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Sample records for modeling coupled flow

  1. ITG sideband coupling models for zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Stransky, M.

    2011-05-15

    Four-wave interaction model between ITG mode and zonal flow was derived using fluid equations. In this model, the zonal flow is excited non-linearly by ITG turbulence via Reynolds stress. Numerical simulations show that the system allows for a small range above the ITG threshold where the zonal flow can stabilize an unstable ITG mode, effectively increasing {eta}{sub i} threshold, an effect which has been called the Dimits shift. However, the shift is smaller than in known cases such that in the Cyclone base.

  2. Coupled continuum and molecular model of flow through fibrous filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunliu; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    A coupled approach combining the continuum boundary singularity method (BSM) and the molecular direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is developed and validated using Taylor-Couette flow and the flow about a single fiber confined between two parallel walls. In the proposed approach, the DSMC is applied to an annular region enclosing the fiber and the BSM is employed in the entire flow domain. The parameters used in the DSMC and the coupling procedure, such as the number of simulated particles, the cell size, and the size of the coupling zone are determined by inspecting the accuracy of pressure drop obtained for the range of Knudsen numbers between zero and unity. The developed approach is used to study flowfield of fibrous filtration flows. It is observed that in the partial-slip flow regime, Kn ⩽ 0.25, the results obtained by the proposed coupled BSM-DSMC method match the solution by BSM combined with the heuristic partial-slip boundary conditions. For transition molecular-to-continuum Knudsen numbers, 0.25 < Kn ⩽ 1, the difference in pressure drop and velocity between these two approaches is significant. This difference increases with the Knudsen number that confirms the usefulness of coupled continuum and molecular methods in numerical modeling of transition low Reynolds number flows in fibrous filters.

  3. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  4. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  5. Model coupling for multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Rainer; Flemisch, Bernd; Wolff, Markus; Ebigbo, Anozie; Class, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Numerical models for flow and transport in porous media are valid for a particular set of processes, scales, levels of simplification and abstraction, grids etc. The coupling of two or more specialised models is a method of increasing the overall range of validity while keeping the computational costs relatively low. Several coupling concepts are reviewed in this article with a focus on the authors’ work in this field. The concepts are divided into temporal and spatial coupling concepts, of which the latter is subdivided into multi-process, multi-scale, multi-dimensional, and multi-compartment coupling strategies. Examples of applications for which these concepts can be relevant include groundwater protection and remediation, carbon dioxide storage, nuclear-waste disposal, soil dry-out and evaporation processes as well as fuel cells and technical filters.

  6. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations.

  7. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  8. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model.

    PubMed

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-01-15

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow-structure-acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration.

  9. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  10. Numerical simulation of the two-phase flows in a hydraulic coupling by solving VOF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Fan, H. G.; Zhuge, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    The flow in a partially filled hydraulic coupling is essentially a gas-liquid two-phase flow, in which the distribution of two phases has significant influence on its characteristics. The interfaces between the air and the liquid, and the circulating flows inside the hydraulic coupling can be simulated by solving the VOF two-phase model. In this paper, PISO algorithm and RNG k-ɛ turbulence model were employed to simulate the phase distribution and the flow field in a hydraulic coupling with 80% liquid fill. The results indicate that the flow forms a circulating movement on the torus section with decreasing speed ratio. In the pump impeller, the air phase mostly accumulates on the suction side of the blades, while liquid on the pressure side; in turbine runner, air locates in the middle of the flow passage. Flow separations appear near the blades and the enclosing boundaries of the hydraulic coupling.

  11. A numerical method for a model of two-phase flow in a coupled free flow and porous media system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we study two-phase fluid flow in coupled free flow and porous media regions. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the porous medium region. We propose a Robin-Robin domain decomposition method for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  12. Common problematic aspects of coupling hydrological models with groundwater flow models on the river catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, R.

    2006-09-01

    Model coupling requires a thorough conceptualisation of the coupling strategy, including an exact definition of the individual model domains, the "transboundary" processes and the exchange parameters. It is shown here that in the case of coupling groundwater flow and hydrological models - in particular on the regional scale - it is very important to find a common definition and scale-appropriate process description of groundwater recharge and baseflow (or "groundwater runoff/discharge") in order to achieve a meaningful representation of the processes that link the unsaturated and saturated zones and the river network. As such, integration by means of coupling established disciplinary models is problematic given that in such models, processes are defined from a purpose-oriented, disciplinary perspective and are therefore not necessarily consistent with definitions of the same process in the model concepts of other disciplines. This article contains a general introduction to the requirements and challenges of model coupling in Integrated Water Resources Management including a definition of the most relevant technical terms, a short description of the commonly used approach of model coupling and finally a detailed consideration of the role of groundwater recharge and baseflow in coupling groundwater models with hydrological models. The conclusions summarize the most relevant problems rather than giving practical solutions. This paper aims to point out that working on a large scale in an integrated context requires rethinking traditional disciplinary workflows and encouraging communication between the different disciplines involved. It is worth noting that the aspects discussed here are mainly viewed from a groundwater perspective, which reflects the author's background.

  13. Simulating urban flow and dispersion in Beijing by coupling a CFD model with the WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Chen, Bicheng; Zhang, Bihui; Wang, Shu; Li, Shuyan

    2013-11-01

    The airflow and dispersion of a pollutant in a complex urban area of Beijing, China, were numerically examined by coupling a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model with a mesoscale weather model. The models used were Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM) software package and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. OpenFOAM was firstly validated against wind-tunnel experiment data. Then, the WRF model was integrated for 42 h starting from 0800 LST 08 September 2009, and the coupled model was used to compute the flow fields at 1000 LST and 1400 LST 09 September 2009. During the WRF-simulated period, a high pressure system was dominant over the Beijing area. The WRF-simulated local circulations were characterized by mountain valley winds, which matched well with observations. Results from the coupled model simulation demonstrated that the airflows around actual buildings were quite different from the ambient wind on the boundary provided by the WRF model, and the pollutant dispersion pattern was complicated under the influence of buildings. A higher concentration level of the pollutant near the surface was found in both the step-down and step-up notches, but the reason for this higher level in each configurations was different: in the former, it was caused by weaker vertical flow, while in the latter it was caused by a downward-shifted vortex. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the coupled WRF-OpenFOAM model is an important tool that can be used for studying and predicting urban flow and dispersions in densely built-up areas.

  14. Coupled groundwater flow and transport: 1. Verification of variable density flow and transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolditz, Olaf; Ratke, Rainer; Diersch, Hans-Jörg G.; Zielke, Werner

    This work examines variable density flow and corresponding solute transport in groundwater systems. Fluid dynamics of salty solutions with significant density variations are of increasing interest in many problems of subsurface hydrology. The mathematical model comprises a set of non-linear, coupled, partial differential equations to be solved for pressure/hydraulic head and mass fraction/concentration of the solute component. The governing equations and underlying assumptions are developed and discussed. The equation of solute mass conservation is formulated in terms of mass fraction and mass concentration. Different levels of the approximation of density variations in the mass balance equations are used for convection problems (e.g. the Boussinesq approximation and its extension, fully density approximation). The impact of these simplifications is studied by use of numerical modelling. Numerical models for nonlinear problems, such as density-driven convection, must be carefully verified in a particular series of tests. Standard benchmarks for proving variable density flow models are the Henry, Elder, and salt dome (HYDROCOIN level 1 case 5) problems. We studied these benchmarks using two finite element simulators - ROCKFLOW, which was developed at the Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Computer Applications in Civil Engineering and FEFLOW, which was developed at the Institute for Water Resources Planning and Systems Research Ltd. Although both simulators are based on the Galerkin finite element method, they differ in many approximation details such as temporal discretization (Crank-Nicolson vs predictor-corrector schemes), spatial discretization (triangular and quadrilateral elements), finite element basis functions (linear, bilinear, biquadratic), iteration schemes (Newton, Picard) and solvers (direct, iterative). The numerical analysis illustrates discretization effects and defects arising from the different levels of the density of approximation. We contribute

  15. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, M.; Chen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor’s surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy’s law for tissue, and simplified Navier–Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling’s law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model. PMID:23840579

  16. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    PubMed

    Soltani, M; Chen, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  17. Numerical modeling of coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow

    Treesearch

    Thijs J. Kelleners; Jeremy Koonce; Rose Shillito; Jelle Dijkema; Markus Berli; Michael H. Young; John M. Frank; William Massman

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional vertical numerical model for coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow was modified to include all three phases of water: vapor, liquid, and ice. The top boundary condition in the model is driven by incoming precipitation and the surface energy balance. The model was applied to three different terrestrial systems: A warm desert bare...

  18. A Computational Model of Coupled Multiphase Flow and Geomechanics to Study Fault Slip and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Jha, B.

    2014-12-01

    The coupling between subsurface flow and geomechanical deformation is critical in the assessment of the environmental impacts of groundwater use, underground liquid waste disposal, geologic storage of carbon dioxide, and exploitation of shale gas reserves. In particular, seismicity induced by fluid injection and withdrawal has emerged as a central element of the scientific discussion around subsurface technologies that tap into water and energy resources. Here we present a new computational approach to model coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics of faulted reservoirs. We represent faults as surfaces embedded in a three-dimensional medium by using zero-thickness interface elements to accurately model fault slip under dynamically evolving fluid pressure and fault strength. We incorporate the effect of fluid pressures from multiphase flow in the mechanical stability of faults and employ a rigorous formulation of nonlinear multiphase geomechanics that is capable of handling strong capillary effects. We develop a numerical simulation tool by coupling a multiphase flow simulator with a mechanics simulator, using the unconditionally stable fixed-stress scheme for the sequential solution of two-way coupling between flow and geomechanics. We validate our modeling approach using several synthetic, but realistic, test cases that illustrate the onset and evolution of earthquakes from fluid injection and withdrawal. We also present the application of the coupled flow-geomechanics simulation technology to the post mortem analysis of the Mw=5.1, May 2011 Lorca earthquake in south-east Spain, and assess the potential that the earthquake was induced by groundwater extraction.

  19. MODELING COUPLING OF EEL GRASS ZOSTRA MARINA AND WATER FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological effects caused by submerged aquatic vegetation not only depend on the plants and their morphology but also on the flow and transport patterns of dissolved and suspended constituents near the canopy. The height of the canopy is a major parameter in any quantitative an...

  20. MODELING COUPLING OF EEL GRASS ZOSTRA MARINA AND WATER FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological effects caused by submerged aquatic vegetation not only depend on the plants and their morphology but also on the flow and transport patterns of dissolved and suspended constituents near the canopy. The height of the canopy is a major parameter in any quantitative an...

  1. A fully coupled depth-integrated model for surface water and groundwater flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyi; Yuan, Dekui; Lin, Binliang; Teo, Fang-Yenn

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the development of a fully coupled surface water and groundwater flow model. The governing equations of the model are derived based on a control volume approach, with the velocity profiles of the two types of flows being both taken into consideration. The surface water and groundwater flows are both modelled based on the unified equations and the water exchange and interaction between the two types of flows can be taken into account. The model can be used to simulate the surface water and groundwater flows simultaneously with the same numerical scheme without other effort being needed to link them. The model is not only suitable for the porous medium consisting of fine sediments, but also for coarse sediments and crushed rocks by adding a quadratic friction term. Benchmark tests are conducted to validate the model. The model predictions agree well with the data.

  2. A general kinetic-flow coupling model for FCC riser flow simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-05-18

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code has been developed for fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser flow simulation. Depending on the application of interest, a specific kinetic model is needed for the FCC flow simulation. This paper describes a method to determine a kinetic model based on limited pilot-scale test data. The kinetic model can then be used with the CFD code as a tool to investigate optimum operating condition ranges for a specific FCC unit.

  3. Coupled Modeling of Flow, Transport, and Deformation during Hydrodynamically Unstable Displacement in Fractured Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled processes of flow, transport, and deformation are important during production of hydrocarbons from oil and gas reservoirs. Effective design and implementation of enhanced recovery techniques such as miscible gas flooding and hydraulic fracturing requires modeling and simulation of these coupled proceses in geologic porous media. We develop a computational framework to model the coupled processes of flow, transport, and deformation in heterogeneous fractured rock. We show that the hydrocarbon recovery efficiency during unstable displacement of a more viscous oil with a less viscous fluid in a fractured medium depends on the mechanical state of the medium, which evolves due to permeability alteration within and around fractures. We show that fully accounting for the coupling between the physical processes results in estimates of the recovery efficiency in agreement with observations in field and lab experiments.

  4. Coupling lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of thermal flows on standard lattices.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; He, Y L; Gao, Y J; Tao, W Q

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating thermal flows on the standard two-dimensional nine-velocity (D2Q9) lattice is developed in the framework of the double-distribution-function (DDF) approach in which the viscous heat dissipation and compression work are considered. In the model, a density distribution function is used to simulate the flow field, while a total energy distribution function is employed to simulate the temperature field. The discrete equilibrium density and total energy distribution functions are obtained from the Hermite expansions of the corresponding continuous equilibrium distribution functions. The pressure given by the equation of state of perfect gases is recovered in the macroscopic momentum and energy equations. The coupling between the momentum and energy transports makes the model applicable for general thermal flows such as non-Boussinesq flows, while the existing DDF LB models on standard lattices are usually limited to Boussinesq flows in which the temperature variation is small. Meanwhile, the simple structure and general features of the DDF LB approach are retained. The model is tested by numerical simulations of thermal Couette flow, attenuation-driven acoustic streaming, and natural convection in a square cavity with small and large temperature differences. The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical solutions and/or other numerical results reported in the literature.

  5. Updating an equivalent porous medium karst aquifer model using the coupled continuum pipe-flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, S. P.; Ronayne, M. J.; Long, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Karst conduits are commonly treated as high-conductivity zones in equivalent porous medium (EPM) models. In this study, an EPM model for a Paleozoic age carbonate aquifer was updated to include discrete conduits, and flow was simulated using the coupled continuum pipe-flow method. The modeled area, encompassing 2000 square km of the Madison aquifer in western South Dakota (USA), includes four karst springs with contributing conduit networks. The updated model considered the same observation data that were used to calibrate the EPM model: measured hydraulic heads at matrix observation wells and estimated springflow. Adjusted parameters included the conduit locations and hydraulic properties, as well as the matrix hydraulic conductivity distribution. Inferred karst pathways from environmental tracer analysis were used to guide the placement of conduits. The new coupled continuum pipe-flow model is characterized by a simpler conductivity distribution; extreme high-K values used in the EPM model are not necessary when conduit flow is explicitly simulated. Results are presented to illustrate the influence of conduits on simulated flow behavior.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Liquid-Vapor Coupled Heat and Fluid Flow in Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xing, H.

    2011-12-01

    Liquid-vapor two phase flows in porous media are complex dynamic processes involving phase transitions and phase production due to concurrent processes. The coupled thermo fluid flow with liquid-vapor phase change has received increasing concern recently due to the highly nonlinear behaviors and drastic changes of physical properties. A numerical model is developed for simulating liquid/vapor two-phase coupled fluid and heat flow in porous media, particularly towards hydrothermal/geothermal reservoirs. The model is formulated by two nonlinear equations with pressure and enthalpy as the primary variables. The nonlinearities in the coupled partial differential equations as well as the severe oscillations and instabilities existing in the numerical modeling are investigated. The coupled highly nonlinear equations are solved simultaneously using a Newton based nonlinear finite element technique with the support of a phase change control module and an automatic time step control module. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and usefulness of the proposed model and algorithms.

  7. A partially open porous media flow with chaotic advection: towards a model of coupled fields.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Guy; Lester, Daniel; Ord, Alison; Kulkarni, Pandurang; Trefry, Mike; Hobbs, Bruce E; Regenaur-Lieb, Klaus; Morris, Jeffery

    2010-01-13

    In nature, dissipative fluxes of fluid, heat and/or reacting species couple to each other and may also couple to deformation of a surrounding porous matrix. We use the well-known analogy of Hele-Shaw flow to Darcy flow to make a model porous medium with porosity proportional to local cell height. Time- and space-varying fluid injection from multiple source/sink wells lets us create many different kinds of chaotic flows and chemical concentration patterns. Results of an initial time-dependent potential flow model illustrate that this is a partially open flow, in which parts of the material transported by the flow remain in the cell forever and parts pass through with residence time and exit time distributions that have self-similar features in the control parameter space of the stirring. We derive analytically the existence boundary in stirring control parameter space between where isolated fluid regions can and cannot remain forever in the open flow. Experiments confirm the predictions.

  8. Inverse model of fully coupled fluid flow and stress in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to reflect the real behavior of the seepage field and deformation field during the environment change and construction process£¬the basic equations and FEM methods for fully coupled analysis of fluid flow and stress are developed£¬based on the assumptions of small deformation and incompressible water flow in complicated fractured rock masses. Both the equivalent continuum media model and the discrete media model are adopted. And the modified initial flow method is used to deal with the free surface of unconfined seepage. Due to the difficulty in determining the parameters of water flow field, stress field and their coupling relations, an inverse model is presented for the fully coupled problem in which both the data of water head and displacement are taken into consideration. Objective function is defined based on sensitivity analysis of parameters, and the relative values of water head, displacement on parameters are adopted in the establishment of objective function. A hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed as optimization method. The probability of crossover and mutation is determined according to chromosome fitness and a concept of self- adaptive probability is given. In addition, simplex method is also applied to increase the ability of local search, the operation of accelerated cycle is used in order to decrease optimization time.

  9. Were the May 2012 Emilia-Romagna earthquakes induced? A coupled flow-geomechanics modeling assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Jha, B.; Hager, B. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Astiz, L.; Dieterich, J. H.; Frohlich, C.

    2016-07-01

    Seismicity induced by fluid injection and withdrawal has emerged as a central element of the scientific discussion around subsurface technologies that tap into water and energy resources. Here we present the application of coupled flow-geomechanics simulation technology to the post mortem analysis of a sequence of damaging earthquakes (Mw = 6.0 and 5.8) in May 2012 near the Cavone oil field, in northern Italy. This sequence raised the question of whether these earthquakes might have been triggered by activities due to oil and gas production. Our analysis strongly suggests that the combined effects of fluid production and injection from the Cavone field were not a driver for the observed seismicity. More generally, our study illustrates that computational modeling of coupled flow and geomechanics permits the integration of geologic, seismotectonic, well log, fluid pressure and flow rate, and geodetic data and provides a promising approach for assessing and managing hazards associated with induced seismicity.

  10. Fluid Transport in Porous Rocks. II. Hydrodynamic Model of Flow and Intervoxel Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, P.; Issa, B.

    In a preceding paper [P. Mansfield and B. Issa, J. Magn. Reson. A122, 137-148 (1996)], a stochastic model of fluid flow in porous rocks based upon the experimental observation of water flow through a Bentheimer sandstone core was proposed. The flow maps were measured by NMR-imaging techniques. The stochastic theory led to a Gaussian velocity distribution with a mean value in accord with Darcy's law. Also predicted was a linear relationship between flow variance and mean fluid flow through rock, the Mansfield-Issa equation, originally proposed as an empirical relationship. In the present work a flow coupling mechanism between voxels is proposed. Examination of the flow coupling between isolated voxel pairs leads to a complementary explanation of the Gaussian velocity distribution, and also gives further details of the Mansfield-Issa equation. These details lead to a new expression for the connectivity, < C>, between voxels with an experimental value of < C> = 5.64 × 10 -9for Bentheimer sandstone.

  11. Coupling of FVCOM and CFD Model for Simulation of Multiscale Coastal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Qu, K.

    2013-12-01

    In correspondence with the need to simulate many emerging problems, especially those in nearshore regions such as deepwater oil spill, it is necessary to develop capabilities to predict small-scale, fully 3D phenomena in coastal ocean flows. A feasible as well as effective approach for the development is a hybrid method that couples different models designed for physics at different scales. We have developed a two-way coupling between a fully 3D CFD model and the FVCOM, in which the former captures small-scale 3D flows and the latter predicts large-scale background currents. In this presentation, a few new applications of such approach will be illustrated. The following figures show a result on tidal flow in a bay and past bridge peers. Tests and analysis are made on solution accuracy and computation efficiency, and discussions are presented on how to achieve seamless solution transition at the model interfaces. Computed large-scale background flow Simulated flow past a brigde

  12. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Soil and Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleners, T.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Both liquid water flow and water vapor flow are included. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from a high-elevation rangeland soil that is subject to significant soil freezing and a mountainous forest soil that is snow-covered for about 8 months of the year. Soil hydraulic parameters are mostly based on measurements and only vegetation parameters are fine-tuned to match measured and calculated soil water content, soil & snow temperature, and snow height. Modeling statistics for both systems show good performance for temperature, intermediate performance for snow height, and relatively low performance for soil water content, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  13. Coupled dam-break flow and bed load modelling using HLLC-WAF scheme.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh-Tabrizi, Alireza; Ghaeini-Hessaroeyeh, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model predicting flow over a mobile bed has been developed. Governing equations consist of the shallow water equations and the Exner equation. The finite volume method on an unstructured triangular grid was deployed to discretize the governing equations. The local Riemann problem is solved by the Harten, Lax and van Leer-contact (HLLC) method in the interface of the cells and the equations are solved using a fully coupled method. Then the flux modelling has been deployed by the total variation diminishing (TVD) version of the weighted average flux (WAF) scheme. The model was verified by comparison of the results and available experimental data for dam-break flow, in a laboratory test, via a channel with sudden enlargement and erodible bed conditions. Comparison of these two sets of results shows that increasing the accuracy of flux modelling caused the model results to have a reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Thermochemical Nonequilibrium 2D Modeling of Nitrogen Inductively Coupled Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghao; Yusuke, Takahashi; Hisashi, Kihara; Ken-ichi, Abe; Kazuhiko, Yamada; Takashi, Abe; Satoshi, Miyatani

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations of thermochemical nonequilibrium inductively coupled plasma (ICP) flows inside a 10-kW inductively coupled plasma wind tunnel (ICPWT) were carried out with nitrogen as the working gas. Compressible axisymmetric Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations coupled with magnetic vector potential equations were solved. A four-temperature model including an improved electron-vibration relaxation time was used to model the internal energy exchange between electron and heavy particles. The third-order accuracy electron transport properties (3rd AETP) were applied to the simulations. A hybrid chemical kinetic model was adopted to model the chemical nonequilibrium process. The flow characteristics such as thermal nonequilibrium, inductive discharge, effects of Lorentz force were made clear through the present study. It was clarified that the thermal nonequilibrium model played an important role in properly predicting the temperature field. The prediction accuracy can be improved by applying the 3rd AETP to the simulation for this ICPWT. supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 23560954), sponsored by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

  15. Sensitivity experiments with a one-dimensional coupled plume - ice flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Johanna; Perrette, Mahé; Beyer, Sebastian; Calov, Reinhard; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    Over the past two decades net mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet quadrupled, caused by enhanced surface melting and speedup of the marine-terminating outlet glaciers. This speedup has been related, among other factors, to enhanced submarine melting, which in turn is caused by warming of the surrounding ocean and by increased subglacial discharge. For the future and recent mass balance changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet, ice-ocean processes potentially play an important role, yet they are not properly represented in contemporary Greenland Ice Sheet models. In this work we performed numerical experiments with a one-dimensional plume model coupled to a one-dimensional model of outlet glacier. We investigate the response of a coupled ice-flow plume model to possible outcomes of climate change. In particularly, we examine the transient and equilibrium response of the outlet glaciers to changes in ocean temperature and subglacial discharge which affects both: glacier geometry and submarine melt rates.

  16. Utilizing coupled isotope-flow modelling to estimate temporal evapotranspiration partitioning in remote northern Canadian watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. A.; Stadnyk, T. A.; Welch, C.

    2015-12-01

    Identification of source water and loss within northern watersheds is of significant importance due to multifaceted changes in physiography as a result of climate change within this region. Understanding the dominant processes is paramount to assess and anticipate the effects of these changes on the flow regime. Evapotranspiration loss has been identified as a primary component of the hydrologic cycle in northern Canadian watersheds and has high seasonal variability; however research within these remote watersheds is very limited. Coupled flow-isotope models have been used to improve process identification at the catchment scale, particularly using stable water isotopes which are affected by evaporation. Using a coupled flow-isotope model to temporally partition evapotranspiration, by exploiting the difference in fractionation of evaporation and transpiration, improved understanding of evapotranspiration in these watersheds is accomplished. Simulating the difference of evaporative fractionation of oxygen-18 and deuterium helps to constrain the output and reduce uncertainty. To assess the temporal evapotranspiration partition established by the coupled flow-isotope model, a dual isotope transit time model will be applied on a monthly time-step to compare using effective precipitation input. Results indicate that the partition of evapotranspiration follows a seasonal trend, consistent with the time of abscission in the watersheds and length of the growing season. Transpiration is the dominant portion of evapotranspiration during the growing season, however as temperatures decrease, vegetation retains moisture and the dominant partition changes to evaporation. Utilizing stable water isotopes has been shown to have good potential at identifying the partition with limited spatial and temporal data, however, assessment of model results against long term or higher spatial resolution data would further reduce uncertainty.

  17. Flow-radiation coupling for atmospheric entries using a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucasse, Laurent; Scoggins, James B.; Rivière, Philippe; Magin, Thierry E.; Soufiani, Anouar

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band (HSNB) model is implemented to make fast and accurate predictions of radiative transfer effects on hypersonic entry flows. The HSNB model combines a Statistical Narrow Band (SNB) model for optically thick molecular systems, a box model for optically thin molecular systems and continua, and a Line-By-Line (LBL) description of atomic radiation. Radiative transfer calculations are coupled to a 1D stagnation-line flow model under thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. Earth entry conditions corresponding to the FIRE 2 experiment, as well as Titan entry conditions corresponding to the Huygens probe, are considered in this work. Thermal nonequilibrium is described by a two temperature model, although non-Boltzmann distributions of electronic levels provided by a Quasi-Steady State model are also considered for radiative transfer. For all the studied configurations, radiative transfer effects on the flow, the plasma chemistry and the total heat flux at the wall are analyzed in detail. The HSNB model is shown to reproduce LBL results with an accuracy better than 5% and a speed up of the computational time around two orders of magnitude. Concerning molecular radiation, the HSNB model provides a significant improvement in accuracy compared to the Smeared-Rotational-Band model, especially for Titan entries dominated by optically thick CN radiation.

  18. Modeling flow in nanoporous, membrane reservoirs and interpretation of coupled fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geren, Filiz

    The average pore size in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this pore size, Darcy flow is no longer the dominating flow mechanism and a combination of diffusive flows determines the flow characteristics. Concentration driven self-diffusion has been well known and included in the flow and transport models in porous media. However, when the sizes of the pores and pore-throats decrease down to the size of the hydrocarbon molecules, the porous medium acts like a semi-permeable membrane, and the size of the pore openings dictates the direction of transport between adjacent pores. Accordingly, characterization of flow and transport in tight unconventional plays requires understanding of their membrane properties. This Master of Science thesis first highlights the membrane properties of nanoporous, unconventional reservoirs and then discusses how filtration effects can be incorporated into the models of transport in nanoporous media within the coupled flux concept. The effect of filtration on fluid composition and its impact on black-oil fluid properties like bubble point pressure is also demonstrated. To define filtration and filtration pressure in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs, analogy to chemical osmosis is applied two pore systems connected with a pore throat, which shows membrane properties. Because the pore throat selectivity permits the passage of fluid molecules by their sizes, given a filtration pressure difference between the two pore systems, the concentration difference between the systems is determined by flash calculations. The results are expressed in the form of filtration (membrane) efficiency, which is essential parameter to define coupled fluxes for porous media flow.

  19. Generic Procedure for Coupling the PHREEQC Geochemical Modeling Framework with Flow and Solute Transport Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmeier, L. C.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Computer simulations of water availability and quality play an important role in state-of-the-art water resources management. However, many of the most utilized software programs focus either on physical flow and transport phenomena (e.g., MODFLOW, MT3DMS, FEFLOW, HYDRUS) or on geochemical reactions (e.g., MINTEQ, PHREEQC, CHESS, ORCHESTRA). In recent years, several couplings between both genres of programs evolved in order to consider interactions between flow and biogeochemical reactivity (e.g., HP1, PHWAT). Software coupling procedures can be categorized as ‘close couplings’, where programs pass information via the memory stack at runtime, and ‘remote couplings’, where the information is exchanged at each time step via input/output files. The former generally involves modifications of software codes and therefore expert programming skills are required. We present a generic recipe for remotely coupling the PHREEQC geochemical modeling framework and flow and solute transport (FST) simulators. The iterative scheme relies on operator splitting with continuous re-initialization of PHREEQC and the FST of choice at each time step. Since PHREEQC calculates the geochemistry of aqueous solutions in contact with soil minerals, the procedure is primarily designed for couplings to FST’s for liquid phase flow in natural environments. It requires the accessibility of initial conditions and numerical parameters such as time and space discretization in the input text file for the FST and control of the FST via commands to the operating system (batch on Windows; bash/shell on Unix/Linux). The coupling procedure is based on PHREEQC’s capability to save the state of a simulation with all solid, liquid and gaseous species as a PHREEQC input file by making use of the dump file option in the TRANSPORT keyword. The output from one reaction calculation step is therefore reused as input for the following reaction step where changes in element amounts due to advection

  20. Numerical Modeling on Two phase Fluid flow in a Coupled Fracture-Skin-Matrix System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsala Kumari, R.; G, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow modeling studies below the ground surface is very essential for designing suitable remediation strategies for contaminated aquifers and for the development of petroleum and geothermal reservoirs. Presence of fractured bedrock beneath the ground surface will make multiphase flow process more complex due to its highly heterogeneous nature. A major challenge in modeling flow within a fractured rock is to capture the interaction between the high permeability fracture and the low permeability rock-matrix. In some instances, weathering and mineral depositions will lead to formation of an additional layer named fracture-skin at the fracture-matrix interface. Porosity and permeability of fracture-skin may significantly vary from the adjacent rock matrix and this variation will result in different flow and transport behavior within the fracture-skin. In the present study, an attempt has been made to model simultaneous flow of two immiscible phases (water and LNAPL) in a saturated coupled fracture-skin-matrix system. A fully-implicit finite difference model has been developed to simulate the variation of pressure and saturation of fluid phases along the fracture and within the rock-matrix. Sensitivity studies have been done to analyze the effect of change of various fracture-skin parameters such as porosity, diffusion coefficient and thickness on pressure and saturation distribution of both wetting and non-wetting fluid phases. It can be concluded from the study that the presence of fracture-skin is significantly affecting the fluid flow at the fracture-matrix interface and it can also be seen from the study that the flow behavior of both fluid phases is sensitive to fracture-skin parameters.

  1. Simultaneous parameter estimation and contaminant source characterization for coupled groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Parameter estimation and contaminant source characterization are key steps in the development of a coupled groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation model. Here a methodologyfor simultaneous model parameter estimation and source characterization is presented. The parameter estimation/source characterization inverse model combines groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation with non-linear maximum likelihood estimation to determine optimal estimates of the unknown model parameters and source characteristics based on measurements of hydraulic head and contaminant concentration. First-order uncertainty analysis provides a means for assessing the reliability of the maximum likelihood estimates and evaluating the accuracy and reliability of the flow and transport model predictions. A series of hypothetical examples is presented to demonstrate the ability of the inverse model to solve the combined parameter estimation/source characterization inverse problem. Hydraulic conductivities, effective porosity, longitudinal and transverse dispersivities, boundary flux, and contaminant flux at the source are estimated for a two-dimensional groundwater system. In addition, characterization of the history of contaminant disposal or location of the contaminant source is demonstrated. Finally, the problem of estimating the statistical parameters that describe the errors associated with the head and concentration data is addressed. A stage-wise estimation procedure is used to jointly estimate these statistical parameters along with the unknown model parameters and source characteristics. ?? 1992.

  2. Modeling velocity in gradient flows with coupled-map lattices with advection.

    PubMed

    Lind, Pedro G; Corte-Real, João; Gallas, Jason A C

    2002-07-01

    We introduce a simple model to investigate large scale behavior of gradient flows based on a lattice of coupled maps which, in addition to the usual diffusive term, incorporates advection, as an asymmetry in the coupling between nearest neighbors. This diffusive-advective model predicts traveling patterns to have velocities obeying the same scaling as wind velocities in the atmosphere, regarding the advective parameter as a sort of geostrophic wind. In addition, the velocity and wavelength of traveling wave solutions are studied. In general, due to the presence of advection, two regimes are identified: for strong diffusion the velocity varies linearly with advection, while for weak diffusion a power law is found with a characteristic exponent proportional to the diffusion.

  3. Modelling Soil Heat and Water Flow as a Coupled Process in Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García González, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Braud, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    To improve model estimates of soil water and heat flow by land surface models (LSMs), in particular in the first few centimetres of the near-surface soil profile, we have to consider in detail all the relevant physical processes involved (see e.g. Milly, 1982). Often, thermal and iso-thermal vapour fluxes in LSMs are neglected and the simplified Richard's equation is used as a result. Vapour transfer may affect the water fluxes and heat transfer in LSMs used for hydrometeorological and climate simulations. Processes occurring in the top 50 cm soil may be relevant for water and heat flux dynamics in the deeper layers, as well as for estimates of evapotranspiration and heterotrophic respiration, or even for climate and weather predictions. Water vapour transfer, which was not incorporated in previous versions of the MOSES/JULES model (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator; Cox et al., 1999), has now been implemented. Furthermore, we also assessed the effect of the soil vertical resolution on the simulated soil moisture and temperature profiles and the effect of the processes occurring at the upper boundary, mainly in terms of infiltration rates and evapotranspiration. SiSPAT (Simple Soil Plant Atmosphere Transfer Model; Braud et al., 1995) was initially used to quantify the changes that we expect to find when we introduce vapour transfer in JULES, involving parameters such as thermal vapour conductivity and diffusivity. Also, this approach allows us to compare JULES to a more complete and complex numerical model. Water vapour flux varied with soil texture, depth and soil moisture content, but overall our results suggested that water vapour fluxes change temperature gradients in the entire soil profile and introduce an overall surface cooling effect. Increasing the resolution smoothed and reduced temperature differences between liquid (L) and liquid/vapour (LV) simulations at all depths, and introduced a temperature increase over the entire soil profile. Thermal

  4. Coupled ice-flow/ocean circulation modeling in the Amundsen Sea Embayment using ISSM and MITgcm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, E. Y.; Menemenlis, D.; Schodlok, M.

    2014-12-01

    the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is thought to be prone to marine instability in which prolonged grounding line retreat could occur due to inland downwards sloping bedrocks. However, this instability is difficult to model in part due to the absence of good parameterizations for melt-rates under ice-shelves, in particular near or at the grounding-line, where a complex interplay between butressing, melt-rate, water-pressure and internal stresses in the ice develops. In order to simulate such melt rates accurately, ice-sheet models need to be fully coupled to ocean models, in order to capture the feedback mechanisms between heat-flux at the ice/ocean interface and cavity shape driven by grounding-line retreat.Here, we show an example of such a coupling between the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) and the MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm). The goal is to run sensitivity studies of the evolution of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica. We quantify the impact of feedbacks between both systems by running short transients (20-100 years) of the coupled ice-sheet flow/ocean circulation model. We vary inputs such as far-field temperature of the Circumpolar Deep-Water, surface temperature of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, and far-field surface ice-flow velocity. Preliminary insights into the variability of the system are presented, as well as quantified impacts of variations in model inputs.This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory undera contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  5. Numerical Model of Dephosphorization Reaction Kinetics in Top Blown Converter Coupled with Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Wang, Minghui

    2017-07-01

    A 3D transient numerical model of dephosphorization kinetics coupled with flow field in a top blown converter was built. Through the model the dephosphorization reaction rate influenced by the oxygen jets and the steel flow were simulated. The results show that the dephosphorization rate at the droplet metal-slag interface is two orders of magnitude faster than that at bath metal-slag interface. When the lance oxygen pressure increases from 0.7 to 0.8 MPa, the dephosphorization rate increases notably and the end content of P has a decrease of 19 %. However, when the pressure continues rising to 0.9 MPa, the dephosphorization rate has no significant increase. In addition, the lance height shows a nearly linear relation to the end P content of steel, that the lower the height, the faster the dephosphorization rate.

  6. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  7. Applying coupled flow and sediment-transport models to understanding habitat requirements and availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, R. R.; Nelson, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between habitat requirements and the magnitude and duration of flow and sediment supply is an important component of both habitat assessment and restoration strategies. Fish habitat is often defined in terms of velocity, depth or substrate composition; locations where combinations of these factors meet habitat requirements depend on channel morphology, flow magnitude, and, in rivers with mobile beds, time-varying change in channel morphology. Because coupled multi-dimensional flow and sediment transport models provide spatially distributed information on flow and other hydraulic quantities, they permit detailed delineation of habitat. Furthermore, they can be used directly to understand how flow magnitude and duration and sediment supply control channel change and habitat availability. We present an example to illustrate how such models can be used in investigations of fish spawning habitat and availability. In the Kootenai River, Idaho, comparison of observed spawning locations with model derived spatial distributions of depths and velocities suggests that white sturgeon utilize the largest available velocity and depth within an 18-kilometer spawning reach over a range of discharges. This is a somewhat more selective criterion than a simple specification of a range of velocity or depth magnitudes, which illustrates the importance of evaluating habitat over a full range of discharge magnitudes. Observations also suggest that spawning currently occurs over a sandy substrate resulting in suffocation of eggs and little to no recruitment of juvenile sturgeon since closure of Libby Dam in 1974. Extending flow modeling to incorporate sediment- transport and bed evolution suggests that a relatively high magnitude long duration discharge can remove sandy substrate, thereby exposing a coarse gravel lag deposit in some areas and providing needed spawning substrate. These results were qualitatively validated through video surveys of channel

  8. A Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Coupled Riparian Vegetation-Geomorphic Response to Altered Flow Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Wilcox, A. C.; Merritt, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ecogeomorphic response of riparian ecosystems to a change in hydrologic properties is difficult to predict because of the interactions and feedbacks among plants, water, and sediment. Most riparian models of community dynamics assume a static channel, yet geomorphic processes strongly control the establishment and survival of riparian vegetation. Using a combination of approaches that includes empirical relationships and hydrodynamic models, we model the coupled vegetation-topographic response of three cross-sections on the Yampa and Green Rivers in Dinosaur National Monument, to a shift in the flow regime. The locations represent the variable geomorphology and vegetation composition of these canyon-bound rivers. We account for the inundation and hydraulic properties of vegetation plots surveyed over three years within International River Interface Cooperative (iRIC) Fastmech, equipped with a vegetation module that accounts for flexible stems and plant reconfiguration. The presence of functional groupings of plants, or those plants that respond similarly to environmental factors such as water availability and disturbance are determined from flow response curves developed for the Yampa River. Using field measurements of vegetation morphology, distance from the channel centerline, and dominant particle size and modeled inundation properties we develop an empirical relationship between these variables and topographic change. We evaluate vegetation and channel form changes over decadal timescales, allowing for the integration of processes over time. From our analyses, we identify thresholds in the flow regime that alter the distribution of plants and reduce geomorphic complexity, predominately through side-channel and backwater infilling. Simplification of some processes (e.g., empirically-derived sedimentation) and detailed treatment of others (e.g., plant-flow interactions) allows us to model the coupled dynamics of riparian ecosystems and evaluate the impact of

  9. Flow equations and the strong-coupling expansion for the Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Jürgen

    1997-07-01

    Applying the method of continuous unitary transformations to a class of Hubbard models, we reexamine the derivation of the t/U expansion for the strong-coupling case. The flow equations for the coupling parameters of the higher order effective interactions can be solved exactly, resulting in a systematic expansion of the Hamiltonian in powers of t/U, valid for any lattice in arbitrary dimension and for general band filling. The expansion ensures a correct treatment of the operator products generated by the transformation, and only involves the explicit recursive calculation of numerical coefficients. This scheme provides a unifying framework to study the strong-coupling expansion for the Hubbard model, which clarifies and circumvents several difficulties inherent to earlier approaches. Our results are compared with those of other methods, and it is shown that the freedom in the choice of the unitary transformation that eliminates interactions between different Hubbard bands can affect the effective Hamiltonian only at order t 3/U2 or higher.

  10. Snowball Earth: Asynchronous coupling of sea-glacier flow with a global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, D.; Kasting, J. F.; Zugger, M. E.

    2017-05-01

    During Snowball Earth episodes of the Neoproterozoic and Paleoproterozoic, limited amounts of tropical open ocean (Jormungand), or tropical ocean with thin ice cover, would help to explain (1) vigorous glacial activity in low latitudes, (2) survival of photosynthetic life, and (3) deglacial recovery without excessive buildup of atmospheric CO2. Some previous models have suggested that tropical open ocean or thin-ice cover is possible; however, its viability in the presence of kilometer-thick sea glaciers flowing from higher latitudes has not been demonstrated conclusively. Here we describe a new method of asynchronously coupling a zonal sea-glacier model with a 3-D global climate model and apply it to Snowball Earth. Equilibrium curves of ice line versus CO2 are mapped out, as well as their dependence on ocean heat transport efficiency, sea-glacier flow, and other model parameters. No climate states with limited tropical open ocean or thin ice are found in any of our model runs, including those with sea glaciers. If this result is correct, then other refugia such as cryoconite pans would have been required for life to survive. However, the reasons for the differences between our results and others should first be resolved. It is suggested that small-scale convective dynamics, affecting fractional snow cover in low latitudes, may be a critical factor accounting for these differences.

  11. Coupled flow-polymer dynamics via statistical field theory: Modeling and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Ceniceros, Hector D. Fredrickson, Glenn H. Mohler, George O.

    2009-03-20

    Field-theoretic models, which replace interactions between polymers with interactions between polymers and one or more conjugate fields, offer a systematic framework for coarse-graining of complex fluids systems. While this approach has been used successfully to investigate a wide range of polymer formulations at equilibrium, field-theoretic models often fail to accurately capture the non-equilibrium behavior of polymers, especially in the early stages of phase separation. Here the 'two-fluid' approach serves as a useful alternative, treating the motions of fluid components separately in order to incorporate asymmetries between polymer molecules. In this work we focus on the connection of these two theories, drawing upon the strengths of each of the approaches in order to couple polymer microstructure with the dynamics of the flow in a systematic way. For illustrative purposes we work with an inhomogeneous melt of elastic dumbbell polymers, though our methodology will apply more generally to a wide variety of inhomogeneous systems. First we derive the model, incorporating thermodynamic forces into a two-fluid model for the flow through the introduction of conjugate chemical potential and elastic strain fields for the polymer density and stress. The resulting equations are composed of a system of fourth order PDEs coupled with a non-linear, non-local optimization problem to determine the conjugate fields. The coupled system is severely stiff and with a high degree of computational complexity. Next, we overcome the formidable numerical challenges posed by the model by designing a robust semi-implicit method based on linear asymptotic behavior of the leading order terms at small scales, by exploiting the exponential structure of global (integral) operators, and by parallelizing the non-linear optimization problem. The semi-implicit method effectively removes the fourth order stability constraint associated with explicit methods and we observe only a first order time

  12. Coupled Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Land Subsidence with Secular Strain (Creep)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, M.

    2012-12-01

    Land subsidence limits sustainable development of many areas around the world. This is especially the case in low lying regions such as deltas which accommodate a significant percentage of the human population. Among the most common human-induced factors for land subsidence, is groundwater extractions. In these cases, groundwater flow and land subsidence are coupled processes, especially in basins with extensive spatial extent of soft soils (e.g. clay, peat). Creep (or secondary consolidation) is a land subsidence component that usually contributes to total land subsidence in soft soils. It leads to a reduction in void ratio at constant effective stress, and consequently, to the development of an apparent pre-consolidation pressure. The creep component has been usually ignored in the analysis of coupled groundwater flow and land subsidence. Here, the focus is the development of a coupled model of groundwater flow and land subsidence in porous media considering secular strain (creep). The Bjerrum method for settlement calculation (Bjerrum, 1967) due to change in effective stresses is coupled with MODFLOW to tackle the problem. In particular, the SUB-WT package of MODFLOW (Leake and Galloway, 2007) is modified where the Bjerrum method is used to calculate the primary and secondary consolidation due to change in effective stresses as a result of groundwater abstraction. The Bjerrum model is based on linear strains relationship. Usage of linear strains means that the model directly supports the common parameters Cr, Cc, Cα (i.e. re-compression, compression, and secondary compression indices; respectively). The Bjerrum model assumes that creep rate will reduce with increasing over-consolidation and that over-consolidation will grow by unloading and by ageing. To verify the coupled model, a hypothetical problem is considered where a simple hydrogeological system consisting of a shallow unconfined aquifer and a deeper confined aquifer separated by a (semi

  13. Coupling-induced complexity in nephron models of renal blood flow regulation

    PubMed Central

    Laugesen, Jakob L.; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Mosekilde, Erik; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Tubular pressure and nephron blood flow time series display two interacting oscillations in rats with normal blood pressure. Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) senses NaCl concentration in tubular fluid at the macula densa, adjusts vascular resistance of the nephron's afferent arteriole, and generates the slower, larger-amplitude oscillations (0.02–0.04 Hz). The faster smaller oscillations (0.1–0.2 Hz) result from spontaneous contractions of vascular smooth muscle triggered by cyclic variations in membrane electrical potential. The two mechanisms interact in each nephron and combine to act as a high-pass filter, adjusting diameter of the afferent arteriole to limit changes of glomerular pressure caused by fluctuations of blood pressure. The oscillations become irregular in animals with chronic high blood pressure. TGF feedback gain is increased in hypertensive rats, leading to a stronger interaction between the two mechanisms. With a mathematical model that simulates tubular and arteriolar dynamics, we tested whether an increase in the interaction between TGF and the myogenic mechanism can cause the transition from periodic to irregular dynamics. A one-dimensional bifurcation analysis, using the coefficient that couples TGF and the myogenic mechanism as a bifurcation parameter, shows some regions with chaotic dynamics. With two nephrons coupled electrotonically, the chaotic regions become larger. The results support the hypothesis that increased oscillator interactions contribute to the transition to irregular fluctuations, especially when neighboring nephrons are coupled, which is the case in vivo. PMID:20147606

  14. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    SciTech Connect

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus

  15. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  16. A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for karstic terrain management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouri, Konstantina P.; Karatzas, George P.; Plagnes, Valérie

    2017-08-01

    A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for the management of karst aquifers with spatial variability is developed. The methodology takes into consideration the duality of flow and recharge in karst and introduces a simple method to integrate the effect of temporal storage in the unsaturated zone. In order to investigate the applicability of the developed methodology, simulation results are validated against available field measurement data. The criteria maps from the PaPRIKa vulnerability-mapping method are used to document the groundwater flow model. The FEFLOW model is employed for the simulation of the saturated zone of Palaikastro-Chochlakies karst aquifer, in the island of Crete, Greece, for the hydrological years 2010-2012. The simulated water table reproduces typical karst characteristics, such as steep slopes and preferred drain axes, and is in good agreement with field observations. Selected calculated error indicators—Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), root mean squared error (RMSE) and model efficiency (E')—are within acceptable value ranges. Results indicate that different storage processes take place in different parts of the aquifer. The north-central part seems to be more sensitive to diffuse recharge, while the southern part is affected primarily by precipitation events. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the parameters of hydraulic conductivity and specific yield. The methodology is used to estimate the feasibility of artificial aquifer recharge (AAR) at the study area. Based on the developed methodology, guidelines were provided for the selection of the appropriate AAR scenario that has positive impact on the water table.

  17. A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for karstic terrain management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouri, Konstantina P.; Karatzas, George P.; Plagnes, Valérie

    2017-02-01

    A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for the management of karst aquifers with spatial variability is developed. The methodology takes into consideration the duality of flow and recharge in karst and introduces a simple method to integrate the effect of temporal storage in the unsaturated zone. In order to investigate the applicability of the developed methodology, simulation results are validated against available field measurement data. The criteria maps from the PaPRIKa vulnerability-mapping method are used to document the groundwater flow model. The FEFLOW model is employed for the simulation of the saturated zone of Palaikastro-Chochlakies karst aquifer, in the island of Crete, Greece, for the hydrological years 2010-2012. The simulated water table reproduces typical karst characteristics, such as steep slopes and preferred drain axes, and is in good agreement with field observations. Selected calculated error indicators—Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), root mean squared error (RMSE) and model efficiency (E')—are within acceptable value ranges. Results indicate that different storage processes take place in different parts of the aquifer. The north-central part seems to be more sensitive to diffuse recharge, while the southern part is affected primarily by precipitation events. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the parameters of hydraulic conductivity and specific yield. The methodology is used to estimate the feasibility of artificial aquifer recharge (AAR) at the study area. Based on the developed methodology, guidelines were provided for the selection of the appropriate AAR scenario that has positive impact on the water table.

  18. Modelling the coupling of flood discharge and glacier flow during jökulhlaups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingslake, J.; Ng, F.

    2012-04-01

    In Nye's (1976) theory of jökulhlaups, lake water drains through a subglacial channel whose size evolves to govern the outburst hydrograph. His theory ignores the impact of the flood on glacier motion that could arise from a dependence of basal sliding on subglacial water pressure. Such coupling between flood and ice-flow dynamics is worthy of study because ice-motion events of various kinds have been observed before or during jökulhlaups in real systems, and because water exchange between the channel and a distributed subglacial drainage system can affect flood initiation and the flood hydrograph. Here we develop a mathematical model that couples these components (channel thermo-mechanical evolution, lake continuity, distributed cavity drainage, basal sliding and channel-cavity water transfer) along a subglacial flood path. Numerical solution of the model equations reveals that a reverse hydraulic gradient near the lake and spatial variability in channel discharge allows a migrating subglacial water divide to form near the lake between floods. This allows the model to reach repeating limit cycles, simulating multiple flood cycles. The channel injects water into and draws water from the cavities at different stages of the flood cycle, modulating the cavity water pressure and the basal sliding. At flood initiation, a wave of high sliding velocity propagates down-glacier due to the arrival of the water divide at the lake and the high lake level. This is followed by deceleration as the channel begins to remove more water from the cavities resulting in ice velocities that are lower than between floods. This begins near the time of peak channel discharge and is due to the enlargement of the channel and the reduction in lake level during the flood. Experiments demonstrate that the flood peak discharge and initiation threshold both depend on the background water supply to the cavities, and that the velocity wave manifests itself differently in glacier and ice

  19. A discontinuous finite element approach to cracking in coupled poro-elastic fluid flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Evans, O.; Ulven, O. I.; Sun, W.

    2016-12-01

    Reaction-driven cracking is a coupled process whereby fluid-induced reactions drive large volume changes in the host rock which produce stresses leading to crack propagation and failure. This in turn generates new surface area and fluid-flow pathways for subsequent reaction in a potentially self-sustaining system. This mechanism has has been proposed for the pervasive serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite, as well as applications to mineral carbon sequestration and hydrocarbon extraction. The key computational issue in this problem is implementing algorithms that adequately model the formation of discrete fractures. Here we present models using a discontinuous finite element method for modeling fracture formation (Radovitsky et al., 2011). Cracks are introduced along facets of the mesh by the relaxation of penalty parameters once a failure criterion is met. It is fully described in the weak form of the equations, requiring no modification of the underlying mesh structure and allowing fluid properties to be easily adjusted along cracked facets. To develop and test the method, we start by implementing the algorithm for the simplified Biot equations for poro-elasticity using the finite element model assembler TerraFERMA. We consider hydro-fracking around a borehole (Grassl et al., 2015), where elevated fluid pressure in the poro-elastic solid causes it to fail radially in tension. We investigate the effects of varying the Biot coefficient and adjusting the fluid transport properties in the vicinity of the crack and compare our results to related dual-graph models (Ulven & Sun, submitted). We discuss issues arising from this method, including the formation of null spaces and appropriate preconditioning and solution strategies. Initial results suggest that this method provides a promising way to incorporate cracking into our reactive fluid flow models and future work aims to integrate the mechanical and chemical aspects of this process.

  20. Coupling a three-dimensional subsurface flow model with a land surface model to simulate stream-aquifer-land interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Bisht, G.; Zhou, T.; Chen, X.; Dai, H.; Hammond, G. E.; Riley, W. J.; Downs, J.; Liu, Y.; Zachara, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional surface and subsurface land model is developed and applied to a site along the Columbia River to simulate three-way interactions among river water, groundwater, and land surface processes. The model features the coupling of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and a massively-parallel multi-physics reactive tranport model (PFLOTRAN). The coupled model (CLM-PFLOTRAN) is applied to a 400m×400m study domain instrumented with groundwater monitoring wells in the Hanford 300 Area along the Columbia River. CLM-PFLOTRAN simulations are performed at three different spatial resolutions over the period 2011-2015 to evaluate the impact of spatial resolution on simulated variables. To demonstrate the difference in model simulations with and without lateral subsurface flow, a vertical-only CLM-PFLOTRAN simulation is also conducted for comparison. Results show that the coupled model is skillful in simulating stream-aquifer interactions, and the land-surface energy partitioning can be strongly modulated by groundwater-river water interactions in high water years due to increased soil moisture availability caused by elevated groundwater table. In addition, spatial resolution does not seem to impact the land surface energy flux simulations, although it is a key factor for accurately estimating the mass exchange rates at the boundaries and associated biogeochemical reactions in the aquifer. The coupled model developed in this study establishes a solid foundation for understanding co-evolution of hydrology and biogeochemistry along the river corridors under historical and future hydro-climate changes.

  1. Coupled Model for CO2 Leaks from Geological Storage: Geomechanics, Fluid Flow and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, G.; Prevost, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deep saline aquifers are considered as a promising option for long-term storage of carbon dioxide. However, risk of CO2 leakage from the aquifers through faults, natural or induced fractures or abandoned wells cannot be disregarded. Therefore, modeling of various leakage scenarios is crucial when selecting a site for CO2 sequestration and choosing proper operational conditions. Carbon dioxide is injected into wells at supercritical conditions (t > 31.04 C, P > 73.82 bar), and these conditions are maintained in the deep aquifers (at 1-2 km depth) due to hydrostatic pressure and geothermal gradient. However, if CO2 and brine start to migrate from the aquifer upward, both pressure and temperature will decrease, and at the depth of 500-750 m, the conditions for CO2 will become subcritical. At subcritical conditions, CO2 starts boiling and the character of the flow changes dramatically due to appearance of the third (vapor) phase and latent heat effects. When modeling CO2 leaks, one needs to couple the multiphase flow in porous media with geomechanics. These capabilities are provided by Dynaflow, a finite element analysis program [1]; Dynaflow has already showed to be efficient for modeling caprock failure causing CO2 leaks [2, 3]. Currently we have extended the capabilities of Dynaflow with the phase transition module, based on two-phase and three-phase isenthalpic flash calculations [4]. We have also developed and implemented an efficient method for solving heat and mass transport with the phase transition using our flash module. Therefore, we have developed a robust tool for modeling CO2 leaks. In the talk we will give a brief overview of our method and illustrate it with the results of simulations for characteristic test cases. References: [1] J.H. Prevost, DYNAFLOW: A Nonlinear Transient Finite Element Analysis Program. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. http://www.princeton.edu/~dynaflow/ (last update 2013

  2. Description of fluid dynamics and coupled transports in models of a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Trávníčková, Tereza; Havlica, Jaromír; Ždímal, Vladimír

    2013-08-14

    The aim of this study is to assess how much the results of nucleation experiments in a laminar flow diffusion chamber (LFDC) are influenced by the complexity of the model of the transport properties. The effects of the type of fluid dynamic model (the steady state compressible Navier-Stokes system for an ideal gas/parabolic profile approximation) and the contributions of the coupled terms describing the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion on the predicted magnitude of the nucleation maxima and its location were investigated. This study was performed on the model of the homogeneous nucleation of an n-butanol-He vapor mixture in a LFDC. The isothermal dependencies of the nucleation rate on supersaturation were determined at three nucleation temperatures: 265 K, 270 K, and 280 K. For this purpose, the experimental LFDC data measured by A. P. Hyvärinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224304 (2006)] were reevaluated using transport models at different levels of complexity. Our results indicate that the type of fluid dynamical model affects both the position of the nucleation maxima in the LFDC and the maximum value of the nucleation rate. On the other hand, the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion perceptibly influence only the value of the maximal nucleation rate. Its position changes only marginally. The dependence of the maximum experimental nucleation rate on the saturation ratio and nucleation temperature was acquired for each case. Based on this dependence, we presented a method for the comparison and evaluation of the uncertainties of simpler models' solutions for the results, where we assumed that the model with Navier-Stokes equations and both coupled effects taken into account was the basis. From this comparison, it follows that an inappropriate choice of mathematical models could lead to relative errors of the order of several hundred percent in the maximum experimental nucleation rate. In the conclusion of this study, we also provide some general recommendations

  3. Description of fluid dynamics and coupled transports in models of a laminar flow diffusion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trávníčková, Tereza; Havlica, Jaromír; Ždímal, Vladimír

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study is to assess how much the results of nucleation experiments in a laminar flow diffusion chamber (LFDC) are influenced by the complexity of the model of the transport properties. The effects of the type of fluid dynamic model (the steady state compressible Navier-Stokes system for an ideal gas/parabolic profile approximation) and the contributions of the coupled terms describing the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion on the predicted magnitude of the nucleation maxima and its location were investigated. This study was performed on the model of the homogeneous nucleation of an n-butanol-He vapor mixture in a LFDC. The isothermal dependencies of the nucleation rate on supersaturation were determined at three nucleation temperatures: 265 K, 270 K, and 280 K. For this purpose, the experimental LFDC data measured by A. P. Hyvärinen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224304 (2006), 10.1063/1.2200341] were reevaluated using transport models at different levels of complexity. Our results indicate that the type of fluid dynamical model affects both the position of the nucleation maxima in the LFDC and the maximum value of the nucleation rate. On the other hand, the Dufour effects and thermodiffusion perceptibly influence only the value of the maximal nucleation rate. Its position changes only marginally. The dependence of the maximum experimental nucleation rate on the saturation ratio and nucleation temperature was acquired for each case. Based on this dependence, we presented a method for the comparison and evaluation of the uncertainties of simpler models' solutions for the results, where we assumed that the model with Navier-Stokes equations and both coupled effects taken into account was the basis. From this comparison, it follows that an inappropriate choice of mathematical models could lead to relative errors of the order of several hundred percent in the maximum experimental nucleation rate. In the conclusion of this study, we also provide some

  4. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  5. Coupled thermodynamic and two-phase flow modelling of partially melting crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, Nicolas; Bouilhol, Pierre; Magni, Valentina; van Hunen, Jeroen; Velic, Mirko

    2016-04-01

    How magmas are formed, transferred and interact in the lower crust to form mid-crust plutonic belts remain a fundamental question to understand the chemical and mechanical evolution of continents. To assess this question we developed a 2-D two-phase flow code using finite volume method. Our formulation takes into account: (i) an extended Darcy's law for fluid flow with first order temperature- and fluid-content dependency for the host-rock viscosity and silica-dependent viscosity for the fluid, (ii) the heat equation assuming thermal equilibrium for both solid and liquid and temperature-dependent diffusivity, (iii) thermodynamic modelling of stable phases via a dynamic coupling with Perple_X, and (iv) chemical advection of both the solid and liquid composition. To model chemical interactions with the host rock during magma transport, the melt is assumed to be either in thermodynamic equilibrium or in thermodynamic disequilibrium, or as function of these two endmembers. We applied our modelling approach to investigate the behaviour and composition of magma during lower crust melting. Our goal is to better understand the formation of felsic crust through melting, segregation and assimilation of lower crustal lithologies, applied to Archaean systems. Our preliminary results show the ascend of silica-rich magmas is slow, occurring on the timescale of millions of years, and is highly controlled by (i) the melting curve of the protolith and (ii) by its chemical degree of interaction with the host rock. The resulting transferred magmas are in good accordance with observed composition forming the grey gneisses of Archean terranes (i.e SiO2-rich > 62%, Mg# = 40-50, Na2O ~6%, MgO = 0.5-1%).

  6. Modeling TGF-mediated flow dynamics in a system of three coupled nephrons.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Saziye

    2012-03-01

    This paper focuses on a mathematical model of a system of three closely coupled nephrons and accompanying analytical and computational analysis. In our previous modeling efforts, we have shown how coupling magnifies the tendency of many coupled identical nephrons to oscillate owing to tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism. However, in this study, our focus is on the coupled nonidentical nephrons and their dynamics due to the TGF system. Our detailed analytical and computational results suggest that systems of three nonidentical nephrons coupled to their nearest neighbors are prone to be found in an oscillatory state, relative to a single-nephron case with the same properties; however, their steady-state regions are not necessarily as small as it was predicted from the system of many coupled identical nephrons cases.

  7. Strongly coupled fluid-particle flows in vertical channels. II. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-03-01

    In Part I, simulations of strongly coupled fluid-particle flow in a vertical channel were performed with the purpose of understanding, in general, the fundamental physics of wall-bounded multiphase turbulence and, in particular, the roles of the spatially correlated and uncorrelated components of the particle velocity. The exact Reynolds-averaged (RA) equations for high-mass-loading suspensions were presented, and the unclosed terms that are retained in the context of fully developed channel flow were evaluated in an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) framework. Here, data from the EL simulations are used to validate a multiphase Reynolds-stress model (RSM) that predicts the wall-normal distribution of the two-phase, one-point turbulence statistics up to second order. It is shown that the anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses both near the wall and far away is a crucial component for predicting the distribution of the RA particle-phase volume fraction. Moreover, the decomposition of the phase-average (PA) particle-phase fluctuating energy into the spatially correlated and uncorrelated components is necessary to account for the boundary conditions at the wall. When these factors are properly accounted for in the RSM, the agreement with the EL turbulence statistics is satisfactory at first order (e.g., PA velocities) but less so at second order (e.g., PA turbulent kinetic energy). Finally, an algebraic stress model for the PA particle-phase pressure tensor and the Reynolds stresses is derived from the RSM using the weak-equilibrium assumption.

  8. Coupled flow and geomechanics modeling of fracture reactivation and induced seismicity in the Basel geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukhova, A.; Castineira, D.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Triggered and induced seismicity is at the cornerstone of discussions surrounding a wide range of subsurface technologies, e.g. unconventional hydrocarbon recovery, geologic carbon sequestration, underground gas storage, and geothermal energy extraction. We revisit the geothermal experiment in Basel, Switzerland, in which over 11 thousand cubic meters of water were injected into deep fractured crystalline rock. The injection took place in December 2006 and was performed at a single injection well, in three stages with increasing injection rate. Seismicity in the region increased during the experiment—with most of the seismic events occurring in the month following injection—and declined slowly after, but with seismic events still being recorded years after injection. The increase in seismicity is caused by reactivation of the pre-existing fractures: an increase in pore pressure decreases the normal effective stress across the fracture, which according to the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion are therefore more prone to slip. The underlying processes, however, may be more complex. It is unclear the role that enhanced hydraulic connectivity in the fracture network plays on triggered seismicity, and on the emergence of seismicity clusters in space. It is also unclear what determines the delay between injection and recorded seismicity, and whether it can be explained by means of pressure propagation and/or dynamic weakening of fractures due to a drop in the friction coefficient as a result of decreased roughness from fracture slip. Here, we employ a computational model of coupled flow and geomechanics to quantitatively assess the impact of fluid injection on the recorded seismicity. We develop a simulation model that incorporates more than ten fractures, whose location, rake and dip are consistent with clusters of seismicity from a relocation of hypocenters and focal mechanisms. We adopt a multiscale description of flow (representing these fractures planes explicitly

  9. Modeling particle-laden turbulent flows with two-way coupling using a high-order kernel density function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Timothy; Lu, Xiaoyi; Ranjan, Reetesh; Pantano, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    We describe a two-way coupled turbulent dispersed flow computational model using a high-order kernel density function (KDF) method. The carrier-phase solution is obtained using a high-order spatial and temporal incompressible Navier-Stokes solver while the KDF dispersed-phase solver uses the high-order Legendre WENO method. The computational approach is used to model carrier-phase turbulence modulation by the dispersed phase, and particle dispersion by turbulence as a function of momentum coupling strength (particle loading) and number of KDF basis functions. The use of several KDF's allows the model to capture statistical effects of particle trajectory crossing to high degree. Details of the numerical implementation and the coupling between the incompressible flow and dispersed-phase solvers will be discussed, and results at a range of Reynolds numbers will be presented. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DMS-1318161.

  10. Simulating Diffusive and Preferential Water Flow in Soils with a Coupled Source-Responsive/Richards-Equation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Water movement through soils is often dominated by preferential flow processes such as fingering and macropore flow. Traditional models of flow in the unsaturated zone are based on the diffusion or Richards equation and assume that diffusive (surface-tension viscous) flow is the only flow process. These models are incapable of accurately simulating preferential flow. Several alternative approaches, including kinematic wave, transfer function, and water-content wave models, have been suggested for simulating water movement through preferential flow paths. The source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010) and Nimmo and Mitchell (2013) is unique among such models in that water transfer from land surface to depth is controlled by the water-application rate at land surface. The source-responsive model has been coupled with a one-dimensional version of the Richards-equation based model of variably saturated flow, VS2DT. The new model, can simulate flow within the preferential (S) domain alone, within the diffuse (D) domain alone, or within both the S and D domains simultaneously. Water exchange between the two domains is treated as a first-order diffusive process, with the exchange coefficient being a function of soil-water content. The new model was used to simulate field and laboratory infiltration experiments described in the literature. Simulations were calibrated against measured soil water contents with the PEST parameter estimation package; values for hydraulic conductivity and 3 van Genuchten and 3 source-responsive parameters were optimized. Although exact matches between measured and simulated water contents were not obtained, the simulation results captured the salient characteristics of the published data sets, including features typical of preferential as well as diffusive flow. Results obtained from simulating flow simultaneously in both the S and D domain provided better matches to measured data than results obtained from simulating flow independently

  11. A Coupled Finite-Volume Model for 2-D Surface and 3-D Subsurface Flows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface-subsurface interactions are an intrinsic component of the hydrologic response within a watershed; therefore, hydrologic modeling tools should consider these interactions to provide reliable predictions, especially during rainfall-runoff processes. This paper presents a fully implicit coupled...

  12. Mathematical model for blood flow through a bifurcated artery using couple stress fluid.

    PubMed

    Srinivasacharya, D; Madhava Rao, G

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the blood flow through a bifurcated artery with mild stenosis is investigated taking blood as couple stress fluid. The artery configuring bifurcation is assumed to be symmetric about the axis of the artery and straight cylinders of finite length. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and coordinate transformation is used to convert the irregular boundary to a regular boundary. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The variation of shear stress, flow rate and impedance near the apex with pertinent parameters are studied graphically. It has been noticed that shear stress, flow rate and impedance have been changing suddenly with all the parameters on both sides of the apex. This occurs because of the backflow of the streaming blood at the onset of the lateral junction and secondary flow near the apex in the daughter artery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermohydrologic Modeling: Coupling Navier-Stokes Models of Gas, Moisture, and Heat Flow in Underground Engineered Systems with Porous-Media Models in Fractured Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y.; Nitao, J. J.; Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Lee, K. H.

    2004-12-01

    Combined free and porous flows occur in a wide range of natural and engineered systems such as coupled transport processes driven by underground-engineered systems. One potential application for modeling these coupled flow processes is related to the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste package in tunnels lying above the water table. This example involves the flow of gas and moisture in large open tunnel and gas- and liquid-phase flow in the surrounding fractured, porous rocks. This study aims to develop a method of coupling the Navier-Stokes equations and the Darcy's law to achieve a more rigorous representation of all major flow and transport processes in underground tunnels and surrounding fractured host-rocks. While the thermohydrologic (TH) processes in host-rocks are treated based on porous-medium Darcy-flow approximations, the Navier-Stokes modeling is applied to describe in-tunnel flow behaviors (natural convection, realistic gas/moisture movement, turbulent flow conditions, etc.). The governing equations are numerically solved by a finite-element scheme in the NUFT code. Some numerical simulation results shown in this presentation provide environmental conditions that engineered systems would experience, which, therefore, may be useful for engineered system design analysis and performance assessment. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  14. Analysis of the Tangjiaxi landslide-generated waves in the Zhexi Reservoir, China, by a granular flow coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bolin; Yin, Yueping; Wang, Shichang; Tan, Jianmin; Liu, Guangning

    2017-05-01

    A rocky granular flow is commonly formed after the failure of rocky bank slopes. An impulse wave disaster may also be initiated if the rocky granular flow rushes into a river with a high velocity. Currently, the granular mass-water body coupling study is an important trend in the field of landslide-induced impulse waves. In this paper, a full coupling numerical model for landslide-induced impulse waves is developed based on a non-coherent granular flow equation, i.e., the Mih equation. In this model, the Mih equation for continuous non-coherent granular flow controls movements of sliding mass, the two-phase flow equation regulates the interaction between sliding mass and water, and the renormalization group (RNG) turbulence model governs the movement of the water body. The proposed model is validated and applied for the 2014 Tangjiaxi landslide of the Zhexi Reservoir located in Hunan Province, China, to analyze the characteristics of both landslide motion and its following impulse waves. On 16 July 2014, a rocky debris flow was formed after the failure of the Tangjiaxi landslide, damming the Tangjiaxi stream and causing an impulse wave disaster with three dead and nine missing bodies. Based on the full coupling numerical analysis, the granular flow impacts the water with a maximum velocity of about 22.5 m s-1. Moreover, the propagation velocity of the generated waves reaches up to 12 m s-1. The maximum calculated run-up of 21.8 m is close enough to the real value of 22.7 m. The predicted landslide final deposit and wave run-up heights are in a good agreement with the field survey data. These facts verify the ability of the proposed model for simulating the real impulse wave generated by rocky granular flow events.

  15. Models of Coupled Flow, Transport and Mineral Precipitation at a Mixing Interface in Intermediate-Scale Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Fang, Y.; Redden, G. D.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface biogeochemical reaction processes that locally modify pore structure (e.g., precipitation, dissolution, biofilm growth and decay) challenge the capabilities of reactive transport simulators. Such processes create a dynamic coupling among fluid flow, solute transport, and reactions that is often dominated by pore-scale geometry and processes whereas predictions are required at much larger scales. Linking models with different scales of resolution, and different representations of physical and chemical systems, can provide insight into these difficult problems. We explore relationships between pore- and continuum-scale models of calcium carbonate precipitation in a porous medium along a mixing interface between two solutes. Intermediate-scale experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell provide motivation for, and a basis for evaluation of, alternative model conceptualizations. Our pore-scale model uses an explicit representation of two- and three-dimensional pore geometry and a Lagrangian particle method (smoothed particle hydrodynamics or SPH) to simulate coupled flow, transport and mineral precipitation. Our continuum-scale model uses an advanced multicomponent reactive transport simulator with various degrees of grid refinement and multiple alternative parameterizations, both with and without coupling among reaction, flow, and transport processes. We compare results between the two model scales and with our experimental observations.

  16. A novel coupling algorithm for computing blood flow in viscoelastic arterial models.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Kamen, Ali; Suciu, Constantin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel coupling algorithm, based on the operator-splitting scheme, which implements the viscoelastic wall law at the coupling nodes of the vessels. Two different viscoelastic models are used (V1 and V2), leading to five different computational setups: elastic wall law, model V1 applied at interior and coupling grid points, model V1 applied only at the interior grid points (V1-int), model V2 applied at interior and coupling grid points, model V2 applied only at the interior grid points (V2-int). These have been tested with two arterial configurations: (i) single artery, and (ii) complete arterial tree. Models V1-int and V2-int lead to incorrect conclusions and to errors which can be of the same order as, and are at least 1/5 of, the difference between the results with the elastic and the viscoelastic laws. Both test cases demonstrate the importance of modeling the viscous component of the pressure-area relationship at all grid points, including the coupling points between vessels or at the inlet/outlet of the model.

  17. A coupled wave-hydrodynamic model of a highly frictional atoll reef system: mechanisms for flow, connectivity, and ecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J.; Monismith, S. G.; Fringer, O. B.; Koweek, D.; Dunbar, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic analysis of an atoll system from modeling simulations using a coupled wave and three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (COAWST) applied to Palmyra Atoll in the Central Pacific. This is the first time the vortex force formalism has been applied in a highly frictional reef environment. The model results agree well with field observations considering the model complexity in terms of bathymetry, bottom roughness, and forcing (waves, wind, metrological, tides, regional boundary conditions), and open boundary conditions. At the atoll scale, strong regional flows create flow separation and a well-defined wake, similar to 2D flow past a cylinder. Circulation within the atoll is typically forced by waves and tides, with strong waves from the north driving flow from north to south across the atoll, and from east to west through the lagoon system. Bottom stress is significant for depths less than about 60 m, and in addition to the model bathymetry, is important for correct representation of flow in the model. Connectivity within the atoll system shows that the general trends follow the mean flow paths. However, some connectivity exists between all regions of the atoll system due to nonlinear processes such as eddies and tidal phasing. While high mean flow and travel time less than 20 hours appears to differentiate very productive coral regions, low temperature and moderate wave stress appear to be the most ideal conditions for high coral cover on Palmyra.

  18. Modelling and simulation of temperature and concentration dispersion in a couple stress nanofluid flow through stenotic tapered arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana Reddy, J. V.; Srikanth, D.; Das, Samir K.

    2017-08-01

    A couple stress fluid model with the suspension of silver nanoparticles is proposed in order to investigate theoretically the natural convection of temperature and concentration. In particular, the flow is considered in an artery with an obstruction wherein the rheology of blood is taken as a couple stress fluid. The effects of the permeability of the stenosis and the treatment procedure involving a catheter are also considered in the model. The obtained non-linear momentum, temperature and concentration equations are solved using the homotopy perturbation method. Nanoparticles and the two viscosities of the couple stress fluid seem to play a significant role in the flow regime. The pressure drop, flow rate, resistance to the fluid flow and shear stress are computed and their effects are analyzed with respect to various fluids and geometric parameters. Convergence of the temperature and its dependency on the degree of deformation is effectively depicted. It is observed that the Nusselt number increases as the volume fraction increases. Hence magnification of molecular thermal dispersion can be achieved by increasing the nanoparticle concentration. It is also observed that concentration dispersion is greater for severe stenosis and it is maximum at the first extrema. The secondary flow of the axial velocity in the stenotic region is observed and is asymmetric in the tapered artery. The obtained results can be utilized in understanding the increase in heat transfer and enhancement of mass dispersion, which could be used for drug delivery in the treatment of stenotic conditions.

  19. A coupled surface-water and ground-water flow model (MODBRANCH) for simulation of stream-aquifer interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water flow models traditionally have been developed separately, with interaction between subsurface flow and streamflow either not simulated at all or accounted for by simple formulations. In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well-connected ground-water and surface-water systems, stream-aquifer interaction should be simulated using deterministic responses of both systems coupled at the stream-aquifer interface. Accordingly, a new coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH; the interfacing code is referred to as MODBRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference ground-water model, and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate unsteady flow in open- channel networks. MODFLOW was originally written with the River package, which calculates leakage between the aquifer and stream, assuming that the stream's stage remains constant during one model stress period. A simple streamflow routing model has been added to MODFLOW, but is limited to steady flow in rectangular, prismatic channels. To overcome these limitations, the BRANCH model, which simulates unsteady, nonuniform flow by solving the St. Venant equations, was restructured and incorporated into MODFLOW. Terms that describe leakage between stream and aquifer as a function of streambed conductance and differences in aquifer and stream stage were added to the continuity equation in BRANCH. Thus, leakage between the aquifer and stream can be calculated separately in each model, or leakages calculated in BRANCH can be used in MODFLOW. Total mass in the coupled models is accounted for and conserved. The BRANCH model calculates new stream stages for each time interval in a transient simulation based on upstream boundary conditions, stream properties, and initial estimates of aquifer heads. Next, aquifer heads are calculated in MODFLOW based on stream

  20. Implementation and use of direct-flow connections in a coupled ground-water and surface-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW finite-difference ground-water flow model has been coupled with three surface-water packages - the MODBRANCH, River, and Stream packages - to simulate surface water and its interaction with ground water. Prior to the development of the coupling packages, the only interaction between these modeling packages was that leakage values could be passed between MODFLOW and the three surface-water packages. To facilitate wider and more flexible uses of the models, a computer program was developed and added to MODFLOW to allow direct flows or stages to be passed between any of the packages and MODFLOW. The flows or stages calculated in one package can be set as boundary discharges or stages to be used in another package. Several modeling packages can be used in the same simulation depending upon the level of sophistication needed in the various reaches being modeled. This computer program is especially useful when any of the River, Stream, or MODBRANCH packages are used to model a river flowing directly into or out of wetlands in direct connection with the aquifer and represented in the model as an aquifer block. A field case study is shown to illustrate an application.

  1. Coupling Kinetic and Hydrodynamic Models for Simulations of Gas Flows and Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Arslanbekov, R. R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents adaptive kinetic/fluid models for simulations of gases and weakly ionized plasmas. We first describe a Unified Flow Solver (UFS), which combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement with automatic selection of kinetic or hydrodynamic models for different parts of flows. This Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) technique limits expensive atomistic-scale solutions only to the regions where they are needed. We present examples of plasma simulations with fluid models and describe kinetic solvers for electrons which are currently being incorporated into AMAR techniques for plasma simulations.

  2. Investigation of the Air-Argon-Steel-Slag Flow in an Industrial RH Reactor with VOF-DPM Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gujun; He, Shengping; Li, Yugang

    2017-08-01

    A coupled three-dimensional volume of fluid method-discrete phase model (VOF-DPM) is developed to investigate the air-argon-steel-slag flow in an industrial Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) reactor while considering the expansion of argon bubbles. The simulated results of mixing time and recirculation flow rate of molten steel, and the flow pattern and local velocity of water agree well with the measured results reported in the literature. Comparison of the results with and without consideration of the expansion of bubbles indicates that the expansion of bubbles has an enormous impact on the multiphase flow in the industrial RH reactor. The proposed mathematical model presents a more realistic free surface in the RH vacuum vessel.

  3. Sand Production Modeling Using Superquadric Discrete Elements and Coupling of Fluid Flow and Particle Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S. Perkins, E.D.

    1999-02-10

    Techniques for modeling oil well sand production have been developed using the formulations for superquadric discrete elements and Darcy fluid flow. Discrete element models are generated using the new technique of particle cloning. Discrete element sources and sinks allow simulation of sand production from the initial state through the transition to an equilibrium state where particles are created and removed at the same rate.

  4. An integrated model coupling open-channel flow, turbidity current and flow exchanges between main river and tributaries in Xiaolangdi Reservoir, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Xia, Junqiang; Li, Tao; Deng, Shanshan; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-12-01

    The ever growing importance of sustainable management of reservoir sedimentation has promoted the development and applications of turbidity current models. However, there are few effective and practical models in literature for turbidity currents in a reservoir where the impounded area involves both the main river and its many tributaries. An integrated numerical model coupling open-channel flow, turbidity current and flow exchanges between main river and tributaries is proposed, which can simulate the complex flow and sediment transport in a reservoir where these three physical processes coexist. The model consists of two sets of governing equations for the open-channel flow and turbidity current, which are based on the modified St. Venant equations by taking into account the effect of lateral flow exchanges. These two sets of equations are solved in the finite volume method framework and the solutions are executed in an alternating calculation mode. Different methods are respectively proposed to calculate the discharge of flow exchange caused by free surface gradient and turbidity current intrusion. For the surface-gradient driven flow exchange, a storage cell method, which re-defines the relationship between water level and representative cross-sectional area, is used to update the water level at confluence. For the turbidity current intrusion, a discharge formula is proposed based on the analysis of the energy and momentum transformation in the intruding turbid water body. This formula differs from previous ones in that the effect of tributary bed slope is considered. Two events of water-sediment regulation conducted in the Xiaolangdi Reservoir in 2004 and 2006 were simulated to test the ability of this model. The predicted reservoir drawdown process, the turbidity current evolution and the sediment venting efficiency were in close agreement with the measurements. The necessity to couple the flow exchanges was demonstrated by comparing the performance of the

  5. Coupling 1D Navier Stokes equation with autoregulation lumped parameter networks for accurate cerebral blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is critical to cerebral blood flow modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries that includes coupling of autoregulatory lumped parameter networks. The model is tested to reproduce a common clinical test to assess autoregulatory function - the carotid artery compression test. The change in the flow velocity at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during carotid compression and release demonstrated strong agreement with published measurements. The model is then used to investigate vasospasm of the MCA, a common clinical concern following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm was modeled by prescribing vessel area reduction in the middle portion of the MCA. Our model showed similar increases in velocity for moderate vasospasms, however, for serious vasospasm (~ 90% area reduction), the blood flow velocity demonstrated decrease due to blood flow rerouting. This demonstrates a potentially important phenomenon, which otherwise would lead to false-negative decisions on clinical vasospasm if not properly anticipated.

  6. A coupled wave-hydrodynamic model of an atoll with high friction: Mechanisms for flow, connectivity, and ecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Justin S.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Koweek, David A.; Dunbar, Robert B.

    2017-02-01

    We present a hydrodynamic analysis of an atoll system from modeling simulations using a coupled wave and three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (COAWST) applied to Palmyra Atoll in the Central Pacific. This is the first time the vortex force formalism has been applied in a highly frictional reef environment. The model results agree well with field observations considering the model complexity in terms of bathymetry, bottom roughness, and forcing (waves, wind, metrological, tides, regional boundary conditions), and open boundary conditions. At the atoll scale, strong regional flows create flow separation and a well-defined wake, similar to 2D flow past a cylinder. Circulation within the atoll is typically forced by waves and tides, with strong waves from the north driving flow from north to south across the atoll, and from east to west through the lagoon system. Bottom stress is significant for depths less than about 60 m, and in addition to the model bathymetry, is important for correct representation of flow in the model. Connectivity within the atoll system shows that the general trends follow the mean flow paths. However, some connectivity exists between all regions of the atoll system due to nonlinear processes such as eddies and tidal phasing. Moderate wave stress, short travel time (days since entering the reef system), and low temperature appear to be the most ideal conditions for high coral cover at this site.

  7. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  8. Multi-scale coupling strategy for fully two-dimensional and depth-averaged models for granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Domnik, Birte; Miller, Stephen A.

    2013-04-01

    We developed a full two-dimensional Coulomb-viscoplastic model and applied it for inclined channel flows of granular materials from initiation to their deposition. The model includes the basic features and observed phenomena in dense granular flows like the exhibition of a yield strength and a non-zero slip velocity. A pressure-dependent yield strength is proposed to account for the frictional nature of granular materials. The yield strength can be related to the internal friction angle of the material and plays an important role, for example, in deposition processes. The interaction of the flow with the solid boundary is modelled by a pressure and rate-dependent Coulomb-viscoplastic sliding law. We developed an innovative multi-scale strategy to couple the full two-dimensional, non depth-averaged model (N-DAM) with a one-dimensional, depth-averaged model (DAM). The coupled model reduces computational complexity dramatically by using DAM only in regions with smooth changes of flow variables. The numerics uses N-DAM in regions where depth-averaging becomes inaccurate, for instance, in the initiation and deposition regions, and (particularly) when the flow hits an obstacle or a defense structure. In these regions, momentum transfer must be, and is, considered in all directions. We observe very high coupling performance, and show that the numerical results deviate only slightly from results of the much more cumbersome full two-dimensional model. This shows that the coupled model, which retains all the basic physics of the flow, is an attractive alternative to an expensive, full two-dimensional simulations. We compare simulation results with different experimental data for shock waves appearing in rapid granular flows down inclined channels and impacting a wall. The model predicts the evolution of the strong shock wave and the impact force on a rigid wall for different inclination angles and sliding surfaces. It is demonstrated that the internal friction angle plays an

  9. A two-dimensional coupled flow-mass transport model based on an improved unstructured finite volume algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Song, Lixiang; Kursan, Suncana; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional coupled water quality model is developed for modeling the flow-mass transport in shallow water. To simulate shallow flows on complex topography with wetting and drying, an unstructured grid, well-balanced, finite volume algorithm is proposed for numerical resolution of a modified formulation of two-dimensional shallow water equations. The slope-limited linear reconstruction method is used to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The algorithm adopts a HLLC-based integrated solver to compute the flow and mass transport fluxes simultaneously, and uses Hancock's predictor-corrector scheme for efficient time stepping as well as second-order temporal accuracy. The continuity and momentum equations are updated in both wet and dry cells. A new hybrid method, which can preserve the well-balanced property of the algorithm for simulations involving flooding and recession, is proposed for bed slope terms approximation. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm are validated by the reasonable good agreement between numerical and reference results of several benchmark test cases. Results show that the proposed coupled flow-mass transport model can simulate complex flows and mass transport in shallow water.

  10. Coupled Flow and Geomechanics Modeling of Slow Earthquakes: Application to Slow Slip Events (SSE) in the Guerrero Gap, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves da Silva Junior, J.; Frank, W.; Castineira, D.; Jha, B.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Three major cycles of slow slip events (SSE) have been reported since the early 2000s in the Guerrero gap, Mexico, on the boundary between the Cocos and North American plates. Analysis of teleseismic waveforms recorded on a dense temporary seismic network in the Guerrero gap have found low S-wave velocity and high Vp/Vs ratios at the depths corresponding to the sources of SSE, implying the possible presence of fluids and thus an active dewatering process that may result in near-lithostatic pore pressure at the plate interface. Here we use coupled flow and geomechanics analysis of the Guerrero gap to model transient changes in the stress field in the subduction zone as a result of pore pressure fluctuations and potential fluid flow along the subduction interface. Our computational modeling approach couples a multiphase flow simulator with a mechanical simulator using the unconditionally stable fixed stress scheme for the sequential solution of the two-way coupling between flow and geomechanics (Jha and Juanes, 2014). We assume quasi-static mechanical deformation and neglect the inertial term in the solid momentum balance equation—an approximation that is valid to model SSE assuming aseismic slip. We represent the subducting Cocos fault as a surface embedded in a three-dimensional medium, and use zero thickness interface elements to accurately model stick-slip behavior under dynamically evolving fluid pressure and fault strength. We employ the rate- and state-dependent friction model in the evolution of the coefficient of friction. We calibrate our model using two distinct datasets—GPS data and tremor catalogs in the area of Guerrero gap—and by separately constraining the rate of water production from a model of mineral hydration with depth. Our quantitative modeling approach furnishes a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between pore pressure evolution, stress transfer and tremor migration, and helps elucidate the origin of SSE in this area.

  11. Numerical modeling of coupled pressure solution and fluid flow in quartz sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, H. A.; Wheeler, J.; Worden, R.

    2001-12-01

    Pressure solution in quartz sandstones can be envisaged as a 3-stage process, involving dissolution along grain contacts, diffusion of the solute along the grain contact to the pore space, and removal of the solute from the pore fluid by a combination of diffusive and/or advective transport and chemical reactions (e.g. precipitation of dissolved silica on free grain surfaces). A number of authors have developed mathematical models of pressure solution in order to assess the impact of this process on porosity and permeability in sandstones. However, such models have always been based on a simplified subset of the governing equations, in order to reduce the computation time to an acceptable level. For example, some models assume diffusion through the grain contact zone to be the rate-limiting step, with all the dissolved material precipitating locally in the pore space. Other models assume that the rate of removal of solute from the pore fluid, by diffusion and precipitation, is rate-limiting. It is now possible to solve the full coupled system of equations on a PC, without such simplifications. This enables us to investigate the coupling and interactions between pressure solution, chemical reactions in the pore spaces and macroscale advective/diffusive transport in the pore fluid. Preliminary results of such modeling will be presented, highlighting the importance of modeling pressure solution in an open system, where there is a strong coupling between macroscale transport in the pore fluid and the rate of porosity loss due to compaction and cementation.

  12. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  13. Validation of a coupled wave-flow model in a high-energy setting: the mouth of the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Edwin P.L.; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; van der Westhuysen, André J.

    2012-01-01

     A monthlong time series of wave, current, salinity, and suspended-sediment measurements was made at five sites on a transect across the Mouth of Columbia River (MCR). These data were used to calibrate and evaluate the performance of a coupled hydrodynamic and wave model for the MCR based on the Delft3D modeling system. The MCR is a dynamic estuary inlet in which tidal currents, river discharge, and wave-driven currents are all important. Model tuning consisted primarily of spatial adjustments to bottom drag coefficients. In combination with (near-) default parameter settings, the MCR model application is able to simulate the dominant features in the tidal flow, salinity and wavefields observed in field measurements. The wave-orbital averaged method for representing the current velocity profile in the wave model is considered the most realistic for the MCR. The hydrodynamic model is particularly effective in reproducing the observed vertical residual and temporal variations in current structure. Density gradients introduce the observed and modeled reversal of the mean flow at the bed and augment mean and peak flow in the upper half of the water column. This implies that sediment transport during calmer summer conditions is controlled by density stratification and is likely net landward due to the reversal of flow near the bed. The correspondence between observed and modeled hydrodynamics makes this application a tool to investigate hydrodynamics and associated sediment transport.

  14. Resolved granular debris-flow simulations with a coupled SPH-DCDEM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjukovs Canelas, Ricardo; Domínguez, José M.; Crespo, Alejandro J. C.; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows represent some of the most relevant phenomena in geomorphological events. Due to the potential destructiveness of such flows, they are the target of a vast amount of research (Takahashi, 2007 and references therein). A complete description of the internal processes of a debris-flow is however still an elusive achievement, explained by the difficulty of accurately measuring important quantities in these flows and developing a comprehensive, generalized theoretical framework capable of describing them. This work addresses the need for a numerical model applicable to granular-fluid mixtures featuring high spatial and temporal resolution, thus capable of resolving the motion of individual particles, including all interparticle contacts. This corresponds to a brute-force approach: by applying simple interaction laws at local scales the macro-scale properties of the flow should be recovered by upscaling. This methodology effectively bypasses the complexity of modelling the intermediate scales by resolving them directly. The only caveat is the need of high performance computing, a demanding but engaging research challenge. The DualSPHysics meshless numerical implementation, based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), is expanded with a Distributed Contact Discrete Element Method (DCDEM) in order to explicitly solve the fluid and the solid phase. The model numerically solves the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations for the liquid phase and Newton's motion equations for solid bodies. The interactions between solids are modelled with classical DEM approaches (Kruggel-Emden et al, 2007). Among other validation tests, an experimental set-up for stony debris flows in a slit check dam is reproduced numerically, where solid material is introduced trough a hopper assuring a constant solid discharge for the considered time interval. With each sediment particle undergoing tens of possible contacts, several thousand time-evolving contacts are efficiently treated

  15. Impact of the initialisation on population balance CFD models coupled with two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hliwa, Ghizlane Zineb; Bannari, Rachid; Belghiti, Mly Taib

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have been made about Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of bubble columns and compared to experimental data. In the present work, a rectangular bubble column is simulated using a model of two-phase flows. The inter-phase forces are used. A population balance equation is introduced by comparing two different models to account the effects of bubble size distribution. The turbulence model k-ɛ is used with mixture transport properties. In this work, the impact of boundary conditions at the inlet is studied. The numerical predictions are validated with experimental data available in the literature.

  16. Scalable parallel methods for monolithic coupling in fluid-structure interaction with application to blood flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Andrew T. Cai Xiaochuan

    2010-02-01

    We introduce and study numerically a scalable parallel finite element solver for the simulation of blood flow in compliant arteries. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to model the fluid and coupled to an incompressible linear elastic model for the blood vessel walls. Our method features an unstructured dynamic mesh capable of modeling complicated geometries, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework that allows for large displacements of the moving fluid domain, monolithic coupling between the fluid and structure equations, and fully implicit time discretization. Simulations based on blood vessel geometries derived from patient-specific clinical data are performed on large supercomputers using scalable Newton-Krylov algorithms preconditioned with an overlapping restricted additive Schwarz method that preconditions the entire fluid-structure system together. The algorithm is shown to be robust and scalable for a variety of physical parameters, scaling to hundreds of processors and millions of unknowns.

  17. Scalable parallel methods for monolithic coupling in fluid-structure interaction with application to blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Andrew T.; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2010-02-01

    We introduce and study numerically a scalable parallel finite element solver for the simulation of blood flow in compliant arteries. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to model the fluid and coupled to an incompressible linear elastic model for the blood vessel walls. Our method features an unstructured dynamic mesh capable of modeling complicated geometries, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework that allows for large displacements of the moving fluid domain, monolithic coupling between the fluid and structure equations, and fully implicit time discretization. Simulations based on blood vessel geometries derived from patient-specific clinical data are performed on large supercomputers using scalable Newton-Krylov algorithms preconditioned with an overlapping restricted additive Schwarz method that preconditions the entire fluid-structure system together. The algorithm is shown to be robust and scalable for a variety of physical parameters, scaling to hundreds of processors and millions of unknowns.

  18. Low-Dimensional Models for Physiological Systems: Nonlinear Coupling of Gas and Liquid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, A. E.; Oran, E. S.; Boris, J. P.; Kailasanath, K.

    2006-11-01

    Current computational models of biological organisms focus on the details of a specific component of the organism. For example, very detailed models of the human heart, an aorta, a vein, or part of the respiratory or digestive system, are considered either independently from the rest of the body, or as interacting simply with other systems and components in the body. In actual biological organisms, these components and systems are strongly coupled and interact in complex, nonlinear ways leading to complicated global behavior. Here we describe a low-order computational model of two physiological systems, based loosely on a circulatory and respiratory system. Each system is represented as a one-dimensional fluid system with an interconnected series of mass sources, pumps, valves, and other network components, as appropriate, representing different physical organs and system components. Preliminary results from a first version of this model system are presented.

  19. Wall jet analysis for circulation control aerodynamics. Part 2: Zonal modeling concepts for wall jet/potential flow coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Frank A.; Dash, Sanford M.

    1987-01-01

    Work currently in progress to update an existing transonic circulation control airfoil analysis method is described. Existing methods suffer from two dificiencies: the inability to predict the shock structure of the underexpanded supersonic jets; and the insensitivity of the calculation to small changes in the Coanda surface geometry. A method developed for the analysis of jet exhaust plumes in supersonic flow is being modified for the case of the underexpanded wall jet. In the subsonic case, the same wall jet model was modified to include the calculation of the normal pressure gradient. This model is currently being coupled with the transonic circulation control airfoil analysis.

  20. Coupling actin flow, adhesion, and morphology in a computational cell motility model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Danying; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2012-05-01

    Cell migration is a pervasive process in many biology systems and involves protrusive forces generated by actin polymerization, myosin dependent contractile forces, and force transmission between the cell and the substrate through adhesion sites. Here we develop a computational model for cell motion that uses the phase-field method to solve for the moving boundary with physical membrane properties. It includes a reaction-diffusion model for the actin-myosin machinery and discrete adhesion sites which can be in a "gripping" or "slipping" mode and integrates the adhesion dynamics with the dynamics of the actin filaments, modeled as a viscous network. To test this model, we apply it to fish keratocytes, fast moving cells that maintain their morphology, and show that we are able to reproduce recent experimental results on actin flow and stress patterns. Furthermore, we explore the phase diagram of cell motility by varying myosin II activity and adhesion strength. Our model suggests that the pattern of the actin flow inside the cell, the cell velocity, and the cell morphology are determined by the integration of actin polymerization, myosin contraction, adhesion forces, and membrane forces.

  1. GSFLOW - Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW-2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Regan, R. Steven; Prudic, David E.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The need to assess the effects of variability in climate, biota, geology, and human activities on water availability and flow requires the development of models that couple two or more components of the hydrologic cycle. An integrated hydrologic model called GSFLOW (Ground-water and Surface-water FLOW) was developed to simulate coupled ground-water and surface-water resources. The new model is based on the integration of the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW). Additional model components were developed, and existing components were modified, to facilitate integration of the models. Methods were developed to route flow among the PRMS Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) and between the HRUs and the MODFLOW finite-difference cells. This report describes the organization, concepts, design, and mathematical formulation of all GSFLOW model components. An important aspect of the integrated model design is its ability to conserve water mass and to provide comprehensive water budgets for a location of interest. This report includes descriptions of how water budgets are calculated for the integrated model and for individual model components. GSFLOW provides a robust modeling system for simulating flow through the hydrologic cycle, while allowing for future enhancements to incorporate other simulation techniques.

  2. A single-point model from SO(3) decomposition of the axisymmetric mean-flow coupled two-point equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Timothy; Rubinstein, Robert; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-01

    The fluctuating-pressure-strain correlations present a significant challenge for engineering turbulence models. For incompressible flow, the pressure is an intrinsically two-point quantity (represented as Green's function, integrated over the field), and therefore representing the implied scale-dependence in a one-point model is difficult. The pioneering work of Launder, Reece and Rodi (1975) presented a model that satisfied the tensor symmetries and dimensional consistency with the underlying Green's function solution, and described the assumptions embedded in their one-point model. Among the constraints of such a model is its inability to capture scale-dependent anisotropic flow development. Restricting our attention to the case of axisymmetric mean-field strains, we present a one-point model of the mean-flow couplings, including the pressure-strain terms, starting from a directional (tensorially isotropic) and polarization (tensorially anisotropic and trace-free) representation of the two-point correlation equations, truncated to the lowest order terms. The model results are then compared to simulations performed using arbitrary orders of spherical harmonic functions from which the exact solution may be obtained to desired accuracy.

  3. Coupled surface and subsurface flow modeling of natural hillslopes in the Aburrá Valley (Medellín, Colombia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessent, Daniela; Barco, Janet; Temgoua, André Guy Tranquille; Echeverrri-Ramirez, Oscar

    2017-03-01

    Numerical results are presented of surface-subsurface water modeling of a natural hillslope located in the Aburrá Valley, in the city of Medellín (Antioquia, Colombia). The integrated finite-element hydrogeological simulator HydroGeoSphere is used to conduct transient variably saturated simulations. The objective is to analyze pore-water pressure and saturation variation at shallow depths, as well as volumes of water infiltrated in the porous medium. These aspects are important in the region of study, which is highly affected by soil movements, especially during the high-rain seasons that occur twice a year. The modeling exercise considers rainfall events that occurred between October and December 2014 and a hillslope that is currently monitored because of soil instability problems. Simulation results show that rainfall temporal variability, mesh resolution, coupling length, and the conceptual model chosen to represent the heterogeneous soil, have a noticeable influence on results, particularly for high rainfall intensities. Results also indicate that surface-subsurface coupled modeling is required to avoid unrealistic increase in hydraulic heads when high rainfall intensities cause top-down saturation of soil. This work is a first effort towards fostering hydrogeological modeling expertise that may support the development of monitoring systems and early landslide warning in a country where the rainy season is often the cause of hydrogeological tragedies associated with landslides, mud flow or debris flow.

  4. Coupled surface and subsurface flow modeling of natural hillslopes in the Aburrá Valley (Medellín, Colombia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessent, Daniela; Barco, Janet; Temgoua, André Guy Tranquille; Echeverrri-Ramirez, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    Numerical results are presented of surface-subsurface water modeling of a natural hillslope located in the Aburrá Valley, in the city of Medellín (Antioquia, Colombia). The integrated finite-element hydrogeological simulator HydroGeoSphere is used to conduct transient variably saturated simulations. The objective is to analyze pore-water pressure and saturation variation at shallow depths, as well as volumes of water infiltrated in the porous medium. These aspects are important in the region of study, which is highly affected by soil movements, especially during the high-rain seasons that occur twice a year. The modeling exercise considers rainfall events that occurred between October and December 2014 and a hillslope that is currently monitored because of soil instability problems. Simulation results show that rainfall temporal variability, mesh resolution, coupling length, and the conceptual model chosen to represent the heterogeneous soil, have a noticeable influence on results, particularly for high rainfall intensities. Results also indicate that surface-subsurface coupled modeling is required to avoid unrealistic increase in hydraulic heads when high rainfall intensities cause top-down saturation of soil. This work is a first effort towards fostering hydrogeological modeling expertise that may support the development of monitoring systems and early landslide warning in a country where the rainy season is often the cause of hydrogeological tragedies associated with landslides, mud flow or debris flow.

  5. Coupled modelling of flow and biofilm in a laminar flow regime through a high-resolution fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumit; Hardy, Richard; Smith, Gregory; Kazemifar, Farzan; Christensen, Kenneth; Best, Jim

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitously present in fluvial systems, growing on almost all wetted surface and has a significant impact on both water quantity, in terms of ambient flow condition, as well as water quality, biofilms growing in water distribution system leads to unwanted contamination. The local hydraulic conditions have a significant impact on the biofilm lifecycle as in order to sustain their growth biofilms draw essential nutrients either from the flow or from the surface on which they grow. This implies that in convection dominated flow, nutrient transfer from water, would nurture the growth of biofilms. However, at higher flow rates biofilms are subjected to higher stresses which may lead to their detachment. Furthermore, biofilms in ambient flow conditions oscillate and therefore alter the local flow conditions. There is, therefore, a complex feedback between biofilms and flow which have has implications for flow dynamics and water quality issues in riverine ecosystems. The research presented here describes a fluid-structure interaction solver to examine the coupled nature of biofilm oscillations due to the ambient flow and its feedback on the local flow structures. The fluid flow is modelled by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and structural deformation of the biofilm is modeled by applying a linear elastic model. The governing equations are numerically solved through Finite Volume methodology based on cell-centered scheme. Simulations are conducted in a laminar regime for a biofilm streamer modelled as moving slender plate. The temporal evolution of the pressure, flow structures are examined in the vicinity of the biofilm. Further investigations examine the impact of changing Reynolds number on the oscillation frequency as well as drag and lift forces experienced by the biofilm. The changing frequency of biofilm oscillation with varying Reynolds number is characterized by the Strouhal number (St). Our investigation reveals that as the flow separates

  6. Coupling actin flow, adhesion, and morphology in a computational cell motility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Herbert

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells crawl by means of the coordinated spatiotemporal dynamics of an active polymer gel, consisting of actin, myosin and regulators thereof. Motility is necessarily coupled to shape, as the force generating mechanisms such as polymerization-based protrusions interact with the elasticity of the cell membrane and thereby determine the cell morphology. We have introduced a ``phase-field'' model of crawling cells, utilizing a mathematical approach originally developed for morphology problems arising in the field of liquid-solid phase transitions. Our model can be used to explain the pattern of traction forces applied to the substrate as well as some recent observations concerning oscillatory instabilities of cells moving on one-dimensional fiber tracks.

  7. A Coupled Multiphase Fluid Flow And Heat And Vapor Transport Model For Air-Gap Membrane Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2010-05-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is emerging as a viable desalination technology because of its low energy requirements that can be provided from low-grade, waste heat and because it causes less fouling. In MD, desalination is accomplished by transporting water vapour through a porous hydrophobic membrane. The vapour transport process is governed by the vapour pressure difference between the two sides of a membrane. A variety of configurations have been tested to impose this vapour pressure gradient, however, the air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD) has been found to be the most efficient. The separation mechanism of AGMD and its overall efficiency is based on vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE). At present, little knowledge is available about the optimal design of such a transmembrane VLE-based evaporation, and subsequent condensation processes. While design parameters for MD have evolved mostly through experimentations, a comprehensive mathematical model is yet to be developed. This is primarily because the coupling and non-linearity of the equations, the interactions between the flow, heat and mass transport regimes, and the complex geometries involved pose a challenging modelling and simulation problem. Yet a comprehensive mathematical model is needed for systematic evaluation of the processes, design parameterization, and performance prediction. This paper thus presents a coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transfer model to investigate the main processes and parameters affecting the performance of an AGMD.

  8. Numerical stabilities of loosely coupled methods for robust modeling of lightweight and flexible structures in incompressible and viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Xiao, Jian; Young, Yin Lu

    2017-06-01

    The growing interest to examine the hydroelastic dynamics and stabilities of lightweight and flexible materials requires robust and accurate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models. Classically, partitioned fluid and structure solvers are easier to implement compared to monolithic methods; however, partitioned FSI models are vulnerable to numerical ("virtual added mass") instabilities for cases when the solid to fluid density ratio is low and if the flow is incompressible. As a partitioned method, the loosely hybrid coupled (LHC) method, which was introduced and validated in Young et al. (Acta Mech. Sin. 28:1030-1041, 2012), has been successfully used to efficiently and stably model lightweight and flexible structures. The LHC method achieves its numerical stability by, in addition to the viscous fluid forces, embedding potential flow approximations of the fluid induced forces to transform the partitioned FSI model into a semi-implicit scheme. The objective of this work is to derive and validate the numerical stability boundary of the LHC. The results show that the stability boundary of the LHC is much wider than traditional loosely coupled methods for a variety of numerical integration schemes. The results also show that inclusion of an estimate of the fluid inertial forces is the most critical to ensure the numerical stability when solving for fluid-structure interaction problems involving cases with a solid to fluid-added mass ratio less than one.

  9. Numerical stabilities of loosely coupled methods for robust modeling of lightweight and flexible structures in incompressible and viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Xiao, Jian; Young, Yin Lu

    2017-08-01

    The growing interest to examine the hydroelastic dynamics and stabilities of lightweight and flexible materials requires robust and accurate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models. Classically, partitioned fluid and structure solvers are easier to implement compared to monolithic methods; however, partitioned FSI models are vulnerable to numerical ("virtual added mass") instabilities for cases when the solid to fluid density ratio is low and if the flow is incompressible. As a partitioned method, the loosely hybrid coupled (LHC) method, which was introduced and validated in Young et al. (Acta Mech. Sin. 28:1030-1041, 2012), has been successfully used to efficiently and stably model lightweight and flexible structures. The LHC method achieves its numerical stability by, in addition to the viscous fluid forces, embedding potential flow approximations of the fluid induced forces to transform the partitioned FSI model into a semi-implicit scheme. The objective of this work is to derive and validate the numerical stability boundary of the LHC. The results show that the stability boundary of the LHC is much wider than traditional loosely coupled methods for a variety of numerical integration schemes. The results also show that inclusion of an estimate of the fluid inertial forces is the most critical to ensure the numerical stability when solving for fluid-structure interaction problems involving cases with a solid to fluid-added mass ratio less than one.

  10. Observations and coupled models of flow, salinity, and hydrate formation in deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Fulton, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    Natural vents in the Gulf of Mexico are actively expelling water, and hydrocarbons. They are ubiquitous across the deepwater and we characterize them in 3 locations: the Auger Basin, the Popeye Basin, and the Ursa Basin. In seismic data, they look like volcanic edifices. Vents are elevated as much as 100 meters relative to the surrounding area and their cores have negative amplitudes that record lower impedance than the overlying water column: this low impedance is interpreted to record the presence of gas. The bottom simulating reflector, which is interpreted to record the boundary between hydrate above and gas and water below, rises toward to the seafloor at the center of the vent. Studies of these vents at Ursa have documented significant temperature anomalies, flow, and high salinities (Paull et al., 2005; Ruppel et al. 2005). We model the coexistence of high salinity fluids, elevated temperatures, and an uplifted bottom simulating reflector with two approaches. First, we assume that high salinity fluids are generated by dissolution of salt bodies at depth and that these hot, saline, fluids are expelled vertically. Second, we model the solidification of gas hydrate during upward flow of gas and water. In this model, free gas combines with water to generate hydrate: salt is excluded, resulting in the generation of a high salinity brine. The two models result in predictable differences of salinity and possibly temperature. A better understanding of the hydrogeological processes at vent zones is important for understanding the fluxes of heat and mass from submarine vents, and it is important for understanding the conditions under which deep sea biological communities exist at these vent locations.

  11. Fully coupled two-phase flow and poromechanics modeling of coalbed methane recovery: Impact of geomechanics on production rate

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Tianran; Rutqvist, Jonny; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; ...

    2017-06-03

    This study presents the development and application of a fully coupled two-phase (methane and water) flow, transport, and poromechanics num erical model for the analysis of geomechanical impacts on coalbed methane (CBM) production. The model considers changes in two-phase fluid flow properties, i.e., coal porosity, permeability, water retention, and relative permeability curves through changes in cleat fractures induced by effective stress variations and desorption-induced shrinkage. The coupled simulator is first verified for poromechanics coupling, and simulation parameters of a CBM reservoir model are calibrated by history matching against one year of CBM production field data from Shanxi Province, China. Then,more » the verified simulator and the calibrated CBM reservoir model are used for predicting the impact of geomechanics on the production rate for twenty years of continuous CBM production. The simulation results show that desorption-induced shrinkage is the dominant process in increasing permeability in the near wellbore region. Away from the wellbore, desorption-induced shrinkage is weaker, and permeability is reduced by pressure depletion and increased effective stress. A sensitivity analysis shows that for coal with a higher sorption strain, a larger initial Young's modulus and a smaller Poisson's ratio promote the enhancement of permeability as well as an increased production rate. Moreover, the conceptual model of the cleat system, whether dominated by vertical cleats with permeability correlated to horizontal stress or with permeability correlated to mean stress, can have a significant impact on the predicted production rate. Overall, the study clearly demonstrates and confirms the critical importance of considering geomechanics for an accurate prediction of CBM production.« less

  12. SABAE-HW3D: a Meteor-Hydrological Model Coupling the Land Surface to Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukili, Y.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    A new coupled model linking the land surface scheme SABAE-HW with the saturated groundwater flow is introduced. SABAE-HW stands for: Soil Atmosphere Boundary, Accurate Evaluations of Heat and Water. It was presented (Loukili et al., 2007) as a parallel extension to the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) which permits a free choice of soil column depth and layers. This development is important as it allows for the coupling of the atmosphere, land surface and subsurface zones. The generic domain under study is subdivided into soil columns whose surface areas represent GCM grid squares. The depths of columns extend to the saturated zone where a water table lower boundary condition is prescribed. In each column the unsaturated flow is forced by the corresponding meteorological data, and the moisture (liquid and frozen) and temperature profiles are computed by SABAE-HW using the half hour time step. The horizontal flow in the saturated zone is described by the vertically integrated model incorporating a storage term, and discretized using a finite volume scheme operating on the same GCM quadrilateral mesh. Since the saturated flow model affords larger time steps, bottom drainages from soil columns are summed up and input as cell recharges. Meanwhile, as the water table fluctuates, the individual column's mesh is allowed to deform. This physically based coupling strategy was selected for its superiority in providing stable and consistent results. In fact, the convergence to steady state situations in both the unsaturated and saturated zones is realized in many validation numerical tests. Moreover, our SABAE-HW3D code was successfully benchmarked against the finite element code Seep/W (Geo-Slope International, 2002) for steady and transient groundwater flows through different soil types. Even when handling coarse grids, SABAE-HW3D solutions are free of moisture oscillation and under or overshoot near the water table. The model is used to understand and assess properly

  13. High-resolution numerical coupling of wildfire and lava flow simulation with a micro scale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, Jean-Baptiste; Durand, Jonathan; Tulet, Pierre; Bosseur, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    A coupled approach between Meso-NH (Non-Hydrostatic) LES (Large Eddy Simulation) meso/microscale scale atmospheric model and ForeFire area simulator is proposed for predicting fine-scale properties of surface propagating systems. Originally developed for large wildland fire simulation (with or without atmospheric coupling) ForeFire has been extended for the simulation of lava flow with the same numerical methods. Similarities in both problems include the requirement to take into account high-resolution topography for the simulation of front dynamics and the requirement to use atmospheric sub-mesh models in order to quantify surface energy and species fluxes to the atmosphere. To be representative of the phenomenon, typical resolution required for the simulation of a fire front or a lava flow is sub-meter (to have an explicit flame depth or narrow flow width) while atmospheric simulation of a typical domain (several tens of square kilometres) may not be performed at a resolution of finer than 50 meters in a reasonable computational time. Front tracking is performed by means of Lagrangian markers that allow simulating interface dynamics at high spatial resolution, temporal scheme is event based with a Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy constant time step calculated for each marker iteration, allowing efficient simulation focused on active flow areas. The Lagrangian front dynamics is used to construct a "time of arrival" high-resolution field that is used to perform local budgets of the different surface fluxes models in a way similar to the level-set method. The two way coupling in a Meso-NH/ForeFire simulation typically involve the surface wind to drive the fire or cool the lava surface, and heat and water vapour fluxes to be injected in the atmosphere at each atmospheric time step. The ForeFire code has been built so that several front velocity function could be easily defined and applied at different locations of the surface (e.g. a fire front velocity model could be

  14. Simulation of weld solidification microstructure and its coupling to the macroscopic heat and fluid flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyk, Vitaliy; Dilthey, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure exerts a strong influence on the mechanical properties and on the integrity of welded joints. Prediction of the formation of the microstructure during welding and of other solidification processes may be an important and supporting factor for technology optimization. Nowadays, increasing computing power allows direct simulations of the dendritic and cell morphology of columnar grains in the molten zone for specific temperature conditions. Modelling is carried out, on the one hand, with the finite difference—cellular automata and, on the other hand, with the phase field method. Determination of the solidification conditions during fusion welding (temperature gradient, local solidification rate, weld pool shape) is carried out with a numerical macroscopic finite element modelling calculation of the weld pool fluid flow and of the temperature distribution, as presented in this paper. As with the use of accurate physical models, the simulations are carried out with a spatial resolution of the microstructure, and many assumptions and restrictions from traditional, analytical or phenomenological models may be eliminated. The possibilities of using numerical algorithms for generation and visualization of microstructure formation during solidification are demonstrated. The spectrum of applications extends from welding and casting to processes with rapid solidification. In particular, computer simulations of the solidification conditions and the formation of a dendritic morphology during the directional solidification in gas-tungsten-arc welding are described. Moreover, the simulation results are compared with the experimental findings.

  15. The importance of coupled modelling of variably saturated groundwater flow-heat transport for assessing river-aquifer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engeler, I.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Müller, R.; Stauffer, F.

    2011-02-01

    SummaryThis paper focuses on the role of heat transport in river-aquifer interactions for the study area Hardhof located in the Limmat valley within the city of Zurich (Switzerland). On site there are drinking water production facilities of Zurich water supply, which pump groundwater and infiltrate bank filtration water from river Limmat. The artificial recharge by basins and by wells creates a hydraulic barrier against the potentially contaminated groundwater flow from the city. A three-dimensional finite element model of the coupled variably saturated groundwater flow and heat transport was developed. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and the leakage coefficient of the riverbed were calibrated for isothermal conditions by inverse modelling, using the pilot point method. River-aquifer interaction was modelled using a leakage concept. Coupling was considered by temperature-dependent values for hydraulic conductivity and for leakage coefficients. The quality of the coupled model was tested with the help of head and temperature measurements. Good correspondence between simulated and measured temperatures was found for the three pumping wells and seven piezometers. However, deviations were observed for one pumping well and two piezometers, which are situated in an area, where zones with important hydrogeological heterogeneity are expected. A comparison of simulation results with isothermal leakage coefficients with those of temperature-dependent leakage coefficients shows that the temperature dependence is able to reduce the head residuals close to the river by up to 30%. The largest improvements are found in the zone, where the river stage is considerably higher than the groundwater level, which is in correspondence with the expectations. Additional analyses also showed that the linear leakage concept cannot reproduce the seepage flux in a downstream section during flood events. It was found that infiltration is enhanced during flood events, which is

  16. Variably-saturated flow in large weighing lysimeters under dry conditions: parameter identification and predictive modelling using coupled water, vapor and heat flow theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Sascha; Reineke, Daniela; Koonce, Jeremy; Berli, Markus; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    The prediction of groundwater recharge in arid and semi-arid regions with simulation models requires an accurate simulation of actual evaporation. Actual evaporation from dry soil cannot be predicted without the consideration of the interplay between liquid, vapor and heat flow. Under dry conditions, soil water content and latent heat fluxes are generally low and temperature gradients close to the surface can become extremely high in bare-soil leading to temperature-induced vapor fluxes. Due to this and because of the temperature-dependence of saturation vapor pressure, the near-surface temperature fluctuations must be correctly modeled to predict actual evaporation. We have analyzed water, vapor and heat fluxes in a large weighing Lysimeter (length 3 m, area 4 m2) in the Mohave desert, Nevada. The Lysimeter contains homogenized and packed desert soil and is instrumented with a total of 152 sensors for the measurement of local water content (TDR), matric potential (HDU) and soil temperature. The time series of the lysimeter mass was first corrected manually and semi-automatically to determine hourly fluxes across the upper boundary. Effective soil hydraulic properties were identified by inverse modeling of the lysimeter data. The soil hydraulic functions had to be parameterized with a flexible model accounting for water flow in completely and incompletely-filled capillaries to match the time series of water potential and local water content. The hydraulic properties were then used in a coupled model of water, vapor and heat flow which was driven by meteorological data and the energy balance of the ground surface. The coupled model provided an excellent prediction of local water contents, soil temperatures at different depths and actual evaporation from the lysimeter in a validation period. The difference between the actual evaporation measured with the lysimeter and the evaporation predicted by the process model was only 5 %.

  17. Coupled lattice Boltzmann method for simulating electrokinetic flows: A localized scheme for the Nernst-Plank model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    We present a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to solve a set of model equations for electrokinetic flows in micro-/nano-channels. The model consists of the Poisson equation for the electrical potential, the Nernst-Planck equation for the ion concentration, and the Navier-Stokes equation for the flows of the electrolyte solution. In the proposed LBM, the electrochemical migration and the convection of the electrolyte solution contributing to the ion flux are incorporated into the collision operator, which maintains the locality of the algorithm inherent to the original LBM. Furthermore, the Neumann-type boundary condition at the solid/liquid interface is then correctly imposed. In order to validate the present LBM, we consider an electro-osmotic flow in a slit between two charged infinite parallel plates, and the results of LBM computation are compared to the analytical solutions. Good agreement is obtained in the parameter range considered herein, including the case in which the nonlinearity of the Poisson equation due to the large potential variation manifests itself. We also apply the method to a two-dimensional problem of a finite-length microchannel with an entry and an exit. The steady state, as well as the transient behavior, of the electro-osmotic flow induced in the microchannel is investigated. It is shown that, although no external pressure difference is imposed, the presence of the entry and exit results in the occurrence of the local pressure gradient that causes a flow resistance reducing the magnitude of the electro-osmotic flow.

  18. Coupling LaGrit unstructured mesh generation and model setup with TOUGH2 flow and transport: A case study

    DOE PAGES

    Sentís, Manuel Lorenzo; Gable, Carl Walter

    2017-06-01

    There are many applications in science and engineering modeling where an accurate representation of a complex model geometry in the form of a mesh is important. In applications of flow and transport in subsurface porous media, this is manifest in models that must capture complex geologic stratigraphy, structure (faults, folds, erosion, deposition) and infrastructure (tunnels, boreholes, excavations). Model setup, defined as the activities of geometry definition, mesh generation (creation, optimization, modification, refine, de-refine, smooth), assigning material properties, initial conditions and boundary conditions requires specialized software tools to automate and streamline the process. In addition, some model setup tools will providemore » more utility if they are designed to interface with and meet the needs of a particular flow and transport software suite. A control volume discretization that uses a two point flux approximation is for example most accurate when the underlying control volumes are 2D or 3D Voronoi tessellations. In this paper we will present the coupling of LaGriT, a mesh generation and model setup software suite and TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999) to model subsurface flow problems and we show an example of how LaGriT can be used as a model setup tool for the generation of a Voronoi mesh for the simulation program TOUGH2. To generate the MESH file for TOUGH2 from the LaGriT output a standalone module Lagrit2Tough2 was developed, which is presented here and will be included in a future release of LaGriT. Here in this paper an alternative method to generate a Voronoi mesh for TOUGH2 with LaGriT is presented and thanks to the modular and command based structure of LaGriT this method is well suited to generating a mesh for complex models.« less

  19. The Deep Crust Magmatic Refinery, Part 1: A Coupled Thermodynamic and Two-phase Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, N., Jr.; Bouilhol, P.; Van Hunen, J.; Velic, M.; Magni, V.

    2016-12-01

    Metamorphic and magmatic processes occurring in the deep crust ultimately control the chemical and physical characteristic of the continental crust. A complex interplay between magma intrusion, crystallization, and reaction with the pre-existing crust provide a wide range of differentiated magma and cumulates (and / or restites) that will feed the upper crustal levels with evolved melt while constructing the lower crust. With growing evidence from field and experimental studies, it becomes clearer that crystallization and melting processes are non-exclusive but should be considered together. Incoming H2O bearing mantle melts will start to fractionate to a certain extent, forming cumulates but also releasing heat and H2O to the intruded host-rock allowing it to melt in saturated conditions. The end-result of such dynamic system is a function of the amount and composition of melt input, and extent of reaction with the host which is itself dependent on the migration mode of the melts. To assess the dynamics of this deep magmatic system we developed a new 2-D two-phase flow code using finite volume method. Our formulation takes into account: (i) melt flow through a viscous porous matrix with temperature- and melt-content dependent host-rock viscosity, (ii) heat transfer, assuming local thermal equilibrium between solid and liquid, (iii) thermodynamic modelling of stable phases, (iv) injection of fractionated melt from crystallizing basalt at the Moho and (v) chemical advection of both the solid and liquid compositions. Here we present the core of our modelling approach, especially the petrological implementation. We show in details that our thermodynamic model can reproduce well both the sub- and supra solidus phase relationship and composition of the host-rock. We apply our method to an idealized amphibolite lower crust that is affected by a magmatic event represented by the intrusion of a wet mantle melt into the crust at Moho depth. The models [see Bouilhol et al

  20. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  1. A numerical model for coupled fluid flow and matrix deformation with applications to disequilibrium compaction and delta stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, Christina; Huismans, Ritske S.; Beaumont, Christopher; Fullsack, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    A model is developed which couples fully saturated porous compaction to the viscous-plastic deformation of the skeleton matrix. The Darcy fluid flow during compaction is described by an advection-diffusion equation for the excess pressure with two source/sink terms that depend on the mechanical compressibility and viscous compaction of the pore space, the latter representing the effect of pressure solution. The incompressible deformation of the composite medium is described by a force balance equation and its rheology can be viscous, plastic, or viscoplastic (Bingham material). For the plastic and viscoplastic cases, the coupling between the compacting and plastically deforming parts of the system is through the Drucker-Prager frictional-plastic yield criterion modified by Terzaghi's principle, so that the yield strength depends on the effective dynamical pressure. The coupled system is solved using a two-dimensional (2-D) finite element method. Two problems are solved to demonstrate the behavior of our theory. The first considers compaction of a uniform sediment layer. The numerical results agree with the predictions of the nondimensional control parameters and previously published results. The second problem concerns 2-D kinematic progradation of deltaic sediments. Substratum and delta sediments have the same compaction properties and a Bingham rheology during deviatoric deformation, such that the delta undergoes linear postyield viscous flow. For certain depositional regimes, overpressure is generated. When pore pressures approach critical values, yielding occurs and the delta front fails and becomes unstable, spreading gravitationally under its own weight. The flow velocity is limited to geological rates by the Bingham viscosity. For the range of parameter values considered, pressure solution is the most effective mechanism for generating near-lithostatic fluid pressures that lead to initial failure, and it appears that mechanical compaction hardly contributes

  2. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-04-15

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes.

  3. Coupling Strontium Isotope and Trace Metal Geochemistry With a Watershed Flow Path Model in the Lamprey River Watershed, New Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.; Bryce, J.; Davis, J.

    2007-12-01

    2006 show a decrease in 87Sr/86Sr in the downstream direction as the water generally flows from the magmatic series to the gneiss complex, indicating that low 87Sr/86Sr groundwater is infiltrating the river. These results also indicate groundwater inputs from extrabasinal flow. Further refinements of the model, coupled with forthcoming trace element analyses, will provide a stronger means to quantify these contributions along the gradient of the river.

  4. Modeling Coupled Processes for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Mechanically Deforming Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S. A.; Pike, D. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of coupled hydrological-mechanical processes in fault zones is critical for understanding the long-term behavior of fluids within the shallow crust. Here we utilize a previously developed cellular-automata (CA) model to define the evolution of permeability within a 2-D fault zone under compressive stress. At each time step, the CA model calculates the increase in fluid pressure within the fault at every grid cell. Pressure surpassing a critical threshold (e.g., lithostatic stress) causes a rupture in that cell, and pressure is then redistributed across the neighboring cells. The rupture can cascade through the spatial domain and continue across multiple time steps. Stress continues to increase and the size and location of rupture events are recorded until a percolating backbone of ruptured cells exists across the fault. Previous applications of this model consider uncorrelated random fields for the compressibility of the fault material. The prior focus on uncorrelated property fields is consistent with development of a number of statistical physics models including percolation processes and fracture propagation. However, geologic materials typically express spatial correlation and this can have a significant impact on the results of the pressure and permeability distributions. We model correlation of the fault material compressibility as a multiGaussian random field with a correlation length defined as the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the kernel used to create the field. The FWHM is varied from < 0.001 to approximately 0.47 of the domain size. The addition of spatial correlation to the compressibility significantly alters the model results including: 1) Accumulation of larger amounts of strain prior to the first rupture event; 2) Initiation of the percolating backbone at lower amounts of cumulative strain; 3) Changes in the event size distribution to a combined power-law and exponential distribution with a smaller power; and 4) Evolution of the

  5. Experiments performed with bubbly flow in vertical pipes at different flow conditions covering the transition region: simulation by coupling Eulerian, Lagrangian and 3D random walks models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José; Chiva, Sergio; El Aziz Essa, Mohamed; Mendes, Santos

    2012-08-01

    Two phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and water were performed in a vertical upward isothermal cocurrent air-water flow column with conditions ranging from bubbly flow, with very low void fraction, to transition flow with some cap and slug bubbles and void fractions around 25%. The superficial velocities of the liquid and the gas phases were varied from 0.5 to 3 m/s and from 0 to 0.6 m/s, respectively. Also to check the effect of changing the surface tension on the previous experiments small amounts of 1-butanol were added to the water. These amounts range from 9 to 75 ppm and change the surface tension. This study is interesting because in real cases the surface tension of the water diminishes with temperature, and with this kind of experiments we can study indirectly the effect of changing the temperature on the void fraction distribution. The following axial and radial distributions were measured in all these experiments: void fraction, interfacial area concentration, interfacial velocity, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity. The range of values of the gas superficial velocities in these experiments covered the range from bubbly flow to the transition to cap/slug flow. Also with transition flow conditions we distinguish two groups of bubbles in the experiments, the small spherical bubbles and the cap/slug bubbles. Special interest was devoted to the transition region from bubbly to cap/slug flow; the goal was to understand the physical phenomena that take place during this transition A set of numerical simulations of some of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions has been performed by coupling a Lagrangian code, that tracks the three dimensional motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates inside the field of the carrier liquid, to an Eulerian model that computes the magnitudes of continuous phase and to a 3D random walk model that takes on account the fluctuation in the velocity field of the

  6. A comparison of the coupled fresh water-salt water flow and the Ghyben-Herzberg sharp interface approaches to modeling of transient behavior in coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional finite difference model which simulates coupled, fresh water and salt water flow, separated by a sharp interface, is used to investigate the effects of storage characteristics, transmissivity, boundary conditions and anisotropy on the transient responses of such flow systems. The magnitude and duration of the departure of aquifer response from the behavior predicted using the Ghyben-Herzberg, one-fluid approach is a function of the ease with which flow can be induced in the salt water region. In many common hydrogeologic settings short-term fresh water head responses, and transitional responses between short-term and long-term, can only be realistically reproduced by including the effects of salt water flow on the dynamics of coastal flow systems. The coupled fresh water-salt water flow modeling approach is able to reproduce the observed annual fresh water head response of the Waialae aquifer of southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. ?? 1986.

  7. Investigation of linear coupling between single-event blood flow responses and interictal discharges in a model of experimental epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vanzetta, Ivo; Flynn, Corey; Ivanov, Anton I; Bernard, Christophe; Bénar, Christian G

    2010-06-01

    A successful outcome of epilepsy neurosurgery relies on an accurate delineation of the epileptogenic region to be resected. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) would allow doing this noninvasively at high spatial resolution. However, a clear, quantitative description of the relationship between hemodynamic changes and the underlying epileptiform neuronal activity is still missing, thereby preventing the systematic use of fMRI for routine epilepsy surgery planning. To this aim, we used a local epilepsy model to record simultaneously cerebral blood flow (CBF) with laser Doppler (LD) and local field potentials (LFP) in rat frontal cortex. CBF responses to individual interictal-like spikes were large and robust. Their amplitude correlated linearly with spike amplitude. Moreover, the CBF response added linearly in time over a large range of spiking rates. CBF responses could thus be predicted by a linear model of the kind currently used for the interpretation of fMRI data, but including also the spikes' amplitudes as additional information. Predicted and measured CBF responses matched accurately. For high spiking frequencies (above approximately 0.2 Hz), the responses saturated but could eventually recover, indicating the presence of multiple neurovascular coupling mechanisms, which might act at different spatiotemporal scales. Spatially, CBF responses peaked at the center of epileptic activity and displayed a spatial specificity at least as good as the millimeter. These results suggest that simultaneous electroencephalographic and blood flow-based fMRI recordings should be suitable for the noninvasive precise localization of hyperexcitable regions in epileptic patients candidate for neurosurgery.

  8. Mechanics of coupled granular/fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinningland, J.; Toussaint, R.; Johnsen, O.; Flekkoy, E. G.; Maloy, K. J.

    2006-12-01

    We introduce a hybrid numerical model for coupled flow of solid grains and intersticial fluid, which renders for complex hydrodynamic interactions between mobile grains. This model treats the solid phase as discrete particles, interacting mechanically with the other particles and with the intersticial flowing fluid. The fluid is described by continuum equations rendering for its advection by the local grains, superposed to a pressure diffusion ruled by a Darcy flow with a permeability depending on the local solid fraction. This model is aimed at describing accurately such coupled flow. This model is tested for two model situations, where it is compared to experimental results: 1/ Injection of a localized overpressure in a grain/fluid filled cell lying horizontally, where gravity is unimportant. 2/ Sedimentation of heavy grains falling into an initially grain-free fluid region. The development of pattern-forming instabilities is obtained in these two situations, corresponding to granular/fluid equivalents of the two-fluids Saffman-Taylor and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Numerical and experimental results are shown to be consistent with each other.

  9. Coupling machine learning with mechanistic models to study runoff production and river flow at the hillslope scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marçais, J.; Gupta, H. V.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Geomorphological structure and geological heterogeneity of hillslopes are major controls on runoff responses. The diversity of hillslopes (morphological shapes and geological structures) on one hand, and the highly non linear runoff mechanism response on the other hand, make it difficult to transpose what has been learnt at one specific hillslope to another. Therefore, making reliable predictions on runoff appearance or river flow for a given hillslope is a challenge. Applying a classic model calibration (based on inverse problems technique) requires doing it for each specific hillslope and having some data available for calibration. When applied to thousands of cases it cannot always be promoted. Here we propose a novel modeling framework based on coupling process based models with data based approach. First we develop a mechanistic model, based on hillslope storage Boussinesq equations (Troch et al. 2003), able to model non linear runoff responses to rainfall at the hillslope scale. Second we set up a model database, representing thousands of non calibrated simulations. These simulations investigate different hillslope shapes (real ones obtained by analyzing 5m digital elevation model of Brittany and synthetic ones), different hillslope geological structures (i.e. different parametrizations) and different hydrologic forcing terms (i.e. different infiltration chronicles). Then, we use this model library to train a machine learning model on this physically based database. Machine learning model performance is then assessed by a classic validating phase (testing it on new hillslopes and comparing machine learning with mechanistic outputs). Finally we use this machine learning model to learn what are the hillslope properties controlling runoffs. This methodology will be further tested combining synthetic datasets with real ones.

  10. Coupled hydrothermal flows of liquid and vapor in welded tuff; Numerical modeling of proposed experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.; Reda, D.C.

    1987-12-31

    Pretest calculations of a proposed small-scale heat-pipe experiment have been made using a finite element, multiphase flow computer code. The purpose of the experiment is to characterize the response of partially saturated, welded, volcanic tuff to the two-phase countercurrent flow induced by an applied temperature gradient. The experimental measurements will be used to refine the presumed permeability and capillary pressure functions, which are used in the finite element analysis. The calculations presented in this paper, using the presumed material functions, show that saturation profiles and experimental time scales are sensitive to applied temperature gradients and initial liquid saturations. The results have been used to predict appropriate experimental parameter ranges.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Bubbly Flow and Slag Layer Behavior in Ladle with Discrete Phase Model (DPM)-Volume of Fluid (VOF) Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linmin; Liu, Zhongqiu; Cao, Maoxue; Li, Baokuan

    2015-07-01

    In the ladle metallurgy process, the bubble movement and slag layer behavior is very important to the refining process and steel quality. For the bubble-liquid flow, bubble movement plays a significant role in the phase structure and causes the unsteady complex turbulent flow pattern. This is one of the most crucial shortcomings of the current two-fluid models. In the current work, a one-third scale water model is established to investigate the bubble movement and the slag open-eye formation. A new mathematical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) is developed for the bubble-liquid-slag-air four-phase flow in the ladle. The Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) model is used for tracking the liquid-slag-air free surfaces and the Lagrangian discrete phase model (DPM) is used for describing the bubble movement. The turbulent liquid flow is induced by bubble-liquid interactions and is solved by LES. The procedure of bubble coming out of the liquid and getting into the air is modeled using a user-defined function. The results show that the present LES-DPM-VOF coupled model is good at predicting the unsteady bubble movement, slag eye formation, interface fluctuation, and slag entrainment.

  12. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3 MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Das, A. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50 kW DC power and 3 MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  13. Flow-flame interactions causing acoustically coupled heat release fluctuations in a thermo-acoustically unstable gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, A.M.; Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W.; Carter, C.D.

    2010-12-15

    A detailed analysis of the flow-flame interactions associated with acoustically coupled heat-release rate fluctuations was performed for a 10 kW, CH{sub 4}/air, swirl stabilized flame in a gas turbine model combustor exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations at 308 Hz. High-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, OH planar laser induced fluorescence, and OH* chemiluminescence measurements were performed at a sustained repetition rate of 5 kHz, which was sufficient to resolve the relevant combustor dynamics. Using spatio-temporal proper orthogonal decomposition, it was found that the flow-field contained several simultaneous periodic motions: the reactant flux into the combustion chamber periodically oscillated at the thermo-acoustic frequency (308 Hz), a helical precessing vortex core (PVC) circumscribed the burner nozzle at 515 Hz, and the PVC underwent axial contraction and extension at the thermo-acoustic frequency. The global heat release rate fluctuated at the thermo-acoustic frequency, while the heat release centroid circumscribed the combustor at the difference between the thermo-acoustic and PVC frequencies. Hence, the three-dimensional location of the heat release fluctuations depended on the interaction of the PVC with the flame surface. This motivated the compilation of doubly phase resolved statistics based on the phase of both the acoustic and PVC cycles, which showed highly repeatable periodic flow-flame configurations. These include flames stabilized between the inflow and inner recirculation zone, large-scale flame wrap-up by the PVC, radial deflection of the inflow by the PVC, and combustion in the outer recirculation zones. Large oscillations in the flame surface area were observed at the thermo-accoustic frequency that significantly affected the total heat-release oscillations. By filtering the instantaneous reaction layers at different scales, the importance of the various flow-flame interactions affecting the flame area was

  14. Analysis of flow-structure coupling in a mechanical model of the vocal folds and the subglottal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.; McGowan, R. S.

    2009-11-01

    An analysis is made of the nonlinear interactions between flow in the subglottal vocal tract and glottis, sound waves in the subglottal system and a mechanical model of the vocal folds. The mean flow through the system is produced by a nominally steady contraction of the lungs, and mechanical experiments frequently involve a ‘lung cavity’ coupled to an experimental subglottal tube of arbitrary or ill-defined effective length L, on the basis that the actual value of L has little or no influence on excitation of the vocal folds. A simple, self-exciting single-mass mathematical model of the vocal folds is used to investigate the sound generated within the subglottal domain and the unsteady volume flux from the glottis for experiments where it is required to suppress feedback of sound from the supraglottal vocal tract. In experiments where the assumed absorption of sound within the sponge-like interior of the lungs is small, the influence of changes in L can be very significant: when the subglottal tube behaves as an open-ended resonator (when L is as large as half the acoustic wavelength) there is predicted to be a mild increase in volume flux magnitude and a small change in waveform. However, the strong appearance of second harmonics of the acoustic field is predicted at intermediate lengths, when L is roughly one quarter of the acoustic wavelength. In cases of large lung damping, however, only modest changes in the volume flux are predicted to occur with variations in L.

  15. Computational modelling of the scaffold-free chondrocyte regeneration: a two-way coupling between the cell growth and local fluid flow and nutrient concentration.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Shakhawath; Bergstrom, D J; Chen, X B

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro chondrocyte cell culture process in a perfusion bioreactor provides enhanced nutrient supply as well as the flow-induced shear stress that may have a positive influence on the cell growth. Mathematical and computational modelling of such a culture process, by solving the coupled flow, mass transfer and cell growth equations simultaneously, can provide important insight into the biomechanical environment of a bioreactor and the related cell growth process. To do this, a two-way coupling between the local flow field and cell growth is required. Notably, most of the computational and mathematical models to date have not taken into account the influence of the cell growth on the local flow field and nutrient concentration. The present research aimed at developing a mathematical model and performing a numerical simulation using the lattice Boltzmann method to predict the chondrocyte cell growth without a scaffold on a flat plate placed inside a perfusion bioreactor. The model considers the two-way coupling between the cell growth and local flow field, and the simulation has been performed for 174 culture days. To incorporate the cell growth into the model, a control-volume-based surface growth modelling approach has been adopted. The simulation results show the variation of local fluid velocity, shear stress and concentration distribution during the culture period due to the growth of the cell phase and also illustrate that the shear stress can increase the cell volume fraction to a certain extent.

  16. Preferential Mode of gas invasion in sediments: Grain-scale mechanistic model of coupled multiphase fluid flow and sediment mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A. K.; Juanes, R.

    2009-08-01

    We present a discrete element model for simulating, at the grain scale, gas migration in brine-saturated deformable media. We rigorously account for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating forces on grains due to pore fluid pressures and surface tension between fluids. This model, which couples multiphase fluid flow with sediment mechanics, permits investigation of the upward migration of gas through a brine-filled sediment column. We elucidate the ways in which gas migration may take place: (1) by capillary invasion in a rigid-like medium and (2) by initiation and propagation of a fracture. We find that grain size is the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport in the sediment, and we show that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain media. The results have important implications for understanding vent sites and pockmarks in the ocean floor, deep subseabed storage of carbon dioxide, and gas hydrate accumulations in ocean sediments and permafrost regions. Our results predict that in fine sediments, hydrate will likely form in veins following a fracture network pattern, and the hydrate concentration will likely be quite low. In coarse sediments, the buoyant methane gas is likely to invade the pore space more uniformly, in a process akin to invasion percolation, and the overall pore occupancy is likely to be much higher than for a fracture-dominated regime. These implications are consistent with laboratory experiments and field observations of methane hydrates in natural systems.

  17. A Coupled Thermal/Material Flow Model of Friction Stir Welding Applied to Sc-Modified Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Carter; Kopyściański, Mateusz; Senkov, Oleg; Dymek, Stanislaw

    2013-04-01

    A coupled thermal/material flow model of friction stir welding was developed and applied to the joining of Sc-modified aluminum alloy (7042-T6) extrusions. The model reveals that surface material is pulled from the retreating side into the weld zone where it is interleaved with in situ material. Due to frictional contact with the shoulder, the surface material is hotter than the in situ material, so that the final weld microstructure is composed of bands of material with different temperature histories. For this alloy and the associated FSW heating rates, secondary phase dissolution/precipitation temperatures are in proximity to the welding temperatures. Therefore, depending on the surface and in situ material temperatures in relation to these transformation temperatures, disparate precipitate distributions can develop in the bands of material comprising the weld nugget. Based on the numerical simulation and on thermal analysis data from differential scanning calorimetry, a mechanism for the formation of onion rings within the weld zone is presented.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Heat Transport and Liquid Water and Water Vapor Flow in Geothermally Heated Ground at Norris Geyser Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, R. A. M.; Jones, S. B.; Neale, C. M. U.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term monitoring of ground surface temperature and heat flow near hydrothermally active areas in Yellowstone National Park can help determine possible changes of the subsurface heat flow. Some of these changes may alter the safety of the park's visitors, rangers and scientists. The geothermal heated ground in Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park receives heat from both the geothermal gradient and the atmospheric shortwave and longwave radiations. In this study a one dimensional numerical model was used to model the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor, and heat in the top 10 cm soil layer near a hydrothermal crater in Norris Geyser Basin. The Hydrus 1D numerical model was used to simulate the coupled processes in order to optimize the soil hydraulic parameters. Parameter optimization was done using Marquardt-Levenberg type parameter optimization algorithm for variably saturated soil under steady state and transient flow conditions. The simulation of coupled heat transport and liquid water and water vapor flow in geothermally heated ground is a new application to Hydrus 1D. Preliminary results, however, showed that the calculated temperature and water content correlated well with observed patterns on both dry sunny days and wet days. The study explained the coupled processes at the ground-atmosphere boundary layer which can help determine possible changes within the subsurface heat flow from the geothermal source.

  19. Vibration dissociation coupling in nonequilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham V.

    1992-01-01

    The final report on research between North Carolina State University and the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The research was aimed at using the Schwartz, Slawsky, Herzfeld (SSH) theory to simulate the vibrational relaxation of nitrogen molecules undergoing dissociation or recombination over a wide range of conditions. The results of these simulations were then treated as exact, and they were used to develop a model for the coupled vibration-dissociation process. This new model is simple enough to be used in computational fluid dynamics codes, but still captures the physics of the complex process. The model is used to simulate the flow over typical geometries to test it and to determine how much impact it has on the flow field. The key elements of this research are summarized.

  20. Development of a sharp interface model that simulates coastal aquifer flow with the coupled use of GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemitzi, Alexandra; Tolikas, Demetrios

    A simulation program, which works seamlessly with GIS and simulates flows in coastal aquifers, is presented in the present paper. The model is based on the Galerkin finite element discretization scheme and it simulates both steady and transient freshwater and saltwater flow, assuming that the two fluids are separated by a sharp interface. The model has been verified in simple cases where analytical solutions exist. The simulation program works as a tool of the GIS program, which is the main database that stores and manages all the necessary data. The combined use of the simulation and the GIS program forms an integrated management tool offering a simpler way of simulating and studying saline intrusion in coastal aquifers. Application of the model to the Yermasogia aquifer illustrates the coupled use of modeling and GIS techniques for the examination of regional coastal aquifer systems. Pour étudier un système aquifère côtier, nous avons développé un modèle aux éléments finis en quasi 3-D qui simule les écoulements d'eau douce et d'eau salée en régime aussi bien permanent que transitoire. Les équations qui les régissent sont discrétisées par un schéma de discrétisation de Garlekin aux éléments finis. Le modèle a été vérifié dans des cas simples où il existe des solutions analytiques. Toutes les données nécessaires sont introduites et gérées grâce à un logiciel de gestion de SIG. Le programme de simulation est utilisé comme un outil du logiciel de SIG, constituant ainsi un outil de gestion intégrée dont le but est de simuler et d'étudier l'intrusion saline dans les aquifères côtiers. L'application du modèle à l'aquifère de Yermasogia illustre l'utilisation couplée de la modélisation et des techniques de SIG pour l'étude des systèmes aquifères côtiers régionaux. Se ha desarrollado un modelo casi tridimensional de elementos finitos para simular el flujo de agua dulce y salada, tanto en régimen estacionario como en

  1. Understand the impacts of wetland restoration on peak flow and baseflow by coupling hydrologic and hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Sabo, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Wetlands as the earth's kidneys provides various ecosystem services, such as absorbing pollutants, purifying freshwater, providing habitats for diverse ecosystems, sustaining species richness and biodiversity. From hydrologic perspective, wetlands can store storm-flood water in flooding seasons and release it afterwards, which will reduce flood peaks and reshape hydrograph. Therefore, as a green infrastructure and natural capital, wetlands provides a competent alternative to manage water resources in a green way, with potential to replace the widely criticized traditional gray infrastructure (i.e. dams and dikes) in certain cases. However, there are few systematic scientific tools to support our decision-making on site selection and allow us to quantitatively investigate the impacts of restored wetlands on hydrological process, not only in local scale but also in the view of entire catchment. In this study, we employed a topographic index, HAND (the Height Above the Nearest Drainage), to support our decision on potential site selection. Subsequently, a hydrological model (VIC, Variable Infiltration Capacity) was coupled with a macro-scale hydrodynamic model (CaMa-Flood, Catchment-Based Macro-scale Floodplain) to simulate the impact of wetland restoration on flood peaks and baseflow. The results demonstrated that topographic information is an essential factor to select wetland restoration location. Different reaches, wetlands area and the change of roughness coefficient should be taken into account while evaluating the impacts of wetland restoration. The simulated results also clearly illustrated that wetland restoration will increase the local storage and decrease the downstream peak flow which is beneficial for flood prevention. However, its impact on baseflow is ambiguous. Theoretically, restored wetlands will increase the baseflow due to the slower release of the stored flood water, but the increase of wetlands area may also increase the actual evaporation

  2. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  3. Regional coupling of unsaturated and saturated flow and transport modeling - implementation at an alpine foothill aquifer in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, G.; Rock, G.; Kupfersberger, H.; Fank, J.

    2012-04-01

    interval of every hydrotope vertical profile until the lowest observed groundwater table is reached. The fluctuation range of the phreatic surface is also discretized in 10 cm intervals and used as outflow boundary condition. By this procedure, the influence of the groundwater table on the water and nitrate mass leaving the unsaturated can be considered taken into account varying soil horizons. To cover saturated flow in the WLF aquifer a 2-dimensional transient horizontal flow and solute transport model is set up. A sequential coupling between the two models is implemented, i.e. a unidirectional transfer of recharge and nitrate mass outflow from the hydrotopes to the saturated compartment. For this purpose, a one-time assignment between the spatial discretization of the hydrotopes and the finite element mesh has to be set up. The resulting groundwater table computed for a given time step with the input from SIMWASER/STOTRASIM is then used to extract the corresponding water and nitrate mass values from the look-up table to be used for the consecutive time step. This process is being repeated until the end of the simulation period. Within this approach there is no direct feedback between the unsaturated and the saturated aquifer compartment, i.e. there is no simultaneous (within the same time step) update of the pressure head - unsaturated head relationship at the soil and the phreatic surface (like is shown e.g. in Walsum and Groedendijk, 2008). For the dominating coarse sand conditions of the WLF aquifer we believe that this simplification is not of further relevance. For higher soil moisture contents (i.e. almost full saturation near the groundwater table) the curve returns to specific retention within a short vertical distance. Thus, there might only be mutual impact between soil and phreatic surface conditions for shallow groundwater tables. However, it should be mentioned here that all other processes in the two compartments (including capillary rise due to clay rich

  4. Energy flow analysis of coupled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Phillip Eung-Ho

    1993-01-01

    Energy flow analysis (EFA) is an analytical tool for prediction of the frequency-averaged vibrational response of built-up structures at high audible frequencies. The procedure is based on two developments; firstly, the derivation of the partial differential equations that govern the propagation of energy-related quantities in simple structural elements such as rods, beams, plates, and acoustic cavities; secondly, the derivation of coupling relationships in terms of energy-related quantities that describe the transfer of energy for various joints (e.g., beam-to-beam, plate-to-plate, and structure-to acoustic field couplings). In this investigation, EFA is used to predict the vibrational response of various coupled structures. In the process of predicting the vibrational response of the coupled structures, the energy flow coupling relationships at the joints of these structures are derived. In addition, the finite element formulation of the governing energy equations are developed. Because the energy density is discontinuous at the joint, a special global assembly procedure is developed to assemble the finite element matrix equations into global matrix equations. The global matrix assembly procedure is predicated on the development of joint element matrix equations using energy flow coupling relationships for various structural joints. The results predicted by EFA for a frame structure with a three-dimensional joint, where four wave types propagate in the structure, are shown to be a reasonable approximation of the frequency-averaged 'exact' energetics, which are computed from classical displacement solutions. The accuracy of the results predicted by EFA increased with high mode count and modal overlap factor or high non-dimensional wavenumber band and non-dimensional damped wavenumber band in the frequency band of interest. An experimental investigation of vibrational response of a light truck frame structure was performed to verify the results of EFA when applied

  5. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0-100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa-1 for the best devices.

  6. Coupled Flow and Deformation Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration in the Presence of a Caprock Fracture during Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Hema J; Gondle, Raj K; Bromhal, Grant S

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the transport of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) during long-term CO{sub 2} injection into a typical geologic reservoir, such as a saline aquifer, could be complicated because of changes in geochemical, hydrogeological, and hydromechanical behavior. While the caprock layer overlying the target aquifer is intended to provide a tight, impermeable seal in securing injected CO{sub 2}, the presence of geologic uncertainties, such as a caprock fracture or fault, may provide a channel for CO{sub 2} leakage. There could also be a possibility of the activation of a new or existing dormant fault or fracture, which could act as a leakage pathway. Such a leakage event during CO{sub 2} injection may lead to a different pressure and ground response over a period of time. In the present study, multiphase fluid flow simulations in porous media coupled with geomechanics were used to investigate the overburden geologic response and plume behavior during CO{sub 2} injection in the presence of a hypothetical permeable fractured zone in a caprock, existing or activated. Both single-phase and multiphase fluid flow simulations were performed. The CO{sub 2} migration through an existing fractured zone leads to changes in the fluid pressure in the overburden geologic layers and could have a significant impact on ground deformation behavior. Results of the study show that pressure signatures and displacement patterns are significantly different in the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock layer. The variation in pressure and displacement signatures because of the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock at different locations may be useful in identifying the presence of a fault/fractured zone in the caprock. The pressure signatures can also serve as a mechanism to identify the activation of leakage pathways through the caprock during CO{sub 2} injection. Pressure response and ground deformation behavior from sequestration modeling could be useful in the development of

  7. Nuclear-Coupled Flow Instabilities and Their Effects on Dryout

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ishii; X. Sunn; S. Kuran

    2004-09-27

    Nuclear-coupled flow/power oscillations in boiling water reactors (BWRs) are investigated experimentally and analytically. A detailed literature survey is performed to identify and classify instabilities in two-phase flow systems. The classification and the identification of the leading physical mechanisms of the two-phase flow instabilities are important to propose appropriate analytical models and scaling criteria for simulation. For the purpose of scaling and the analysis of the nonlinear aspects of the coupled flow/power oscillations, an extensive analytical modeling strategy is developed and used to derive both frequency and time domain analysis tools.

  8. Using a Coupled Thermal/Material Flow Model to Predict Residual Stress in Friction Stir Processed AlMg9Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, C.; Węglowski, M. St.; Dymek, S.; Sedek, P.

    2015-03-01

    A coupled thermal/material flow model of friction stir processing is developed for friction stir processing of an as-cast AlSi9Mg aluminum alloy. By capturing material flow during processing, an asymmetric temperature distribution is generated with higher processing temperatures on the advancing side than on the retreating side. The temperature distribution from the coupled model is then incorporated into a thermomechanical model to predict the residual stress state after processing. These numerical results are compared with the residual stresses experimentally measured by the trepanation method. Experimental results show that the tensile residual stresses are higher on the advancing side than on the retreating side. The simulation successfully captures the asymmetric behavior of the residual stress profile, and the predicted maximum residual stress values show relatively good agreement with the experimental values. The simulated profile, however, is narrower than the experimental profile, yielding a smaller region of tensile residual stresses around the process zone than experimentally observed.

  9. Coupling WEPP and 3ST1D models for improved prediction of flow and sediment transport at watershed scales

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Watershed modeling is a key component of watershed management that involves the simulation of hydrological and fluvial processes for predicting flow and sediment transport within a watershed. For practical purposes, most numerical models have been developed to simulate either runoff and soil erosion...

  10. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  11. The influence of topographic feedback on a coupled mass balance and ice-flow model for Vestfonna ice-cap, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Martina; Möller, Marco; Zwinger, Thomas; Moore, John

    2016-04-01

    Using a coupled simulation set-up between a by statistical climate data forced and to ice-cap resolution downscaled mass balance model and an ice-dynamic model, we study coupling effects for the Vestfonna ice cap, Nordaustlandet, Svalbard, by analysing the impacts of different imposed coupling intervals on mass-balance and sea-level rise (SLR) projections. Based on a method to estimate errors introduced by different coupling schemes, we find that neglecting the topographic feedback in the coupling leads to underestimations of 10-20% in SLR projections on century time-scales in our model compared to full coupling (i.e., exchange of properties using smallest occurring time-step). Using the same method it also is shown that parametrising mass-balance adjustment for changes in topography using lapse rates is a - in computational terms - cost-effective reasonably accurate alternative applied to an ice-cap like Vestfonna. We test the forcing imposed by different emission pathways (RCP 2.4, 4.5, 6.0 and 8.5). For most of them, over the time-period explored (2000-2100), fast-flowing outlet glaciers decrease in impacting SLR due to their deceleration and reduced mass flux as they thin and retreat from the coast, hence detaching from the ocean and thereby losing their major mass drainage mechanism, i.e., calving.

  12. Atmospheric Flow over a Mountainous Region by a One-Way Coupled Approach Based on Reynolds-Averaged Turbulence Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, C. Veiga; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Rodrigues, Á. H.

    2016-05-01

    The atmospheric flow over a mountainous region has been simulated using a model-chain approach, whereby the flow in a larger region was simulated using a mesoscale model with three nesting levels, down to a 3-km horizontal resolution, within which a fourth nesting level was set with a microscale flow solver and a domain with varying horizontal resolution, around 300 m at the site of interest. Two periods in the summer (July) and autumn (November-December) 2005, each with a duration of two weeks, were selected to test the present approach. Two sites were chosen, comprising a total of seven meteorological masts with wind vanes and anemometers at two heights. The microscale solver improved the wind-speed prediction of the mesoscale model in 10 of the 14 anemometers and replicated the high wind speeds, which were under-predicted in the mesoscale model. The wind conditions in summer varied with the daily cycle, related to regional-scale sea breezes and their interaction with local circulations induced by the topography. Regarding the turbulence intensity, the predicted decay with wind-speed increase was in agreement with the measurements. This study shows the need of both models: the microscale model captures the details of the boundary-layer physics, which would not be possible without the boundary conditions provided by the mesoscale model.

  13. Modeling coupled water flow, solute transport and geochemical reactions affecting heavy metal migration in a podzol soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many or most subsurface pollution problems at the field scale involve such simultaneous processes as water flow, multicomponent solute transport, heat transport and biogeochemical processes and reactions. Process-based models that integrate these various processes can be valuable tools for investiga...

  14. A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Kollet, S; Chow, F; Granvold, P; Duan, Q

    2007-02-23

    This final report is organized in four sections. Section 1 is the project summary (below), Section 2 is a submitted manuscript that describes the offline, or spinup simulations in detail, Section 3 is also a submitted manuscript that describes the online, or fully-coupled simulations in detail and Section 3, which is report that describes work done via a subcontract with UC Berkeley. The goal of this project was to develop and apply a coupled regional climate, land-surface, groundwater flow model as a means to further understand important mass and energy couplings between regional climate, the land surface, and groundwater. The project involved coupling three distinct submodels that are traditionally used independently with abstracted and potentially oversimplified (inter-model) boundary conditions. This coupled model lead to (1) an improved understanding of the sensitivity and importance of coupled physical processes from the subsurface to the atmosphere; (2) a new tool for predicting hydrologic conditions (rainfall, temperature, snowfall, snowmelt, runoff, infiltration and groundwater flow) at the watershed scale over a range of timeframes; (3) a simulation of hydrologic response of a characteristic watershed that will provide insight into the certainty of hydrologic forecasting, dominance and sensitivity of groundwater dynamics on land-surface fluxes; and (4) a more realistic model representation of weather predictions, precipitation and temperature, at the regional scale. Regional climate models are typically used for the simulation of weather, precipitation and temperature behavior over 10-1000 km domains for weather or climate prediction purposes, and are typically driven by boundary conditions derived from global climate models (GCMs), observations or both. The land or ocean surface typically represents a bottom boundary condition of these models, where important mass (water) and energy fluxes are approximated. The viability and influence of these

  15. Solid-State Constitutive Modelling of Glassy Polymers: Coupling the Rolie-Poly Equations for Melts with Anisotropic Viscoplastic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Focatiis, Davide S. A.; Embery, John; Buckley, C. Paul

    2008-07-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of a well-characterised monodisperse grade of entangled atactic polystyrene across a very wide temperature and strain rate range through linear and non-linear melt rheology and solid-state deformation. In an effort to construct a constitutive model for large deformations able to describe rheological response right across this wide timescale, two well-established rheological models are combined: the well known RoliePoly (RP) conformational melt model and the Oxford glass-rubber constitutive model for glassy polymers. Comparisons between experimental data and simulations from a numerical implementation of the model illustrate that the model can cope well with the range of deformations in which orientation is limited to length-scales longer than an entanglement length. One approach in which the model can be expanded to incorporate the effects of orientation on shorter length scales using anisotropic viscoplastic flow is briefly discussed.

  16. Solid-State Constitutive Modelling of Glassy Polymers: Coupling the Rolie-Poly Equations for Melts with Anisotropic Viscoplastic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    De Focatiis, Davide S. A.; Buckley, C. Paul; Embery, John

    2008-07-07

    This paper investigates the behaviour of a well-characterised monodisperse grade of entangled atactic polystyrene across a very wide temperature and strain rate range through linear and non-linear melt rheology and solid-state deformation. In an effort to construct a constitutive model for large deformations able to describe rheological response right across this wide timescale, two well-established rheological models are combined: the well known RoliePoly (RP) conformational melt model and the Oxford glass-rubber constitutive model for glassy polymers. Comparisons between experimental data and simulations from a numerical implementation of the model illustrate that the model can cope well with the range of deformations in which orientation is limited to length-scales longer than an entanglement length. One approach in which the model can be expanded to incorporate the effects of orientation on shorter length scales using anisotropic viscoplastic flow is briefly discussed.

  17. Evaluation of a coupled model for numerical simulation of a multiphase flow system in a porous medium and a surface fluid.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among atmosphere, water, and groundwater, including saltwater intrusion along coasts. Coupled numerical simulations of such problems must consider both vertical flow between the surface fluid and the porous medium and complicated boundary conditions at their interface. In this study, a numerical simulation method coupling Navier-Stokes equations for surface fluid flow and Darcy equations for flow in a porous medium was developed. Then, the basic ability of the coupled model to reproduce (1) the drawdown of a surface fluid observed in square-pillar experiments, using pillars filled with only fluid or with fluid and a porous medium and (2) the migration of saltwater (salt concentration 0.5%) in the porous medium using the pillar filled with fluid and a porous medium was evaluated. Simulations that assumed slippery walls reproduced well the results with drawdowns of 10-30 cm when the pillars were filled with packed sand, gas, and water. Moreover, in the simulation of saltwater infiltration by the method developed in this study, velocity was precisely reproduced because the experimental salt concentration in the porous medium after saltwater infiltration was similar to that obtained in the simulation. Furthermore, conditions across the boundary between the porous medium and the surface fluid were satisfied in these numerical simulations of square-pillar experiments in which vertical flow predominated. Similarly, the velocity obtained by the simulation for a system coupling flow in surface fluid with that in a porous medium when horizontal flow predominated satisfied the conditions across the boundary. Finally, it was confirmed that the present simulation method was able to simulate a practical-scale surface fluid and porous medium system. All of these numerical simulations, however, required a great deal of

  18. Coupling a three-dimensional subsurface flow and transport model with a land surface model to simulate stream-aquifer-land interactions (PFLOTRAN_CLM v1.0) [Coupling a three-dimensional subsurface flow model with a land surface model to simulate stream-aquifer-land interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Bisht, Gautam; Huang, Maoyi; Zhou, Tian; ...

    2017-02-17

    A fully coupled three-dimensional surface and subsurface land model is developed and applied to a site along the Columbia River to simulate three-way interactions among river water, groundwater, and land surface processes. The model features the coupling of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and a massively-parallel multi-physics reactive transport model (PFLOTRAN). The coupled model, named PFLOTRAN_CLM v1.0, is applied to a 400 m × 400 m study domain instrumented with groundwater monitoring wells along the Columbia River shoreline. PFLOTRAN_CLM v1.0 simulations are performed at three spatial resolutions over a five-year period to evaluate the impact of hydro-climatic conditionsmore » and spatial resolution on simulated variables. Results show that the coupled model is capable of simulating groundwater-river water interactions driven by river stage variability along managed river reaches, which are of global significance as a result of over 30,000 dams constructed worldwide during the past half century. Our numerical experiments suggest that the land-surface energy partitioning is strongly modulated by groundwater-river water interactions through expanding the periodically inundated fraction of the riparian zone, and enhancing moisture availability in the vadose zone via capillary rise in response to the river stage change. Furthermore, spatial resolution is found to impact significantly the accuracy of estimated the mass exchange rates at the boundaries of the aquifer, and it becomes critical when surface and subsurface become more tightly coupled with groundwater table within six to seven meters below the surface. Inclusion of lateral subsurface flow impacted both the surface energy budget and subsurface transport processes. The coupled model developed in this study can be used for improving mechanistic understanding of ecosystem functioning, biogeochemical cycling, and land-atmosphere interactions along river corridors under historical and future

  19. Coupled Monte Carlo Probability Density Function/ SPRAY/CFD Code Developed for Modeling Gas-Turbine Combustor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The success of any solution methodology for studying gas-turbine combustor flows depends a great deal on how well it can model various complex, rate-controlling processes associated with turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation and spreading rates of the spray, convective and radiative heat transfer, and other phenomena. These phenomena often strongly interact with each other at disparate time and length scales. In particular, turbulence plays an important role in determining the rates of mass and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and evaporation in many practical combustion devices. Turbulence manifests its influence in a diffusion flame in several forms depending on how turbulence interacts with various flame scales. These forms range from the so-called wrinkled, or stretched, flamelets regime, to the distributed combustion regime. Conventional turbulence closure models have difficulty in treating highly nonlinear reaction rates. A solution procedure based on the joint composition probability density function (PDF) approach holds the promise of modeling various important combustion phenomena relevant to practical combustion devices such as extinction, blowoff limits, and emissions predictions because it can handle the nonlinear chemical reaction rates without any approximation. In this approach, mean and turbulence gas-phase velocity fields are determined from a standard turbulence model; the joint composition field of species and enthalpy are determined from the solution of a modeled PDF transport equation; and a Lagrangian-based dilute spray model is used for the liquid-phase representation with appropriate consideration of the exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy between the two phases. The PDF transport equation is solved by a Monte Carlo method, and existing state-of-the-art numerical representations are used to solve the mean gasphase velocity and turbulence fields together with the liquid-phase equations. The joint composition PDF

  20. Stability of an overland flow scheme in the framework of a fully coupled eco-hydrological model based on the Macroscopic Cellular Automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendicino, Giuseppe; Pedace, Jessica; Senatore, Alfonso

    2015-04-01

    Cellular Automata are often used for modeling the evolution in time of environmental systems mainly because they are directly compatible with parallel programming. Nevertheless, defining the optimal time step criterion for integrating forward in time numerical processes can further enhance model computational efficiency. To this aim, a numerical stability analysis of an original overland flow model, within the framework of a fully coupled eco-hydrological system based on the Macroscopic Cellular Automata paradigm, is performed. According to the other modules of the system describing soil water flow, soil-surface-atmosphere fluxes and vegetation dynamics, overland flow model equations were derived through a direct discrete formulation (i.e. no differential equations were discretized), adopting the diffusion wave model as an approximation of the full De Saint Venant equations and including the capability of accounting for specific processes, such as the increasing roughness effects due to vegetation growth or surface-soil water exchanges. Suitable formulations of robust tools usually applied in the stability analyses, such as Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy and von Neumann conditions, were initially derived for the CA-based overland flow model. Afterwards, the theoretical stability conditions were compared to experimental time step constraints through several numerical simulations of a 5-h rain event. Specifically, adopting a constant (i.e. not adaptive) time step for simulations, and discretizing head losses in a way that increases model stability, experimental upper limits preventing numerical instability were found for 13 test cases with different slopes, precipitation intensities, vegetation densities and depths of surface depressions. Even though von Neumann condition and experimental values were well positively correlated, the latter were almost always sensibly lower, excluding cases when free surface gradients tended to zero. Therefore, based on the original method

  1. Hydraulic jumps in inhomogeneous strongly coupled toroidal dust flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Wilms, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The inhomogeneous flow of strongly coupled dust particles in a toroidal particle trap with harmonic radial confinement is analyzed in the incompressible fluid limit. It is shown that the flow can spontaneously generate shock-like events, which are similar to the hydraulic jump in open channel flows. A definition of the Froude number for this model is given and the critical speed is recovered as the group velocity of surface waves. This hydraulic model is compared with molecular-dynamics simulations, which show that a sudden bifurcation of the flow lines and a localized temperature peak appear just at the point where the critical condition for the hydraulic jump is located.

  2. Hydraulic jumps in inhomogeneous strongly coupled toroidal dust flows

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, Alexander Wilms, Jochen

    2016-07-15

    The inhomogeneous flow of strongly coupled dust particles in a toroidal particle trap with harmonic radial confinement is analyzed in the incompressible fluid limit. It is shown that the flow can spontaneously generate shock-like events, which are similar to the hydraulic jump in open channel flows. A definition of the Froude number for this model is given and the critical speed is recovered as the group velocity of surface waves. This hydraulic model is compared with molecular-dynamics simulations, which show that a sudden bifurcation of the flow lines and a localized temperature peak appear just at the point where the critical condition for the hydraulic jump is located.

  3. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  4. Galvanic corrosion couple-induced Marangoni flow of liquid metal.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si-Cong; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Gui, Han; Ding, Yu-Jie; Wang, Lei; Yuan, Bin; Liu, Jing

    2017-03-22

    The Marangoni flow of room temperature liquid metal has recently attracted significant attention in developing advanced flexible drivers. However, most of its induction methods are limited to an external electric field. This study disclosed a new Marangoni flow phenomenon of liquid gallium induced by the gallium-copper galvanic corrosion couple. To better understand this effect, the flow field distribution of liquid gallium was modeled and quantitatively calculated. Then, the intrinsic mechanism of this flow phenomenon was interpreted, during which natural convection and temperature gradient were both excluded and the galvanic corrosion couple was identified as the main reason. In addition, this conclusion was further confirmed by combining the experimental measurement of liquid gallium surface potential and the thermocapillary effect. Moreover, the temperature condition was found to be an indirect factor to the Marangoni flow. This finding broadens the classical understanding of liquid metal surface flow, which also suggests a new way for the application of soft machines.

  5. Description and field analysis of a coupled ground-water/surface-water flow model (MODFLOW/BRANCH) with modifications for structures and wetlands in southern Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.; Howie, Barbara; Dixon, Joann

    1996-01-01

    A coupled surface-water model (BRANCH) and ground-water model (MODFLOW) model were tested to simulate the interacting wetlands/surface-water/ ground-water system of southern Dade County. Several options created for the MODFLOW ground- ground-water model were used in representing this field situation. The primary option is the MODBRANCH interfacing software, which allows leakage to be accounted for between the MODFLOW ground-water model and the BRANCH dynamic model for simulation of flow in an interconnected network of open channels. A modification to an existing software routine, which is referred to as BCF2, allows cells in MODFLOW to rewet when dry--a requirement in representing the seasonal wetlands in Dade County. A companion to BCF2 is the modified evapotranspiration routine EVT2. The EVT2 routine changes the cells where evapotranspiration occurs, depending on which cells are wet. The Streamlink package represents direct connections between the canals and wetlands at locations where canals open directly into overland flow. Within the BRANCH model, the capability to represent the numerous hydraulic structures, gated spillways, gated culverts, and pumps was added. The application of these modifications to model surface-water/ground-water interactions in southern Dade County demonstrated the usefulness of the coupled MODFLOW/BRANCH model. Ground-water and surface-water flows are both simulated with dynamic models. Flow exchange between models, intermittent wetting and drying, evapotranspiration, and hydraulic structure operations are all represented appropriately. Comparison was made with a simulation using the RIV1 package instead of MODBRANCH to represent the canals. RIV1 represents the canals by user-defined stages, and computes leakage to the aquifer. Greater accuracy in reproducing measured ground- water heads was achieved with MODBRANCH, which also computes dynamic flow conditions in the canals, unlike RIV1. The surface-water integrated flow and transport

  6. A concurrent precursor inflow method for LES of atmospheric boundary layer flows with variable inflow direction for coupling with meso-scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munters, Wim; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2014-11-01

    In order to incorporate multiple scales of meteorological phenomena in atmospheric simulations, subsequent nesting of meso-scale models is often used. However, the spatial and temporal resolution in such models is too coarse to resolve the three-dimensional turbulent eddies that are characteristic for atmospheric boundary layer flows. This motivates the development of tools to couple meso-scale models to Large-Eddy Simulations (LES), in which turbulent fluctuations are explicitly resolved. A major challenge in this area is the spin-up region near the inlet of the LES in which the flow has to evolve from a RANS-like inflow, originating from the meso-scale model, to a fully turbulent velocity field. We propose a generalized concurrent precursor inflow method capable of imposing boundary conditions for time-varying inflow directions. The method is based on a periodic fully-developed precursor boundary-layer simulation that is dynamically rotated with the wind direction that drives the main LES. In this way realistic turbulent inflow conditions are applied while still retaining flexibility to dynamically adapt to meso-scale variations in wind directions. Applications to wind simulations with varying inflow directions, and comparisons to conventional coupling methods are shown. Work supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, Grant No: 306471). CM is supported by NSF (Grant No. 1243482).

  7. Drag force acting on a neuromast in the fish lateral line trunk canal. I. Numerical modelling of external-internal flow coupling.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Charlotte; Humphrey, Joseph A C

    2009-07-06

    Fishes use a complex, multi-branched, mechanoreceptive organ called the lateral line to detect the motion of water in their immediate surroundings. This study is concerned with a subset of that organ referred to as the lateral line trunk canal (LLTC). The LLTC consists of a long tube no more than a few millimetres in diameter embedded immediately under the skin of the fish on each side of its body. In most fishes, pore-like openings are regularly distributed along the LLTC, and a minute sensor enveloped in a gelatinous cupula, referred to as a neuromast, is located between each pair of pores. Drag forces resulting from fluid motions induced inside the LLTC by pressure fluctuations in the external flow stimulate the neuromasts. This study, Part I of a two-part sequence, investigates the motion-sensing characteristics of the LLTC and how it may be used by fishes to detect wakes. To this end, an idealized geometrical/dynamical situation is examined that retains the essential problem physics. A two-level numerical model is developed that couples the vortical flow outside the LLTC to the flow stimulating the neuromasts within it. First, using a Navier-Stokes solver, we calculate the unsteady flow past an elongated rectangular prism and a fish downstream of it, with both objects moving at the same speed. By construction, the prism generates a clean, periodic vortex street in its wake. Then, also using the Navier-Stokes solver, the pressure field associated with this external flow is used to calculate the unsteady flow inside the LLTC of the fish, which creates the drag forces acting on the neuromast cupula. Although idealized, this external-internal coupled flow model allows an investigation of the filtering properties and performance characteristics of the LLTC for a range of frequencies of biological interest. The results obtained here and in Part II show that the LLTC acts as a low-pass filter, preferentially damping high-frequency pressure gradient oscillations, and

  8. A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics: Application to Methane Hydrates in Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Jain, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    We present a discrete element model for the simulation, at the grain scale, of gas migration in brine- saturated deformable media. We account rigorously for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating grain forces due to pore fluid pressures, and surface tension between fluids. The coupled model permits investigating an essential process that takes place at the base of the hydrate stability zone: the upward migration of methane in its own free gas phase. We elucidate the way in which gas migration may take place: (1) by capillary invasion in a rigid-like medium; and (2) by initiation and propagation of a fracture. We find that the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport in the sediment is the grain size, and show that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain media. The results have important implications for understanding hydrates in natural systems. Our results predict that, in fine sediments, hydrate will likely form in veins that follow a fracture-network pattern, and the hydrate concentration in this type of accumulations will likely be quite low. In coarse sediments, the buoyant methane gas is likely to invade the pore space more uniformly, in a process akin to invasion percolation, and the overall pore occupancy is likely to be much higher than for a fracture-dominated regime. These implications are consistent with field observations of methane hydrates in natural systems.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dritselis, Chris D.

    2017-04-01

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions.

  10. Static Aeroelastic Predictions for a Transonic Transport Model Using an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver Coupled With a Structural Plate Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Cavallo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    An equivalent-plate structural deformation technique was coupled with a steady-state unstructured-grid three-dimensional Euler flow solver and a two-dimensional strip interactive boundary-layer technique. The objective of the research was to assess the extent to which a simple accounting for static model deformations could improve correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients at transonic speeds. Results were computed and compared to test data for a wing-fuselage model of a generic low-wing transonic transport at a transonic cruise condition over a range of Reynolds numbers and dynamic pressures. The deformations significantly improved correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients. This method provided a means of quantifying the role of dynamic pressure in wind-tunnel studies of Reynolds number effects for transonic transport models.

  11. Ensemble Kalman Filter vs Particle Filter in a Physically Based Coupled Model of Surface-Subsurface Flow (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putti, M.; Camporese, M.; Pasetto, D.

    2010-12-01

    Data assimilation (DA) has recently received growing interest by the hydrological modeling community due to its capability to merge observations into model prediction. Among the many DA methods available, the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) and the Particle Filter (PF) are suitable alternatives for applications to detailed physically-based hydrological models. For each assimilation period, both methods use a Monte Carlo approach to approximate the state probability distribution (in terms of mean and covariance matrix) by a finite number of independent model trajectories, also called particles or realizations. The two approaches differ in the way the filtering distribution is evaluated. EnKF implements the classical Kalman filter, optimal only for linear dynamics and Gaussian error statistics. Particle filters, instead, use directly the recursive formula of the sequential Bayesian framework and approximate the posterior probability distributions by means of appropriate weights associated to each realization. We use the Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) technique, which retains only the most probable particles, in practice the trajectories closest in a statistical sense to the observations, and duplicates them when needed. In contrast to EnKF, particle filters make no assumptions on the form of the prior distribution of the model state, and convergence to the true state is ensured for large enough ensemble size. In this study EnKF and PF have been implemented in a physically based catchment simulator that couples a three-dimensional finite element Richards equation solver with a finite difference diffusion wave approximation based on a digital elevation data for surface water dynamics. We report on the retrieval performance of the two schemes using a three-dimensional tilted v-catchment synthetic test case in which multi-source observations are assimilated (pressure head, soil moisture, and streamflow data). The comparison between the results of the two approaches

  12. Using the Model Coupling Toolkit to couple earth system models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Perlin, N.; Skyllingstad, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Continued advances in computational resources are providing the opportunity to operate more sophisticated numerical models. Additionally, there is an increasing demand for multidisciplinary studies that include interactions between different physical processes. Therefore there is a strong desire to develop coupled modeling systems that utilize existing models and allow efficient data exchange and model control. The basic system would entail model "1" running on "M" processors and model "2" running on "N" processors, with efficient exchange of model fields at predetermined synchronization intervals. Here we demonstrate two coupled systems: the coupling of the ocean circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to the surface wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the coupling of ROMS to the atmospheric model Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS). Both coupled systems use the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) as a mechanism for operation control and inter-model distributed memory transfer of model variables. In this paper we describe requirements and other options for model coupling, explain the MCT library, ROMS, SWAN and COAMPS models, methods for grid decomposition and sparse matrix interpolation, and provide an example from each coupled system. Methods presented in this paper are clearly applicable for coupling of other types of models. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SPXCPL: two-dimensional modeling program of self-potential effects from cross-coupled fluid and heat flow (User's Guide and documentation for Version 1. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    Sill, W.R.; Killpack, T.J.

    1982-03-01

    The program is applicable to the calculation of self-potential effects due to fluid flow (electrokinetic effects) and heat flow (thermoelectric effects). The geological structure is two dimensional but the sources can be either finite line sources or point sources. The accuracy of the calculated potentials depends on the model discretization and the distance from the source(s). For the default mesh, the accuracy is usually a few percent at a distance of about one unit from the source. Surface boundary conditions for the primary problem require careful consideration as the form of the flow near the air-earth interface can have a profound effect on the resultant electric potentials. For temperature problems the appropriate boundary condition is a constant temperature, which is taken as zero. With this boundary condition there is a normal flux of heat at the surface and there will be induced electrical sources here, if the surface medium has a nonzero coupling coefficient. In the models, zero temperature at the surface is produced by giving the air a very large thermal conductivity.

  14. Modeling of Calcite Precipitation Driven by Bacteria-facilitated Urea Hydrolysis in A Flow Column Using A Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Parallel Reactive Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    One approach for immobilizing subsurface metal contaminants involves stimulating the in situ production of mineral phases that sequester or isolate contaminants. One example is using calcium carbonate to immobilize strontium. The success of such approaches depends on understanding how various processes of flow, transport, reaction and resulting porosity-permeability change couple in subsurface systems. Reactive transport models are often used for such purpose. Current subsurface reactive transport simulators typically involve a de-coupled solution approach, such as operator-splitting, that solves the transport equations for components and batch chemistry sequentially, which has limited applicability for many biogeochemical processes with fast kinetics and strong medium property-reaction interactions. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit reactive transport simulator has been developed based on a parallel multi-physics object oriented software environment computing framework (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, the system of transport and reaction equations is solved simultaneously in a fully coupled manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with preconditioning. The simulator was applied to model reactive transport in a one-dimensional column where conditions that favor calcium carbonate precipitation are generated by urea hydrolysis that is catalyzed by urease enzyme. Simulation results are compared to both laboratory column experiments and those obtained using the reactive transport simulator STOMP in terms of: the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitates and reaction rates and other major species in the reaction system; the changes in porosity and permeability; and the computing efficiency based on wall clock simulation time.

  15. A New Computational Model for Neuro-Glio-Vascular Coupling: Astrocyte Activation Can Explain Cerebral Blood Flow Nonlinear Response to Interictal Events

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Solenna; Saillet, Sandrine; Ivanov, Anton; Benquet, Pascal; Bénar, Christian-George; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Benali, Habib; Wendling, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Developing a clear understanding of the relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) response and neuronal activity is of significant importance because CBF increase is essential to the health of neurons, for instance through oxygen supply. This relationship can be investigated by analyzing multimodal (fMRI, PET, laser Doppler…) recordings. However, the important number of intermediate (non-observable) variables involved in the underlying neurovascular coupling makes the discovery of mechanisms all the more difficult from the sole multimodal data. We present a new computational model developed at the population scale (voxel) with physiologically relevant but simple equations to facilitate the interpretation of regional multimodal recordings. This model links neuronal activity to regional CBF dynamics through neuro-glio-vascular coupling. This coupling involves a population of glial cells called astrocytes via their role in neurotransmitter (glutamate and GABA) recycling and their impact on neighboring vessels. In epilepsy, neuronal networks generate epileptiform discharges, leading to variations in astrocytic and CBF dynamics. In this study, we took advantage of these large variations in neuronal activity magnitude to test the capacity of our model to reproduce experimental data. We compared simulations from our model with isolated epileptiform events, which were obtained in vivo by simultaneous local field potential and laser Doppler recordings in rats after local bicuculline injection. We showed a predominant neuronal contribution for low level discharges and a significant astrocytic contribution for higher level discharges. Besides, neuronal contribution to CBF was linear while astrocytic contribution was nonlinear. Results thus indicate that the relationship between neuronal activity and CBF magnitudes can be nonlinear for isolated events and that this nonlinearity is due to astrocytic activity, highlighting the importance of astrocytes in the

  16. Coupled evolution of near-inertial waves and quasigeostrophic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Gregory; Young, William

    2015-11-01

    We derive a model describing the coupled nonlinear evolution of three fields: near-inertial wave (NIW) amplitude, quasigoestrophic potential vorticity, and the NIW second harmonic. The model is derived by asymptotic reduction of the Boussinesq equations using the method of multiple scales. The model conserves two distinct quantities: wave action, and coupled energy. Wave action conservation implies energy exchange between NIW kinetic energy and energy in the NIW second harmonic. Coupled energy conservation implies energy exchange between NIW potential energy and quasigeostrophic flow. We explore the implications of the model with two-dimensional numerical solutions meant to approximate NIW evolution in non-uniform quasigeostrophic flow following storm-driven excitation. For this scenario we find good agreement between the model and solutions of the full Boussinesq equations. Preliminary results show the initial transient evolution of the NIW field extracts energy from the quasigeostrophic flow. Further, the quasigeostrophic flow catalyzes an interaction between the NIW and the NIW second harmonic which ultimately leads to the generation of small NIW vertical scales. We thank the National Science Foundation for support under OCE-1357047.

  17. Energy Flow Analysis of Coupled Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, P. E.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1998-04-01

    Energy flow analysis (EFA) is an analytical tool for prediction of the frequency-averaged vibrational response of built-up structures at high audible frequencies. The procedure is based on two developments; first, the derivation of the partial differential equations that govern the propagation of energy-related quantities in simple structural elements such as rods, beams, plates, and acoustic cavities; and second, the derivation of coupling relationships in terms of energy-related quantities that describe the transfer of energy for various joints (e.g., beam-to-beam, rod-to-beam, plate-to-plate, structure-to-acoustic field coupling). In this investigation, the energy flow coupling relationships at these joints for rods and beams are derived. EFA is used to predict the frequency-averaged vibrational response of a frame structure with a three-dimensional joint, where four wave types propagate in the structure. The predicted results of EFA are shown to be a good approximation of the frequency-averaged “exact” energetics, which are computed from classical displacement solutions.

  18. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the

  19. Coupled Fluid-Heat Flow Model Analysis to Explain the Origin and Accumulation of Subsurface Carbon Dioxide: McElmo Dome Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, B. J.; Heath, J.; Han, W. S.; Koonce, J.

    2004-12-01

    McElmo Dome contains a very large reservoir of natural carbon dioxide. Located within the Paradox Basin, southwestern Colorado, McElmo is among several large carbon dioxide reservoirs in the southwestern U.S. Estimates of total carbon dioxide in the reservoir exceed 2 gigatons, and over 14 megatons are piped annually from McElmo to petroleum fields in the west Texas Permian Basin, for enhanced oil recovery operations. This and other carbon dioxide accumulations in the region have been the subject of many studies since the 1930s, with several hypotheses offered for the origin of McElmo's carbon dioxide. The most cited explanation is thermal degradation of the Mississippian Leadville Formation, a carbonate system that extends over much of the western U.S. The Ute Mountain laccolith is only a few miles from McElmo. This large igneous intrusion penetrates the Leadville carbonates at McElmo, providing the setting for the thermal degradation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to evaluate quantitatively this conceptual model of carbon dioxide origin. We developed mathematical simulation models of coupled heat and fluid flow of the McElmo system. Thermal data suggest that temperatures were probably sufficient for thermal degradation (metamorphism) to generate carbon dioxide. However, uncertainties associated with the intrusion's properties and timing hinder efforts to evaluate whether other mechanisms may play a significant role as well. For instance, coupled fluid-heat flow history model results suggest carbon dioxide may also have been generated as a byproduct of hydrocarbon catagenesis in Mississippian strata.

  20. Coupling a mechanosensitive channel with a vesicle under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan Nan; Veerapaneni, Shravan; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Mechanosensitive channels enable cells to respond to their local environment. Continuum mechanical models have been proposed to describe how bilayer deformation induced by the transmembrane protein and the membrane tension influence the free energy of channel gating under static conditions. The dynamics of mechanosensitive channels under flow conditions however remains largely unexplored. Cells under flow display interesting features not observed under static environments. Here we present a model coupling a mechanosensitive channel with the dynamics of a vesicle under shear flow to investigate how the channel gating responds to hydrodynamic stress. The model could be used to investigate the release of signaling molecules, transport of ions or drugs across cell membranes under flow in biological systems, as well as the design and control of channel gating in synthetic cells.

  1. Translation-vibration-dissociation coupling in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    A new simple and computationally efficient model was developed, describing the evolution of vibrational states during relaxation and dissociation. The model is based on dividing the nitrogen molecules into two types, those in the vibrational states at a lower level, whose vibrational energy is below a cutoff energy, and those in an upper level, with vibrational energy above the cutoff. Dissociation occurs at the upper level, and recombination returns molecules to the lower level. The model was applied to two flows of engineering interest, the flow through a normal Mach 15 shock wave at 60 km, and a supersonic quasi-one-dimensional flow in a nozzle. Results are compared to those obtained by existing translation-vibration-dissociation coupling models, with results indicating significant differences between the models.

  2. Translation-vibration-dissociation coupling in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    A new simple and computationally efficient model was developed, describing the evolution of vibrational states during relaxation and dissociation. The model is based on dividing the nitrogen molecules into two types, those in the vibrational states at a lower level, whose vibrational energy is below a cutoff energy, and those in an upper level, with vibrational energy above the cutoff. Dissociation occurs at the upper level, and recombination returns molecules to the lower level. The model was applied to two flows of engineering interest, the flow through a normal Mach 15 shock wave at 60 km, and a supersonic quasi-one-dimensional flow in a nozzle. Results are compared to those obtained by existing translation-vibration-dissociation coupling models, with results indicating significant differences between the models.

  3. Simulating groundwater-surface water interactions in the Canadian Prairies using a coupled land-atmosphere model (ParFlow-CLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. A.; Ireson, A. M.; Keim, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Canadian prairies are cold and dry. Surface depressions are ubiquitous, and contain permanent or ephemeral ponds. The ponds are filled by snowmelt and precipitation on the ponds and lose a significant portion of their water to evaporation, but also, depending on their landscape position, may spill to other ponds or channels, recharge groundwater, or received groundwater discharge. Since precipitation and actual evaporation are closely balanced, the pond water balances are very sensitive to change in climate, and the prairies in general have been subject to damaging floods and droughts, in particular in the last decade or two. A 2.25 km2 field site at St Denis, central Saskatchewan, contains over 100 ponds, some permanent, some ephemeral, some saline, some fresh, some recharging groundwater, some receiving groundwater discharge. The site has been extensively studied for almost 50 years, with about one decade of continuous meteorological data, and three years of detailed pond level, soil moisture and temperature, and groundwater data. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of PARFLOW-CLM (a coupled land-atmosphere model) in simulating the pond-groundwater interactions at this site. Our conceptual model of the site includes soil properties that are progressively weathered with depth, and we implement this in a simplified dual permeability mathematical model of the soil hydraulic properties, whereby storage is dominated by the matrix and flow is dominated by macropores. The model performance was surprisingly good, doing quite a good job of capturing the observed groundwater and pond level dynamics. The soil freezing regime is also captured reasonably well, though the timing and pattern of the zero degree isotherm during soil thaw, which is critically important for runoff generation processes, was not captured as well. The model provides credible insights into the spatial patterns of evapotranspiration, and the seasonal dynamics of subsurface

  4. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  5. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  6. Dynamic coupling of three hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnack, J. N.; Philip, G. T.; Rungoe, M.; Smith, G.; Johann, G.; Larsen, O.; Gregersen, J.; Butts, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    The need for integrated modelling is evidently present within the field of flood management and flood forecasting. Engineers, modellers and managers are faced with flood problems which transcend the classical hydrodynamic fields of urban, river and coastal flooding. Historically the modeller has been faced with having to select one hydrodynamic model to cover all the aspects of the potentially complex dynamics occurring in a flooding situation. Such a single hydrodynamic model does not cover all dynamics of flood modelling equally well. Thus the ideal choice may in fact be a combination of models. Models combining two numerical/hydrodynamic models are becoming more standard, typically these models combine a 1D river model with a 2D overland flow model or alternatively a 1D sewer/collection system model with a 2D overland solver. In complex coastal/urban areas the flood dynamics may include rivers/streams, collection/storm water systems along with the overland flow. The dynamics within all three areas is of the same time scale and there is feedback in the system across the couplings. These two aspects dictate a fully dynamic three way coupling as opposed to running the models sequentially. It will be shown that the main challenges of the three way coupling are time step issues related to the difference in numerical schemes used in the three model components and numerical instabilities caused by the linking of the model components. MIKE FLOOD combines the models MIKE 11, MIKE 21 and MOUSE into one modelling framework which makes it possible to couple any combination of river, urban and overland flow fully dynamically. The MIKE FLOOD framework will be presented with an overview of the coupling possibilities. The flood modelling concept will be illustrated through real life cases in Australia and in Germany. The real life cases reflect dynamics and interactions across all three model components which are not possible to reproduce using a two-way coupling alone. The

  7. A coupled heat and water flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Caporouscio, F.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, C.H. ); Kjartanson, B.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires isolation of a number of diverse chemical elements form the environment. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of disposing of waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the ground surface in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The temperatures and hydraulic potential in the buffer and back fill material were investigated. To study the performance of a compacted buffer material under thermal and isothermal conditions, a coupled heat and water flow apparatus is designed and presented. In the preliminary design, a one-dimensional flow of heat and water was not achieved. however, control of temperature gradient, existence of one-dimensional flow, and uniformity of temperature and volumetric water content distributions at any cross section within the specimen are achieved in the modified design. Experimental results have shown that the temperature stabilizes very rapidly after a period of approximately 0. 107 days. The moisture moves away from the hot end along the longitudinal direction of the specimen due to imposed thermal gradient. The time required for moisture to stabilize is in order of days. 17 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A-TOUGH: A multimedia fluid-flow/energy-transport model for fully- coupled atmospheric-subsurface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Montazer, P.; Hammermeister, D.; Ginanni, J.

    1994-12-31

    The long-term effect of changes in atmospheric climatological conditions on subsurface hydrological conditions in the unsaturated zone in and environments is an important factor in defining the performance of a high-level and low-level radioactive waste repositories in geological environment. Computer simulation coupled with paleohydrological studies can be used to understand and quantify the potential impact of future climatological conditions on repository performance. A-TOUGH efficiently simulates (given current state-of-the-art technology) the physical processes involved in the near-surface atmosphere and its effect on subsurface conditions. This efficiency is due to the numerical techniques used in TOUGH and the efficient computational techniques used in V-TOUGH to solve non-linear thermodynamic equations that govern the flux of vapor and energy within subsurface porous and fractured media and between these media and the atmosphere.

  9. Coupled Heat and Fluid Flow Modeling of the Earth's Largest Zinc Ore Deposit at Red Dog, Alaska: Implications for Structurally-Focused, Free Convection in Submarine Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.; Dumoulin, J. A.; Bradley, D. A.; Young, L. E.; Kelley, K. D.; Leach, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Crustal heat flow can provide a strong mechanism for driving groundwater flow, particularly in submarine basins where other mechanisms for driving pore fluid flow such as topography, compaction and crustal deformation are too weak or too slow to have a significant effect on disturbing conductive heat flow. Fault zones appear to play a crucial role in focusing fluid migration in basins, as inferred in ancient rocks by many examples of hydrothermal deposits of sediment-hosted ores worldwide. Many rift-hosted deposits of lead, zinc, and barite ore appear to have formed at or near the seafloor by focused venting of hot basinal fluids and modified seawater, although the geophysical nature of these systems is not so well known. For example, the upper Kuna Formation, a finely laminated, black, organic-rich siliceous mudstone and shale in the Western Brooks Range of northwest Alaska, is host to the largest resources of zinc yet discovered in the Earth's crust, containing ore reserves in excess of 175 Mt averaging about 16% Zn and 5% Pb. Although situated today in a highly-deformed series of structural allocthonous plates thrusted during the Jurassic to Cretaceous Brookian Orogeny, the stratiform ores are thought to have formed much earlier in the anoxic, mud-rich Carboniferous-age Kuna Basin when adjacent carbonate platforms were drowned by rifting and tectonic subsidence. Fluid inclusion studies of ore-stage sphalerite and gangue minerals indicate sub-seafloor mineralization temperatures less than 200oC and most likely between 120 to 150 oC, during a period of sediment diagenesis and extensional faulting. We have constructed fully-coupled numerical models of heat and fluid flow to test hydrologic theories for free convection, submarine venting and subsequent ore formation, as constrained by paleoheat flow and petrologic observations. A finite element grid was designed and adapted for a cross section of the Kuna Basin, geologically restored to latest Mississippian time

  10. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3  MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50 kW DC power and 3 MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  11. Seasonal-scale abrasion and quarrying patterns from a two-dimensional ice-flow model coupled to distributed and channelized subglacial drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Pimentel, Sam

    2014-08-01

    Field data and numerical modeling show that glaciations have the potential either to enhance relief or to dampen topography. We aim to model the effect of the subglacial hydraulic system on spatiotemporal patterns of glacial erosion by abrasion and quarrying on time scales commensurate with drainage system fluctuations (e.g., seasonal to annual). We use a numerical model that incorporates a dual-morphology subglacial drainage system coupled to a higher-order ice-flow model and process-specific erosion laws. The subglacial drainage system allows for a dynamic transition between two morphologies: the distributed system, characterized by an increase in basal water pressure with discharge, and the channelized system, which exhibits a decrease in equilibrium water pressure with increasing discharge. We apply the model to a simple synthetic glacier geometry, drive it with prescribed meltwater input variations, and compute sliding and erosion rates over a seasonal cycle. When both distributed and channelized systems are included, abrasion and sliding maxima migrate ~ 20% up-glacier compared to simulations with distributed drainage only. Power-law sliding generally yields to a broader response of abrasion to water pressure changes along the flowline compared to Coulomb-friction sliding. Multi-day variations in meltwater input elicit a stronger abrasion response than either diurnal- or seasonal variations alone for the same total input volume. An increase in water input volume leads to increased abrasion. We find that ice thickness commensurate with ice sheet outlet glaciers can hinder the up-glacier migration of abrasion. Quarrying patterns computed with a recently published law differ markedly from calculated abrasion patterns, with effective pressure being a stronger determinant than sliding speeds of quarrying rates. These variations in calculated patterns of instantaneous erosion as a function of hydrology-, sliding-, and erosion-model formulation, as well as model

  12. Evaluation of Rainfall Impacts on Groundwater Flow and Land Deformation in an Unsaturated Heterogeneous Slope and Slope Stability Using a Fully Coupled Hydrogeomechanical Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, J.; Kim, J.

    2006-12-01

    A series of numerical simulations using a fully coupled hydrogeomechanical numerical model, which is named COWADE123D, is performed to analyze groundwater flow and land deformation in an unsaturated heterogeneous slope and its stability under various rainfall rates. The slope is located along a dam lake in Republic of Korea. The slope consists of the Cretaceous granodiorite and can be subdivided into the four layers such as weathered soil, weathered rock, intermediate rock, and hard rock from its ground surface due to weathering process. The numerical simulation results show that both rainfall rate and heterogeneity play important roles in controlling groundwater flow and land deformation in the unsaturated slope. The slope becomes more saturated, and thus its overall hydrogeomechanical stability deteriorates, especially in the weathered rock and weathered soil layers, as the rainfall increases up to the maximum daily rainfall rate in the return period of one year. However, the slope becomes fully saturated, and thus its hydrogeomechanical responses are almost identical under more than such a critical rainfall rate. From the viewpoint of hydrogeology, the pressure head, and hence the hydraulic head increase as the rainfall rate increases. As a result, the groundwater table rises, the unsaturated zone reduces, the seepage face expands from the slope toe toward the slope crest, and the groundwater flow velocity increases along the seepage face. Particularly, the groundwater flow velocity increases significantly in the weathered soil and weathered rock layers as the rainfall rate increases. This is because their hydraulic conductivity is relatively higher than that of the intermediate rock and hard rock layers. From the viewpoint of geomechanics, the horizontal displacement increases, while the vertical displacement decreases toward the slope toe as the rainfall rate increases. This may result from the buoyancy effect associated with the groundwater table rise as the

  13. Agni: Coupling Model Analysis Tools and High-Performance Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulators for Risk and Performance Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Pau, George; Finsterle, Stefan

    2012-06-28

    Agni is open source /community /multi platform framework for model-based analyses (SA, UQ, PE, RA, DS). Agni can be applied independently from other Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) modules. Agni will be available as Mercurial repository (hg clone https://akuna.labworks.org/hg/Platform) including source code, manual, test and verification examples.

  14. Base Flow Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Neeraj; Brinckman, Kevin; Jansen, Bernard; Seiner, John

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed of obtaining propulsive base flow data in both hot and cold jet environments, at Mach numbers and altitude of relevance to NASA launcher designs. The base flow data was used to perform computational fluid dynamics (CFD) turbulence model assessments of base flow predictive capabilities in order to provide increased confidence in base thermal and pressure load predictions obtained from computational modeling efforts. Predictive CFD analyses were used in the design of the experiments, available propulsive models were used to reduce program costs and increase success, and a wind tunnel facility was used. The data obtained allowed assessment of CFD/turbulence models in a complex flow environment, working within a building-block procedure to validation, where cold, non-reacting test data was first used for validation, followed by more complex reacting base flow validation.

  15. Data flow modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavi, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    There have been a number of simulation packages developed for the purpose of designing, testing and validating computer systems, digital systems and software systems. Complex analytical tools based on Markov and semi-Markov processes have been designed to estimate the reliability and performance of simulated systems. Petri nets have received wide acceptance for modeling complex and highly parallel computers. In this research data flow models for computer systems are investigated. Data flow models can be used to simulate both software and hardware in a uniform manner. Data flow simulation techniques provide the computer systems designer with a CAD environment which enables highly parallel complex systems to be defined, evaluated at all levels and finally implemented in either hardware or software. Inherent in data flow concept is the hierarchical handling of complex systems. In this paper we will describe how data flow can be used to model computer system.

  16. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  17. Inverse Problem for 3D coupled Flow-Geomechanics Models and Induced Seismicity: Application to Subsurface Characterization and Seismicity Forecasting in Geologic CO2 Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castineira, D.; Jha, B.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is regarded as a promising technology to mitigate rising CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere from industrial emissions. However, as a result of the inherent uncertainty that is present in geological structures, assessing the stability of geological faults and quantifying the potential for induced seismicity is a fundamental challenge for practical implementation of CCS. Here we present a formal framework for the solution of the inverse problem associated with coupled flow and geomechanics models of CO2 injection and subsurface storage. Our approach builds from the application of Gaussian Processes, MCMC and posterior predictive analysis to evaluate relevant earthquake attributes (earthquake time, location and magnitude) in 3D synthetic models of CO2 storage under geologic, observational and operational uncertainty. In our approach, we first conduct hundreds of simulations of a high-fidelity 3D computational model for CO2 injection into a deep saline aquifer, dominated by an anticline structure and a fault. This ensemble of realizations accounts for uncertainty in the model parameters (including fault geomechanical and rock properties) and observations (earthquake time, location and magnitude). We apply Gaussian processes (GP) to generate a valid surrogate that closely approximates the behavior of the high fidelity (and computationally intensive) model, and apply hyperparameter optimization and cross-validation techniques in the solution of this multidimensional data-fit problem. The net result of this process is the generation of a fast model that can be effectively used for Bayesian analysis. We then implement Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to determine the posterior distribution of the model uncertain parameters (given some prior distributions for those parameters and given the likelihood defined in this case by the GP model). Our results show that the resulting posterior distributions correctly converge towards the "true

  18. Coupling flow and deformation in evolving salt basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolinakou, M. A.; Heidari, M.; Flemings, P. B.; Hudec, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    We build transient, large-strain, evolutionary geomechanical models of salt basins that couple deformation with sedimentation and fluid flow. We study how pore pressures develop near salt and how such excess pressures affect the strength of basin sediments and the evolution of the salt system. We find that salt growth results in excess pore pressures both near a rising wall and below an advancing salt sheet. In particular, we show that pressures near a rising diapir are higher than those developing in a uniaxial column having the same sedimentation rate. In addition, we show that the shear-induced component of these excess pressures is significant. Furthermore, we illustrate that excess pore pressures cause the effective stresses to remain low within the wall rocks and subsalt sediments. As a result, the strength of these sediments also remains low, enabling salt growth. Therefore, we illustrate that coupling pore-fluid flow with salt flow significantly affects the macro-scale geological evolution. We develop our coupled models in the finite element program Elfen. We model salt as solid viscoplastic and sediments as poro-elastoplastic materials, and calibrate the consolidation properties based on experimental testing on smectite-rich mudrocks typical of the Gulf of Mexico. Overall, our transient evolutionary models incorporate sedimentation history and salt deformation, and provide the complete stress tensor as well as pore pressure prediction over time. Unlike traditional basin models, the pore pressure and stress fields are interrelated and impact the kinematics of the system. Our results help advance our fundamental understanding of the interaction between pressure, stress, and deformation in basins. Furthermore, our modeling provides the foundation for a technical approach that can address many geological systems where large strains, pore fluids, and sedimentation interact.

  19. Numerical simulation of two-way coupling mechanism in particle-laden turbulent flow based on one-dimensional turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David; Hewson, John; Gin, Craig

    2013-11-01

    We present three algorithms (type-I, type-C and type-IC) for Lagrangian particle transport within the context of the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) approach. ODT is a stochastic model that captures the full range of length and time scales and provides statistical information on fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport at low computational cost. Two of the particle transport algorithms are new as is an algorithm to provide two-way momentum and energy coupling between the particle and carrier phases. Using these methods we investigate particle-laden turbulent jet flow. In contrast to other previous particle implementation in ODT, the two new methods allow the particles to interact with multiple eddies simultaneously and evolve the particle phase continuously, and therefore are able to accurately capture turbulent mixing and fluctuation seen by inertial particles in ODT. Simulation results are compared with experimental data including the effect of two particle Stokes numbers (St = 3.6 and 10.8). Turbulence modification, particle number density PDFs and particle velocity evolution are presented.

  20. A fully coupled transient thermomechanical ice-flow/permafrost model of the Rhine Glacier, Switzerland: effects of permafrost on basal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Zwinger, T.; Haeberli, W.; Fischer, U. H.

    2016-12-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geological repositories requires their containment and isolation for up to one million years. Over that time period, the performance of the repositories in mid- and high-latitude regions can be impacted by future ice-age conditions which may cause deep glacial erosion, permafrost development, and changes in groundwater fluxes. In Switzerland, repositories are planned in the northern Swiss lowlands near the marginal zone of the former Rhine Glacier that repeatedly formed two extensive piedmont lobes (the Rhine and Linth lobes) over the Swiss Plateau. There, overdeepenings formed by glacial erosion indicate that the glacier was warm-based. Yet the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) occurred under cold conditions: central Europe experienced extremely cold and dry conditions caused by the penetration of winter sea ice to low latitudes in the Atlantic Ocean and the corresponding closure of the primary humidity source north of the Alps. At the LGM, flat and extended lobes of large piedmont glaciers spreading out over much of the Swiss Plateau were polythermal, characterized by low driving stresses (typically around 30 kPa) and surrounded by continuous periglacial permafrost up to 150 m thick. Subsurface temperatures and groundwater flow conditions were strongly influenced by the presence of extended surface and subsurface ice. Using numerical models we explore the effects of permafrost on basal conditions of the piedmont lobes during the build-up of the Rhine Glacier. We apply a two-dimensional transient fully coupled thermomechanical full stress ice-flow and permafrost model along a flowline characterizing the Rhine lobe. The energy equation is solved in both ice and rock and permafrost is modeled using an effective heat capacity formulation to account for phase transitions. Transient effects during ice advances and permafrost build-up up to the LGM are resolved by modeling the full glacial cycle using reconstructed temperature

  1. Integrity of Pre-existing Wellbores in Geological Sequestration of CO2 – Assessment Using a Coupled Geomechanics-fluid Flow Model

    DOE PAGES

    Kelkar, Sharad; Carey, J. William; Dempsey, David; ...

    2014-12-31

    Assessment of potential CO2 and brine leakage from wellbores is central to any consideration of the viability of geological CO2 sequestration. Depleted oil and gas reservoirs are some of the potential candidates for consideration as sequestration sites. The sequestration sites are expected to cover laterally extensive areas to be of practical interest. Hence there is a high likelihood that such sites will contain many pre-existing abandoned wells. Most existing work on wellbore integrity has focused on field and laboratory studies of chemical reactivity. Very little work has been done on the impacts of mechanical stresses on wellbore performance. This studymore » focuses on the potential enhancement of fluid flow pathways in the near-wellbore environment due to modifications in the geomechanical stress field resulting from the CO2 injection operations. The majority of the operational scenarios for CO2 sequestration lead to significant rise in the formation pore pressure. This is expected to lead to an expansion of the reservoir rock and build-up of shear stresses near wellbores where the existence of cement and casing are expected to constrain the expansion. If the stress buildup is large enough, this can lead to failure with attendant permeability enhancement that can potentially provide leakage pathways to shallower aquifers and the surface. In this study, we use a numerical model to simulate key features of a wellbore (casing, annulus and cement) embedded in a system that includes the upper aquifer, caprock, and storage aquifer. We present the sensitivity of damage initiation and propagation to various operational and formation parameters. We consider Mohr-Coulomb shear-failure models; tensile failure is also likely to occur but will require higher stress changes and will be preceded by shear failure. The modeling is performed using the numerical simulator FEHM developed at LANL that models coupled THM processes during multi-phase fluid flow and deformation in

  2. Integrity of Pre-existing Wellbores in Geological Sequestration of CO2 – Assessment Using a Coupled Geomechanics-fluid Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad; Carey, J. William; Dempsey, David; Lewis, Kayla

    2014-12-31

    Assessment of potential CO2 and brine leakage from wellbores is central to any consideration of the viability of geological CO2 sequestration. Depleted oil and gas reservoirs are some of the potential candidates for consideration as sequestration sites. The sequestration sites are expected to cover laterally extensive areas to be of practical interest. Hence there is a high likelihood that such sites will contain many pre-existing abandoned wells. Most existing work on wellbore integrity has focused on field and laboratory studies of chemical reactivity. Very little work has been done on the impacts of mechanical stresses on wellbore performance. This study focuses on the potential enhancement of fluid flow pathways in the near-wellbore environment due to modifications in the geomechanical stress field resulting from the CO2 injection operations. The majority of the operational scenarios for CO2 sequestration lead to significant rise in the formation pore pressure. This is expected to lead to an expansion of the reservoir rock and build-up of shear stresses near wellbores where the existence of cement and casing are expected to constrain the expansion. If the stress buildup is large enough, this can lead to failure with attendant permeability enhancement that can potentially provide leakage pathways to shallower aquifers and the surface. In this study, we use a numerical model to simulate key features of a wellbore (casing, annulus and cement) embedded in a system that includes the upper aquifer, caprock, and storage aquifer. We present the sensitivity of damage initiation and propagation to various operational and formation parameters. We consider Mohr-Coulomb shear-failure models; tensile failure is also likely to occur but will require higher stress changes and will be preceded by shear failure. The modeling is performed using the numerical simulator FEHM developed at LANL that models coupled THM processes during multi

  3. Drivers of circulation in a fringing coral reef embayment: A wave-flow coupled numerical modeling study of Hanalei Bay, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeke, Ron K.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Ridd, Peter V.

    2013-04-01

    A coupled wave-circulation numerical model of Hanalei Bay, Hawaii, was constructed to investigate controls on nearshore hydrodynamics and overall circulation of a bathymetrically-complex coral reef embayment that is exposed to large waves and river floods several times per annum. The model was calibrated using in situ data representative of the two conditions that dominate the region's wave climate: one associated with local trade winds and associated trade-wind waves, and the other with distant-source episodic large swells. The model results were improved by including spatially-varying hydrodynamic bed roughness and making the semi-empirical wave-breaking parameter dependent on incident wave steepness and reef slope. During trade-wind conditions, circulation was primarily wind-driven and volume flux-based flushing times of the bay were on the order of 35 h. Under the episodic swell conditions, circulation were dominated by wave-driven flows and flushing times decreased to as little as 2 h. The vigorous hydrodynamics that occur during the upper 10% most energetic swell conditions indicate that only a few (0-10) events each year are likely capable of exporting significant volumes of sediment from the bay. Like many fringing reef areas backed by steep-sided watersheds on tropical and sub-tropical high islands worldwide, Hanalei Bay receives high episodic fluvial sediment load during a similarly low number of flood events. These similarly episodic but decoupled processes of sediment delivery and removal identified here suggest that the water quality and sedimentary environment of Hanalei Bay and similar linked watershed-reef systems are sensitive to changes in annual storm frequency and intensity.

  4. Space-Time Correlations and Dynamic Coupling in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guowei; Jin, Guodong; Yang, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Space-time correlation is a staple method for investigating the dynamic coupling of spatial and temporal scales of motion in turbulent flows. In this article, we review the space-time correlation models in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian frames of reference, which include the random sweeping and local straining models for isotropic and homogeneous turbulence, Taylor's frozen-flow model and the elliptic approximation model for turbulent shear flows, and the linear-wave propagation model and swept-wave model for compressible turbulence. We then focus on how space-time correlations are used to develop time-accurate turbulence models for the large-eddy simulation of turbulence-generated noise and particle-laden turbulence. We briefly discuss their applications to two-point closures for Kolmogorov's universal scaling of energy spectra and to the reconstruction of space-time energy spectra from a subset of spatial and temporal signals in experimental measurements. Finally, we summarize the current understanding of space-time correlations and conclude with future issues for the field.

  5. Role of Runoff-Infiltration Partitioning and Resolved Overland Flow on Land-Atmosphere Feedbacks: A Case-Study with the WRF-Hydro Coupled Modeling System for West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, J.; Wagner, S.; Rummler, T.; Fersch, B.; Bliefernicht, J.; Andresen, S.; Kunstmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of land-atmosphere feedbacks requires detailed representation of land processes in atmospheric models. Our focus here is on runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow. In the standard version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, coupled with the Noah Land Surface Model, runoff-infiltration partitioning is described as a purely vertical process. In the WRF-Hydro coupled modeling system, runoff is enhanced with lateral water flows. The study region is the Sissili catchment (12800 km2) in West Africa, and the period of investigation is March 2003 - February 2004. Our WRF setup includes an outer and inner domain at 10 and 2 km resolution, respectively. In our WRF-Hydro setup the inner domain is coupled with a sub-grid at 500 m resolution to compute overland and river flow. Model results are compared with TRMM precipitation, MTE evapotranspiration, CCI soil moisture, CRU temperature, and streamflow observation. In the outer domain, a sensitivity analysis to runoff-infiltration partitioning gives a range of simulated annual precipitation of one sixth of the annual amount. In the inner domain, where precipitation patterns are mainly prescribed by lateral boundary conditions, sensitivity is small, but additionally resolved overland flow here clearly increases infiltration and evapotranspiration at the beginning of the wet season when soils are still dry. Our WRF-Hydro setup shows the potential of this fully coupled modeling system for joint atmospheric and terrestrial water balance studies, and reproduces observed daily discharge with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient of 0.43.

  6. Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, R. Joy, Ashwin

    2014-07-15

    Undriven, incompressible Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional doubly periodic strongly coupled dusty plasma is modelled using generalised hydrodynamics, both in linear and nonlinear regime. A complete stability diagram is obtained for low Reynolds numbers R and for a range of viscoelastic relaxation time τ{sub m} [0 < τ{sub m} < 10]. For the system size considered, using a linear stability analysis, similar to Navier Stokes fluid (τ{sub m} = 0), it is found that for Reynolds number beyond a critical R, say R{sub c}, the Kolmogorov flow becomes unstable. Importantly, it is found that R{sub c} is strongly reduced for increasing values of τ{sub m}. A critical τ{sub m}{sup c} is found above which Kolmogorov flow is unconditionally unstable and becomes independent of Reynolds number. For R < R{sub c}, the neutral stability regime found in Navier Stokes fluid (τ{sub m} = 0) is now found to be a damped regime in viscoelastic fluids, thus changing the fundamental nature of transition of Kolmogorov flow as function of Reynolds number R. A new parallelized nonlinear pseudo spectral code has been developed and is benchmarked against eigen values for Kolmogorov flow obtained from linear analysis. Nonlinear states obtained from the pseudo spectral code exhibit cyclicity and pattern formation in vorticity and viscoelastic oscillations in energy.

  7. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  8. Strongly coupled turbulent gas-particle flows in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) simulations of strongly coupled (high mass loading) gas-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of exploring the fundamental physics of fully developed, wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. An adaptive spatial filter is developed that accurately decomposes the total granular energy of the particles into correlated and uncorrelated components at each location in the wall-normal direction of the flow. In this manner, Reynolds- and phase-averaged (PA) two-phase turbulence statistics up to second order are reported for both phases and for three values of the PA mean fluid velocity. As expected due to the high mass loading, in all cases the turbulence production due to mean drag dominates production due to mean shear. A multiphase LRR-IP Reynolds-stress turbulence model is developed to predict the turbulent flow statistics as a function of the wall-normal distance. Using a correlation for the vertical drift velocity developed from the EL data, the turbulence model predictions agree satisfactorily with all of one-point EL statistics for the vertical channel flows, as well as for the homogeneous cluster-induced turbulence (CIT) statistics reported previously. Funded by U.S. National Science Foundation (CBET-1437865).

  9. Long line coupling models.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2004-03-01

    This report assembles models for the response of a wire interacting with a conducting ground to an electromagnetic pulse excitation. The cases of an infinite wire above the ground as well as resting on the ground and buried beneath the ground are treated. The focus is on the characteristics and propagation of the transmission line mode. Approximations are used to simplify the description and formulas are obtained for the current. The semi-infinite case, where the short circuit current can be nearly twice that of the infinite line, is also examined.

  10. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  11. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  12. Radiation-Spray Coupling for Realistic Flow Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam; Iannetti, Anthony C.

    2011-01-01

    Three Large Eddy Simulations (LES) for a lean-direct injection (LDI) combustor are performed and compared. In addition to the cold flow simulation, the effect of radiation coupling with the multi-physics reactive flow is analyzed. The flame let progress variable approach is used as a subgrid combustion model combined with a stochastic subgrid model for spray atomization and an optically thin radiation model. For accurate chemistry modeling, a detailed Jet-A surrogate mechanism is utilized. To achieve realistic inflow, a simple recycling technique is performed at the inflow section upstream of the swirler. Good comparison is shown with the experimental data mean and root mean square profiles. The effect of combustion is found to change the shape and size of the central recirculation zone. Radiation is found to change the spray dynamics and atomization by changing the heat release distribution and the local temperature values impacting the evaporation process. The simulation with radiation modeling shows wider range of droplet size distribution by altering the evaporation rate. The current study proves the importance of radiation modeling for accurate prediction in realistic spray combustion configurations, even for low pressure systems.

  13. Modeling and flow theory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    (1) We recommend the establishment of an experimental test facility, appropriately instrumented, dedicated to research on theoretical modeling concepts. Validation of models for the various flow regimes, and establishment of the limitations or concepts used in the construction of models, are sorely needed areas of research. There exists no mechanism currently for funding of such research on a systematic basis. Such a facility would provide information fundamental to progress in the physics of turbulent multi-phase flow, which would also have impact on the understanding of coal utilization processes; (2) combustion research appears to have special institutional barriers to information exchange because it is an established, commercial ongoing effort, with heavy reliance on empirical data for proprietary configurations; (3) for both gasification and combustion reactors, current models appear to handle adequately some, perhaps even most, gross aspects of the reactors such as overall efficiency and major chemical output constituents. However, new and more stringent requirements concerning NOX, SOX and POX (small paticulate) production require greater understanding of process details and spatial inhomogenities, hence refinement of current models to include some greater detail is necessary; (4) further progress in the theory of single-phase turbulent flow would benefit our understanding of both combustors and gasifiers; and (5) another area in which theoretical development would be extremely useful is multi-phase flow.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation using Fully-Coupled Peridynamics, Thin-Film Flow, and Darcian Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiruga, A. F.; Moridis, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical model is presented for the simulation of the evolution of hydraulic fracture in general geological media that couples a peridynamic mechanical model and finite element models for porous flow and fracture flow. The two-dimensional model captures porous flow through rock; thin-film flow through hydraulic fractures; mechanical deformation due to applied loads, pore pressure, and fracture pressure; and fracture growth and deformation. The fracture mesh is built dynamically as the fracture grows, connecting broken peridynamic bonds. While a simple finite element model of Darcian flow is employed in the presented results, the formulation and implementation of the peridynamic and fracture models allows the code to be easily coupled to any other hydrogeological code. The dynamic evolution of the system is solved by implicit Runge-Kutta integration. The mechanical deformation, matrix pore pressure, and fracture pressure fields are solved fully-coupled in staggered nonlinear iterations at each Runge-Kutta stage, and the damage field is updated sequentially at each time step. The accuracy and convergence rates of the peridynamic model is studied by comparing numerical results to analytical solutions in linear mechanics, and the fully-coupled model is benchmarked against Terzhaghi's consolidation problem. Applications of the model to simulating pressure-driven hydraulic fracture extension of a lone fracture and a fracture interacting with preexisting natural fractures are presented.

  15. Modelling pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Tawhai, Merryn H; Burrowes, Kelly S

    2008-11-30

    Computational model analysis has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity.

  16. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  17. Simplified coupling power model for fibers fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saktioto, J.; Ali, J.; Fadhali, M.

    2009-09-01

    Fiber coupler fabrication used for an optical waveguide requires lossless power for an optimal application. The previous research coupled fibers were successfully fabricated by injecting hydrogen flow at 1 bar and fused slightly by unstable torch flame in the range of 800-1350°C. Optical parameters may vary significantly over wide range physical properties. Coupling coefficient and refractive index are estimated from the experimental result of the coupling ratio distribution from 1% to 75%. The change of geometrical fiber affects the normalized frequency V even for single mode fibers. V is derived and some parametric variations are performed on the left and right hand side of the coupling region. A partial power is modelled and derived using V, normalized lateral phase constant u, and normalized lateral attenuation constant, w through the second kind of modified Bessel function of the l order, which obeys the normal mode and normalized propagation constant b. Total power is maintained constant in order to comply with the energy conservation law. The power is integrated through V, u, and w over the pulling length of 7500 µm for 1-D. The core radius of a fiber significantly affects V and power partially at coupling region rather than wavelength and refractive index of core and cladding. This model has power phenomena in transmission and reflection for an optical switch and tunable filter.

  18. Counseling couples about coitus during menstrual flow.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, R A

    1981-12-01

    For some couples sexual intercourse during menses is both acceptable and pleasurable, while for others it is an undesirable or unacceptable sexual pattern. When counseling couples about having sexual intercourse during menses, one need to keep in mind both the advantages and possible disadvantages. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is the most threatening risk of having coitus during menses. A woman who has experienced PID or a woman at high risk of developing PID may want her partner to use a condom if she wants to have intercourse during menses. Religious reasons may keep couples from sexual intercourse during menses. Women with very short monthly cycles may, from time to time, ovulate during menses. The use of tampons during menses may make the vagina very dry, and extra lubrication may be required. If sexual intercourse during menses does not lead to orgasm for the woman, pelvic congestion may be increased, thereby increasing the dysmenorrhea a woman experiences. The advantages of intercourse during menses are: pregnancy is far less likely to occur; by diminishing pelvic congestion, orgasm may significantly decrease the amount of dysmenorrhea a woman experiences; blood may be a good lubricant; and there are less days of abstinence in the monthly cycle.

  19. Session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    1993-01-01

    The session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models is reviewed. Current model limitations, current issues and critical unknowns, and modeling activity are addressed. Specific recommendations and experimental strategies on the following are given: multiscale surface layer - planetary boundary layer - chemical flux measurements; Eulerian budget study; and Langrangian experiment. Nonprecipitating cloud studies, organized convective systems, and aerosols - heterogenous chemistry are also discussed.

  20. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2014-11-14

    A multiscale linear-solver framework for the pressure equation associated with flow in highly heterogeneous porous formations was developed. The multiscale based approach is cast in a general algebraic form, which facilitates integration of the new scalable linear solver in existing flow simulators. The Algebraic Multiscale Solver (AMS) is employed as a preconditioner within a multi-stage strategy. The formulations investigated include the standard MultiScale Finite-Element (MSFE) andMultiScale Finite-Volume (MSFV) methods. The local-stage solvers include incomplete factorization and the so-called Correction Functions (CF) associated with the MSFV approach. Extensive testing of AMS, as an iterative linear solver, indicate excellent convergence rates and computational scalability. AMS compares favorably with advanced Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) solvers for highly detailed three-dimensional heterogeneous models. Moreover, AMS is expected to be especially beneficial in solving time-dependent problems of coupled multiphase flow and transport in large-scale subsurface formations.

  1. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1990-01-01

    Because of the complexity of helicopter flow field, a zonal method of analysis of computational aerodynamics is required. Here, a new procedure for coupling potential and viscous flow is proposed. An overlapping, velocity coupling technique is to be developed with the unique feature that the potential flow surface singularity strengths are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes at a smoother inner fluid boundary. The closed-loop iteration method proceeds until the velocity field is converged. This coupling should provide the means of more accurate viscous computations of the near-body and rotor flow fields with resultant improved analysis of such important performance parameters as helicopter fuselage drag and rotor airloads.

  2. Multiple steady states in coupled flow tank reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Katharine L. C.; Kottalam, J.; Hatlee, Michael D.; Ross, John

    1992-05-01

    Coupling between continuous-flow, stirred tank reactors (CSTR's), each having multiple steady states, can produce new steady states with different concentrations of the chemical species in each of the coupled tanks. In this work, we identify a kinetic potential ψ that governs the deterministic time evolution of coupled tank reactors, when the reaction mechanism permits a single-variable description of the states of the individual tanks; examples include the iodate-arsenous acid reaction, a cubic model suggested by Noyes, and two quintic models. Stable steady states correspond to minima of ψ, and unstable steady states to maxima or saddle points; marginally stable states typically correspond to saddle-node points. We illustrate the variation in ψ due to changes in the rate constant for external material intake (k0) and for exchange between tanks (kx). For fixed k0 values, we analyze the changes in numbers and types of steady states as kx increases from zero. We show that steady states disappear by pairwise coalescence; we also show that new steady states may appear with increasing kx, when the reaction mechanism is sufficiently complex. For fixed initial conditions, the steady state ultimately reached in a mixing experiment may depend on the exchange rate constant as a function of time, kx(t) : Adiabatic mixing is obtained in the limit of slow changes in kx(t) and instantaneous mixing in the limit as kx(t)→∞ while t remains small. Analyses based on the potential ψ predict the outcome of mixing experiments for arbitrary kx(t). We show by explicit counterexamples that a prior theory developed by Noyes does not correctly predict the instability points or the transitions between steady states of coupled tanks, to be expected in mixing experiments. We further show that the outcome of such experiments is not connected to the relative stability of steady states in individual tank reactors. We find that coupling may effectively stabilize the tanks. We provide

  3. A Coupled Finite Volume Solver for Incompressible Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukalled, F.; Darwish, M.

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports on a pressure-based coupled algorithm for the solution of laminar incompressible flow problems. The implicit pressure-velocity coupling is accomplished by deriving a pressure equation in a way similar to a segregated SIMPLE algorithm with the extended set of equations solved simultaneously and having diagonally dominant coefficients. The superiority of the coupled approach over the segregated approach is demonstrated by solving the lid-driven flow in a square cavity problem using both methodologies and comparing their computational costs. Results indicate that the number of iterations needed by the coupled solver is grid independent. Moreover, recorded CPU time values reveal that the coupled approach substantially reduces the computational cost with the reduction rate for the problem solved increasing as the grid size increases and reaching a value as high as 115.

  4. Understanding the transport and fate of multiple pollutants: development and testing of a coupled surface-groundwater flow and water quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumit; Wade, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The problem of river pollutant diversity, especially in the south-east of UK, is typically associated with sediment, nutrients and micro-organic chemicals such as pesticides. The pollution problem is further exacerbated by climate change and population growth. Given this policy makers and environmental regulators need catchment scale water quantity and quality model that could be potentially used to assess multiple pollutants in catchments with a large groundwater contribution. The research presented here details development of a spatially explicit, coupled surface- groundwater model and its application in an exemplar lowland catchment in the south-east of UK with extensive surface and groundwater datasets available. More specifically, the fully distributed mesoscale hydrological model (mHM) is coupled with MODFLOW in the Enborne catchment (150 km2). Simulations are conducted on daily time step with spatial resolution of 1 km2 grid cell between 1970 and 2010. The spatially explicit nature of the modelling framework is being used to explore aquifer recharge and water and solute residence times to ultimately explore the lags between changes to pollutant loadings, the introduction of small-scale pollution control measures and the within stream response.

  5. Coupled heat and fluid flow modeling of the Carboniferous Kuna Basin, Alaska: Implications for the genesis of the Red Dog Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba ore district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garven, G.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Dumoulin, J.A.; Bradley, D.A.; Young, L.E.; Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Red Dog deposit is a giant 175 Mton (16% Zn, 5% Pb), shale-hosted Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba ore district situated in the Carboniferous Kuna Basin, Western Brooks Range, Alaska. These SEDEX-type ores are thought to have formed in calcareous turbidites and black mudstone at elevated sub-seafloor temperatures (120-150??C) within a hydrogeologic framework of submarine convection that was structurally organized by large normal faults. The theory for modeling brine migration and heat transport in the Kuna Basin is discussed with application to evaluating flow patterns and heat transport in faulted rift basins and the effects of buoyancy-driven free convection on reactive flow and ore genesis. Finite element simulations show that hydrothermal fluid was discharged into the Red Dog subbasin during a period of basin-wide crustal heat flow of 150-160 mW/m2. Basinal brines circulated to depths as great as 1-3 km along multiple normal faults flowed laterally through thick clastic aquifers acquiring metals and heat, and then rapidly ascended a single discharge fault zone at rates ??? 5 m/year to mix with seafloor sulfur and precipitate massive sulfide ores. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  7. The Challenges to Coupling Dynamic Geospatial Models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N

    2006-06-23

    Many applications of modeling spatial dynamic systems focus on a single system and a single process, ignoring the geographic and systemic context of the processes being modeled. A solution to this problem is the coupled modeling of spatial dynamic systems. Coupled modeling is challenging for both technical reasons, as well as conceptual reasons. This paper explores the benefits and challenges to coupling or linking spatial dynamic models, from loose coupling, where information transfer between models is done by hand, to tight coupling, where two (or more) models are merged as one. To illustrate the challenges, a coupled model of Urbanization and Wildfire Risk is presented. This model, called Vesta, was applied to the Santa Barbara, California region (using real geospatial data), where Urbanization and Wildfires occur and recur, respectively. The preliminary results of the model coupling illustrate that coupled modeling can lead to insight into the consequences of processes acting on their own.

  8. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  9. Coupled gas flow-plasma model for a gliding arc: investigations of the back-breakdown phenomenon and its effect on the gliding arc characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. R.; Kolev, St.; Wang, H. X.; Bogaerts, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D and 2D Cartesian quasi-neutral plasma model for a low current argon gliding arc discharge, including strong interactions between the gas flow and arc plasma column. The 3D model is applied only for a short time of 0.2 ms due to its huge computational cost. It mainly serves to verify the reliability of the 2D model. As the results in 2D compare well with those in 3D, they can be used for a better understanding of the gliding arc basic characteristics. More specifically, we investigate the back-breakdown phenomenon induced by an artificially controlled plasma channel, and we discuss its effect on the gliding arc characteristics. The back-breakdown phenomenon, or backward-jump motion of the arc, as observed in the experiments, results in a drop of the gas temperature, as well as in a delay of the arc velocity with respect to the gas flow velocity, allowing more gas to pass through the arc, and thus increasing the efficiency of the gliding arc for gas treatment applications.

  10. Off-centered stagnation point flow of a couple stress fluid towards a rotating disk.

    PubMed

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Riaz, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    An investigation has been made to study the off-centered stagnation flow of a couple stress fluid over a rotating disk. The model developed for the governing problem in the form of partial differential equations has been converted to ordinary differential equations with the use of suitable similarity transformation. The analytical approximation has been made with the most promising analytical approach, homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence region of the obtained solution is determined and plotted. The effects of couple stress and nondimensional parameters have been observed on the flows of couple stress fluid. Also comparison has been made with the Newtonian fluid as the special case of considered problem.

  11. Coupling Between Subauroral Neutral Wind and Extended Sunward Ion Flow During the 17 March 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, C.; Nishimura, T.; Maruyama, N.; Lyons, L. R.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Subauroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) are strong westward flow enhancements in the pre-midnight sector equatorward of the electron aurora oval. They are closely associated with region-2 field-aligned currents in the region of low conductivity below the electron equatorward boundary. While SAPS are usually regarded as a magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling phenomenon, recent studies have suggested a strong interaction of SAPS with the thermosphere. The March 17, 2013 storm was studied by using the near-simultaneous observations of plasma velocity and neutral wind made by the DMSP-18 and GOCE satellites to investigate the subauroral neutral wind responses to storm time sunward ion flows in the dusk local time sector, as well as the role of the thermosphere in SAPS M-I coupling. Sunward ion flows intensified and shifted equatorward as the storm progressed, and the duskside subauroral neutral wind showed a strong correlation with the sunward ion flow with 2 hours delay. Our simulation results from a coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere (M-I-T) model that includes the self-consistent electrodynamic coupling reproduced the temporal and spatial evolution of the observed ion and neutral flow patterns fairly well with some discrepancies. The model auroral conductivity calculation has been improved by including the RCM aurora precipitation to achieve better agreement between model results and observation. The force terms in the neutral momentum equation have been analyzed to understand the cause of the observed correlation between the neutral wind and ion flow. By comparing runs with and without self-consistent I-T coupling, we found that coupling to the neutral wind increases sunward ion flows by 20% and drives ion-flow penetration to lower latitudes, suggesting that neutral wind can drive the plasma flow where the magnetospheric forcing does not exist at mid and low latitude. Furthermore, we will also address the impact of the frictional heating arising from

  12. Modeling of transitional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Thomas S.

    1988-01-01

    An effort directed at developing improved transitional models was initiated. The focus of this work was concentrated on the critical assessment of a popular existing transitional model developed by McDonald and Fish in 1972. The objective of this effort was to identify the shortcomings of the McDonald-Fish model and to use the insights gained to suggest modifications or alterations of the basic model. In order to evaluate the transitional model, a compressible boundary layer code was required. Accordingly, a two-dimensional compressible boundary layer code was developed. The program was based on a three-point fully implicit finite difference algorithm where the equations were solved in an uncoupled manner with second order extrapolation used to evaluate the non-linear coefficients. Iteration was offered as an option if the extrapolation error could not be tolerated. The differencing scheme was arranged to be second order in both spatial directions on an arbitrarily stretched mesh. A variety of boundary condition options were implemented including specification of an external pressure gradient, specification of a wall temperature distribution, and specification of an external temperature distribution. Overall the results of the initial phase of this work indicate that the McDonald-Fish model does a poor job at predicting the details of the turbulent flow structure during the transition region.

  13. Dispersive transport dynamics in a strongly coupled groundwater-brine flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1995-02-01

    Many problems in subsurface hydrology involve the flow and transport of solutes that affect liquid density. When density variations are large (>5%), the flow and transport are strongly coupled. Density variations in excess of 20% occur in salt dome and bedded-salt formations which are currently being considered for radioactive waste repositories. The widely varying results of prior numerical simulation efforts of salt dome groundwater-brine flow problems have underscored the difficulty of solving strongly coupled flow and transport equations. We have implemented a standard model for hydrodynamic dispersion in our general purpose integral finite difference simulator, TOUGH2. The residual formulation used in TOUGH2 is efficient for the strongly coupled flow problem and allows the simulation to reach a verifiable steady state. We use the model to solve two classic coupled flow problems as verification. We then apply the model to a salt dome flow problem patterned after the conditions present at the Gorleben salt dome, Germany, a potential site for high-level nuclear waste disposal. Our transient simulations reveal the presence of two flow regimes: (1) recirculating and (2) swept forward. The flow dynamics are highly sensitive to the strength of molecular diffusion, with recirculating flows arising for large values of molecular diffusivity. For pure hydrodynamic dispersion with parameters approximating those at Gorleben, we find a swept-forward flow field at steady state rather than the recirculating flows found in previous investigations. The time to steady state is very sensitive to the initial conditions, with long time periods required to sweep out an initial brine pool in the lower region of the domain. Dimensional analysis is used to demonstrate the tendency toward brine recirculation. An analysis based on a dispersion timescale explains the observed long time to steady state when the initial condition has a brine pool in the lower part of the system.

  14. Coupled transport in rotor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, S.; Lepri, S.; Livi, R.; Politi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Steady nonequilibrium states are investigated in a one-dimensional setup in the presence of two thermodynamic currents. Two paradigmatic nonlinear oscillators models are investigated: an XY chain and the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Their distinctive feature is that the relevant variable is an angle in both cases. We point out the importance of clearly distinguishing between energy and heat flux. In fact, even in the presence of a vanishing Seebeck coefficient, a coupling between (angular) momentum and energy arises, mediated by the unavoidable presence of a coherent energy flux. Such a contribution is the result of the ‘advection’ induced by the position-dependent angular velocity. As a result, in the XY model, the knowledge of the two diagonal elements of the Onsager matrix suffices to reconstruct its transport properties. The analysis of the nonequilibrium steady states finally allows to strengthen the connection between the two models.

  15. Using the Flow-3D General Moving Object Model to Simulate Coupled Liquid Slosh - Container Dynamics on the SPHERES Slosh Experiment: Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Richard; Kirk, Daniel; Marsell, Brandon; Roth, Jacob; Schallhorn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The SPHERES Slosh Experiment (SSE) is a free floating experimental platform developed for the acquisition of long duration liquid slosh data aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The data sets collected will be used to benchmark numerical models to aid in the design of rocket and spacecraft propulsion systems. Utilizing two SPHERES Satellites, the experiment will be moved through different maneuvers designed to induce liquid slosh in the experiment's internal tank. The SSE has a total of twenty-four thrusters to move the experiment. In order to design slosh generating maneuvers, a parametric study with three maneuvers types was conducted using the General Moving Object (GMO) model in Flow-30. The three types of maneuvers are a translation maneuver, a rotation maneuver and a combined rotation translation maneuver. The effectiveness of each maneuver to generate slosh is determined by the deviation of the experiment's trajectory as compared to a dry mass trajectory. To fully capture the effect of liquid re-distribution on experiment trajectory, each thruster is modeled as an independent force point in the Flow-3D simulation. This is accomplished by modifying the total number of independent forces in the GMO model from the standard five to twenty-four. Results demonstrate that the most effective slosh generating maneuvers for all motions occurs when SSE thrusters are producing the highest changes in SSE acceleration. The results also demonstrate that several centimeters of trajectory deviation between the dry and slosh cases occur during the maneuvers; while these deviations seem small, they are measureable by SSE instrumentation.

  16. Recovery Act: An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a Reaction Transport Model that Couples Chemical Reactions of Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation with Spatial and Temporal Flow Variations.

    SciTech Connect

    Saar, Martin O.; Seyfried, Jr., William E.; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2016-06-24

    A total of 12 publications and 23 abstracts were produced as a result of this study. In particular, the compilation of a thermodynamic database utilizing consistent, current thermodynamic data is a major step toward accurately modeling multi-phase fluid interactions with solids. Existing databases designed for aqueous fluids did not mesh well with existing solid phase databases. Addition of a second liquid phase (CO2) magnifies the inconsistencies between aqueous and solid thermodynamic databases. Overall, the combination of high temperature and pressure lab studies (task 1), using a purpose built apparatus, and solid characterization (task 2), using XRCT and more developed technologies, allowed observation of dissolution and precipitation processes under CO2 reservoir conditions. These observations were combined with results from PIV experiments on multi-phase fluids (task 3) in typical flow path geometries. The results of the tasks 1, 2, and 3 were compiled and integrated into numerical models utilizing Lattice-Boltzmann simulations (task 4) to realistically model the physical processes and were ultimately folded into TOUGH2 code for reservoir scale modeling (task 5). Compilation of the thermodynamic database assisted comparisons to PIV experiments (Task 3) and greatly improved Lattice Boltzmann (Task 4) and TOUGH2 simulations (Task 5). PIV (Task 3) and experimental apparatus (Task 1) have identified problem areas in TOUGHREACT code. Additional lab experiments and coding work has been integrated into an improved numerical modeling code.

  17. Documentation of a restart option for the U.S. Geological Survey coupled Groundwater and Surface-Water Flow (GSFLOW) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Regan, R. Steve; Niswonger, Richard G.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2015-10-02

    The spin-up simulation should be run for a sufficient length of time necessary to establish antecedent conditions throughout a model domain. Each GSFLOW application can require different lengths of time to account for the hydrologic stresses to propagate through a coupled groundwater and surface-water system. Typically, groundwater hydrologic processes require many years to come into equilibrium with dynamic climate and other forcing (or stress) data, such as precipitation and well pumping, whereas runoff-dominated surface-water processes respond relatively quickly. Use of a spin-up simulation can substantially reduce execution-time requirements for applications where the time period of interest is small compared to the time for hydrologic memory; thus, use of the restart option can be an efficient strategy for forecast and calibration simulations that require multiple simulations starting from the same day.

  18. Documentation of a restart option for the U.S. Geological Survey coupled Groundwater and Surface-Water Flow (GSFLOW) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Regan, Robert S.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2015-10-02

    The spin-up simulation should be run for a sufficient length of time necessary to establish antecedent conditions throughout a model domain. Each GSFLOW application can require different lengths of time to account for the hydrologic stresses to propagate through a coupled groundwater and surface-water system. Typically, groundwater hydrologic processes require many years to come into equilibrium with dynamic climate and other forcing (or stress) data, such as precipitation and well pumping, whereas runoff-dominated surface-water processes respond relatively quickly. Use of a spin-up simulation can substantially reduce execution-time requirements for applications where the time period of interest is small compared to the time for hydrologic memory; thus, use of the restart option can be an efficient strategy for forecast and calibration simulations that require multiple simulations starting from the same day.

  19. Integrated Surface-groundwater Flow Modeling: a Free-surface Overland Flow Boundary Condition in a Parallel Groundwater Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kollet, S J; Maxwell, R M

    2005-04-08

    Interactions between surface and ground water are a key component of the hydrologic budget on the watershed scale. Models that honor these interactions are commonly based on the conductance concept that presumes a distinct interface at the land surface, separating the surface from the subsurface domain. These types of models link the subsurface and surface domains via an exchange flux that depends upon the magnitude and direction of the hydraulic gradient across the interface and a proportionality constant (a measure of the hydraulic connectivity). Because experimental evidence of such a distinct interface is often lacking in field systems, there is a need for a more general coupled modeling approach. A more general coupled model is presented that incorporates a new two-dimensional overland flow simulator into the parallel three-dimensional variable saturated subsurface flow code ParFlow. In ParFlow, the overland flow simulator takes the form of an upper boundary condition and is, thus, fully integrated without relying on the conductance concept. Another important advantage of this approach is the efficient parallelism incorporated into ParFlow, which is efficiently exploited by the overland flow simulator. Several verification and simulation examples are presented that focus on the two main processes of runoff production: excess infiltration and saturation. The model is shown to reproduce an analytical solution for overland flow and compares favorably to other commonly used hydrologic models. The influence of heterogeneity of the shallow subsurface on overland flow is also examined. The results show the uncertainty in overland flow predictions due to subsurface heterogeneity and demonstrate the usefulness of our approach. Both the overland flow component and the coupled model are evaluated in a parallel scaling study and show to be efficient.

  20. Coupling of Solute and Solvent Flows in Porous Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Thomas E.; Schafer, James A.; Troutman, Susan L.

    1971-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to evaluate coupling of water and nonelectrolyte flows in porous lipid bilayer membranes (i.e., in the presence of amphotericin B) in series with unstirred layers. Alterations in solute flux during osmosis, with respect to the flux in the absence of net water flow, could be related to two factors: first, changes in the diffusional component of solute flux referable to variations in solute concentrations at the membrane interfaces produced by osmotic flow through the unstirred layers; and second, coupling of solute and solvent flows within the membrane phase. Osmotic water flow in the same direction as solute flow increased substantially the net fluxes of glycerol and erythritol through the membranes, while osmotic flow in the opposite direction to glycerol flow reduced the net flux of that solute. The observed effects of osmotic water flow on the fluxes of these solutes were in reasonable agreement with predictions based on a model for coupling of solute and solvent flows within the membrane phase, and considerably in excess of the prediction for a diffusion process alone. PMID:5549100

  1. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  2. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wu

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

  3. Coupled compaction driven fluid flow and mechanical deformation in sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huismans, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    Model experiments will be presented where compaction driven fluid flow is coupled to the viscous-plastic deformation of the skeleton matrix. The Darcy fluid flow during compaction is described by an advection-diffusion equation for the excess pressure with two source/sink terms that depend on the mechanical compressibility and viscous compaction of the pore space, the latter representing the effect of pressure solution. The coupling between the compacting and plastically deforming parts of the system is through the Drucker-Prager frictional-plastic yield criterion, so that the yield strength depends on the effective dynamical pressure. The coupled system is solved using a two-dimensional (2-D) finite element method. Several problems are solved to demonstrate the coupling between compaction driven fluid flow and mechanical deformation.

  4. Coupled chemo(enzymatic) reactions in continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Yuryev, Ruslan; Strompen, Simon; Liese, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This review highlights the state of the art in the field of coupled chemo(enzymatic) reactions in continuous flow. Three different approaches to such reaction systems are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages and disadvantages as well as trends for their future development.

  5. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  6. T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

    2011-02-14

    At its most basic level, the injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites involves a system comprising the wellbore and the target reservoir. The wellbore is the only conduit available to emplace CO{sub 2} into reservoirs for long-term storage. At the same time, wellbores in general have been identified as the most likely conduit for CO{sub 2} and brine leakage from geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites, especially those in sedimentary basins with historical hydrocarbon production. We have developed a coupled wellbore and reservoir model for simulating the dynamics of CO{sub 2} injection and leakage through wellbores. The model describes the following processes: (1) upward or downward wellbore flow of CO{sub 2} and variable salinity water with transition from supercritical to gaseous CO{sub 2} including Joule-Thomson cooling, (2) exsolution of CO{sub 2} from the aqueous phase as pressure drops, and (3) cross flow into or interaction with layers of surrounding rock (reservoirs). We use the Drift-Flux Model and related conservation equations for describing transient two-phase non-isothermal wellbore flow of CO{sub 2}-water mixtures under different flow regimes and interacting with surrounding rock. The mass and thermal energy balance equations are solved numerically by a finite difference scheme with wellbore heat transmission to the surrounding rock handled either semi-analytically or numerically. The momentum balance equation for the flow in the wellbore is solved numerically with a semi-explicit scheme. This manual provides instructions for compilation and use of the new model, and presents some example problems to demonstrate its use.

  7. Coupled parametric design of flow control and duct shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan (Inventor); Bertuccioli, Luca (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for designing gas turbine engine components using a coupled parametric analysis of part geometry and flow control is disclosed. Included are the steps of parametrically defining the geometry of the duct wall shape, parametrically defining one or more flow control actuators in the duct wall, measuring a plurality of performance parameters or metrics (e.g., flow characteristics) of the duct and comparing the results of the measurement with desired or target parameters, and selecting the optimal duct geometry and flow control for at least a portion of the duct, the selection process including evaluating the plurality of performance metrics in a pareto analysis. The use of this method in the design of inter-turbine transition ducts, serpentine ducts, inlets, diffusers, and similar components provides a design which reduces pressure losses and flow profile distortions.

  8. Coupling compositional liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at porous and free-flow domains interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, R.; Trenty, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an efficient splitting algorithm to solve coupled liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at the interface between a porous medium and a free-flow domain. This model is compared to the reduced model introduced in [6] using a 1D approximation of the gas free flow. For that purpose, the gas molar fraction diffusive flux at the interface in the free-flow domain is approximated by a two point flux approximation based on a low-frequency diagonal approximation of a Steklov-Poincaré type operator. The splitting algorithm and the reduced model are applied in particular to the modelling of the mass exchanges at the interface between the storage and the ventilation galleries in radioactive waste deposits.

  9. Coupling compositional liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at porous and free-flow domains interface

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, R.; Trenty, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-09-15

    This paper proposes an efficient splitting algorithm to solve coupled liquid gas Darcy and free gas flows at the interface between a porous medium and a free-flow domain. This model is compared to the reduced model introduced in [6] using a 1D approximation of the gas free flow. For that purpose, the gas molar fraction diffusive flux at the interface in the free-flow domain is approximated by a two point flux approximation based on a low-frequency diagonal approximation of a Steklov–Poincaré type operator. The splitting algorithm and the reduced model are applied in particular to the modelling of the mass exchanges at the interface between the storage and the ventilation galleries in radioactive waste deposits.

  10. A turbulence model for pulsatile arterial flows.

    PubMed

    Younis, B A; Berger, S A

    2004-10-01

    Difficulties in predicting the behavior of some high Reynolds number flows in the circulatory system stem in part from the severe requirements placed on the turbulence model chosen to close the time-averaged equations of fluid motion. In particular, the successful turbulence model is required to (a) correctly capture the "nonequilibrium" effects wrought by the interactions of the organized mean-flow unsteadiness with the random turbulence, (b) correctly reproduce the effects of the laminar-turbulent transitional behavior that occurs at various phases of the cardiac cycle, and (c) yield good predictions of the near-wall flow behavior in conditions where the universal logarithmic law of the wall is known to be not valid. These requirements are not immediately met by standard models of turbulence that have been developed largely with reference to data from steady, fully turbulent flows in approximate local equilibrium. The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of a turbulence model suited for use in arterial flows. The model is of the two-equation eddy-viscosity variety with dependent variables that are zero-valued at a solid wall and vary linearly with distance from it. The effects of transition are introduced by coupling this model to the local value of the intermittency and obtaining the latter from the solution of a modeled transport equation. Comparisons with measurements obtained in oscillatory transitional flows in circular tubes show that the model produces substantial improvements over existing closures. Further pulsatile-flow predictions, driven by a mean-flow wave form obtained in a diseased human carotid artery, indicate that the intermittency-modified model yields much reduced levels of wall shear stress compared to the original, unmodified model. This result, which is attributed to the rapid growth in the thickness of the viscous sublayer arising from the severe acceleration of systole, argues in favor of the use of the model for the

  11. Stochastic power flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The stochastic nature of customer demand and equipment failure on large interconnected electric power networks has produced a keen interest in the accurate modeling and analysis of the effects of probabilistic behavior on steady state power system operation. The principle avenue of approach has been to obtain a solution to the steady state network flow equations which adhere both to Kirchhoff's Laws and probabilistic laws, using either combinatorial or functional approximation techniques. Clearly the need of the present is to develop sound techniques for producing meaningful data to serve as input. This research has addressed this end and serves to bridge the gap between electric demand modeling, equipment failure analysis, etc., and the area of algorithm development. Therefore, the scope of this work lies squarely on developing an efficient means of producing sensible input information in the form of probability distributions for the many types of solution algorithms that have been developed. Two major areas of development are described in detail: a decomposition of stochastic processes which gives hope of stationarity, ergodicity, and perhaps even normality; and a powerful surrogate probability approach using proportions of time which allows the calculation of joint events from one dimensional probability spaces.

  12. Role of runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow on land-atmosphere feedbacks: A case-study with the WRF-Hydro coupled modeling system for West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Wagner, Seven; Rummler, Thomas; Fersch, Benjamin; Bliefernicht, Jan; Andresen, Sabine; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of land-atmosphere feedbacks requires detailed representation of land processes in atmospheric models. Our focus here is on runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow. In the standard version of WRF, runoff-infiltration partitioning is described as a purely vertical process. In WRF-Hydro, runoff is enhanced with lateral water flows. The study region is the Sissili catchment (12800 km2) in West Africa and the study period March 2003 - February 2004. Our WRF setup includes an outer and inner domain at 10 and 2 km resolution covering the West African and Sissili region, respectively. In our WRF-Hydro setup the inner domain is coupled with a sub-grid at 500 m resolution to compute overland and river flow. Model results are compared with TRMM precipitation, MTE evapotranspiration, CCI soil moisture, CRU temperature, and streamflow observation. The role of runoff infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow on land-atmosphere feedbacks is addressed with a sensitivity analysis of WRF results to the runoff-infiltration partitioning parameter and a comparison between WRF and WRF-Hydro results, respectively. In the outer domain, precipitation is sensitive to runoff-infiltration partitioning at the scale of the Sissili area (~100x100 km2), but not of area A (500x2500 km2). In the inner domain, where precipitation patterns are mainly prescribed by lateral boundary conditions, sensitivity is small, but additionally resolved overland flow here clearly increases infiltration and evapotranspiration at the beginning of the wet season when soils are still dry. Our WRF-Hydro setup shows potential for joint atmospheric and terrestrial water balance studies, and reproduces observed daily discharge with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient of 0.43.

  13. Coupling catchment hydrology and transient storage to model the fate of solutes during low-flow conditions of an upland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trévisan, D.; Periáñez, R.

    2016-03-01

    The residence time of solutes in catchments is longer during low-flow conditions, due to the lengthening of transport routes and the decrease in transfer velocities. In rivers, transient storage depends largely on exchanges with channel storage and the hyporheic zone and reflects the capacity of the river to buffer pollutant loads before they enter the aquatic environment of final receptors. Our objective was to evaluate the fate of solutes along a typical confined river of upland catchments. First, we calculate lateral inflows using a variable-source hydrology approach. Then, water motion and quality in the river channel are predicted by combining hydrodynamics and exchanges with channel storage and the hyporheic zone. The model is mainly parametrized from literature data during baseflow conditions to mimic the fate of adsorptive and non-persistent pollutants. Residence time in surface water, channel storage and the hyporheic zone were found to be sensitive to lateral inflows from groundwater seepage. Channel storage is the main process controlling residence time in upstream conditions, where the riverbed is mainly composed of stones and bedrock. Downstream, along with the formation of sediment deposits and riffle-pool units, hyporheic exchanges also control the lag time in the transfer of solutes. By integrating physically-based processes, the number of parameters is small, but the model still requires a detailed description of stream geometry and morphology. It can be used to evaluate stream restoration or catchment-river management when detailed data of stream geometry and morphology are available.

  14. Surge dynamics coupled to pore-pressure evolution in debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, S.B.; Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Temporally and spatially varying pore-fluid pressures exert strong controls on debris-flow motion by mediating internal and basal friction at grain contacts. We analyze these effects by deriving a one-dimensional model of pore-pressure diffusion explicitly coupled to changes in debris-flow thickness. The new pore-pressure equation is combined with Iverson's (1997) extension of the depth-averaged Savage-Hutter (1989, 1991) granular avalanche equations to predict motion of unsteady debris-flow surges with evolving pore-pressure distributions. Computational results illustrate the profound effects of pore-pressure diffusivities on debris-flow surge depths and velocities. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  15. Coupling of two-phase flow in fractured-vuggy reservoir with filling medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Haojun; Li, Aifen; Huang, Zhaoqin; Gao, Bo; Peng, Ruigang

    2017-01-01

    Caves in fractured-vuggy reservoir usually contain lots of filling medium, so the two-phase flow in formations is the coupling of free flow and porous flow, and that usually leads to low oil recovery. Considering geological interpretation results, the physical filled cave models with different filling mediums are designed. Through physical experiment, the displacement mechanism between un-filled areas and the filling medium was studied. Based on the experiment model, we built a mathematical model of laminar two-phase coupling flow considering wettability of the porous media. The free fluid region was modeled using the Navier-Stokes and Cahn-Hilliard equations, and the two-phase flow in porous media used Darcy's theory. Extended BJS conditions were also applied at the coupling interface. The numerical simulation matched the experiment very well, so this numerical model can be used for two-phase flow in fracture-vuggy reservoir. In the simulations, fluid flow between inlet and outlet is free flow, so the pressure difference was relatively low compared with capillary pressure. In the process of water injection, the capillary resistance on the surface of oil-wet filling medium may hinder the oil-water gravity differentiation, leading to no fluid exchange on coupling interface and remaining oil in the filling medium. But for the water-wet filling medium, capillary force on the surface will coordinate with gravity. So it will lead to water imbibition and fluid exchange on the interface, high oil recovery will finally be reached at last.

  16. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  17. Coupled assimilation for an intermediated coupled ENSO prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhu, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    The value of coupled assimilation is discussed using an intermediate coupled model in which the wind stress is the only atmospheric state which is slavery to model sea surface temperature (SST). In the coupled assimilation analysis, based on the coupled wind-ocean state covariance calculated from the coupled state ensemble, the ocean state is adjusted by assimilating wind data using the ensemble Kalman filter. As revealed by a series of assimilation experiments using simulated observations, the coupled assimilation of wind observations yields better results than the assimilation of SST observations. Specifically, the coupled assimilation of wind observations can help to improve the accuracy of the surface and subsurface currents because the correlation between the wind and ocean currents is stronger than that between SST and ocean currents in the equatorial Pacific. Thus, the coupled assimilation of wind data can decrease the initial condition errors in the surface/subsurface currents that can significantly contribute to SST forecast errors. The value of the coupled assimilation of wind observations is further demonstrated by comparing the prediction skills of three 12-year (1997-2008) hindcast experiments initialized by the ocean-only assimilation scheme that assimilates SST observations, the coupled assimilation scheme that assimilates wind observations, and a nudging scheme that nudges the observed wind stress data, respectively. The prediction skills of two assimilation schemes are significantly better than those of the nudging scheme. The prediction skills of assimilating wind observations are better than assimilating SST observations. Assimilating wind observations for the 2007/2008 La Niña event triggers better predictions, while assimilating SST observations fails to provide an early warning for that event.

  18. A Coupled Thermal, Fluid Flow, and Solidification Model for the Processing of Single-Crystal Alloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Bansal, Rohan; Gambone, Justin J.; Das, Suman

    2014-12-01

    Scanning laser epitaxy (SLE) is a new laser-based additive manufacturing technology under development at the Georgia Institute of Technology. SLE is aimed at the creation of equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal deposits of nickel-based superalloys through the melting of alloy powders onto superalloy substrates using a fast scanning Nd:YAG laser beam. The fast galvanometer control movement of the laser (0.2 to 2 m/s) and high-resolution raster scanning (20 to 200 µm line spacing) enables superior thermal control over the solidification process and allows the production of porosity-free, crack-free deposits of more than 1000 µm thickness. Here, we present a combined thermal and fluid flow model of the SLE process applied to alloy CMSX-4 with temperature-dependent thermo-physical properties. With the scanning beam described as a moving line source, the instantaneous melt pool assumes a convex hull shape with distinct leading edge and trailing edge characteristics. Temperature gradients at the leading and trailing edges are of order 2 × 105 and 104 K/m, respectively. Detailed flow analysis provides insights on the flow characteristics of the powder incorporating into the melt pool, showing velocities of order 1 × 10-4 m/s. The Marangoni effect drives this velocity from 10 to 15 times higher depending on the operating parameters. Prediction of the solidification microstructure is based on conditions at the trailing edge of the melt pool. Time tracking of solidification history is incorporated into the model to couple the microstructure prediction model to the thermal-fluid flow model, and to predict the probability of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition. Qualitative agreement is obtained between simulation and experimental result.

  19. Lattice-based flow field modeling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Zhao, Ye; Fan, Zhe; Li, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Yoakum-Stover, Suzanne; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach for simulating the natural dynamics that emerge from the interaction between a flow field and immersed objects. We model the flow field using the Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) with boundary conditions appropriate for moving objects and accelerate the computation on commodity graphics hardware (GPU) to achieve real-time performance. The boundary conditions mediate the exchange of momentum between the flow field and the moving objects resulting in forces exerted by the flow on the objects as well as the back-coupling on the flow. We demonstrate our approach using soap bubbles and a feather. The soap bubbles illustrate Fresnel reflection, reveal the dynamics of the unseen flow field in which they travel, and display spherical harmonics in their undulations. Our simulation allows the user to directly interact with the flow field to influence the dynamics in real time. The free feather flutters and gyrates in response to lift and drag forces created by its motion relative to the flow. Vortices are created as the free feather falls in an otherwise quiescent flow.

  20. Selective Pinacol-Coupling Reaction using a Continuous Flow System.

    PubMed

    Sotto, Nicolas; Cazorla, Clément; Villette, Carole; Billamboz, Muriel; Len, Christophe

    2016-11-18

    The first continuous flow pinacol coupling reaction of carbonyl compounds was successfully achieved within only 2 min during a single pass through a cartridge filled with zinc(0). The optimized method allowed the efficient production of gram-scale value-added compounds with high productivity. The developed methodology is efficient for aromatic or α,β-unsaturated aldehydes but gives moderate results for more stable acetophenone derivatives. Moreover, the flow method displayed better results in terms of yield and selectivity in comparison to the corresponding batch methodology.

  1. Screening for suitable areas for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage within the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium using coupled groundwater flow and heat transport modelling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anibas, Christian; Kukral, Janik; Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md; Huysmans, Marijke

    2017-04-01

    Urban areas have a great potential for shallow geothermal systems. Their energy demand is high, but currently they have only a limited potential to cover their own energy demand. The transition towards a low-carbon energy regime offers alternative sources of energy an increasing potential. Urban areas however pose special challenges for the successful exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. High building densities limit the available space for drillings and underground investigations. Urban heat island effects and underground structures influence the thermal field, groundwater pollution and competing water uses limit the available subsurface. To tackle these challenges in the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium two projects 'BruGeo' and the recently finished 'Prospective Research of Brussels project 2015-PRFB-228' address the investigation in urban geothermal systems. They aim to identify the key factors of the underground with respect to Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) installations like thermal properties, aquifer thicknesses, groundwater flow velocities and their heterogeneity. Combined numerical groundwater and heat transport models are applied for the assessment of both open and closed loop shallow geothermal systems. The Brussels Capital Region comprises of the Belgian Capital, the City of Brussels and 18 other municipalities covering 161 km2 with almost 1.2 million inhabitants. Beside the high population density the Brussels Capital Region has a pronounced topography and a relative complex geology. This is both a challenge and an opportunity for the exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. The most important shallow hydrogeological formation in the Brussels-Capital Region are the Brussels Sands with the Brussels Sands Aquifer. Scenarios where developed using criteria for the hydrogeological feasibility of ATES installations such as saturated aquifer thickness, groundwater flow velocity and the groundwater head below surface. The Brussels Sands

  2. Coupled incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for continuum-based modelling sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahar, Gourabananda; Dhar, Anirban

    2017-04-01

    A coupled solenoidal Incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) model is presented for simulation of sediment displacement in erodible bed. The coupled framework consists of two separate incompressible modules: (a) granular module, (b) fluid module. The granular module considers a friction based rheology model to calculate deviatoric stress components from pressure. The module is validated for Bagnold flow profile and two standardized test cases of sediment avalanching. The fluid module resolves fluid flow inside and outside porous domain. An interaction force pair containing fluid pressure, viscous term and drag force acts as a bridge between two different flow modules. The coupled model is validated against three dambreak flow cases with different initial conditions of movable bed. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental data. A demonstrative case considering effect of granular column failure under full/partial submergence highlights the capability of the coupled model for application in generalized scenario.

  3. Power flow analysis of two coupled plates with arbitrary characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    In the last progress report (Feb. 1988) some results were presented for a parametric analysis on the vibrational power flow between two coupled plate structures using the mobility power flow approach. The results reported then were for changes in the structural parameters of the two plates, but with the two plates identical in their structural characteristics. Herein, limitation is removed. The vibrational power input and output are evaluated for different values of the structural damping loss factor for the source and receiver plates. In performing this parametric analysis, the source plate characteristics are kept constant. The purpose of this parametric analysis is to determine the most critical parameters that influence the flow of vibrational power from the source plate to the receiver plate. In the case of the structural damping parametric analysis, the influence of changes in the source plate damping is also investigated. The results obtained from the mobility power flow approach are compared to results obtained using a statistical energy analysis (SEA) approach. The significance of the power flow results are discussed together with a discussion and a comparison between the SEA results and the mobility power flow results. Furthermore, the benefits derived from using the mobility power flow approach are examined.

  4. A New Hybrid Redox Flow Battery with Multiple Redox Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-05-19

    A redox flow battery using V{sup 4+}/V{sup 5+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples in chloric/sulphuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency {approx}80% and no capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previous reported Fe/V cell using only Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples.

  5. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Poedts, S.; Rogava, A.D. |; Mahajan, S.M. |

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  6. Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhanli

    2015-08-01

    Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks is investigated in this paper. As one crucial factor to determine the processing ability of nodes, the information flow with potential time lag is modeled by co-processing diffusion which couples the continuous time processing and the discrete diffusing dynamics. Exact results on master equation and stationary state are achieved to disclose the formation. In order to understand the evolution of the co-processing and design the optimal routing strategy according to the maximal entropic diffusion on networks, we propose the coupling entropy comprehending the structural characteristics and information propagation on social network. Based on the analysis of the co-processing model, we analyze the coupling impact of the structural factor and information propagating factor on the coupling entropy, where the analytical results fit well with the numerical ones on scale-free social networks.

  7. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  8. A multilingual programming model for coupled systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, E. T.; Larson, J. W.; Norris, B.; Tobis, M.; Steder, M.; Jacob, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Chicago; The Australian National Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Multiphysics and multiscale simulation systems share a common software requirement-infrastructure to implement data exchanges between their constituent parts-often called the coupling problem. On distributed-memory parallel platforms, the coupling problem is complicated by the need to describe, transfer, and transform distributed data, known as the parallel coupling problem. Parallel coupling is emerging as a new grand challenge in computational science as scientists attempt to build multiscale and multiphysics systems on parallel platforms. An additional coupling problem in these systems is language interoperability between their constituent codes. We have created a multilingual parallel coupling programming model based on a successful open-source parallel coupling library, the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). This programming model's capabilities reach beyond MCT's native Fortran implementation to include bindings for the C++ and Python programming languages. We describe the method used to generate the interlanguage bindings. This approach enables an object-based programming model for implementing parallel couplings in non-Fortran coupled systems and in systems with language heterogeneity. We describe the C++ and Python versions of the MCT programming model and provide short examples. We report preliminary performance results for the MCT interpolation benchmark. We describe a major Python application that uses the MCT Python bindings, a Python implementation of the control and coupling infrastructure for the community climate system model. We conclude with a discussion of the significance of this work to productivity computing in multidisciplinary computational science.

  9. Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Liou, William; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Liu, Nan-Suey; Lumley, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine combustors generally involve turbulent swirling flows in order to enhance fuel-air mixing and flame stabilization. It has long been recognized that eddy viscosity turbulence models are unable to appropriately model swirling flows. Therefore, it has been suggested that, for the modeling of these flows, a second order closure scheme should be considered because of its ability in the modeling of rotational and curvature effects. However, this scheme will require solution of many complicated second moment transport equations (six Reynolds stresses plus other scalar fluxes and variances), which is a difficult task for any CFD implementations. Also, this scheme will require a large amount of computer resources for a general combustor swirling flow. This report is devoted to the development of a cubic Reynolds stress-strain model for turbulent swirling flows, and was inspired by the work of Launder's group at UMIST. Using this type of model, one only needs to solve two turbulence equations, one for the turbulent kinetic energy k and the other for the dissipation rate epsilon. The cubic model developed in this report is based on a general Reynolds stress-strain relationship. Two flows have been chosen for model evaluation. One is a fully developed rotating pipe flow, and the other is a more complex flow with swirl and recirculation.

  10. Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa liquid: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2015-10-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flows in liquids remains a problem of great interest despite decades of intensive research. Here, we report an atomistic study of this transition in a model Yukawa liquid using molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from an thermally equilibrated Yukawa liquid, for a given value of coupling parameter Γ (defined as ratio of potential energy to kinetic energy per particle) and screening length κ, a subsonic flow of magnitude U0 is superposed and transition to an unstable regime is observed eventually leading to turbulent flow at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers. We have performed a parametric study for a range of Reynolds number R and found that the flow is neutrally stable for R flow occurs for R >Rc(Γ) , where Rc is the critical value of Reynolds number. Strong molecular shear heating is observed in all cases studied here. It is found that the coupling parameter Γ decreases because of molecular shear heating on a time scale comparable to the instability time scale. Irrespective of the initial value of coupling parameter Γ, the average heating rate is found to be sensitive to the ratio of equilibrium flow speed to the thermal speed, say, α=U/0 vt h , where vt h=√{2/Γ } . Our results reported here are expected to be generic and should apply to a wide variety of strongly coupled systems such as laboratory dusty plasma, molten salts, and charged colloidal systems.

  11. Statistical equilibria of the coupled barotropic flow and shallow water flow on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xueru

    The motivation of this research is to build equilibrium statistical models that can apply to explain two enigmatic phenomena in the atmospheres of the solar system's planets: (1) the super-rotation of the atmospheres of slowly-rotating terrestrial planets---namely Venus and Titan, and (2) the persistent anticyclonic large vortex storms on the gas giants, such as the Great Red Spot (GRS) on Jupiter. My thesis is composed of two main parts: the first part focuses on the statistical equilibrium of the coupled barotropic vorticity flow (non-divergent) on a rotating sphere; the other one has to do with the divergent shallow water flow rotating sphere system. The statistical equilibria of these two systems are simulated in a wide range of parameter space by Monte Carlo methods based on recent energy-relative enstrophy theory and extended energy-relative enstrophy theory. These kind of models remove the low temperatures defect in the old classical doubly canonical energy-enstrophy theory which cannot support any phase transitions. The other big difference of our research from previous work is that we work on the coupled fluid-sphere system, which consists of a rotating high density rigid sphere, enveloped by a thin shell of fluid. The sphere is considered to have infinite mass and angular momentum; therefore, it can serve as a reservoir of angular momentum. Unlike the fluid sphere system itself, the coupled fluid sphere system allows for the exchange of angular momentum between the atmosphere and the solid planet. This exchange is the key point in any model that is expected to capture coherent structures such as the super-rotation and GRS-like vortices problems in planetary atmospheres. We discovered that slowly-rotating planets can have super-rotation at high energy state. All known slowly-rotating cases in the solar system---Venus and Titan---have super-rotation. Moreover, we showed that the anticyclonicity in the GRS-like structures is closely associated with the

  12. Comparison of Coupled Radiative Flow Solutions with Project Fire 2 Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olynick, David R.; Henline, W. D.; Chambers, Lin Hartung; Candler, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    A nonequilibrium, axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes flow solver with coupled radiation has been developed for use in the design or thermal protection systems for vehicles where radiation effects are important. The present method has been compared with an existing now and radiation solver and with the Project Fire 2 experimental data. Good agreement has been obtained over the entire Fire 2 trajectory with the experimentally determined values of the stagnation radiation intensity in the 0.2-6.2 eV range and with the total stagnation heating. The effects of a number of flow models are examined to determine which combination of physical models produces the best agreement with the experimental data. These models include radiation coupling, multitemperature thermal models, and finite rate chemistry. Finally, the computational efficiency of the present model is evaluated. The radiation properties model developed for this study is shown to offer significant computational savings compared to existing codes.

  13. A New Coupled 4DVAR Assimilation System for Coupled Ocean-Wave Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, C. A.; Orzech, M.; Carrier, M.; Ngodock, H.; Souopgui, I.; Smith, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    The coastal ocean environment poses prediction challenges due to shortened time and space scales and highly nonlinear interactions between its wave and circulation dynamics. In-situ observations in such a region can often be scattered and/or incomplete, further stressing our ability to accurately forecast coastal parameters such as currents, wave heights and direction, and density structure. To extend predictability in these coastal environments, we have developed a coupled, four-dimensional, variational (4DVAR) assimilation system for coupled ocean-wave models. Coupling the assimilation systems for the ocean and waves insures dynamical consistency of the assimilation innovations in a highly nonlinear, continuously evolving environment. Coupled assimilation also permits observations of one process to affect the forecast of another, which can maximize our use of limited datasets. The ocean-wave assimilation system is presently coupled through three mechanisms: ocean currents, Stokes' drift, and wave radiation stress gradients, and is incorporated within the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). The coupled assimilation is realized by including each of these coupling terms within the adjoint and tangent linear components of the ocean-wave, 4DVAR assimilation system. The ocean-wave assimilation and forecast system is then applied to a series of twin experiments near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay. These twin experiments are designed to show how information flows from observations assimilated in to either the ocean or wave model through the coupled assimilation to influence both ocean and wave model variables. Inferred corrections from one system to another are demonstrated. As part of the coupled assimilation system, a newly developed formulation for wave error covariances is implemented. Impacts of the wave covariances on predictions from the coupled ocean-wave model system are also assessed.

  14. Flow Over a Model Submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Juan; Smits, Alexander

    2003-11-01

    Experimental investigation over a DARPA SUBOFF submarine model (SUBOFF Model) was performed using flow visualization and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The model has an axisymmetric body with sail and fins, and it was supported by a streamlined strut that was formed by the extension of the sail appendage. The range of flow conditions studied correspond to a Reynolds numbers based on model length, Re_L, of about 10^5. Velocity vector fields, turbulence intensities, vorticity fields, and flow visualization in the vicinity of the junction flows are presented. In the vicinity of the control surface and sail hull junctions, the presence of streamwise vortices in the form of horseshoe or necklace vortices locally dominates the flow. The effects of unsteady motions about an axis passing through the sail are also investigated to understand the evolution of the unsteady wake.

  15. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Liu

    2000-03-03

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models.

  16. Hydromagnetic couple-stress nanofluid flow over a moving convective wall: OHAM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awais, M.; Saleem, S.; Hayat, T.; Irum, S.

    2016-12-01

    This communication presents the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow of a couple-stress nanofluid over a convective moving wall. The flow dynamics are analyzed in the boundary layer region. Convective cooling phenomenon combined with thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects has been discussed. Similarity transforms are utilized to convert the system of partial differential equations into coupled non-linear ordinary differential equation. Optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) is utilized and the concept of minimization is employed by defining the average squared residual errors. Effects of couple-stress parameter, convective cooling process parameter and energy enhancement parameters are displayed via graphs and discussed in detail. Various tables are also constructed to present the error analysis and a comparison of obtained results with the already published data. Stream lines are plotted showing a difference of Newtonian fluid model and couplestress fluid model.

  17. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  18. Numerical Simulations of Rapidly Rotating Boundary-Coupled Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Michael Andrew

    Many of the large-scale fluid systems present on and within the Earth, other planetary bodies in the Solar System, and throughout our universe are characterized by large length scales, weak viscous forces, and a rapid background rotation. The combination of these attributes with various forcing mechanisms results in unique fluid dynamical phenomena that dictate the evolutionary path of our universe. However, even for relatively small fluid velocities (e.g. 10-4 m s-1), these systems are often characterized by large Reynolds numbers and the presence of localized boundary layers due to sharp hydrodynamic, thermal, chemical, or magnetic gradients that render laboratory or numerical modeling difficult. Furthermore, geophysical and planetary fluid flows often interact in a complex manner with bounding solid surfaces that result in further difficulties. Physical and mathematical simplifications are thus paramount for advancing our understanding of these fluid systems. In this document we explain our approach at attempting to understand two problems in the field of geophysical fluid dynamics using simplified, two-dimensional numerical simulations. Studies have shown that angular momentum is exchanged between the Earth's liquid outer core and solid mantle, resulting in measurable changes in the rotation rate of the Earth. The physical mechanism responsible for this exchange is not currently understood. One possibility is the interaction of flow in the core with topography present along the core-mantle boundary. Towards this end, we employ a quasi-two-dimensional thermal convection model in a spherical shell to carry out the first detailed study on the effects of core-mantle boundary topography. We find that the presence of topography can generate a spatially heterogeneous flow field and azimuthally dependent heat flux along the inner and outer boundaries. The total heat transfer and azimuthal velocities are typically enhanced in the presence of the topography. These

  19. Benchmark initiative on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisch, K.; Annewandter, R.; Olden, P.; Mackay, E.; Bauer, S.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers involves multiple strongly interacting processes such as multiphase flow and geomechanical deformation, which threat to the seal integrity of CO2 repositories. Coupled simulation codes are required to establish realistic prognoses of the coupled process during CO2 injection operations. International benchmark initiatives help to evaluate, to compare and to validate coupled simulation results. However, there is no published code comparison study so far focusing on the impact of coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics on the long-term integrity of repositories, which is required to obtain confidence in the predictive capabilities of reservoir simulators. We address this gap by proposing a benchmark study. A wide participation from academic and industrial institutions is sought, as the aim of building confidence in coupled simulators become more plausible with many participants. Most published benchmark studies on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes have been performed within the field of nuclear waste disposal (e.g. the DECOVALEX project), using single-phase formulation only. As regards CO2 injection scenarios, international benchmark studies have been published comparing isothermal and non-isothermal multiphase flow processes such as the code intercomparison by LBNL, the Stuttgart Benchmark study, the CLEAN benchmark approach and other initiatives. Recently, several codes have been developed or extended to simulate the coupling of hydraulic and geomechanical processes (OpenGeoSys, ELIPSE-Visage, GEM, DuMuX and others), which now enables a comprehensive code comparison. We propose four benchmark tests of increasing complexity, addressing the coupling between multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection. In the first case, a horizontal non-faulted 2D model consisting of one reservoir and one cap rock is considered, focusing on stress and strain regime changes in the storage formation and the

  20. Modeling flow and sedimention of slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondy, L.; Rao, R.; Altobelli, S.; Ingber, M.; Graham, A.

    2002-12-01

    Many natural processes involve flows of sediments at high particle concentrations. The equations describing such two-phase flows are highly nonlinear. We will give an overview of the performance of a continuum constitutive model of suspensions of particles in liquid for low Reynolds number flows. The diffusive flux model (Leighton and Acrivos, J. Fluid Mech., 1987, and Phillips et al., Phys. Fluids A, 1992) is implemented in a general purpose finite element computational program. This constitutive description couples a Newtonian stress/shear-rate relationship (where the local viscosity of the suspension is dependent on the local volume fraction of solids) with a shear-induced migration model of the suspended particles. The momentum transport, continuity, and diffusive flux equations are solved simultaneously. The formulation is fully three-dimensional and can be run on a parallel computer platform. Recent work introducing a flow-aligned tensor correction to this model has had success in representing the anisotropic force that is seen in curvilinear flows. Gravity effects are added in an approach similar to that of Zhang and Acrivos (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 1994). The model results are compared with laboratory data obtained with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) of evolving particle concentration profiles in complex flows, as well as in batch sedimentation. Interesting secondary flows appear both in the experiment and model. Overall, good agreement is found between the experiments and the simulations. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy. The authors would like to acknowledge support for this work by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Engineering and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  1. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  2. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in

  3. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sonnenthale

    2001-04-16

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are required

  4. High-resolution reactive transport: A coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisman, J. J.; Maxwell, R. M.; Steefel, C. I.; Sitchler, A.; Molins, S.

    2013-12-01

    Subsurface hydrogeochemical systems are an especially complex component of the terrestrial environment and play host to a multitude of interactions. Parameterizations of these interactions are perhaps the least understood component of terrestrial systems, presenting uncertainties in the predictive understanding of biogeochemical cycling and transport. Thorough knowledge of biogeochemical transport processes is critical to the quantification of carbon/nutrient fluxes in the subsurface, and to the development of effective contaminant remediation techniques. Here we present a coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model, ParCrunchFlow, as a tool to further our understanding of governing processes and interactions in natural hydrogeochemical systems. ParCrunchFlow is a coupling of the reactive transport simulator CrunchFlow with the hydrologic model ParFlow. CrunchFlow is a multicomponent reactive flow and transport code that can be used to simulate a range of important processes and environments, including reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, carbon sequestration, biogeochemical cycling, and water-rock interaction. ParFlow is a parallel, three-dimensional, variably-saturated, coupled surface-subsurface flow and transport code with the ability to simulate complex topography, geology, and heterogeneity. ParCrunchflow takes advantage of the efficient parallelism built into Parflow, allowing the numerical simulation of reactive transport processes in chemically and physically heterogeneous media at high spatial resolutions. This model provides an ability to further examine the interactions and feedbacks between biogeochemical systems and complex subsurface flow fields. In addition to the details of model construction, results will be presented that show floodplain nutrient cycling and the effects of heterogeneity on small-scale mixing reactions at the Department of Energy's Old Rifle Legacy site.

  5. Circuit Model for Capacitive Coupling in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Shaw, D. M.; Collins, G. J.; Sugai, H.

    1998-10-01

    A crude circuit model has been developed to illustrate and account for capacitive coupling between the rf coil and the bulk plasma in a stove top inductively coupled plasma source. The circuit model is composed of three levels of capacitance: the dielectric window capacitance, sheath capacitance contiguous to the dielectric window, and the chamber to ground sheath capacitance. The model is verified by quantitative comparison with the measured rf plasma potential in the bulk plasma body, plasma feedstock gas (argon) pressures below 2 mTorr. At higher pressures above 5 mTorr, the measured results diverge from the circuit model due to the transition from a spatially uniform electron density throughout the bulk plasma at pressures less than 2 mTorr to a less spatially uniform electron density at pressures above 5 mTorr.

  6. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  7. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in CMIP5 coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Tim

    2017-02-01

    This study provided a quantitative evaluation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) over the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean simulated by 20 coupled climate models that participated in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. The two leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of filtered daily precipitation anomalies are used to represent the eastward propagating CCKWs in both observations and simulations. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the EOF modes represent the spatial patterns and intensity of CCKWs respectively, and the lead-lag relationship between the two EOF principle components describe the phase propagation of CCKWs. A non-dimensional metric was designed in consideration of all the three factors (i.e., pattern, amplitude and phase propagation) for evaluation. The relative rankings of the models based on the skill scores calculated by the metric are conducted for the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively. Two models (NorESM1-M and MPI-ESM-LR) are ranked among the best 20 % for both the regions. Three models (inmcm4, MRI-CGCM3 and HadGEM2-ES) are ranked among the worst 20 % for both the regions. While the observed CCKW amplitude is greater north of the equator in the Pacific, some models overestimate the CCKW ampliutde in the Southern Hemisphere. This bias is related to the mean state precipitation bias along the south Pacific convergence zone.

  8. Internal thermal coupling in direct-flow coaxial vacuum tube collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Glembin, J.; Rockendorf, G.; Scheuren, J.

    2010-07-15

    This investigation covers the impact of low flow rates on the efficiency of coaxial vacuum tube collectors. Measurements show an efficiency reduction of 10% if reducing the flow rate from 78 kg/m{sup 2} h to 31 kg/m{sup 2} h for a collector group with 60 parallel vacuum tubes with a coaxial flow conduit at one-sided connection. For a more profound understanding a model of the coaxial tube was developed which defines the main energy fluxes including the internal thermal coupling. The tube simulations show a non-linear temperature profile along the tube with the maximum temperature in the outer pipe. Due to heat transfer to the entering flow this maximum is not located at the fluid outlet. The non-linearity increases with decreasing flow rates. The experimentally determined flow distribution allows simulating the measured collector array. The simulation results confirm the efficiency decrease at low flow rates. The flow distribution has a further impact on efficiency reduction, but even at an ideal uniform flow, a considerable efficiency reduction at low flow rates is to be expected. As a consequence, low flow rates should be prevented for coaxial tube collectors, thus restricting the possible operation conditions. The effect of constructional modifications like diameter or material variations is presented. Finally the additional impact of a coaxial manifold design is discussed. (author)

  9. Tinamit: Making coupled system dynamics models accessible to stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, Julien; Inam Baig, Azhar; Rojas Díaz, Marcela; Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Adamowski, Jan; Tuy, Héctor; Melgar-Quiñonez, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    Model coupling is increasingly used as a method of combining the best of two models when representing socio-environmental systems, though barriers to successful model adoption by stakeholders are particularly present with the use of coupled models, due to their high complexity and typically low implementation flexibility. Coupled system dynamics - physically-based modelling is a promising method to improve stakeholder participation in environmental modelling while retaining a high level of complexity for physical process representation, as the system dynamics components are readily understandable and can be built by stakeholders themselves. However, this method is not without limitations in practice, including 1) inflexible and complicated coupling methods, 2) difficult model maintenance after the end of the project, and 3) a wide variety of end-user cultures and languages. We have developed the open-source Python-language software tool Tinamit to overcome some of these limitations to the adoption of stakeholder-based coupled system dynamics - physically-based modelling. The software is unique in 1) its inclusion of both a graphical user interface (GUI) and a library of available commands (API) that allow users with little or no coding abilities to rapidly, effectively, and flexibly couple models, 2) its multilingual support for the GUI, allowing users to couple models in their preferred language (and to add new languages as necessary for their community work), and 3) its modular structure allowing for very easy model coupling and modification without the direct use of code, and to which programming-savvy users can easily add support for new types of physically-based models. We discuss how the use of Tinamit for model coupling can greatly increase the accessibility of coupled models to stakeholders, using an example of a stakeholder-built system dynamics model of soil salinity issues in Pakistan coupled with the physically-based soil salinity and water flow model

  10. Dispersive Transport Dynamics in a Strongly Coupled Groundwater-Brine Flow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Pruess, Karsten

    1995-02-01

    Many problems in subsurface hydrology involve the flow and transport of solutes that affect liquid density. When density variations are large (>5%), the flow and transport are strongly coupled. Density variations in excess of 20% occur in salt dome and bedded-salt formations which are currently being considered for radioactive waste repositories. The widely varying results of prior numerical simulation efforts of salt dome groundwater-brine flow problems have underscored the difficulty of solving strongly coupled flow and transport equations. We have implemented a standard model for hydrodynamic dispersion in our general purpose integral finite difference simulator, TOUGH2. The residual formulation used in TOUGH2 is efficient for the strongly coupled flow problem and allows the simulation to reach a verifiable steady state. We use the model to solve two classic coupled flow problems as verification. We then apply the model to a salt dome flow problem patterned after the conditions present at the Gorleben salt dome, Germany, a potential site for high-level nuclear waste disposal. Our transient simulations reveal the presence of two flow regimes: (1) recirculating and (2) swept forward. The flow dynamics are highly sensitive to the strength of molecular diffusion, with recirculating flows arising for large values of molecular diffusivity. For pure hydrodynamic dispersion with parameters approximating those at Gorleben, we find a swept-forward flow field at steady state rather than the recirculating flows found in previous investigations. The time to steady state is very sensitive to the initial conditions, with long time periods required to sweep out an initial brine pool in the lower region of the domain. Dimensional analysis is used to demonstrate the tendency toward brine recirculation. An analysis based on a dispersion timescale explains the observed long time to steady state when the initial condition has a brine pool in the lower part of the system. The

  11. HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M

    2006-09-28

    The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

  12. Groundwater flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Mercer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic, distributed-parameter, numerical simulation models for analyzing groundwater flow and transport problems have come to be used almost routinely during the past decade. A review of the theoretical basis and practical use of groundwater flow and solute transport models is used to illustrate the state-of-the-art. Because of errors and uncertainty in defining model parameters, models must be calibrated to obtain a best estimate of the parameters. For flow modeling, data generally are sufficient to allow calibration. For solute-transport modeling, lack of data not only limits calibration, but also causes uncertainty in process description. Where data are available, model reliability should be assessed on the basis of sensitivity tests and measures of goodness-of-fit. Some of these concepts are demonstrated by using two case histories. ?? 1988.

  13. A computational approach for flow-acoustic coupling in closed side branches.

    PubMed

    Radavich, P M; Selamet, A; Novak, J M

    2001-04-01

    The quarter-wave resonator, which produces a narrow band of high acoustic attenuation at regularly spaced frequency intervals, is a common type of silencer used in ducts. The presence of mean flow in the main duct, however, is likely to promote an interaction between these acoustic resonances and the flow. The coupling for some discrete flow conditions leads to the production of both large wave amplitudes in the side branch and high noise levels in the main duct, thereby transforming the quarter-wave silencer into a noise generator. The present approach employs computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model this complex interaction between the flow and acoustic resonances at low Mach number by solving the unsteady, turbulent, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Comparisons between the present computations and the experiments of Ziada [PVP-Vol. 258, ASME, 35-59 (1993)] for a system with two coaxial side branches show that the method is capable of reproducing the physics of the flow-acoustic coupling and predicting the flow conditions when the coupling occurs. The theory of Howe [IMA J. Appl. Math. 32, 187-209 (1984)] is then employed to determine the location and timing of the acoustic power production during a cycle.

  14. Testing the global flow reconstruction method on coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, Emese; Kolláth, Zoltán

    2010-03-01

    Irregular behaviour of pulsating variable stars may occur due to low dimensional chaos. To determine the quantitative properties of the dynamics in such systems, we apply a suitable time series analysis, the global flow reconstruction method. The robustness of the reconstruction can be tested through the resultant quantities, like Lyapunov dimension and Fourier frequencies. The latter is specially important as it is directly derivable from the observed light curves. We have performed tests using coupled Rossler oscillators to investigate the possible connection between those quantities. In this paper we present our test results.

  15. Coupling surface and subsurface flows with curved interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pu; Yotov, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A mortar multiscale method is developed for the coupled Stokes andDarcy flows with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition in irregular domains. Conforming Stokes elements and multipoint flux mixed finite elements in Darcy are used to discretize the subdomains on the fine scale. A coarse scale mortar finite element space is used to approximate interface stresses and pressures and impose weakly continuity of velocities and fluxes. Matching conditions on curved interfaces are imposed by mapping the physical grids to reference grids with flat interfaces.

  16. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  17. Integrated Coupling of Surface and Subsurface Flow with HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Anne; Šimůnek, Jirka; Wöhling, Thomas; Schütze, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Describing interactions between surface and subsurface flow processes is important to adequately define water flow in natural systems. Since overland flow generation is highly influenced by rainfall and infiltration, both highly spatially heterogeneous processes, overland flow is unsteady and varies spatially. The prediction of overland flow needs to include an appropriate description of the interactions between the surface and subsurface flow. Coupling surface and subsurface water flow is a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed during the last few years, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. A new approach by Weill et al. (2009) to couple overland flow and subsurface flow based on a generalized Richards equation was implemented into the well-known subsurface flow model HYDRUS-2D (Šimůnek et al., 2011). This approach utilizes the one-dimensional diffusion wave equation to model overland flow. The diffusion wave model is integrated in HYDRUS-2D by replacing the terms of the Richards equation in a pre-defined runoff layer by terms defining the diffusion wave equation. Using this approach, pressure and flux continuity along the interface between both flow domains is provided. This direct coupling approach provides a strong coupling of both systems based on the definition of a single global system matrix to numerically solve the coupled flow problem. The advantage of the direct coupling approach, compared to the loosely coupled approach, is supposed to be a higher robustness, when many convergence problems can be avoided (Takizawa et al., 2014). The HYDRUS-2D implementation was verified using a) different test cases, including a direct comparison with the results of Weill et al. (2009), b) an analytical solution of the kinematic wave equation, and c) the results of a benchmark test of Maxwell et al. (2014), that included several known coupled surface subsurface flow models. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects

  18. Effects of dynamically variable saturation and matrix-conduit coupling of flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimann, T.; Geyer, T.; Shoemaker, W.B.; Liedl, R.; Sauter, M.

    2011-01-01

    Well-developed karst aquifers consist of highly conductive conduits and a relatively low permeability fractured and/or porous rock matrix and therefore behave as a dual-hydraulic system. Groundwater flow within highly permeable strata is rapid and transient and depends on local flow conditions, i.e., pressurized or nonpressurized flow. The characterization of karst aquifers is a necessary and challenging task because information about hydraulic and spatial conduit properties is poorly defined or unknown. To investigate karst aquifers, hydraulic stresses such as large recharge events can be simulated with hybrid (coupled discrete continuum) models. Since existing hybrid models are simplifications of the system dynamics, a new karst model (ModBraC) is presented that accounts for unsteady and nonuniform discrete flow in variably saturated conduits employing the Saint-Venant equations. Model performance tests indicate that ModBraC is able to simulate (1) unsteady and nonuniform flow in variably filled conduits, (2) draining and refilling of conduits with stable transition between free-surface and pressurized flow and correct storage representation, (3) water exchange between matrix and variably filled conduits, and (4) discharge routing through branched and intermeshed conduit networks. Subsequently, ModBraC is applied to an idealized catchment to investigate the significance of free-surface flow representation. A parameter study is conducted with two different initial conditions: (1) pressurized flow and (2) free-surface flow. If free-surface flow prevails, the systems is characterized by (1) a time lag for signal transmission, (2) a typical spring discharge pattern representing the transition from pressurized to free-surface flow, and (3) a reduced conduit-matrix interaction during free-surface flow. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Coupling between pre-onset flows and substorm onset waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm expansion phase onset. Recent THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have shown a repeatable pre-onset sequence, which is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and is followed by auroral streamers moving equatorward (earthward flow in the plasma sheet) and then by substorm onset. On the other hand, substorm onset is also preceded by azimuthally propagating waves, indicating a possible importance of wave instability for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast flows and waves. We have found an isolated substorm event that was well-instrumented with the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white-light ASI, and multi-spectral ASI, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR and ASI fields-of-view. This substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and ionospheric flows propagated equatorward from the polar cap, crossed the PBI and reached the growth phase arc. This sequence provides evidence that flows from open magnetic field lines propagate across the open-closed boundary and reach the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to the onset. Quasi-stable oscillations in auroral luminosity and ionospheric density are found along the growth phase arc. These pre-onset auroral waves amplified abruptly at the onset time, soon after the equatorward flows reached the onset region. This sequence suggests a coupling process where pre-existing stable waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet interact with flows from further downtail and then evolve to onset instability.

  20. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  1. Predictive Models for Hydrodynamic Coupling Coefficients in Clay Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueutin, P.; Gonçalvès, J.; Violette, S.

    2007-12-01

    In charged and low permeability media (e.g. clay media) the classical Darcy's law does not describe accurately the water movement. A generalized Darcy's law, one of the coupled fluxes equations, has to be used. The identification of the coupling parameters, in clay-rocks, is crucial in order to estimate the water flow. Here, we will only focus on the electrochemical-hydraulic coupling coefficients : the intrinsic permeability k and the osmotic permeability kc. These hydrodynamic coupling coefficients can be estimated using two approaches: (i) theoretical models : • porosity/intrinsic permeability relationships, defined for a clay medium, are used to estimate the intrinsic permeability. • an electrochemical model is used to estimate the osmotic coupling coefficient. The electrical model, a triple layer model, is implemented to simulate the interactions between the charged surfaces of the clay minerals and the pore solution. (ii) experiments : • at the sample scale. • at the field scale. The measurement of these parameters is generally challenging either at the sample or at the field scale. For this reason, predictive models can be useful. The purpose of this study is to give reference values for the two coupling parameters under consideration here, using to the petrophysical properties of the medium. Different models to estimate these coupling coefficients are tested : (i) the intrinsic permeability is estimated with a pretrophysical model. In this model, the intrinsic permeability depends on the effective pore radius and the electrical formation factor. (ii) the osmotic coupling coefficient is estimated with the model developed by Revil and Leroy (2004). The comparison between three different models with the available data shows that these data are more closely reproduced using this model. Some reference values are provided for several type of clays as a fonction of some readily measurable or estimable parameters or variables, such as the porosity, the

  2. Development of the T+M coupled flow-geomechanical simulator to describe fracture propagation and coupled flow-thermal-geomechanical processes in tight/shale gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2013-10-01

    We developed a hydraulic fracturing simulator by coupling a flow simulator to a geomechanics code, namely T+M simulator. Modeling of the vertical fracture development involves continuous updating of the boundary conditions and of the data connectivity, based on the finite element method for geomechanics. The T+M simulator can model the initial fracture development during the hydraulic fracturing operations, after which the domain description changes from single continuum to double or multiple continua in order to rigorously model both flow and geomechanics for fracture-rock matrix systems. The T+H simulator provides two-way coupling between fluid-heat flow and geomechanics, accounting for thermo-poro-mechanics, treats nonlinear permeability and geomechanical moduli explicitly, and dynamically tracks changes in the fracture(s) and in the pore volume. We also fully account for leak-off in all directions during hydraulic fracturing. We first test the T+M simulator, matching numerical solutions with the analytical solutions for poromechanical effects, static fractures, and fracture propagations. Then, from numerical simulation of various cases of the planar fracture propagation, shear failure can limit the vertical fracture propagation of tensile failure, because of leak-off into the reservoirs. Slow injection causes more leak-off, compared with fast injection, when the same amount of fluid is injected. Changes in initial total stress and contributions of shear effective stress to tensile failure can also affect formation of the fractured areas, and the geomechanical responses are still well-posed.

  3. Modeling jets in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches to the modeling of jets in cross flow are reviewed. These are grouped into four classes, namely: empirical models, integral models, perturbation models, and numerical models. Empirical models depend largely on the correlation of experimental data and are mostly useful for first-order estimates of global properties such as jet trajectory and velocity and temperature decay rates. Integral models are based on some ordinary-differential form of the conservation laws, but require substantial empirical calibration. They allow more details of the flow field to be obtained; simpler versions have to assume similarity of velocity and temperature profiles, but more sophisticated ones can actually calculate these profiles. Perturbation models require little empirical input, but the need for small parameters to ensure convergent expansions limits their application to either the near-field or the far-field. Therefore, they are mostly useful for the study of flow physics. Numerical models are based on conservation laws in partial-differential form. They require little empirical input and have the widest range of applicability. They also require the most computational resources. Although many qualitative and quantitative features of jets in cross flow have been predicted with numerical models, many issues affecting accuracy such as grid resolution and turbulence model are not completely resolved.

  4. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  5. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  6. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  7. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  8. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  9. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on water and gas

  10. A Weight-Averaged Interpolation Method for Coupling Time-Accurate Rarefied and Continuum Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Steven William

    A novel approach to coupling rarefied and continuum flow regimes as a single, hybrid model is introduced. The method borrows from techniques used in the simulation of spray flows to interpolate Lagrangian point-particles onto an Eulerian grid in a weight-averaged sense. A brief overview of traditional methods for modeling both rarefied and continuum domains is given, and a review of the literature regarding rarefied/continuum flow coupling is presented. Details of the theoretical development of the method of weighted interpolation are then described. The method evaluates macroscopic properties at the nodes of a CFD grid via the weighted interpolation of all simulated molecules in a set surrounding the node. The weight factor applied to each simulated molecule is the inverse of the linear distance between it and the given node. During development, the method was applied to several preliminary cases, including supersonic flow over an airfoil, subsonic flow over tandem airfoils, and supersonic flow over a backward facing step; all at low Knudsen numbers. The main thrust of the research centered on the time-accurate expansion of a rocket plume into a near-vacuum. The method proves flexible enough to be used with various flow solvers, demonstrated by the use of Fluent as the continuum solver for the preliminary cases and a NASA-developed Large Eddy Simulation research code, WRLES, for the full lunar model. The method is applicable to a wide range of Mach numbers and is completely grid independent, allowing the rarefied and continuum solvers to be optimized for their respective domains without consideration of the other. The work presented demonstrates the validity, and flexibility of the method of weighted interpolation as a novel concept in the field of hybrid flow coupling. The method marks a significant divergence from current practices in the coupling of rarefied and continuum flow domains and offers a kernel on which to base an ongoing field of research. It has the

  11. Use of GPU Computing to Study Coupled Deformation and Fluid Flow in Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Simon, Nina; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    Actual challenges in computational geodynamics put high requirements for the development of new coupled models. These need to solve accurate physics, on high resolution and in reasonable computation time. Multi-scale problems such as deformation of porous rocks triggered by fluid flow require both high temporal and spatial resolution. The resulting preferential flow paths involve complex physics and a strong coupling between deformation and fluid flow processes. Shortcuts such as sequential or iterative coupling of two existing solvers will not be sufficient in these difficult cases to localize the deformation and flow. We base our numerical implementation on the physically and thermodynamically consistent mathematical model for fluid flow in porous rocks, taking nonlinear stress dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology into account. The effective permeability used for the Darcy flow is obtained through the nonlinear Karman-Cozeny relation. The model is not restricted by the lithostatic stress assumption, allowing for background stress regime as it occurs in natural conditions. We have developed a fully three-dimensional numerical application based on an iterative finite difference scheme. The application is written in C-CUDA, is enabled for GPU accelerators and is parallelized with MPI to run on multi-GPU clusters. The parallelization on a rectangular grid is straightforward (at each iteration, the boundaries of the local problem are updated by the neighboring processes) and requires no MPI global operations, only MPI point-to-point communication between neighboring processes. This parallelization method should allow by construction for linear weak scaling on any number of processors. Our linearly scaling numerical application predicts the formation of dynamically evolving fluid pathways. These supercomuting applications are vital for resolving actual challenging high-resolution three-dimensional models.

  12. Strongly coupled single-phase flow problems: Effects of density variation, hydrodynamic dispersion, and first order decay

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1995-03-01

    We have developed TOUGH2 modules for strongly coupled flow and transport that include full hydrodynamic dispersion. T2DM models tow-dimensional flow and transport in systems with variable salinity, while T32DMR includes radionuclide transport with first-order decay of a parent-daughter chain of radionuclide components in variable salinity systems. T2DM has been applied to a variety of coupled flow problems including the pure solutal convection problem of Elder and the mixed free and forced convection salt-dome flow problem. In the Elder and salt-dome flow problems, density changes of up to 20% caused by brine concentration variations lead to strong coupling between the velocity and brine concentration fields. T2DM efficiently calculates flow and transport for these problems. We have applied T2DMR to the dispersive transport and decay of radionuclide tracers in flow fields with permeability heterogeneities and recirculating flows. Coupling in these problems occurs by velocity-dependent hydrodynamic dispersion. Our results show that the maximum daughter species concentration may occur fully within a recirculating or low-velocity region. In all of the problems, we observe very efficient handling of the strongly coupled flow and transport processes.

  13. Strongly coupled single-phase flow problems: Effects of density variation, hydrodynamic dispersion, and first order decay

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1995-03-01

    We have developed TOUGH2 modules for strongly coupled flow and transport that include full hydrodynamic dispersion. T2DM models two-dimensional flow and transport in systems with variable salinity, while T2DMR includes radionuclide transport with firstorder decay of a parent-daughter chain of radionuclide components in variable salinity systems. T2DM has been applied to a variety of coupled flow problems including the pure solutal convection problem of Elder and the mixed free and forced convection salt-dome flow problem. In the Elder and salt-dome flow problems, density changes of up to 20% caused by brine concentration variations lead to strong coupling between the velocity and brine concentration fields. T2DM efficiently calculates flow and transport for these problems. We have applied T2DMR to the dispersive transport and decay of radionuclide tracers in flow fields with permeability heterogeneities and recirculating flows. Coupling in th ese problems occurs by velocity-dependent hydrodynamic dispersion. Our results show that the maximum daughter species concentration may occur fully within a recirculating or low-velocity region. In all of the problems, we observe very efficient handling of the strongly coupled flow and transport processes.

  14. Modeling Combustion in Supersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Danehy, Paul M.; Bivolaru, Daniel; Gaffney, Richard L.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress of work to model high-speed supersonic reacting flow. The purpose of the work is to improve the state of the art of CFD capabilities for predicting the flow in high-speed propulsion systems, particularly combustor flow-paths. The program has several components including the development of advanced algorithms and models for simulating engine flowpaths as well as a fundamental experimental and diagnostic development effort to support the formulation and validation of the mathematical models. The paper will provide details of current work on experiments that will provide data for the modeling efforts along with with the associated nonintrusive diagnostics used to collect the data from the experimental flowfield. Simulation of a recent experiment to partially validate the accuracy of a combustion code is also described.

  15. Preserving Flow Variability in Watershed Model Calibrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although watershed modeling flow calibration techniques often emphasize a specific flow mode, ecological conditions that depend on flow-ecology relationships often emphasize a range of flow conditions. We used informal likelihood methods to investig...

  16. Preserving Flow Variability in Watershed Model Calibrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although watershed modeling flow calibration techniques often emphasize a specific flow mode, ecological conditions that depend on flow-ecology relationships often emphasize a range of flow conditions. We used informal likelihood methods to investig...

  17. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  18. Coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a thermoacoustic system with a mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zhao, Dan

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a one dimensional duct in the presence of a mean flow is considered. As acoustic disturbances impinge on a compact heat source enclosed in the duct, entropy disturbances are generated. The transfer function between the generated entropy waves and oncoming flow velocity fluctuations is deduced by conducting order analysis of the linearized governing equations. The effects of the mean flow are emphasized for different forms of unsteady heat release model. It is shown that there is a strong coupling between entropy, heat release, mean flow and acoustic impedance at the heat source. To validate our theoretical analysis, numerical investigation is conducted by using a low order model. Comparing the theoretical and the low order model's results reveals that a good agreement is observed. It is found that when the mean flow Mach number is not negligible, the term of O(M1) in the identified entropy transfer function is as important as that of O(M0). Neglecting the term of O(M1) may lead to wrong prediction of the entropy waves produced in the system.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Bernard P.; Martin, Paul F.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  20. Officer Accessions Flow Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-31

    18]) General Charles Campbell noted that , although…. “the Army has a system for organizing, staffing, equipping, training, deploying, sustaining...Harrell, Charles , Ghosh, Biman K., & Bowden Jr.,Royce O. 2004. Simulation Using ProModel. Second edition. McGraw Hill, New York. [22] Klimas, J...RUNS: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook. U.S. Army War College, Carlisle, PA. [24] McNeill , Dan K. 2005 (August). Army Force Generation

  1. On the coupling of canopy flow to ambient flow for a variety of vegetation types and densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Ronald M.

    1983-08-01

    A canopy flow coupling parameter is defined from earlier canopy flow research to describe the degree of coupling of air flow in vegetation to ambient flow of the surface boundary layer. This ratio concept employs an exponential wind-height relationship in the canopy referenced to the logarithmic wind-height relationship of the ambient air in close proximity to the vegetation interface. Qualitatively, the coupling ratio decreases as the index of canopy flow increases. Numerical criteria are derived to quantify the coupling upwind of the canopy, at the leading edge, through the transition zone, through the zone of established flow, at the trailing edge, and downwind from the canopy domain. It was found that coupling was relatively independent of element density for the more dense arrays, but increased rapidly as densities became more sparsely arrayed. A high degree of coupling existed both upwind and downwind of well-defined domains, while a degeneration of coupling is clearly evident through the zone of established flow. A seasonal contrast in coupling was also discerned. Gravity and slope flows contributed to a higher degree of coupling.

  2. Numerical simulation of gas-phonon coupling in thermal transpiration flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaohui; Singh, Dhruv; Murthy, Jayathi; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2009-10-01

    Thermal transpiration is a rarefied gas flow driven by a wall temperature gradient and is a promising mechanism for gas pumping without moving parts, known as the Knudsen pump. Obtaining temperature measurements along capillary walls in a Knudsen pump is difficult due to extremely small length scales. Meanwhile, simplified analytical models are not applicable under the practical operating conditions of a thermal transpiration device, where the gas flow is in the transitional rarefied regime. Here, we present a coupled gas-phonon heat transfer and flow model to study a closed thermal transpiration system. Discretized Boltzmann equations are solved for molecular transport in the gas phase and phonon transport in the solid. The wall temperature distribution is the direct result of the interfacial coupling based on mass conservation and energy balance at gas-solid interfaces and is not specified a priori unlike in the previous modeling efforts. Capillary length scales of the order of phonon mean free path result in a smaller temperature gradient along the transpiration channel as compared to that predicted by the continuum solid-phase heat transfer. The effects of governing parameters such as thermal gradients, capillary geometry, gas and phonon Knudsen numbers and, gas-surface interaction parameters on the efficiency of thermal transpiration are investigated in light of the coupled model.

  3. Fluid Coupling in a Discrete Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Ni, G.

    2011-11-01

    The interaction between the basilar membrane, BM, dynamics and the fluid coupling in the cochlea can be formulated using a discrete model by assuming that the BM is divided into a number of longitudinal elements. The form of the fluid coupling can then be understood by dividing it into a far field component, due to plane wave acoustic coupling, and a near field component, due to higher order evanescent acoustic modes. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the cross-sectional areas of the fluid chambers can also be accounted for within this formulation. The discrete model is used to calculate the effect on the coupled BM response of a short cochlear implant, which reduces the volume of one of the fluid chambers over about half its length. The passive response of the coupled cochlea at lower frequencies is shown to be almost unaffected by this change in volume.

  4. Higgs couplings in noncommutative Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batebi, S.; Haghighat, M.; Tizchang, S.; Akafzade, H.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the Higgs and Yukawa parts of the Noncommutative Standard Model (NCSM). We explore the NC-action to give all Feynman rules for couplings of the Higgs boson to electroweak gauge fields and fermions.

  5. A Nodal Domain Integration Model of Two-Dimensional Heat and Soil-Water Flow Coupled by Soil-Water Phase Change.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    6. Zienkiewicz, 0. C., The Finite Element Method in Engineering Science, McGraw-Hill, 1977. 7. Ramadhyani, S. and S. V. Patankar, Solution of the...computer model which provides analysis capability for geotechnical engineers involved in cold regions engineering project. The program is designed to...Derivations," Int. Journal tN. Methods in Eng,. (4), 551, (1972). Zienkiewtcz, 0. C., "The Finite Elinet Method in Engineering Science," McGraw-Hill, (1977

  6. Synchronization of chemical noise-sustained structures in asymmetrically coupled differential-flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Izús, Gonzalo G; Sánchez, Alejandro D

    2013-12-01

    The differential-flow-induced chemical instability is investigated in the context of two coupled reactors with cubic autocatalytic kinetics (the Gray-Scott model). Previous results for master-slave arrangement [Izús, Deza, and Sánchez, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 234112 (2010)] are extended in this study to include bidirectional coupling between reactions. Numerical simulations in the convectively unstable regime show that synchronized noise-sustained structures are developed in both reactors due to the selective amplification of noise. A theoretical analysis shows that the nature of the synchronization and the stability of the synchronized manifold are related with the properties of the critical modes.

  7. A coupled multi-physics modeling framework for induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karra, S.; Dempsey, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    There is compelling evidence that moderate-magnitude seismicity in the central and eastern US is on the rise. Many of these earthquakes are attributable to anthropogenic injection of fluids into deep formations resulting in incidents where state regulators have even intervened. Earthquakes occur when a high-pressure fluid (water or CO2) enters a fault, reducing its resistance to shear failure and causing runaway sliding. However, induced seismicity does not manifest as a solitary event, but rather as a sequence of earthquakes evolving in time and space. Additionally, one needs to consider the changes in the permeability due to slip within a fault and the subsequent effects on fluid transport and pressure build-up. A modeling framework that addresses the complex two-way coupling between seismicity and fluid-flow is thus needed. In this work, a new parallel physics-based coupled framework for induced seismicity that couples the slip in faults and fluid flow is presented. The framework couples the highly parallel subsurface flow code PFLOTRAN (www.pflotran.org) and a fast Fourier transform based earthquake simulator QK3. Stresses in the fault are evaluated using Biot's formulation in PFLOTRAN and is used to calculate slip in QK3. Permeability is updated based on the slip in the fault which in turn influences flow. Application of the framework to synthetic examples and datasets from Colorado and Oklahoma will also be discussed.

  8. A fjord-glacier coupled system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés, Eva; Otero, Jaime; Navarro, Francisco; Prominska, Agnieszka; Lapazaran, Javier; Walczowski, Waldemar

    2017-04-01

    With the aim of studying the processes occurring at the front of marine-terminating glaciers, we couple a fjord circulation model with a flowline glacier dynamics model, with subglacial discharge and calving, which allows the calculation of submarine melt and its influence on calving processes. For ocean modelling, we use a general circulation model, MITgcm, to simulate water circulation driven by both fjord conditions and subglacial discharge, and for calculating submarine melt rates at the glacier front. To constrain freshwater input to the fjord, we use estimations from European Arctic Reanalysis (EAR). To determine the optimal values for each run period, we perform a sensitivity analysis of the model to subglacial discharge variability, aimed to get the best fit of model results to observed temperature and salinity profiles in the fjord for each of these periods. Then, we establish initial and boundary fjord conditions, which we vary weekly-fortnightly, and calculate the submarine melt rate as a function of depth at the calving front. These data are entered into the glacier-flow model, Elmer/Ice, which has been added a crevasse-depth calving model, to estimate the glacier terminus position at a weekly time resolution. We focus our study on the Hansbreen Glacier-Hansbukta Fjord system, in Southern Spitsbergen, Svalbard, where a large set of data are available for both glacier and fjord. The bathymetry of the entire system has been determined from ground penetrating radar and sonar data. In the fjord we have got temperature and salinity data from CTDs (May to September, 2010-2014) and from a mooring (September to May, 2011-2012). For Hansbreen, we use glacier surface topography data from the SPIRIT DEM, surface mass balance from EAR, centre line glacier velocities from stake measurements (May 2005-April 2011), weekly terminus positions from time-lapse photos (Sept. 2009-Sept. 2011), and sea-ice concentrations from time-lapse photos and Nimbus-7 SMMR and DMSP SSM

  9. Debris Flow Distributed Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoretti, C.

    The debris flow distributed propagation model is a DEM-based model. The fan is dis- cretized by square cells and each cell is assigned an altitude on the sea level. The cells of the catchment are distinguished in two categories: the source cells and the stripe cells. The source cells receive the input hydograph: the cells close to the torrent which are flooded by the debris flow overflowing the torrent embankment are source cells. The stripes cells are the cells flooded by debris flow coming from the surrounding cells. At the first time step only the source cells are flooded by debris flow coming from the torrent. At the second time step a certain number of cells are flooded by de- bris flow coming from the source cells. These cells constitute a stripe of cells and are assigned order two. At the third time step another group of cells are flooded by the debris flow coming from the cells whose order is two. These cells constitute another stripe and are assigned order three. The cell order of a stripe is the time step number corresponding to the transition from dry to flooded state. The mass transfer or mo- mentum exchange between cells is governed by two different mechanisms. The mass transfer is allowed only by a positive or equal to zero flow level difference between the drained cell and the receiving cell. The mass transfer is limited by a not negative final flow level difference between the drained cell and the receiving cells. This limitation excludes the case of possible oscillations in the mass transfer. Another limitation is that the mass drained by a cell should be less than the available mass in that cell. This last condition provides the respect of mass conservation. The first mechanism of mass transfer is the gravity. The mass in a cell is transferred to the neighbouring cells with lower altitude and flow level according to an uniform flow law: The second mecha- nism of mass transfer is the broad crested weir. The mass in a cell is transferred to the

  10. Modeling flow and solute transport in irrigation furrows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presents an internally coupled flow and solute transport model for free-draining irrigation furrows. Furrow hydraulics is simulated with a numerical zero-inertia model and solute transport is computed with a model based on a numerical solution of the cross-section averaged advection-dispe...

  11. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christian D

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  12. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  13. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghyeon; Cheong, Cheolung; Park, Warn-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k - ɛ turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  14. Comparison of Coupled Radiative Navier-Stokes Flow Solutions with the Project Fire II Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olynick, David R.; Henline, William D.; Chambers, Lin Hartung; Candler, Graham V,; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonequilibrium, axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes flow solver with coupled radiation has been developed to use in the design of thermal protection systems for vehicles where radiation effects are important. The present method has been compared with an existing flow and radiation solver and with the Project Fire II experimental data. Very good agreement has been obtained over the entire Fire II trajectory with the experimentally determined values of the stagnation radiation intensity in the .2 to 6.2 eV range and with the total stagnation heating. The agreement was significantly better than previous numerical predictions. The effects of a number of flow models are examined to determine which combination of physical models produces the best agreement with the experimental data. These models include radiation coupling, multi-temperature thermal models, finite-rate chemistry, and a quasi-steady-state or Boltzmann assumption for the calculation of the excited electronic states. Finally, the computational efficiency of the present model is evaluated. The radiation properties model developed for this study is shown to offer significant computational savings compared to existing codes.

  15. Inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses important fundamental issues of inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows through scaling analysis. In typical point-particle or two-fluid approaches, the fluid motion and convective heat transfer at the particle scale are not resolved and the momentum and energy coupling between fluid and particles are provided by proper closure models. By examining the kinetic energy transfer due to the coupling forces from the macroscale to microscale fluid motion, closure models are obtained for the contributions of the coupling forces to the energy coupling. Due to the inviscid origin of the added-mass force, its contribution to the microscale kinetic energy does not contribute to dissipative transfer to fluid internal energy as was done by the quasi-steady force. Time scale analysis shows that when the particle is larger than a critical diameter, the diffusive-unsteady kernel decays at a time scale that is smaller than the Kolmogorov time scale. As a result, the computationally costly Basset-like integral form of diffusive-unsteady heat transfer can be simplified to a non-integral form. Conventionally, the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is used to evaluate the relative importance of the unsteady heat transfer to the energy balance of the particles. Therefore, for gas-particle flows, where the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is small, unsteady heat transfer is usually ignored. However, the present scaling analysis shows that for small fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio, the importance of the unsteady heat transfer actually depends on the ratio between the particle size and the Kolmogorov scale. Furthermore, the particle mass loading multiplied by the heat capacity ratio is usually used to estimate the importance of the thermal two-way coupling effect. Through scaling argument, improved estimates are established for the energy coupling parameters of each

  16. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC Model is used solely for the validation of the THC

  17. A preferential vibration dissociation coupling model for nonequilibrium flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, David E.; Carlson, Leland A.; Gally, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    A preferential vibration-dissociation coupling model is incorporated into a radiatively coupled viscous shock laver code that also includes chemical, radiative, and thermal nonequilibrium. Stagnation point flow profiles are obtained for various Fire 2 flight conditions and for a typical 14 km/sec AOTV case, and comparisons are made with Fire 2 experimental data. Adjustments in molecular absorption coefficients are also made for several diatomic species. Based on comparisons with experimental data, very little preferential dissociation behavior is present in the Fire 2 flight conditions.

  18. Modeling groundwater flow on MPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Smith, S.G.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1993-10-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media is examined. To enable detailed modeling of large contaminated sites, preconditioned iterative methods and massively parallel computing power are combined in a simulator called PARFLOW. After describing this portable and modular code, some numerical results are given, including one that demonstrates the code`s scalability.

  19. Numerical simulation of biofilm growth in flow channels using a cellular automaton approach coupled with a macro flow computation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Ueda, Shuya

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm is a slime-like complex aggregate of microorganisms and their products, extracellular polymer substances, that grows on a solid surface. The growth phenomenon of biofilm is relevant to the corrosion and clogging of water pipes, the chemical processes in a bioreactor, and bioremediation. In these phenomena, the behavior of the biofilm under flow has an important role. Therefore, controlling the biofilm behavior in each process is important. To provide a computational tool for analyzing biofilm growth, the present study proposes a computational model for the simulation of biofilm growth in flows. This model accounts for the growth, decay, detachment and adhesion of biofilms. The proposed model couples the computation of the surrounding fluid flow, using the finite volume method, with the simulation of biofilm growth, using the cellular automaton approach, a relatively low-computational-cost method. Furthermore, a stochastic approach for considering the adhesion process is proposed. Numerical simulations for the biofilm growth on a planar wall and that in an L-shaped rectangular channel were carried out. A variety of biofilm structures were observed depending on the strength of the flow. Moreover, the importance of the detachment and adhesion processes was confirmed.

  20. Turbulence modeling for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Material prepared for a course on Applications and Fundamentals of Turbulence given at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, January 10 and 11, 1977, is presented. A complete concept of turbulence modeling is described, and examples of progess for its use in computational aerodynimics are given. Modeling concepts, experiments, and computations using the concepts are reviewed in a manner that provides an up-to-date statement on the status of this problem for compressible flows.

  1. A coupled Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows through moving porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepona, Marianna; Favier, Julien

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we propose a numerical framework to simulate fluid flows in interaction with moving porous media of complex geometry. It is based on the Lattice Boltzmann method including porous effects via a Brinkman-Forchheimer-Darcy force model coupled to the Immersed Boundary method to handle complex geometries and moving structures. The coupling algorithm is described in detail and it is validated on well-established literature test cases for both stationary and moving porous configurations. The proposed method is easy to implement and efficient in terms of CPU cost and memory management compared to alternative methods which can be used to deal with moving immersed porous media, e.g. re-meshing at each time step or use of a moving/chimera mesh. An overall good agreement was obtained with reference results, opening the way to the numerical simulation of moving porous media for flow control applications.

  2. A Boundary Condition Relaxation Algorithm for Strongly Coupled, Ablating Flows Including Shape Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2011-01-01

    Implementations of a model for equilibrium, steady-state ablation boundary conditions are tested for the purpose of providing strong coupling with a hypersonic flow solver. The objective is to remove correction factors or film cooling approximations that are usually applied in coupled implementations of the flow solver and the ablation response. Three test cases are considered - the IRV-2, the Galileo probe, and a notional slender, blunted cone launched at 10 km/s from the Earth's surface. A successive substitution is employed and the order of succession is varied as a function of surface temperature to obtain converged solutions. The implementation is tested on a specified trajectory for the IRV-2 to compute shape change under the approximation of steady-state ablation. Issues associated with stability of the shape change algorithm caused by explicit time step limits are also discussed.

  3. Electro-osmotic flow of couple stress fluids in a micro-channel propagated by peristalsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Yadav, Ashu; Anwar Bég, O.

    2017-04-01

    A mathematical model is developed for electro-osmotic peristaltic pumping of a non-Newtonian liquid in a deformable micro-channel. Stokes' couple stress fluid model is employed to represent realistic working liquids. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation for electric potential distribution is implemented owing to the presence of an electrical double layer (EDL) in the micro-channel. Using long wavelength, lubrication theory and Debye-Huckel approximations, the linearized transformed dimensionless boundary value problem is solved analytically. The influence of electro-osmotic parameter (inversely proportional to Debye length), maximum electro-osmotic velocity (a function of external applied electrical field) and couple stress parameter on axial velocity, volumetric flow rate, pressure gradient, local wall shear stress and stream function distributions is evaluated in detail with the aid of graphs. The Newtonian fluid case is retrieved as a special case with vanishing couple stress effects. With increasing the couple stress parameter there is a significant increase in the axial pressure gradient whereas the core axial velocity is reduced. An increase in the electro-osmotic parameter both induces flow acceleration in the core region (around the channel centreline) and it also enhances the axial pressure gradient substantially. The study is relevant in the simulation of novel smart bio-inspired space pumps, chromatography and medical micro-scale devices.

  4. Dual coupling effective band model for polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Dominic J. J.; Stamp, Philip C. E.; Berciu, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Nondiagonal couplings to a bosonic bath completely change polaronic dynamics, from the usual diagonally coupled paradigm of smoothly varying properties. We study, using analytic and numerical methods, a model having both diagonal Holstein and nondiagonal Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) couplings. The critical coupling found previously in the pure SSH model, at which the k =0 effective mass diverges, now becomes a transition line in the coupling constant plane—the form of the line depends on the adiabaticity parameter. Detailed results are given for the quasiparticle and ground-state properties, over a wide range of couplings and adiabaticity ratios. The new paradigm involves a destabilization, at the transition line, of the simple Holstein polaron to one with a finite ground-state momentum, but with everywhere a continuously evolving band shape. No "self-trapping transition" exists in any of these models. The physics may be understood entirely in terms of competition between different hopping terms in a simple renormalized effective band theory. The possibility of further transitions is suggested by the results.

  5. Modelling water flow under glaciers and ice sheets

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Gwenn E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of dynamic water systems beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have sparked renewed interest in modelling subglacial drainage. The foundations of today's models were laid decades ago, inspired by measurements from mountain glaciers, discovery of the modern ice streams and the study of landscapes evacuated by former ice sheets. Models have progressed from strict adherence to the principles of groundwater flow, to the incorporation of flow ‘elements’ specific to the subglacial environment, to sophisticated two-dimensional representations of interacting distributed and channelized drainage. Although presently in a state of rapid development, subglacial drainage models, when coupled to models of ice flow, are now able to reproduce many of the canonical phenomena that characterize this coupled system. Model calibration remains generally out of reach, whereas widespread application of these models to large problems and real geometries awaits the next level of development. PMID:27547082

  6. Modelling water flow under glaciers and ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Gwenn E

    2015-04-08

    Recent observations of dynamic water systems beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have sparked renewed interest in modelling subglacial drainage. The foundations of today's models were laid decades ago, inspired by measurements from mountain glaciers, discovery of the modern ice streams and the study of landscapes evacuated by former ice sheets. Models have progressed from strict adherence to the principles of groundwater flow, to the incorporation of flow 'elements' specific to the subglacial environment, to sophisticated two-dimensional representations of interacting distributed and channelized drainage. Although presently in a state of rapid development, subglacial drainage models, when coupled to models of ice flow, are now able to reproduce many of the canonical phenomena that characterize this coupled system. Model calibration remains generally out of reach, whereas widespread application of these models to large problems and real geometries awaits the next level of development.

  7. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Thomas; Efendiev, Yalchin; Tchelepi, Hamdi; Durlofsky, Louis

    2016-05-24

    Our work in this project is aimed at making fundamental advances in multiscale methods for flow and transport in highly heterogeneous porous media. The main thrust of this research is to develop a systematic multiscale analysis and efficient coarse-scale models that can capture global effects and extend existing multiscale approaches to problems with additional physics and uncertainties. A key emphasis is on problems without an apparent scale separation. Multiscale solution methods are currently under active investigation for the simulation of subsurface flow in heterogeneous formations. These procedures capture the effects of fine-scale permeability variations through the calculation of specialized coarse-scale basis functions. Most of the multiscale techniques presented to date employ localization approximations in the calculation of these basis functions. For some highly correlated (e.g., channelized) formations, however, global effects are important and these may need to be incorporated into the multiscale basis functions. Other challenging issues facing multiscale simulations are the extension of existing multiscale techniques to problems with additional physics, such as compressibility, capillary effects, etc. In our project, we explore the improvement of multiscale methods through the incorporation of additional (single-phase flow) information and the development of a general multiscale framework for flows in the presence of uncertainties, compressible flow and heterogeneous transport, and geomechanics. We have considered (1) adaptive local-global multiscale methods, (2) multiscale methods for the transport equation, (3) operator-based multiscale methods and solvers, (4) multiscale methods in the presence of uncertainties and applications, (5) multiscale finite element methods for high contrast porous media and their generalizations, and (6) multiscale methods for geomechanics.

  8. An Appraisal of Coupled Climate Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K; Gleckler, P; Covey, C; Taylor, K; Bader, D; Phillips, T; Fiorino, M; Achutarao, K

    2004-02-24

    In 2002, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) proposed the concept for a state-of-the-science appraisal of climate models to be performed approximately every two years. Motivation for this idea arose from the perceived needs of the international modeling groups and the broader climate research community to document progress more frequently than provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Reports. A committee of external reviewers, which included senior researchers from four leading international modeling centers, supported the concept by stating in its review: ''The panel enthusiastically endorses the suggestion that PCMDI develop an independent appraisal of coupled model performance every 2-3 years. This would provide a useful 'mid-course' evaluation of modeling progress in the context of larger IPCC and national assessment activities, and should include both coupled and single-component model evaluations.''

  9. Gradient flow running coupling in SU(2) gauge theory with Nf=8 fundamental flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Viljami; Rantaharju, Jarno; Rantalaiho, Teemu; Rummukainen, Kari; Suorsa, Joni; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2017-06-01

    We study the evolution of the coupling in SU(2) gauge field theory with Nf=8 fundamental fermion flavors on the lattice. This model is expected to have an infrared fixed point at high coupling. We use HEX-smeared Wilson-clover action, and measure the gradient flow running coupling with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Extrapolating our results to continuum, we find an infrared fixed point at g*2=8.24 (59 )-1.64+0.97 , with statistical and systematic error estimates. We also measure the anomalous dimension of the quark mass operator, and find its value at the fixed point γ*≃0.15 ±0.02 , although for this quantity a reliable continuum limit is still lacking.

  10. On a multigrid method for the coupled Stokes and porous media flow problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, P.; Rodrigo, C.; Gaspar, F. J.; Oosterlee, C. W.

    2017-07-01

    The multigrid solution of coupled porous media and Stokes flow problems is considered. The Darcy equation as the saturated porous medium model is coupled to the Stokes equations by means of appropriate interface conditions. We focus on an efficient multigrid solution technique for the coupled problem, which is discretized by finite volumes on staggered grids, giving rise to a saddle point linear system. Special treatment is required regarding the discretization at the interface. An Uzawa smoother is employed in multigrid, which is a decoupled procedure based on symmetric Gauss-Seidel smoothing for velocity components and a simple Richardson iteration for the pressure field. Since a relaxation parameter is part of a Richardson iteration, Local Fourier Analysis (LFA) is applied to determine the optimal parameters. Highly satisfactory multigrid convergence is reported, and, moreover, the algorithm performs well for small values of the hydraulic conductivity and fluid viscosity, that are relevant for applications.

  11. A coupled chemical burster: The chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction in two flow reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnik, Milos; Epstein, Irving R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction has been studied in a system consisting of two continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The reactors are coupled by computer monitoring of the electrochemical potential in each reactor, which is then used to control the input into the other reactor. Two forms of coupling are employed: reciprocally triggered, exponentially decreasing stimulation, and alternating mass exchange. The reaction, which exhibits oscillatory and excitable behavior in a single CSTR, displays neuronlike bursting behavior with both forms of coupling. Reciprocal stimulation yields bursting in both reactors, while with alternating mass exchange, bursting is observed in one reactor and complex oscillation in the other. A simple model of the reaction gives good agreement between the experimental observations and numerical simulations.

  12. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  13. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  14. Modelling the Auroral Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling System at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunce, E. J.; Cowley, S.; Provan, G.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system at Jupiter is a topic of central significance in understanding the fundamental properties of its large-scale plasma environment. Theoretical discussion of this topic typically considers the properties of the field-aligned current systems that form part of a large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system associated with momentum exchange between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, communicated via the magnetic field. The current system associated with the main oval is believed to be related to centrifugally-driven outward radial transport of iogenic plasma that leads to sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere. In addition to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system, upward-directed field-aligned currents may flow at the open-closed field line boundary due to the shear between outer closed field lines and open field lines, which may relate to emission poleward of the main oval. An axi-symmetric model of the plasma flow in the jovian system, the related coupling currents, and the consequent auroral precipitation based on these combined ideas was initially devised to represent typical steady-state conditions for the system and later extended to consider auroral effects resulting from sudden compressions of the magnetosphere. More recently, the model has been extended along model magnetic field lines into the magnetosphere in order to relate them to in situ observations from the NASA Juno spacecraft at Jupiter. The field-aligned coupling currents associated with the modelled current systems produce a readily-observable azimuthal field signature that bends the field lines out of magnetic meridians. Here we show the computed azimuthal fields produced by our model auroral current system throughout the region between the ionosphere and the magnetic equator, and illustrate the results by evaluation of various model parameters (e.g. field-aligned current density, accelerating voltages, accelerated

  15. Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Seasonally Frozen Soils with Snow Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Kasurak, A.; Kelly, R. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Derksen, C.

    2011-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Separate equations are used to describe both unsaturated and saturated soil water flow. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from an existing laboratory soil column freezing experiment and an ongoing field experiment in a high-elevation rangeland soil. A dimensionless impedance factor describing the effect of ice pore blocking on soil hydraulic conductivity is treated as a calibration parameter for both cases. Calculated values of total water content for the laboratory soil column freezing experiment compare well with measured values, especially during the early stages of the experiment, as is also found by others. Modeling statistics for the rangeland field experiment show varied performance for soil water content and excellent performance for soil temperature, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  16. Coupled Water Flow and Heat Transport in Seasonally Frozen Soils with Snow Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kelleners, T.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model is developed to calculate coupled water flow and heat transport in seasonally frozen soil and snow. Separate equations are used to describe both unsaturated and saturated soil water flow. The effect of dissolved ions on soil water freezing point depression is included by combining an expression for osmotic head with the Clapeyron equation and the van Genuchten soil water retention function. The coupled water flow and heat transport equations are solved using the Thomas algorithm and Picard iteration. Ice pressure is always assumed zero and frost heave is neglected. The new model is tested using data from an existing laboratory soil column freezing experiment and an ongoing field experiment in a high-elevation rangeland soil. A dimensionless impedance factor describing the effect of ice pore blocking on soil hydraulic conductivity is treated as a calibration parameter for both cases. Calculated values of total water content for the laboratory soil column freezing experiment compare well with measured values, especially during the early stages of the experiment, as is also found by others. Modeling statistics for the rangeland field experiment show varied performance for soil water content and excellent performance for soil temperature, in accordance with earlier results with an older version of the model.

  17. Systematics of Coupling Flows in AdS Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2003-03-18

    We give an effective field theory derivation, based on the running of Planck brane gauge correlators, of the large logarithms that arise in the predictions for low energy gauge couplings in compactified AdS}_5 backgrounds, including the one-loop effects of bulk scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons. In contrast to the case of charged scalars coupled to Abelian gauge fields that has been considered previously in the literature, the one-loop corrections are not dominated by a single 4D Kaluza-Klein mode. Nevertheless, in the case of gauge field loops, the amplitudes can be reorganized into a leading logarithmic contribution that is identical to the running in 4D non-Abelian gauge theory, and a term which is not logarithmically enhanced and is analogous to a two-loop effect in 4D. In a warped GUT model broken by the Higgs mechanism in the bulk,we show that the matching scale that appears in the large logarithms induced by the non-Abelian gauge fields is m_{XY}^2/k where m_{XY} is the bulk mass of the XY bosons and k is the AdS curvature. This is in contrast to the UV scale in the logarithmic contributions of scalars, which is simply the bulk mass m. Our results are summarized in a set of simple rules that can be applied to compute the leading logarithmic predictions for coupling constant relations within a given warped GUT model. We present results for both bulk Higgs and boundary breaking of the GUT gauge

  18. Systematics of coupling flows in AdS backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2003-12-01

    We give an effective field theory derivation, based on the running of Planck brane gauge correlators, of the large logarithms that arise in the predictions for low energy gauge couplings in compactified AdS5 backgrounds, including the one-loop effects of bulk scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons. In contrast with the case of charged scalars coupled to Abelian gauge fields that has been considered previously in the literature, the one-loop corrections are not dominated by a single 4D Kaluza-Klein mode. Nevertheless, in the case of gauge field loops, the amplitudes can be reorganized into a leading logarithmic contribution that is identical to the running in 4D non-Abelian gauge theory, and a term which is not logarithmically enhanced and is analogous to a two-loop effect in 4D. In a warped grand unified theory (GUT) model broken by the Higgs mechanism in the bulk, we show that the matching scale that appears in the large logarithms induced by the non-Abelian gauge fields is m2XY/k where mXY is the bulk mass of the XY bosons and k is the AdS curvature. This is in contrast with the UV scale in the logarithmic contributions of scalars, which is simply the bulk mass m. Our results are summarized in a set of simple rules that can be applied to compute the leading logarithmic predictions for coupling constant relations within a given warped GUT model. We present results for both boundary breaking of the GUT gauge group and bulk breaking through the Higgs mechanism.

  19. Development of a coupled pathogen-hydrologic catchment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydon, S.; Deletic, A.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryLarge numbers of pathogens can be mobilised from drinking water catchments during wet weather causing serious problems in management of water treatment plants. This paper presents an attempt to model pathogen discharges from large catchments. Two conceptual continuous pathogen models have been developed and evaluated using E. coli as a pathogen indicator. The first model, the EG model, describes surface and subsurface pathogen transport processes by means of wash-off and loss equations. It is coupled to an existing hydrologic model (SimHyd) that predicts flows. The second model, named ASP, takes into account only surface pathogen transport processes. It is coupled to a stormflow-baseflow separation model, and therefore is simpler than EG. The models have been tested against baseflow and storm event E. coli concentrations measured at three dissimilar catchments from southern Australia. The prediction of pathogen peak concentrations by the EG model was reasonably good; the coefficient of correlation between the measured and modelled pathogen peaks for all three catchments was r2 = 0.93. However, the ASP model was not able to model the peaks well ( r2 = 0.54). The prediction of pathogen loads was significantly better with r2 = 0.95 for the EG model and r2 = 0.89 for the ASP model. It was concluded that a slightly more complex EG model was performing better than the oversimplified ASP model.

  20. Asymmetrical Flow-Field-Flow Fractionation coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the analysis of gold nanoparticles in the presence of natural nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Meisterjahn, Boris; Neubauer, Elisabeth; Von der Kammer, Frank; Hennecke, Dieter; Hofmann, Thilo

    2014-11-03

    Flow-Field-Flow Fractionation (Flow-FFF), coupled with online detection systems, is one of the most promising tools available for the analysis and characterization of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in complex matrices. In order to demonstrate the applicability of Flow-FFF for the detection, quantification, and characterization of engineered gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), model dispersions were prepared containing AuNPs with diameters of 30 or 100nm, natural nanoparticles (NNPs) extracted from a soil sample, and different concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), which were then used to investigate interactions between the AuNPs and the NNPs. It could be shown that light scattering detection can be used to evaluate the fractionation performance of the pure NNPs, but not the fractionation performance of the mixed samples that also contained AuNPs because of specific interactions between the AuNPs and the laser light. A combination of detectors (i.e. light absorbance and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) was found to be useful for differentiating between heteroaggregation and homoaggregation of the nanoparticles (NPs). The addition of NOM to samples containing 30nm AuNPs stabilized the AuNPs without affecting the NP size distribution. However, fractograms for samples with no added NOM showed a change in the size distribution, suggesting interactions between the AuNPs and NNPs. This interpretation was supported by unchanged light absorption wavelengths for the AuNPs. In contrast, results for samples containing 100nm AuNPs were inconclusive with respect to recovery and size distributions because of problems with the separation system that probably related to the size and high density of these nanoparticles, highlighting the need for extensive method optimization strategies, even for nanoparticles of the same material but different sizes.

  1. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  2. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, A.; Kotsalis, E. M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  3. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, A; Kotsalis, E M; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  4. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  5. A hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics coupled model for evaluating bioreactors derived from CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2010-12-01

    Investigating how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. Traditional methods used to investigate flow-field cannot meet this challenge accurately and economically. Hydrodynamics model can solve this problem, but to understand a bioreactor in sufficient depth, it is often insufficient. In this paper, a coupled hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics model was formulated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate a gas-liquid-solid three-phase biotreatment system for the first time. The hydrodynamics model is used to formulate prediction of the flow field and the reaction kinetics model then portrays the reaction conversion process. The coupled model is verified and used to simulate the behavior of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production. The flow patterns were visualized and analyzed. The coupled model also demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production. The advantages and limitations of applying this coupled model are discussed.

  6. MICROSCALE FLOW INJECTION AND MICROBORE HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATORGRAPHY COUPLED WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY VIA A HIGH-EFFICIENCY NEBULIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high-effeciency nebulizer has been used for coupling microscale flow injection and microbore high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The microscale flow injection system was configured to minimize band broadening between...

  7. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  8. Sensitivity of neural-hemodynamic coupling to alterations in cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Jones, Phill B.; Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K.; Teng, Ivan C.; Dale, Anders M.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between measurements of cerebral blood oxygenation and neuronal activity is highly complex and depends on both neurovascular and neurometabolic biological coupling. While measurements of blood oxygenation changes via optical and MRI techniques have been developed to map functional brain activity, there is evidence that the specific characteristics of these signals are sensitive to the underlying vascular physiology and structure of the brain. Since baseline blood flow and oxygen saturation may vary between sessions and across subjects, functional blood oxygenation changes may be a less reliable indicator of brain activity in comparison to blood flow and metabolic changes. In this work, we use a biomechanical model to examine the relationships between neural, vascular, metabolic, and hemodynamic responses to parametric whisker stimulation under both normal and hypercapnic conditions in a rat model. We find that the relationship between neural activity and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin changes is sensitive to hypercapnia-induced changes in baseline cerebral blood flow. In contrast, the underlying relationships between evoked neural activity, blood flow, and model-estimated oxygen metabolism changes are unchanged by the hypercapnic challenge. We conclude that evoked changes in blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism are more closely associated with underlying evoked neuronal responses. PMID:19725749

  9. Sensitivity of neural-hemodynamic coupling to alterations in cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Jones, Phill B.; Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K.; Teng, Ivan C.; Dale, Anders M.; Boas, David A.

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between measurements of cerebral blood oxygenation and neuronal activity is highly complex and depends on both neurovascular and neurometabolic biological coupling. While measurements of blood oxygenation changes via optical and MRI techniques have been developed to map functional brain activity, there is evidence that the specific characteristics of these signals are sensitive to the underlying vascular physiology and structure of the brain. Since baseline blood flow and oxygen saturation may vary between sessions and across subjects, functional blood oxygenation changes may be a less reliable indicator of brain activity in comparison to blood flow and metabolic changes. In this work, we use a biomechanical model to examine the relationships between neural, vascular, metabolic, and hemodynamic responses to parametric whisker stimulation under both normal and hypercapnic conditions in a rat model. We find that the relationship between neural activity and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin changes is sensitive to hypercapnia-induced changes in baseline cerebral blood flow. In contrast, the underlying relationships between evoked neural activity, blood flow, and model-estimated oxygen metabolism changes are unchanged by the hypercapnic challenge. We conclude that evoked changes in blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism are more closely associated with underlying evoked neuronal responses.

  10. Coupling Between Flow and Precipitation in Heterogeneous Subsurface Environments and Effects On Contaminant Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Redden, George D.; Yoshiko Fujita; Scheibe, Tim; Smith, Robert; Reddy, Michael; Kelly, Shelly

    2006-06-01

    Reactive mixing fronts can occur at large scales, e.g. when chemical amendments are injected in wells, or at small scales (pore-scales) when reactive intermediates are being generated in situ at grain boundaries, cell surfaces and adjacent to biofilms. The product of the reactions such as mineral precipitates, biofilms or filtered colloids modifies permeability leading to the complex coupling between flow and reactions and precipitation. The objectives are to determine how precipitates are distributed within large and small scale mixing fronts, how permeability and flow is modified by precipitation, how the mobility of a representative contaminant, strontium, is affected by the precipitation of carbonates, and how subsequent dissolution of the carbonates result in mobilization of Sr and increased flow. The desired outcomes of the project are to help develop methods leading to sequestration of metal contaminants, and to determine how macroscopic field-scale modeling can be applied to predict the outcome of remediation activities.

  11. Vortical Inviscid Flows with Two-Way Solid-Fluid Coupling.

    PubMed

    Vines, Mauricio; Houston, Ben; Lang, Jochen; Lee, Won-Sook

    2013-06-21

    Vortex methods increasingly receive attention from the computer graphics community for simple and direct modeling of complex flow phenomena such as turbulence. The coupling between free-form solids, represented by arbitrary surface meshes, and fluids simulated with vortex methods, leads to visually rich simulations. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for simulating the interaction between solids and inviscid fluids for high-quality simulations using Lagrangian vortex particles. The key aspect of our method is simulating the creation of vorticity at a solid's surface. While previous vortex simulators only focus on modeling the solid as a boundary for the fluid, our approach allows the accurate simulation of two processes of visual interest. The first is the introduction of surface vorticity in the main flow as turbulence (vortex shedding). The second is the motion of the solid induced by fluid forces. Lastly, we introduce to computer graphics the concept of source panels to model non-turbulent flow around objects. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work on two-way coupling of 3D solids and fluids using Lagrangian vortex methods in computer graphics.

  12. Vortical inviscid flows with two-way solid-fluid coupling.

    PubMed

    Vines, Mauricio; Houston, Ben; Lang, Jochen; Lee, Won-Sook

    2014-02-01

    Vortex methods increasingly receive attention from the computer graphics community for simple and direct modeling of complex flow phenomena such as turbulence. The coupling between free-form solids, represented by arbitrary surface meshes, and fluids simulated with vortex methods, leads to visually rich simulations. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for simulating the interaction between solids and inviscid fluids for high-quality simulations using Lagrangian vortex particles. The key aspect of our method is simulating the creation of vorticity at a solid's surface. While previous vortex simulators only focus on modeling the solid as a boundary for the fluid, our approach allows the accurate simulation of two processes of visual interest. The first is the introduction of surface vorticity in the main flow as turbulence (vortex shedding). The second is the motion of the solid induced by fluid forces. We also introduce to computer graphics the concept of source panels to model nonturbulent flow around objects. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work on two-way coupling of 3D solids and fluids using Lagrangian vortex methods in computer graphics.

  13. Notes from 1999 on computational algorithm of the Local Wave-Vector (LWV) model for the dynamical evolution of the second-rank velocity correlation tensor starting from the mean-flow-coupled Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zemach, Charles; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-14

    These notes present an account of the Local Wave Vector (LWV) model of a turbulent flow defined throughout physical space. The previously-developed Local Wave Number (LWN) model is taken as a point of departure. Some general properties of turbulent fields and appropriate notation are given first. The LWV model is presently restricted to incompressible flows and the incompressibility assumption is introduced at an early point in the discussion. The assumption that the turbulence is homogeneous is also introduced early on. This assumption can be relaxed by generalizing the space diffusion terms of LWN, but the present discussion is focused on a modeling of homogeneous turbulence.

  14. Coupled surface-water and ground-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1991-01-01

    In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well connected ground-water and surface-water systems, it is desirable that stream-aquifer interaction be simulated with models of equal sophistication and accuracy. Accordingly, a new, coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water model and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate flow in open-channel networks. Because time steps used in ground-water modeling commonly are much longer than those used in surface-water simulations, provision has been made for handling multiple BRANCH time steps within one MODFLOW time step. Verification testing of the coupled model was done using data from previous studies and by comparing results with output from a simpler four-point implicit open-channel flow model linked with MODFLOW.

  15. A coupling concept for two-phase compositional porous-medium and single-phase compositional free flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Baber, K.; Flemisch, B.; Helmig, R.; Leijnse, A.; Rybak, I.; Wohlmuth, B.

    2011-10-01

    Domains composed of a porous part and an adjacent free-flow region are of special interest in many fields of application. So far, the coupling of free flow with porous-media flow has been considered only for single-phase systems. Here we extend this classical concept to two-component nonisothermal flow with two phases inside the porous medium and one phase in the free-flow region. The mathematical modeling of flow and transport phenomena in porous media is often based on Darcy's law, whereas in free-flow regions the (Navier-) -Stokes equations are used. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the employed subdomain models. The main contribution is the developed coupling concept, which is able to deal with compositional (miscible) flow and a two-phase system in the porous medium. It is based on the continuity of fluxes and the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium, and uses the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition. The phenomenological explanations leading to a simple, solvable model, which accounts for the physics at the interface, are laid out in detail. Our model can account for evaporation and condensation processes at the interface and is used to model evaporation from soil influenced by a wind field in a first numerical example.

  16. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jin

    2007-01-01

    force networks. This algorithm provides a possible route to constructing a continuum model with microstructural information supplied from it. Microstructures in gas fluidized beds are also analyzed using a hybrid method, which couples the discrete element method (DEM) for particle dynamics with the averaged two-fluid (TF) equations for the gas phase. Multi-particle contacts are found in defluidized regions away from bubbles in fluidized beds. The multi-particle contacts invalidate the binary-collision assumption made in the kinetic theory of granular flows for the defluidized regions. Large ratios of contact forces to drag forces are found in the same regions, which confirms the relative importance of contact forces in determining particle dynamics in the defluidized regions.

  17. Energy flow model for thin plate considering fluid loading with mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ju-Bum; Hong, Suk-Yoon; Song, Jee-Hun

    2012-11-01

    Energy Flow Analysis (EFA) has been developed to predict the vibration energy density of system structures in the high frequency range. This paper develops the energy flow model for the thin plate in contact with mean flow. The pressure generated by mean flow affects energy governing equation and power reflection-transmission coefficients between plates. The fluid pressure is evaluated by using velocity potential and Bernoulli's equation, and energy governing equations are derived by considering the flexural wavenumbers of a plate, which are different along the direction of flexural wave and mean flow. The derived energy governing equation is composed of two kinds of group velocities. To verify the developed energy flow model, various numerical analyses are performed for a simple plate and a coupled plate for several excitation frequencies. The EFA results are compared with the analytical solutions, and correlations between the EFA results and the analytical solutions are verified.

  18. Characterization of flow pattern transitions for horizontal liquid-liquid pipe flows by using multi-scale distribution entropy in coupled 3D phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Zong, Yan-Bo; Wang, Hong-Mei; Yan, Cong; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal oil-water two-phase flows often exist in many industrial processes. Uncovering the dynamic mechanism of the flow pattern transition is of great significance for modeling the flow parameters. In this study we propose a method called multi-scale distribution entropy (MSDE) in a coupled 3D phase space, and use it to characterize the flow pattern transitions in horizontal oil-water two-phase flows. Firstly, the proposed MSDE is validated with Lorenz system and ARFIMA processes. Interestingly, it is found that the MSDE is dramatically associated with the cross-correlations of the coupled time series. Then, through conducting the experiment of horizontal oil-water two-phase flows, the upstream and downstream flow information is collected using a conductance cross-correlation velocity probe. The coupled cross-correlated signals are investigated using the MSDE method, and the results indicate that the MSDE is an effective tool uncovering the complex dynamic behaviors of flow pattern transitions.

  19. Coupling TOUGH2 with CLM3: Developing a Coupled Land Surface andSubsurface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2006-05-19

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions among atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys to understanding the water cycling system that supports life on earth. The inherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures among subsystems make such interactions difficult to simulate. In this paper, we present a model that simulates the land surface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing. This model combines a state-of-the-art land-surface model, the NCAR Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variably saturated groundwater model, TOUGH2, through an internal interface that includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels. Specifically, TOUGH2 uses infiltration, evaporation, and root-uptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms in its simulation; CLM3 uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles, calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables in its simulation. This new model, CLMT2, preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state-of-the-art modeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes (including snow, runoff, freezing/melting, evapotranspiration, radiation, and biophysiological processes) from CLM3 and the more realistic physical-process-based modeling capability of subsurface hydrologic processes (including heterogeneity, three-dimensional flow, seamless combining of unsaturated and saturated zone, and water table) from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulation results show that the coupled model greatly improved the predictions of the groundwater table, evapotranspiration, and surface temperature at a real watershed, as evaluated using 18 years of observed data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with an atmospheric simulation model, to form one of the first top of the atmosphere to deep groundwater atmosphere-land-surface-subsurface models.

  20. Experimental Study of Shock-train/Combustion Coupling and Flame Dynamics in a Heated Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotia, Matthew Leonard

    Isolator/combustor interactions are measured in a direct-connect dual-mode ramjet-scramjet experiment. An operating point approach is used to create a mapping of the coupling effects between the isolator geometry, inlet flow conditions and fuel injector behavior. The resulting isolator/injector coupling map provides a description of the response of the isolator to particular injector performance, and the effective blockage it induces on the isolator flow. Existing models and correlations predicting the pressure rise across a pseudo-shock, and its resultant length, were evaluated through comparison with measurements made in a heated-flow isolator duct that is coupled to a hydrogen-air combustor. The observation of a normal-to-oblique shock-train transition mechanism has lead to the development of a revised shock-train operating regime description that takes into account the impact of Mach number and maximum pressure recovery on the shock configurations present in the isolator. The behavior of a ram-scram transition was examined along with pressure measurements and high-speed laser interferometry. The work quantifies the sudden change in the wall static pressure profile and flame position that occurs as the downstream boundary condition abruptly changes when the flow becomes unchoked. Transition was studied in three ways; as a quasi-steady phenomenon, or as caused by rapid variations in either fuel flow-rate or test-section wall temperature. A regime diagram was measured that plots the ram-scram transition boundary. Under certain conditions some periodic low-frequency oscillations of the flame position occur and they are shown to be correlated with oscillations of the upstream pre-combustion pseudo-shock. A self-sustaining shear-layer instability, associated with the flameholding cavity, is identified as the mechanism perpetuating this behavior. The relevant time scales associated with the ram-scram transition and the flame-shock interactions are discussed.

  1. Mass functions in coupled dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Mainini, Roberto; Bonometto, Silvio

    2006-08-15

    We evaluate the mass function of virialized halos, by using Press and Schechter (PS) and/or Steth and Tormen (ST) expressions, for cosmologies where dark energy (DE) is due to a scalar self-interacting field, coupled with dark matter (DM). We keep to coupled DE (cDE) models known to fit linear observables. To implement the PS-ST approach, we start from reviewing and extending the results of a previous work on the growth of a spherical top-hat fluctuation in cDE models, confirming their most intriguing astrophysical feature, i.e. a significant baryon-DM segregation, occurring well before the onset of any hydrodynamical effect. Accordingly, the predicted mass function depends on how halo masses are measured. For any option, however, the coupling causes a distortion of the mass function, still at z=0. Furthermore, the z-dependence of cDE mass functions is mostly displaced, in respect to {lambda}CDM, in the opposite way of uncoupled dynamical DE. This is an aspect of the basic underlying result, that even a little DM-DE coupling induces relevant modifications in the nonlinear evolution. Therefore, without causing great shifts in linear astrophysical observables, the DM-baryon segregation induced by the coupling can have an impact on a number of cosmological problems, e.g., galaxy satellite abundance, spiral disk formation, apparent baryon shortage, entropy input in clusters, etc.

  2. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  3. An improved pore-network model including viscous coupling effects using direct simulation by the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chiyu; Raeini, Ali Q.; Wang, Yihang; Blunt, Martin J.; Wang, Moran

    2017-02-01

    Viscous coupling during simultaneous flow of different fluid phases has a significant impact on their flow through porous media. In this work, a new multiscale strategy is proposed for multiphase flow in porous media. We use the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to simulate two-phase flow at pore scale and obtain empirical terms for the viscous coupling inside individual pores. The empirical coupling terms are then used in a pore-network model to efficiently simulate two-phase flow through porous media at core scale. It is shown that including viscous coupling leads to better predictions of relative permeability.

  4. Subgrid modelling for geophysical flows.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Jorgen S; O'Kane, Terence J; Zidikheri, Meelis J

    2013-01-13

    Recently developed closure-based and stochastic model approaches to subgrid-scale modelling of eddy interactions are reviewed. It is shown how statistical dynamical closure models can be used to self-consistently calculate the eddy damping and stochastic backscatter parameters, required in large eddy simulations (LESs), from higher resolution simulations. A closely related direct stochastic modelling scheme that is more generally applicable to complex models is then described and applied to LESs of quasi-geostrophic turbulence of the atmosphere and oceans. The fundamental differences between atmospheric and oceanic LESs, which are related to the difference in the deformation scales in the two classes of flows, are discussed. It is noted that a stochastic approach may be crucial when baroclinic instability is inadequately resolved. Finally, inhomogeneous closure theory is applied to the complex problem of flow over topography; it is shown that it can be used to understand the successes and limitations of currently used heuristic schemes and to provide a basis for further developments in the future.

  5. Turbulence models in pulsating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, Alberto; Piomelli, Ugo

    2001-11-01

    We compare the performance of four low-Reynolds-number models for the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations applied to the flow in a channel driven by a pressure gradient oscillating around a non-zero mean. The models considered are the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, the k-\\varepsilon model with the wall functions of Lam and Bremhorst, the k-ω^2 model of Saffman and Wilcox, and the k-\\varepsilon-v^2 model of Durbin. The results are compared with experiments, direct simulations and large-eddy simulations. The models give similar and reasonably accurate results as far as predicting the velocity profile in the channel as a function of the phase, and reproduce the observed behavior during part of the cycle. However, large differences exist between the models themselves, as well as with respect to the LES, at the level of the Reynolds shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. The k-\\varepsilon-v^2 model is overall superior to the other models considered.

  6. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  7. Numerical investigation of coupled density-driven flow and hydrogeochemical processes below playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Enrico; Post, Vincent; Kohfahl, Claus; Prommer, Henning; Simmons, Craig T.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical modeling approaches with varying complexity were explored to investigate coupled groundwater flow and geochemical processes in saline basins. Long-term model simulations of a playa system gain insights into the complex feedback mechanisms between density-driven flow and the spatiotemporal patterns of precipitating evaporites and evolving brines. Using a reactive multicomponent transport model approach, the simulations reproduced, for the first time in a numerical study, the evaporite precipitation sequences frequently observed in saline basins ("bull's eyes"). Playa-specific flow, evapoconcentration, and chemical divides were found to be the primary controls for the location of evaporites formed, and the resulting brine chemistry. Comparative simulations with the computationally far less demanding surrogate single-species transport models showed that these were still able to replicate the major flow patterns obtained by the more complex reactive transport simulations. However, the simulated degree of salinization was clearly lower than in reactive multicomponent transport simulations. For example, in the late stages of the simulations, when the brine becomes halite-saturated, the nonreactive simulation overestimated the solute mass by almost 20%. The simulations highlight the importance of the consideration of reactive transport processes for understanding and quantifying geochemical patterns, concentrations of individual dissolved solutes, and evaporite evolution.

  8. Modeling of karst aquifer genesis: Influence of exchange flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Liedl, Rudolf; Sauter, Martin

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical model study simulating the early karstification of a single conduit embedded in a fissured system. A hybrid continuum-discrete pipe flow model (CAVE) is used for the modeling. The effects of coupling of the two flow systems on type and duration of early karstification are studied for different boundary conditions. Assuming fixed head boundaries at both ends of the conduit, coupling of the two flow systems via exchange flow between the conduit and the fissured system leads to an enhanced evolution of the conduit. This effect is valid over a wide range of initial conduit diameters, and karstification is accelerated by a factor of about 100 as compared to the case of no exchange flow. Parameter studies reveal the influence of the exchange coefficient and of the hydraulic conductivity of the fissured system on the development time for the conduit. In a second scenario the upstream fixed head boundary is switched to a fixed flow boundary at a specified flow rate during the evolution, limiting the amount of water draining toward the evolving conduit. Depending on the flow rate specified, conduit evolution may be slowed down or greatly impaired if exchange flow is considered.

  9. Parallelization of the Coupled Earthquake Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Gary; Li, P. Peggy; Song, Yuhe T.

    2007-01-01

    This Web-based tsunami simulation system allows users to remotely run a model on JPL s supercomputers for a given undersea earthquake. At the time of this reporting, predicting tsunamis on the Internet has never happened before. This new code directly couples the earthquake model and the ocean model on parallel computers and improves simulation speed. Seismometers can only detect information from earthquakes; they cannot detect whether or not a tsunami may occur as a result of the earthquake. When earthquake-tsunami models are coupled with the improved computational speed of modern, high-performance computers and constrained by remotely sensed data, they are able to provide early warnings for those coastal regions at risk. The software is capable of testing NASA s satellite observations of tsunamis. It has been successfully tested for several historical tsunamis, has passed all alpha and beta testing, and is well documented for users.

  10. Fluid-structural interactions using Navier-Stokes flow equations coupled with shell finite element structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1993-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented to study fluid-structural interaction problems for three-dimensional aerospace structures. The flow is modeled using the three-dimensional unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes equations and solved using the finite-difference approach. The three dimensional structure is modeled using shell/plate finite-element formulation. The two disciplines are coupled using a domain decomposition approach. Accurate procedures both in time and space are developed to combine the solutions from the flow equations with those of the structural equations. Time accuracy is maintained using aeroelastic configuration-adaptive moving grids that are computed every time step. The work done by aerodynamic forces due to structural deformations is preserved using consistent loads. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Results are illustrated for a typical wing-body configuration.

  11. Computational simulation of coupled nonequilibrium discharge and compressible flow phenomena in a microplasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Deconinck, Thomas; Mahadevan, Shankar; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2009-09-15

    The microplasma thruster (MPT) concept is a simple extension of a cold gas micronozzle propulsion device, where a direct-current microdischarge is used to preheat the gas stream to improve the specific impulse of the device. Here we study a prototypical MPT device using a detailed, self-consistently coupled plasma and flow computational model. The model describes the microdischarge power deposition, plasma dynamics, gas-phase chemical kinetics, coupling of the plasma phenomena with high-speed flow, and overall propulsion system performance. Compared to a cold gas micronozzle, a significant increase in specific impulse is obtained from the power deposition in the diverging section of the MPT nozzle. For a discharge voltage of 750 V, a power input of 650 mW, and an argon mass flow rate of 5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), the specific impulse of the device is increased by a factor of approx1.5 to about 74 s. The microdischarge remains mostly confined inside the micronozzle and operates in an abnormal glow discharge regime. Gas heating, primarily due to ion Joule heating, is found to have a strong influence on the overall discharge behavior. The study provides a validation of the MPT concept as a simple and effective approach to improve the performance of micronozzle cold gas propulsion devices.

  12. Computational simulation of coupled nonequilibrium discharge and compressible flow phenomena in a microplasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconinck, Thomas; Mahadevan, Shankar; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2009-09-01

    The microplasma thruster (MPT) concept is a simple extension of a cold gas micronozzle propulsion device, where a direct-current microdischarge is used to preheat the gas stream to improve the specific impulse of the device. Here we study a prototypical MPT device using a detailed, self-consistently coupled plasma and flow computational model. The model describes the microdischarge power deposition, plasma dynamics, gas-phase chemical kinetics, coupling of the plasma phenomena with high-speed flow, and overall propulsion system performance. Compared to a cold gas micronozzle, a significant increase in specific impulse is obtained from the power deposition in the diverging section of the MPT nozzle. For a discharge voltage of 750 V, a power input of 650 mW, and an argon mass flow rate of 5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), the specific impulse of the device is increased by a factor of ˜1.5 to about 74 s. The microdischarge remains mostly confined inside the micronozzle and operates in an abnormal glow discharge regime. Gas heating, primarily due to ion Joule heating, is found to have a strong influence on the overall discharge behavior. The study provides a validation of the MPT concept as a simple and effective approach to improve the performance of micronozzle cold gas propulsion devices.

  13. Computational modelling of a large dimension wind farm cluster using domain coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa Gomes, V. M. M. G.; Palma, J. M. L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models for Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows relies largely on the placement of the domain boundaries and the quality of the imposed flow conditions, the inlet boundary in particular. Exploiting the parabolic nature of many ABL flows and of CFD modelled ABL flow in particular, a precursor simulation is used as source of flow data to improve the target domain's inlet flow description over the standard synthetic boundary conditions, one-directionally coupling the solutions to the two simulations. Using the approach, a case of flow over a two wind farm offshore cluster is modelled using two small coupled simulations, matching the results of a single simulation including the full cluster at a significant computational time saving, in the order of 70%. Further savings were shown to be possible by reducing the resolution of the precursor simulation, with negligible impact on the results at the target domain.

  14. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  15. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, Lu

    1993-04-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  16. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  17. Multi-Scale Coupling in Ocean and Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengyu Liu, Leslie Smith

    2009-08-14

    We have made significant progress on several projects aimed at understanding multi-scale dynamics in geophysical flows. Large-scale flows in the atmosphere and ocean are influenced by stable density stratification and rotation. The presence of stratification and rotation has important consequences through (i) the conservation of potential vorticity q = {omega} {center_dot} {del} {rho}, where {omega} is the total vorticity and {rho} is the density, and (ii) the existence of waves that affect the redistribution of energy from a given disturbance to the flow. Our research is centered on quantifying the effects of potential vorticity conservation and of wave interactions for the coupling of disparate time and space scales in the oceans and the atmosphere. Ultimately we expect the work to help improve predictive capabilities of atmosphere, ocean and climate modelers. The main findings of our research projects are described.

  18. Global scale groundwater flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  19. Impeller leakage flow modeling for mechanical vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.

    1996-01-01

    HPOTP and HPFTP vibration test results have exhibited transient and steady characteristics which may be due to impeller leakage path (ILP) related forces. For example, an axial shift in the rotor could suddenly change the ILP clearances and lengths yielding dynamic coefficient and subsequent vibration changes. ILP models are more complicated than conventional-single component-annular seal models due to their radial flow component (coriolis and centrifugal acceleration), complex geometry (axial/radial clearance coupling), internal boundary (transition) flow conditions between mechanical components along the ILP and longer length, requiring moment as well as force coefficients. Flow coupling between mechanical components results from mass and energy conservation applied at their interfaces. Typical components along the ILP include an inlet seal, curved shroud, and an exit seal, which may be a stepped labyrinth type. Von Pragenau (MSFC) has modeled labyrinth seals as a series of plain annular seals for leakage and dynamic coefficient prediction. These multi-tooth components increase the total number of 'flow coupled' components in the ILP. Childs developed an analysis for an ILP consisting of a single, constant clearance shroud with an exit seal represented by a lumped flow-loss coefficient. This same geometry was later extended to include compressible flow. The objective of the current work is to: supply ILP leakage-force impedance-dynamic coefficient modeling software to MSFC engineers, base on incompressible/compressible bulk flow theory; design the software to model a generic geometry ILP described by a series of components lying along an arbitrarily directed path; validate the software by comparison to available test data, CFD and bulk models; and develop a hybrid CFD-bulk flow model of an ILP to improve modeling accuracy within practical run time constraints.

  20. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5 m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  1. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  2. Flow Model Development for the Idaho National Laboratory OU 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Huang; Swen Magnuson; Thomas Wood

    2005-09-01

    A two-dimensional (2D), steady-state groundwater flow model was developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sitewide groundwater model. A total of 224 wells inside the model domain were used to calibrate the 2D flow model. Three different calibration techniques, zonation approach, pilot point approach and coupled zonation/pilot point approach, were explored and applied during the model development. The pilot point approach allows modelers to model aquifer heterogeneities at various scales, and extract the maximum amount of data from available monitoring data, permitting the best possible representation of flow and transport at the INL.

  3. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  4. Coupled turbulent flow, heat, and solute transport in continuous casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutalebi, M. Reza; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1995-08-01

    A fully coupled fluid flow, heat, and solute transport model was developed to analyze turbulent flow, solidification, and evolution of macrosegregation in a continuous billet caster. Transport equations of total mass, momentum, energy, and species for a binary iron-carbon alloy system were solved using a continuum model, wherein the equations are valid for the solid, liquid, and mushy zones in the casting. A modified version of the low-Reynolds number k-ɛ model was adopted to incorporate turbulence effects on transport processes in the system. A control-volume-based finite-difference procedure was employed to solve the conservation equations associated with appropriate boundary conditions. Because of high nonlinearity in the system of equations, a number of techniques were used to accelerate the convergence process. The effects of the parameters such as casting speed, steel grade, nozzle configuration on flow pattern, solidification profile, and carbon segregation were investigated. From the computed flow pattern, the trajectory of inclusion particles, as well as the density distribution of the particles, was calculated. Some of the computed results were compared with available experimental measurements, and reasonable agreements were obtained.

  5. Numerical simulation on macro-instability of coupling flow field structure in jet-stirred tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, D. Y.; Lu, J. P.; Bu, Q. X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zheng, S. X.

    2016-05-01

    The velocity field macro-instability (MI) can help to improve the mixing efficiency. In this work, the MI features of flow field induced by jet-stirred coupling action is studied by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The numerical simulation method of jet-stirred model was established based on standard turbulent equations, and the impeller rotation was modeled by means of the Sliding Mesh (SM) technology. The numerical results of test fluid (water) power consumption were compared with the data obtained by power test experiments. The effects of jet flow velocity and impeller speed on MI frequency were analyzed thoroughly. The results show that the calculated values of power consumption agree well with the experiment measured data, which validates the turbulent model, and the flow structure and MI frequency distribution are affected by both impeller speed and jet flow rate. The amplitude of MI frequency increases obviously with the increasing rotation speed of impeller and the eccentric jet rate, and it can be enhanced observably by eccentric jet rate, in condition of comparatively high impeller speed. At this time, the MI phenomenon disappears with the overall chaotic mixing.

  6. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: left-ventricular fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Krittian, Sebastian; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert; Böhlke, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    We present a 3D code-coupling approach which has been specialized towards cardiovascular blood flow. For the first time, the prescribed geometry movement of the cardiovascular flow model KaHMo (Karlsruhe Heart Model) has been replaced by a myocardial composite model. Deformation is driven by fluid forces and myocardial response, i.e., both its contractile and constitutive behavior. Whereas the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) of the Navier-Stokes equations is discretized by finite volumes (FVM), the solid mechanical finite elasticity equations are discretized by a finite element (FEM) approach. Taking advantage of specialized numerical solution strategies for non-matching fluid and solid domain meshes, an iterative data-exchange guarantees the interface equilibrium of the underlying governing equations. The focus of this work is on left-ventricular fluid-structure interaction based on patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging datasets. Multi-physical phenomena are described by temporal visualization and characteristic FSI numbers. The results gained show flow patterns that are in good agreement with previous observations. A deeper understanding of cavity deformation, blood flow, and their vital interaction can help to improve surgical treatment and clinical therapy planning.

  7. Thermodynamic coupling of heat and matter flows in near-field regions of nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1983-11-01

    In near-field regions of nuclear waste repositories, thermodynamically coupled flows of heat and matter can occur in addition to the independent flows in the presence of gradients of temperature, hydraulic potential, and composition. The following coupled effects can occur: thermal osmosis, thermal diffusion, chemical osmosis, thermal filtration, diffusion thermal effect, ultrafiltration, and coupled diffusion. Flows of heat and matter associated with these effects can modify the flows predictable from the direct effects, which are expressed by Fourier's law, Darcy's law, and Fick's law. The coupled effects can be treated quantitatively together with the direct effects by the methods of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The extent of departure of fully coupled flows from predictions based only on consideration of direct effects depends on the strengths of the gradients driving flows, and may be significant at early times in backfills and in near-field geologic environments of repositories. Approximate calculations using data from the literature and reasonable assumptions of repository conditions indicate that thermal-osmotic and chemical-osmotic flows of water in semipermeable backfills may exceed Darcian flows by two to three orders of magnitude, while flows of solutes may be reduced greatly by ultrafiltration and chemical osmosis, relative to the flows predicted by advection and diffusion alone. In permeable materials, thermal diffusion may contribute to solute flows to a smaller, but still significant, extent.

  8. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprat, A. P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J. P.; Corley, R. A.; Einstein, D. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton's method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  9. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kuprat, A P; Kabilan, S; Carson, J P; Corley, R A; Einstein, D R

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton's Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple sets

  10. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple

  11. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton’s method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD–ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  12. Modeling sediment mobilization using a distributed hydrological model coupled with a bank stability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, J.; Wemple, B.; Bomblies, A.

    2017-03-01

    In addition to surface erosion, stream bank erosion and failure contributes significant sediment and sediment-bound nutrients to receiving waters during high flow events. However, distributed and mechanistic simulation of stream bank sediment contribution to sediment loads in a watershed has not been achieved. Here we present a full coupling of existing distributed watershed and bank stability models and apply the resulting model to the Mad River in central Vermont. We fully coupled the Bank Stability and Toe Erosion Model (BSTEM) with the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) to allow the simulation of stream bank erosion and potential failure in a spatially explicit environment. We demonstrate the model's ability to simulate the impacts of unstable streams on sediment mobilization and transport within a watershed and discuss the model's capability to simulate watershed sediment loading under climate change. The calibrated model simulates total suspended sediment loads and reproduces variability in suspended sediment concentrations at watershed and subbasin outlets. In addition, characteristics such as land use and road-to-stream ratio of subbasins are shown to impact the relative proportions of sediment mobilized by overland erosion, erosion of roads, and stream bank erosion and failure in the subbasins and watershed. This coupled model will advance mechanistic simulation of suspended sediment mobilization and transport from watersheds, which will be particularly valuable for investigating the potential impacts of climate and land use changes, as well as extreme events.

  13. Coupled Disturbance Modelling And Validation Of A Reaction Wheel Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Aglietti, Gugliemo S.

    2012-07-01

    Microvibrations of a RWA are usually studied in either hard-mounted or coupled conditions, although coupled wheel-structure disturbances are more representative than the hard-mounted disturbances. The coupled analysis method of the wheel-structure is not as well developed as the hard-mounted one. A coupled disturbance analysis method is proposed in this paper. One of the most important factors in coupled disturbance analysis - the accelerance or dynamic mass of the wheel is measured and results are validated with an equivalent FE model. The wheel hard-mounted disturbances are also measured from a vibration measurement platform particularly designed for this study. Wheel structural modes are solved from its analytical disturbance model and validated with the test results. The wheel-speed dependent accelerance analysis method is proposed.

  14. Design of a Water Coupling Bolus with Improved Flow Distribution for Multielement Superficial Hyperthermia Applicators

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Schlorff, Jaime L.; Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    A water bolus used in superficial hyperthermia couples the electromagnetic (EM) or acoustic energy into the target tissue and cools the tissue surface to minimize thermal hotspots and patient discomfort during treatment. Parametric analyses of the fluid pressure inside the bolus computed using 3D fluid dynamics simulations are used in this study to determine a bolus design with improved flow and surface temperature distributions for large area superficial heat applicators. The simulation results are used in the design and fabrication of a 19×32 cm prototype bolus with dual input-dual output (DIDO) flow channels. Sequential thermal images of the bolus surface temperature recorded for a step change in the circulating water temperature are used to assess steady state flow and surface temperature distributions across the bolus. Modeling and measurement data indicate substantial improvement in bolus flow and surface temperature distributions when changing from the previous single input-single output (SISO) to DIDO configuration. Temperature variation across the bolus at steady state was measured to be less than 0.8°C for the DIDO bolus compared to 1.5°C for the SISO waterbolus. The new DIDO bolus configuration maintains a nearly uniform flow distribution and low variation in surface temperature over a large area typically treated in superficial hyperthermia. PMID:19848618

  15. Coupled wave model for large magnet coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A wave coupled model based on field theory is evolved for analysis of fast electromagnetic transients on superconducting coils. It is expected to play a useful role in the design of protection methods against damage due to high voltages or any adverse effects that might arise from unintentional transients. The significant parameters of the coil are identified to be the turn to turn wave coupling coefficients and the travel time of an electromagnetic disturbance around a single turn. Unlike circuit theoretic inductor, the coil response evolves in discrete steps having durations equal to this travel time. It is during such intervals that high voltages are likely to occur. The model also bridges the gap between the low and high ends of the frequency spectrum.

  16. Mathematical Models Of Turbulence In Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses mathematical models of turbulence used in numerical simulations of complicated viscous, hypersonic flows. Includes survey of essential features of models and their statuses in applications.

  17. Coupling Radar Rainfall to Hydrological Models for Water Abstraction Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Shucksmith, James; Smith, Andrea; MacDonald, Ken

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of climate change and growing water use are likely to put considerable pressure on water resources and the environment. In the UK, a reform to surface water abstraction policy has recently been proposed which aims to increase the efficiency of using available water resources whilst minimising impacts on the aquatic environment. Key aspects to this reform include the consideration of dynamic rather than static abstraction licensing as well as introducing water trading concepts. Dynamic licensing will permit varying levels of abstraction dependent on environmental conditions (i.e. river flow and quality). The practical implementation of an effective dynamic abstraction strategy requires suitable flow forecasting techniques to inform abstraction asset management. Potentially the predicted availability of water resources within a catchment can be coupled to predicted demand and current storage to inform a cost effective water resource management strategy which minimises environmental impacts. The aim of this work is to use a historical analysis of UK case study catchment to compare potential water resource availability using modelled dynamic abstraction scenario informed by a flow forecasting model, against observed abstraction under a conventional abstraction regime. The work also demonstrates the impacts of modelling uncertainties on the accuracy of predicted water availability over range of forecast lead times. The study utilised a conceptual rainfall-runoff model PDM - Probability-Distributed Model developed by Centre for Ecology & Hydrology - set up in the Dove River catchment (UK) using 1km2 resolution radar rainfall as inputs and 15 min resolution gauged flow data for calibration and validation. Data assimilation procedures are implemented to improve flow predictions using observed flow data. Uncertainties in the radar rainfall data used in the model are quantified using artificial statistical error model described by Gaussian distribution and

  18. Towards Better Coupling of Hydrological Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penton, D.; Stenson, M.; Leighton, B.; Bridgart, R.

    2012-12-01

    Standards for model interoperability and scientific workflow software provide techniques and tools for coupling hydrological simulation models. However, model builders are yet to realize the benefits of these and continue to write ad hoc implementations and scripts. Three case studies demonstrate different approaches to coupling models, the first using tight interfaces (OpenMI), the second using a scientific workflow system (Trident) and the third using a tailored execution engine (Delft Flood Early Warning System - Delft-FEWS). No approach was objectively better than any other approach. The foremost standard for coupling hydrological models is the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI), which defines interfaces for models to interact. An implementation of the OpenMI standard involves defining interchange terms and writing a .NET/Java wrapper around the model. An execution wrapper such as OatC.GUI or Pipistrelle executes the models. The team built two OpenMI implementations for eWater Source river system models. Once built, it was easy to swap river system models. The team encountered technical challenges with versions of the .Net framework (3.5 calling 4.0) and with the performance of the execution wrappers when running daily simulations. By design, the OpenMI interfaces are general, leaving significant decisions around the semantics of the interfaces to the implementer. Increasingly, scientific workflow tools such as Kepler, Taverna and Trident are able to replace custom scripts. These tools aim to improve the provenance and reproducibility of processing tasks. In particular, Taverna and the myExperiment website have had success making many bioinformatics workflows reusable and sharable. The team constructed Trident activities for hydrological software including IQQM, REALM and eWater Source. They built an activity generator for model builders to build activities for particular river systems. The models were linked at a simulation level, without any daily time

  19. A closed-form solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow using the Lambert-W function.

    PubMed

    Hall, A J; Minchin, P E H

    2013-12-01

    A closed-form solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow is presented. This incorporates the basic Münch flow model of phloem transport, the cohesion model of xylem flow, and local variation in the xylem water potential and lateral water flow along the transport pathway. Use of the Lambert-W function allows this solution to be obtained under much more general and realistic conditions than has previously been possible. Variation in phloem resistance (i.e. viscosity) with solute concentration, and deviations from the Van't Hoff expression for osmotic potential are included. It is shown that the model predictions match those of the equilibrium solution of a numerical time-dependent model based upon the same mechanistic assumptions. The effect of xylem flow upon phloem flow can readily be calculated, which has not been possible in any previous analytical model. It is also shown how this new analytical solution can handle multiple sources and sinks within a complex architecture, and can describe competition between sinks. The model provides new insights into Münch flow by explicitly including interactions with xylem flow and water potential in the closed-form solution, and is expected to be useful as a component part of larger numerical models of entire plants.

  20. Coupling Discrete and Continuum Mechanics in Low Concentration, Particle-Laden Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Paul; Houchens, Brent; Kim, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The study of particle-laden flow plays a critical role in pressure-driven membrane filtration such as microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF), and reverse osmosis (RO). Hydrodynamic and inter-particle interactions, coupled to the ambient crossflow field, are well documented in literature. Transport of particles is originated due to Brownian and shear-induced diffusion, and convection due to the axial crossflow and transverse permeate flow. These effects are modeled using Hydrodynamic Force Bias Monte Carlo (HFBMC) simulations to predict the deposition of the particles on the membrane surface. In addition, the particles in the simulation are also subject to electrostatic double layer repulsion and van der Waals attraction both between particles and between the particles and membrane surfaces. In conjunction with the hydrodynamics, the change in particle potential determines the transition probability that a proposed, random move of a particle will be accepted. In the current study, these discrete particle effects at the microscopic level are coupled to the continuum flow via an apparent local viscosity, yielding a quasi-steady-state velocity profile. This velocity profile is dynamically updated in order to refine the hydrodynamic interactions. The resulting simulation predicts the formation of a cake layer of deposited interacting particles on the membrane surface.

  1. Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Multiscale Preferential Flow - 8/05-8/10 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph Showalter; Malgorzata Peszynska

    2012-07-03

    The research agenda of this project are: (1) Modeling of preferential transport from mesoscale to macroscale; (2) Modeling of fast flow in narrow fractures in porous media; (3) Pseudo-parabolic Models of Dynamic Capillary Pressure; (4) Adaptive computational upscaling of flow with inertia from porescale to mesoscale; (5) Adaptive modeling of nonlinear coupled systems; and (6) Adaptive modeling and a-posteriori estimators for coupled systems with heterogeneous data.

  2. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new potential/viscous flow coupling procedure for reducing computational effort while maintaining solution accuracy. This closed-loop, overlapped velocity-coupling concept has been developed in a new two-dimensional code, ZAP2D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 2D), a three-dimensional code for wing analysis, ZAP3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 3D), and a three-dimensional code for isolated helicopter rotors in hover, ZAPR3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program for Rotors - 3D). Comparisons with large domain ARC3D solutions and with experimental data for a NACA 0012 airfoil have shown that the required domain size can be reduced to a few tenths of a percent chord for the low Mach and low angle of attack cases and to less than 2-5 chords for the high Mach and high angle of attack cases while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. This represents CPU time reductions by a factor of 2-4 compared with ARC2D. The current ZAP3D calculation for a rectangular plan-form wing of aspect ratio 5 with an outer domain radius of about 1.2 chords represents a speed-up in CPU time over the ARC3D large domain calculation by about a factor of 2.5 while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. A ZAPR3D simulation for a two-bladed rotor in hover with a reduced grid domain of about two chord lengths was able to capture the wake effects and compared accurately with the experimental pressure data. Further development is required in order to substantiate the promise of computational improvements due to the ZAPR3D coupling concept.

  3. Coupling SWAT and ANN models for enhanced daily streamflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, Navideh; Kalin, Latif

    2016-02-01

    To improve daily flow prediction in unmonitored watersheds a hybrid model was developed by combining a quasi-distributed watershed model and artificial neural network (ANN). Daily streamflow data from 29 nearby watersheds in and around the city of Atlanta, Southeastern United States, with leave-one-site-out jackknifing technique were used to build the flow predictive models during warm and cool seasons. Daily streamflow was first simulated with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and then the SWAT simulated baseflow and stormflow were used as inputs to ANN. Out of the total 29 test watersheds, 62% and 83% of them had Nash-Sutcliffe values above 0.50 during the cool and warm seasons, respectively (considered good or better). As the percent forest cover or the size of test watershed increased, the performances of the models gradually decreased during both warm and cool seasons. This indicates that the developed models work better in urbanized watersheds. In addition, SWAT and SWAT Calibration Uncertainty Procedure (SWAT-CUP) program were run separately for each station to compare the flow prediction accuracy of the hybrid approach to SWAT. Only 31% of the sites during the calibration and 34% of validation runs had ENASH values ⩾0.50. This study showed that coupling ANN with semi-distributed models can lead to improved daily streamflow predictions in ungauged watersheds.

  4. DYNAMIC COUPLING OF CONVECTIVE FLOWS AND MAGNETIC FIELD DURING FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Fang; Manchester IV, Ward; Van der Holst, Bart; Abbett, William P.

    2012-01-20

    We simulate the buoyant rise of a magnetic flux rope from the solar convection zone into the corona to better understand the energetic coupling of the solar interior to the corona. The magnetohydrodynamic model addresses the physics of radiative cooling, coronal heating, and ionization, which allow us to produce a more realistic model of the solar atmosphere. The simulation illustrates the process by which magnetic flux emerges at the photosphere and coalesces to form two large concentrations of opposite polarities. We find that the large-scale convective motion in the convection zone is critical to form and maintain sunspots, while the horizontal converging flows in the near-surface layer prevent the concentrated polarities from separating. The footpoints of the sunspots in the convection zone exhibit a coherent rotation motion, resulting in the increasing helicity of the coronal field. Here, the local configuration of the convection causes the convergence of opposite polarities of magnetic flux with a shearing flow along the polarity inversion line. During the rising of the flux rope, the magnetic energy is first injected through the photosphere by the emergence, followed by energy transport by horizontal flows, after which the energy is subducted back to the convection zone by the submerging flows.

  5. High frequency electromagnetism, heat transfer and fluid flow coupling in ANSYS multiphysics.

    PubMed

    Sabliov, Cristina M; Salvi, Deepti A; Boldor, Dorin

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to numerically predict the temperature of a liquid product heated in a continuous-flow focused microwave system by coupling high frequency electromagnetism, heat transfer, and fluid flow in ANSYS Multiphysics. The developed model was used to determine the temperature change in water processed in a 915 MHz microwave unit, under steady-state conditions. The influence of the flow rates on the temperature distribution in the liquid was assessed. Results showed that the average temperature of water increased from 25 degrees C to 34 degrees C at 2 l/min, and to 42 degrees C at 1 l/min. The highest temperature regions were found in the liquid near the center of the tube, followed by progressively lower temperature regions as the radial distance from the center increased, and finally followed by a slightly higher temperature region near the tube's wall corresponding to the energy distribution given by the Mathieu function. The energy distribution resulted in a similar temperature pattern, with the highest temperatures close to the center of the tube and lower at the walls. The presented ANSYS Multiphysics model can be easily improved to account for complex boundary conditions, phase change, temperature dependent properties, and non-Newtonian flows, which makes for an objective of future studies.

  6. Numerical study of coupled turbulent flow and solidification for steel slab casters

    SciTech Connect

    Aboutalebi, M.R.; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R.I.L.

    1995-09-01

    A two-dimensional numerical modeling study was undertaken to account for coupled turbulent flow and heat transfer with solidification in the mold and submold regions of a steel slab coaster. Liquid steel is introduced into a water-cooled mold through a bifurcated submerged entry nozzle. Turbulence phenomena in the melt pool of the caster were accounted for, using a modified version of the low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model of Launder and Sharma. The mushy region solidification, in the presence of turbulence, was taken into account by modifying the standard enthalpy-porosity technique, which is presently popular for modeling solidification problems. Thermocapillary and buoyancy effects have been considered in this model to evaluate the influences of the liquid surface tension gradient at the meniscus surface, and natural convection on flow patterns in the liquid pool. Parametric studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of typical variables, such as inlet superheat and casting speed, on the fluid flow and heat transfer results. The numerical predictions were compared with available experimental data.

  7. Coupling of geochemical and multiphase flow processes for validation of the MUFITS reservoir simulator against TOUGHREACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Afanasyev, Andrey; Melnik, Oleg; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Coupled reactive transport simulations, especially in heterogeneous settings considering multiphase flow, are extremely time consuming and suffer from significant numerical issues compared to purely hydrodynamic simulations. This represents a major hurdle in the assessment of geological subsurface utilization, since it constrains the practical application of reactive transport modelling to coarse spatial discretization or oversimplified geological settings. In order to overcome such limitations, De Lucia et al. [1] developed and validated a one-way coupling approach between geochemistry and hydrodynamics, which is particularly well suited for CO2 storage simulations, while being of general validity. In the present study, the models used for the validation of the one-way coupling approach introduced by De Lucia et al. (2015), and originally performed with the TOUGHREACT simulator, are transferred to and benchmarked against the multiphase reservoir simulator MUFITS [2]. The geological model is loosely inspired by an existing CO2 storage site. Its grid comprises 2,950 elements enclosed in a single layer, but reflecting a realistic three-dimensional anticline geometry. For the purpose of this comparison, homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios in terms of porosity and permeability were investigated. In both cases, the results of the MUFITS simulator are in excellent agreement with those produced with the fully-coupled TOUGHREACT simulator, while profiting from significantly higher computational performance. This study demonstrates how a computationally efficient simulator such as MUFITS can be successfully included in a coupled process simulation framework, and also suggests ameliorations and specific strategies for the coupling of chemical processes with hydrodynamics and heat transport, aiming at tackling geoscientific problems beyond the storage of CO2. References [1] De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., and Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations

  8. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  9. Partitioned coupling of advection-diffusion-reaction systems and Brinkman flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenarda, Pietro; Paggi, Marco; Ruiz Baier, Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    We present a partitioned algorithm aimed at extending the capabilities of existing solvers for the simulation of coupled advection-diffusion-reaction systems and incompressible, viscous flow. The space discretisation of the governing equations is based on mixed finite element methods defined on unstructured meshes, whereas the time integration hinges on an operator splitting strategy that exploits the differences in scales between the reaction, advection, and diffusion processes, considering the global system as a number of sequentially linked sets of partial differential, and algebraic equations. The flow solver presents the advantage that all unknowns in the system (here vorticity, velocity, and pressure) can be fully decoupled and thus turn the overall scheme very attractive from the computational perspective. The robustness of the proposed method is illustrated with a series of numerical tests in 2D and 3D, relevant in the modelling of bacterial bioconvection and Boussinesq systems.

  10. Nonlinear Walecka models and point-coupling relativistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lourenco, O.; Amaral, R. L. P. G.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.

    2009-10-15

    We study hadronic nonlinear point-coupling (NLPC) models which reproduce numerically the binding energy, the incompressibility, and the nucleon effective mass at the nuclear matter saturation obtained by different nonlinear Walecka (NLW) models. We have investigated their behaviors as functions of the nuclear matter density to observe how they deviate from known NLW models. In our study we present a meson-exchange modified nonlinear Walecka model (MNLW) which exactly underlies a nonlinear point-coupling model (NLPC) presenting third- and fourth-order scalar density self-couplings. A discussion about naive dimensional analysis (NDA) and naturalness is also provided for a large class of NLW and NLPC models. At finite temperature, critical and flash parameters of both approaches are presented.

  11. Application of partially-coupled hydro-mechanical schemes to multiphase flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Elena; Kempka, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of subsurface reservoirs by fluid storage or production generally triggers pore pressure changes and volumetric strains in reservoirs and cap rocks. The assessment of hydro-mechanical effects can be undertaken using different process coupling strategies. The fully-coupled geomechanics and flow simulation, constituting a monolithic system of equations, is rarely applied for simulations involving multiphase fluid flow due to the high computational efforts required. Pseudo-coupled simulations are driven by static tabular data on porosity and permeability changes as function of pore pressure or mean stress, resulting in a rather limited flexibility when encountering complex subsurface utilization schedules and realistic geological settings. Partially-coupled hydro-mechanical simulations can be distinguished into one-way and iterative two-way coupled schemes, whereby the latter one is based on calculations of flow and geomechanics, taking into account the iterative exchange of coupling parameters between the two respective numerical simulators until convergence is achieved. In contrast, the one-way coupling scheme is determined by the provision of pore pressure changes calculated by the flow simulator to the geomechanical simulator neglecting any feedback. In the present study, partially-coupled two-way schemes are discussed in view of fully-coupled single-phase flow and geomechanics, and their applicability to multiphase flow simulations. For that purpose, we introduce a comparison study between the different coupling schemes, using selected benchmarks to identify the main requirements for the partially-coupled approach to converge with the numerical solution of the fully-coupled one.

  12. Coupling biology and oceanography in models.

    PubMed

    Fennel, W; Neumann, T

    2001-08-01

    The dynamics of marine ecosystems, i.e. the changes of observable chemical-biological quantities in space and time, are driven by biological and physical processes. Predictions of future developments of marine systems need a theoretical framework, i.e. models, solidly based on research and understanding of the different processes involved. The natural way to describe marine systems theoretically seems to be the embedding of chemical-biological models into circulation models. However, while circulation models are relatively advanced the quantitative theoretical description of chemical-biological processes lags behind. This paper discusses some of the approaches and problems in the development of consistent theories and indicates the beneficial potential of the coupling of marine biology and oceanography in models.

  13. Four mass coupled oscillator guitar model.

    PubMed

    Popp, John E

    2012-01-01

    Coupled oscillator models have been used for the low frequency response (50 to 250 Hz) of a guitar. These 2 and 3 mass models correctly predict measured resonance frequency relationships under various laboratory boundary conditions, but did not always represent the true state of a guitar in the players' hands. The model presented has improved these models in three ways, (1) a fourth oscillator includes the guitar body, (2) plate stiffnesses and other fundamental parameters were measured directly and effective areas and masses used to calculate the responses, including resonances and phases, directly, and (3) one of the three resultant resonances varies with neck and side mass and can also be modeled as a bar mode of the neck and body. The calculated and measured resonances and phases agree reasonably well.

  14. A constitutive model for representing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a constitutive model for representing inelastic flow due to coupled creep, damage, and healing in rock salt is present in this paper. This model, referred to as Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, has been formulated by considering individual mechanisms that include dislocation creep, shear damage, tensile damage, and damage healing. Applications of the model to representing the inelastic flow and fracture behavior of WIPP salt subjected to creep, quasi-static loading, and damage healing conditions are illustrated with comparisons of model calculations against experimental creep curves, stress-strain curves, strain recovery curves, time-to-rupture data, and fracture mechanism maps.

  15. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries' roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading "trophic levels" have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows.

  16. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries’ roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading “trophic levels” have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  17. Field experiment and numerical simulation of coupling non-Darcy flow caused by curtain and pumping well in foundation pit dewatering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiu; Liu, Xiaotian; Wu, Yuanbin; Liu, Shaoli; Wu, Lingao; Lou, Rongxiang; Lu, Jiansheng; Yin, Yao

    2017-06-01

    High-velocity non-Darcy flow produced larger drawdown than Darcy flow under the same pumping rate. When the non-Darcy flow caused by curtain met non-Darcy flow caused by pumping wells, superposition and amplification effect occurred in the coupling area, the non-Darcy flow was defined as coupling non-Darcy flow. The coupling non-Darcy flow can be produced and controlled using different combination of curtain and pumping wells in foundation pit dewatering to obtain the maximum drawdown using the minimum pumping rate. The Qianjiang Century City Station foundation pit of Hangzhou subway, China, was selected as background. Field experiments were performed to observe the coupling non-Darcy flow in round gravel. A generalized conceptual model was established to study the coupling effect under different combination of curtain and pumping wells. Numerical simulations of the coupling non-Darcy flow in foundation pit dewatering were carried out based on the Forchheimer equation. The non-Darcy flow area and flow velocity were influenced by the coupling effect. Short filter tube, large pumping rate, small horizontal distance between filter tube and diaphragm wall, and small vertical distance between the filter tube and confined aquifer roof effecti