5 m to 500m vertical resolution) with a horizontal grid resolution of approximately 1.2 degrees (40962 grid cells). The model includes second order dissipation. To increase the time step, the gravity wave retardation method of Higdon (2002) is used. The altimetric based bathymetry estimates of Sandwell and Smith (1997) are incorporated into the ocean model. The sea ice model is the CICE model on geodesic grid (Stark et al. 2006). The CICE model includes the elastic-viscous-plastic ice dynamics as defined by Hunke and Dukowicz (2002) and the energy conserving thermodynamics of Bitz and Lipscomb (1999). The ECMWF atmospheric fields provide the forcing at the ocean/ice-atmosphere interface, in preparation of coupling the ocean/ice system to an atmospheric model also on a similar geodesic grid. The initial results of the ocean/ice coupled system show realistic ocean and ice features (e.g. currents, ice thickness) both in their mean and in the variability of these features.

  19. Abstracts of the symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    Abstract titles are: Recent developments in modeling variably saturated flow and transport; Unsaturated flow modeling as applied to field problems; Coupled heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils; Influence of climatic parameters on movement of radionuclides in a multilayered saturated-unsaturated media; Modeling water and solute transport in soil containing roots; Simulation of consolidation in partially saturated soil materials; modeling of water and solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous fields; Fluid dynamics and mass transfer in variably-saturated porous media; Solute transport through soils; One-dimensional analytical transport modeling; Convective transport of ideal tracers in unsaturated soils; Chemical transport in macropore-mesopore media under partially saturated conditions; Influence of the tension-saturated zone on contaminant migration in shallow water regimes; Influence of the spatial distribution of velocities in porous media on the form of solute transport; Stochastic vs deterministic models for solute movement in the field; and Stochastic analysis of flow and solute transport. (DMC)

  20. Modeling and Visualizing Flow of Chemical Agents Across Complex Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kramer, Marc; Chaderjian, Neal

    2005-01-01

    Release of chemical agents across complex terrain presents a real threat to homeland security. Modeling and visualization tools are being developed that capture flow fluid terrain interaction as well as point dispersal downstream flow paths. These analytic tools when coupled with UAV atmospheric observations provide predictive capabilities to allow for rapid emergency response as well as developing a comprehensive preemptive counter-threat evacuation plan. The visualization tools involve high-end computing and massive parallel processing combined with texture mapping. We demonstrate our approach across a mountainous portion of North California under two contrasting meteorological conditions. Animations depicting flow over this geographical location provide immediate assistance in decision support and crisis management.

  1. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  2. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantification of quantum dots bioconjugation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Miranda, Mario; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernández, José M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2015-11-27

    Hyphenation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) to an on-line elemental detection (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ICP-MS) is proposed as a powerful diagnostic tool for quantum dots bioconjugation studies. In particular, conjugation effectiveness between a "model" monoclonal IgG antibody (Ab) and CdSe/ZnS core-shell Quantum Dots (QDs), surface-coated with an amphiphilic polymer, has been monitored here by such hybrid AF4-ICP-MS technique. Experimental conditions have been optimized searching for a proper separation between the sought bioconjugates from the eventual free reagents excesses employed during the bioconjugation (QDs and antibodies). Composition and pH of the carrier have been found to be critical parameters to ensure an efficient separation while ensuring high species recovery from the AF4 channel. An ICP-MS equipped with a triple quadropole was selected as elemental detector to enable sensitive and reliable simultaneous quantification of the elemental constituents, including sulfur, of the nanoparticulated species and the antibody. The hyphenated technique used provided nanoparticle size-based separation, elemental detection, and composition analysis capabilities that turned out to be instrumental in order to investigate in depth the Ab-QDs bioconjugation process. Moreover, the analytical strategy here proposed allowed us not only to clearly identify the bioconjugation reaction products but also to quantify nanoparticle:antibodies bioconjugation efficiency. This is a key issue in future development of analytical and bioanalytical photoluminescent QDs applications. PMID:26493473

  3. Constitutive equations for coupled flows in clay materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Woodruff, W. F.; Lu, N.

    2011-05-01

    We first upscale the local transport (Stokes and Nernst-Planck) equations to the scale of a single capillary saturated by a binary 1:1 electrolyte. These equations are then upscaled to the scale of a network of tortuous capillaries embedded in a homogeneous and continuous mineral matrix, including the influence of the distribution of pore sizes but excluding the effect of connectivity between the pores. One of the features of our theory is to account for transport along the mineral surface in the so-called Stern layer because of recent evidence that this mechanism is effective in describing frequency-dependent electrical conductivity. Real clay materials are, however, not described by a set of capillaries, so we have to modify the model to include the effect of transversal dispersivity, for example. We found no evidence for transport in the Stern layer because of the discontinuity of the solid phase at the scale of a representative elementary volume in clay materials. The effect of the diffuse layer is accounted for through the use of a Donnan equilibrium approach to determine the effective concentrations of the ions in the pore space, which are different from the ionic concentrations of an ionic reservoir in local equilibrium with the porous material. We found that the diffuse layer controls various transport properties, including, for example, the DC electrical conductivity, the osmotic efficiency coefficient, the streaming potential coupling coefficient, and the macroscopic Hittorf numbers. Comparison to a large data set of experimental data, mainly on clay materials, confirms the validity of the derived relationships used to describe the material properties entering into the constitutive equations.

  4. Uncertainty methodology for the strongly coupled physical phenomena associated with annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J. W.; Aumiller Jr, D. L.

    2012-07-01

    Best-Estimate plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methods are slowly supplanting the use of deterministic analysis methods for thermal-hydraulic analyses. As the uncertainty methodologies evolve it is expected that, where both experimental techniques allow and data are available, there will be a shift to quantifying the uncertainty in increasingly more fundamental parameters. For example, for annular flow in a three-field analysis environment (vapor, liquid film, droplet), the driving parameters would be: a) film interfacial shear stress, b) droplet drag, c) droplet entrainment rate and d) droplet deposition rate. An improved annular flow modeling package was recently developed and implemented in an in-house version of the COBRA-TF best-estimate subchannel analysis tool (Lane, 2009). Significant improvement was observed in the code-to-data predictions of several steam-water annular flow tests following the implementation of this modeling package; however, to apply this model set in formal BEPU analysis requires uncertainty distributions to be determined. The unique aspect of annular flow, and the topic of the present work, is the strong coupling between the interfacial drag, entrainment and deposition phenomena. Ideally the uncertainty in each phenomenon would be isolated; however, the situation is further complicated by an inability to experimentally isolate and measure the individual rate processes (particularly entrainment rate), which results in available experimental data that are inherently integral in nature. This paper presents a methodology for isolating the individual physical phenomena of interest, to the extent that the currently available experimental data allow, and developing the corresponding uncertainty distributions for annular flow. (authors)

  5. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  6. Coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics analysis of the 2011 Lorca earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B.; Hager, B. H.; Juanes, R.; Bechor, N.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new approach for modeling coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics of faulted reservoirs. We couple a flow simulator with a mechanics simulator using the unconditionally stable fixed-stress sequential solution scheme [Kim et al, 2011]. We model faults as surfaces of discontinuity using interface elements [Aagaard et al, 2008]. This allows us to model stick-slip behavior on the fault surface for dynamically evolving fault strength. We employ a rigorous formulation of nonlinear multiphase geomechanics [Coussy, 1995], which is based on the increment in mass of fluid phases instead of the traditional, and less accurate, scheme based on the change in porosity. Our nonlinear formulation is capable of handling strong capillarity and large changes in saturation in the reservoir. To account for the effect of surface stresses along fluid-fluid interfaces, we use the equivalent pore pressure in the definition of the multiphase effective stress [Coussy et al, 1998; Kim et al, 2013]. We use our simulation tool to study the 2011 Lorca earthquake [Gonzalez et al, 2012], which has received much attention because of its potential anthropogenic triggering (long-term groundwater withdrawal leading to slip along the regional Alhama de Murcia fault). Our coupled fluid flow and geomechanics approach to model fault slip allowed us to take a fresh look at this seismic event, which to date has only been analyzed using simple elastic dislocation models and point source solutions. Using a three-dimensional model of the Lorca region, we simulate the groundwater withdrawal and subsequent unloading of the basin over the period of interest (1960-2010). We find that groundwater withdrawal leads to unloading of the crust and changes in the stress across the impermeable fault plane. Our analysis suggests that the combination of these two factors played a critical role in inducing the fault slip that ultimately led to the Lorca earthquake. Aagaard, B. T., M. G. Knepley, and C. A

  7. In situ spazialisation of flow laws in a fractured media with multi-parametric measurements (pressure, deformation, water conductivity) and 2d coupled hydro-mechanical (h.m) modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmoille, A.; Cappa, F.; Guglielmie, Y.

    2003-04-01

    decreasing. The simultaneous record of deformations in the drain and joint show us that joint deformation is effective after the drain opening. It is necessarily to have a sufficient water pressure in the drain to open the joint, thus the joint deformation is strongly dependent of the water pressure in the drain. When the pressure decreases in the drain, the stress stopped on the joint, and it happens a reduction of the joint aperture which induces a pressure fall less fast than the pressure fall in the drain. In the very low permeable area of the joint, it only happens a lightly decrease of pressure. In this investigation area, the joint opening is less important than in the low permeable area. During the pressure decrease in the drain, the joint closed, and the new affected permeability only permits water to slowly flow out of the joint. Then, we induce the second pressure increase when the pressure decrease in this area doesn’t finish. The reopening of the joint with the arrivals of water induces a new pressure increase which adds to the residual pressure, thus, it happens an accumulation of pressure in the joint. This observation shows us that the flow in the fractured media isn’t governed by the same parameters in a low permeable discontinuity or in a very permeable discontinuity. The conductivity measurements in the joint and in drain clearly highlight the channelling of a fracture plan. In this stratigraphic joint studied, the conductivity variations show the complexity of a joint surface. These variations of conductivity resulted of the water flow from one channel to another one induced by the pressure variations in the drain. The last stage of this research work consists of to analyse the hydro-mechanical (H.M) behaviour of the two studied discontinuities with the UDEC 2D numerical code. The procedures of modelling examine the coupled H.M effects of a jointed rock mass affected, in a first test, by an identical joint aperture in the network, and, in a second

  8. Nonperiodicity of the flow within the gap of a thermoacoustic couple at high amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Berson, Arganthaël; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    The flow inside a thermoacoustic couple is investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry. Measurements show the oscillation of the shear layers flowing out of a single stack, thus forming an asymmetric vortex street at high driving amplitudes. Development of vortices is also observed within the gap of a thermoacoustic couple. It causes the flow not to repeat from one acoustic period to another. The nonperiodicity of the flow will lead to unsteady heat transfer between the stack and heat exchangers and to the oscillation of the cooling load. PMID:17902740

  9. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  10. Thermochemical flows couple the Earth's inner core growth to mantle heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Julien; Amit, Hagay; Hulot, Gauthier; Olson, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Seismic waves sampling the top 100 km of the Earth's inner core reveal that the eastern hemisphere (40 degrees E-180 degrees E) is seismically faster, more isotropic and more attenuating than the western hemisphere. The origin of this hemispherical dichotomy is a challenging problem for our understanding of the Earth as a system of dynamically coupled layers. Previously, laboratory experiments have established that thermal control from the lower mantle can drastically affect fluid flow in the outer core, which in turn can induce textural heterogeneity on the inner core solidification front. The resulting texture should be consistent with other expected manifestations of thermal mantle control on the geodynamo, specifically magnetic flux concentrations in the time-average palaeomagnetic field over the past 5 Myr, and preferred eddy locations in flows imaged below the core-mantle boundary by the analysis of historical geomagnetic secular variation. Here we show that a single model of thermochemical convection and dynamo action can account for all these effects by producing a large-scale, long-term outer core flow that couples the heterogeneity of the inner core with that of the lower mantle. The main feature of this thermochemical 'wind' is a cyclonic circulation below Asia, which concentrates magnetic field on the core-mantle boundary at the observed location and locally agrees with core flow images. This wind also causes anomalously high rates of light element release in the eastern hemisphere of the inner core boundary, suggesting that lateral seismic anomalies at the top of the inner core result from mantle-induced variations in its freezing rate. PMID:18685706

  11. Coupled map lattice model of jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, R W; Schwartz, A J; Baker, E L

    2001-01-25

    An alternative approach is described to evaluate the statistical nature of the breakup of shaped charge liners. Experimental data from ductile and brittle copper jets are analyzed in terms of velocity gradient, deviation of {Delta}V from linearity, R/S analysis, and the Hurst exponent within the coupled map lattice model. One-dimensional simulations containing 600 zones of equal mass and using distinctly different force-displacement curves are generated to simulate ductile and brittle behavior. A particle separates from the stretching jet when an element of material reaches the failure criterion. A simple model of a stretching rod using brittle, semi-brittle, and ductile force-displacement curves is in agreement with the experimental results for the Hurst exponent and the phase portraits and indicates that breakup is a correlated phenomenon.

  12. Simple supersymmetric strongly coupled preon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajfer, S.; Tadić, D.

    1988-08-01

    This supersymmetric-SU(5) composite model is a natural generalization of the usual strong-coupling models. Preon superfields are in representations 5* and 10. The product representations 5*×10, 5×10, 5×5, and 5*×5 contain only those strongly hypercolor bound states which are needed in the standard electroweak theory. There are no superfluous quarklike states. The neutrino is massless. Only one strongly hypercolor bound singlet (10×10*) can exist as a free particle. At higher energies one should expect to see a plethora of new particles. Grand unification happens at the scale M~1014 GeV. Cabibbo mixing can be incorporated by using a transposed Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix.

  13. Unsteady, Transonic Flow Around Delta Wings Undergoing Coupled and Natural Modes Response: A Multidisciplinary Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Margaret Anne

    1996-01-01

    The unsteady, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Euler equations of rigid-body dynamics are sequentially solved to simulate and analyze the aerodynamic response of a high angle of attack delta wing undergoing oscillatory motion. The governing equations of fluid flow and dynamics of the multidisciplinary problem are solved using a time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier- Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme and a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme, respectively. The primary model under consideration consists of a 65 deg swept, sharp-edged, cropped delta wing of zero thickness at 20 deg angle of attack. In a freestream of Mach 0.85 and Reynolds number of 3.23 x 10(exp 6), the flow over the upper surface of the wing develops a complex shock system which interacts with the leading-edge primary vortices producing vortex breakdown. The effect of the oscillatory motion of the wing on the vortex breakdown and overall aerodynamic response is detailed to provide insight to the complicated physics associated with unsteady flows and the phenomenon of wing rock. Forced sinusoidal single and coupled mode rolling and pitching motion is presented for the wing in a transonic freestream. The Reynolds number, frequency of oscillation, and the phase angle are varied. Comparison between the single and coupled mode forced rolling and pitching oscillation cases illustrate the effects of coupling the motion. This investigation shows that even when coupled, forced rolling oscillation at a reduced frequency of 2(pi) eliminates the vortex breakdown which results in an increase in lift. The coupling effect for in phase forced oscillations show that the lift coefficient of the pitching-alone case and the rolling-moment coefficient of the rolling-alone case dominate the resulting response. However, with a phase lead in the pitching motion, the coupled motion results in a non

  14. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving

  15. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  16. Power flow analysis of two coupled plates with arbitrary characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The limitation of keeping two plates identical is removed and the vibrational power input and output are evaluated for different area ratios, plate thickness ratios, and for different values of the structural damping loss factor for the source plate (plate with excitation) and the receiver plate. In performing this parametric analysis, the source plate characteristics are kept constant. The purpose of this parametric analysis is to be able to determine the most critical parameters that influence the flow of vibrational power from the source plate to the receiver plate. In the case of the structural damping parametric analysis, the influence of changes in the source plate damping is also investigated. As was done previously, results obtained from the mobility power flow approach will be compared to results obtained using a statistical energy analysis (SEA) approach. The significance of the power flow results are discussed together with a discussion and a comparison between SEA results and the mobility power flow results. Furthermore, the benefits that can be derived from using the mobility power flow approach, are also examined.

  17. Unexpected coupling between flow and adsorption in porous media.

    PubMed

    Vanson, Jean-Mathieu; Coudert, François-Xavier; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Levesque, Maximilien; Tardivat, Caroline; Klotz, Michaela; Boutin, Anne

    2015-08-14

    We study the interplay between transport and adsorption in porous systems under a fluid flow, based on a lattice Boltzmann scheme extended to account for adsorption. We performed simulations on well-controlled geometries with slit and grooved pores, investigating the influence of adsorption and flow on dispersion coefficient and adsorbed density. In particular, we present a counterintuitive effect where fluid flow induces heterogeneity in the adsorbate, displacing the adsorption equilibrium towards downstream adsorption sites in grooves. We also present an improvement of the adsorption-extended lattice Boltzmann scheme by introducing the possibility for saturating Langmuir-like adsorption, while earlier work focused on linear adsorption phenomena. We then highlight the impact of this change in situations of high concentration of adsorbate. PMID:26139013

  18. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  19. Continental-scale river flow in climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.; Caliri, Guilherme

    1994-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle is a major part of the global climate system. There is an atmospheric flux of water from the ocean surface to the continents. The cycle is closed by return flow in rivers. In this paper a river routing model is developed to use with grid box climate models for the whole earth. The routing model needs an algorithm for the river mass flow and a river direction file, which has been compiled for 4 deg x 5 deg and 2 deg x 2.5 deg resolutions. River basins are defined by the direction files. The river flow leaving each grid box depends on river and lake mass, downstream distance, and an effective flow speed that depends on topography. As input the routing model uses monthly land source runoff from a 5-yr simulation of the NASA/GISS atmospheric climate model (Hansen et al.). The land source runoff from the 4 deg x 5 deg resolution model is quartered onto a 2 deg x 2.5 deg grid, and the effect of grid resolution is examined. Monthly flow at the mouth of the world's major rivers is compared with observations, and a global error function for river flow is used to evaluate the routing model and its sensitivity to physical parameters. Three basinwide parameters are introduced: the river length weighted by source runoff, the turnover rate, and the basinwide speed. Although the values of these parameters depend on the resolution at which the rivers are defined, the values should converge as the grid resolution becomes finer. When the routing scheme described here is coupled with a climate model's source runoff, it provides the basis for closing the hydrologic cycle in coupled atmosphere-ocean models by realistically allowing water to return to the ocean at the correct location and with the proper magnitude and timing.

  20. Continental-scale river flow in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R. ); Russell, G.L. ); Caliri, G. )

    1994-06-01

    The hydrologic cycle is a major part of the global climate system. There is an atmospheric flux of water from the ocean surface to the continents. The cycle is closed by return flow in rivers. In this paper a river routing model is developed, to use with grid box climate models for the whole earth. The routing model needs an algorithm for the river mass flow and a river direction file, which has been compiled for 4[degrees] x 5[degrees] and 2[degrees] x 2.5[degrees] resolutions. River basins are defined by the direction files. The river flow leaving each grid box depends on river and lake mass, downstream distance, and an effective flow speed that depends on topography. As input the routing model uses monthly land source runoff from a 5-yr simulation of the NASA/GISS atmospheric climate model. The land source runoff from the 4[degrees] x 5[degrees] resolution model is quartered onto a 2[degrees] x 2.5[degrees] grid, and the effect of grid resolution is examined. Monthly flow at the mouth of the world's major rivers is compared with observations, and a global error function for river flow is used to evaluate the routing model and its sensitivity to physical parameters. Three basinwide parameters are introduced: the river length weighted by source runoff, the turnover rate, and the basinwide speed. Although the values of these parameters depend on the resolution at which the rivers are defined, the values should converge as the grid resolution becomes finer. When the routing scheme described here is coupled with a climate model's source runoff, it provides the basis for closing the hydrologic cycle in coupled atmosphere-ocean models by realistically allowing water to return to the ocean at the correct location and with the proper magnitude and timing. 26 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-06-30

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases. PMID:27374823

  2. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  3. Generalized hydrodynamics model for strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, A.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Beginning with the exact equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, we obtain the density, momentum, and stress tensor-moment equations. We close the moment equations with two closures, one that guarantees an equilibrium state given by density-functional theory and another that includes collisions in the relaxation of the stress tensor. The introduction of a density functional-theory closure ensures self-consistency in the equation-of-state properties of the plasma (ideal and excess pressure, electric fields, and correlations). The resulting generalized hydrodynamics thus includes all impacts of Coulomb coupling, viscous damping, and the high-frequency (viscoelastic) response. We compare our results with those of several known models, including generalized hydrodynamic theory and models obtained using the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation and the quasilocalized charge approximation. We find that the viscoelastic response, including both the high-frequency elastic generalization and viscous wave damping, is important for correctly describing ion-acoustic waves. We illustrate this result by considering three very different systems: ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, and dense plasmas. The new model is validated by comparing its results with those of the current autocorrelation function obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations of Yukawa plasmas, and the agreement is excellent. Generalizations of this model to mixtures and quantum systems should be straightforward.

  4. Experimental Flow Models for SSME Flowfield Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, L. C.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    Full scale flow models with extensive instrumentation were designed and manufactured to provide data necessary for flow field characterization in rocket engines of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) type. These models include accurate flow path geometries from the pre-burner outlet through the throat of the main combustion chamber. The turbines are simulated with static models designed to provide the correct pressure drop and swirl for specific power levels. The correct turbopump-hot gas manifold interfaces were designed into the flow models to permit parametric/integration studies for new turbine designs. These experimental flow models provide a vehicle for understanding the fluid dynamics associated with specific engine issues and also fill the more general need for establishing a more detailed fluid dynamic base to support development and verification of advanced math models.

  5. Stepwise calibration procedure for regional coupled hydrological-hydrogeological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarthe, Baptiste; Abasq, Lena; de Fouquet, Chantal; Flipo, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Stream-aquifer interaction is a complex process depending on regional and local processes. Indeed, the groundwater component of hydrosystem and large scale heterogeneities control the regional flows towards the alluvial plains and the rivers. In second instance, the local distribution of the stream bed permeabilities controls the dynamics of stream-aquifer water fluxes within the alluvial plain, and therefore the near-river piezometric head distribution. In order to better understand the water circulation and pollutant transport in watersheds, the integration of these multi-dimensional processes in modelling platform has to be performed. Thus, the nested interfaces concept in continental hydrosystem modelling (where regional fluxes, simulated by large scale models, are imposed at local stream-aquifer interfaces) has been presented in Flipo et al (2014). This concept has been implemented in EauDyssée modelling platform for a large alluvial plain model (900km2) part of a 11000km2 multi-layer aquifer system, located in the Seine basin (France). The hydrosystem modelling platform is composed of four spatially distributed modules (Surface, Sub-surface, River and Groundwater), corresponding to four components of the terrestrial water cycle. Considering the large number of parameters to be inferred simultaneously, the calibration process of coupled models is highly computationally demanding and therefore hardly applicable to a real case study of 10000km2. In order to improve the efficiency of the calibration process, a stepwise calibration procedure is proposed. The stepwise methodology involves determining optimal parameters of all components of the coupled model, to provide a near optimum prior information for the global calibration. It starts with the surface component parameters calibration. The surface parameters are optimised based on the comparison between simulated and observed discharges (or filtered discharges) at various locations. Once the surface parameters

  6. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  7. Three-dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium flow modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, L. T.; Li, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium model has been developed and applied to the study of entry flows surrounding space vehicles. The model accounts for both chemical and vibrational nonequilibrium phenomena behind the bow shock. The thermodynamic state of a real gas is modeled with a translational-rotational temperature and a electron-vibrational temperature. Their internal energies are averaged to determine the temperature used in the reaction rates calculation. In order to establish the validity of the selected models, both one- and two-temperature models with seven and/or eleven species were investigated. Several numerical experiments that include a sphere, the RAMC vehicle and 3D AFE forebody flows were performed. Preliminary results were compared with RAMC-II experimental data. Good agreement was obtained after a two-temperature model with eleven species and thirty reactions was incorporated into the study.

  8. Magnetic particle capture for biomagnetic fluid flow in stenosed aortic bifurcation considering particle-fluid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the basic principle behind the Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT). It is essential to couple the ferrohydrodynamic (FHD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles when magnetic fields are applied to blood as a biomagnetic fluid. The present study is devoted to study on MDT technique by particle tracking in the presence of a non uniform magnetic field in a stenosed aortic bifurcation. The present numerical model of biomagnetic fluid dynamics (BFD) takes into accounts both magnetization and electrical conductivity of blood. The blood flow in the bifurcation is considered to be incompressible and Newtonian. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT two way particle-fluid coupling. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Results concerning the velocity and temperature field indicate that the presence of the magnetic field influences the flow field considerably and the disturbances increase as the magnetic field strength increases. The insert position is also varied to observe the variation in flow as well as temperature field. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the particle size (dp), flow Reynolds number (Re) and external magnetic field strength (B0) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. The difference in CE is also studied for different particle loading condition. According to the results, the magnetic field increased the particle concentration in the target region

  9. User's guide for the computer code COLTS for calculating the coupled laminar and turbulent flow over a Jovian entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Graeves, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A user's guide for a computer code 'COLTS' (Coupled Laminar and Turbulent Solutions) is provided which calculates the laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows with radiation and coupled ablation injection past a Jovian entry probe. Time-dependent viscous-shock-layer equations are used to describe the flow field. These equations are solved by an explicit, two-step, time-asymptotic finite-difference method. Eddy viscosity in the turbulent flow is approximated by a two-layer model. In all, 19 chemical species are used to describe the injection of carbon-phenolic ablator in the hydrogen-helium gas mixture. The equilibrium composition of the mixture is determined by a free-energy minimization technique. A detailed frequency dependence of the absorption coefficient for various species is considered to obtain the radiative flux. The code is written for a CDC-CYBER-203 computer and is capable of providing solutions for ablated probe shapes also.

  10. Coupled Modeling of Fault Poromechanics During Geologic CO2 Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B.; Hager, B. H.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Perhaps the most pressing current debate surrounding carbon capture and storage (CCS) revolves around the pressure limitations on geologic storage [Szulczewski et al., 2012]. Overpressures due to CO2 injection could fracture the caprock [Birkholzer and Zhou, 2009], trigger earthquakes [Cappa and Rutqvist, 2011], and potentially compromise the caprock by activating faults [Zoback and Gorelick, 2012]. While an alarmist view of these issues [Zoback and Gorelick, 2012] appears unwarranted, it seems clear that addressing the coupled processes of CO2 injection and fault poromechanics constitutes a pressing challenge for CCS. More generally, the fundamental link between earthquakes and groundwater flow is a first-order geoscience problem. Despite the interest that this issue has received in recent times, many aspects remain poorly understood, from the physics of the problem to the ability to perform credible fully-coupled simulations. Here, we advance our current simulation technology for forecasting fault slip and fault activation from fluid injection and withdrawal at depth. We present the development and application of a coupled multiphase-flow and reservoir-geomechanics simulator able to model the poromechanics of faults. We use a recently-discovered operator split, the fixed-stress split [Kim et al., 2011], to obtain an unconditionally-stable sequential iterative scheme for the simulation of multiphase flow and geomechanics. The geomechanics code PyLith [Aagaard et al., 2011] permits simulating faults as surfaces of discontinuity. We use the rigorous nonlinear formulation of coupled geomechanics, in which the variation in the fluid mass of each phase is tracked [Coussy, 1995]. Our approach allows us to model strong capillarity and compressibility effects, which can be important in the context of CO2 injection. We present results from several synthetic case studies to highlight the main features of our simulator, and to perform a preliminary risk assessment of leakage

  11. Average-passage flow model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  12. Coupling multi-physics models to cardiac mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nordsletten, D A; Niederer, S A; Nash, M P; Hunter, P J; Smith, N P

    2011-01-01

    We outline and review the mathematical framework for representing mechanical deformation and contraction of the cardiac ventricles, and how this behaviour integrates with other processes crucial for understanding and modelling heart function. Building on general conservation principles of space, mass and momentum, we introduce an arbitrary Eulerian-Lagrangian framework governing the behaviour of both fluid and solid components. Exploiting the natural alignment of cardiac mechanical properties with the tissue microstructure, finite deformation measures and myocardial constitutive relations are referred to embedded structural axes. Coupling approaches for solving this large deformation mechanics framework with three dimensional fluid flow, coronary hemodynamics and electrical activation are described. We also discuss the potential of cardiac mechanics modelling for clinical applications.

  13. Teaching Couples Counseling: An Integrative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Lynn L.; Burnett, Judith A.

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, training in couples counseling has not received equal status as other counseling modalities. Recently, there is renewed interest in specific training for couples counseling as more emphasis is placed on the stability of couple relationships as an important factor for helping families and children function in a society of frequent…

  14. Coupled model of physical and biological processes affecting maize pollination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arritt, R.; Westgate, M.; Riese, J.; Falk, M.; Takle, E.

    2003-04-01

    Controversy over the use of genetically modified (GM) crops has led to increased interest in evaluating and controlling the potential for inadvertent outcrossing in open-pollinated crops such as maize. In response to this problem we have developed a Lagrangian model of pollen dispersion as a component of a coupled end-to-end (anther to ear) physical-biological model of maize pollination. The Lagrangian method is adopted because of its generality and flexibility: first, the method readily accommodates flow fields of arbitrary complexity; second, each element of the material being transported can be identified by its source, time of release, or other properties of interest. The latter allows pollen viability to be estimated as a function of such factors as travel time, temperature, and relative humidity, so that the physical effects of airflow and turbulence on pollen dispersion can be considered together with the biological aspects of pollen release and viability. Predicted dispersion of pollen compares well both to observations and to results from a simpler Gaussian plume model. Ability of the Lagrangian model to handle complex air flows is demonstrated by application to pollen dispersion in the vicinity of an agricultural shelter belt. We also show results indicating that pollen viability can be quantified by an "aging function" that accounts for temperature, humidity, and time of exposure.

  15. Measurements and kinetic modeling of energy coupling in volume and surface nanosecond pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Yin, Zhiyao; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulse discharge plasma imaging, coupled pulse energy measurements, and kinetic modeling are used to analyze the mechanism of energy coupling in high repetition rate, spatially uniform, nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane geometry. Under these conditions, coupled pulse energy scales nearly linearly with pressure (number density), with energy coupled per molecule being nearly constant, in good agreement with the kinetic model predictions. In spite of high-peak reduced electric field reached before breakdown, E/N ˜ 500-700 Td, the reduced electric field in the plasma after breakdown is much lower, E/N ˜ 50-100 Td, predicting that a significant fraction of energy coupled to the air plasma, up to 30-40%, is loaded into nitrogen vibrational mode. A self-similar, local ionization kinetic model predicting energy coupling to the plasma in a surface ionization wave discharge produced by a nanosecond voltage pulse has been developed. The model predicts key discharge parameters such as ionization wave speed and propagation distance, electric field, electron density, plasma layer thickness, and pulse energy coupled to the plasma, demonstrating good qualitative agreement with experimental data and two-dimensional kinetic modeling calculations. The model allows an analytic solution and lends itself to incorporation into existing compressible flow codes, at very little computational cost, for in-depth analysis of the nanosecond discharge plasma flow control mechanism. The use of the model would place the main emphasis on coupling of localized thermal perturbations produced by the discharge with the flow via compression waves and would provide quantitative insight into the flow control mechanism on a long time scale.

  16. A coupled implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Choi, Yunho

    1993-01-01

    The present time-accurate coupled-solution procedure addresses the chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide Mach-number range uses, in conjunction with the strong conservation form of the governing equations, five unknown primitive variables. The numerical tests undertaken address steady convergent-divergent nozzle flows with air dissociation/recombination, dump combustor flows with n-pentane/air chemistry, and unsteady nonreacting cavity flows.

  17. A solar rechargeable flow battery based on photoregeneration of two soluble redox couples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Cao, Yu-liang; Li, Guo-Ran; Gao, Xue-Ping; Ai, Xin-Ping; Yang, Han-Xi

    2013-05-01

    Storable sunshine, reusable rays: A solar rechargeable redox flow battery is proposed based on the photoregeneration of I(3)(-)/I(-) and [Fe(C(10)H(15))(2)](+)/Fe(C(10)H(15))(2) soluble redox couples, which can be regenerated by flowing from a discharged redox flow battery (RFB) into a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and then stored in tanks for subsequent RFB applications This technology enables effective solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

  18. Field theoretical approach for bio-membrane coupled with flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Kawakatsu, T.

    2013-02-01

    Shape deformation of bio-membranes in flow field is well known phenomenon in biological systems, for example red blood cell in blood vessel. To simulate such deformation with use of field theoretical approach, we derived the dynamical equation of phase field for shape of membrane and coupled the equation with Navier-Stokes equation for flow field. In 2-dimensional simulations, we found that a bio-membrane in a Poiseuille flow takes a parachute shape similar to the red blood cells.

  19. Dean flow-coupled inertial focusing in curved channels.

    PubMed

    Ramachandraiah, Harisha; Ardabili, Sahar; Faridi, Asim M; Gantelius, Jesper; Kowalewski, Jacob M; Mårtensson, Gustaf; Russom, Aman

    2014-05-01

    Passive particle focusing based on inertial microfluidics was recently introduced as a high-throughput alternative to active focusing methods that require an external force field to manipulate particles. In inertial microfluidics, dominant inertial forces cause particles to move across streamlines and occupy equilibrium positions along the faces of walls in flows through straight micro channels. In this study, we systematically analyzed the addition of secondary Dean forces by introducing curvature and show how randomly distributed particles entering a simple u-shaped curved channel are focused to a fixed lateral position exiting the curvature. We found the lateral particle focusing position to be fixed and largely independent of radius of curvature and whether particles entering the curvature are pre-focused (at equilibrium) or randomly distributed. Unlike focusing in straight channels, where focusing typically is limited to channel cross-sections in the range of particle size to create single focusing point, we report here particle focusing in a large cross-section area (channel aspect ratio 1:10). Furthermore, we describe a simple u-shaped curved channel, with single inlet and four outlets, for filtration applications. We demonstrate continuous focusing and filtration of 10 μm particles (with >90% filtration efficiency) from a suspension mixture at throughputs several orders of magnitude higher than flow through straight channels (volume flow rate of 4.25 ml/min). Finally, as an example of high throughput cell processing application, white blood cells were continuously processed with a filtration efficiency of 78% with maintained high viability. We expect the study will aid in the fundamental understanding of flow through curved channels and open the door for the development of a whole set of bio-analytical applications.

  20. Coupling between elastic strain and interstitial fluid flow: ramifications for poroelastic imaging.

    PubMed

    Leiderman, Ricardo; Barbone, Paul E; Oberai, Assad A; Bamber, Jeffrey C

    2006-12-21

    We study the effects of interstitial fluid flow and interstitial fluid drainage on the spatio-temporal response of soft tissue strain. The motivation stems from the ability to measure in vivo strain distributions in soft tissue via elastography, and the desire to explore the possibility of using such techniques to investigate soft tissue fluid flow. Our study is based upon a mathematical model for soft tissue mechanics from the literature. It is a simple generalization of biphasic theory that includes coupling between the fluid and solid phases of the soft tissue, and crucially, fluid exchange between the interstitium and the local microvasculature. We solve the mathematical equations in two dimensions by the finite element method (FEM). The finite element implementation is validated against an exact analytical solution that is derived in the appendix. Realistic input tissue properties from the literature are used in conjunction with FEM modelling to conduct several computational experiments. The results of these lead to the following conclusions: (i) different hypothetical flow mechanisms lead to different patterns of strain relaxation with time; (ii) representative tissue properties show fluid drainage into the local microvasculature to be the dominant flow-related stress/strain relaxation mechanism; (iii) the relaxation time of strain in solid tumours due to drainage into the microvasculature is on the order of 5-10 s; (iv) under realistic applied pressure magnitudes, the magnitude of the strain relaxation can be as high as approximately 0.4% strain (4000 microstrains), which is well within the range of strains measurable by elastography.

  1. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  2. Coupling Advanced Modeling and Visualization to Improve High-Impact Tropical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Green, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    To meet the goals of extreme weather event warning, this approach couples a modeling and visualization system that integrates existing NASA technologies and improves the modeling system's parallel scalability to take advantage of petascale supercomputers. It also streamlines the data flow for fast processing and 3D visualizations, and develops visualization modules to fuse NASA satellite data.

  3. Kinetic model for dilute traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    The flow of traffic represents a many-particle non-equilibrium problem with important practical consequences. Traffic behavior has been studied using a variety of approaches, including fluid dynamics models, Boltzmann equation, and recently cellular automata (CA). The CA model for traffic flow that Nagel and Schreckenberg (NS) introduced can successfully mimic many of the known features of the traffic flow. We show that in the dilute limit of the NS model, where vehicles exhibit free flow, cars show significant nearest neighbor correlation primarily via a short-range repulsion. introduce an approximate analytic model to describe this dilute limit. We show that the distribution of the distance between consecutive vehicles obeys a drift-diffusion equation. We compared this model with direct simulations. The steady state solution and relaxation of this model agrees well with direct simulations. We explore how this model breaks down as the transition to jams occurs.

  4. Coupled prediction of flash flood response and debris flow occurrence in an alpine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amponsah, William

    2015-04-01

    Coupled prediction of flash flood response and debris flow occurrence in an alpine basin Author(s): William Amponsah1, E.I. Nikolopoulos2, Lorenzo Marchi1, Roberto Dinale4, Francesco Marra3,Davide Zoccatelli2 , Marco Borga2 Affiliation(s): 1CNR - IRPI, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127, Padova, ITALY, 2Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry, University of Padova,VialeDell'Università 16, 35020, Legnaro PD, ITALY 3Department of Geography, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, ISRAEL 4Ufficio Idrografico, Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy This contribution examines the main hydrologic and morphologic metrics responsible for widespread triggering of debris-flows associated with flash flood occurrences in headwater alpine catchments.To achieve this objective, we investigate the precipitation forcing, hydrologic responses and landslides and debris-flow occurrences that prevailed during the August 4-5, 2012 extreme flash flood on the 140 km2 Vizze basin in the Eastern Alps of Italy. An intensive post-event survey was carried out a few days after the flood. This included the surveys of cross-sectional geometry and flood marks for the estimation of the peak discharges at multiple river sections and of the initiation and deposition areas of several debris flows. Rainfall estimates are based on careful analysis of weather radar observations and raingauge data. These data and observations permitted the implementation and calibration of a spatially distributed hydrological model, which was used to derive simulated flood hydrographs in 58 tributaries of the Vizze basin. Of these, 33 generated debris-flows, with area ranging from 0.02 km2 to 10 km2, with an average of 1.5 km2. With 130 mm peak event rainfall and a duration of 4 hours (with a max intensity of 90 mm h-1 for 10 min), model-simulated unit peak discharges range from 4 m3 s-1 km-2for elementary catchments up to 10 km2 to 2 m3 s-1 km-2 for catchments in the range of 50 - 100 km2. These are very high

  5. New DNS and modeling results for turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Arne; El Khoury, George; Grundestam, Olof; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Linne Flow Centre Team

    2013-11-01

    The near-wall region of turbulent pipe and channel flows (as well as zero-pressure gradient boundary layers) have been shown to exhibit a very high degree of similarity in terms of all statistical moments and many other features, while even the mean velocity profile in the two cases exhibits significant differences between in the outer region. The wake part of the profile, i.e. the deviation from the log-law, in the outer region is of substantially larger amplitude in pipe flow as compared to channel flow (although weaker than in boundary layer flow). This intriguing feature has been well known but has no simple explanation. Model predictions typically give identical results for the two flows. We have analyzed a new set of DNS for pipe and channel flows (el Khoury et al. 2013, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion) for friction Reynolds numbers up to 1000 and made comparing calculations with differential Reynolds stress models (DRSM). We have strong indications that the key factor behind the difference in mean velocity in the outer region can be coupled to differences in the turbulent diffusion in this region. This is also supported by DRSM results, where interesting differences are seen depending on the sophistication of modeling the turbulent diffusion coefficient.

  6. Mathematical and computational models of plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinsky, K. V.

    Investigations of plasma flows are of interest, firstly, due to numerous applications, and secondly, because of their general principles, which form a special branch of physics: the plasma dynamics. Numerical simulation and computation, together with theoretic and experimental methods, play an important part in these investigations. Speaking on flows, a relatively dense plasma is mentioned, so its mathematical models appertain to the fluid mechanics, i.e., they are based on the magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma. Time dependent two dimensional models of plasma flows of two wide-spread types are considered: the flows across the magnetic field and those in the magnetic field plane.

  7. Analytical models for complex swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, A.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    We develops a new class of analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for swirling flows, and suggests ways to predict and control such flows occurring in various technological applications. We view momentum accumulation on the axis as a key feature of swirling flows and consider vortex-sink flows on curved axisymmetric surfaces with an axial flow. We show that these solutions model swirling flows in a cylindrical can, whirlpools, tornadoes, and cosmic swirling jets. The singularity of these solutions on the flow axis is removed by matching them with near-axis Schlichting and Long's swirling jets. The matched solutions model flows with very complex patterns, consisting of up to seven separation regions with recirculatory 'bubbles' and vortex rings. We apply the matched solutions for computing flows in the Ranque-Hilsch tube, in the meniscus of electrosprays, in vortex breakdown, and in an industrial vortex burner. The simple analytical solutions allow a clear understanding of how different control parameters affect the flow and guide selection of optimal parameter values for desired flow features. These solutions permit extension to other problems (such as heat transfer and chemical reaction) and have the potential of being significantly useful for further detailed investigation by direct or large-eddy numerical simulations as well as laboratory experimentation.

  8. SRMAFTE facility checkout model flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Equipment (SRMAFTE) facility was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the internal propellant, insulation, and nozzle configurations of solid propellant rocket motor designs. This makes the characterization of the facility internal flow field very important in assuring that no facility induced flow field features exist which would corrupt the model related measurements. In order to verify the design and operation of the facility, a three-dimensional computational flow field analysis was performed on the facility checkout model setup. The checkout model measurement data, one-dimensional and three-dimensional estimates were compared, and the design and proper operation of the facility was verified. The proper operation of the metering nozzles, adapter chamber transition, model nozzle, and diffuser were verified. The one-dimensional and three-dimensional flow field estimates along with the available measurement data are compared.

  9. Wave-vortex mode coupling in neutrally stable baroclinic flows.

    PubMed

    Salhi, Abdelaziz; Pieri, Alexandre B

    2014-10-01

    Rotating stratified flows in thermal wind balance are at the center of geophysical fluid dynamics. Recently, endeavors were put on studying the linear response of such flows to potential vorticity perturbations. It has been shown that the initial potential vorticity (PV) distribution is fundamental and is responsible for important transient growth of the perturbation and gravity-wave generation. Using Pfeiffer's theorem [J. Differ. Equat. 11, 145 (1972)], we give the mathematical demonstration of the stability of asymmetric perturbations k1≠0 of a uniform, unbounded flow in thermal wind balance. Incidentally, we prove that both the wave mode (that corresponds to a vanishing PV) and the vortex mode (corresponding to a nonzero PV) are stable. The emphasis is put on the nontrivial behavior of inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) when deformed by a background shear. In particular, we show that in the linear limit, sheared inertia-gravity waves asymptotically oscillate at the inertial waves frequency, but their amplitude is sensitive to shear, stratification, and rotation. Last, we study the development of the IGWs dynamics considering isotropic initial conditions. Computations indicate that both the vortex mode and the wave mode generate IGWs, but the energy of the IGWs generated by the vortex mode is more important than the energy of the IGWs generated by the wave mode. It is also found that, at large times, the energy of the IGWs generated by the vortex mode increases as the ratio kv/kh (initial vertical wavenumber over horizontal wavenumber) increases (like kv(2)/kh(2)), while the energy of the IGWs generated by the wave mode oscillates in function of kv/kh. PMID:25375590

  10. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  11. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gilca, Alex; Cole, Charles R.; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2006-07-20

    The CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator described in this User’s Guide is a three-dimensional finite-element model used to evaluate groundwater flow and solute mass transport. Confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows can be represented with CFEST. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentra¬tion of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Although several thermal parameters described in this User’s Guide are required inputs, thermal transport has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. The CFEST simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. Execution of the CFEST simulator is controlled through three required text input files. These input file use a structured format of associated groups of input data. Example input data lines are presented for each file type, as well as a description of the structured FORTRAN data format. Detailed descriptions of all input requirements, output options, and program structure and execution are provided in this User’s Guide. Required inputs for auxillary CFEST utilities that aide in post-processing data are also described. Global variables are defined for those with access to the source code. Although CFEST is a proprietary code (CFEST, Inc., Irvine, CA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory retains permission to maintain its own source, and to distribute executables to Hanford subcontractors.

  12. Coupled melt flow and thermal stress predictions for Czochralski crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.F.; Zhang, H.; Prasad, V.

    1995-12-31

    A coupled finite volume-finite element algorithm is developed to simulate the melt flows and predict the temperature distributions and thermal stresses in the Czochralski grown crystals. The computer model employs a multizone adaptive grid generation scheme together with curvilinear finite column discretization (MASTRAPP) to predict the transport phenomena associated with the crystal growth processes as well as the nonplanar melt/crystal interface shape and its dynamics (Zhang and Prasad, 1995a). The MASTRAPP has proven to be a robust and efficient scheme for the problems involving moving interfaces and free surfaces. Thermal stresses in the crystal are obtained by using a commercial finite element code, ALGOR, that uses the curvilinear mesh generated by the MASTRAPP. The numerical results show that the melt flows have a strong influence on thermal stresses in the crystal near the melt/crystal interface, and hence, melt convection must be included in the computer model for accurate stress predictions. The predicted stress phenomena agrees qualitatively with the report results.

  13. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources.

  14. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources. PMID:26802012

  15. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    PubMed

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data. PMID:15864957

  16. Modelling boundary layer flow over barnacle-fouled surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadique, Jasim; Yang, Xiang; Meneveau, Charles; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Macro-biofouling is a critical concern for the marine industry. However, there is little data on flow and drag over such surfaces. Accurate modelling of such multi-scale flows remains a big challenge. Such simulations are vital in providing insights into the fundamental flow physics, and they can be used to estimate the timing, need and effectiveness of measures used to counteract bio-fouling. This talk focuses on the use of a sharp-interface immersed boundary method coupled with a wall model and large-eddy simulations to carry out accurate simulations of a turbulent boundary layer flow over macro-fouled surfaces. For the current study, high resolution scans of barnacles were used to create simple geometrical representations. Simulations were then carried out to test how well these simpler geometric models mimic the flow over actual barnacles. Simulations of array of modeled barnacles, with different barnacle densities have also been carried out and we present results on the effect distribution density on the flow physics and drag on the surfaces. This work is funded by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0582.

  17. Coupling approaches used in atmospheric entry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    While a planet orbits the Sun, it is subject to impact by smaller objects, ranging from tiny dust particles and space debris to much larger asteroids and comets. Such collisions have taken place frequently over geological time and played an important role in the evolution of planets and the development of life on the Earth. Though the search for near-Earth objects addresses one of the main points of the Asteroid and Comet Hazard, one should not underestimate the useful information to be gleaned from smaller atmospheric encounters, known as meteors or fireballs. Not only do these events help determine the linkages between meteorites and their parent bodies; due to their relative regularity they provide a good statistical basis for analysis. For successful cases with found meteorites, the detailed atmospheric path record is an excellent tool to test and improve existing entry models assuring the robustness of their implementation. There are many more important scientific questions meteoroids help us to answer, among them: Where do these objects come from, what are their origins, physical properties and chemical composition? What are the shapes and bulk densities of the space objects which fully ablate in an atmosphere and do not reach the planetary surface? Which values are directly measured and which are initially assumed as input to various models? How to couple both fragmentation and ablation effects in the model, taking real size distribution of fragments into account? How to specify and speed up the recovery of a recently fallen meteorites, not letting weathering to affect samples too much? How big is the pre-atmospheric projectile to terminal body ratio in terms of their mass/volume? Which exact parameters beside initial mass define this ratio? More generally, how entering object affects Earth's atmosphere and (if applicable) Earth's surface? How to predict these impact consequences based on atmospheric trajectory data? How to describe atmospheric entry

  18. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  19. Analysis of Coupled Seals, Secondary and Powerstream Flow Fields in Aircraft and Aerospace Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, M. M.; Ho, Y. H.; Prezekwas, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    Higher power, high efficiency gas turbine engines require optimization of the seals and secondary flow systems as well as their impact on the powerstream. This work focuses on two aspects: 1. To apply the present day CFD tools (SCISEAL) to different real-life secondary flow applications from different original equipment manufacturers (OEM s) to provide feedback data and 2. Develop a computational methodology for coupled time-accurate simulation of the powerstream and secondary flow with emphasis on the interaction between the disk-cavity and rim seals flows with the powerstream (SCISEAL-MS-TURBO). One OEM simulation was of the Allison Engine Company T-56 turbine drum cavities including conjugate heat transfer with good agreement with data and provided design feedback information. Another was the GE aspirating seal where the 3-D CFD simulations played a major role in analysis and modification of that seal configuration. The second major objective, development of a coupled flow simulation capability was achieved by using two codes MS-TURBO for the powerstream and SCISEAL for the secondary flows with an interface coupling algorithm. The coupled code was tested against data from three differed configurations: 1. bladeless-rotor-stator-cavity turbine test rig, 2. UTRC high pressure turbine test rig, and, 3. the NASA Low-Speed-Air Compressor rig (LSAC) with results and limitations discussed herein.

  20. A coupled energy transport and hydrological model for urban canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Smith, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Urban land-atmosphere interaction has been attracting more research efforts in order to understand the complex physics of flow and mass and heat transport in urban surfaces and the lower urban atmosphere. In this work, we developed and implemented a new physically-based single-layer urban canopy model, coupling the surface exchange of energy and the subsurface transport of water/soil moisture. The new model incorporates sub-facet heterogeneity for each urban surface (roof, wall or ground). This better simulates the energy transport in urban canopy layers, especially over low-intensity built (suburban type) terrains that include a significant fraction of vegetated surfaces. We implemented detailed urban hydrological models for both natural terrains (bare soil and vegetation) and porous engineered materials with water-holding capacity (concrete, gravel, etc). The skill of the new scheme was tested against experimental data collected through a wireless sensor network deployed over the campus of Princeton University. The model performance was found to be robust and insensitive to changes in weather conditions or seasonal variability. Predictions of the volumetric soil water content were also in good agreement with field measurements, highlighting the model capability of capturing subsurface water transport for urban lawns. The new model was also applied to a case study assessing different strategies, i.e. white versus green roofs, in the mitigation of urban heat island effect.

  1. Modeling of price and profit in coupled-ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangmongkollert, Kittiwat; Suwanna, Sujin

    2016-06-01

    We study the behaviors of magnetization, price, and profit profiles in ring networks in the presence of the external magnetic field. The Ising model is used to determine the state of each node, which is mapped to the buy-or-sell state in a financial market, where +1 is identified as the buying state, and -1 as the selling state. Price and profit mechanisms are modeled based on the assumption that price should increase if demand is larger than supply, and it should decrease otherwise. We find that the magnetization can be induced between two rings via coupling links, where the induced magnetization strength depends on the number of the coupling links. Consequently, the price behaves linearly with time, where its rate of change depends on the magnetization. The profit grows like a quadratic polynomial with coefficients dependent on the magnetization. If two rings have opposite direction of net spins, the price flows in the direction of the majority spins, and the network with the minority spins gets a loss in profit.

  2. Dynamically Coupled Food-web and Hydrodynamic Modeling with ADH-CASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, C.; Swannack, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oysters and freshwater mussels are "ecological engineers," modifying the local water quality by filtering zooplankton and other suspended particulate matter from the water column and flow hydraulics by impinging on the near-bed flow environment. The success of sessile, benthic invertebrates such as oysters depends on environmental factors including but not limited to temperature, salinity, and flow regime. Typically food-web and other types of ecological models use flow and water quality data as direct input without regard to the feedback between the ecosystem and the physical environment. The USACE-ERDC has developed a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological modeling approach that dynamically couples a 2-D hydrodynamic and constituent transport model, Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH), with a bioenergetics food-web model, the Comprehensive Aquatics Systems Model (CASM), which captures the dynamic feedback between aquatic ecological systems and the environment. We present modeling results from restored oyster reefs in the Great Wicomico River on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, which quantify ecosystem services such as the influence of the benthic ecosystem on water quality. Preliminary results indicate that while the influence of oyster reefs on bulk flow dynamics is limited due to the localized influence of oyster reefs, large reefs and the associated benthic ecosystem can create measurable changes in the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon in the areas around reefs. We also present a sensitivity analysis to quantify the relative sensitivity of the coupled ADH-CASM model to both hydrodynamic and ecological parameter choice.

  3. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  4. Madden-Julian Variability in Coupled Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gualdi, S; Li, W; Slingo, J M

    2001-12-12

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a dominant mode of tropical variability (Madden and Julian 1971, 1972). It is manifested on a timescale of {approx}30-70 days through large-scale circulation anomalies which occur in conjunction with eastward propagating convective anomalies over the eastern hemisphere. Recent evidence has suggested that an interactive ocean may be important for the simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (Flatau et al. 1997, Sperber et al. 1997, Waliser et al. 1999, Inness et al. 2002). As part of an initiative to the CLIVAR Working Group on Coupled Modeling, we examine ocean-atmosphere GCMs to ascertain the degree to which they can represent the 4-dimensional space-time structure of the MJO. The eastward propagation of convection is also examined with respect to the surface fluxes and SST, and we compare and contrast the behavior over the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. Importantly, the results are interpreted with respect to systematic error of the mean state.

  5. Coupled evolution of magma chambers and flow in conduits during large volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Manga, M.; Rudolph, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The largest silicic and mafic volcanic eruptions in the geologic record, Supervolcano and Large Igneous Province (LIP) eruptions, are distinguished by differences in surface emplacement mode, geologic context, magma volatile content, viscosity, and reservoir depth. However, these large eruptions also share several common features. Individual eruptions of both types emplace roughly the same total volume (10^3 - 10^4 km^3) of remarkably homogeneous magma that likely comes from a single reservoir. In addition, they both release large quantities of volatiles, and hence individual eruptions may significantly perturb global climate. We have developed a model that couples conduit flow and magma chamber deformation, allowing us to study both eruption types. Steady, one-dimensional multiphase flow of magma containing crystals, exsolved water, and CO_2 in a cylindrical conduit is coupled to pressure evolution within an ellipsoidal magma chamber beneath a free surface. LIP eruptions are characterized by gas-driven flow of mafic lava that may be sustained past the cessation of chamber overpressure, much like a siphon. Eruptions cease when the yield strength of the country rocks is reached and the (generally Moho-level) chamber or the conduit implodes, resulting in steady discharge and atmospheric volatile loading. In contrast, more shallow silicic lavas such as the Fish Canyon Tuff erupt through rapid mobilization of a long-lived crystal-rich mush. The crystal-rich mush is a yield strength fluid, which we model using the von Mises criterion for mobilization. If the trigger for mobilization of the mush leads directly to eruption, time-progressive yielding due to mass removal results in a fluid magma chamber that grows as the eruption proceeds, until free-surface stresses induce roof collapse and caldera formation. Chamber pressure evolution may be buffered by the mobilization of the mush, maintaining overpressure and high discharge throughout the eruption. This model suggests

  6. User's Guide of TOUGH2-EGS. A Coupled Geomechanical and Reactive Geochemical Simulator for Fluid and Heat Flow in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Fakcharoenphol, Perapon; Xiong, Yi; Hu, Litang; Winterfeld, Philip H.; Xu, Tianfu; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2013-05-01

    TOUGH2-EGS is a numerical simulation program coupling geomechanics and chemical reactions for fluid and heat flows in porous media and fractured reservoirs of enhanced geothermal systems. The simulator includes the fully-coupled geomechanical (THM) module, the fully-coupled geochemical (THC) module, and the sequentially coupled reactive geochemistry (THMC) module. The fully-coupled flow-geomechanics model is developed from the linear elastic theory for the thermo-poro-elastic system and is formulated with the mean normal stress as well as pore pressure and temperature. The chemical reaction is sequentially coupled after solution of flow equations, which provides the flow velocity and phase saturation for the solute transport calculation at each time step. In addition, reservoir rock properties, such as porosity and permeability, are subjected to change due to rock deformation and chemical reactions. The relationships between rock properties and geomechanical and chemical effects from poro-elasticity theories and empirical correlations are incorporated into the simulator. This report provides the user with detailed information on both mathematical models and instructions for using TOUGH2-EGS for THM, THC or THMC simulations. The mathematical models include the fluid and heat flow equations, geomechanical equation, reactive geochemistry equations, and discretization methods. Although TOUGH2-EGS has the capability for simulating fluid and heat flows coupled with both geomechanical and chemical effects, it is up to the users to select the specific coupling process, such as THM, THC, or THMC in a simulation. There are several example problems illustrating the applications of this program. These example problems are described in details and their input data are presented. The results demonstrate that this program can be used for field-scale geothermal reservoir simulation with fluid and heat flow, geomechanical effect, and chemical reaction in porous and fractured media.

  7. A New Object-Oriented MODFLOW Framework for Coupling Multiple Hydrologic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, C.; Hughes, J. D.; Panday, S. M.; Banta, E. R.; Niswonger, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    MODFLOW is a popular open-source groundwater flow model distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey. For 30 years, the MODFLOW program has been widely used by academic researchers, private consultants, and government scientists to accurately, reliably, and efficiently simulate groundwater flow. With time, growing interest in surface and groundwater interactions, local refinement with nested and unstructured grids, karst groundwater flow, solute transport, and saltwater intrusion, has led to the development of numerous MODFLOW versions. Although these MODFLOW versions are often based on the core version (presently MODFLOW-2005), there are often incompatibilities that restrict their use with one another. In many cases, development of these alternative versions has been challenging due to the underlying MODFLOW structure, which was designed for simulation with a single groundwater flow model using a rectilinear grid. A new object-oriented framework is being developed for MODFLOW to provide a platform for supporting multiple models and multiple types of models within the same simulation. In the new design, any number of numerical models can be tightly coupled at the matrix level by adding them to the same numerical solution, or they can be iteratively coupled until there is convergence between them. Transfer of information between models is isolated to exchange objects, which allow models to be developed and used independently. For existing MODFLOW users, this means that the program can function in the same way it always has for a single groundwater flow model. Within this new framework, a regional-scale groundwater model may be coupled with multiple local-scale groundwater models. Or, a surface water flow model can be coupled to multiple groundwater flow models. The framework naturally allows for the simulation of solute transport. Presently, unstructured control-volume finite-difference models have been implemented in the framework for three-dimensional groundwater

  8. Alfvén wave coupled with flow-driven fluid instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.

    2015-05-15

    The Alfvén wave is analyzed in case of one quasineutral plasma propagating with some constant speed v{sub 0} through another static quasineutral plasma. A dispersion equation is derived describing the Alfvén wave coupled with the flow driven mode ω=kv{sub 0} and solutions are discussed analytically and numerically. The usual solutions for two oppositely propagating Alfvén waves are substantially modified due to the flowing plasma. More profound is modification of the solution propagating in the negative direction with respect to the magnetic field and the plasma flow. For a large enough flow speed (exceeding the Alfvén speed in the static plasma), this negative solution may become non-propagating, with frequency equal to zero. In this case, it represents a spatial variation of the electromagnetic field. For greater flow speed it becomes a forward mode, and it may merge with the positive one. This merging of the two modes represents the starting point for a flow-driven instability, with two complex-conjugate solutions. The Alfvén wave in interpenetrating plasmas is thus modified and coupled with the flow-driven mode and this coupled mode is shown to be growing when the flow speed is large enough. The energy for the instability is macroscopic kinetic energy of the flowing plasma. The dynamics of plasma particles caused by such a coupled wave still remains similar to the ordinary Alfvén wave. This means that well-known stochastic heating by the Alfvén wave may work, and this should additionally support the potential role of the Alfvén wave in the coronal heating.

  9. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  10. Compressor Flow Control Concepts. 2; UEET Compressor Flow Control Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2001-01-01

    Several passive flow control devices have been modeled computationally in the Swift CFD code. The models were applied to the first stage rotor and stator of the baseline UEET compressor in an attempt to improve efficiency and/or stall margin. The devices included suction surface bleed, tip injection, self-aspirated rotors, area-ruled casing, and vortex generators. The models and computed results will be described in the presentation. None of the results have shown significant gains in efficiency; however, casing vortex generators have shown potential improvements in stall margin.

  11. Peristaltic hemodynamic flow of couple stress fluid through a porous medium under the influence of magnetic field with slip effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarnalathamma, B. V.; Krishna, M. Veera

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the theoretical and computational study of peristaltic hemodynamic flow of couple stress fluids through a porous medium under the influence of magnetic field with wall slip condition. Actually this study is motivated towards the physiological flow of the blood in the micro circulatory system by taking account of the particle size effect. We consider the Reynolds number is small enough and the wave length to diameter ratio is large enough to negate inertial effects. The governing equations for the couple stress fluid flow through porous medium based on stoke constitutive equations and Brinkman model. The exact solutions for axial velocity, pressure gradient, frictional force, stream function and mechanical efficiency are obtained analytically, its behaviour computationally discussed with reference to different physical parameters reflecting couple stress parameter, Hartmann number, permeability parameter, slip parameter as well as amplitude ratio on pumping characteristics and frictional force, stream lines pattern and trapping of peristaltic flow pattern are studied with particular emphasis making use of graphs.

  12. Integrated flow and temperature modeling at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinaz, Maria C.; Davidsen, Hasse Kampp; Butts, Michael; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Changes in natural stream temperature levels can be detrimental to the health of aquatic ecosystems. Water use and land management directly affect the distribution of diffuse heat sources and thermal loads to streams, while riparian vegetation and geomorphology play a critical role in how thermal loads are buffered. In many areas, groundwater flow is a significant contribution to river flow, particularly during low flows and therefore has a strong influence on stream temperature levels and dynamics. However, previous stream temperature models do not properly simulate how surface water-groundwater dynamics affect stream temperature. A coupled surface water-groundwater and temperature model has therefore been developed to quantify the impacts of land management and water use on stream flow and temperatures. The model is applied to the simulation of stream temperature levels in a spring-fed stream, the Silver Creek Basin in Idaho, where stream temperature affects the populations of fish and other aquatic organisms. The model calibration highlights the importance of spatially distributed flow dynamics in the catchment to accurately predict stream temperatures. The results also show the value of including temperature data in an integrated flow model calibration because temperature data provide additional constraints on the flow sources and volumes. Simulations show that a reduction of 10% in the groundwater flow to the Silver Creek Basin can cause average and maximum temperature increases in Silver Creek over 0.3 °C and 1.5 °C, respectively. In spring-fed systems like Silver Creek, it is clearly not feasible to separate river habitat restoration from upstream catchment and groundwater management.

  13. A coupled chemo-fluidic computational model for thrombogenesis in infarcted left ventricles.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung Hee; Abd, Thura; George, Richard T; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-06-01

    A coupled chemo-fluidic computational model for investigating flow-mediated thrombogenesis in infarcted left ventricles (LVs) is proposed. LV thrombus (LVT) formation after the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may lead to thromboembolic events that are associated with high mortality and morbidity, and reliable stratification of LVT risk is the key to managing the treatment of AMI patients. There have been several studies emphasizing the importance of LV blood flow patterns on thrombus formation; however, given the complex interplay between ventricular flow dynamics and biochemistry of thrombogenesis, current understanding is mostly empirical. In the present model, blood flow in the LV is obtained by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and this is coupled to the biochemical modeling of the coagulation cascade, platelet activation, and fibrinogen polymerization. The coupled model is used to examine the effect of ventricular flow patterns on thrombogenesis in modeled ventricles. It is expected that the method developed here will enable in-depth studies of thrombogenesis in patient-derived infarcted LV models. PMID:27016582

  14. Coupling Climate Models and Forward-Looking Economic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judd, K.; Brock, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    Authors: Dr. Kenneth L. Judd, Hoover Institution, and Prof. William A. Brock, University of Wisconsin Current climate models range from General Circulation Models (GCM’s) with millions of degrees of freedom to models with few degrees of freedom. Simple Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCM’s) help us understand the dynamics of GCM’s. The same is true in economics with Computable General Equilibrium Models (CGE’s) where some models are infinite-dimensional multidimensional differential equations but some are simple models. Nordhaus (2007, 2010) couples a simple EBCM with a simple economic model. One- and two- dimensional ECBM’s do better at approximating damages across the globe and positive and negative feedbacks from anthroprogenic forcing (North etal. (1981), Wu and North (2007)). A proper coupling of climate and economic systems is crucial for arriving at effective policies. Brock and Xepapadeas (2010) have used Fourier/Legendre based expansions to study the shape of socially optimal carbon taxes over time at the planetary level in the face of damages caused by polar ice cap melt (as discussed by Oppenheimer, 2005) but in only a “one dimensional” EBCM. Economists have used orthogonal polynomial expansions to solve dynamic, forward-looking economic models (Judd, 1992, 1998). This presentation will couple EBCM climate models with basic forward-looking economic models, and examine the effectiveness and scaling properties of alternative solution methods. We will use a two dimensional EBCM model on the sphere (Wu and North, 2007) and a multicountry, multisector regional model of the economic system. Our aim will be to gain insights into intertemporal shape of the optimal carbon tax schedule, and its impact on global food production, as modeled by Golub and Hertel (2009). We will initially have limited computing resources and will need to focus on highly aggregated models. However, this will be more complex than existing models with forward

  15. Mathematical Models of Continuous Flow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.; Snyder, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Development of high resolution continuous flow electrophoresis devices ultimately requires comprehensive understanding of the ways various phenomena and processes facilitate or hinder separation. A comprehensive model of the actual three dimensional flow, temperature and electric fields was developed to provide guidance in the design of electrophoresis chambers for specific tasks and means of interpreting test data on a given chamber. Part of the process of model development includes experimental and theoretical studies of hydrodynamic stability. This is necessary to understand the origin of mixing flows observed with wide gap gravitational effects. To insure that the model accurately reflects the flow field and particle motion requires extensive experimental work. Another part of the investigation is concerned with the behavior of concentrated sample suspensions with regard to sample stream stability particle-particle interactions which might affect separation in an electric field, especially at high field strengths. Mathematical models will be developed and tested to establish the roles of the various interactions.

  16. Transient Wellbore Fluid Flow Model

    1982-04-06

    WELBORE is a code to solve transient, one-dimensional two-phase or single-phase non-isothermal fluid flow in a wellbore. The primary thermodynamic variables used in solving the equations are the pressure and specific energy. An equation of state subroutine provides the density, quality, and temperature. The heat loss out of the wellbore is calculated by solving a radial diffusion equation for the temperature changes outside the bore. The calculation is done at each node point in themore » wellbore.« less

  17. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  18. Coupling of groundwater, river flow and rainfall in an upland floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Nicole; Dochartaigh, Brighid Ó.; MacDonald, Alan; Bonell, Mike; Black, Andrew; Coles, Neil

    2014-05-01

    Upland floodplains provide an important function in regulating river flows and controlling the coupling of hillslope runoff with rivers. To investigate the responses of floodplain groundwater to river flows and rainfall events, a small floodplain in an upland area of the River Tweed catchment, Scotland, was characterised using geophysics, 3D geological mapping and hydrogeological testing; and monitoring undertaken from September 2011 to February 2013 of: groundwater levels in five pairs of piezometers; river stage and flow at the upstream and downstream limits of the study site; soil moisture on the adjacent hillslope; and meteorological parameters. Periodical groundwater chemistry and residence data were also collected. The floodplain aquifer is permeable throughout but partially stratified, comprising dominantly alluvial and glaciofluvial sandy gravels between 8 and 15m interspersed with thin, intermittent layers of low permeability silts, clays and peats. Overlying the gravel aquifer is a partial thin cover of low permeability alluvial silts, and it is underlain dominantly by low permeability glaciolacustrine silts and clays. High permeability solifluction deposits mantle much of the adjacent hillslope and provide a rapid connection to the floodplain aquifer. The unusually wet year of 2012 provides a good example of how a temperate upland floodplain responds to consistently high rainfall. Statistical analysis and graphical interpretation of groundwater level, rainfall, soil moisture and river stage demonstrates that: 1) dominant groundwater flow within the floodplain is in the same direction as the river, from up-valley to down-valley; 2) soil moisture in the hillslope is strongly correlated with local rainfall, but groundwater across much of the floodplain is more strongly influenced by river stage; except 3) groundwater near the edge of floodplain, which responds more slowly to local rainfall and river stage changes ; and 4) subsurface flow from the hillslope

  19. Modeling groundwater flow and quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Selinus, Olle

    2013-01-01

    In most areas, rocks in the subsurface are saturated with water at relatively shallow depths. The top of the saturated zone—the water table—typically occurs anywhere from just below land surface to hundreds of feet below the land surface. Groundwater generally fills all pore spaces below the water table and is part of a continuous dynamic flow system, in which the fluid is moving at velocities ranging from feet per millennia to feet per day (Fig. 33.1). While the water is in close contact with the surfaces of various minerals in the rock material, geochemical interactions between the water and the rock can affect the chemical quality of the water, including pH, dissolved solids composition, and trace-elements content. Thus, flowing groundwater is a major mechanism for the transport of chemicals from buried rocks to the accessible environment, as well as a major pathway from rocks to human exposure and consumption. Because the mineral composition of rocks is highly variable, as is the solubility of various minerals, the human-health effects of groundwater consumption will be highly variable.

  20. General single phase wellbore flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Liang-Biao; Arbabi, S.; Aziz, K.

    1997-02-05

    A general wellbore flow model, which incorporates not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow, is presented in this report. The new wellbore model is readily applicable to any wellbore perforation patterns and well completions, and can be easily incorporated in reservoir simulators or analytical reservoir inflow models. Three dimensionless numbers, the accelerational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub af}, the gravitational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub gf}, and the inflow-directional to accelerational pressure gradient ratio R{sub da}, have been introduced to quantitatively describe the relative importance of different pressure gradient components. For fluid flow in a production well, it is expected that there may exist up to three different regions of the wellbore: the laminar flow region, the partially-developed turbulent flow region, and the fully-developed turbulent flow region. The laminar flow region is located near the well toe, the partially-turbulent flow region lies in the middle of the wellbore, while the fully-developed turbulent flow region is at the downstream end or the heel of the wellbore. Length of each region depends on fluid properties, wellbore geometry and flow rate. As the distance from the well toe increases, flow rate in the wellbore increases and the ratios R{sub af} and R{sub da} decrease. Consequently accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops have the greatest impact in the toe region of the wellbore. Near the well heel the local wellbore flow rate becomes large and close to the total well production rate, here R{sub af} and R{sub da} are small, therefore, both the accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops can be neglected.

  1. Numerical study on coupled fluid flow and heat transfer process in parabolic trough solar collector tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.B.; He, Y.L.

    2010-10-15

    A unified two-dimensional numerical model was developed for the coupled heat transfer process in parabolic solar collector tube, which includes nature convection, forced convection, heat conduction and fluid-solid conjugate problem. The effects of Rayleigh number (Ra), tube diameter ratio and thermal conductivity of the tube wall on the heat transfer and fluid flow performance were numerically analyzed. The distributions of flow field, temperature field, local Nu and local temperature gradient were examined. The results show that when Ra is larger than 10{sup 5}, the effects of nature convection must be taken into account. With the increase of tube diameter ratio, the Nusselt number in inner tube (Nu{sub 1}) increases and the Nusselt number in annuli space (Nu{sub 2}) decreases. With the increase of tube wall thermal conductivity, Nu{sub 1} decreases and Nu{sub 2} increases. When thermal conductivity is larger than 200 W/(m K), it would have little effects on Nu and average temperatures. Due to the effect of the nature convection, along the circumferential direction (from top to down), the temperature in the cross-section decreases and the temperature gradient on inner tube surface increases at first. Then, the temperature and temperature gradients would present a converse variation at {theta} near {pi}. The local Nu on inner tube outer surface increases along circumferential direction until it reaches a maximum value then it decreases again. (author)

  2. Coupling of turbulent and non-turbulent flow regimes within pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert; Jones, Jim R.; Dufek, Josef; Cronin, Shane J.; Valentine, Greg A.; Moebis, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic eruptions are at their most deadly when pyroclastic density currents sweep across landscapes to devastate everything in their path. The internal dynamics underpinning these hazards cannot be directly observed. Here we present a quantitative view inside pyroclastic density currents by synthesizing their natural flow behaviour in large-scale experiments. The experiments trace flow dynamics from initiation to deposition, and can explain the sequence and evolution of real-world deposits. We show that, inside pyroclastic density currents, the long-hypothesized non-turbulent underflow and fully turbulent ash-cloud regions are linked through a hitherto unrecognized middle zone of intermediate turbulence and concentration. Bounded by abrupt jumps in turbulence, the middle zone couples underflow and ash-cloud regions kinematically. Inside this zone, strong feedback between gas and particle phases leads to the formation of mesoscale turbulence clusters. These extremely fast-settling dendritic structures dictate the internal stratification and evolution of pyroclastic density currents and allow the underflows to grow significantly during runout. Our experiments reveal how the underflow and ash-cloud regions are dynamically related--insights that are relevant to the forecasting of pyroclastic density current behaviour in volcanic hazard models.

  3. Fluid migration in the subduction zone: a coupled fluid flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Huismans, Ritske; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone are the main entry point of water into earth's mantle and play an important role in the global water cycle. The progressive release of water by metamorphic dehydration induce important physical-chemical process in the subduction zone, such as hydrous melting, hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge, creation of pore fluid pressures that may weaken the subduction interface and induce earthquakes. Most previous studies on the role of fluids in subduction zones assume vertical migration or migration according to the dynamic pressure in the solid matrix without considering the pore fluid pressure effect on the deformation of the solid matrix. Here we investigate this interaction by explicitly modeling two-phase coupled poro-plastic flow during subduction. In this approach, the fluid migrates by compaction and decompaction of the solid matrix and affects the subduction dynamics through pore fluid pressure dependent frictional-plastic yield. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) the rate of fluid migration depends strongly on the permeability and the bulk viscosity of the solid matrix, 2) fluid transfer occurs preferentially along the slab and then propagates into the mantle wedge by viscous compaction driven fluid flow, 3) fluid transport from the surface to depth is a prerequisite for producing high fluid pore pressures and associated hydration induced weakening of the subduction zone interface.

  4. Incipient subduction interface formation by coupling solid deformation and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Dymkova, Diana

    2014-05-01

    Although most of the presently active intra-oceanic subduction zones are relatively young and initiated during the Cenozoic, subduction initiation process associated with an incipient subduction interface formation remains poorly understood. We investigated incipient spontaneously initiating intra-oceanic subduction by exploring new numerical hydro-thermo-mechanical (HTM) model, in which solid rock deformation and fluid percolation are fully coupled. Based on 2-D numerical experiments, we demonstrate that subduction can naturally start in the presence of porous fluid inside oceanic crust and pre-existing fracture zones. During subduction initiation, fluid percolation is localized along a system of multiple listric propagating thrusts with coalescing nearly horizontal roots forming near the oceanic Moho of the forming subducting slab. These coalescing roots form incipient strongly hydrated subduction interface, which decouples upper and lower plates. High pressure of aqueous fluid flow, which spontaneously focuses along this interface, compensates lithostatic pressure, thus dramatically decreasing friction between the plates. Through the parametric study, we conclude that the most important parameter for the incipient subduction interface formation is the solid matrix permeability. Paradoxical at first, lowering the permeability indeed favors subduction initiation by maintaining high fluid pressure and thus decreasing friction along the active system of coalescent listric thrusts. Citation: Dymkova, D., and T. Gerya (2013), Porous fluid flow enables oceanic subduction initiation on Earth, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 5671-5676, doi:10.1002/2013GL057798.

  5. Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Melanie; Dupey, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    The Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness is a conceptualization of spiritual health and well-being that has implications for clinical practice and research. The model is unique in its placement of the spirit at the center of Life and in its fluid vision of the spirit. The authors present the model after a discussion of spirituality and the…

  6. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation In Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects on Contaminant Fate and Transport (Project no. 99272)

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, G.D.; Fujita, Y.; Scheibe, T.D.; Tartakovsky, A.M.; Smith, R.W.; Reddy, M.M.; Kelly, S.D.

    2006-04-05

    This project is aimed at understanding how contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media is impacted by precipitation and dissolution events through chemical interactions with precipitates and as a consequence of coupling between precipitation and flow. We hypothesize that precipitation/coprecipitation, encapsulation, isolation from flow and alteration of reactive surfaces will contribute to altering contaminant mobility during precipitation events, and that predicting the release of contaminants during precipitate dissolution requires an understanding of how precipitates are distributed and how contaminants are released from the different compartments over time. Using calcium carbonate as a model system, physical experiments and modeling at the pore-scale and continuum-scale will be used to improve the conceptual approach to predicting the impact of flow-precipitation coupling on solute migration. Column and 2-dimensional intermediate-scale experiments with constructed physical and chemical heterogeneities will be used to investigate the movement of fluids and reactive solutes during different types of mixing events that lead to calcium carbonate supersaturation and precipitation. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling will be used to simulate pore-scale mixing and precipitation in heterogeneous porous media and estimate continuum-scale parameters. Continuum-scale modeling will be used to test conceptual models and associated effective parameters that simulate the macroscopic behavior of the experimental domains.

  7. A compendium of fracture flow models, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Diodato, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    The report is designed to be used as a decision-making aid for individuals who need to simulate fluid flow in fractured porous media. Fracture flow codes of varying capability in the public and private domain were identified in a survey of government, academia, and industry. The selection and use of an appropriate code requires conceptualization of the geology, physics, and chemistry (for transport) of the fracture flow problem to be solved. Conceptual models that have been invoked to describe fluid flow in fractured porous media include explicit discrete fracture, dual continuum (porosity and/or permeability), discrete fracture network, multiple interacting continua, multipermeability/multiporosity, and single equivalent continuum. The explicit discrete-fracture model is a ``near-field`` representation, the single equivalent continuum model is a ``far-field`` representation, and the dual-continuum model is intermediate to those end members. Of these, the dual-continuum model is the most widely employed. The concept of multiple interacting continua has been applied in a limited number of examples. Multipermeability/multiporosity provides a unified conceptual model. The ability to accurately describe fracture flow phenomena will continue to improve as a result of advances in fracture flow research and computing technology. This improvement will result in enhanced capability to protect the public environment, safety, and health.

  8. Effect of fluid friction on interstitial fluid flow coupled with blood flow through solid tumor microvascular network.

    PubMed

    Sefidgar, Mostafa; Soltani, M; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Bazmara, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    A solid tumor is investigated as porous media for fluid flow simulation. Most of the studies use Darcy model for porous media. In Darcy model, the fluid friction is neglected and a few simplified assumptions are implemented. In this study, the effect of these assumptions is studied by considering Brinkman model. A multiscale mathematical method which calculates fluid flow to a solid tumor is used in this study to investigate how neglecting fluid friction affects the solid tumor simulation. The mathematical method involves processes such as blood flow through vessels and solute and fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. The sprouting angiogenesis model is used for generating capillary network and then fluid flow governing equations are implemented to calculate blood flow through the tumor-induced capillary network. Finally, the two models of porous media are used for modeling fluid flow in normal and tumor tissues in three different shapes of tumors. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a solid tumor demonstrate that the simplifications used in Darcy model affect the interstitial velocity and Brinkman model predicts a lower value for interstitial velocity than the values that Darcy model predicts.

  9. Modeling of transient flow through a viscoelastic preparative chromatography packing.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Dariusch; Kuhn, Michael; Meinhardt, Verena; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The common method for purification of macromolecular bioproducts is preparative packed-bed chromatography using polymer-based, compressible, viscoelastic resins. Because of a downstream processing bottleneck, the chromatography equipment is often operated at its hydrodynamic limit. In this case, the resins may exhibit a complex behavior which results in compression-relaxation hystereses. Up to now, no modeling approach of transient flow through a chromatography packing has been made considering the viscoelasticity of the resins. The aim of the present work was to develop a novel model and compare model calculations with experimental data of two agarose-based resins. Fluid flow and bed permeability were modeled by Darcy's law and the Kozeny-Carman equation, respectively. Fluid flow was coupled to solid matrix stress via an axial force balance and a continuity equation of a deformable packing. Viscoelasticity was considered according to a Kelvin-Voigt material. The coupled equations were solved with a finite difference scheme using a deformable mesh. The model boundary conditions were preset transient pressure drop functions which resemble simulated load/elution/equilibration cycles. Calculations using a homogeneous model (assuming constant variables along the column height) gave a fair agreement with experimental data with regard to predicted flow rate, bed height, and compression-relaxation hysteresis for symmetric as well as asymmetric pressure drop functions. Calculations using an inhomogeneous model gave profiles of the bed porosity as a function of the bed height. In addition, the influence of medium wall support and intraparticle porosity was illustrated. The inhomogeneous model provides insights that so far are not easily experimentally accessible.

  10. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gas causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design production

  11. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gasmore » causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design

  12. Assessment of chemistry models for compressible reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Recent technological advances in propulsion and power devices and renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles have increased the need for detailed understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible reacting flows. In numerical simulations of such flows, accurate modeling of the fuel chemistry is a critical component of capturing the relevant physics. Various chemical models are currently being used in reacting flow simulations. However, the differences between these models and their impacts on the fluid dynamics in the context of compressible flows are not well understood. In the present work, a numerical code is developed to solve the fully coupled compressible conservation equations for reacting flows. The finite volume code is based on the theoretical and numerical framework developed by Oefelein (Prog. Aero. Sci. 42 (2006) 2-37) and employs an all-Mach-number formulation with dual time-stepping and preconditioning. The numerical approach is tested on turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz numbers. Different chemical models of varying complexity and computational cost are used and their effects are compared.

  13. Computational modeling of air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells with flow-over and flow-through anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Ye, Ding-ding; Sui, Pang-Chieh; Djilali, Ned; Zhu, Xun

    2014-08-01

    A three-dimensional computational model for air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells (AMFCs) with flow-over and flow-through anodes is developed. The coupled multiphysics phenomena of fluid flow, species transport and electrochemical reactions are resolved numerically. The model has been validated against experimental data using an in-house AMFC prototype with a flow-through anode. Characteristics of fuel transfer and fuel crossover for both types of anodes are investigated. The model results reveal that the fuel transport to the flow-over anode is intrinsically limited by the fuel concentration boundary layer. Conversely, fuel transport for the flow-through anode is convectively enhanced by the permeate flow, and no concentration boundary layer is observed. An unexpected additional advantage of the flow-through anode configuration is lower parasitic (crossover) current density than the flow-over case at practical low flow rates. Cell performance of the flow-through case is found to be limited by reaction kinetics. The present model provides insights into the fuel transport and fuel crossover in air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells and provides guidance for further design and operation optimization.

  14. A Flow-Through Reaction Cell that Couples Time - Resolved Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    A Wall; P Heaney; R Mathur; J Post; J Hanson; P Eng

    2011-12-31

    A non-metallic flow-through reaction cell is described, designed for in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction coupled with stable isotope analysis. The experimental setup allows the correlation of Cu isotope fractionation with changes in crystal structure during copper sulfide dissolution. This flow-through cell can be applied to many classes of fluid-mineral reactions that involve dissolution or ion exchange.

  15. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multiple detections: A complementary approach in the characterization of egg yolk plasma.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Li, Yueqiu; Choi, Jaeyeong; Huo, Shuying; Ding, Liang; Shen, Shigang; Lee, Seungho

    2016-09-23

    The capability of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV/VIS, multiangle light scattering (MALS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) (AF4-UV-MALS-QELS) for separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma was evaluated. The accuracy of hydrodynamic radius (Rh) obtained from QELS and AF4 theory (using both simplified and full expression of AF4 retention equations) was discussed. The conformation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and its aggregates in egg yolk plasma was discussed based on the ratio of radius of gyration (Rg) to Rh together with the results from bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The results indicate that the full retention equation is more relevant than simplified version for the Rh determination at high cross flow rate. The Rh from online QELS is reliable only at a specific range of sample concentration. The effect of programmed cross flow rate (linear and exponential decay) on the analysis of egg yolk plasma was also investigated. It was found that the use of an exponentially decaying cross flow rate not only reduces the AF4 analysis time of the egg yolk plasma, but also provides better resolution than the use of either a constant or linearly decaying cross flow rate. A combination of an exponentially decaying cross flow AF4-UV-MALS-QELS and the utilization of full retention equation was proved to be a useful method for the separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma. PMID:27582461

  16. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multiple detections: A complementary approach in the characterization of egg yolk plasma.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Li, Yueqiu; Choi, Jaeyeong; Huo, Shuying; Ding, Liang; Shen, Shigang; Lee, Seungho

    2016-09-23

    The capability of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV/VIS, multiangle light scattering (MALS) and quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) (AF4-UV-MALS-QELS) for separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma was evaluated. The accuracy of hydrodynamic radius (Rh) obtained from QELS and AF4 theory (using both simplified and full expression of AF4 retention equations) was discussed. The conformation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and its aggregates in egg yolk plasma was discussed based on the ratio of radius of gyration (Rg) to Rh together with the results from bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The results indicate that the full retention equation is more relevant than simplified version for the Rh determination at high cross flow rate. The Rh from online QELS is reliable only at a specific range of sample concentration. The effect of programmed cross flow rate (linear and exponential decay) on the analysis of egg yolk plasma was also investigated. It was found that the use of an exponentially decaying cross flow rate not only reduces the AF4 analysis time of the egg yolk plasma, but also provides better resolution than the use of either a constant or linearly decaying cross flow rate. A combination of an exponentially decaying cross flow AF4-UV-MALS-QELS and the utilization of full retention equation was proved to be a useful method for the separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma.

  17. Bulk flow coupled to a viscous interfacial film sheared by a rotating knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunandan, Aditya; Rasheed, Fayaz; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of the interfacial properties of highly viscous biofilms, such as DPPC (the primary component of lung surfactant), present on the surface of liquids (bulk phase) continues to attract significant attention. Most measurement techniques rely on shearing the interfacial film and quantifying its viscous response in terms of a surface (excess) viscosity at the air-liquid interface. The knife edge viscometer offers a significant advantage over other approaches used to study highly viscous films as the film is directly sheared by a rotating knife edge in direct contact with the film. However, accurately quantifying the viscous response is non-trivial and involves accounting for the coupled interfacial and bulk phase flows. Here, we examine the nature of the viscous response of water insoluble DPPC films sheared in a knife edge viscometer over a range of surface packing, and its influence on the strength of the coupled bulk flow. Experimental results, obtained via Particle Image Velocimetry in the bulk and at the surface (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), are compared with numerical flow predictions to quantify the coupling across hydrodynamic flow regimes, from the Stokes flow limit to regimes where flow inertia is significant. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. A model for insect tracheolar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Anne; Chatterjee, Krishnashis

    2015-11-01

    Tracheoles are the terminal ends of the microscale tracheal channels present in most insect respiratory systems that transport air directly to the tissue. From a fluid dynamics perspective, tracheolar flow is notable because it lies at the intersection of several specialized fluid flow regimes. The flow through tracheoles is creeping, microscale gas flow in the rarefied regime. Here, we use lubrication theory to model the flow through a single microscale tracheole and take into account fluid-structure interactions through an imposed periodic wall deformation corresponding to the rhythmic abdominal compression found in insects, and rarefaction effects using slip boundary conditions. We compare the pressure, axial pressure gradient, and axial and radial velocities in the channel, and the volumetric flow rate through the channel for no-slip, low slip, and high slip conditions under two different channel deformation regimes. We find that the presence of slip tends to reduce the flow rate through the model tracheole and hypothesize that one of the mechanical functions of tracheoles is to act as a diffuser to decelerate the flow, enhance mixing, and increase the residency time of freshly oxygenated air at the surface of the tissue. This work was funded by the NSF under grant no. 1437387.

  19. Coupling of a distributed hydrological model with an urban storm water model for impact analysis of forced infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidmose, Jacob; Troldborg, Lars; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Bischoff, Nils

    2015-06-01

    Only few studies have attempted to couple a storm water runoff model with a distributed hydrological model even though infiltration or exfiltration processes between pipes and canals of urban runoff systems and groundwater are widely recognised. We present a fully coupled model that allows simulation of the complete urban freshwater cycle including: runoff from paved and impervious areas, flow through the runoff network, overland flow, infiltration through the unsaturated zone, evapotranspiration (at green areas), and groundwater flow in complex, urban geology. For example, at the investigated urban area at the City of Silkeborg, Western Denmark, the coupled model show that one fourth (24%) of water input to the storm water runoff systems arrives from groundwater sources. The study furthermore quantifies groundwater feedback mechanisms of forced infiltration to surface water systems by the fully coupled hydrological and urban runoff model. Three local area recharge scenarios with forced infiltration are compared with the present situation without forced infiltration. The forced infiltration impacts the local groundwater table with an average rise of up to 69 cm resulting in significant feedback from the groundwater to the runoff system via drains, overland flow and leakage of groundwater to the pipes and canals of the urban runoff network.

  20. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    SciTech Connect

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  1. Reduced order model of draft tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.; Štefan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Swirling flow with compact coherent structures is very good candidate for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), i.e. for decomposition into eigenmodes, which are the cornerstones of the flow field. Present paper focuses on POD of steady flows, which correspond to different operating points of Francis turbine draft tube flow. Set of eigenmodes is built using a limited number of snapshots from computational simulations. Resulting reduced order model (ROM) describes whole operating range of the draft tube. ROM enables to interpolate in between the operating points exploiting the knowledge about significance of particular eigenmodes and thus reconstruct the velocity field in any operating point within the given range. Practical example, which employs axisymmetric simulations of the draft tube flow, illustrates accuracy of ROM in regions without vortex breakdown together with need for higher resolution of the snapshot database close to location of sudden flow changes (e.g. vortex breakdown). ROM based on POD interpolation is very suitable tool for insight into flow physics of the draft tube flows (especially energy transfers in between different operating points), for supply of data for subsequent stability analysis or as an initialization database for advanced flow simulations.

  2. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  3. Transient magneto-peristaltic flow of couple stress biofluids: a magneto-hydro-dynamical study on digestive transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Anwar Bég, O

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic fields are increasingly being utilized in endoscopy and gastric transport control. In this regard, the present study investigates the influence of a transverse magnetic field in the transient peristaltic rheological transport. An electrically-conducting couple stress non-Newtonian model is employed to accurately simulate physiological fluids in peristaltic flow through a sinusoidally contracting channel of finite length. This model is designed for computing the intra-bolus oesophageal and intestinal pressures during the movement of food bolus in the digestive system under magneto-hydro-dynamic effects. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations have been employed to reduce the governing equations from nonlinear to linear form, this being a valid approach for creeping flows which characterizes physiological dynamics. Analytical approximate solutions for axial velocity, transverse velocity, pressure gradient, local wall shear stress and volumetric flow rate are obtained for the non-dimensional conservation equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions. The effects of couple stress parameter and transverse magnetic field on the velocity profile, pressure distribution, local wall shear stress and the averaged flow rate are discussed with the aid of computational results. The comparative study of non-integral and integral number of waves propagating along the finite length channel is also presented. Magnetic field and non-Newtonian properties are found to strongly influence peristaltic transport. PMID:23911695

  4. Transient magneto-peristaltic flow of couple stress biofluids: a magneto-hydro-dynamical study on digestive transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Anwar Bég, O

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic fields are increasingly being utilized in endoscopy and gastric transport control. In this regard, the present study investigates the influence of a transverse magnetic field in the transient peristaltic rheological transport. An electrically-conducting couple stress non-Newtonian model is employed to accurately simulate physiological fluids in peristaltic flow through a sinusoidally contracting channel of finite length. This model is designed for computing the intra-bolus oesophageal and intestinal pressures during the movement of food bolus in the digestive system under magneto-hydro-dynamic effects. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations have been employed to reduce the governing equations from nonlinear to linear form, this being a valid approach for creeping flows which characterizes physiological dynamics. Analytical approximate solutions for axial velocity, transverse velocity, pressure gradient, local wall shear stress and volumetric flow rate are obtained for the non-dimensional conservation equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions. The effects of couple stress parameter and transverse magnetic field on the velocity profile, pressure distribution, local wall shear stress and the averaged flow rate are discussed with the aid of computational results. The comparative study of non-integral and integral number of waves propagating along the finite length channel is also presented. Magnetic field and non-Newtonian properties are found to strongly influence peristaltic transport.

  5. GENERALIZED VISCOPLASTIC MODELING OF DEBRIS FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    The earliest model developed by R. A. Bagnold was based on the concept of the 'dispersive' pressure generated by grain collisions. Some efforts have recently been made by theoreticians in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics to modify or improve Bagnold's concept or model. A viable rheological model should consist both of a rate-independent part and a rate-dependent part. A generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model that has both parts as well as two major rheological properties (i. e. , the normal stress effect and soil yield criterion) is shown to be sufficiently accurate, yet practical for general use in debris-flow modeling. In fact, Bagnold's model is found to be only a particular case of the GVF model. analytical solutions for (steady) uniform debris flows in wide channels are obtained from the GVF model based on Bagnold's simplified assumption of constant grain concentration.

  6. Continuous flow Sonogashira C-C coupling using a heterogeneous palladium-copper dual reactor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li-Min; Sem, Zhi-Yu; Chong, Wei-Yuan; Liu, Xiaoqian; Hendra; Kwan, Wei Lek; Lee, Chi-Lik Ken

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a heterogeneous catalyst system on continuous flow chemistry. A palladium (Pd) coated tubular reactor was placed in line with copper (Cu) tubing using a continuous flow platform, and a Sonogashira C-C coupling reaction was used to evaluate the performance. The reactions were favorably carried out in the Cu reactor, catalyzed by the traces of leached Pd from the Pd reactor. The leached Pd and Cu were trapped with a metal scavaging resin at the back-end of the continuous flow system, affording a genuine approach toward green chemistry. PMID:23248977

  7. Coupled finite difference and boundary element methods for fluid flow through a vessel with multibranches in tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Wu, Guo Xiong

    2013-03-01

    A mathematical model and a numerical solution procedure are developed to simulate flow field through a 3D permeable vessel with multibranches embedded in a solid tumour. The model is based on Poisseuille's law for the description of the flow through the vessels, Darcy's law for the fluid field inside the tumour interstitium, and Starling's law for the flux transmitted across the vascular walls. The solution procedure is based on a coupled method, in which the finite difference method is used for the flow in the vessels and the boundary element method is used for the flow in the tumour. When vessels meet each other at a junction, the pressure continuity and mass conservation are imposed at the junction. Three typical representative structures within the tumour vasculature, symmetrical dichotomous branching, asymmetrical bifurcation with uneven radius of daughter vessels and trifurcation, are investigated in detail as case studies. These results have demonstrated the features of tumour flow environment by the pressure distributions and flow velocity field.

  8. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm and cold season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Barros, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. The first objective of this study is to investigate this hypothesis. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations, availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions, and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions necessary for the initiation of slope instability, and should therefore be considered explicitly in landslide hazard assessments. Moreover, the relationships between slope stability and interflow are

  9. Closure models for transitional blunt-body flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, Robert Paul

    1998-12-01

    A mean-flow modeling approach is proposed for the prediction of high-speed blunt-body wake flows undergoing transition to turbulence. This method couples the k- /zeta (Enstrophy) compressible turbulence model with a procedure for characterizing non-turbulent fluctuations upstream of transition. Two different instability mechanisms are examined in this study. In the first model, transition is brought about by streamwise disturbance modes, whereas the second mechanism considers instabilities in the free shear layer associated with the wake flow. An important feature of this combined approach is the ability to specify or predict the location of transition onset. Solutions obtained using the new approach are presented for a variety of perfect-gas hypersonic flows over blunt- cone configurations. These results are shown to provide better agreement with experimental heating data than earlier laminar predictions by other researchers. In addition, it is demonstrated that the free-shear-layer instability mechanism is superior to the streamwise mechanism in terms of comparisons with heating measurements. The favorable comparisons are a strong indication that transition to turbulence is indeed present in the flowfields considered. They also show that the present method is a useful predictive tool for transitional blunt-body wake flows.

  10. The multilevel CC3 coupled cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, Rolf H.; Koch, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the closed shell multilevel coupled cluster method where coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) is used for the inactive orbital space and CCSD with perturbative triples (CC3) is employed for the smaller active orbital space. Using Cholesky orbitals, the active space can be spatially localized and the computational cost is greatly reduced compared to full CC3 while retaining the accuracy of CC3 excitation energies. For the small organic molecules considered we achieve up to two orders of magnitude reduction in the computational requirements.

  11. Incompressible SPH scour model for movable bed dam break flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qihua; Tong, Jian; Shao, Songdong; Fu, Xudong; Xu, Yueping

    2015-08-01

    In this study an incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (ISPH) approach coupled with the sediment erosion model is developed to investigate the sediment bed scour and grain movement under the dam break flows. Two-phase formulations are used in the ISPH numerical algorithms to examine the free surface and bed evolution profiles, in which the entrained sediments are treated as a different fluid component as compared with the water. The sediment bed erosion model is based on the concept of pick-up flow velocity and the sediment is initiated when the local flow velocity exceeds a critical value. The proposed model is used to reproduce the sediment erosion and follow-on entrainment process under an instantaneous dam break flow and the results are compared with those from the weakly compressible moving particle semi-implicit (WCMPS) method as well as the experimental data. It has been demonstrated that the two-phase ISPH model performed well with the experimental data. The study shows that the ISPH modelling approach can accurately predict the dynamic sediment scouring process without the need to use empirical sediment transport formulas.

  12. Domain decomposition for coupled Stokes and Darcy flows with floating Stokes domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changqing; Yotov, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition method is presented to solve a coupled Stokes-Darcy flow problem in parallel by partitioning the computational domain into multiple subdomains. Specifically, in the case where floating Stokes subdomain occurs, an approach based on the FETI methods is introduced and tested.

  13. Three-dimensional particle focusing under viscoelastic flow based on dean-flow-coupled elasto-inertial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, D.; Zhang, J.; Yan, S.; Pan, C.; Alici, G.; Nguyen, N. T.; Li, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Based on dean-flow-coupled elasto-inertial effects, 3D particle focusing in a straight channel with asymmetrical expansion-contraction cavity arrays (ECCA channel) is achieved. First, the mechanism of particle focusing in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids was introduced. Then particle focusing was demonstrated experimentally in this channel with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids using three different sized particles (3.2μm, 4.8 μm, 13 μm), respectively. The influences of flow rates on focusing performance in ECCA channel were studied. Results show that in ECCA channel particles are focused on the cavity side in Newtonian fluid due to the synthesis effects of inertial and dean-drag force, whereas on the opposite cavity side in non-Newtonian fluid due to the addition of viscoelastic force. Compared with the focusing performance in Newtonian fluid, the particles are more easily and better focused in non- Newtonian fluid. A further advantage is three-dimensional (3D) particle focusing in non-Newtonian fluid is realized according to the lateral side view of the channel while only two-dimensional (2D) particle focusing can be achieved in Newtonian fluid. Conclusively, this Dean-flow-coupled elasto-inertial microfluidic device could offer a continuous, sheathless, and high throughput (>10000 s-1) 3D focusing performance, which may be valuable in various applications from high speed flow cytometry to cell counting, sorting, and analysis.

  14. CIDGA - Coupling of Interior Dynamic models with Global Atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2010-05-01

    Atmosphere temperatures and in particular the surface temperatures mostly depend on the solar heat flux and the atmospheric composition. The latter can be influenced by interior processes of the planet, i.e. volcanism that releases greenhouse gases such as H2O, CO2 and methane into the atmosphere and plate tectonics through which atmospheric CO2 is recycled via carbonates into the mantle. An increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere results in an increase of the surface temperature. Changes in the surface temperature on the other hand may influence the cooling behaviour of the planet and hence influence its volcanic activity [Phillips et al., 2001]. This feedback relation between mantle convection and atmosphere is not very well understood, since until now mostly either the interior dynamic of a planet or its atmosphere was investigated separately. 2D or 3D mantle convection models to the authors' knowledge haven't been coupled to the atmosphere so far. We have used the 3D spherical simulation code GAIA [Hüttig et al., 2008] including partial melt production and coupled it with the atmosphere module CIDGA using a gray greenhouse model for varying H2O concentrations. This way, not only the influence of mantle dynamics on the atmosphere can be investigated, but also the recoupling effect, that the surface temperature has on the mantle dynamics. So far, we consider one-plate planets without crustal and thus volatile recycling. Phillips et al. [2001] already investigated the coupling effect of the surface temperature on mantle dynamics by using simple parameterized convection models for Venus. In their model a positive feedback mechanism has been observed, i.e., an increase of the surface temperature leads to an increase of partial melt and hence an increase of atmosphere density and surface temperature. Applying our model to Venus, we show that an increase of surface temperature leads not only to an increase of partial melt in the mantle; it also

  15. Time integration for diffuse interface models for two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aland, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    We propose a variant of the θ-scheme for diffuse interface models for two-phase flow, together with three new linearization techniques for the surface tension. These involve either additional stabilizing force terms, or a fully implicit coupling of the Navier–Stokes and Cahn–Hilliard equation. In the common case that the equations for interface and flow are coupled explicitly, we find a time step restriction which is very different to other two-phase flow models and in particular is independent of the grid size. We also show that the proposed stabilization techniques can lift this time step restriction. Even more pronounced is the performance of the proposed fully implicit scheme which is stable for arbitrarily large time steps. We demonstrate in a Taylor-flow application that this superior coupling between flow and interface equation can decrease the computation time by several orders of magnitude.

  16. Flow-Noise Calculation Using the Mutual Coupling Between Vulcanized Rubber and the Flow Around in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue-Gang; Yang, Kun-De; Ma, Yuan-Liang

    2012-06-01

    A vulcanized rubber layer is usually used on the head of an axisymmetric body to keep it streamlined and watertight. The elastic boundary condition is considered when the flow noise of an axisymmetric body is calculated, and we employ the mutual coupling method between the vulcanized rubber layer and the flow around to solve the flow-noise field for an axisymmetric body in water. The results show that the deformation of the vulcanized rubber layer is reduced with the increase in Young's modulus. The Young's modulus of the rubber material should be large enough to keep it streamlined, and the noise power levels in the peak of the axisymmetric body are smaller than the other positions, which provides us with important theoretical support for laying acoustic arrays on the head of the body.

  17. Model validation for karst flow using sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, M.; Pacheco Castro, R. B.; Tao, X.; Zhao, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study of flow in karst is complex due of the high heterogeneity of the porous media. Several approaches have been proposed in the literature to study overcome the natural complexity of karst. Some of those methods are the single continuum, double continuum and the discrete network of conduits coupled with the single continuum. Several mathematical and computing models are available in the literature for each approach. In this study one computer model has been selected for each category to validate its usefulness to model flow in karst using a sandbox experiment. The models chosen are: Modflow 2005, Modflow CFPV1 and Modflow CFPV2. A sandbox experiment was implemented in such way that all the parameters required for each model can be measured. The sandbox experiment was repeated several times under different conditions. The model validation will be carried out by comparing the results of the model simulation and the real data. This model validation will allows ud to compare the accuracy of each model and the applicability in Karst. Also we will be able to evaluate if the results of the complex models improve a lot compared to the simple models specially because some models require complex parameters that are difficult to measure in the real world.

  18. Simple leakage flow model for brush seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Dowler, Constance A.; Holle, Glenn F.

    1991-06-01

    Brush seals are potential replacements for some or most of the air-to-air labyrinth seals in gas turbine engines. A simple flow model is presented to generalize brush seal leakage performance throughout the range of test and application environments. The model uses a single parameter, effective brush thickness, to correlate flow through the seal. This effective brush thickness is a measure of the compactness of the bristle bed. Initial model results have been obtained using leakage flow data from two investigators. The results indicate that this simple single parameter model gives insight into the active nature of a brush seal and approximately accounts for the effect of fluid temperature, especially at the higher pressure ratios, where brush seals are commonly applied.

  19. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  20. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O.

    1994-04-04

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  1. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-08-02

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  2. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-11-15

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  3. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  4. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  5. Modelling soil-plant-atmosphere interactions by coupling the regional weather model WRF to mechanistic plant models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Priesack, E.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change causes altering distributions of meteorological factors influencing plant growth and its interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Recent studies show, that uncertainties in regional and global climate simulations are also caused by lacking descriptions of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Therefore, we couple a mechanistic soil-plant model to a regional climate and forecast model. The detailed simulation of the water and energy exchanges, especially the transpiration of grassland and forests stands, are the key features of the modelling framework. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) (Skamarock 2008) is an open source mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. The WRF model was modified in a way, to either choose its native, static land surface model NOAH or the mechanistic eco-system model Expert-N 5.0 individually for every single grid point within the simulation domain. The Expert-N 5.0 modelling framework provides a highly modular structure, enabling the development and use of a large variety of different plant and soil models, including heat transfer, nitrogen uptake/turnover/transport as well as water uptake/transport and crop management. To represent the key landuse types grassland and forest, we selected two mechanistic plant models: The Hurley Pasture model (Thornley 1998) and a modified TREEDYN3 forest simulation model (Bossel 1996). The models simulate plant growth, water, nitrogen and carbon flows for grassland and forest stands. A mosaic approach enables Expert-N to use high resolution land use data e.g. CORINE Land Cover data (CLC, 2006) for the simulation, making it possible to simulate different land use distributions within a single grid cell. The coupling results are analyzed for plausibility and compared with the results of the default land surface model NOAH (Fei Chen and Jimy Dudhia 2010). We show differences between the mechanistic and the static model coupling