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Sample records for modeling euvl mask

  1. EUVL Mask Blank Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P; Stearns, D G; Sweeney, D; Chapman, H N; Clift, M; Hector, S; Yi, M

    2002-05-22

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Small defects in this thin film coating can significantly alter the reflected field and introduce defects in the printed image. Ideally one would want to produce defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to effectively repair multilayer defects, and to this effect they present two complementary defect repair strategies for use on multilayer-coated EUVL mask blanks. A defect is any area on the mask which causes unwanted variations in EUV dose in the aerial image obtained in a printing tool, and defect repair is correspondingly defined as any strategy that renders a defect unprintable during exposure. The term defect mitigation can be adopted to describe any strategy which renders a critical defect non-critical when printed, and in this regard a non-critical defect is one that does not adversely affect device function. Defects in the patterned absorber layer consist of regions where metal, typically chrome, is unintentionally added or removed from the pattern leading to errors in the reflected field. There currently exists a mature technology based on ion beam milling and ion beam assisted deposition for repairing defects in the absorber layer of transmission lithography masks, and it is reasonable to expect that this technology will be extended to the repair of absorber defects in EUVL masks. However, techniques designed for the repair of absorber layers can not be directly applied to the repair of defects in the mask blank, and in particular the multilayer film. In this paper they present for the first time a new technique for the repair of amplitude defects as well as recent results on the repair of phase defects.

  2. SEMATECH EUVL mask program status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Henry; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Orvek, Kevin; Cha, Brian; Rastegar, Abbas; Kearney, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    As we approach the 22nm half-pitch (hp) technology node, the industry is rapidly running out of patterning options. Of the several lithography techniques highlighted in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the leading contender for the 22nm hp insertion is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Despite recent advances with EUV resist and improvements in source power, achieving defect free EUV mask blank and enabling the EUV mask infrastructure still remain critical issues. To meet the desired EUV high volume manufacturing (HVM) insertion target date of 2013, these obstacles must be resolved on a timely bases. Many of the EUV mask related challenges remain in the pre-competitive stage and a collaborative industry based consortia, such as SEMATECH can play an important role to enable the EUVL landscape. SEMATECH based in Albany, NY is an international consortium representing several of the largest manufacturers in the semiconductor market. Full members include Intel, Samsung, AMD, IBM, Panasonic, HP, TI, UMC, CNSE (College of Nanoscience and Engineering), and Fuller Road Management. Within the SEMATECH lithography division a major thrust is centered on enabling the EUVL ecosystem from mask development, EUV resist development and addressing EUV manufacturability concerns. An important area of focus for the SEMATECH mask program has been the Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). At the MBDC key issues in EUV blank development such as defect reduction and inspection capabilities are actively pursued together with research partners, key suppliers and member companies. In addition the mask program continues a successful track record of working with the mask community to manage and fund critical mask tools programs. This paper will highlight recent status of mask projects and longer term strategic direction at the MBDC. It is important that mask technology be ready to support pilot line development HVM by 2013. In several areas progress has been

  3. EUVL mask substrate specifications (wafer-type)

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W

    1999-07-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) program currently is constructing an alpha-class exposure tool known as the Engineering Test Stand (ETS) that will employ 200mm wafer format masks. This report lists and explains the current specifications for the EUVL mask substrates suitable for use on the ETS. The shape and size of the mask are the same as those of a standard 200mm Si wafer. The flatness requirements are driven by the potential image placement distortion caused by the non-telecentric illumination of EUVL. The defect requirements are driven by the printable-defect size and desired yield for mask blank fabrication. Surface roughness can cause both a loss of light throughput and image speckle. The EUVL mask substrate must be made of low-thermal-expansion material because 40% of the light is absorbed by the multilayers and causes some uncorrectable thermal distortion during printing.

  4. EUVL mask performance and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; de Kruif, Robert; van Setten, Eelco; Connolly, Brid; Mehagnoul, Karolien; Zimmerman, John; Harned, Noreen; Kalk, Franklin

    2012-02-01

    EUV lithography requires an exposure system with complex reflective optics and an equally complex EUV dedicated reflective mask. The required high level of reflectivity is obtained by using multilayers. The multilayer of the system optics and the mask are tuned to each other. The mask is equipped with an additional patterned absorber layer. The EUV mask is an optical element with many parameters that contribute to the final image and overlay quality on the wafer and the productivity of the system. Several of these parameters can be tuned for optimal overlay, imaging and productivity results. This should be done with care because of possible interaction between parameters. We will present an overview of the EUV mask contributors to the imaging, overlay and productivity performance for the 27 nm node and below, such as multilayer and absorber stack composition, reflectivity and reflectivity uniformity. These parameters will be reviewed in the context of real-life scanner parameters for the ASML NXE:3100 and NXE:3300 system configurations. The predictions will be compared to actual exposure results on NXE:3100 systems (NA=0.25) for various masks and extrapolated to the NXE:3300 (NA=0.33). In particular, we will present extensive multilayer and absorber actinic spectral reflectance measurements of a state-ofthe art EUV mask over a range of incidence angles corresponding to an NA of 0.33 at multiple positions within the image field. The ML measurements allow calibrating ML stack for imaging simulations. It allows also the estimation of mask-induced apodization effects having impact on overlay. In general, the reflectivity measurements will give detailed variations over the image field of mask parameters such as ML centroid wavelength and absorber reflectivity which contribute to CD uniformity. Such a relation will be established by means of rigorous full stack imaging simulations taking into account optical properties of the coming NXE:3300 system. Based on this

  5. Study of mask process development for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tsukasa; Nishiguchi, Masaharu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Motonaga, Toshiaki; Sasaki, Shiho; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Tanaka, Yuusuke; Yamanashi, Hiromasa; Nishiyama, Iwao

    2004-08-01

    EUVL mask process of absorber layer dry etching and defect repair were evaluated. TaGeN and Cr were selected for absorber layer and buffer layer, respectively. These absorber layer and buffer layer were coated on 6025 Qz substrate. Two dry etching processes were evaluated for absorber layer etching. One is CF4 gas process and the other is Cl2 gas process. CD uniformity, selectivity, cross section profile and resist damage were evaluated for each process. FIB-GAE and AFM machining were applied for absorber layer repair test. XeF2 gas was used for FIB-GAE. Good selectivity between absorber layer and buffer layer was obtained using XeF2 gas. However, XeF2 gas causes side etching of TaGeN layer. AFM machining repair technique was demonstrated for TaGeN layer repair.

  6. Mask substrate requirements and development for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    SciTech Connect

    Hector, S D; Shell, M; Taylor, J S; Tong, W M

    1999-09-28

    The mask is deemed one of the areas that require significant research and development in EUVL. Silicon wafers will be used for mask substrates for an alpha-class EUVL exposure tool due to their low-defect levels and high quality surface finish. However, silicon has a large coefficient of thermal expansion that leads to unacceptable image distortion due to absorption of EUV light. A low thermal expansion glass or glass-ceramic is likely to be required in order to meet error budgets for the 70nm node and beyond. Since EUVL masks are used in reflection, they are coated with multilayers prior to patterning. Surface imperfections, such as polishing marks, particles, scratches, or digs, are potential nucleation sites for defects in the multilayer coating, which could result in the printed defects. Therefore we are accelerating developments in the defect reduction and surface finishing of low thermal expansion mask substrates in order to understand long-term issues in controlling printable defects, and to establish the infrastructure for supplying masks. In this paper, we explain the technical requirements for EUVL mask substrates and describe our efforts in establishing a SEMI standard for EUVL masks. We will also report on the early progress of our suppliers in producing low thermal-expansion mask substrates for our development activities.

  7. EUVL printing results of a low-thermal expansion material (LTEM) mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, William M.; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Shell, Melissa K.; Zhang, Guojing; Kearney, Patrick A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Larson, Cindy C.; Wasson, James R.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; O'Connell, Donna J.; Folk, Daniel R.

    2000-07-01

    Minimizing image placement errors due to thermal distortion of the mask is a key requirement for qualifying EUV Lithography as a Next Generation Lithography (NGL). Employing Low Thermal Expansion Materials (LTEMs) for mask substrates is a viable solution for controlling mask thermal distortion and is being investigated by a wide array of researchers, tool makers, photomask suppliers, and material manufacturers. Finite element modeling has shown that an EUVL mask with a Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of less than 20 ppb/K will meet overlay error budgets for EUVL masks; some of these differences are EUVL specific, while others are natural consequences of the shrinking critical dimension. We demonstrate that a feasible manufacturing pathway exists for Low Thermal Expansion Material (LTEM) EUVL masks by fabricating a wafer-shaped LTEM mask substrate using the same manufacturing steps as for fabricating Si wafers. The LTEM substrate was then coated with Mo/Si multilayers, patterned, and printed using the 10X Microstepper. The images were essentially indistinguishable from those images acquired from masks fabricated from high quality silicon wafers as substrates. Our observations lend further evidence that an LTEM can be used as the EUVL mask substrate material.

  8. Advances in Low-Defect Multilayers for EUVL Mask Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J A; Davidson, J C; Larson, C C; Walton, C C; Kearney, P A

    2002-04-15

    Low-defect multilayer coatings are required to fabricate mask blanks for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blanks consist of high reflectance E W multilayers on low thermal expansion substrates. A defect density of 0.0025 printable defects/cm{sup 2} for both the mask substrate and the multilayer is required to provide a mask blank yield of 60%. Current low defect multilayer coating technology allows repeated coating-added defect levels of 0.05/cm{sup 2} for defects greater than 90 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) equivalent size for lots of 20 substrates. Extended clean operation of the coating system at levels below 0.08/cm{sup 2} for 3 months of operation has also been achieved. Two substrates with zero added defects in the quality area have been fabricated, providing an existence proof that ultra low defect coatings are possible. Increasing the ion source-to-target distance from 410 to 560 mm to reduce undesired coating of the ion source caused the defect density to increase to 0.2/cm{sup 2}. Deposition and etching diagnostic witness substrates and deposition pinhole cameras showed a much higher level of ion beam spillover (ions missing the sputter target) than expected. Future work will quantify beam spillover, and test designs to reduce spillover, if it is confirmed to be the cause of the increased defect level. The LDD system will also be upgraded to allow clean coating of standard format mask substrates. The upgrade will confirm that the low defect process developed on Si wafers is compatible with the standard mask format 152 mm square substrates, and will provide a clean supply of EUVL mask blanks needed to support development of EUVL mask patterning processes and clean mask handling technologies.

  9. Detectability and printability of EUVL mask blank defects for the32 nm HP node

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Wonil; Han, Hak-Seung; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kearney,Patrick A.; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2007-08-01

    The readiness of a defect-free extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask blank infrastructure is one of the main enablers for the insertion of EUVL technology into production. It is essential to have sufficient defect detection capability and understanding of defect printability to develop a defect-free EUVL mask blank infrastructure. The SEMATECH Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) has been developing EUVL mask blanks with low defect densities with the Lasertec M1350 and M7360, the 1st and 2nd generations, respectively, of visible light EUVL mask blank inspection tools. Although the M7360 represents a significant improvement in our defect detection capability, it is time to start developing a 3rd generation tool for EUVL mask blank inspection. The goal of this tool is to detect all printable defects; therefore, understanding defect printability criteria is critical to this tool development. In this paper, we will investigate the defect detectability of a 2nd generation blank inspection tool and a patterned EUVL mask inspection tool. We will also compare the ability of the inspection tools to detect programmed defects whose printability has been estimated from wafer printing results and actinic aerial images results.

  10. Mask aspects of EUVL imaging at 27nm node and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; van Setten, Eelco; Han, Sang-In; van de Kerkhof, Mark; de Kruif, Robert; Oorschot, Dorothe; Zimmerman, John; Lammers, Ad; Connolly, Brid; Driessen, Frank; van Oosten, Anton; Dusa, Mircea; van Dommelen, Youri; Harned, Noreen; Jiang, Jiong; Liu, Wei; Kang, Hoyoung; Liu, Hua-yu

    2011-11-01

    EUVL requires the use of reflective optics including a reflective mask. The mask consists of an absorber layer pattern on top of a reflecting multilayer, tuned for 13.53 nm. The EUVL mask is a complex optical element with many parameters contributing the final wafer image quality. Specifically, the oblique incidence of light, in combination with the small ratio of wavelength to mask topography, causes a number of effects which are unique to EUV, such as an HV CD offset. These so-called shadowing effects can be corrected by means of OPC, but also need to be considered in the mask stack design. In this paper we will present an overview of the mask contributors to imaging performance at the 27 nm node and below, such as CD uniformity, multilayer and absorber stack composition, thickness and reflectivity. We will consider basic OPC and resulting MEEF and contrast. These parameters will be reviewed in the context of real-life scanner parameters both for the NXE:3100 and NXE:3300 system configurations. The predictions will be compared to exposure results on NXE:3100 tools, with NA=0.25 for different masks. Using this comparison we will extrapolate the predictions to NXE:3300, with NA=0.33. Based on the lithographic investigation, expected requirements for EUV mask parameters will be proposed for 22 nm node EUV lithography, to provide guidance for mask manufacturers to support the introduction of EUV High Volume Manufacturing.

  11. Actinic defect counting statistics over 1 cm2 area of EUVL mask blank

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Seongtae; Lai, Chih-Wei; Rekawa, Seno; Walton, Chris W.; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2000-02-18

    As a continuation of comparison experiments between EUV inspection and visible inspection of defects on EUVL mask blanks, we report on the result of an experiment where the EUV defect inspection tool is used to perform at-wavelength defect counting over 1 cm{sup 2} of EUVL mask blank. Initial EUV inspection found five defects over the scanned area and the subsequent optical scattering inspection was able to detect all of the five defects. Therefore, if there are any defects that are only detectable by EUV inspection, the density is lower than the order of unity per cm2. An upgrade path to substantially increase the overall throughput of the EUV inspection system is also identified in the manuscript.

  12. Challenges for 1x-nm device fabrication using EUVL: scanner and mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, William H.

    2011-11-01

    EUVL lithography using high resolution step and scan systems operating at 13.5nm is being inserted in leading edge production lines for memory and logic devices. These tools use mirror optics and either laser produced plasma (LPP) or discharge produced plasma (DPP) sources along with reflective reduction masks to image circuit features. These tools show their capability to meet the challenging device requirements for imaging and overlay. Next generation scanners with resolution and overlay capability to produce 1X nm (10 nm class) memory and logic devices are in preparation. Challenges remain for EUVL, the principal of which are increasing source power enabling high productivity, building a volume mask business encouraging rapid learning cycles, and improving resist performance so it is capable of sub 20nm resolution.

  13. Evaluation of defect repair of EUVL mask pattern using FIB-GAE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Yasushi; Shigemura, Hiroyuki; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Suga, Osamu; Hagiwara, Ryoji; Shiina, Kensuke; Kikuchi, Shuichi; Yasaka, Anto

    2008-05-01

    We utilized a newly developed low acceleration voltage FIB (Focused Ion Beam) system and evaluated the process for repairing the absorber layer on EUVL mask. During the etching of the absorber layer, which is a step in conventional repair technique, a phenomenon of side-etching of Ta-nitride layer with XeF2 gas was observed. This phenomenon was considered to be caused by the isotropic etching of the Ta-nitride layer with XeF2 gas. We then added another gas for etching and evaluated the new process to prevent the side-etching of Ta-nitride layer. In this paper, we will report four evaluation results of EUVL mask pattern defect repair using FIB-GAE (Gas Assisted Etching). The first one is the problem of pattern topography after conventional repairing process and the reaction mechanism of gas assisted etching of Ta based absorber. The second evaluation result is addressed in two parts. One is the evaluation of a new gas assisted etching process that employs an additional gas that has an ability to control the etching rate of absorber layer. The second part addresses the repairing accuracy of EUVL mask pattern. The third is the basic etching performance e.g. etching rate of Ta based absorber, Cr based buffer, and Si based capping layer. The fourth and the last evaluation is the application of the newly developed gas assisted etching process on programmed bridge defect in narrow pitched L/S patterns.

  14. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplate microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K; Naulleau, P; Barty, A; Rekawa, S; Kemp, C; Gunion, R; Salmassi, F; Gullikson, E; Anderson, E; Han, H

    2007-09-25

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  15. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplatemicroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Barty, Anton; Rekawa,Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Gunion, Robert F.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.; Han, Hak-Seung

    2007-08-20

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  16. Evaluation of EUVL mask pattern defect inspection using 199nm inspection tool with super-resolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Yasushi; Suga, Osamu; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Hashimoto, Hideaki; Takahara, Kenichi; Usuda, Kinya; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Hirano, Ryoichi

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we will report on our experimental and simulation results on the impact of EUVL mask absorber structure and of inspection system optics on mask defect detection sensitivity. We employed a commercial simulator EM-Suite (Panoramic Technology, Inc.) which calculated rigorously using FDTD (Finite-difference time-domain) method. By using various optical constants of absorber stacks, we calculated image contrasts and defect image signals as obtained from the mask defect inspection system. We evaluated the image contrast and the capability of detecting defects on the EUVL masks by using a new inspection tool made by NuFlare Technology, Inc. (NFT) and Advanced Mask Inspection Technology, Inc. (AMiT). This tool is based on NPI-5000 which is the leading-edge photomask defect inspection system using 199nm wavelength inspection optics. The programmed defect masks with LR-TaBN and LRTaSi absorbers were used which had various sized opaque and clear extension defects on hp-160nm, hp-225nm, and hp- 325nm line and space patterns. According to the analysis, reflectivity of EUVL mask absorber structures and the inspection optics have large influence on image contrast and defect sensitivity. It is very important to optimize absorber structure and inspection optics for the development of EUVL mask inspection technology, and for the improvement of performance of EUV lithographic systems.

  17. Study of EUVL mask defect repair using FIB-GAE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Yasushi; Shigemura, Hiroyuki; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Suga, Osamu; Shiina, Kensuke; Aramaki, Fumio; Hagiwara, Ryoji; Yasaka, Anto

    2008-10-01

    We evaluated a new FIB-GAE (Focused Ion Beam-Gas Assisted Etching) repairing process for the absorber defects on EUVL mask. XeF2 gas and H2O gas were used as etching assist agent and etching stop agent respectively. The H2O gas was used to oxidize Ta-nitride side-wall and to inactivate the remaining XeF2 gas after the completion of defect repair. At the Photomask Japan 2008 we had reported that side-etching of Ta-nitride caused CD degradation in EUVL. In the present paper we report on the performance of defect repair by FIB, and of printability using SFET (Small Field Exposure Tool). The samples evaluated, were in form of bridge defects in hp225nm L/S pattern. The cross sectional SEM images certified that the newly developed H2O gas process prevented side-etching damage to TaBN layer and made the side-wall close to vertical. The printability also showed excellent results. There were no significant CD changes in the defocus characterization of the defect repaired region. In its defect repair process, the FIB method showed no signs of scan damage on Cr buffered EUV mask. The repair accuracy and the application to narrow pitched pattern are also discussed.

  18. Impact of EUVL mask surface roughness on an actinic blank inspection image and a wafer image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Terasawa, Tsuneo

    2012-11-01

    An impact of EUVL mask surface roughness on actinic inspection was studied. The background level (BGL) of an actinic inspection image is caused by the light scattered from the mask blank surface roughness. The BGL is found to be proportional to the square of the mask surface roughness measured by AFM. By using this proportionality coefficient, a global distribution of the surface roughness can be obtained at the same time while inspection a mask. On the other hand, any local variation of BGL indicates variation of the mask surface roughness at each pixel. Assuming that the roughness at a center pixel is 0.15 nm rms (SEMI standard specification) and those at the surrounding pixels are 0.1 nm rms, the signal intensity at the center pixel is found to be approximately the same as that of a 1.2 nm-high and 40 nm-wide programmed defect. In that case, CD error on a wafer image due to the reflectivity loss by the roughness is found to be not critical. This means that the local roughness should be less than 0.15 nm rms, and that the inspection system can detect such a local variation of the roughness with 100 % probability.

  19. Study of EUVL mask defect inspection using 199-nm inspection tool with super-resolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Suga, Osamu; Hashimoto, Hideaki; Saito, Masanori; Takeda, Masaya; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Hirano, Ryoichi

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we will report on our experimental results on the impact of inspection system optics on mask defect detection sensitivity. We evaluated the capability of detecting defects on the EUVL masks by using a new inspection tool (NPI6000EUVα) made by NuFlare Technology, Inc. (NFT) and Advanced Mask Inspection Technology, Inc. (AMiT). This tool is based on NPI-5000 which is the leading-edge photomask defect inspection system using 199nm wavelength inspection optics. The programmed defect mask with LR-TaBN absorber was used which had various sized opaque and clear extension defects on hp-180nm, hp-128nm, and hp-108nm line and space patterns. According to the analysis, to obtain optimum sensitivity for various types of defects, using both C- and P-polarized illumination conditions were found to be effective. At present, sufficient defect-detection sensitivity is achieved for opaque and clear extension defects in hp128nm (hp32nm at wafer). For hp108nm (hp27nm at wafer), using both C- and P- polarized illumination is effective. However, further developments in defect-detection sensitivity are necessary.

  20. Evaluation of dry etching and defect repair of EUVL mask absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tsukasa; Nishiguchi, Masaharu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Motonaga, Toshiaki; Sasaki, Shiho; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Tanaka, Yuusuke; Nishiyama, Iwao

    2004-12-01

    EUVL mask process of absorber layer, buffer layer dry etching and defect repair were evaluated. TaGeN and Cr were selected for absorber layer and buffer layer, respectively. These absorber layer and buffer layer were coated on 6025 Qz substrate. Two dry etching processes were evaluated for absorber layer etching. One is CF4 plasma process and the other is Cl2 plasma process. Etch bias uniformity, selectivity, cross section profile and resist damage were evaluated for each process. Disadvantage of CF4 plasma process is low resist selectivity and Cl2 plasma process is low Cr selectivity. CF4 plasma process caused small absorber layer damage on isolate line and Cl2 plasma process caused Cr buffer layer damage. To minimize these damages overetch time was evaluated. Buffer layer process was also evaluated. Buffer layer process causes capping layer damage. Therefore, etching time was optimized. FIB-GAE and AFM machining were applied for absorber layer repair test. XeF2 gas was used for FIB-GAE. Good selectivity between absorber layer and buffer layer was obtained using XeF2 gas. However, XeF2 gas causes side etching of TaGeN layer. AFM machining repair technique was demonstrated for TaGeN layer repair.

  1. EUVL reticle factory model and reticle cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Shelden, G.; Troccolo, P.

    1996-05-22

    The key issues in reticle manufacturing are cost and delivery time, both of which are dependent upon the yield of the process line. To estimate the cost and delivery time for EUVL reticles in commercial manufacturing, we have developed the first model for an EUV reticle factory which includes all the tools required for a presumed EUVL reticle fabrication process. This model includes the building, support tools and sufficient ``in-line`` process tools for the manufacture of (more than) 2500 reticles per year. Industry specifications for the tool performance are used to determine the number of tools required per process step and the average number of reticles fabricated per year. Building and capital equipment depreciation costs, tool installation costs, tool maintenance costs, labor, clean room costs, process times and process yields are estimated and used to calculate the yearly operating cost of the reticle factory and the average reticle fabrication cost. We estimate the sales price of an EUV reticle to be $60K for non-critical levels and $120K for ``leading-edge.`` The average reticle fabrication time is calculated for three different process-line yields.

  2. Phase defect analysis with actinic full-field EUVL mask blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Suga, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    We had developed an actinic full-field inspection system to detect multilayer phase-defects with dark field imaging. Regarding the actinic inspection of native defects, the influence of the defect's surface dimension and multilayer structure, on the intensity-signal obtained from the inspection was analyzed. Three mask blanks were inspected from which 55 defects, observed with AFM and SEM, were classified as amplitude-defects or phase-defects. The surface dimensions and SEVDs (sphere equivalent volume diameters) of the defects were measured with the AFM. In the case where their SEVDs were same as of the programmed phase-defects, they were found to produce stronger intensitysignals in comparison to the ones from the programmed phase-defects. Cross-sectional multilayer structures of two native phase-defects were observed with TEM, and those defects formed non-conformal structures in the multilayer. This result means that most of the native phase-defects tend to form a non-conformal structure, and can make large impact on the wafer image in comparison to the ones from a conformal structure. Besides phase-defects, the actinic inspection also detected amplitude-defects. Although the sensitivities of the amplitude-defects were found to be lower than those of the phase-defects, an amplitude-defect higher than 30 nm could be detected with high probability.

  3. Model of Ru-surface oxidation for the lifetime scaling of EUVL projection optics mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Iwao

    2006-03-01

    A chemical model of the surface oxidization of a ruthenium capping layer was constructed for the lifetime scaling of the mirrors of EUVL projection optics. It has two steps: the formation of active oxygen from adsorbed water by EUV irradiation, and the diffusion of active oxygen and its reaction with Ru at the interface between Ru oxide and Ru metal. The rate equations for these steps can be solved independently because the time scale is very different. This paper reports results for Step 1. They revealed the following: (1) The predicted dependence of the amount of oxidation on water pressure is linear over a very wide range. That means that water pressure is a good measure of the degree of acceleration. The reported non-linear dependence on water pressure cannot be explained without the influence of other factors, such as the amount of background hydrocarbons. (2) The rate equation showed the dependence on light intensity also to be linear. That is, a theoretical model based on a simple rate equation cannot predict the reported non-linear intensity dependence. So, we calculated the rise in surface temperature caused by irradiation over a long period from the rate equation for one-dimensional thermal conduction and the Lambert-Beer Law for surface photoabsorption. These calculations revealed that irradiation for a long period of time causes the surface temperature to rise, thus reducing the rate of formation of active oxygen. So, light intensity is a limiting factor in acceleration tests. (3) The rate of oxidation is significantly lower for pulse excitation than for quasi-continuous (synchrotron radiation) light when the EUV light source produces narrow pulses at a low repetition rate.

  4. Process liability evaluation for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Tawarayama, Kazuo; Tanaka, Yuusuke; Kawamura, Daisuke; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Uno, Taiga; Kamo, Takashi; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Itani, Toshiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yumi; Inanami, Ryoichi; Takai, Kosuke; Murano, Koji; Koshiba, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Kohji; Mori, Ichiro

    2009-03-01

    This paper concerns the readiness of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) for high-volume manufacture based on accelerated development in critical areas and the construction of a process liability (PL) test site that integrates results in these areas. The overall lithography performance was determined from the performance of the exposure tool, the printability obtainable with the resist, mask fabrication with accurate critical dimension (CD) control, and correction technology for mask data preparation. The EUV1 exposure tool can carry out exposure over the full field (26 mm × 33 mm) at a resolution high enough for 32-nm line-and-space patterns when Selete Standard Resist 3 (SSR3) is used. Thus, the test site was designed for the full-field exposure of various pattern sizes [half-pitch (hp) 32-50 nm]. The CD variation of the mask was found to be as good as 2.8 nm (3σ) and only one printable defect was detected. The effect of flare on CD variation is a critical issue in EUVL; so flare was compensated for based on the point spread function for the projection optics of the EUV1 and aerial simulations that took resist blur into account. The accuracy obtained when an electronic design automation (EDA) tool was used for mask resizing was found to be very good (error <= +/-2 nm). Metal wiring patterns with a size of hp 32 nm were successfully formed by wafer processing. The production readiness of EUVL based on the integration of results in these areas was evaluated by electrical tests on low-resistance tungsten wiring. The yield for the electrically open test for hp 50 nm (32-nm logic node) and hp 40 nm (22-nm logic node) were found to be over 60% and around 50%, respectively; and the yield tended to decrease as patterns became smaller. We found the PL test site to be very useful for determining where further improvements need to be made and for evaluating the production readiness of EUVL.

  5. Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

  6. Challenges and solutions ensuring EUVL photomask integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brux, O.; Dreß, P.; Schmalfuß, H.; Jonckheere, R.; Koolen-Hermkens, W.

    2012-06-01

    Industry roadmaps indicate that the introduction of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is on track for high volume manufacturing. Although, there has been significant progress in each of the individual subsets of the EUVL infrastructure, the absolute management of the process outside of the scanner and up to the point-of-exposure has been highlighted as critical requirement for the adoption of EUVL. Significant changes in the EUV system environment and mask architecture are driving a zero process tolerance level. Any unforeseen contamination introduced to the scanner environment from the EUV mask could cause considerable downtime and yield loss. Absolute mask integrity at the point-of-exposure must be guaranteed. EUV mask cleaning processes-of-record have been developed and introduced to the industry [1]. The issue is not longer "how to clean the mask" but, "how to keep it clean". With the introduction of EUVL, mask cleanliness extends out beyond the traditional mask cleaning tool. Complete control of contamination and/or particles during transportation, handling and storage will require a holistic approach to mask management. A new environment specifically for EUV mask integrity must be developed and fully tested for the sub 16nm half-pitch node introduction. The SUSS MaskTrack Pro (MTP) InSync was introduced as the solution for EUV mask integrity. SUSS demonstrated the fully automated handling of EUV masks into and out of a Dual Pod System [2]. Intrinsic cleanliness of each individual handling and storage step of the inner pod (EIP) and EUV mask inside the MTP InSync Tool was investigated and reported. A target specification of a PRP <= 0.08 as criterion for the cross contamination between EIP and the EUV reticle during handling within MTP InSync has been achieved and therefore proofing the applicability for the Dual Pod automation. Moreover an appropriate automated handling, other aspects like backside particle contamination and EIP cleanliness plays a

  7. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  8. 100-Picometer Interferometry for EUVL

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G E; Phillion, D W; Johnson, M A; Nguyen, N O; Barty, A; Snell, F J; Dillon, D R; Bradsher, L S

    2002-03-18

    Future extreme ultraviolet lithography (EWL) steppers will, in all likelihood, have six-mirror projection cameras. To operate at the diffraction limit over an acceptable depth of focus each aspheric mirror will have to be fabricated with an absolute figure accuracy approaching 100 pm rms. We are currently developing visible light interferometry to meet this need based on modifications of our present phase shifting diffraction interferometry (PSDI) methodology where we achieved an absolute accuracy of 250pm. The basic PSDI approach has been further simplified, using lensless imaging based on computational diffractive back-propagation, to eliminate auxiliary optics that typically limit measurement accuracy. Small remaining error sources, related to geometric positioning, CCD camera pixel spacing and laser wavelength, have been modeled and measured. Using these results we have estimated the total system error for measuring off-axis aspheric EUVL mirrors with this new approach to interferometry.

  9. Evaluating Printability of Buried Native EUV Mask Phase Defects through a Modeling and Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Mihir; Jindal, Vibhu; Basavalingappa, Adarsh; Herbol, Henry; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Jang, Il-Yong; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Marokkey, Sajan; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Pistor, Thomas V.; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2015-03-16

    The availability of defect-free masks is considered to be a critical issue for enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) as the next generation technology. Since completely defect-free masks will be hard to achieve, it is essential to have a good understanding of the printability of the native EUV mask defects. In this work, we performed a systematic study of native mask defects to understand the defect printability caused by them. The multilayer growth over native substrate mask blank defects was correlated to the multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects having similar profiles in terms of their width and height. To model the multilayer growth over the defects, a novel level-set multilayer growth model was used that took into account the tool deposition conditions of the Veeco Nexus ion beam deposition tool. The same tool was used for performing the actual deposition of the multilayer stack over the characterized native defects, thus ensuring a fair comparison between the actual multilayer growth over native defects, and modeled multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects. Further, the printability of the characterized native defects was studied with the SEMATECH-Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV mask-imaging microscope at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Printability of the modeled regular-shaped defects, which were propagated up the multilayer stack using level-set growth model was studied using defect printability simulations implementing the waveguide algorithm. Good comparison was observed between AIT and the simulation results, thus demonstrating that multilayer growth over a defect is primarily a function of a defect’s width and height, irrespective of its shape. This would allow us to predict printability of the arbitrarily-shaped native EUV mask defects in a systematic and robust manner.

  10. Recent results from extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask inspection for 11 nm half-pitch generation using projection electron microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a promising technique for 1X nm half-pitch (hp) generation lithography. The inspection of patterned EUVL masks is one of the main issues that must be addressed during mask fabrication for manufacture of devices with 11 nm hp feature sizes. We have already designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics that have been integrated into a new inspection system called Model EBEYE-V30 (where "Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) and this system seems quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL patterned mask inspection. The defect inspection sensitivity of this system was evaluated via capture of an electron image that was generated at the mask by focusing the image through the projection optics onto a time-delay integration (TDI) image sensor. For increased throughput and higher defect detection sensitivity, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and a simultaneous deflector for the image capture area that follows the mask scanning motion have been developed. Using a combination of synchronous deflection and mask scanning, the image can be integrated into both the fixed area image sensor and the TDI image sensor. We describe our experimental results for EUV patterned mask inspection using the above system. Elements have been developed for inspection tool integration and the designed specification has been verified. The system performance demonstrates the defect detectability required for 11 nm hp generation EUVL masks.

  11. Simplified models for mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    The ITRS requires < 1.2nm line-edge roughness (LER) for the 22nm half-pitch node. Currently, we can consistently achieve only about 3nm LER. Further progress requires understanding the principle causes of LER. Much work has already been done on how both the resist and LER on the mask effect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and factor into LER limits. Presently, mask-roughness induced LER is studied via full 2D aerial image modeling and subsequent analysis of the resulting image. This method is time consuming and cumbersome. It is, therefore, the goal of this research to develop a useful 'rule-of-thumb' analytic model for mask roughness induced LER to expedite learning and understanding.

  12. Quartz substrates for EUVL reticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, D.R.; Weber, F.J.; Vernon, S.P.; Hawryluk, A.; Baker, S.L.; Golub, A.M.; Shikata, A.; Grady, E.C.

    1995-02-10

    A EUVL reticle blank was fabricated on a specially polished quartz blank. The stress-induced distortion of the multilayer coating was unacceptably large. The distortion can be effectively eliminated by coating the backside of the reticle blank with an identical coating. This strategy has the potential to eliminate multilayer induced stress distortion for the reticle blank in a manner which is compatible with the existing reticle fabrication infrastructure.

  13. Contrast Gain Control Model Fits Masking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Solomon, Joshua A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We studied the fit of a contrast gain control model to data of Foley (JOSA 1994), consisting of thresholds for a Gabor patch masked by gratings of various orientations, or by compounds of two orientations. Our general model includes models of Foley and Teo & Heeger (IEEE 1994). Our specific model used a bank of Gabor filters with octave bandwidths at 8 orientations. Excitatory and inhibitory nonlinearities were power functions with exponents of 2.4 and 2. Inhibitory pooling was broad in orientation, but narrow in spatial frequency and space. Minkowski pooling used an exponent of 4. All of the data for observer KMF were well fit by the model. We have developed a contrast gain control model that fits masking data. Unlike Foley's, our model accepts images as inputs. Unlike Teo & Heeger's, our model did not require multiple channels for different dynamic ranges.

  14. Mask process correction (MPC) modeling and its application to EUV mask for electron beam mask writer EBM-7000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamikubo, Takashi; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Hara, Shigehiro; Anze, Hirohito; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Bai, Shufeng; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Howell, Rafael; Chen, George; Li, Jiangwei; Tao, Jun; Wiley, Jim; Kurosawa, Terunobu; Saito, Yasuko; Takigawa, Tadahiro

    2010-09-01

    In electron beam writing on EUV mask, it has been reported that CD linearity does not show simple signatures as observed with conventional COG (Cr on Glass) masks because they are caused by scattered electrons form EUV mask itself which comprises stacked heavy metals and thick multi-layers. To resolve this issue, Mask Process Correction (MPC) will be ideally applicable. Every pattern is reshaped in MPC. Therefore, the number of shots would not increase and writing time will be kept within reasonable range. In this paper, MPC is extended to modeling for correction of CD linearity errors on EUV mask. And its effectiveness is verified with simulations and experiments through actual writing test.

  15. Are Masking-Based Models of Risk Useful?

    PubMed

    Gisiner, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    As our understanding of directly observable effects from anthropogenic sound exposure has improved, concern about "unobservable" effects such as stress and masking have received greater attention. Equal energy models of masking such as power spectrum models have the appeal of simplicity, but do they offer biologically realistic assessments of the risk of masking? Data relevant to masking such as critical ratios, critical bandwidths, temporal resolution, and directional resolution along with what is known about general mammalian antimasking mechanisms all argue for a much more complicated view of masking when making decisions about the risk of masking inherent in a given anthropogenic sound exposure scenario. PMID:26610979

  16. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography - Reflective Mask Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C.C.; Kearney, P.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Bowers, J.M.; Cerjan, C.; Warrick, A.L.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Fought, E.; Moore, C.; Larson, C.; Baker, S.; Burkhart, S.C.; Hector, S.D.

    2000-05-09

    EUVL mask blanks consist of a distributed Bragg reflector made of 6.7nm-pitch bi-layers of MO and Si deposited upon a precision Si or glass substrate. The layer deposition process has been optimized for low defects, by application of a vendor-supplied but highly modified ion-beam sputter deposition system. This system is fully automated using SMIF technology to obtain the lowest possible environmental- and handling-added defect levels. Originally designed to coat 150mm substrates, it was upgraded in July, 1999 to 200 mm and has coated runs of over 50 substrates at a time with median added defects >100nm below 0.05/cm{sup 2}. These improvements have resulted from a number of ion-beam sputter deposition system modifications, upgrades, and operational changes, which will be discussed. Success in defect reduction is highly dependent upon defect detection, characterization, and cross-platform positional registration. We have made significant progress in adapting and extending commercial tools to this purpose, and have identified the surface scanner detection limits for different defect classes, and the signatures of false counts and non-printable scattering anomalies on the mask blank. We will present key results and how they have helped reduce added defects. The physics of defect reduction and mitigation is being investigated by a program on multilayer growth over deliberately placed perturbations (defects) of varying size. This program includes modeling of multilayer growth and modeling of defect printability. We developed a technique for depositing uniformly sized gold spheres on EUVL substrates, and have studied the suppression of the perturbations during multilayer growth under varying conditions. This work is key to determining the lower limit of critical defect size for EUV Lithography. We present key aspects of this work. We will summarize progress in all aspects of EUVL mask blank development, and present detailed results on defect reduction and mask blank

  17. Automated mask creation from a 3D model using Faethm.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2007-11-01

    We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micro-machining. The masks produced by this design tool can be generic, process independent masks, or if given process constraints, specific for a target process. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology of the model.

  18. A model of PSF estimation for coded mask infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ao; Jin, Jie; Wang, Qing; Yang, Jingyu; Sun, Yi

    2014-11-01

    The point spread function (PSF) of imaging system with coded mask is generally acquired by practical measure- ment with calibration light source. As the thermal radiation of coded masks are relatively severe than it is in visible imaging systems, which buries the modulation effects of the mask pattern, it is difficult to estimate and evaluate the performance of mask pattern from measured results. To tackle this problem, a model for infrared imaging systems with masks is presented in this paper. The model is composed with two functional components, the coded mask imaging with ideal focused lenses and the imperfection imaging with practical lenses. Ignoring the thermal radiation, the systems PSF can then be represented by a convolution of the diffraction pattern of mask with the PSF of practical lenses. To evaluate performances of different mask patterns, a set of criterion are designed according to different imaging and recovery methods. Furthermore, imaging results with inclined plane waves are analyzed to achieve the variation of PSF within the view field. The influence of mask cell size is also analyzed to control the diffraction pattern. Numerical results show that mask pattern for direct imaging systems should have more random structures, while more periodic structures are needed in system with image reconstruction. By adjusting the combination of random and periodic arrangement, desired diffraction pattern can be achieved.

  19. Source mask optimization using 3D mask and compact resist models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sewefy, Omar; Chen, Ao; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Chung, Angeline; Foong, Yee Mei; Adam, Kostas; Sturtevant, John

    2016-03-01

    Source Mask Optimization (SMO) has played an important role in technology setup and ground rule definition since the 2x nm technology node. While improvements in SMO algorithms have produced higher quality and more consistent results, the accuracy of the overall solution is critically linked to how faithfully the entire patterning system is modeled, from mask down to substrate. Fortunately, modeling technology has continued to advance to provide greater accuracy in modeling 3D mask effects, 3D resist behavior, and resist phenomena. Specifically, the Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) approximates the 3D mask response as a superposition of edge-responses.1 The DDM can be applied to a sectorized illumination source based on Hybrid-Hopkins Abbe approximation,2 which provides an accurate and fast solution for the modeling of 3D mask effects and has been widely used in OPC modeling. The implementation of DDM in the SMO flow, however, is more challenging because the shape and intensity of the source, unlike the case in OPC modeling, is evolving along the optimization path. As a result, it gets more complicated. It is accepted that inadequate pupil sectorization results in reduced accuracy in any application, however in SMO the required uniformity and density of pupil sampling is higher than typical OPC and modeling cases. In this paper, we describe a novel method to implement DDM in the SMO flow. The source sectorization is defined by following the universal pixel sizes used in SMO. Fast algorithms are developed to enable computation of edge signals from each fine pixel of the source. In this case, each pixel has accurate information to describe its contribution to imaging and the overall objective function. A more continuous angular spectrum from 3D mask scattering is thus captured, leading to accurate modeling of 3D mask effects throughout source optimization. This method is applied on a 2x nm middle-of-line layer test case. The impact of the 3D mask model accuracy on

  20. Modeling Spatial and Temporal Aspects of Visual Backward Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Luksys, Gediminas; Gerstner, Wulfram; Herzog, Michael H.; Ernst, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Visual backward masking is a versatile tool for understanding principles and limitations of visual information processing in the human brain. However, the mechanisms underlying masking are still poorly understood. In the current contribution, the authors show that a structurally simple mathematical model can explain many spatial and temporal…

  1. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  2. Simulation of AIMS measurements using rigorous mask 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chih-Shiang; Huang, Hsu-Ting; Chu, Fu-Sheng; Chu, Yuan-Chih; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Aerial image measurement system (AIMSTM) has been widely used for wafer level inspection of mask defects. Reported inspection flows include die-to-die (D2D) and die-to-database (D2DB) methods. For patterns that do not repeat in another die, only the D2DB approach is applicable. The D2DB method requires accurate simulation of AIMS measurements for a mask pattern. An optical vectorial model is needed to depict the mask diffraction effect in this simulation. To accurately simulate the imaging results, a rigorous electro-magnetic field (EMF) model is essential to correctly take account of the EMF scattering induced by the mask topography, which is usually called the mask 3D effect. In this study, the mask 3D model we use is rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), which calculates the diffraction fields from a single plane wave incidence. A hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method with RCWA is used to calculate the EMF diffraction at a desired accuracy level while keeping the computation time practical. We will compare the speed of the hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method to the rigorous Abbe method. The matching between simulation and experiment is more challenging for AIMS than CD-SEM because its measurements provide full intensity information. Parameters in the mask 3D model such as film stack thickness or film optical properties, is optimized during the fitting process. We will report the fitting results of AIMS images for twodimensional structures with various pitches. By accurately simulating the AIMS measurements, it provides a necessary tool to perform the mask inspection using the D2DB approach and to accurately predict the mask defects.

  3. A physiological ear model for the emulation of masking.

    PubMed

    Baumgarte, F

    1999-01-01

    Auditory masking is exploited in technical audio systems for transmission and storage to improve the perceived audio quality. In this respect, perception models are necessary for a masked threshold prediction to quantify the threshold of audibility for a given signal or distortion. The presented ear model emulates those parts of the auditory sound processing which are relevant to masking. The physiological modeling approach is not limited to simple masker-test-signal configurations as usually employed in psychoacoustical measurements, but it is valid for complex signals as well, which is desired in the aforementioned applications. The ear model includes a nonlinear active cochlear model which emulates the basic mechanisms effective in masking: excitation and suppression. Nonlinear mechanical amplification by means of the outer hair cells plays a crucial role in proper modeling of these effects. In addition to physiological measurements at the mechanical level of sound processing in the cochlea, classical masking patterns and nonlinear masking effects are demonstrated by the ear model. PMID:10529651

  4. Impact of topographic mask models on scanner matching solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Pomplun, Jan; Renwick, Stephen P.

    2014-03-01

    Of keen interest to the IC industry are advanced computational lithography applications such as Optical Proximity Correction of IC layouts (OPC), scanner matching by optical proximity effect matching (OPEM), and Source Optimization (SO) and Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) used as advanced reticle enhancement techniques. The success of these tasks is strongly dependent on the integrity of the lithographic simulators used in computational lithography (CL) optimizers. Lithographic mask models used by these simulators are key drivers impacting the accuracy of the image predications, and as a consequence, determine the validity of these CL solutions. Much of the CL work involves Kirchhoff mask models, a.k.a. thin masks approximation, simplifying the treatment of the mask near-field images. On the other hand, imaging models for hyper-NA scanner require that the interactions of the illumination fields with the mask topography be rigorously accounted for, by numerically solving Maxwell's Equations. The simulators used to predict the image formation in the hyper-NA scanners must rigorously treat the masks topography and its interaction with the scanner illuminators. Such imaging models come at a high computational cost and pose challenging accuracy vs. compute time tradeoffs. Additional complication comes from the fact that the performance metrics used in computational lithography tasks show highly non-linear response to the optimization parameters. Finally, the number of patterns used for tasks such as OPC, OPEM, SO, or SMO range from tens to hundreds. These requirements determine the complexity and the workload of the lithography optimization tasks. The tools to build rigorous imaging optimizers based on first-principles governing imaging in scanners are available, but the quantifiable benefits they might provide are not very well understood. To quantify the performance of OPE matching solutions, we have compared the results of various imaging optimization trials obtained

  5. The difficult business model for mask equipment makers and mask infrastructure development support from consortia and governments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    The extension of optical projection lithography through immersion to patterning features with half pitch <=65 nm is placing greater demands on the mask. Strong resolution enhancement techniques (RETs), such as embedded and alternating phase shift masks and complex model-based optical proximity correction, are required to compensate for diffraction and limited depth of focus (DOF). To fabricate these masks, many new or upgraded tools are required to write patterns, measure feature sizes and placement, inspect for defects, review defect printability and repair defects on these masks. Beyond the significant technical challenges, suppliers of mask fabrication equipment face the challenge of being profitable in the small market for mask equipment while encountering significant R&D expenses to bring new generations of mask fabrication equipment to market. The total available market for patterned masks is estimated to be $2.5B to $2.9B per year. The patterned mask market is about 20% of the market size for lithography equipment and materials. The total available market for mask-making equipment is estimated to be about $800M per year. The largest R&D affordability issue arises for the makers of equipment for fabricating masks where total available sales are typically less than ten units per year. SEMATECH has used discounted cash flow models to predict the affordable R&D while maintaining industry accepted internal rates of return. The results have been compared to estimates of the total R&D cost to bring a new generation of mask equipment to market for various types of tools. The analysis revealed that affordability of the required R&D is a significant problem for many suppliers of mask-making equipment. Consortia such as SEMATECH and Selete have played an important role in cost sharing selected mask equipment and material development projects. Governments in the United States, in Europe and in Japan have also helped equipment suppliers with support for R&D. This paper

  6. Evaluation of a new model of mask topography effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrat, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    A new method for simulating mask topography effects is described. A model comprising a set of functions is generated based on the results of test patterns simulated using rigorous mask simulation. The functions are combined with the thin mask diffraction pattern in order to create a modeled thick mask diffraction pattern. The mask diffraction pattern is subsequently used in the lithosimTM simulation tool to generate the wafer image. Results are described for 1D and 2D test structures. The 1D test structures is a line and space test pattern where the line is set at 40nm width and the space is varied from 40nm to 1000nm. The illumination setting chosen was a TE polarized dipole illumination with a pole distance of 0.9 and a pole radius of 0.01. First the accuracy of the simulator itself was verified using thin mask calculation and comparing the data to another simulator. The intensity profiles are virtually identical. The RMS of the difference between the two plots is 8E-05. Next the model is compared to the rigorous calculation. The RMS of the difference between the two plots is 3E-03. The standard deviation of the CD difference between the model and the rigorous calculation, calculated for 5 thresholds (0.1, 0.11, 0.12, 0.13, and 0.14) and for all the structures, is 0.38nm. We also demonstrate that the mask model can be used with different optical settings by showing an example of two additional defocus values with an identical RMS of 3E-03. For the 2D test pattern made of a dense contact array, the mask fields are computed using rigorous calculation and compared to the model. The difference between the fields is within the error of the rigorous calculation. The resulting wafer images are almost identical. No re-scaling of the data was applied to either the mask fields or the wafer images.

  7. Modeling the field diffracted from photo mask at oblique incidence.

    PubMed

    Tawfik Elazhary, Tamer; Hisham Morshed, Ahmed; Khalil, Diaa

    2010-08-01

    In optical lithography, light diffracted from photo mask structures has been customarily assumed to be constant with the angle of incidence of the light illuminating the photo mask. As numerical aperture increases to unity and beyond, to cope with the continuous demand for shrinking integrated circuits, device dimensions, and densities, this approximation is no longer valid. In this paper we use the physical theory of diffraction to study, understand, and model the variation of light diffracted from photo mask structures of the order of the wavelength, with the angle of light incidence. We present a semianalytical model that is fast, accurate, and compatible with existing professional software in this domain. The accuracy of the model is studied using the finite-difference time-domain technique and is shown to be below 5% at the image plane, within angles of incidence between +/-20 degrees .

  8. Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, S C; Cerjarn, C; Kearney, P; Mirkarimi, P; Walton, C; Ray-Chaudhuri, A

    1999-03-11

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithgraphy (EUVL) is an emerging technology for fabrication of sub-100 nm feature sizes on silicon, following the SIA roadmap well into the 21st century. The specific EUVL system described is a scanned, projection lithography system with a 4:1 reduction, using a laser plasma EUV source. The mask and all of the system optics are reflective, multilayer mirrors which function in the extreme ultraviolet at 13.4 nm wavelength. Since the masks are imaged to the wafer exposure plane, mask defects greater than 80% of the exposure plane CD (for 4:1 reduction) will in many cases render the mask useless, whereas intervening optics can have defects which are not a printing problem. For the 100 nm node, we must reduce defects to less than 0.01/cm² @ 80nm or larger to obtain acceptable mask production yields. We have succeeded in reducing the defects to less than 0.1/cm² for defects larger than 130 nm detected by visible light inspection tools, however our program goal is to achieve 0.01/cm² in the near future. More importantly though, we plan to have a detailed understanding of defect origination and the effect on multilayer growth in order to mitigate defects below the 10-2/cm² level on the next generation of mask blank deposition systems. In this paper we will discuss issues and results from the ion-beam multilayer deposition tool, details of the defect detection and characterization facility, and progress on defect printability modeling.

  9. Mask roughness induced LER: geometric model at long correlation lengths

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-02-11

    Collective understanding of how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER has made significant advances. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which mask surface roughness couples to image plane LER as a function of illumination conditions, NA, and defocus. Recently, progress has been made in formulating a simplified solution for mask roughness induced LER. Here, we investigate the LER behavior at long correlation lengths of surface roughness on the mask. We find that for correlation lengths greater than 3/NA in wafer dimensions and CDs greater than approximately 0.75/NA, the previously described simplified model, which remains based on physical optics, converges to a 'geometric regime' which is based on ray optics and is independent of partial coherence. In this 'geometric regime', the LER is proportional to the mask slope error as it propagates through focus, and provides a faster alternative to calculating LER in contrast to either full 2D aerial image simulation modeling or the newly proposed physical optics model. Data is presented for both an NA = 0.32 and an NA = 0.5 imaging system for CDs of 22-nm and 50-nm horizontal-line-dense structures.

  10. Using an excitation-pattern model to predict auditory masking.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, M; Kohlrausch, A

    1994-10-01

    This paper evaluates the extent to which auditory masking can be reliably predicted from excitation patterns. For this purpose a quantitative model proposed by Glasberg and Moore [Hear. Res. 47, 103-138 (1990)] was used to calculate excitation patterns evoked by stationary sounds. Model simulations were performed for a number of masking experiments, reported in the literature, by calculating excitation patterns for the masker-alone as well as for the masker-plus-target conditions. As a threshold criterion, a difference between the two patterns of 1 dB at any frequency was imposed. For narrow-band-noise masking patterns, the method yields a fairly precise prediction of experimental data. For other conditions, however, systematic deviations between model predictions and data are observed. For instance, the model does not reproduce the typical tip-tail shape of psychophysical tuning curves. Furthermore, the nonlinearities in level dependence are not correctly described, and the model fails to reproduce a realistic two-tone masking curve. PMID:7852202

  11. A model of selective masking in chromatic detection.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Timothy G; Swanson, Emily A; McCarthy, Comfrey L; Eskew, Rhea T

    2016-07-01

    Narrowly tuned, selective noise masking of chromatic detection has been taken as evidence for the existence of a large number of color mechanisms (i.e., higher order color mechanisms). Here we replicate earlier observations of selective masking of tests in the (L,M) plane of cone space when the noise is placed near the corners of the detection contour. We used unipolar Gaussian blob tests with three different noise color directions, and we show that there are substantial asymmetries in the detection contours-asymmetries that would have been missed with bipolar tests such as Gabor patches. We develop a new chromatic detection model, which is based on probability summation of linear cone combinations, and incorporates a linear contrast energy versus noise power relationship that predicts how the sensitivity of these mechanisms changes with noise contrast and chromaticity. With only six unipolar color mechanisms (the same number as the cardinal model), the new model accounts for the threshold contours across the different noise conditions, including the asymmetries and the selective effects of the noises. The key for producing selective noise masking in the (L,M) plane is having more than two mechanisms with opposed L- and M-cone inputs, in which case selective masking can be produced without large numbers of color mechanisms. PMID:27442723

  12. Phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph mask fabrication, characterization, and modeling for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Wilson, Daniel; Muller, Richard; Sidick, Erkin; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a second-generation occulting mask for a phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph, designed for use on the WFIRST-AFTA mission. The mask has many small features (˜micron lateral scales) and was fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory, then characterized using a scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and optical interferometric microscope. The measured fabrication errors were then fed to a wavefront control model which predicts the contrast performance of a full coronagraph. The expected coronagraphic performance using this mask is consistent with observing ˜15 planetary targets with WFIRST-AFTA in a reasonable time (<1 day/target).

  13. System for generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model using topological analysis

    DOEpatents

    Schiek, Richard

    2006-06-20

    A method of generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model comprises providing a three-dimensional model representing a micro-electro-mechanical structure for manufacture and a description of process mask requirements, reducing the three-dimensional model to a topological description of unique cross sections, and selecting candidate masks from the unique cross sections and the cross section topology. The method further can comprise reconciling the candidate masks based on the process mask requirements description to produce two-dimensional process masks.

  14. Mask process matching using a model based data preparation solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Brian; Saib, Mohamed; Figueiro, Thiago; Petroni, Paolo; Progler, Chris; Schiavone, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Process matching is the ability to precisely reproduce the signature of a given fabrication process while using a different one. A process signature is typically described as systematic CD variation driven by feature geometry as a function of feature size, local density or distance to neighboring structures. The interest of performing process matching is usually to address differences in the mask fabrication process without altering the signature of the mask, which is already validated by OPC models and already used in production. The need for such process matching typically arises from the expansion of the production capacity within the same or different mask fabrication facilities, from the introduction of new, perhaps more advanced, equipment to deliver same process of record masks and/or from the re-alignment of processes which have altered over time. For state-of-the-art logic and memory mask processes, such matching requirements can be well below 2nm and are expected to reduce below 1nm in near future. In this paper, a data preparation solution for process matching is presented and discussed. Instead of adapting the physical process itself, a calibrated model is used to modify the data to be exposed by the source process in order to induce the results to match the one obtained while running the target process. This strategy consists in using the differences among measurements from the source and target processes, in the calibration of a single differential model. In this approach, no information other than the metrology results is required from either process. Experimental results were obtained by matching two different processes at Photronics. The standard deviation between both processes was of 2.4nm. After applying the process matching technique, the average absolute difference between the processes was reduced to 1.0nm with a standard deviation of 1.3nm. The methods used to achieve the result will be described along with implementation considerations, to

  15. Calibration of a Spatial-Temporal Discrimination Model from Forward, Simultaneous, and Backward Masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.; Beard, B. L.; Stone, Leland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have been developing a simplified spatial-temporal discrimination model similar to our simplified spatial model in that masking is assumed to be a function of the local visible contrast energy. The overall spatial-temporal sensitivity of the model is calibrated to predict the detectability of targets on a uniform background. To calibrate the spatial-temporal integration functions that define local visible contrast energy, spatial-temporal masking data are required. Observer thresholds were measured (2IFC) for the detection of a 12 msec target stimulus in the presence of a 700 msec mask. Targets were 1, 3 or 9 c/deg sine wave gratings. Masks were either one of these gratings or two of them combined. The target was presented in 17 temporal positions with respect to the mask, including positions before, during and after the mask. Peak masking was found near mask onset and offset for 1 and 3 c/deg targets, while masking effects were more nearly uniform during the mask for the 9 c/deg target. As in the purely spatial case, the simplified model can not predict all the details of masking as a function of masking component spatial frequencies, but overall the prediction errors are small.

  16. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of {sigma} = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with {sigma} = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  17. Update on the SEMATECH 0.5 NA Extreme-Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Microfield Exposure Tool (MET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Kevin; Ashworth, Dominic; Bremer, Mark; Chin, Rodney; Fan, Yu-Jen; Girard, Luc; Glatzel, Holger; Goldstein, Michael; Gullikson, Eric; Kennon, Jim; Kestner, Bob; Marchetti, Lou; Naulleau, Patrick; Soufli, Regina; Bauer, Johannes; Mengel, Markus; Welker, Joachim; Grupp, Michael; Sohmen, Erik; Wurm, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    In support of the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) roadmap, a SEMATECH/CNSE joint program is underway to produce multiple EUVL (wavelength of 13.5 nm) R&D photolithography tools. The 0.5 NA projection optic magnification (5X), track length and mechanical interfaces match the currently installed 0.3 NA micro-field exposure tools (MET) projection optic [1] [2] [3]. Therefore, significant changes to the current tool platforms and other adjacent modules are not necessary. However, many of the existing systems do need upgrades to achieve the anticipated smaller exposure feature sizes [4]. To date we have made considerable progress in the production of the first of the two-mirror 0.5 NA projection optics for EUVL [5]. With a measured transmitted wave front error of less than 1 nm root mean square (RMS) over its 30 μm × 200 μm image field, lithography modeling shows that a predicted resolution of <=12 nm and an ultimate resolution of 8 nm (with extreme dipole illumination) will be possible. This paper will present an update from the 0.5 NA EUVL program. We will detail the more significant activities that are being undertaken to upgrade the MET and discuss expected performance.

  18. Accurate mask model implementation in optical proximity correction model for 14-nm nodes and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Farys, Vincent; Huguennet, Frederic; Armeanu, Ana-Maria; Bork, Ingo; Chomat, Michael; Buck, Peter; Schanen, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that the current optical proximity correction model assuming the mask pattern to be analogous to the designed data is no longer valid. An extreme case of line-end shortening shows a gap up to 10 nm difference (at mask level). For that reason, an accurate mask model has been calibrated for a 14-nm logic gate level. A model with a total RMS of 1.38 nm at mask level was obtained. Two-dimensional structures, such as line-end shortening and corner rounding, were well predicted using scanning electron microscopy pictures overlaid with simulated contours. The first part of this paper is dedicated to the implementation of our improved model in current flow. The improved model consists of a mask model capturing mask process and writing effects, and a standard optical and resist model addressing the litho exposure and development effects at wafer level. The second part will focus on results from the comparison of the two models, the new and the regular.

  19. Accurate mask model implementation in OPC model for 14nm nodes and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Farys, Vincent; Huguennet, Frederic; Armeanu, Ana-Maria; Bork, Ingo; Chomat, Michael; Buck, Peter; Schanen, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    In a previous work [1] we demonstrated that current OPC model assuming the mask pattern to be analogous to the designed data is no longer valid. Indeed as depicted in figure 1, an extreme case of line-end shortening shows a gap up to 10 nm difference (at mask level). For that reason an accurate mask model, for a 14nm logic gate level has been calibrated. A model with a total RMS of 1.38nm at mask level was obtained. 2D structures such as line-end shortening and corner rounding were well predicted using SEM pictures overlaid with simulated contours. The first part of this paper is dedicated to the implementation of our improved model in current flow. The improved model consists of a mask model capturing mask process and writing effects and a standard optical and resist model addressing the litho exposure and development effects at wafer level. The second part will focus on results from the comparison of the two models, the new and the regular, as depicted in figure 2.

  20. Mechanisms of Masked Priming: Testing the Entry Opening Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    Since it was introduced in Forster and Davis (1984), masked priming has been widely adopted in the psycholinguistic research on visual word recognition, but there has been little consensus on its actual mechanisms, i.e. how it occurs and how it should be interpreted. This dissertation addresses two different interpretations of masked priming, one…

  1. Modeling and Observations of Phase-Mask Trapezoidal Profiles with Grating-Fiber Image Reproduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Lindesay, James V.; Lee, Hyung R.; Ndlela, Zolili U.; Thompso, Erica J.

    2000-01-01

    We report on an investigation of the trapezoidal design and fabrication defects in phase masks used to produce Bragg reflection gratings in optical fibers. We used a direct visualization technique to examine the nonuniformity of the interference patterns generated by several phase masks. Fringe patterns from the phase masks are compared with the analogous patterns resulting from two-beam interference. Atomic force microscope imaging of the actual phase gratings that give rise to anomalous fringe patterns is used to determine input parameters for a general theoretical model. Phase masks with pitches of 0.566 and 1.059 microns are modeled and investigated.

  2. Automated surface micro-machining mask creation from a 3D model.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2004-06-01

    We have developed and implemented a method, which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micromachining. The masks produced by this design tool can be generic, process independent masks, or if given process constraints, specific for a target process. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology to the model. The 3D model is first separated into bodies that are non-intersecting, made from different materials or only linked through a ground plane. Next, for each body unique vertical cross sections are located and arranged into a tree based on their topological relationship. A branch-wise search of the tree uncovers locations where deposition boundaries must lie and identifies candidate masks creating a generic mask set for the 3D model. Finally, in the last step specific process requirements are considered that may constrain the generic mask set. Constraints can include the thickness or number of deposition layers, specific ordering of masks as required by a process and type of material used in a given layer. Candidate masks are reconciled with the process constraints through a constrained optimization.

  3. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  4. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    DOEpatents

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  5. EUV scanner throughput considerations for the higher mask magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehisa, Kiwamu

    2013-06-01

    EUVL scanner throughputs are calculated considering a higher mask magnification. The calculation results show that the throughput of 8X mask system is 60-70% of that of 4X mask system. However the relative throughput compared to the 4X is higher if the duty cycle is considered as the input EUV power. The throughput is also estimated considering a 450mm wafer. Additionally the throughput for a twin reticle stage system using two 8X 6" masks is estimated for the case of stitching exposure.

  6. LithoScope: Simulation Based Mask Layout Verification with Physical Resist Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qi-De

    2002-12-01

    Simulation based mask layout verification and optimization is a cost effective way to ensure high mask performance in wafer lithography. Because mask layout verification serves as a gateway to the expensive manufacturing process, the model used for verification must have superior accuracy than models used upstream. In this paper, we demonstrate, for the first time, a software system for mask layout verification and optical proximity correction that employs a physical resist development model. The new system, LithoScope, predicts wafer patterning by solving optical and resist processing equations on a scale that is until recently considered unpractical. Leveraging the predictive capability of the physical model, LithoScope can perform mask layout verification and optical proximity correction under a wide range of processing conditions and for any reticle enhancement technology without the need for multiple model development. We show the ability for physical resist model to change iso-focal bias by optimizing resist parameters, which is critical for matching the experimental process window. We present line width variation statistics and chip level process window predictions using a practical cell layout. We show that LithoScope model can accurately describe the resist-intensive poly gate layer patterning. This system can be used to pre-screen mask data problems before manufacturing to reduce the overall cost of the mask and the product.

  7. EUV mask defect mitigation through pattern placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, John; Abbas, Mansoor

    2010-09-01

    One of the challenges of EUVL is to bring EUV mask blank defect levels to zero. With uncertainty on when defect free masks may be routinely available, we explore a possibility for effectively using defective EUV mask blanks in production with a defect avoidance strategy. The key idea is to position the pattern/layout on the blank where the defects do not impact the final wafer image. Assuming that layout designs contain some non-critical areas in which defects can be safely positioned, it may be possible to align these regions with a given, small set of defect positions mapped from an imperfect mask blank. Using a few representative assortment of current-node, full-chip layout patterns we run multiple trials against real blank defect maps with various defect counts successfully. Our goal is to assess the probabilities that defect avoidance will work as a function of mask blank defect count, and by lithography layer.

  8. A study of defects on EUV mask using blank inspection, patterned mask inspection, and wafer inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S.; Ren, L.; Chan, D.; Wurm, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Nakajima, T.; Kishimoto, M.; Ahn, B.; Kang, I.; Park, J.-O.; Cho, K.; Han, S.-I.; Laursen, T.

    2010-03-12

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. yet link data is available for understanding native defects on real masks. In this paper, a full-field EUV mask is fabricated to investigate the printability of various defects on the mask. The printability of defects and identification of their source from mask fabrication to handling were studied using wafer inspection. The printable blank defect density excluding particles and patterns is 0.63 cm{sup 2}. Mask inspection is shown to have better sensitivity than wafer inspection. The sensitivity of wafer inspection must be improved using through-focus analysis and a different wafer stack.

  9. Actinic review of EUV masks: Status and recent results of the AIMS EUV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Markus R.; Hellweg, Dirk; Koch, Markus; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Perlitz, Sascha; Garetto, Anthony; Magnusson, Krister; Capelli, Renzo; Jindal, Vibhu

    2015-03-01

    The EUV mask infrastructure is of key importance for the successful introduction of EUV lithography into volume production. In particular, for the production of defect free masks an actinic review of potential defect sites is required. To realize such an actinic review tool, Carl Zeiss and the SEMATECH EUVL Mask Infrastructure consortium started a development program for an EUV aerial image metrology system, the AIMS™ EUV. In this paper, we discuss the current status of the prototype integration and show recent results.

  10. DIET Processes on Ruthenium Surfaces Related to Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL)

    SciTech Connect

    Yakshinskiy, B.; Wasielewski, R; Loginova, E; Hedhili, M; Madey, T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide insights into desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) processes that affect the reflectivity of ruthenium-capped Mo/Si multilayer mirrors working under EUVL (extreme ultraviolet lithography) operating conditions (high vacuum, and 13.5 nm (92 eV) photons). Critical issues are associated with possible oxidation of the 2 nm thick Ru capping layer due to the inevitable background pressure of H{sub 2}O, and carbon build up due to background hydrocarbons. In the present work, we discuss aspects of the radiation-induced surface chemistry of Ru irradiated by 100 eV electrons and 92 eV photons. The cross section for electron-stimulated desorption of oxygen from O-covered Ru is 6 x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}. Carbon accumulation several nm thick occurs on the Ru surface during electron irradiation in methyl methacrylate (MMA) vapor, a model background impurity hydrocarbon. Radiation damage by low-energy secondary electrons is believed to dominate over direct photoexcitation of adsorbates under EUVL conditions. The secondary electron yield from Ru varies strongly with photon energy, and is 0.02 electrons/photon at 92 eV.

  11. DIET processes on ruthenium surfaces related to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Wasielewski, R.; Loginova, E.; Hedhili, M. N.; Madey , T. E.

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this work is to provide insights into desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) processes that affect the reflectivity of ruthenium-capped Mo/Si multilayer mirrors working under EUVL (extreme ultraviolet lithography) operating conditions [high vacuum, and 13.5 nm (92 eV) photons]. Critical issues are associated with possible oxidation of the 2 nm thick Ru capping layer due to the inevitable background pressure of H 2O, and carbon build up due to background hydrocarbons. In the present work, we discuss aspects of the radiation-induced surface chemistry of Ru irradiated by 100 eV electrons and 92 eV photons. The cross section for electron-stimulated desorption of oxygen from O-covered Ru is ˜6 × 10 -19 cm 2. Carbon accumulation several nm thick occurs on the Ru surface during electron irradiation in methyl methacrylate (MMA) vapor, a model background impurity hydrocarbon. Radiation damage by low-energy secondary electrons is believed to dominate over direct photoexcitation of adsorbates under EUVL conditions. The secondary electron yield from Ru varies strongly with photon energy, and is ˜0.02 electrons/photon at 92 eV.

  12. Top Level User Specifications for Mask Inspection Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Taylor, J S

    2002-01-31

    This document compiles top-level user specifications for an EUV microscope for characterizing EUVL mask defects. Two broad categories of application are considered: (1) emulation of the imaging characteristics of a stepper for printability analysis (AIM mode); and (2) high-resolution imaging for obtaining a more detailed characterization of defects or mask features. It is generally assumed that the mask defects that are to be characterized have been located by a previous inspection procedure and the spatial coordinates of the defect can be transferred to the microscope.

  13. Neonatal resuscitation 3: manometer use in a model of face mask ventilation

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Adequate ventilation is the key to successful neonatal resuscitation. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) is initiated with manual ventilation devices via face masks. These devices may be used with a manometer to measure airway pressures delivered. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To assess the effect of viewing a manometer on the peak inspiratory pressures used, the volume delivered, and leakage from the face mask during PPV with two manual ventilation devices in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Participants gave PPV to a modified resuscitation mannequin using a Laerdal infant resuscitator and a Neopuff infant resuscitator at specified pressures ensuring adequate chest wall excursion. Each participant gave PPV to the mannequin with each device twice, viewing the manometer on one occasion and unable to see the manometer on the other. Data from participants were averaged for each device used with the manometer and without the manometer separately. Results: A total of 7767 inflations delivered by the 18 participants were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressures delivered were lower with the Laerdal device. There were no differences in leakage from the face mask or volumes delivered. Whether or not the manometer was visible made no difference to any measured variable. Conclusions: Viewing a manometer during PPV in this model of neonatal resuscitation does not affect the airway pressure or tidal volumes delivered or the degree of leakage from the face mask. PMID:15871988

  14. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  15. Enforcement of Mask Rule Compliance in Model-Based OPC'ed Layouts during Data Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Dirk H.; Vuletic, Radovan; Seidl, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    Currently available commercial model-based OPC tools do not always generate layouts which are mask rule compliant. Additional processing is required to remove mask rule violations, which are often too numerous for manual patching. Although physical verification tools can be used to remove simple mask rule violations, the results are often unsatisfactory for more complicated geometrical configurations. The subject of this paper is the development and application of a geometrical processing engine that automatically enforces mask rule compliance of the OPC'ed layout. It is designed as an add-on to a physical verification tool. The engine constructs patches, which remove mask rule violations such as notches or width violations. By employing a Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) optimization method, the edges of each patch are placed in a way that avoids secondary violations while modifying the OPC'ed layout as little as possible. A sequence of enforcement steps is applied to the layout to remove all types of mask rule violations. This approach of locally confined minimal layout modifications retains OPC corrections to a maximum amount. This method has been used successfully in production on a variety of DRAM designs for the non-array regions.

  16. Optimization of mask manufacturing rule check constraint for model based assist feature generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Seongbo; Kim, Young-chang; Chun, Yong-jin; Lee, Seong-Woo; Lee, Suk-joo; Choi, Seong-woon; Han, Woo-sung; Chang, Seong-hoon; Yoon, Seok-chan; Kim, Hee-bom; Ki, Won-tai; Woo, Sang-gyun; Cho, Han-gu

    2008-11-01

    space restriction. The test mask for this experimental work includes not only typical split patterns but also real device patterns that are generated by in-house model-based assist feature generation tool. We analyzed the mask writing result for typical patterns and compared the simulation result, and wafer result for real device patterns.

  17. Application of DBM tool for detection of EUV mask defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Gyun; Kim, Jungchan; Park, Chanha; Lee, Taehyeong; Ji, Sunkeun; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu; Park, Byeongjun; Maruyama, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2013-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is one of the most leading lithography technologies for high volume manufacturing. The EUVL is based on reflective optic system therefore critical patterning issues are arisen from the surface of photomask. Defects below and inside of the multilayer or absorber of EUV photomask is one of the most critical issues to implement EUV lithography in mass production. It is very important to pick out and repair printable mask defects. Unfortunately, however, infrastructure for securing the defect free photomask such as inspection tool is still under development furthermore it does not seem to be ready soon. In order to overcome the lack of infrastructures for EUV mask inspection, we will discuss an alternative methodology which is based on wafer inspection results using DBM (Design Based Metrology) tool. It is very challenging for metrology to quantify real mask defect from wafer inspection result since various sources are possible contributor. One of them is random defect comes from poor CD uniformity. It is probable that those random defects are majority of a defect list including real mask defects. It is obvious that CD uniformity should be considered to pick out only a real mask defect. In this paper, the methodology to determine real mask defect from the wafer inspection results will be discussed. Experiments are carried out on contact layer and on metal layer using mask defect inspection tool, Teron(KLA6xx) and DBM (Design Based Metrology) tool, NGR2170™.

  18. Considering mask pellicle effect for more accurate OPC model at 45nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Heng; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Liguo

    2008-11-01

    Now it comes to the 45nm technology node, which should be the first generation of the immersion micro-lithography. And the brand-new lithography tool makes many optical effects, which can be ignored at 90nm and 65nm nodes, now have significant impact on the pattern transmission process from design to silicon. Among all the effects, one that needs to be pay attention to is the mask pellicle effect's impact on the critical dimension variation. With the implement of hyper-NA lithography tools, light transmits the mask pellicle vertically is not a good approximation now, and the image blurring induced by the mask pellicle should be taken into account in the computational microlithography. In this works, we investigate how the mask pellicle impacts the accuracy of the OPC model. And we will show that considering the extremely tight critical dimension control spec for 45nm generation node, to take the mask pellicle effect into the OPC model now becomes necessary.

  19. Image-based EUVL aberration metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenger, Germain Louis

    A significant factor in the degradation of nanolithographic image fidelity is optical wavefront aberration. As resolution of nanolithography systems increases, effects of wavefront aberrations on aerial image become more influential. The tolerance of such aberrations is governed by the requirements of features that are being imaged, often requiring lenses that can be corrected with a high degree of accuracy and precision. Resolution of lithographic systems is driven by scaling wavelength down and numerical aperture (NA) up. However, aberrations are also affected from the changes in wavelength and NA. Reduction in wavelength or increase in NA result in greater impact of aberrations, where the latter shows a quadratic dependence. Current demands in semiconductor manufacturing are constantly pushing lithographic systems to operate at the diffraction limit; hence, prompting a need to reduce all degrading effects on image properties to achieve maximum performance. Therefore, the need for highly accurate in-situ aberration measurement and correction is paramount. In this work, an approach has been developed in which several targets including phase wheel, phase disk, phase edges, and binary structures are used to generate optical images to detect and monitor aberrations in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic systems. The benefit of using printed patterns as opposed to other techniques is that the lithography system is tested under standard operating conditions. Mathematical models in conjunction with iterative lithographic simulations are used to determine pupil phase wavefront errors and describe them as combinations of Zernike polynomials.

  20. Hyper-chaos encryption using convolutional masking and model free unmasking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guo-Yuan; Sandra Bazebo, Matondo

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, during the masking process the encrypted message is convolved and embedded into a Qi hyper-chaotic system characterizing a high disorder degree. The masking scheme was tested using both Qi hyper-chaos and Lorenz chaos and indicated that Qi hyper-chaos based masking can resist attacks of the filtering and power spectrum analysis, while the Lorenz based scheme fails for high amplitude data. To unmask the message at the receiving end, two methods are proposed. In the first method, a model-free synchronizer, i.e. a multivariable higher-order differential feedback controller between the transmitter and receiver is employed to de-convolve the message embedded in the receiving signal. In the second method, no synchronization is required since the message is de-convolved using the information of the estimated derivative.

  1. Mathematical modeling of pattern formation caused by drying of colloidal film under a mask.

    PubMed

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu; Vodolazskaya, Irina V; Sakharova, Lyudmila V

    2016-02-01

    In our model, we simulate an experiment (D.J. Harris, H. Hu, J.C. Conrad, J.A. Lewis, Patterning colloidal films via evaporative lithography, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 148301 (2007)). A thin colloidal sessile droplet is allowed to dry out on a horizontal hydrophilic surface. A mask just above the droplet predominantly allows evaporation from the droplet free surface directly beneath the holes in the mask. We consider one special case, when the holes in the mask are arranged so that the system has rotational symmetry of order m . We use a speculative evaporative flux to mimic the real system. Advection, diffusion, and sedimentation are taken into account. FlexPDE is utilized to solve an advection-diffusion equation using the finite element method. The simulation demonstrates that the colloidal particles accumulate below the holes as the solvent evaporates. Diffusion can reduce this accumulation. PMID:26920529

  2. Neonatal resuscitation 1: a model to measure inspired and expired tidal volumes and assess leakage at the face mask

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Kamlin, C; Davis, P; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Neonatal resuscitation is a common and important intervention, and adequate ventilation is the key to success. In the delivery room, positive pressure ventilation is given with manual ventilation devices using face masks. Mannequins are widely used to teach and practise this technique. During both simulated and real neonatal resuscitation, chest excursion is used to assess tidal volume delivery, and leakage from the mask is not measured. Objective: To describe a system that allows measurement of mask leakage and estimation of tidal volume delivery. Methods: Respiratory function monitors, a modified resuscitation mannequin, and a computer were used to measure leakage from the mask and to assess tidal volume delivery in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Results: The volume of gas passing through a flow sensor was measured at the face mask. This was a good estimate of the tidal volume entering and leaving the lung in this model. Gas leakage between the mask and mannequin was also measured. This occurred principally during inflation, although gas leakage during deflation was seen when the total leakage was large. A volume of gas that distended the mask but did not enter the lung was also measured. Conclusion: This system can be used to assess the effectiveness of positive pressure ventilation given using a face mask during simulated neonatal resuscitation. It could be useful for teaching neonatal resuscitation and assessing ventilation through a face mask. PMID:15871990

  3. A two level model of the masking property of human ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jack; Qi, Yingyong

    2003-10-01

    The absolute hearing threshold and masking are two fundamental phenomena in psychoacoustics. The former is the minimum intensity for the ear to detect sound at a given frequency in quiet. The latter is described by the nonlinearly raised threshold for the ear to detect sound in the vicinity of an existing signal or the masker. A two level model is developed to compute the latter given the former and the masker. The first level is a partial differential equation (PDE) model of the inner ear (cochlea), and the second level is a similarity transform, accounting for the functions of the remaining high level processes of audition. The model has a solid ground on first principles and is adaptive to nonlinearities when compared with existing data-driven empirical models. Modeled masking thresholds of banded noise by tonal signals agree well with existing hearing data. [Work partially supported by ARO Grant No. DAAD 19-00-1-0524 and NSF No. ITR-0219004.

  4. Determining the Critcial Size of EUV Mask Substrate Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mccall, Monnikue M; Han, Hakseung; Cho, Wonil; Goldberg, Kenneth; Gullikson, Eric; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-02-28

    Determining the printability of substrate defects beneath the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflecting multilayer stack is an important issue in EUVL lithography. Several simulation studies have been performed in the past to determine the tolerable defect size on EUV mask blank substrates but the industry still has no exact specification based on real printability tests. Therefore, it is imperative to experimentally determine the printability of small defects on a mask blanks that are caused by substrate defects using direct printing of programmed substrate defect in an EUV exposure tool. SEMATECH fabricated bump type program defect masks using standard electron beam lithography and performed printing tests with the masks using an EUV exposure tool. Defect images were also captured using SEMATECH's Berkeley Actinic Imaging Tool in order to compare aerial defect images with secondary electron microscope images from exposed wafers. In this paper, a comprehensive understanding of substrate defect printability will be presented and printability specifications of EUV mask substrate defects will be discussed.

  5. Determining the critical size of EUV mask substrate defects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Han, Hakseung; Cho, Wonil; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-05-26

    Determining the printability of substrate defects beneath the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflecting multilayer stack is an important issue in EUVL lithography. Several simulation studies have been performed in the past to determine the tolerable defect size on EUV mask blank substrates but the industry still has no exact specification based on real printability tests. Therefore, it is imperative to experimentally determine the printability of small defects on a mask blanks that are caused by substrate defects using direct printing of programmed substrate defect in an EUV exposure tools. SEMATECH fabricated bump type program defect masks using standard electron beam lithography and performed printing tests with the masks using an EUV exposure tool. Defect images were also captured using SEMATECH's Berkeley Actinic Imaging Tool in order to compare aerial defect images with secondary electron microscope images from exposed wafers. In this paper, a comprehensive understanding of substrate defect printability will be presented and printability specifications of EUV mask substrate defects will be discussed.

  6. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  7. Method for fabricating an ultra-low expansion mask blank having a crystalline silicon layer

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) using Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE) substrates and crystalline silicon. ULE substrates are required for the necessary thermal management in EUVL mask blanks, and defect detection and classification have been obtained using crystalline silicon substrate materials. Thus, this method provides the advantages for both the ULE substrate and the crystalline silicon in an Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) mask blank. The method is carried out by bonding a crystalline silicon wafer or member to a ULE wafer or substrate and thinning the silicon to produce a 5-10 .mu.m thick crystalline silicon layer on the surface of the ULE substrate. The thinning of the crystalline silicon may be carried out, for example, by chemical mechanical polishing and if necessary or desired, oxidizing the silicon followed by etching to the desired thickness of the silicon.

  8. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  9. Simulated masking of right whale sounds by shipping noise: incorporating a model of the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kane A; Mountain, David C

    2014-03-01

    Many species of large, mysticete whales are known to produce low-frequency communication sounds. These low-frequency sounds are susceptible to communication masking by shipping noise, which also tends to be low frequency in nature. The size of these species makes behavioral assessment of auditory capabilities in controlled, captive environments nearly impossible, and field-based playback experiments are expensive and necessarily limited in scope. Hence, it is desirable to produce a masking model for these species that can aid in determining the potential effects of shipping and other anthropogenic noises on these protected animals. The aim of this study was to build a model that combines a sophisticated representation of the auditory periphery with a spectrogram-based decision stage to predict masking levels. The output of this model can then be combined with a habitat-appropriate propagation model to calculate the potential effects of noise on communication range. For this study, the model was tested on three common North Atlantic right whale communication sounds, both to demonstrate the method and to probe how shipping noise affects the detection of sounds with varying spectral and temporal characteristics.

  10. Novel EUV Mask Blank Defect Repair Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P

    2003-03-31

    The development of defect-free reticle blanks is an important challenge facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The basis of EUVL reticles are mask blanks consisting of a substrate and a reflective Mo/Si multilayer. Defects on the substrate or defects introduced during multilayer deposition can result in critical phase and amplitude defects. Amplitude- or phase-defect repair techniques are being developed with the goal to repair many of these defects. In this report, we discuss progress in two areas of defect repair: (1) We discuss the effect of the residual reflectance variation over the repair zone after amplitude-defect repair on the process window. This allows the determination of the maximum tolerable residual damage induced by amplitude defect repair. (2) We further performed a quantitative assessment of the yield improvement due to defect repair. We found that amplitude- and phase-defect repair have the potential to significantly improve mask blank yield. Our calculations further show that yield can be maximized by increasing the number of Mo/Si bilayers.

  11. Model-based assist feature placement for 32nm and 22nm technology nodes using inverse mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawala, Amyn; Painter, Benjamin; Kerchner, Chip

    2009-10-01

    Inverse imaging has been long known to provide a true mathematical solution to the mask design problem. However, it is often times marred by problems like high run-time, mask manufacturability costs, and non-invertible models. In this paper, we propose a mask synthesis flow for advanced lithography nodes, which capitalizes on the inverse mask solution while still overcoming all the above problems. Our technique uses inverse mask technology (IMT) to calculate an inverse mask field containing all the useful information about the AF solution. This field is fed to a polygon placement algorithm to obtain initial AF placements, which are then cooptimized with the main features during an OPC/AF print-fix routine to obtain the final mask solution. The proposed flow enables process window maximization via IMT while guaranteeing fully MRC compliant masks. We present several results demonstrating the superiority of this approach. We also compare our IMT-AFs with the best AF solution obtained using extensive brute-force search (via a first principles simulator, S-litho), and prove that our solution is optimum.

  12. Optimized qualification protocol on particle cleanliness for EUV mask infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Donck, J. C. J.; Stortelder, J. K.; Derksen, G. B.

    2011-11-01

    With the market introduction of the NXE:3100, Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography (EUVL) enters a new stage. Now infrastructure in the wafer fabs must be prepared for new processes and new materials. Especially the infrastructure for masks poses a challenge. Because of the absence of a pellicle reticle front sides are exceptionally vulnerable to particles. It was also shown that particles on the backside of a reticle may cause tool down time. These effects set extreme requirements to the cleanliness level of the fab infrastructure for EUV masks. The cost of EUV masks justifies the use of equipment that is qualified on particle cleanliness. Until now equipment qualification on particle cleanliness have not been carried out with statistically based qualification procedures. Since we are dealing with extreme clean equipment the number of observed particles is expected to be very low. These particle levels can only be measured by repetitively cycling a mask substrate in the equipment. Recent work in the EUV AD-tool presents data on added particles during load/unload cycles, reported as number of Particles per Reticle Pass (PRP). In the interpretation of the data, variation by deposition statistics is not taken into account. In measurements with low numbers of added particles the standard deviation in PRP number can be large. An additional issue is that particles which are added in the routing outside the equipment may have a large impact on the testing result. The number mismatch between a single handling step outside the tool and the multiple cycling in the equipment makes accuracy of measurements rather complex. The low number of expected particles, the large variation in results and the combined effect of added particles inside and outside the equipment justifies putting good effort in making a test plan. Without a proper statistical background, tests may not be suitable for proving that equipment qualifies for the limiting cleanliness levels. Other risks are that a

  13. Infinitely high selective inductively coupled plasma etching of an indium tin oxide binary mask structure for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. R.; Ahn, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kwon, B. S.; Lee, N.-E.; Kang, H. Y.; Hwangbo, C. K.; Ahn, Jinho; Seo, Hwan Seok

    2010-07-15

    Currently, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is being investigated for next generation lithography. Among the core EUVL technologies, mask fabrication is of considerable importance due to the use of new reflective optics with a completely different configuration than those of conventional photolithography. This study investigated the etching properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) binary mask materials for EUVL, such as ITO (absorber layer), Ru (capping/etch-stop layer), and a Mo-Si multilayer (reflective layer), by varying the Cl{sub 2}/Ar gas flow ratio, dc self-bias voltage (V{sub dc}), and etch time in inductively coupled plasmas. The ITO absorber layer needs to be etched with no loss in the Ru layer on the Mo-Si multilayer for fabrication of the EUVL ITO binary mask structure proposed here. The ITO layer could be etched with an infinitely high etch selectivity over the Ru etch-stop layer in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasma even with a very high overetch time.

  14. Source-mask selection using computational lithography: further investigation incorporating rigorous resist models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapasi, Sanjay; Robertson, Stewart; Biafore, John; Smith, Mark D.

    2009-12-01

    Recent publications have emphasized the criticality of computational lithography in source-mask selection for 32 and 22 nm technology nodes. Lithographers often select the illuminator geometries based on analyzing aerial images for a limited set of structures using computational lithography tools. Last year, Biafore, et al1 demonstrated the divergence between aerial image models and resist models in computational lithography. In a follow-up study2, it was illustrated that optimal illuminator is different when selected based on resist model in contrast to aerial image model. In the study, optimal source shapes were evaluated for 1D logic patterns using aerial image model and two distinct commercial resist models. Physics based lumped parameter resist model (LPM) was used. Accurately calibrated full physical models are portable across imaging conditions compared to the lumped models. This study will be an extension of previous work. Full physical resist models (FPM) with calibrated resist parameters3,4,5,6 will be used in selecting optimum illumination geometries for 1D logic patterns. Several imaging parameters - like Numerical Aperture (NA), source geometries (Annular, Quadrupole, etc.), illumination configurations for different sizes and pitches will be explored in the study. Our goal is to compare and analyze the optimal source-shapes across various imaging conditions. In the end, the optimal source-mask solution for given set of designs based on all the models will be recommended.

  15. Nanoparticle detection limits of TNO's Rapid Nano: modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Walle, Peter; Kumar, Pragati; Ityaksov, Dmitry; Versulis, Richard; Maas, Diederik J.; Kievit, Olaf; Janssen, Jochem; van der Donck, Jacques C. J.

    2012-11-01

    TNO has developed the Rapid Nano scanner to detect nanoparticles on EUVL mask blanks. This scanner was designed to be used in particle qualifications of EUV reticle handling equipment. In this paper we present an end-to-end model of the Rapid Nano detection process. All important design parameters concerning illumination, detection and noise are included in the model. The prediction from the model matches the performance that was experimentally determined (59 nm LSE). The model will be used to design and predict the performance of future generations of particle scanners.

  16. Method for characterizing mask defects using image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns

    DOEpatents

    Hau-Riege, Stefan Peter

    2007-05-01

    The invention applies techniques for image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns on the three-dimensional imaging of defects in EUVL multilayer films. The reconstructed image gives information about the out-of-plane position and the diffraction strength of the defect. The positional information can be used to select the correct defect repair technique. This invention enables the fabrication of defect-free (since repaired) X-ray Mo--Si multilayer mirrors. Repairing Mo--Si multilayer-film defects on mask blanks is a key for the commercial success of EUVL. It is known that particles are added to the Mo--Si multilayer film during the fabrication process. There is a large effort to reduce this contamination, but results are not sufficient, and defects continue to be a major mask yield limiter. All suggested repair strategies need to know the out-of-plane position of the defects in the multilayer.

  17. Formal specification and verification of a fault-masking and transient-recovery model for digital flight-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John

    1991-01-01

    The formal specification and mechanically checked verification for a model of fault-masking and transient-recovery among the replicated computers of digital flight-control systems are presented. The verification establishes, subject to certain carefully stated assumptions, that faults among the component computers are masked so that commands sent to the actuators are the same as those that would be sent by a single computer that suffers no failures.

  18. Properites of ultrathin films appropriate for optics capping layers in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Edwards, N V; Madey, T E

    2007-06-25

    The contamination of optical surfaces by irradiation shortens optics lifetime and is one of the main concerns for optics used in conjunction with intense light sources, such as high power lasers, 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron sources or plasma sources used in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tools. This paper focuses on properties and surface chemistry of different materials, which as thin layers, could be used as capping layers to protect and extend EUVL optics lifetime. The most promising candidates include single element materials such as ruthenium and rhodium, and oxides such as TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  19. Compensation of flare-induced CD changes EUVL

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkholm, John E.; Stearns, Daniel G.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Hector, Scott D.

    2004-11-09

    A method for compensating for flare-induced critical dimensions (CD) changes in photolithography. Changes in the flare level results in undesirable CD changes. The method when used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography essentially eliminates the unwanted CD changes. The method is based on the recognition that the intrinsic level of flare for an EUV camera (the flare level for an isolated sub-resolution opaque dot in a bright field mask) is essentially constant over the image field. The method involves calculating the flare and its variation over the area of a patterned mask that will be imaged and then using mask biasing to largely eliminate the CD variations that the flare and its variations would otherwise cause. This method would be difficult to apply to optical or DUV lithography since the intrinsic flare for those lithographies is not constant over the image field.

  20. AutoMOPS- B2B and B2C in mask making: Mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction improvement through better information flow management using generic models and standardized languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filies, Olaf; de Ridder, Luc; Rodriguez, Ben; Kujiken, Aart

    2002-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing has become a global business, in which companies of different size unite in virtual enterprises to meet new opportunities. Therefore Mask manufacturing is a key business, but mask ordering is a complex process and is always critical regarding design to market time, even though mask complexity and customer base are increasing using a wide variety of different mask order forms which are frequently faulty and very seldom complete. This is effectively blocking agile manufacturing and can tie wafer fabs to a single mask The goal of the project is elimination of the order verification through paperless, electronically linked information sharing/exchange between chip design, mask production and production stages, which will allow automation of the mask preparation. To cover these new techniques and their specifications as well as the common ones with automated tools a special generic Meta-model will be generated, based on the current standards for mask specifications, including the requirements from the involved partners (Alcatel Microelectronics, Altis, Compugraphics, Infineon, Nimble, Sigma-C), the project works out a pre-normative standard. The paper presents the current status of work. This work is partly funded by the Commission of the European Union under the Fifth Framework project IST-1999-10332 AutoMOPS.

  1. Recent advances in SEMATECH's mask blank development program, the remaining technical challenges, and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Frank; Kearney, Patrick; Kadaksham, Arun J.; Wurm, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    The ability of optical lithography to steadily produce images at increasingly smaller dimension while maintaining pattern fidelity of devices with greater complexity has enabled the success of Moore's Law. Although 193 nm immersion and double patterning techniques have proven successful in extending optical lithography, the strategies proposed for further extension are too costly to support device manufacturing. As a result, greater focus has been shifted to resolving the challenges hindering extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) adoption as the mainstream lithography solution. While similar to conventional optical lithography, there are unique challenges to EUVL, one of which is the change from transmission masks to the reflective masks required for EUVL. The use of reflective reticles greatly increases complexity of EUV reticle structure when compared to the binary masks used with optical lithography. Maximizing the reflectance an EUV mask requires the use of a multilayer Bragg reflector deposited on a finely polished substrate with a thin absorber film on top used to define the device pattern. Although similar in form to the substrates used in optical lithography, the tolerances on figure, surface finish, and defects are significantly more stringent for EUV substrates. Control of aberrations and maintaining pattern fidelity places tight constraints on the flatness and roughness of the EUV substrate; imperfections and particles can result in printable defects. The Bragg reflector of the EUV mask consists of 40 to 50 Si/Mo bi-layers deposited using an ion beam deposition tool. This film stack must be deposited to meet the reflectivity and uniformity requirements of the exposure tool and must be completely free of defects. The absorber film is typically a tantalum-based nitride layer selected for its ability to absorb EUV radiation and maintain thermal stability. The thickness and morphology of this film must be tightly controlled to enable use as the patterning

  2. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micro-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Barty, Anton; Anderson, Erik; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-02-01

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. They describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV) wavelength microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. The defects present in EUV masks can appear in many well-known forms: as particles that cause amplitude or phase variations in the reflected field; as surface contamination that reduces reflectivity and contrast; and as damage from inspection and use that reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating. This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. They describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in defect repair studies, observations of laser damage, actinic inspection following scanning electron microscopy, and the detection of both native and programmed defects.

  3. [Masked depression].

    PubMed

    Preradović, M; Griva, D; Eror, S

    1991-01-01

    The study comprised 25 patients with masked depression and 30 patients with endogenous depression. According to the general characteristics both groups were homogenous and accordingly, comparable. Together with clinical evaluation of depressive syndrome, psychological management was applied. Rorschach test, Thematic Apperception Test and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory were used in the study. In the clinical picture of masked depressions somatovegetative disorders dominated and depressive behavior in endogenous depression. The frequence of suicid does not differ between patients with masked and endogenous depression.

  4. Decoupling Stimulus Duration from Brightness in Metacontrast Masking: Data and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Lollo, Vincent; Muhlenen, Adrian von; Enns, James T.; Bridgeman, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    A brief target that is visible when displayed alone can be rendered invisible by a trailing stimulus (metacontrast masking). It has been difficult to determine the temporal dynamics of masking to date because increments in stimulus duration have been invariably confounded with apparent brightness (Bloch's law). In the research reported here,…

  5. Symmetry: modeling the effects of masking noise, axial cueing and salience.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Tyler, Christopher W

    2010-04-06

    Symmetry detection is an interesting probe of pattern processing because it requires the matching of novel patterns without the benefit of prior recognition. However, there is evidence that prior knowledge of the axis location plays an important role in symmetry detection. We investigated how the prior information about the symmetry axis affects symmetry detection under noise-masking conditions. The target stimuli were random-dot displays structured to be symmetric about vertical, horizontal, or diagonal axes and viewed through eight apertures (1.2 degrees diameter) evenly distributed around a 6 degrees diameter circle. The information about axis orientation was manipulated by (1) cueing of axis orientation before the trial and (2) varying axis salience by including or excluding the axis region within the noise apertures. The percentage of correct detection of the symmetry was measured at for a range of both target and masking noise densities. The threshold vs. noise density function was flat at low noise density and increased with a slope of 0.75-0.8 beyond a critical density. Axis cueing reduced the target threshold 2-4 fold at all noise densities while axis salience had an effect only at high noise density. Our results are inconsistent with an ideal observer or signal-to-noise account of symmetry detection but can be explained by a multiple-channel model is which the response in each channel is the ratio between the nonlinear transform of the responses of sets of early symmetry detectors and the sum of external and intrinsic sources of noise.

  6. A cocktail party model of spatial release from masking by both noise and speech interferers a)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gary L.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical formula for estimating spatial release from masking (SRM) in a cocktail party environment would be useful as a simpler alternative to computationally intensive algorithms and may enhance understanding of underlying mechanisms. The experiment presented herein was designed to provide a strong test of a model that divides SRM into contributions of asymmetry and angular separation [Bronkhorst (2000). Acustica 86, 117–128] and to examine whether that model can be extended to include speech maskers. Across masker types the contribution to SRM of angular separation of maskers from the target was found to grow at a diminishing rate as angular separation increased within the frontal hemifield, contrary to predictions of the model. Speech maskers differed from noise maskers in the overall magnitude of SRM and in the contribution of angular separation (both greater for speech). These results were used to develop a modified model that achieved good fits to data for noise maskers (ρ = 0.93) and for speech maskers (ρ = 0.94) while using the same functions to describe separation and asymmetry components of SRM for both masker types. These findings suggest that this approach can be used to accurately model SRM for speech maskers in addition to primarily “energetic” noise maskers. PMID:21895087

  7. Control of the sidewall angle of an absorber stack using the Faraday cage system for the change of pattern printability in EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Il-Yong; Huh, Sung-Min; Moon, Seong-Yong; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Lee, Jin-Kwan; Moon, Sang Heup; Cho, HanKu

    2008-10-01

    A patterned TaN substrate, which is candidate for a mask absorber in extreme ultra-violet lithography (EUVL), was etched to have inclined sidewalls by using a Faraday cage system under the condition of a 2-step process that allowed the high etch selectivity of TaN over the resist. The sidewall angle (SWA) of the patterned substrate, which was in the shape of a parallelogram after etching, could be controlled by changing the slope of a substrate holder that was placed in the Faraday cage. The performance of an EUV mask, which contained the TaN absorber of an oblique pattern over the molybdenum/silicon multi-layer, was simulated for different cases of SWA. The results indicated that the optical properties, such as the critical dimension (CD), an offset in the CD bias between horizontal and vertical patterns (H-V bias), and a shift in the image position on the wafer, could be controlled by changing the SWA of the absorber stack. The simulation result showed that the effect of the SWA on the optical properties became more significant at larger thicknesses of the absorber and smaller sizes of the target CD. Nevertheless, the contrast of the aerial images was not significantly decreased because the shadow effect caused by either sidewall of the patterned substrate cancelled with each other.

  8. Masked target transform volume clutter metric for human observer visual search modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard Kirk

    The Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) develops an imaging system performance model to aid in the design and comparison of imaging systems for military use. It is intended to approximate visual task performance for a typical human observer with an imaging system of specified optical, electrical, physical, and environmental parameters. When modeling search performance, the model currently uses only target size and target-to-background contrast to describe a scene. The presence or absence of other non-target objects and textures in the scene also affect search performance, but NVESD's targeting task performance metric based time limited search model (TTP/TLS) does not currently account for them explicitly. Non-target objects in a scene that impact search performance are referred to as clutter. A universally accepted mathematical definition of clutter does not yet exist. Researchers have proposed a number of clutter metrics based on very different methods, but none account for display geometry or the varying spatial frequency sensitivity of the human visual system. After a review of the NVESD search model, properties of the human visual system, and a literature review of clutter metrics, the new masked target transform volume clutter metric will be presented. Next the results of an experiment designed to show performance variation due to clutter alone will be presented. Then, the results of three separate perception experiments using real or realistic search imagery will be used to show that the new clutter metric better models human observer search performance than the current NVESD model or any of the reviewed clutter metrics.

  9. Highly selective etching of SnO2 absorber in binary mask structure for extreme ultra-violet lithography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jin; Jung, Chang Yong; Park, Sung Jin; Hwangbo, Chang Kweun; Seo, Hwan Seok; Kim, Sung Soo; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2012-04-01

    Among the core EUVL (extreme ultra-violet lithography) technologies for nanoscale patterning below the 30 nm node for Si chip manufacturing, new materials and fabrication processes for high-performance EUVL masks are of considerable importance due to the use of new reflective optics. In this work, the selective etching of SnO2 (tin oxide) as a new absorber material, with high EUV absorbance due to its large extinction coefficient, for the binary mask structure of SnO2 (absorber layer)/Ru (capping/etch stop layer)/Mo-Si multilayer (reflective layer)/Si (substrate), was investigated. Because infinitely high selectivity of the SnO2 layer to the Ru ESL is required due to the ultrathin nature of the Ru layer, various etch parameters were assessed in the inductively coupled Cl2/Ar plasmas in order to find the process window required for infinitely high etch selectivity of the SnO2 layer. The results showed that the gas flow ratio and V(dc) value play an important role in determining the process window for the infinitely high etch selectivity of SnO2 to Ru ESL. The high EUV-absorbance SnO2 layer, patternable by a dry process, allows a smaller absorber thickness, which can mitigate the geometric shadowing effects observed for high-performance binary EUVL masks.

  10. Mask defect verification using actinic inspection and defect mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sungmin; Kearney, Patrick; Wurm, Stefan; Goodwin, Frank; Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric

    2009-04-14

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. The successful production of defect-free masks will depend on the timely development of defect inspection tools, including both mask blank inspection tools and absorber pattern inspection tools to meet the 22 nm half-pitch node. EUV mask blanks with embedded phase defects were inspected with a reticle actinic inspection tool (AIT) and the Lasertec M7360. The Lasertec M7360 is operated at SEMA TECH's Mask blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, with sensitivity to multilayer defects down to 40-45 nm, which is not likely sufficient for mask blank development below the 32 nm half-pitch node. Phase defect printability was simulated to calculate the required defect sensitivity for the next generation blank inspection tool to support reticle development for the sub-32 nm half-pitch technology node. This paper will also discuss the kind of infrastructure that will be required in the development and mass production stages.

  11. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, S.B.; Kemp, C.D.; Barty, A.; Anderson, E.H.; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-05-26

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. We describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV wavelength) microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. Types of defects: (a) Buried Substrate Defects: particles & pits (causes amplitude and/or phase variations); (b) Surface Contamination (reduces reflectivity and (possibly) contrast); (c) Damage from Inspection and Use (reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating). This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. We describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in four cases: defect repair studies; observations of laser damage; after scanning electron microscopy; and native and programmed defects.

  12. A method for repairing amplitude defects in multilayer-coated EUV mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Hau-Riege, S; Stearns, D; Clift, M; Mirkarimi, P; Gullikson, E; Chapman, H; Sweeney, D

    2003-10-20

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Localized defects in this thin film coating can significantly perturb the reflected field and produce errors in the printed image. Ideally one would want to manufacture defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to be able to repair a significant number of the defects in the multilayer coating. In this paper we present a method for repairing defects that are near the top surface of the coating; we call these amplitude defects because they predominantly attenuate the amplitude of the reflected field. Although the discussion is targeted to the application of manufacturing masks for EUV lithography, the conclusions and results are also applicable to understanding the optical effects of multilayer erosion, including ion-induced multilayer erosion and condenser erosion in EUVL steppers.

  13. Extending models of visual-word recognition to semicursive scripts: Evidence from masked priming in Uyghur.

    PubMed

    Yakup, Mahire; Abliz, Wayit; Sereno, Joan; Perea, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    One basic feature of the Arabic script is its semicursive style: some letters are connected to the next, but others are not, as in the Uyghur word [see text]/ya xʃi/ ("good"). None of the current orthographic coding schemes in models of visual-word recognition, which were created for the Roman script, assign a differential role to the coding of within letter "chunks" and between letter "chunks" in words in the Arabic script. To examine how letter identity/position is coded at the earliest stages of word processing in the Arabic script, we conducted 2 masked priming lexical decision experiments in Uyghur, an agglutinative Turkic language. The target word was preceded by an identical prime, by a transposed-letter nonword prime (that either kept the ligation pattern or did not), or by a 2-letter replacement nonword prime. Transposed-letter primes were as effective as identity primes when the letter transposition in the prime kept the same ligation pattern as the target word (e.g., [see text]/inta_jin/-/itna_jin/), but not when the transposed-letter prime didn't keep the ligation pattern (e.g., [see text]/so_w_ʁa_t/-/so_ʁw_a_t/). Furthermore, replacement-letter primes were more effective when they kept the ligation pattern of the target word than when they did not (e.g., [see text]/so_d_ʧa_t/-/so_w_ʁa_t/ faster than [see text]/so_ʧd_a_t/-/so_w_ʁa_t/). We examined how input coding schemes could be extended to deal with the intricacies of semicursive scripts. PMID:26618626

  14. Mask manufacturability improvement by MRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.; Coburn, D.; Buck, P.

    2007-10-01

    Mask data which can not be properly resolved by the mask writing tools, such as sub(resolution (reticle-scale) features or singularities can interfere with design intent or manufacturing capabilities in the absence of design guidelines or formal verification procedures. As a consequence, mask writing tools may introduce defects to device or metrology structures by snapping geometries to grid or misrepresenting process based sizing. To reduce the visibility of these defects by detuning inspection tools to release the mask with non-resolvable data in the production cycle or by waiving minimum CD rules compromises high fidelity of die pattern transfer to wafer. Driven by poor data quality, mask tool would provide degraded resolution without contextual analysis, such as correlations to the overlying and underlying mask layers and without regard to device models. The key reasons for this situation are arbitrary layout of technology structures and design layout-to-mask post-processing for OPC and fill pattern for which design has no intention or knowledge to intervene. The post-processing of mask data to eliminate errors effectively detaches design responsibility from the mask shop actions and may have other detrimental effects on the production cycle such as iterative defect analysis and long write times due to the large polygon count. In this work we propose mask rule check based on the principles to which the masks are being written and inspected. Running this mandatory rule set should reduce the product cycletime, benefit the cost and improve mask quality and reproduction of design intent. It feeds the prospective mask information back to the layout time making it possible to make design adjustments in the interest of pattern fidelity and device parameters.

  15. Clay Mask Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Masks can represent so many things, such as emotions (happy, sad, fearful) and power. The familiar "comedy and tragedy" masks, derived from ancient Greek theater, are just one example from mask history. Death masks from the ancient Egyptians influenced the ancient Romans into creating similar masks for their departed. Masks can represent many…

  16. The effects of simultaneous electrophoresis and thermophoresis on particulate contamination of an inverted EUVL photomask surface in parallel airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Handol; Yook, Se-Jin; Young Han, Seog

    2012-10-01

    The combined influences of electrophoresis and thermophoresis on particle deposition on the inverted critical surface of a flat plate in parallel airflow were investigated by employing the statistical Lagrangian particle tracking approach in an effort to assess the degree of particulate contamination of EUVL photomasks during horizontal transport in cleanroom environments. The numerical method was validated through the comparison with the experimental data, found in the literature, about particle deposition velocity onto a wafer in vertical airflow with and without electrophoresis or thermophoresis. In addition, the validation of the present model was performed via the comparison with the theoretical prediction of particle deposition velocity onto a flat plate under no phoretic forces in parallel airflow. Then, the particle deposition velocity onto the face-down surface of a flat plate in parallel airflow was obtained by varying the temperature of the inverted critical surface in different strengths of uniform electric fields. Injected particles were assumed to be charged with -1 , 0, or +1 elementary unit of charge, in order to consider attractive or repulsive electric force. The degree of particulate contamination of the inverted critical surface was found to be significantly influenced by the combination of electrophoretic and thermophoretic effects.

  17. Modeling the anti-masking effects of the olivocochlear reflex in auditory nerve responses to tones in sustained noise.

    PubMed

    Chintanpalli, Ananthakrishna; Jennings, Skyler G; Heinz, Michael G; Strickland, Elizabeth A

    2012-04-01

    The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) has been hypothesized to provide benefit for listening in noise. Strong physiological support for an anti-masking role for the MOCR has come from the observation that auditory nerve (AN) fibers exhibit reduced firing to sustained noise and increased sensitivity to tones when the MOCR is elicited. The present study extended a well-established computational model for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired AN responses to demonstrate that these anti-masking effects can be accounted for by reducing outer hair cell (OHC) gain, which is a primary effect of the MOCR. Tone responses in noise were examined systematically as a function of tone level, noise level, and OHC gain. Signal detection theory was used to predict detection and discrimination for different spontaneous rate fiber groups. Decreasing OHC gain decreased the sustained noise response and increased maximum discharge rate to the tone, thus modeling the ability of the MOCR to decompress AN fiber rate-level functions. Comparing the present modeling results with previous data from AN fibers in decerebrate cats suggests that the ipsilateral masking noise used in the physiological study may have elicited up to 20 dB of OHC gain reduction in addition to that inferred from the contralateral noise effects. Reducing OHC gain in the model also extended the dynamic range for discrimination over a wide range of background noise levels. For each masker level, an optimal OHC gain reduction was predicted (i.e., where maximum discrimination was achieved without increased detection threshold). These optimal gain reductions increased with masker level and were physiologically realistic. Thus, reducing OHC gain can improve tone-in-noise discrimination even though it may produce a “hearing loss” in quiet. Combining MOCR effects with the sensorineural hearing loss effects already captured by this computational AN model will be beneficial for exploring the implications of their interaction

  18. Smoke Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury from the noxious products of fire combustion accounts for as much as 80 percent of fire-related deaths in the United States. Many of these deaths are preventable. Smoke Mask, Inc. (SMI), of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, is working to decrease these casualties with its line of life safety devices. The SMI personal escape hood and the Guardian Filtration System provide respiratory protection that enables people to escape from hazardous and unsafe conditions. The breathing filter technology utilized in the products is specifically designed to supply breathable air for 20 minutes. In emergencies, 20 minutes can mean the difference between life and death.

  19. Bridging the gap from mask to physical design for multiple patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bei; Gao, Jhih-Rong; Xu, Xiaoqing; Pan, David Z.

    2014-03-01

    Due to the delay of EUVL, multiple patterning techniques have been used to extend the 193nm lithography to 22nm/14nm nodes, and possibly further. There are many studies on MPL layout decompositions at the mask synthesis stage to resolve the coloring conflicts, minimize the stitches, balance the mask density, or even mitigate the undesirable overlay effects. Meanwhile, there are studies showing that it is very important to consider the multiple patterning implications at earlier physical design stages so that the overall design and manufacturing closure can be reached. In this paper, we will show some recent results and propose a unified physical design methodology for standard cell compliance, pin access, routing, and placement to bridge the gap from mask/layout decomposition to physical design, while accommodating various requirements from double/triple patterning lithography in certain "correct by construction" manner.

  20. CS-dependent response probability in an auditory masked-detection task: considerations based on models of Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Mason, Christine R; Idrobo, Fabio; Early, Susan J; Abibi, Ayome; Zheng, Ling; Harrison, J Michael; Carney, Laurel H

    2003-05-01

    Experimental studies were performed using a Pavlovian-conditioned eyeblink response to measure detection of a variable-sound-level tone (T) in a fixed-sound-level masking noise (N) in rabbits. Results showed an increase in the asymptotic probability of conditioned responses (CRs) to the reinforced TN trials and a decrease in the asymptotic rate of eyeblink responses to the non-reinforced N presentations as a function of the sound level of the T. These observations are consistent with expected behaviour in an auditory masked detection task, but they are not consistent with predictions from a traditional application of the Rescorla-Wagner or Pearce models of associative learning. To implement these models, one typically considers only the actual stimuli and reinforcement on each trial. We found that by considering perceptual interactions and concepts from signal detection theory, these models could predict the CS dependence on the sound level of the T. In these alternative implementations, the animals response probabilities were used as a guide in making assumptions about the "effective stimuli".

  1. Masks: Interpretations and Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Presents a high school art teacher's views of and experiences with masks. Outlines a maskmaking activity in which students were required to create variations on existing masks. Emphasizes use of experimental materials. Displays examples of student-created masks. (DB)

  2. Dynamic mask for producing uniform or graded-thickness thin films

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    2006-06-13

    A method for producing single layer or multilayer films with high thickness uniformity or thickness gradients. The method utilizes a moving mask which blocks some of the flux from a sputter target or evaporation source before it deposits on a substrate. The velocity and position of the mask is computer controlled to precisely tailor the film thickness distribution. The method is applicable to any type of vapor deposition system, but is particularly useful for ion beam sputter deposition and evaporation deposition; and enables a high degree of uniformity for ion beam deposition, even for near-normal incidence of deposition species, which may be critical for producing low-defect multilayer coatings, such as required for masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The mask can have a variety of shapes, from a simple solid paddle shape to a larger mask with a shaped hole through which the flux passes. The motion of the mask can be linear or rotational, and the mask can be moved to make single or multiple passes in front of the substrate per layer, and can pass completely or partially across the substrate.

  3. Image-based pupil plane characterization via principal component analysis for EUVL tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Zac; Burbine, Andrew; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert; Mangat, Pawitter; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Smith, Bruce W.

    2016-03-01

    We present an approach to image-based pupil plane amplitude and phase characterization using models built with principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is a statistical technique to identify the directions of highest variation (principal components) in a high-dimensional dataset. A polynomial model is constructed between the principal components of through-focus intensity for the chosen binary mask targets and pupil amplitude or phase variation. This method separates model building and pupil characterization into two distinct steps, thus enabling rapid pupil characterization following data collection. The pupil plane variation of a zone-plate lens from the Semiconductor High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Project (SHARP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will be examined using this method. Results will be compared to pupil plane characterization using a previously proposed methodology where inverse solutions are obtained through an iterative process involving least-squares regression.

  4. Development of a Model to Assess Masking Potential for Marine Mammals by the Use of Air Guns in Antarctic Waters.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Dietrich; Tougaard, Jakob; Stilz, Peter; Dähne, Michael; Clark, Christopher W; Lucke, Klaus; von Benda-Beckmann, Sander; Ainslie, Michael A; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the long-range effects of air gun array noise on marine mammal communication ranges in the Southern Ocean. Air gun impulses are subject to significant distortion during propagation, potentially resulting in a quasi-continuous sound. Propagation modeling to estimate the received waveform was conducted. A leaky integrator was used as a hearing model to assess communication masking in three species due to intermittent/continuous air gun sounds. Air gun noise is most probably changing from impulse to continuous noise between 1,000 and 2,000 km from the source, leading to a reduced communication range for, e.g., blue and fin whales up to 2,000 km from the source.

  5. Development of a Model to Assess Masking Potential for Marine Mammals by the Use of Air Guns in Antarctic Waters.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Dietrich; Tougaard, Jakob; Stilz, Peter; Dähne, Michael; Clark, Christopher W; Lucke, Klaus; von Benda-Beckmann, Sander; Ainslie, Michael A; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the long-range effects of air gun array noise on marine mammal communication ranges in the Southern Ocean. Air gun impulses are subject to significant distortion during propagation, potentially resulting in a quasi-continuous sound. Propagation modeling to estimate the received waveform was conducted. A leaky integrator was used as a hearing model to assess communication masking in three species due to intermittent/continuous air gun sounds. Air gun noise is most probably changing from impulse to continuous noise between 1,000 and 2,000 km from the source, leading to a reduced communication range for, e.g., blue and fin whales up to 2,000 km from the source. PMID:26611093

  6. Challenges in constructing EUV metrology tools to qualify the EUV masks for HVM implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, David C.; Dong, Feng; Perera, Chami N.; Perera, Rupert C. C.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography is still viewed as the most promising approach for maintaining the pace of Moore's Law. Recent real achievements in EUV Lithography (EUVL) have encouraged semiconductor manufacturers to reconsider their road maps. One of the principal challenges in the ongoing EUVL implementation for high volume manufacturing (HVM) is the availability of necessary clean at wavelength metrology tools. EUV Tech is the world's leading manufacturer of at-wavelength EUV metrology equipment. Founded in 1997, EUV Tech has pioneered the development of several stand-alone inspection, metrology, and calibration tools for EUV lithographic applications that can be operated in a clean room environment on the floor of a fab. In this paper, EUV Tech's R&D program to minimize particle adders in our EUV Reflectometer along with the ongoing effort to enhance the reflectivity and wavelength, precision and accuracy required to qualify the EUV masks for HVM. In addition to preliminary results from our stand alone EUV Scatterometer developed to characterize the phase roughness of a EUV mask and the introduction of EUV Tech's Pellicle test suite for testing EUV pellicles.

  7. Masks and Other Disguises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Debra

    Instructions for making simple masks are provided in this guide for teachers of elementary children. Directions with illustrations are given for constructing masks from paper plates, construction paper, plastic milk jugs, and papier-mache. Ideas include a clown mask, a flower mask, a top hat, a paper crown, and "Groucho" glasses. Types of masks…

  8. A consistent NPMLE of the joint distribution function with competing risks data under the dependent masking and right-censoring model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiahui; Yu, Qiqing

    2016-01-01

    Dinse (Biometrics, 38:417-431, 1982) provides a special type of right-censored and masked competing risks data and proposes a non-parametric maximum likelihood estimator (NPMLE) and a pseudo MLE of the joint distribution function [Formula: see text] with such data. However, their asymptotic properties have not been studied so far. Under the extention of either the conditional masking probability (CMP) model or the random partition masking (RPM) model (Yu and Li, J Nonparametr Stat 24:753-764, 2012), we show that (1) Dinse's estimators are consistent if [Formula: see text] takes on finitely many values and each point in the support set of [Formula: see text] can be observed; (2) if the failure time is continuous, the NPMLE is not uniquely determined, and the standard approach (which puts weights only on one element in each observed set) leads to an inconsistent NPMLE; (3) in general, Dinse's estimators are not consistent even under the discrete assumption; (4) we construct a consistent NPMLE. The consistency is given under a new model called dependent masking and right-censoring model. The CMP model and the RPM model are indeed special cases of the new model. We compare our estimator to Dinse's estimators through simulation and real data. Simulation study indicates that the consistent NPMLE is a good approximation to the underlying distribution for moderate sample sizes. PMID:25160694

  9. History and future of mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ken L.

    1996-12-01

    The history of the mask industry has three main periods, which I call the Classical Period, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, by analogy with those periods in the history of Western Europe. During the Classical Period, people developed 1X masks and the technology to make them. In the Dark Ages, people exploited the equipment developed during the Classical Period to make 5X reduction reticle, ending the nobility of mask making. In today's Renaissance of mask making, a proliferation of mask types is requiring a rebirth of innovation and creativity. The Renaissance resembles the Classical Period: masks are once again strategic, and technological capability is once again the driver. Meanwhile, the mask industry is carrying forward the productivity and efficiency gains it achieved during the Dark Ages. We must create a new business and economic model to support these changes in the characteristics of the marketplace.

  10. Measuring the Cold Mask Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roye, E.; Krist, J.; Schultz, A. B.; Wiklind, T.

    2003-04-01

    An unexpected increase in measured thermal background during the Cycle 11 early calibration program caused speculation that the cold mask position could have shifted since Cycle 7. To address this concern, a single orbit NICMOS program was executed (Program ID: 9704) to obtain deep PSF images of the star LHS1846 in all three cameras. Analysis of this data using the Phase Retrieval software package revealed a minimal amount of cold mask shift since Cycle 7 and provided new, more accurate cold mask values for the Tiny Tim PSF modeling software. It was concluded that the cold mask position was not the cause of increased thermal background observed during the Cycle 11 early calibration program. Increased thermal background has since been determined to be the result of increased thermal load on the HST aft shroud due to the addition of ACS and NCS during SM3b.

  11. A computational feedforward model predicts categorization of masked emotional body language for longer, but not for shorter, latencies.

    PubMed

    Stienen, Bernard M C; Schindler, Konrad; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2012-07-01

    Given the presence of massive feedback loops in brain networks, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of feedforward and feedback processing to the recognition of visual stimuli, in this case, of emotional body expressions. The aim of the work presented in this letter is to shed light on how well feedforward processing explains rapid categorization of this important class of stimuli. By means of parametric masking, it may be possible to control the contribution of feedback activity in human participants. A close comparison is presented between human recognition performance and the performance of a computational neural model that exclusively modeled feedforward processing and was engineered to fulfill the computational requirements of recognition. Results show that the longer the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), the closer the performance of the human participants was to the values predicted by the model, with an optimum at an SOA of 100 ms. At short SOA latencies, human performance deteriorated, but the categorization of the emotional expressions was still above baseline. The data suggest that, although theoretically, feedback arising from inferotemporal cortex is likely to be blocked when the SOA is 100 ms, human participants still seem to rely on more local visual feedback processing to equal the model's performance.

  12. Shuttle mask floorplanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Tian, Ruiqi; Wong, Martin D.; Reich, Alfred J.

    2003-12-01

    A shuttle mask has different chips on the same mask. The chips are not electrically connected. Alliance and foundry customers can utilize shuttle masks to share the rising cost of mask and wafer manufacturing. This paper studies the shuttle mask floorplan problem, which is formulated as a rectangle-packing problem with constraints of final die sawing strategy and die-to-die mask inspection. For our formulation, we offer a "merging" method that reduces the problem to an unconstrained slicing floorplan problem. Excellent results are obtained from the experiment with real industry data. We also study a "general" method and discuss the reason why it does not work very well.

  13. Prevention of MoSi multilayer reflection loss in EUVL tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiling, Hans; Mertens, Bas; Stietz, Frank; Wedowski, Marco; Klein, Roman; Kurt, Ralph; Louis, Eric; Yakshin, Andrey E.

    2001-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography requires vacuum conditions in the optical train. In order to maintain sufficient energy throughput, reflection reduction of multilayer mirrors due to contamination has to be minimized. We report on oxidation and carbonization experiments on MoSi mirrors under exposure with EUV radiation from a synchrotron. To mimic the effects of EUV radiation we also exposed samples using an electron gun. The oxidation rate was found to be ~0.015 nm/h per mW/mm2 of EUV radiation under vacuum conditions that are typical for a high throughput EUVL system, I.e. 10-6 mbar H2O. This oxidation can to a large extend be suppressed by using smart gas blend strategies during exposure, e.g. using ethanol. A deposition rate of 0.25 nm/h was found when the hydrocarbon pressure of Fomblin was reduced to 10(superscript -9 mbar. We demonstrate that carbonization can be suppressed by admitting oxygen during electron gun exposure.

  14. Masking the Color Wheel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Charlene

    1982-01-01

    Describes an art activity in which sixth graders made mirror-image masks using only two primary colors and one secondary color. Students discussed the effect of color combinations and the use of masks in folk and modern cultures. (AM)

  15. LER control and mitigation: mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    In the push towards commercialization of extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), meeting the stringent requirements for line-edge roughness (LER) is increasingly challenging. For the 22-nm half-pitch node and below, the ITRS requires under 1.2 nm LER. Much of this LER is thought to arise from three significant contributors: LER on the mask absorber pattern, LER from the resist, and LER from mask roughness induced speckle. The physical mechanism behind the last contributor is becoming clearer, but how it is affected by the presence of aberrations is less well understood. Here, we conduct a full 2D aerial image simulation analysis of aberrations sensitivities of mask roughness induced LER for the first 37 fringe zernikes. These results serve as a guideline for future LER aberrations control. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we next consider an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides merely minimal improvement to the LER as several alternate illumination schemes, overall imaging quality in terms of ILS, NILS, and contrast is improved. While the 22-nm half-pitch node can tolerate significant aberrations from a mask roughness induced LER perspective, total aberration levels for the 16-nm half-pitch node need to be strictly capped at 0.25nm rms to meet the ITRS guidelines. An individual aberrations study for the first 37 fringe zernikes on the 16-nm half-pitch node at the 0.25nm rms level reveals a sensitivity to various forms of spherical aberrations (Z9 & Z25) and quadrafoil (Z28) in particular, under conventional crosspole illumination ({sigma} = 0.10). Compared to conventional dipole or crosspole illuminations, an extended dipole 'strip' illumination scheme offers a way to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, while still maintaining high imaging quality for

  16. Attention Attenuates Metacontrast Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Jennifer; Ro, Tony

    2007-01-01

    The influence of attention on perceptual awareness was examined using metacontrast masking. Attention was manipulated with endogenous cues to assess the effects on the temporal and spatial parameters of target visibility. Experiment 1 examined the time course of effective masking when the target and mask set were presented at an attended vs. an…

  17. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  18. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  19. Detecting drawdowns masked by environmental stresses with water-level models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Halford, K.J.; Fenelon, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying small drawdown at observation wells distant from the pumping well greatly expands the characterized aquifer volume. However, this detection is often obscured by water level fluctuations such as barometric and tidal effects. A reliable analytical approach for distinguishing drawdown from nonpumping water-level fluctuations is presented and tested here. Drawdown is distinguished by analytically simulating all pumping and nonpumping water-level stresses simultaneously during the period of record. Pumping signals are generated with Theis models, where the pumping schedule is translated into water-level change with the Theis solution. This approach closely matched drawdowns simulated with a complex three-dimensional, hypothetical model and reasonably estimated drawdowns from an aquifer test conducted in a complex hydrogeologic system. Pumping-induced changes generated with a numerical model and analytical Theis model agreed (RMS as low as 0.007 m) in cases where pumping signals traveled more than 1 km across confining units and fault structures. Maximum drawdowns of about 0.05 m were analytically estimated from field investigations where environmental fluctuations approached 0.2 m during the analysis period.

  20. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  1. Study on modeling of resist heating effect correction in EB mask writer EBM-9000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Haruyuki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Suganuma, Mizuna; Kato, Yasuo; Yashima, Jun; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Anze, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Munehiro

    2015-07-01

    Resist heating effect which is caused in electron beam lithography by rise in substrate temperature of a few tens or hundreds of degrees changes resist sensitivity and leads to degradation of local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). Increasing writing pass count and reducing dose per pass is one way to avoid the resist heating effect, but it worsens writing throughput. As an alternative way, NuFlare Technology is developing a heating effect correction system which corrects CD deviation induced by resist heating effect and mitigates LCDU degradation even in high dose per pass conditions. Our developing correction model is based on a dose modulation method. Therefore, a kind of conversion equation to modify the dose corresponding to CD change by temperature rise is necessary. For this purpose, a CD variation model depending on local pattern density was introduced and its validity was confirmed by experiments and temperature simulations. And then the dose modulation rate which is a parameter to be used in the heating effect correction system was defined as ideally irrelevant to the local pattern density, and the actual values were also determined with the experimental results for several resist types. The accuracy of the heating effect correction was also discussed. Even when deviations depending on the pattern density slightly remains in the dose modulation rates (i.e., not ideal in actual), the estimated residual errors in the correction are sufficiently small and acceptable for practical 2 pass writing with the constant dose modulation rates. In these results, it is demonstrated that the CD variation model is effective for the heating effect correction system.

  2. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  3. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  4. Binary mask programmable hologram.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C; Zhou, Changhe; Cheung, K W K

    2012-11-19

    We report, for the first time, the concept and generation of a novel Fresnel hologram called the digital binary mask programmable hologram (BMPH). A BMPH is comprised of a static, high resolution binary grating that is overlaid with a lower resolution binary mask. The reconstructed image of the BMPH can be programmed to approximate a target image (including both intensity and depth information) by configuring the pattern of the binary mask with a simple genetic algorithm (SGA). As the low resolution binary mask can be realized with less stringent display technology, our method enables the development of simple and economical holographic video display.

  5. Object Substitution Masking: When Does Mask Preview Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Chua, Fook K.

    2008-01-01

    When a target is enclosed by a 4-dot mask that persists after the target disappears, target identification is worse than it is when the mask terminates with the target. This masking effect is attributed to object substitution masking (OSM). Previewing the mask, however, attenuates OSM. This study investigated specific conditions under which mask…

  6. Fast mask writers: technology options and considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Lloyd C.; Groves, Timothy; Hughes, Greg

    2011-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is under constant pressure to reduce production costs even as the complexity of technology increases. Lithography represents the most expensive process due to its high capital equipment costs and the implementation of low-k1 lithographic processes, which have added to the complexity of making masks because of the greater use of optical proximity correction, pixelated masks, and double or triple patterning. Each of these mask technologies allows the production of semiconductors at future nodes while extending the utility of current immersion tools. Low-k1 patterning complexity combined with increased data due to smaller feature sizes is driving extremely long mask write times. While a majority of the industry is willing to accept times of up to 24 hours, evidence suggests that the write times for many masks at the 22 nm node and beyond will be significantly longer. It has been estimated that funding on the order of 50M to 90M for non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs will be required to develop a multiple beam mask writer system, yet the business case to recover this kind of investment is not strong. Moreover, funding such a development poses a high risk for an individual supplier. The structure of the mask fabrication marketplace separates the mask writer equipment customer (the mask supplier) from the final customer (wafer manufacturer) that will be most effected by the increase in mask cost that will result if a high speed mask writer is not available. Since no individual company will likely risk entering this market, some type of industry-wide funding model will be needed.

  7. Enhancement in Informational Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xiang; Richards, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to detect a tone added to a random masker improves when a preview of the masker is provided. In 2 experiments, the authors explored the role that perceptual organization plays in this release from masking. Method: Detection thresholds were measured in informational masking studies. The maskers were drawn at random prior to…

  8. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  9. Vendor Capability for Low Thermal Expansion Mask Substrates for EUV Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Taylor, J S; Hector, S D; Yan, P Y; Ramamoorthy, A; Brooker, P D

    2002-04-12

    Development of manufacturing infrastructure is required to ensure a commercial source of mask substrates for the timely introduction of EUVL. Improvements to the low thermal expansion materials that compose the substrate have been made, but need to be scaled to production quantities. We have been evaluating three challenging substrate characteristics to determine the state of the infrastructure for the finishing of substrates. First, surface roughness is on track and little risk is associated with achieving the roughness requirement as an independent specification. Second, with new flatness-measuring equipment just coming on line, the vendors are poised for improvement toward the SEMI P37 flatness specification. Third, significant acceleration is needed in the reduction of defect levels on substrates. The lack of high-sensitivity defect metrology at the vendors' sites is limiting progress in developing substrates for EWL.

  10. Lithographic performance evaluation of a contaminated EUV mask after cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Holfeld, Christian; Wuest, Andrea

    2009-11-16

    The effect of surface contamination and subsequent mask surface cleaning on the lithographic performance of a EUV mask is investigated. SEMATECH's Berkeley micro-field exposure tool (MET) printed 40 nm and 50 nm line and space (L/S) patterns are evaluated to compare the performance of a contaminated and cleaned mask to an uncontaminated mask. Since the two EUV masks have distinct absorber architectures, optical imaging models and aerial image calculations were completed to determine any expected differences in performance. Measured and calculated Bossung curves, process windows, and exposure latitudes for the two sets of L/S patterns are compared to determine how the contamination and cleaning impacts the lithographic performance of EUV masks. The observed differences in mask performance are shown to be insignificant, indicating that the cleaning process did not appreciably affect mask performance.

  11. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  12. Masking by Gratings Predicted by an Image Sequence Discriminating Model: Testing Models for Perceptual Discrimination Using Repeatable Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adding noise to stimuli to be discriminated allows estimation of observer classification functions based on the correlation between observer responses and relevant features of the noisy stimuli. Examples will be presented of stimulus features that are found in auditory tone detection and visual vernier acuity. using the standard signal detection model (Thurstone scaling), we derive formulas to estimate the proportion of the observers decision variable variance that is controlled by the added noise. one is based on the probability of agreement of the observer with him/herself on trials with the same noise sample. Another is based on the relative performance of the observer and the model. When these do not agree, the model can be rejected. A second derivation gives the probability of agreement of observer and model when the observer follows the model except for internal noise. Agreement significantly less than this amount allows rejection of the model.

  13. 2012 Mask Industry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.

    2012-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to semiconductor industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. 2012 marks the 11th consecutive year for the mask industry survey. This year's survey and reporting structure are similar to those of the previous years with minor modifications based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics. Categories include general mask information, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, and maintenance and returns. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. Results, initial observations, and key comparisons between the 2011 and 2012 survey responses are shown here, including multiple indications of a shift towards the manufacturing of higher end photomasks.

  14. Performance and stability of mask process correction for EBM-7000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasuko; Chen, George; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Bai, Shufeng; Howell, Rafael; Li, Jiangwei; Tao, Jun; VanDenBroeke, Doug; Wiley, Jim; Takigawa, Tadahiro; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Hara, Shigehiro; Anze, Hirohito; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Tamamushi, Shuichi

    2010-05-01

    In order to support complex optical masks today and EUV masks in the near future, it is critical to correct mask patterning errors with a magnitude of up to 20nm over a range of 2000nm at mask scale caused by short range mask process proximity effects. A new mask process correction technology, MPC+, has been developed to achieve the target requirements for the next generation node. In this paper, the accuracy and throughput performance of MPC+ technology is evaluated using the most advanced mask writing tool, the EBM-70001), and high quality mask metrology . The accuracy of MPC+ is achieved by using a new comprehensive mask model. The results of through-pitch and through-linewidth linearity curves and error statistics for multiple pattern layouts (including both 1D and 2D patterns) are demonstrated and show post-correction accuracy of 2.34nm 3σ for through-pitch/through-linewidth linearity. Implementing faster mask model simulation and more efficient correction recipes; full mask area (100cm2) processing run time is less than 7 hours for 32nm half-pitch technology node. From these results, it can be concluded that MPC+ with its higher precision and speed is a practical technology for the 32nm node and future technology generations, including EUV, when used with advance mask writing processes like the EBM-7000.

  15. Mask CD measurement approach by diffraction intensity for lithography equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takaharu; Mesuda, Kei; Sutou, Takanori; Inazuki, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Toyama, Nobuhito; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2008-04-01

    In 45nm node and beyond with hyper NA lithography, mask topography effect is not ignorable and mask CD bias impacts printing performance such as MEEF or exposure latitude. In that situation, 3D simulation is required for precise evaluation of printing performance and the accuracy of 3D mask model on simulation is a key issue. Verification of 3D mask model by diffraction intensity measurement with AIMS TM45-193i was discussed in our previous works. Through the verification, though real mask successfully creates effective or simulated diffractions, CD on 3D mask model on simulation was different to that on AIMS TM result which was measured by CD-SEM. Therefore, purpose of this work is to analyze the cause of CD differences through AIMS TM diffraction intensity evaluation in various conditions (mask material, pattern pitch, mask CD bias and mask CD-SEM system). Furthermore, lithography equivalent CD is proposed as width of "ideal" mask shape. As a result achieved from the experiments, constant CD shift was successfully observed at hp40-70nm L/S pattern with varied bias for both 6% EAPSM and Binary masks. It can be said that mask topography difference related to mask material and pattern dimensions has not been observed. On the other hand, the value of CD shift was smaller on the condition of newer generation CD-SEM measurement. Other result achieved from further discussion and analysis, cause of the CD difference was explained using simple SEM image simulation. The CD difference was mainly changed by electron beam size factor, and it was stable with side wall angle in the range of 80 to 90 degree if the middle CD, which is the width of 3D model defined at the half height of the mask film's thickness, is constant. Since side wall angles on actual masks are nearly 90 degree, lithography equivalent CD could be measured by CD-SEM with constant offset.

  16. Space and time in masking and crowding.

    PubMed

    Lev, Maria; Polat, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Masking and crowding are major phenomena associated with contextual modulations, but the relationship between them remains unclear. We have recently shown that crowding is apparent in the fovea when the time available for processing is limited, pointing to the strong relationship between crowding in the spatial and temporal domains. Models of crowding emphasize the size (acuity) of the target and the spacing between the target and flankers as the main determinants that predict crowding. Our model, which is based on lateral interactions, posits that masking and crowding are related in the spatial and temporal domains at the fovea and periphery and that both can be explained by the increasing size of the human perceptive field (PF) with increasing eccentricity. We explored the relations between masking and crowding using letter identification and contrast detection by correlating the crowding effect with the estimated size of the PF and with masking under different spatiotemporal conditions. We found that there is a large variability in PF size and crowding effects across observers. Nevertheless, masking and crowding were both correlated with the estimated size of the PF in the fovea and periphery under a specific range of spatiotemporal parameters. Our results suggest that under certain conditions, crowding and masking share common neural mechanisms that underlie the spatiotemporal properties of these phenomena in both the fovea and periphery. These results could explain the transfer of training gains from spatiotemporal Gabor masking to letter acuity, reading, and reduced crowding.

  17. A pilot study on the use of geometrically accurate face models to replicate ex vivo N95 mask fit.

    PubMed

    Golshahi, Laleh; Telidetzki, Karla; King, Ben; Shaw, Diana; Finlay, Warren H

    2013-01-01

    To test the feasibility of replicating a face mask seal in vitro, we created 5 geometrically accurate reconstructions of the head and neck of an adult human subject using different materials. Three breathing patterns were simulated with each replica and an attached N95 mask. Quantitative fit testing on the subject and the replicas showed that none of the 5 isotropic materials used allowed duplication of the ex vivo mask seal for the specific mask-face combination studied.

  18. Protective Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mask to protect the physically impaired from injuries to the face and head has been developed by Langley Research Center. It is made of composite materials, usually graphite or boron fibers woven into a matrix. Weighs less than three ounces.

  19. Neonatal resuscitation 2: an evaluation of manual ventilation devices and face masks

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: The key to successful neonatal resuscitation is effective ventilation. Little evidence exists to guide clinicians in their choice of manual ventilation device or face mask. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To compare the efficacy of (a) the Laerdal infant resuscitator and the Neopuff infant resuscitator, used with (b) round and anatomically shaped masks in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Thirty four participants gave positive pressure ventilation to a mannequin at specified pressures with each of the four device-mask combinations. Flow, inspiratory tidal volume at the face mask (VTI(mask)), VTE(mask), and airway pressure were recorded. Leakage from the mask was calculated from VTI(mask) and VTE(mask). Results: A total of 10 780 inflations were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressure targets were achieved equally with the Laerdal and Neopuff resuscitators. Positive end expiratory pressure was delivered with the Neopuff but not the Laerdal device. Despite similar peak pressures, VTE(mask) varied widely. Mask leakage was large for each combination of device and mask. There were no differences between the masks. Conclusion: During face mask ventilation of a neonatal resuscitation mannequin, there are large leaks around the face mask. Airway pressure is a poor proxy for volume delivered during positive pressure ventilation through a mask. PMID:15871989

  20. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  1. Mask Industry Assessment: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Chan, David Y.

    2010-09-01

    A survey created supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the ninth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was basically the same as the 2005 through 2009 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  2. New mask technology challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2001-09-01

    Mask technology development has accelerated dramatically in recent years from the glacial pace of the last three decades to the rapid and sometimes simultaneous introductions of new wavelengths and mask-based resolution enhancement techniques. The nature of the semiconductor business has also become one driven by time-to-market as an overwhelming factor in capturing market share and profit. These are among the factors that have created enormous stress on the mask industry to produce masks with enhanced capabilities, such as phase-shifting attenuators, sub-resolution assist bars, and optical proximity correction (OPC) features, while maintaining or reducing cost and cycle time. The mask can no longer be considered a commodity item that is purchased form the lowest-cost supplier. Instead, it must now be promoted as an integral part of the technical and business case for a total lithographic solution. Improving partnership between designer, mask-maker, and wafer lithographer will be the harbinger of success in finding a profitable balance of capability, cost, and cycle time. Likewise for equipment infrastructure development, stronger partnership on the international level is necessary to control development cost and mitigate schedule and technical risks.

  3. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  4. Masks: The Artist in Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Whether masks are made from cardboard, papier-mache, metal, wood, leather, fabric, clay or any combination of these materials, they bring out the artist in people. Young children like to wear masks when they play to pretend they were another person or animal. Masks let them fantasize and be creative. The author's students made masks representing…

  5. Mask cost of ownership for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Edward G.; Seidel, Philip K.

    2000-07-01

    As technology advances, becoming more difficult and more expensive, the cost of ownership (CoO) metric becomes increasingly important in evaluating technical strategies. The International SEMATECH CoC analysis has steadily gained visibility over the past year, as it attempts to level the playing field between technology choices, and create a fair relative comparison. In order to predict mask cots for advanced lithography, mask process flows are modeled using bets-known processing strategies, equipment cost, and yields. Using a newly revised yield mode, and updated mask manufacture flows, representative mask flows can be built. These flows are then used to calculate mask costs for advanced lithography down to the 50 nm node. It is never the goal of this type of work to provide absolute cost estimates for business planning purposes. However, the combination of a quantifiable yield model with a clearly defined set of mask processing flows and a cost model based upon them serves as an excellent starting point for cost driver analysis and process flow discussion.

  6. Mask-LMC: lithographic simulation and defect detection from high-resolution mask images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, George; Wiley, James N.; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Howell, Rafael C.; Bai, Shufeng; Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Frank; Cao, Yu; Takigawa, Tadahiro; Kurosawa, Terunobu; Tsuchiya, Hideo; Usuda, Kinya; Tokita, Masakazu; Ozaki, Fumio; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Tsuji, Yoshitake

    2009-04-01

    We report the development of Mask-LMC for defect printability evaluation from sub-200nm wavelength mask inspection images. Both transmitted and reflected images are utilized, and both die-to-die and die-to-database inspection modes are supported. The first step of the process is to recover the patterns on the mask from high resolution T and R images by de-convolving inspection optical effects. This step uses a mask reconstruction model, which is based on rigorous Hopkins-modeling of the inspection optics, and is pre-determined before the full mask inspection. After mask reconstruction, wafer scanner optics and wafer resist simulations are performed on the reconstructed mask, with a wafer lithography model. This step leverages Brion's industry-proven, hardware-accelerated LMC (Lithography Manufacturability Check) technology1. Existing litho process models that are in use for Brion's OPC+ and verification products may be used for this simulation. In the final step, special detectors are used to compare simulation results on the reference and defect dice. We have developed detectors for contact CD, contact area, line and space CD, and edge placement errors. The detection result has been validated with AIMSTM.

  7. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction time, breakthroughs, and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  8. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction temperature and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  9. Partitioning mechanisms of masking: contrast transducer versus divisive inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghout-Stein, Lauren; Tyler, Christopher W.; Klein, Stanley A.

    1997-06-01

    noise that intrudes on the detecting mechanism from neighboring mechanisms. A detailed review of this debate is provided by the paper by Klein et al., 3016-02 in this Proceedings. Threshold elevation functions that show the relationship between mask spatial frequency and masking magnitude cannot illuminate this debate, as we demonstrated at ARVO (1994). For that study, we generated threshold elevation functions (the ratio of unmasked versus masked target threshold) for multi-channel systems using computational models that invoked either divisive inhibition, a set of transducer nonlinearities or multiplicative noise. Threshold elevation functions were indistinguishable when each masking process was assumed to have similar strength. These results led us to design the experiment presented here, which attempts to compare the effects of two of these masking processes, lateral divisive inhibition and nonlinear transducer compression.

  10. A pilot study on the use of geometrically accurate face models to replicate ex vivo N95 mask fit.

    PubMed

    Golshahi, Laleh; Telidetzki, Karla; King, Ben; Shaw, Diana; Finlay, Warren H

    2013-01-01

    To test the feasibility of replicating a face mask seal in vitro, we created 5 geometrically accurate reconstructions of the head and neck of an adult human subject using different materials. Three breathing patterns were simulated with each replica and an attached N95 mask. Quantitative fit testing on the subject and the replicas showed that none of the 5 isotropic materials used allowed duplication of the ex vivo mask seal for the specific mask-face combination studied. PMID:22503133

  11. Masked mycotoxins: A review

    PubMed Central

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders. PMID:23047235

  12. Masked mycotoxins: a review.

    PubMed

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders.

  13. COAs: Behind the Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birke, Szifra

    1993-01-01

    Provides information on alcoholism and codependency to help teachers identify and respond to children of alcoholics (COAs). Discusses characteristics of alcoholic homes and problems encountered by children and adult COAs. Examines survival "masks" of COAs, including hero, rebel, adjustor, clown, and caretaker. Lists organizational, print, and…

  14. CADAT integrated circuit mask analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CADAT System Mask Analysis Program (MAPS2) is automated software tool for analyzing integrated-circuit mask design. Included in MAPS2 functions are artwork verification, device identification, nodal analysis, capacitance calculation, and logic equation generation.

  15. Mask characterization for critical dimension uniformity budget breakdown in advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    As the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors critical dimension uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. We will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for advanced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 1D (dense lines) and 2D (dense contacts) feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CDs and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples. Mask stack reflectivity variations should also be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We also observed mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) through field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may play a role towards the total intrafield CDU and may need to be taken into account for EUV lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, with results herein, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to quantifying the mask part of

  16. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask inspection will be

  17. Respiratory Source Control Using Surgical Masks With Nanofiber Media

    PubMed Central

    Skaria, Shaji D.; Smaldone, Gerald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Potentially infected individuals (‘source’) are sometimes encouraged to use face masks to reduce exposure of their infectious aerosols to others (‘receiver’). To improve compliance with Respiratory Source Control via face mask and therefore reduce receiver exposure, a mask should be comfortable and effective. We tested a novel face mask designed to improve breathability and filtration using nanofiber filtration. Methods: Using radiolabeled test aerosols and a calibrated exposure chamber simulating source to receiver interaction, facepiece function was measured with a life-like ventilated manikin model. Measurements included mask airflow resistance (pressure difference during breathing), filtration, (mask capture of exhaled radiolabeled test aerosols), and exposure (the transfer of ‘infectious’ aerosols from the ‘source’ to a ‘receiver’). Polydisperse aerosols were measured at the source with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.95 µm. Approximately 90% of the particles were <2.0 µm. Tested facepieces included nanofiber prototype surgical masks, conventional surgical masks, and for comparison, an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an ‘N95 respirator’). Airflow through and around conventional surgical face mask and nanofiber prototype face mask was visualized using Schlieren optical imaging. Results: Airflow resistance [ΔP, cmH2O] across sealed surgical masks (means: 0.1865 and 0.1791 cmH2O) approached that of the N95 (mean: 0.2664 cmH2O). The airflow resistance across the nanofiber face mask whether sealed or not sealed (0.0504 and 0.0311 cmH2O) was significantly reduced in comparison. In addition, ‘infected’ source airflow filtration and receiver exposure levels for nanofiber face masks placed on the source were comparable to that achieved with N95 placed on the source; 98.98% versus 82.68% and 0.0194 versus 0.0557, respectively. Compared to deflection within and around the conventional face

  18. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, A.L.; Kroop, D.C.; McGee, M.K.; Lenkszus, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  19. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, Alan L.; Kroop, David C.; McGee, Marilyn K.; Lenkszus, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  20. Mask strategy at International SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-08-01

    International SEMATECH (ISMT) is a consortium consisting of 13 leading semiconductor manufacturers from around the globe. Its objective is to develop the infrastructure necessary for its member companies to realize the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) through efficiencies of shared development resources and knowledge. The largest area of effort is lithography, recognized as a crucial enabler for microelectronics technology progress. Within the Lithography Division, most of the efforts center on mask-related issues. The development strategy at International SEMATCH will be presented and the interlock of lithography projects clarified. Because of the limited size of the mask production equipment market, the business case is weak for aggressive investment commensurate with the pace of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. With masks becoming the overwhelming component of lithography cost, new ways of reducing or eliminating mask costs are being explored. Will mask technology survive without a strong business case? Will the mask industry limit the growth of the semiconductor industry? Are advanced masks worth their escalating cost? An analysis of mask cost from the perspective of mask value imparted to the user is presented with examples and generic formulas for the reader to apply independently. A key part to the success for both International SEMATECH and the industry globally will be partnerships on both the local level between mask-maker and mask-user, and the macro level where global collaborations will be necessary to resolve technology development cost challenges.

  1. The Attentional Dynamics of Masked Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Philip L.; Wolfgang, Bradley J.

    2004-01-01

    A dichoptic masking procedure was used to test whether the mask-dependent cuing effects found in luminance detection by P. L. Smith (2000a) were due to integration masking or interruption masking. Attentional cuing enhanced detection sensitivity (d') when stimuli were backwardly masked with either dichoptic or monoptic masks, whereas no cuing…

  2. Revisiting mask contact hole measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Masaru; Gallagher, Emily; Ceperley, Daniel; Brunner, Timothy; Bowley, Reg; McGuire, Anne

    2006-10-01

    Contact holes represent one of the biggest critical dimension (CD) mask metrology challenges for 45nm technology mask development. The challenge is a consequence of both wafer and mask sensitivities. Large mask error factors and the small process windows found when contact holes are imaged on wafers impose very tight mask specifications for CD uniformity. The resultant CD error budget leaves little room for mask metrology. Current advanced mask metrology deploys a CD-SEM to characterize the mask contact hole CD uniformity. Measuring a contact hole is complex since it is inherently two-dimensional and is not always well-characterized by one-dimensional x- and y-axis measurements. This paper will investigate contact metrics such as line edge roughness (LER), region of interest (ROI) size, area, and CD sampling methods. The relative merits of each will be explored. Ultimately, an understanding of the connection between what is physically measured on the mask and what impacts wafer imaging must be understood. Simulations will be presented to explore the printability of a contact hole's physical attributes. The results will be summarized into a discussion of optimal contact hole metrology for 45nm technology node masks.

  3. Mask Design for the Space Interferometry Mission Internal Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, David; Zhao, Feng; Korechoff, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the mask design used for the internal metrology of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). Included is information about the project, the method of measurements with SIM, the internal metrology, numerical model of internal metrology, wavefront examples, performance metrics, and mask design

  4. Metabolic power of European starlings Sturnus vulgaris during flight in a wind tunnel, estimated from heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water and mask respirometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, S; Möller, U; Rayner, J M V; Jackson, D M; Nachtigall, W; Speakman, J R

    2004-11-01

    It is technically demanding to measure the energetic cost of animal flight. Each of the previously available techniques has some disadvantage as well advantages. We compared measurements of the energetic cost of flight in a wind tunnel by four European starlings Sturnus vulgaris made using three independent techniques: heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water (DLW) and mask respirometry. We based our heat transfer model on thermal images of the surface temperature of the birds and air flow past the body and wings calculated from wing beat kinematics. Metabolic power was not sensitive to uncertainty in the value of efficiency when estimated from heat transfer modelling. A change in the assumed value of whole animal efficiency from 0.19 to 0.07 (the range of estimates in previous studies) only altered metabolic power predicted from heat transfer modelling by 13%. The same change in the assumed value of efficiency would cause a 2.7-fold change in metabolic power if it were predicted from mechanical power. Metabolic power did not differ significantly between measurements made using the three techniques when we assumed an efficiency in the range 0.11-0.19, although the DLW results appeared to form a U-shaped power-speed curve while the heat transfer model and respirometry results increased linearly with speed. This is the first time that techniques for determining metabolic power have been compared using data from the same birds flying under the same conditions. Our data provide reassurance that all the techniques produce similar results and suggest that heat transfer modelling may be a useful method for estimating metabolic rate.

  5. Metabolic power of European starlings Sturnus vulgaris during flight in a wind tunnel, estimated from heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water and mask respirometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, S; Möller, U; Rayner, J M V; Jackson, D M; Nachtigall, W; Speakman, J R

    2004-11-01

    It is technically demanding to measure the energetic cost of animal flight. Each of the previously available techniques has some disadvantage as well advantages. We compared measurements of the energetic cost of flight in a wind tunnel by four European starlings Sturnus vulgaris made using three independent techniques: heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water (DLW) and mask respirometry. We based our heat transfer model on thermal images of the surface temperature of the birds and air flow past the body and wings calculated from wing beat kinematics. Metabolic power was not sensitive to uncertainty in the value of efficiency when estimated from heat transfer modelling. A change in the assumed value of whole animal efficiency from 0.19 to 0.07 (the range of estimates in previous studies) only altered metabolic power predicted from heat transfer modelling by 13%. The same change in the assumed value of efficiency would cause a 2.7-fold change in metabolic power if it were predicted from mechanical power. Metabolic power did not differ significantly between measurements made using the three techniques when we assumed an efficiency in the range 0.11-0.19, although the DLW results appeared to form a U-shaped power-speed curve while the heat transfer model and respirometry results increased linearly with speed. This is the first time that techniques for determining metabolic power have been compared using data from the same birds flying under the same conditions. Our data provide reassurance that all the techniques produce similar results and suggest that heat transfer modelling may be a useful method for estimating metabolic rate. PMID:15531650

  6. Overlay improvement by exposure map based mask registration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Irene; Guo, Eric; Chen, Ming; Lu, Max; Li, Gordon; Li, Rivan; Tian, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Along with the increased miniaturization of semiconductor electronic devices, the design rules of advanced semiconductor devices shrink dramatically. [1] One of the main challenges of lithography step is the layer-to-layer overlay control. Furthermore, DPT (Double Patterning Technology) has been adapted for the advanced technology node like 28nm and 14nm, corresponding overlay budget becomes even tighter. [2][3] After the in-die mask registration (pattern placement) measurement is introduced, with the model analysis of a KLA SOV (sources of variation) tool, it's observed that registration difference between masks is a significant error source of wafer layer-to-layer overlay at 28nm process. [4][5] Mask registration optimization would highly improve wafer overlay performance accordingly. It was reported that a laser based registration control (RegC) process could be applied after the pattern generation or after pellicle mounting and allowed fine tuning of the mask registration. [6] In this paper we propose a novel method of mask registration correction, which can be applied before mask writing based on mask exposure map, considering the factors of mask chip layout, writing sequence, and pattern density distribution. Our experiment data show if pattern density on the mask keeps at a low level, in-die mask registration residue error in 3sigma could be always under 5nm whatever blank type and related writer POSCOR (position correction) file was applied; it proves random error induced by material or equipment would occupy relatively fixed error budget as an error source of mask registration. On the real production, comparing the mask registration difference through critical production layers, it could be revealed that registration residue error of line space layers with higher pattern density is always much larger than the one of contact hole layers with lower pattern density. Additionally, the mask registration difference between layers with similar pattern density

  7. Mask fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  8. A Masked Photocathode in Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a masked photocathode inside the photoinjector for generating high brightness election beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto an electrode, an electrode with small hole is used as a mask to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material easy by rotating the photocathode behind the electrode into the hole. Furthermore, this helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode material. The masked photocathode also provides transverse cut-off to a Gaussian laser beam that reduces electron beam emittance growth from nonlinear space-charge effects.

  9. What Is Being Masked in Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Cole, Geoff; Skarratt, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is said to occur when a perceptual object is hypothesized that is mismatched by subsequent sensory evidence, leading to a new hypothesized object being substituted for the first. For example, when a brief target is accompanied by a longer lasting display of nonoverlapping mask elements, reporting of target…

  10. Actinic inspection of multilayer defects on EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Taylor, J S; Wood, O

    2005-03-24

    The production of defect-free mask blanks, and the development of techniques for inspecting and qualifying EUV mask blanks, remains a key challenge for EUV lithography. In order to ensure a reliable supply of defect-free mask blanks, it is necessary to develop techniques to reliably and accurately detect defects on un-patterned mask blanks. These inspection tools must be able to accurately detect all critical defects whilst simultaneously having the minimum possible false-positive detection rate. There continues to be improvement in high-speed non-actinic mask blank inspection tools, and it is anticipated that these tools can and will be used by industry to qualify EUV mask blanks. However, the outstanding question remains one of validating that non-actinic inspection techniques are capable of detecting all printable EUV defects. To qualify the performance of non-actinic inspection tools, a unique dual-mode EUV mask inspection system has been installed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In high-speed inspection mode, whole mask blanks are scanned for defects using 13.5-nm wavelength light to identify and map all locations on the mask that scatter a significant amount of EUV light. In imaging, or defect review mode, a zone plate is placed in the reflected beam path to image a region of interest onto a CCD detector with an effective resolution on the mask of 100-nm or better. Combining the capabilities of the two inspection tools into one system provides the unique capability to determine the coordinates of native defects that can be used to compare actinic defect inspection with visible light defect inspection tools under commercial development, and to provide data for comparing scattering models for EUV mask defects.

  11. EFFECT OF MASKED REGIONS ON WEAK-LENSING STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-10

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple {chi}{sup 2} analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg{sup 2} survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting {chi}{sup 2}/n{sub dof} = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard {Lambda}CDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  12. Masked Proportional Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Masked proportional routing is an improved procedure for choosing links between adjacent nodes of a network for the purpose of transporting an entity from a source node ("A") to a destination node ("B"). The entity could be, for example, a physical object to be shipped, in which case the nodes would represent waypoints and the links would represent roads or other paths between waypoints. For another example, the entity could be a message or packet of data to be transmitted from A to B, in which case the nodes could be computer-controlled switching stations and the links could be communication channels between the stations. In yet another example, an entity could represent a workpiece while links and nodes could represent, respectively, manufacturing processes and stages in the progress of the workpiece towards a finished product. More generally, the nodes could represent states of an entity and the links could represent allowed transitions of the entity. The purpose of masked proportional routing and of related prior routing procedures is to schedule transitions of entities from their initial states ("A") to their final states ("B") in such a manner as to minimize a cost or to attain some other measure of optimality or efficiency. Masked proportional routing follows a distributed (in the sense of decentralized) approach to probabilistically or deterministically choosing the links. It was developed to satisfy a need for a routing procedure that 1. Does not always choose the same link(s), even for two instances characterized by identical estimated values of associated cost functions; 2. Enables a graceful transition from one set of links to another set of links as the circumstances of operation of the network change over time; 3. Is preferably amenable to separate optimization of different portions of the network; 4. Is preferably usable in a network in which some of the routing decisions are made by one or more other procedure(s); 5. Preferably does not cause an

  13. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  14. Combining Simultaneous with Temporal Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Herzog, Michael H.; Francis, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous and temporal masking are two frequently used techniques in psychology and vision science. Although there are many studies and theories related to each masking technique, there are no systematic investigations of their mutual relationship, even though both techniques are often applied together. Here, the authors show that temporal…

  15. Mask registration and wafer overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chulseung; Bang, Changjin; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kang, Hyosang; Lee, Dohwa; Jeong, Woonjae; Lim, Ok-Sung; Yoon, Seunghoon; Jung, Jaekang; Laske, Frank; Parisoli, Lidia; Roeth, Klaus-Dieter; Robinson, John C.; Jug, Sven; Izikson, Pavel; Dinu, Berta; Widmann, Amir; Choi, DongSub

    2010-03-01

    Overlay continues to be one of the key challenges for lithography in advanced semiconductor manufacturing. It becomes even more challenging due to the continued shrinking of the device node. Some low k1 techniques, such as Double Exposure and Double Patterning also add additional loss of the overlay margin due to the fact that the single layer pattern is created based on more than 1 exposure. Therefore, the overlay between 2 exposures requires very tight overlay specification. Mask registration is one of the major contributors to wafer overlay, especially field related overlay. We investigated mask registration and wafer overlay by co-analyzing the mask data and the wafer overlay data. To achieve the accurate cohesive results, we introduced the combined metrology mark which can be used for both mask registration measurement as well as for wafer overlay measurement. Coincidence of both metrology marks make it possible to subtract mask signature from wafer overlay without compromising the accuracy due to the physical distance between measurement marks, if we use 2 different marks for both metrologies. Therefore, it is possible to extract pure scanner related signatures, and to analyze the scanner related signatures in details to in order to enable root cause analysis and ultimately drive higher wafer yield. We determined the exact mask registration error in order to decompose wafer overlay into mask, scanner, process and metrology. We also studied the impact of pellicle mounting by comparison of mask registration measurement pre-pellicle mounting and post-pellicle mounting in this investigation.

  16. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  17. Microscale rarefied gas dynamics and surface interactions for EUVL and MEMS applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2004-11-01

    A combined experimental/modeling study was conducted to better understand the critical role of gas-surface interactions in rarefied gas flows. An experimental chamber and supporting diagnostics were designed and assembled to allow simultaneous measurements of gas heat flux and inter-plate gas density profiles in an axisymmetric, parallel-plate geometry. Measurements of gas density profiles and heat flux are made under identical conditions, eliminating an important limitation of earlier studies. The use of in situ, electron-beam fluorescence is demonstrated as a means to measure gas density profiles although additional work is required to improve the accuracy of this technique. Heat flux is inferred from temperature-drop measurements using precision thermistors. The system can be operated with a variety of gases (monatomic, diatomic, polyatomic, mixtures) and carefully controlled, well-characterized surfaces of different types (metals, ceramics) and conditions (smooth, rough). The measurements reported here are for 304 stainless steel plates with a standard machined surface coupled with argon, helium, and nitrogen. The resulting heat-flux and gas-density-profile data are analyzed using analytic and computational models to show that a simple Maxwell gas-surface interaction model is adequate to represent all of the observations. Based on this analysis, thermal accommodation coefficients for 304 stainless steel coupled with argon, nitrogen, and helium are determined to be 0.88, 0.80, and 0.38, respectively, with an estimated uncertainty of {+-}0.02.

  18. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  19. Programmable RET Mask Layout Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Daniel F.; Mayhew, Jeffrey P.; Rieger, Michael L.; Tang, Zongwu

    2002-12-01

    Emerging resolution enhancement techniques (RET) and OPC are dramatically increasing the complexity of mask layouts and, in turn, mask verification. Mask shapes needed to achieve required results on the wafer diverge significantly from corresponding shapes in the physical design, and in some cases a single chip layer may be decomposed into two masks used in multiple exposures. The mask verification challenge is to certify that a RET-synthesized mask layout will produce an acceptable facsimile of the design intent expressed in the design layout. Furthermore costs, tradeoffs between mask-complexity, design intent, targeted process latitude, and other factors are playing a growing role in helping to control rising mask costs. All of these considerations must in turn be incorporated into the mask layout verification strategy needed for data prep sign-off. In this paper we describe a technique for assessing the lithographic quality of mask layouts for diverse RET methods while effectively accommodating various manufacturing objectives and specifications. It leverages the familiar DRC paradigm for identifying errors and producing DRC-like error shapes in its output layout. It integrates a unique concept of "check figures" - layer-based geometries that dictate where and how simulations of shapes on the wafer are to be compared to the original desired layout. We will show how this provides a highly programmable environment that makes it possible to engage in "compound" check strategies that vary based on design intent and adaptive simulation with multiple checks. Verification may be applied at the "go/no go" level or can be used to build a body of data for quantitative analysis of lithographic behavior at multiple process conditions or for specific user-defined critical features. In addition, we will outline automated methods that guide the selection of input parameters controlling specific verification strategies.

  20. Masked object registration in the Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Padfield, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Registration is one of the most common tasks of image analysis and computer vision applications. The requirements of most registration algorithms include large capture range and fast computation so that the algorithms are robust to different scenarios and can be computed in a reasonable amount of time. For these purposes, registration in the Fourier domain using normalized cross-correlation is well suited and has been extensively studied in the literature. Another common requirement is masking, which is necessary for applications where certain regions of the image that would adversely affect the registration result should be ignored. To address these requirements, we have derived a mathematical model that describes an exact form for embedding the masking step fully into the Fourier domain so that all steps of translation registration can be computed efficiently using Fast Fourier Transforms. We provide algorithms and implementation details that demonstrate the correctness of our derivations. We also demonstrate how this masked FFT registration approach can be applied to improve the Fourier-Mellin algorithm that calculates translation, rotation, and scale in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate the computational efficiency, advantages, and correctness of our algorithm on a number of images from real-world applications. Our framework enables fast, global, parameter-free registration of images with masked regions.

  1. The Mask Designs for Space Interferometer Mission (SIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xu

    2008-01-01

    The Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) consists of three interferometers (science, guide1, and guide2) and two optical paths (metrology and starlight). The system requirements for each interferometer/optical path combination are different and sometimes work against each other. A diffraction model is developed to design and optimize various masks to simultaneously meet the system requirements of three interferometers. In this paper, the details of this diffraction model will be described first. Later, the mask design for each interferometer will be presented to demonstrate the system performance compliance. In the end, a tolerance sensitivity study on the geometrical dimension, shape, and the alignment of these masks will be discussed.

  2. A computational investigation of feedforward and feedback processing in metacontrast backward masking

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, David N.

    2015-01-01

    In human perception studies, visual backward masking has been used to understand the temporal dynamics of subliminal vs. conscious perception. When a brief target stimulus is followed by a masking stimulus after a short interval of <100 ms, performance on the target is impaired when the target and mask are in close spatial proximity. While the psychophysical properties of backward masking have been studied extensively, there is still debate on the underlying cortical dynamics. One prevailing theory suggests that the impairment of target performance due to the mask is the result of lateral inhibition between the target and mask in feedforward processing. Another prevailing theory suggests that this impairment is due to the interruption of feedback processing of the target by the mask. This computational study demonstrates that both aspects of these theories may be correct. Using a biophysical model of V1 and V2, visual processing was modeled as interacting neocortical attractors, which must propagate up the visual stream. If an activating target attractor in V1 is quiesced enough with lateral inhibition from a mask, or not reinforced by recurrent feedback, it is more likely to burn out before becoming fully active and progressing through V2 and beyond. Results are presented which simulate metacontrast backward masking with an increasing stimulus interval and with the presence and absence of feedback activity. This showed that recurrent feedback diminishes backward masking effects and can make conscious perception more likely. One model configuration presented a metacontrast noise mask in the same hypercolumns as the target, and produced type-A masking. A second model configuration presented a target line with two parallel adjacent masking lines, and produced type-B masking. Future work should examine how the model extends to more complex spatial mask configurations. PMID:25759672

  3. Bringing mask repair to the next level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Auth, N.; Spies, P.; Oster, J.; Schneider, H.; Budach, M.; Hofmann, T.; Waiblinger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. These challenges require sophisticated technologies to bring mask repair to the next level. For high end masks ion-beam based and e-based repair technologies are the obvious choice when it comes to the repair of small features. Both technologies have their pro and cons. The scope of this paper is to review and compare the performance of ion-beam based mask repair to e-beam based mask repair. We will analyze the limits of both technologies theoretically and experimentally and show mask repair related performance data. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair tools.

  4. [Masked hypertension: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Mallion, Jean-Michel; Ormezzano, Olivier; Barone-Rochette, Gilles; Neuder, Yannick; Salvat, Muriel; Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Masked hypertension is also referred as reverse white coat hypertension. Masked hypertension is diagnosed in subjects who have normal clinic blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg and elevated ambulatory BP or home BP, with daytime systolic BP> or = 135 mmHg or daytime diastolic BP > or = 85 mmHg. Its prevalence varies between 10 to at least 47% and differs substantially according to the reference population and the specific criteria.Subjects with masked hypertension have been shown to have more extensive target organ damage, specifically, a higher prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis and of left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy. Longitudinal studies of patients with masked hypertension show higher levels of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than in reference populations. These studies show that ambulatory or home BP measurements predict risk much better than the usual clinical measurements and that those who are found to be hypertensive by ambulatory or home measurements have greater risks than those who are not. Who should be tested for masked hypertension? Our reference study shows that 3 characteristics are most likely to predict masked hypertension: male sex, age over 60 years, and office systolic BP of more than 130 mmHg. Masked hypertension is indeed a reality. Individual patients should be tested and treated, based on the physician's clinical judgment.

  5. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  6. Mask side wall clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaijkens, G. J. P.; Rosielle, P. C. J. N.; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-04-01

    Current state-of-the-art optical lithography scanners using 193nm wavelength lasers and numerical apertures of 1.35 have reached fundamental printing limits. Yet, consumer demands and device trends continue to drive smaller feature sizes, and most IC manufacturers have already navigated beyond the lithographic printing limits by turning to double patterning techniques.1 Requiring an extra lithography step for these techniques, it is essential to keep costs down by e.g. increasing wafer throughput. Currently, leading edge immersion scanners consistently produce over 190 wafers per hour (wph). However, to keep decreasing the cost per transistor, higher throughputs of 250 wph are key targets for the year 20132. Amongst others, higher throughput can be acquired by increasing acceleration of the positioning stages. One of the constraining technologies is the current mask or reticle clamping concept due to its friction based acceleration. While current reticle accelerations amount to 150 m/s2, some research3 has already been performed to reticle stage accelerations of 400 m/s2. In this paper, a novel reticle clamping concept is presented. The concept is shown to be suitable for accelerations larger than 400 m/s2 entirely eliminating reticle slip, whilst meeting specifications for clamping induced error with a pattern deformation of < 0.12 nm on wafer stage level (WS) and comprising high clamp stiffness.

  7. Hg-Mask Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assus, P.; Colas, F.

    In order to optimize the occulting process of a Lyot coronagraph and to provide a high dynamic range imaging, a new kind of occulting disk has been developed at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro. A mercury (Hg) drop glued onto an optical window by molecular cohesion and compressed by a pellicle film is used as the occulting disk. The minimum of the superficial tension potential function provides an optical precision (lambda/100) of the toric free surface of the mercury. This process provides a size control for the adaptation to the seeing conditions and to the apparent diameter of a resolved object, and in the case of adaptive optics, to the Airy diameter fraction needed. The occultation is a three dimensional process near the focal plane on the toric free surface that provides an apodization of the occultation. The Hg-Mask coronagraph has been projected for astrometric observations of faint satellites near to Jovian planets and works since 2000 at the 1.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory (OPD - Brazil).

  8. Laser Shock Removal of Nanoparticles from Si Capping Layer of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kang, Young-Jae; Park, Jin-Goo; Busnaina, Ahmed A.; Lee, Jong-Myung; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Zhang, Guojing; Eschbach, Florence; Ramamoorthy, Arun

    2005-07-01

    A new dry laser shock wave generated by a Nd:YAG laser was applied to remove nanosized polystyrene latex (PSL) particles on the silicon capping layer of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask. UV laser was irradiated on the surface before irradiation with laser shock waves to increase the removal efficiency of the organic PSL particles. Owing to the expected damage to the surfaces, the energy of the UV laser was reduced to 8 mJ and the gap distance between the laser shock wave and the surface was increased to 10.5 mm. UV irradiation alone resulted in the removal of 50% of the particles. Exposure to the UV laser three times increased the removal efficiency to 70%. Over 95% particle removal efficiency was found when a laser shock wave was combined with the UV laser. However, the removal efficiency of the particles was below 25% by laser shock wave cleaning alone. Enhanced removal efficiency by UV laser irradiation may be attributed to the photothermal and chemical effects of UV light on the organic PSL particles.

  9. Recovery of EUVL substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Baker, S.L.

    1995-01-19

    Mo/Si multilayers, were removed from superpolished zerodur and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  10. Block-based mask optimization for optical lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Song, Zhiyang; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-05-10

    Pixel-based optical proximity correction (PBOPC) methods have been developed as a leading-edge resolution enhancement technique (RET) for integrated circuit fabrication. PBOPC independently modulates each pixel on the reticle, which tremendously increases the mask's complexity and, at the same time, deteriorates its manufacturability. Most current PBOPC algorithms recur to regularization methods or a mask manufacturing rule check (MRC) to improve the mask manufacturability. Typically, these approaches either fail to satisfy manufacturing constraints on the practical product line, or lead to suboptimal mask patterns that may degrade the lithographic performance. This paper develops a block-based optical proximity correction (BBOPC) algorithm to pursue the optimal masks with manufacturability compliance, where the mask is shaped by a set of overlapped basis blocks rather than pixels. BBOPC optimization is formulated based on a vector imaging model, which is adequate for both dry lithography with lower numerical aperture (NA), and immersion lithography with hyper-NA. The BBOPC algorithm successively optimizes the main features (MF) and subresolution assist features (SRAF) based on a modified conjugate gradient method. It is effective at smoothing any unmanufacturable jogs along edges. A weight matrix is introduced in the cost function to preserve the edge fidelity of the printed images. Simulations show that the BBOPC algorithm can improve lithographic imaging performance while maintaining mask manufacturing constraints. PMID:23669851

  11. Review of biomedical aspects of CB masks and their relationship to military performance. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Muza, S.R.

    1986-11-01

    This review describes the most important factors affecting military work performance while wearing a CB mask: (1) the additional inspiratory and expiratory breathing resistance; (2) increased external dead space; (3) thermal stress of the mask and hood; (4) restriction of functional vision; (5) hindrance of speech transmission and reception; (6) weight, size, and pressure on the face by the CB mask; (7) claustrophobic reactions, and (8) sleep loss and lack of nutrient intake due to long-term wear. In assessing the biomedical aspects of these factors, rather than making comparisons between specific models of CB masks, the review addresses these factors as they apply to CB masks in general.

  12. Subdivisions with infinitely supported mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Pan, Yali

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the convergence of subdivision schemes associated with masks being polynomially decay sequences. Two-scale vector refinement equations are the formwhere the vector of functions [phi]=([phi]1,E..,[phi]r)T is in and is polynomially decay sequence of rxr matrices called refinement mask. Associated with the mask a is a linear operator on given byBy using same methods in [B. Han, R. Q. Jia, Characterization of Riesz bases of wavelets generated from multiresolution analysis, manuscript]; [BE Han, Refinable functions and cascade algorithms in weighted spaces with infinitely supported masks, manuscript]; [R.Q. Jia, Q.T. Jiang, Z.W. Shen, Convergence of cascade algorithms associated with nonhomogeneous refinement equations, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 129 (2001) 415-427]; [R.Q. Jia, Convergence of vector subdivision schemes and construction of biorthogonal multiple wavelets, in: Advances in Wavelet, Hong Kong,1997, Springer, Singapore, 1998, pp. 199-227], a characterization of convergence of the sequences in the L2-norm is given, which extends the main results in [R.Q. Jia, S.D. Riemenschneider, D.X. Zhou, Vector subdivision schemes and multiple wavelets, Math. Comp. 67 (1998) 1533-1563] on convergence of the subdivision schemes associated with a finitely supported mask to the case in which mask a is polynomially decay sequence. As an application, we also obtain a characterization of smoothness of solutions of the refinement equation mentioned above for the case r=1.

  13. Comparison of univariate and multivariate models for prediction of major and minor elements from laser-induced breakdown spectra with and without masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb I.; Giguere, Stephen; Lepore, Kate; Byrne, Sarah; Boucher, Thomas; Carey, CJ; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-09-01

    This study uses 1356 spectra from 452 geologically-diverse samples, the largest suite of LIBS rock spectra ever assembled, to compare the accuracy of elemental predictions in models that use only spectral regions thought to contain peaks arising from the element of interest versus those that use information in the entire spectrum. Results show that for the elements Si, Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ni, Mn, Cr, Co, and Zn, univariate predictions based on single emission lines are by far the least accurate, no matter how carefully the region of channels/wavelengths is chosen and despite the prominence of the selected emission lines. An automated iterative algorithm was developed to sweep through all 5485 channels of data and select the single region that produces the optimal prediction accuracy for each element using univariate analysis. For the eight major elements, use of this technique results in a 35% improvement in prediction accuracy; for minors, the improvement is 13%. The best wavelength region choice for any given univariate analysis is likely to be an inherent property of the specific training set that cannot be generalized. In comparison, multivariate analysis using partial least-squares (PLS) almost universally outperforms univariate analysis. PLS using all the same wavelength regions from the univariate analysis produces results that improve in accuracy by 63% for major elements and 3% for minor element. This difference is likely a reflection of signal to noise ratios, which are far better for major elements than for minor elements, and likely limit their prediction accuracy by any technique. We also compare predictions using specific wavelength ranges for each element against those employing all channels. Masking out channels to focus on emission lines from a specific element that occurs decreases prediction accuracy for major elements but is useful for minor elements with low signals and proportionally much higher noise; use of PLS rather than univariate

  14. Visual Masking During Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    Visual masking occurs when one stimulus interferes with the perception of another stimulus. Investigates which matters more for visual masking--that the target and masking stimuli are flashed on the same part of the retina, or, that the target and mask appear in the same place. (Author/RK)

  15. The Meaning behind the Mask. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students explore the cultural significance of masks. After exploring the world of African masks and storytelling, they create masks that tell stories of their own. In these six lessons, students first recall contexts in which masks are worn in the United States, and then discuss their use in stories. Students then investigate…

  16. Masking mediated print defect visibility predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaochen; Nachlieli, Hila; Shaked, Doron; Shiffman, Smadar; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Banding is a well-known artifact produced by printing systems. It usually appears as lines perpendicular to the process direction of the print. Therefore, banding is an important print quality issue which has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers. However, little literature has focused on the study of the masking effect of content for this kind of print quality issue. Compared with other image and print quality research, our work is focused on the print quality of typical documents printed on a digital commercial printing press. In this paper, we propose a Masking Mediated Print Defect Visibility Predictor (MMPDVP) to predict the visibility of defects in the presence of customer content. The parameters of the algorithm are trained from ground-truth images that have been marked by subjects. The MMPDVP could help the press operator decide whether the print quality is acceptable for specific customer requirements. Ultimately, this model can be used to optimize the print-shop workflow.

  17. Vector scattering analysis of TPF coronagraph pupil masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, Daniel P.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Lieber, Michael D.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Shih, Ta-Ming

    2004-10-01

    Rigorous finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic simulation is used to simulate the scattering from proto-typical pupil mask cross-section geometries and to quantify the differences from the normally assumed ideal on-off behavior. Shaped pupil plane masks are a promising technology for the TPF coronagraph mission. However the stringent requirements placed on the optics require that the detailed behavior of the edge-effects of these masks be examined carefully. End-to-end optical system simulation is essential and an important aspect is the polarization and cross-section dependent edge-effects which are the subject of this paper. Pupil plane masks are similar in many respects to photomasks used in the integrated circuit industry. Simulation capabilities such as the FDTD simulator, TEMPEST, developed for analyzing polarization and intensity imbalance effects in nonplanar phase-shifting photomasks, offer a leg-up in analyzing coronagraph masks. However, the accuracy in magnitude and phase required for modeling a chronograph system is extremely demanding and previously inconsequential errors may be of the same order of magnitude as the physical phenomena under study. In this paper, effects of thick masks, finite conductivity metals, and various cross-section geometries on the transmission of pupil-plane masks are illustrated. Undercutting the edge shape of Cr masks improves the effective opening width to within λ/5 of the actual opening but TE and TM polarizations require opposite compensations. The deviation from ideal is examined at the reference plane of the mask opening. Numerical errors in TEMPEST, such as numerical dispersion, perfectly matched layer reflections, and source haze are also discussed along with techniques for mitigating their impacts.

  18. New method of contour-based mask-shape compiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Onizawa, Akira; Sato, Hidetoshi; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a new method of accurately profiling a mask shape by utilizing a Mask CD-SEM. The method is intended to realize high accuracy, stability and reproducibility of the Mask CD-SEM adopting an edge detection algorithm as the key technology used in CD-SEM for high accuracy CD measurement. In comparison with a conventional image processing method for contour profiling, it is possible to create the profiles with much higher accuracy which is comparable with CD-SEM for semiconductor device CD measurement. In this report, we will introduce the algorithm in general, the experimental results and the application in practice. As shrinkage of design rule for semiconductor device has further advanced, an aggressive OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) is indispensable in RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology). From the view point of DFM (Design for Manufacturability), a dramatic increase of data processing cost for advanced MDP (Mask Data Preparation) for instance and surge of mask making cost have become a big concern to the device manufacturers. In a sense, it is a trade-off between the high accuracy RET and the mask production cost, while it gives a significant impact on the semiconductor market centered around the mask business. To cope with the problem, we propose the best method for a DFM solution in which two dimensional data are extracted for an error free practical simulation by precise reproduction of a real mask shape in addition to the mask data simulation. The flow centering around the design data is fully automated and provides an environment where optimization and verification for fully automated model calibration with much less error is available. It also allows complete consolidation of input and output functions with an EDA system by constructing a design data oriented system structure. This method therefore is regarded as a strategic DFM approach in the semiconductor metrology.

  19. The mask of psychotic diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Garfield, David

    2003-01-01

    Chronic mental illness results in the patient becoming adhered to a DSM-IV diagnostic label. Over time, this diagnosis can expand and become a "mask" that invisibly covers over the true person of the patient. Most commonly, two things then occur. First, the outside world forgets that the patient is a person and family, friends, staff, and doctors begin to treat the patient according to the superficial aspects of what the mask of the diagnosis connotes, rather than connecting with the person struggling with the illness. Second and, perhaps, more insidious, is that the patient, who has been vulnerable and shattered by his or her experience and battle with the illness, adopts the mask as a kind of invisible protective shield. The task of making contact with the patient behind the mask of the diagnosis is therefore a formidable one for psychoanalysts and therapists and staff who work with seriously ill patients. Treatment must focus on the dual process of interfering with the patient's use of the diagnostic mask while, at the same time, making safe contact with the person of the patient behind the mask. A focus on affect can help achieve these dual goals. By utilizing Semrad's (Semrad and van Buskirk, 1969) method of noticing and asking about "feelings" as conveyed by hallucinations, delusions, or bodily sensations, a reliable relationship can evolve and the clinician can come to have an important "selfobject" (Kohut, 1971) meaning for the patient. By attuning to the patient's "vitality" affects (Stern, 1985), great stability and a new sense of "aliveness" is made possible to help the patient emerge from the deadening effects of the illness and the mask of the diagnosis. PMID:12722887

  20. Stray-light sources from pupil mask edges and mitigation techniques for the TPF Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, Daniel; Neureuther, Andrew; Miller, Marshall; Lieber, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2006-06-01

    Stray-light sources from pupil plane masks that may limit Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) performance are characterized 1,2 and mitigation strategies are discussed to provide a guide for future development. Rigorous vector simulation with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method is used to characterize waveguiding effects in narrow openings, sidewall interactions, manufacturing tool-marks, manufacturing roughness, mask tilt, and cross-wavelength performance of thick Silicon mask structures. These effects cause stray-light that is not accounted for in scalar thin-mask diffraction theory, the most important of which are sidewall interactions, waveguiding effects in narrow openings, and tilt. These results have been used to improve the scalar thin-mask theory used to simulate the TPF-C with the Integrated Telescope Model. 3 Of particular interest are simulations of 100m thick vertical sidewall openings that model features typically found on Ripple masks 4 fabricated by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) processes. 5 This paper contributes fundamental data for systematically modeling these effects in end-to-end system simulation. Leakage straight through the mask material varies greatly with wavelength, especially in Silicon (an attractive mask material due to the precision manufacturing techniques developed by the IC industry). Coating Silicon with 200nm of Chrome effectively mitigates the leakage without causing additional scattering. Thick-mask diffraction differs from the predictions of scalar thin-mask theory because diffraction spreading is confined by the mask's sidewalls. This confinement can make a mask opening look electro-magnetically larger or smaller than designed, by up to 3λ per vertical sidewall on a 50μm thick mask yet this can be reduced an order of magnitude by undercutting the sidewalls 20°. These confinement effects are sensitive to mask tilt (if light reaches the sidewalls) which can lead to an imbalance in stray-light sources and

  1. Visual masking: past accomplishments, present status, future developments

    PubMed Central

    Breitmeyer, Bruno G.

    2008-01-01

    Visual masking, throughout its history, has been used as an investigative tool in exploring the temporal dynamics of visual perception, beginning with retinal processes and ending in cortical processes concerned with the conscious registration of stimuli. However, visual masking also has been a phenomenon deemed worthy of study in its own right. Most of the recent uses of visual masking have focused on the study of central processes, particularly those involved in feature, object and scene representations, in attentional control mechanisms, and in phenomenal awareness. In recent years our understanding of the phenomenon and cortical mechanisms of visual masking also has benefited from several brain imaging techniques and from a number of sophisticated and neurophysiologically plausible neural network models. Key issues and problems are discussed with the aim of guiding future empirical and theoretical research. PMID:20517494

  2. Mask roughness induced LER: a rule of thumb -- paper

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2010-03-12

    Much work has already been done on how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and currently factor into LER limits. Here, we propose a 'rule-of-thumb' simplified solution that provides a fast and powerful method to obtain mask roughness induced LER. We present modeling data on an older generation mask with a roughness of 230 pm as well as the ultimate target roughness of 50 pm. Moreover, we consider feature sizes of 50 nm and 22 nm, and show that as a function of correlation length, the LER peaks at the condition that the correlation length is approximately equal to the resolution of the imaging optic.

  3. Physiologic and subjective effects of respirator mask type.

    PubMed

    Harber, P; Beck, J; Brown, C; Luo, J

    1991-09-01

    The effect of alternate airflow path designs on full-face mask air-purifying respirators was assessed in 14 healthy volunteers during submaximal exercise. Respirator designs included no respirator (N), full-face mask, dual-cartridge with no nasal deflector (FN), full-face mask respirator with nasal deflector (FD), and a powered air-purifying respirator (PA). Physiologic effects were measured by using respiratory inductive plethysmography and subjective responses by two visual analog scales. There were significant effects of airflow path design upon the physiologic parameters of ventilation, tidal volume, and mean flow rate. There were no significant physiologic or subjective differences between the full-face mask respirators with and without the nasal deflector in place. The PA had less physiologic impact than the nonpowered models but did not show significant subjective benefit. The study suggests that both subjective and objective physiologic responses must be utilized in assessing respirator design. PMID:1781441

  4. Binaural effects in simultaneous room reflection masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Joerg M.

    2005-04-01

    Masked thresholds (MT) for a single test reflection masked by a direct sound (200 ms long broadband noise) were measured dependent on the time delay of the reflection for diotic as well as dichotic stimulus presentation. In the diotic case, the direct sound and the test reflection were presented equally to both ears via headphones. In the dichotic case, an ITD of 0.5 ms was added to the test reflection. In order to focus on simultaneous masking effects, the reflection was truncated in such a way that it formed a common offset with the direct sound. For the diotic case, the resulting data showed a MT increase with increasing reflection delay and for the dichotic case a MT decrease with increasing reflection delay, producing an intercept between both curves at a reflection delay of 6-8 ms. Hence, negative BMLDs (up to -8 dB) were found for very early reflections and positive BMLDs (up to +8 dB) for later reflections, suggesting a binaural mechanism that suppresses very early reflections and enhances later reflections. The measurement results are discussed in the background of different auditory models.

  5. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  6. Fabless company mask technology approach: fabless but not fab-careless

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisamura, Toshiyuki; Wu, Xin

    2009-10-01

    There are two different foundry-fabless working models in the aspect of mask. Some foundries have in-house mask facility while others contract with merchant mask vendors. Significant progress has been made in both kinds of situations. Xilinx as one of the pioneers of fabless semiconductor companies has been continually working very closely with both merchant mask vendors and mask facilities of foundries in past many years, contributed well in both technology development and benefited from corporations. Our involvement in manufacturing is driven by the following three elements: The first element is to understand the new fabrication and mask technologies and then find a suitable design / layout style to better utilize these new technologies and avoid potential risks. Because Xilinx has always been involved in early stage of advanced technology nodes, this early understanding and adoption is especially important. The second element is time to market. Reduction in mask and wafer manufacturing cycle-time can ensure faster time to market. The third element is quality. Commitment to quality is our highest priority for our customers. We have enough visibility on any manufacturing issues affecting the device functionality. Good correlation has consistently been observed between FPGA speed uniformity and the poly mask Critical Dimension (CD) uniformity performance. To achieve FPGA speed uniformity requirement, the manufacturing process as well as the mask and wafer CD uniformity has to be monitored. Xilinx works closely with the wafer foundries and mask suppliers to improve productivity and the yield from initial development stage of mask making operations. As an example, defect density reduction is one of the biggest challenges for mask supplier in development stage to meet the yield target satisfying the mask cost and mask turn-around-time (TAT) requirement. Historically, masks were considered to be defect free but at these advanced process nodes, that assumption no longer

  7. EUV mask particle adders during scanner exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yoonsuk; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Kyuyoung; Koo, Sunyoung; Kim, SeoMin; Kim, Youngsik; Lim, Changmoon; Kwak, Nohjung

    2015-03-01

    As EUV reaches high volume manufacturing, scanner source power and reticle defectivity attract a lot of attention. Keeping a EUV mask clean after mask production is as essential as producing a clean EUV mask. Even though EUV pellicle is actively investigated, we might expose EUV masks without EUV pellicle for some time. To keep clean EUV mask under pellicle-less lithography, EUV scanner cleanliness needs to meet the requirement of high volume manufacturing. In this paper, we will show the cleanliness of EUV scanners in view of mask particle adders during scanner exposure. From this we will find several tendencies of mask particle adders depending on mask environment in scanner. Further we can categorize mask particle adders, which could show the possible causes of particle adders during exposure in scanners.

  8. Informational masking and musical training.

    PubMed

    Oxenham, Andrew J; Fligor, Brian J; Mason, Christine R; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  9. Informational masking and musical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Fligor, Brian J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  10. Production mask composition checking flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shou-Yuan; Yang, Chuen-Huei; Tsai, Joe; Wang, Alice; Lin, Roger; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin; Lin, Ling-Chieh; Liao, Hung-Yueh; Tsai, Jenny; Bowhill, Amanda; Vu, Hien; Russell, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The mask composition checking flow is an evolution of the traditional mask rule check (MRC). In order to differentiate the flow from MRC, we call it Mask Data Correctness Check (MDCC). The mask house does MRC only to identify process limitations including writing, etching, metrology, etc. There still exist many potential errors that could occur when the frame, main circuit and dummies all together form a whole reticle. The MDCC flow combines the design rule check (DRC) and MRC concepts to adapt to the complex patterns in today's wafer production technologies. Although photomask data has unique characteristics, the MRC tool in Calibre® MDP can easily achieve mask composition by using the Extended MEBES job deck (EJB) format. In EJB format, we can customize the combination of any input layers in an IC design layout format, such as OASIS. Calibre MDP provides section-based processing for many standard verification rule format (SVRF) commands that support DRC-like checks on mask data. Integrating DRC-like checking with EJB for layer composition, we actually perform reticle-level DRC, which is the essence of MDCC. The flow also provides an early review environment before the photomask pattern files are available. Furthermore, to incorporate the MDCC in our production flow, runtime is one of the most important indexes we consider. When the MDCC is included in the tape-out flow, the runtime impact is very limited. Calibre, with its multi-threaded processes and good scalability, is the key to achieving acceptable runtime. In this paper, we present real case runtime data for 28nm and 14nm technology nodes, and prove the practicability of placing MDCC into mass production.

  11. Masked translation priming effects with low proficient bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulou, Maria; Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Carreiras, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    Non-cognate masked translation priming lexical decision studies with unbalanced bilinguals suggest that masked translation priming effects are asymmetric as a function of the translation direction (significant effects only in the dominant [L1] to nondominant [L2] language translation direction). However, in contrast to the predictions of most current accounts of masked translation priming effects, bidirectional effects have recently been reported with a group of low proficient bilinguals Duyck & Warlop 2009 (Experimental Psychology 56:173-179). In a series of masked translation priming lexical decision experiments we examined whether the same pattern of effects would emerge with late and low proficient Greek (L1)-Spanish (L2) bilinguals. Contrary to the results obtained by Duyck and Warlop, and in line with the results found in most studies in the masked priming literature, significant translation priming effects emerged only when the bilinguals performed the task with L1 primes and L2 targets. The existence of the masked translation priming asymmetry with low proficient bilinguals suggests that cross-linguistic automatic lexico-semantic links may be established very early in the process of L2 acquisition. These findings could help to define models of bilingualism that consider L2 proficiency level to be a determining factor.

  12. RET masks for patterning 45nm node contact hole using ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Michael; Chen, J. Fung; Van Den Broeke, Doug; En Tszng, Shih; Shieh, Jason; Hsu, Stephen; Shi, Xuelong

    2006-05-01

    Immersion exposure system with the numerical aperture (NA) greater than unity effectively extends the printing resolution limit without the need of shrinking the exposure wavelength. From the perspective of imaging contact hole mask, we are convinced that a mature ArF immersion exposure system will be able to meet 45nm node manufacturing requirement. However, from a full-chip mask data processing point of view, a more challenging question could be: how to ensure the intended RET mask to best achieve a production worthy solution? At 45nm, we are using one-fourth of the exposure wavelength for the patterning; there is very little room for error. For full-chip, especially for contact hole mask, we need a robust RET mask strategy to ensure sufficient CD control. A production-worthy RET mask technology should have good imaging performance with advanced exposure system; and, it should base on currently available mask blank material and be compatible with the existing mask making process. In this work, we propose a new type of contact hole RET masks that is capable of 45nm node full-chip manufacturing. Three types of potential RET masks are studied. The 1st type is the conventional 6% attenuated PSM (attPSM) with 0-phase Scattering Bars (SB). The 2nd type is to use CPL mask with both 0- and π-phase SB, and their relative placements are based on interference mapping lithography (IML) under optimized illumination. The 3rd type, here named as 6% CPL, can be thought of as a CPL mask type with 6% transmission on the background but with π-phase SB only. Of those three RET masks, 6% CPL mask has the best performance for printing 45nm contact and via masks. To implement 6% CPL for contact and via mask design, we study several critical process steps starting from the illumination optimization, model-based SB OPC, 3D mask effect, quartz etch depth optimization, side-lobe printability verification, and then to the mask making flow. Additionally, we investigate printability for

  13. Multiple-mask chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple masking techniques use lateral etching to reduce the total area of the high etch-rate oxide exposed to the chemical etchant. One method uses a short-term etch to remove the top layer from the silicon oxide surface, another acts before the top layer is grown.

  14. Process optimization for mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hideaki; Itoh, Masamitsu; Kumagae, Akitoshi; Anze, Hirohito; Abe, Takayuki; Higashikawa, Iwao

    1998-09-01

    Recently, next-generation mask fabrication processes have been actively examined for application with Electron Beam writing tools and chemically amplified resists. In this study, we used a variable shaped electron beam writing system with an accelerating voltage and chemically amplified resist to investigate the dependence of the CD error in a localized area of a 6025 mask on the process factors, with the goal of fabricating more accurate masks with improving sensitivity. Our results indicated that CD error in a localized area did not depend on the resist thickness. Higher sensitivity and CD uniformity were achieved simultaneously. Moreover, we could isolate the CD error caused by the resist heating effect is more apparent for higher doses than lower doses. However, a higher dose gives rise to a small CD change rate. In this experiment, the effect of the lower CD change rate at a higher dose counterbalances the resist heating effect. By decreasing CD error in a localized area, we obtained a CD uniformity of 14 nm in a 100 mm area on the mask.

  15. Perceptual masking of boar taint in Swedish fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Stolzenbach, Sandra; Lindahl, Gunilla; Lundström, Kerstin; Chen, Gang; Byrne, Derek V

    2009-04-01

    Surgical castration of male piglets has traditionally been practiced to avoid development of boar taint in pork meat which can occur if entire male pigs are raised. Boar taint is commonly characterised as exhibiting the odour and flavour of urine and manure. This study involves sensory characterisation of the possibilities to mask boar taint in meat from entire male pigs by fermentation and smoking to maintain high sensory quality in meat products if castration is prohibited. Model and commercial type Swedish fermented sausage products based on low or high levels of boar tainted fat, three different starter cultures and two different levels of smoking were studied. In the model sausages, liquid smoke masked the perception of boar taint. In contrast, the smoking procedure of the commercial sausages was insufficient to totally mask the perception of boar taint. In both the model and commercial sausages, the aroma development from the starter cultures lowered the perception of boar taint but was insufficient for total perceptual masking. Due to the total masking effect of smoking in the model sausages, it was clear that smoke may present a potential solution to remove the perception of boar taint in fermented sausages if the smoking procedure is optimised. PMID:20416588

  16. "The Mask Who Wasn't There": Visual Masking Effect with the Perceptual Absence of the Mask

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Amandine Eve; Riou, Benoit; Muller, Dominique; Dabic, Stéphanie; Versace, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Does a visual mask need to be perceptually present to disrupt processing? In the present research, we proposed to explore the link between perceptual and memory mechanisms by demonstrating that a typical sensory phenomenon (visual masking) can be replicated at a memory level. Experiment 1 highlighted an interference effect of a visual mask on the…

  17. Ultrahigh efficiency EUV contact-hole printing with chromeless phase shift mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Chao, Weilun; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric; Salmassi, Farhad; Wojdyla, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Contact-hole layer patterning is expected to be one of the first applications for EUV lithography. Conventional darkfield absorber masks, however, are extremely inefficient for these layers, placing even more burden on the already challenging source power demands. To address this concern, a checkerboard phase shift mask configuration has been proposed yielding theoretical throughput gains of 5x assuming a thin-mask modeling. In this manuscript we describe the fabrication of such a mask and demonstrate its imaging performance using the SHARP EUV microscope and MET exposure tool at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. For 25-nm dense features, the phase shift mask was shown to provide a throughput gain of 8x based on SHARP and 7x based on the Berkeley MET. The higher then predicted gain is expected to be due to the fact that the thin mask modeling used in the initial prediction misses shadowing effects.

  18. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

      Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates extraction of the ... in a CALIPSO Lidar Level 2 Vertical Feature Mask feature classification flag value. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) ...

  19. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  20. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  1. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  11. Mask qualification strategies in a wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnert, Carmen; Kunowski, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Having consistent high quality photo masks is one of the key factors in lithography in the wafer fab. Combined with stable exposure- and resist processes, it ensures yield increases in production and fast learning cycles for technology development and design evaluation. Preventive controlling of incoming masks and quality monitoring while using the mask in production is essential for the fab to avoid yield loss or technical problems caused by mask issues, which eventually result in delivery problems to the customer. In this paper an overview of the procedures used for mask qualification and production release, for both logic and DRAM, at Infineon Dresden is presented. Incoming qualification procedures, such as specification checks, incoming inspection, and inline litho process window evaluation, are described here. Pinching and electrical tests, including compatibility tests for mask copies for high volume products on optimized litho processes, are also explained. To avoid mask degradation over lifetime, re-inspection checks are done for re-qualification while using the mask in production. The necessity of mask incoming inspection and re-qualification, due to the repeater printing from either the processing defects of the original mask or degrading defects of being used in the fab (i.e. haze, ESD, and moving particles, etc.), is demonstrated. The need and impact of tight mask specifications, such as CD uniformity signatures and corresponding electrical results, are shown with examples of mask-wafer CD correlation.

  12. Object Substitution Masking Induced by Illusory Masks: Evidence for Higher Object-Level Locus of Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    A briefly presented target can be rendered invisible by a lingering sparse mask that does not even touch it. This form of visual backward masking, called object substitution masking, is thought to occur at the object level of processing. However, it remains unclear whether object-level interference alone produces substitution masking because…

  13. Sandwich Priming: A Method for Overcoming the Limitations of Masked Priming by Reducing Lexical Competitor Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupker, Stephen J.; Davis, Colin J.

    2009-01-01

    An orthographically similar masked nonword prime facilitates responding in a lexical decision task (Forster & Davis, 1984). Recently, this masked priming paradigm has been used to evaluate models of orthographic coding--models that attempt to quantify prime-target similarity. One general finding is that priming effects often do not occur when…

  14. Mask blank defect printability comparison using optical and SEM mask and wafer inspection and bright field actinic mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangat, Pawitter; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert R.; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2015-07-01

    Despite significant enhancements in defect detection using optical and e-beam methodology, the smaller length scales and increasing challenges of future technology nodes motivate ongoing research into the need and associated cost of actinic inspection for EUV masks. This paper reports an extensive study of two EUV patterned masks, wherein the mask blank defectivity was characterized using optical (mask and wafer) methods and bright-field mask imaging (using the SHARP actinic microscope) of previously identified blank defects. We find that the bright field actinic imaging tool microscope captures and images many defects that are not seen by the automated optical inspection of patterned masks and printed wafers. In addition, actinic review reveals the impact of multilayer damage and depicts the printability profile which can be used as an added metric to define the patterned mask repair and defect compensation strategies.

  15. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  16. Improving vision by pupil masking.

    PubMed

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-07-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  17. Improving vision by pupil masking

    PubMed Central

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  18. Cortical correlate of pattern backward masking.

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, G; Vogels, R; Orban, G A

    1995-01-01

    The perception of a briefly presented shape is strongly impaired when it is followed by another pattern, a phenomenon called backward masking. We found that the vast majority of a sample of shape-selective neurons in the macaque inferior temporal cortex respond selectively to backward-masked shapes, although these shapes could not be discriminated by human and monkey subjects. However, this selective response was brief, since it was either interrupted by the mask or overridden by a response to the mask itself. We show that reliable discrimination of briefly presented shapes by single neurons depends on the temporal integration of the response. Presentation of the mask, however, reduces the number of spikes available for integration, explaining backward masking. These results also provide direct neurophysiological evidence for the "interruption theory" of backward masking. PMID:7777553

  19. Multiple beam mask writers: an industry solution to the write time crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Lloyd C.

    2010-09-01

    The semiconductor industry is under constant pressure to reduce production costs even as technology complexity increases. Lithography represents the most expensive process due to its high capital equipment costs and the implementation of low-k1 lithographic processes, which has added to the complexity of making masks through the greater use of optical proximity correction, pixelated masks, and double or triple patterning. Each of these mask technologies allows the production of semiconductors at future nodes while extending the utility of current immersion tools. Low k1 patterning complexity combined with increased data due to smaller feature sizes is driving extremely long mask write times. While a majority of the industry is willing to accept mask write times of up to 24 hours, evidence suggests that the write times for many masks at the 22 nm node and beyond will be significantly longer. It has been estimated that $50M+ in non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs will be required to develop a multiple beam mask writer system, yet the business case to recover this kind of investment is not strong. Moreover, funding such a development is a high risk for an individual supplier. The problem is compounded by a disconnect between the tool customer (the mask supplier) and the final mask customer that will bear the increased costs if a high speed writer is not available. Since no individual company will likely risk entering this market, some type of industry-wide funding model will be needed. Because SEMATECH's member companies strongly support a multiple beam technology for mask writers to reduce the write time and cost of 193 nm and EUV masks, SEMATECH plans to pursue an advanced mask writer program in 2011 and 2012. In 2010, efforts will focus on identifying a funding model to address the investment to develop such a technology.

  20. Comparative Study of Manufacturing Techniques for Coronagraphic Binary Pupil Masks: Masks on Substrates and Free-Standing Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, Keigo; Haze, Kanae; Kotani, Takayuki; Abe, Lyu

    2012-12-01

    We present a comparative study of the manufacture of binary pupil masks for coronagraphic observations of exoplanets. A checkerboard mask design, a type of binary pupil mask design, was adopted, and identical patterns of the same size were used for all masks in order that we could compare the differences resulting from the different manufacturing methods. The masks on substrates had aluminum checkerboard patterns with thicknesses of 0.1/0.2/0.4/0.8/1.6μm, constructed on substrates of BK7 glass, silicon, and germanium using photolithography and chemical processes. Free-standing masks made of copper and nickel with thicknesses of 2/5/10/20μm were also realized using photolithography and chemical processes, which included careful release from the substrate used as an intermediate step in the manufacture. Coronagraphic experiments using a visible laser were carried out for all masks on BK7 glass substrate and the free-standing masks. The average contrasts were 8.4 × 10-8, 1.2 × 10-7, and 1.2 × 10-7 for the masks on BK7 substrates, the free-standing copper masks, and the free-standing nickel masks, respectively. No significant correlation was concluded between the contrast and the mask properties. The high-contrast masks have the potential to cover the needs of coronagraphs for both ground-based and space-borne telescopes over a wide wavelength range. Especially, their application to the infrared space telescope, SPICA, is appropriate.

  1. Early, Equivalent ERP Masked Priming Effects for Regular and Irregular Morphology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Joanna; Stockall, Linnaea

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from behavioral masked priming (Rastle & Davis, 2008), EEG masked priming (Morris, Frank, Grainger, & Holcomb, 2007) and single word MEG (Zweig & Pylkkanen, 2008) experiments has provided robust support for a model of lexical processing which includes an early, automatic, visual word form based stage of morphological parsing…

  2. Mask roughness and its implications for LER at the 22- and 16-nm nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; George, Simi A.; McClinton, Brittany M.

    2010-02-16

    Line-edge roughness (LER) remains the most significant challenge facing the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resist. The mask, however, has been found to be a significant contributor to image-plane LER. This has long been expected based on modeling and has more recently been demonstrated experimentally. Problems arise from both mask-absorber LER as well as mask multilayer roughness leading to random phase variations in the reflected beam and consequently speckle. Understanding the implications this has on mask requirements for the 22-nm half pitch node and below is crucial. Modeling results indicate a replicated surface roughness (RSR) specification of 50 pm and a ruthenium capping layer roughness specification of 440 pm. Moreover, modeling indicates that it is crucial to achieve the current ITRS specifications for mask absorber LER which is significantly smaller than current capabilities.

  3. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2011-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked…

  4. Masked Inhibitory Priming in English: Evidence for Lexical Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Colin J.; Lupker, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Predictions derived from the interactive activation (IA) model were tested in 3 experiments using the masked priming technique in the lexical decision task. Experiment 1 showed a strong effect of prime lexicality: Classifications of target words were facilitated by orthographically related nonword primes (relative to unrelated nonword primes) but…

  5. Polarization masks: concept and initial assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2002-07-01

    Polarization from photomasks can be used as a new lever to improve lithographic performance in both binary and phase-shifting masks (PSMs). While PSMs manipulate the phase of light to control the temporal addition of electric field vectors, polarization masks manipulate the vector direction of electric field vectors to control the spatial addition of electric field components. This paper explores the theoretical possibilities of polarization masks, showing that it is possible to use bar structures within openings on the mask itself to polarize incident radiation. Rigorous electromagnetic scattering simulations using TEMPEST and imaging with SPLAT are used to give an initial assessment on the functionality of polarization masks, discussing the polarization quality and throughputs achieved with the masks. Openings between 1/8 and 1/3 of a wavelength provide both a low polarization ratio and good transmission. A final overall throughput of 33% - 40% is achievable, corresponding to a dose hit of 2.5x - 3x.

  6. Repairing native defects on EUV mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawliss, Mark; Gallagher, Emily; Hibbs, Michael; Seki, Kazunori; Isogawa, Takeshi; Robinson, Tod; LeClaire, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    Mask defectivity is a serious problem for all lithographic masks, but especially for EUV masks. Defects in the EUV blank are particularly challenging because their elimination is beyond control of the mask fab. If defects have been identified on a mask blank, patterns can be shifted to place as many blank defects as possible in regions where printing impact will be eliminated or become unimportant. For those defects that cannot be mitigated through pattern shift, repair strategies must be developed. Repairing defects that occur naturally in the EUV blank is challenging because the printability of these defects varies widely. This paper describes some types of native defects commonly found and begins to outline a triage strategy for defects that are identified on the blank. Sample defects best suited to nanomachining repair are treated in detail: repairs are attempted, characterized using mask metrology and then tested for printability. Based on the initial results, the viability of repairing EUV blank native defects is discussed.

  7. Semiconductor technology trend and requirements for masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Hiroyoshi

    1999-08-01

    The fabrication cost of the semiconductor device is increasing because the fabrication cost per wafer unit area and the mask cost are increasing rapidly with the design rule decreased. The rapid increase in the mask cost will influence the semiconductor industry growth. The progress in the lithography, including the mask, is the key issue for the progress in the entire semiconductor technology beyond 180 nm design rule, because the mask is indispensable for any types of lithography, and is regarded as one of the most critical technologies, both in resolution and productivity. To continue the progress in the entire semiconductor technology and the growth of the semiconductor business, it is indispensable to make challenges in the low cost and high precision mask technology under the cooperation with related industries and academia. It is especially important to develop the cost optimum solution for the total lithography technology including masks.

  8. Development of mask-DFM system MiLE load estimation of mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamura, Yoshikazu; Hosono, Kunihiro; Narukawa, Shogo; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Kato, Masahiro; Kawase, Hidemichi

    2007-10-01

    Load of photomask manufacturing for the most advanced semiconductor devices is increasing due to the complexity of mask layouts caused by highly accurate RET or OPC, tight specification for 2D/3D mask structures, and requirements of quick deliveries. The mask cost becomes a concern of mask users especially in SoC businesses because the number of masks required throughout the wafer process is almost the same for each product regardless of the variety in production volume when a unified platform is applied to the designs. Shares of mask cost within total production cost cannot be ignored especially in small volume SoC products. DFM (design for manufacturing) is inevitable in a mask level as well as in a wafer level to solve the cost problem. "Mask-DFM" is a method to decrease the burden of mask manufacturing and to improve the yield and quality of masks, not only by modification of mask pattern layouts (design) but also all other things including utilization of designer's intents. We have developed our Mask-DFM system called "MiLE", that calculates mask-manufacturing workload through layout analyses combining information of mask configuration, and visualizes the consequence of Mask-DFM efforts. "MiLE (Mask manufacturIng Load Estimation)" calculates a relative index which represents the mask manufacturing workload determined by factors of 1) EB writing, 2) defect inspection/repair, 3) materials and processes and 4) specification. All the factors are computed before tape-outs for mask making in the system by the following methods. To estimate EB writing time, we applied high-throughput simulator and counted the number of "shot", minimum figure unit in EB writing, by using post-OPC layout data. Mask layout that caused troubles and extra load in mask inspection or repair was specified from MRC (mask rule checking) of the same post-OPC data. Additional layout analysis perceives designer's intents that are described in the layout data and these are reflected in the

  9. Polyurethane Masks Large Areas in Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam provides effective mask in electroplating of copper or nickel. Thin layer of Turco maskant painted on area to be masked: Layer ensures polyurethane foam removed easily after served its purpose. Component A, isocyanate, and component B, polyol, mixed together and brushed or sprayed on mask area. Mixture reacts, yielding polyurethane foam. Foam prevents deposition of nickel or copper on covered area. New method saves time, increases productivity and uses less material than older procedures.

  10. Investigation of Mask Inclination Due to Oxygen-Radical Irradiation during Resist Trimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofuji, Naoyuki; Miura, Hideo

    2010-08-01

    A novel analytical method for predicting the inclination of a resist mask during its trimming process has been proposed by considering the formation of the surface degraded layer with high compressive stress. It was found that the irradiation of oxygen radicals creates a degraded layer on the resist surface and causes high compressive stress in it. A nonuniform spatial distribution of oxygen radicals, therefore, causes an asymmetrical stress field on the resist-mask surface. Such an asymmetrical stress field distorts the resist mask. The well-known Deal-Grove's oxidation model was modified for the trimming process by considering the time-dependent change of the spatial distribution of oxygen radicals on the mask surface. This model successfully explains the observed complicated time-dependent deformation of the resist mask.

  11. VIIRS Cloud Mask Validation Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, R.; Heidinger, A. K.; Hutchison, K.; Dutcher, S.

    2011-12-01

    The NPP Satellite is scheduled for launch October 25, 2011. Included on the platform is the VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Suite) instrument which features 16 bands at about 0.75 m spatial resolution and 5 imager bands at roughly 0.375 m resolution. The basic VIIRS cloud mask (VCM) output is a flag that indicates one of four possible cloudy vs. clear conditions for each 0.75 m pixel: confident clear, probably clear, probably cloudy, and confident cloudy. Pre-launch assessment of the VCM algorithm has been performed with use of MODIS observations as proxy input. Several comparisons are shown between VCM results and cloud detection from other instruments and/or algorithms: MODIS cloud mask (MOD35) at the five-minute granule level (L2), global and regional monthly average cloud amounts from MODIS (MOD35) and MODIS-CERES, ISCCP, PATMOS-x (AVHRR), and CALIOP (lidar). In addition to overall results, collocated MODIS observations, CALIOP and VCM cloud determinations are used to evaluate VCM cloud test thresholds and other tunable parameters. The methods shown will be among those used during the Intensive Calibration and Validation period and beyond.

  12. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  13. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  14. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  15. Computational defect review for actinic mask inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram

    2013-04-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into low-k1 regime, resolution of mask patterns continues to diminish. The limitation of 1.35 NA posed by water-based lithography has led to the application of various resolution enhancement techniques (RET), for example, use of strong phase-shifting masks, aggressive OPC and sub-resolution assist features, customized illuminators, etc. The adoption of these RET techniques combined with the requirements to detect even smaller defects on masks due to increasing MEEF, poses considerable challenges for a mask inspection engineer. Inspecting masks under their actinic-aerial image conditions would detect defects that are more likely to print under those exposure conditions. However, this also makes reviewing such defects in their low-contrast aerial images very challenging. On the other hand, inspecting masks under higher resolution inspection optics would allow for better viewing of defects post-inspection. However, such inspections generally would also detect many more defects, including printable and nuisance, thereby making it difficult to judge which are of real concern for printability on wafer. Often, an inspection engineer may choose to use Aerial and/or high resolution inspection modes depending on where in the process flow the mask is and the specific device-layer characteristics of the mask. Hence, a comprehensive approach is needed in handling defects both post-aerial and post-high resolution inspections. This analysis system is designed for the Applied Materials Aera™ mask inspection platform, all data reported was collected using the Aera.

  16. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory. PMID:26409781

  17. Influence of Planck foreground masks in the large angular scale quadrant CMB asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, L.; Cabella, P.; Villela, T.; Zhao, W.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The measured cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular distribution shows high consistency with the ΛCDM model, which predicts cosmological isotropy as one of its fundamental characteristics. However, isotropy violations were reported in CMB temperature maps of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and confirmed by Planck satellite data. Aims: Our purpose is to investigate the influence of different sky cuts (masks) employed in the analysis of CMB angular distribution, in particular in the excess of power in the southeastern quadrant (SEQ) and the lack of power in the northeastern quadrant (NEQ), found in both WMAP and Planck data. Methods: We compared the two-point correlation function (TPCF) computed for each quadrant of the CMB foreground-cleaned temperature maps to 1000 Monte Carlo (MC) simulations generated assuming the ΛCDM best-fit power spectrum using four different masks, from the least to the most severe one: mask-rulerminimal, UT78, U73, and U66. In addition to the quadrants and for a better understanding of these anomalies, we computed the TPCF using the mask-rulerminimal for circular regions in the map where the excess and lack of power are present. We also compared, for completeness, the effect of Galactic cuts (+/-10, 20, 25, and 30 degrees above/below the Galactic plane) in the TPCF calculations as compared to the MC simulations. Results: We found consistent results for three masks, namely mask-rulerminimal, U73, and U66. The results indicate that the excess of power in the SEQ tends to vanish as the portion of the sky covered by the mask increases and the lack of power in the NEQ remains virtually unchanged. A different result arises for the newly released UT78 Planck mask. When this mask is applied, the NEQ is no longer anomalous. On the other hand, the excess of power in the SEQ becomes the most significant one among the masks. Nevertheless, the asymmetry between the SEQ and NEQ is independent of the mask and it disagrees

  18. A cluster randomised trial of cloth masks compared with medical masks in healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, C Raina; Seale, Holly; Dung, Tham Chi; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Nga, Phan Thi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Rahman, Bayzidur; Dwyer, Dominic E; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of cloth masks to medical masks in hospital healthcare workers (HCWs). The null hypothesis is that there is no difference between medical masks and cloth masks. Setting 14 secondary-level/tertiary-level hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants 1607 hospital HCWs aged ≥18 years working full-time in selected high-risk wards. Intervention Hospital wards were randomised to: medical masks, cloth masks or a control group (usual practice, which included mask wearing). Participants used the mask on every shift for 4 consecutive weeks. Main outcome measure Clinical respiratory illness (CRI), influenza-like illness (ILI) and laboratory-confirmed respiratory virus infection. Results The rates of all infection outcomes were highest in the cloth mask arm, with the rate of ILI statistically significantly higher in the cloth mask arm (relative risk (RR)=13.00, 95% CI 1.69 to 100.07) compared with the medical mask arm. Cloth masks also had significantly higher rates of ILI compared with the control arm. An analysis by mask use showed ILI (RR=6.64, 95% CI 1.45 to 28.65) and laboratory-confirmed virus (RR=1.72, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.94) were significantly higher in the cloth masks group compared with the medical masks group. Penetration of cloth masks by particles was almost 97% and medical masks 44%. Conclusions This study is the first RCT of cloth masks, and the results caution against the use of cloth masks. This is an important finding to inform occupational health and safety. Moisture retention, reuse of cloth masks and poor filtration may result in increased risk of infection. Further research is needed to inform the widespread use of cloth masks globally. However, as a precautionary measure, cloth masks should not be recommended for HCWs, particularly in high-risk situations, and guidelines need to be updated. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000887077. PMID

  19. Mask CD uniformity improvement by electron scanning exposure based Global Loading Effect Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rivan; Tian, Eric; Shi, Irene; Guo, Eric; Lu, Max

    2015-07-01

    Critical Dimension (CD) Uniformity is one of the necessary parameters to assure good performance and reliable functionality of any integrated circuit (IC), and towards the advanced technology node 28nm and beyond, corresponding CD Uniformity becomes more and more crucial. It is found that bad mask CD Uniformity is a significant error source at 28nm process. The CD Uniformity on mask, if not controlled well, will badly impact wafer CD performance, and it has been well-studied that CD Uniformity issue from gate line-width in transistors would affect the device performance directly. In this paper we present a novel solution for mask global CD uniformity error correction, which is called as global loading effect correction (GLEC) method and applied nesting in the mask exposure map during the electron beam exposure. There are factors such as global chip layout, writing sequence and chip pattern density distribution (Global Loading), that work on the whole mask CD Uniformity, especially Global Loading is the key factor related to mask global CD error. From our experimental results, different pattern density distribution on mask significantly influenced the final mask CD Uniformity: the mask with undulating pattern density distribution provides much worse CD Uniformity than that with uniform one. Therefore, a GLEC model based on pattern density has been created to compensate the global error during the electron beam exposure, which has been proved to be efficacious to improve mask global CD Uniformity performance. Furthermore, it 's also revealed that pattern type is another important impact factor, and GLEC coefficient need be modified due to the specific pattern type (e.g. dense line-space only, iso-space only or an average of them) to improve the corresponding mask CD uniformity.

  20. Bilateral Advantages in Subitizing With Visual Masking.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Campbell G; Howe, Piers D L

    2015-01-01

    Performance on a range of visual-processing tasks has been shown to improve when information is split bilaterally across the left and right visual hemifields rather than being restricted to a single visual hemifield. However, a recent study by Delvenne et al. found no such bilateral advantage for subitizing, which is our ability to rapidly and accurately enumerate small quantities of objects. This finding is particularly surprising, as it contradicts the prediction of FINgers of INSTantiation theory that subitizing should benefit from bilateral presentation. Our study investigated the issue by determining if there are any circumstances where a bilateral advantage for subitization occurs. Contrary to Delvenne et al., we found that subitizing could show bilateral advantages, but only when the display was backward-masked. We discuss these findings in relation to how the rate of encoding and the time available for this encoding may affect bilateral advantages in subitizing. A general model is proposed under which bilateral advantages could be explained.

  1. Set Size and Mask Duration Do Not Interact in Object-Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Ioannis; Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield

    2013-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a mask, such as four dots that surround a brief target item, onsets simultaneously with the target and offsets a short time after the target, rather than simultaneously with it. OSM is a reduction in accuracy of reporting the target with the temporally trailing mask, compared with the simultaneously…

  2. IntenCD and mask phase uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yaron; Mangan, Shmoolik; Attal, Shay; Ben-Yishay, Michael; Englard, Ilan

    2010-09-01

    The allowable wafer Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) budget of the 2x node poses stringent requirements on mask induced errors at wafer level. The total CDU budget of 2 nm which is partially consumed by across wafer and field process and imaging variations, leaves little room for additional mask errors to still comply to the overall CDU budget. The trend of higher mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) for advanced technology nodes aggravates this situation further. Traditionally, the assessment of these variations is based on separate critical dimension and phase/transmission measurements. Metrology measurement tools are typically based on different techniques to independently measure each source of non-uniformity and produce the required uniformity maps. Each technique concentrates on a single physical property (e.g., line-width, phase, transmission, etc.) and requires special calibration for the required accuracy, precision and its transformation from mask to the wafer nanometer domain. An alternative to all these separate measurements is proposed by using the IntenCDTM application based on the aerial image of the mask. This alternative approach provides a map of mask-induced, printed CD variations across the photomask. In this paper, a study is presented to estimate mask-induced printed CDU at wafer level from the aerial image and results are compared to mask- and phase-CD measurements. The work shows that a single aerial IntenCD map can replace the two sets of data based on mask-CD and mask-phase measurements and allows for prediction of the mask contribution to overall printed CDU.

  3. Shadows Alter Facial Expressions of Noh Masks

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyata, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Ritsuko; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Background A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers’ recognition of the emotional expressions. Methodology/Principal Findings In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. Conclusions/Significance Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa’s smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art “yugen (profound grace and subtlety)”, which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness. PMID:23940748

  4. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  5. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  6. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  7. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  8. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  9. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  10. Transmission and signal loss in mask designs for a dual neutron and gamma imager applied to mobile standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Hayward, Jason P.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Blackston, Matthew A.; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2013-06-01

    In order to design a next-generation, dual neutron and gamma imager for mobile standoff detection which uses coded aperture imaging as its primary detection modality, the following design parameters have been investigated for gamma and neutron radiation incident upon a hybrid, coded mask: (1) transmission through mask elements for various mask materials and thicknesses; and (2) signal attenuation in the mask versus angle of incidence. Each of these parameters directly affects detection significance, as quantified by the signal-to-noise ratio. The hybrid mask consists of two or three layers: organic material for fast neutron attenuation and scattering, Cd for slow neutron absorption (if applied), and one of three of the following photon or photon and slow neutron attenuating materials—Linotype alloy, CLYC, or CZT. In the MCNP model, a line source of gamma rays (100-2500 keV), fast neutrons (1000-10,000 keV) or thermal neutrons was positioned above the hybrid mask. The radiation penetrating the mask was simply tallied at the surface of an ideal detector, which was located below the surface of the last mask layer. The transmission was calculated as the ratio of the particles transmitted through the fixed aperture to the particles passing through the closed mask. In order to determine the performance of the mask considering relative motion between the source and detector, simulations were used to calculate the signal attenuation for incident radiation angles of 0-50°. The results showed that a hybrid mask can be designed to sufficiently reduce both transmission through the mask and signal loss at large angles of incidence, considering both gamma ray and fast neutron radiations. With properly selected material thicknesses, the signal loss of a hybrid mask, which is necessarily thicker than the mask required for either single mode imaging, is not a setback to the system's detection significance.

  11. The attentional blink is not affected by backward masking of T2, T2-mask SOA, or level of T2 impoverishment.

    PubMed

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M; Lagroix, Hayley E P; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Identification of the second of two targets (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is thought to arise from a delay in T2 processing during which T2 is vulnerable to masking. Conventional studies have measured T2 accuracy which is constrained by the 100% ceiling. We avoided this problem by using a dynamic threshold-tracking procedure that is inherently free from ceiling constraints. In two experiments we examined how AB magnitude is affected by three masking-related factors: (a) presence/absence of T2 mask, (b) T2-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and (c) level of T2 impoverishment (signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]). In Experiment 1, overall accuracy decreased with T2-mask SOA. The magnitude of the AB, however, was invariant with SOA and with mask presence/absence. Experiment 2 further showed that the AB was invariant with T2 SNR. The relationship among mask presence/absence, SOA, and T2 SNR and the AB is encompassed in a qualitative model. PMID:22060143

  12. A novel 3D constellation-masked method for physical security in hierarchical OFDMA system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijia; Liu, Bo; Xin, Xiangjun; Liu, Deming

    2013-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel 3D constellation-masked method to ensure the physical security in hierarchical optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access (OFDMA) system. The 3D constellation masking is executed on the two levels of hierarchical modulation and among different OFDM subcarriers, which is realized by the masking vectors. The Lorenz chaotic model is adopted for the generation of masking vectors in the proposed scheme. A 9.85 Gb/s encrypted hierarchical QAM OFDM signal is successfully demonstrated in the experiment. The performance of illegal optical network unit (ONU) with different masking vectors is also investigated. The proposed method is demonstrated to be secure and efficient against the commonly known attacks in the experiment.

  13. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  15. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  18. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  19. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  20. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  3. Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research on visual perception has uncovered many phenomena, such as binocular rivalry, backward masking, and the attentional blink, that reflect "failures of consciousness". Although stimuli do not reach awareness in these paradigms, there is evidence that they nevertheless undergo semantic processing. Object substitution masking (OSM),…

  4. Computing Challenges in Coded Mask Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This slide presaentation reviews the complications and challenges in developing computer systems for Coded Mask Imaging telescopes. The coded mask technique is used when there is no other way to create the telescope, (i.e., when there are wide fields of view, high energies for focusing or low energies for the Compton/Tracker Techniques and very good angular resolution.) The coded mask telescope is described, and the mask is reviewed. The coded Masks for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) instruments are shown, and a chart showing the types of position sensitive detectors used for the coded mask telescopes is also reviewed. Slides describe the mechanism of recovering an image from the masked pattern. The correlation with the mask pattern is described. The Matrix approach is reviewed, and other approaches to image reconstruction are described. Included in the presentation is a review of the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) / High Energy Telescope (HET), with information about the mission, the operation of the telescope, comparison of the EXIST/HET with the SWIFT/BAT and details of the design of the EXIST/HET.

  5. Defect printability analysis by lithographic simulation from high resolution mask images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, George; Wiley, James N.; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Howell, Rafael C.; Bai, Shufeng; Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Frank; Cao, Yu; Takigawa, Tadahiro; Saito, Yasuko; Kurosawa, Terunobu; Tsuchiya, Hideo; Usuda, Kinya; Tokita, Masakazu; Ozaki, Fumio; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Tsuji, Yoshitake

    2009-10-01

    We report the development of Mask-LMC for defect printability evaluation from sub-200nm wavelength mask inspection images. Both transmitted and reflected images are utilized, and both die-to-die and die-to-database inspection modes are supported. The first step of the process is to recover the patterns on the mask from high resolution T and R images by de-convolving inspection optical effects. This step uses a mask reconstruction model, which is based on rigorous Hopkins-modeling of the inspection optics, and is pre-determined before the full mask inspection. After mask reconstruction, wafer scanner optics and wafer resist simulations are performed on the reconstructed mask, with a wafer lithography model. This step leverages Brion's industry-proven, hardware-accelerated LMC (Lithography Manufacturability Check) technology1. Existing litho process models that are in use for Brion's OPC+ and verification products may be used for this simulation. In the final step, special detectors are used to compare simulation results on the reference and defect dice. We have developed detectors for contact CD, contact area, line and space CD, and edge placement errors. The detection results on test and production reticles have been validated with AIMSTM.

  6. Thin silicon shadow masks for organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ching-Chang; Chiu, Chen-Wei; Zhung, Kai-Xiang; Lee, Jiun-Haw; Su, Guo-Dung John

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report thin silicon shadow masks used for vacuum thermal evaporation (VTE) for manufacturing compact-size OLED (organic light emitting diodes) displays. Currently, the OLED displays attract many research attentions because of novel organic materials for emitting the light at relative low cost. The fabrication processes of OLED make use of shadow masks for thermal deposition of organic materials due to etching difficulties. The metal shadow masks are widely used because of easy access. However, the openings of the metal shadow masks are limited to vertical sidewall, which cause the rounded profile at the top surface of deposited organic layers. This may cause potential step coverage problem and non-uniform device efficiency. In order to overcome the deposition profile of organic materials, we propose to use thin silicon shadow masks. Due to the crystal orientation of (100) silicon wafers, the etched aperture slope of the silicon shadow mask has approximately 54 degree sidewalls. This slope increases the accepting angle of the openings around the edge that results in a better profile of deposited organic materials. The simulation model for deposition profile is based on basic physical equation. The simulation results show flat profile at the top surface by using silicon shadow masks with the wedged openings; which could overcome the potential problem listed above. The silicon shadow masks are fabricated by micromachining techniques and are used in the vacuum deposition of aluminum and organic polymers. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures of organic films and side profiles measured by alpha stepper will be applied to verify the simulation models and to optimize the deposition factor. We demonstrate that the thin silicon shadow masks can provide deposition advantages over traditional metal shadow masks in terms of deposition profiles of aluminum and organic layers for making OLED displays.

  7. Cheap Face Masks Little Help Against Air Pollutants

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- Inexpensive cloth masks offer little protection against air pollution, a new study suggests. Many people in Asia ... or washable cloth masks to protect against small air pollution particles. But tests on different types of masks ...

  8. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients. PMID:27625477

  9. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients.

  10. Masking property of quantum random cipher with phase mask encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohma, Masaki; Hirota, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    The security analysis of physical encryption protocol based on coherent pulse position modulation (CPPM) originated by Yuen is one of the most interesting topics in the study of cryptosystem with a security level beyond the Shannon limit. Although the implementation of CPPM scheme has certain difficulty, several methods have been proposed recently. This paper deals with the CPPM encryption in terms of symplectic transformation, which includes a phase mask encryption as a special example, and formulates a unified security analysis for such encryption schemes. Specifically, we give a lower bound of Eve's symbol error probability using reliability function theory to ensure that our proposed system exceeds the Shannon limit. Then we assume the secret key is given to Eve after her heterodyne measurement. Since this assumption means that Eve has a great advantage in the sense of the conventional cryptography, the lower bound of her error indeed ensures the security level beyond the Shannon limit. In addition, we show some numerical examples of the security performance.

  11. LCD masks for spatial augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithwick, Quinn Y. J.; Reetz, Daniel; Smoot, Lanny

    2014-03-01

    One aim of Spatial Augmented Reality is to visually integrate synthetic objects into real-world spaces amongst physical objects, viewable by many observers without 3D glasses, head-mounted displays or mobile screens. In common implementations, using beam-combiners, scrim projection, or transparent self-emissive displays, the synthetic object's and real-world scene's light combine additively. As a result, synthetic objects appear low-contrast and semitransparent against well-lit backgrounds, and do not cast shadows. These limitations prevent synthetic objects from appearing solid and visually integrated into the real-world space. We use a transparent LCD panel as a programmable dynamic mask. The LCD panel displaying the synthetic object's silhouette mask is colocated with the object's color image, both staying aligned for all points-of-view. The mask blocks the background providing occlusion, presents a black level for high-contrast images, blocks scene illumination thus casting true shadows, and prevents blow-by in projection scrim arrangements. We have several implementations of SAR with LCD masks: 1) beam-combiner with an LCD mask, 2) scrim projection with an LCD mask, and 3) transparent OLED display with an LCD mask. Large format (80" diagonal) and dual layer volumetric variations are also implemented.

  12. The Sensitivity of Coded Mask Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2008-01-01

    Simple formulae are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask X-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but t,hese are strictly only applicable if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given which allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimisation of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  13. An interactive tool for gamut masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying; Lau, Cheryl; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Artists often want to change the colors of an image to achieve a particular aesthetic goal. For example, they might limit colors to a warm or cool color scheme to create an image with a certain mood or feeling. Gamut masking is a technique that artists use to limit the set of colors they can paint with. They draw a mask over a color wheel and only use the hues within the mask. However, creating the color palette from the mask and applying the colors to the image requires skill. We propose an interactive tool for gamut masking that allows amateur artists to create an image with a desired mood or feeling. Our system extracts a 3D color gamut from the 2D user-drawn mask and maps the image to this gamut. The user can draw a different gamut mask or locally refine the image colors. Our voxel grid gamut representation allows us to represent gamuts of any shape, and our cluster-based image representation allows the user to change colors locally.

  14. Achievements and challenges of EUV mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; van Setten, Eelco; de Kruif, Robert; Connolly, Brid; Fukugami, Norihito; Kodera, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Sakata, Yo; Kotani, Jun; Kondo, Shinpei; Imoto, Tomohiro; Rolff, Haiko; Ullrich, Albrecht; Lammers, Ad; Schiffelers, Guido; van Dijk, Joep

    2014-07-01

    The impact of various mask parameters on CDU combined in a total mask budget is presented, for 22 nm lines, for reticles used for NXE:3300 qualification. Apart from the standard mask CD measurements, actinic spectrometry of multilayer is used to qualify reflectance uniformity over the image field; advanced 3D metrology is applied for absorber profile characterization including absorber height and side wall angle. The predicted mask impact on CDU is verified using actual exposure data collected on multiple NXE:3300 scanners. Mask 3D effects are addressed, manifesting themselves in best focus shifts for different structures exposed with off-axis illumination. Experimental NXE:3300 results for 16 nm dense lines and 20 nm (semi-)isolated spaces are shown: best focus range reaches 24 nm. A mitigation strategy by absorber height optimization is proposed based on experimental results of a special mask with varying absorber heights. Further development of a black image border for EUV mask is considered. The image border is a pattern free area surrounding image field preventing exposure the image field neighborhood on wafer. Normal EUV absorber is not suitable for this purpose as it has 1-3% EUV reflectance. A current solution is etching of ML down to substrate reducing EUV reflectance to <0.05%. A next step in the development of the black border is the reduction of DUV Out-of-Band reflectance (<1.5%) in order to cope with DUV light present in EUV scanners. Promising results achieved in this direction are shown.

  15. Intact crowding and temporal masking in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Doron, Adi; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael H; Ahissar, Merav

    2015-01-01

    Phonological deficits in dyslexia are well documented. However, there is an ongoing discussion about whether visual deficits limit the reading skills of people with dyslexia. Here, we investigated visual crowding and backward masking. We presented a Vernier (i.e., two vertical bars slightly offset to the left or right) and asked observers to indicate the offset direction. Vernier stimuli are visually similar to letters and are strongly affected by crowding, even in the fovea. To increase task difficulty, Verniers are often followed by a mask (i.e., backward masking). We measured Vernier offset discrimination thresholds for the basic Vernier task, under crowding, and under backward masking, in students with dyslexia (n = 19) and age and intelligence matched students (n = 27). We found no group differences in any of these conditions. Controls with fast visual processing (good backward masking performance), were faster readers. By contrast, no such correlation was found among the students with dyslexia, suggesting that backward masking does not limit their reading efficiency. These findings indicate that neither elevated crowding nor elevated backward masking pose a bottleneck to reading skills of people with dyslexia. PMID:26505966

  16. Intact crowding and temporal masking in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Doron, Adi; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael H; Ahissar, Merav

    2015-01-01

    Phonological deficits in dyslexia are well documented. However, there is an ongoing discussion about whether visual deficits limit the reading skills of people with dyslexia. Here, we investigated visual crowding and backward masking. We presented a Vernier (i.e., two vertical bars slightly offset to the left or right) and asked observers to indicate the offset direction. Vernier stimuli are visually similar to letters and are strongly affected by crowding, even in the fovea. To increase task difficulty, Verniers are often followed by a mask (i.e., backward masking). We measured Vernier offset discrimination thresholds for the basic Vernier task, under crowding, and under backward masking, in students with dyslexia (n = 19) and age and intelligence matched students (n = 27). We found no group differences in any of these conditions. Controls with fast visual processing (good backward masking performance), were faster readers. By contrast, no such correlation was found among the students with dyslexia, suggesting that backward masking does not limit their reading efficiency. These findings indicate that neither elevated crowding nor elevated backward masking pose a bottleneck to reading skills of people with dyslexia.

  17. Actinic EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.

    2008-08-06

    Operating at EUV wavelengths, the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a zoneplate microscope that provides high quality aerial image measurements in routine operations for SEMATECH member companies. We have upgraded the optical performance of the AIT to provide multiple image magnifications, and several inspection NA values up to 0.35 NA equivalent (0.0875 mask-side). We report on the improved imaging capabilities including resolution below 100-nm on the mask side (25 nm, 4x wafer equivalent). EUV reticles are intricate optical systems made from of several materials with wavelength-specific optical properties. The combined interactions of the substrate, multilayer-stack, buffer layer and absorber layer produce a reflected EUV optical field that is challenging to model accurately, and difficult to fully assess without actinic at-wavelength inspection. Understanding the aerial image from lithographic printing alone is complicated by photoresist properties. The AIT is now used to investigate mask issues such as amplitude and phase defect printability, pattern repair techniques, contamination, inspection damage, and mask architecture. The AIT has a 6{sup o} illumination angle, and high-resolution exposure times are typically 20 seconds per image. The AIT operates semi-automatically capturing through-focus imaging series with step sizes as small as 0.1 {micro}m (0.5-0.8 {micro}m are typical), and a step resolution of 0.05 {micro}m. We believe it is the most advanced EUV mask inspection tool in operation today. In the AIT, an EUV image of the mask is projected by a zoneplate lens with high magnification (680-910x) onto a CCD camera. The CCD over-samples the image, providing equivalent pixel sizes down to 15 nm in mask coordinates-several image pixels per resolution element. The original AIT zoneplate specifications were designed to emulate the resolution of a 0.25-NA 4x stepper, and thorough benchmarking analysis of the aberrations, flare, contrast

  18. Evaluating EUV mask pattern imaging with two EUV microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Takase, Kei; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Han, Hakseung; Barty, Anton; Kinoshita, Hiroo; Hamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-02-26

    Aerial image measurement plays a key role in the development of patterned reticles for each generation of lithography. Studying the field transmitted (reflected) from EUV masks provides detailed information about potential disruptions caused by mask defects, and the performance of defect repair strategies, without the complications of photoresist imaging. Furthermore, by measuring the continuously varying intensity distribution instead of a thresholded, binary resist image, aerial image measurement can be used as feedback to improve mask and lithography system modeling methods. Interest in EUV, at-wavelength, aerial image measurement lead to the creation of several research tools worldwide. These tools are used in advanced mask development work, and in the evaluation of the need for commercial at-wavelength inspection tools. They describe performance measurements of two such tools, inspecting the same EUV mask in a series of benchmarking tests that includes brightfield and darkfield patterns. One tool is the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) operating on a bending magnet beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. The AIT features an EUV Fresnel zoneplate microscope that emulates the numerical aperture of a 0.25-NA stepper, and projects the aerial image directly onto a CCD camera, with 700x magnification. The second tool is an EUV microscope (EUVM) operating at the NewSUBARU synchrotron in Hyogo, Japan. The NewSUBARU tool projects the aerial image using a reflective, 30x Schwarzschild objective lens, followed by a 10-200x x-ray zooming tube. The illumination conditions and the imaging etendue are different for the two tools. The benchmarking measurements were used to determine many imaging and performance properties of the tools, including resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), aberration magnitude, aberration field-dependence (including focal-plane tilt), illumination uniformity, line-edge roughness, and flare

  19. A binary masking technique for isolating energetic masking in speech perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brungart, Douglas S.; Simpson, Brian D.; Chang, Peter S.; Wang, Deliang

    2005-04-01

    When a target speech signal is obscured by interfering speech, two distinct types of masking contribute to the resulting degradation in the intelligibility of the target talker: energetic masking caused by overlap in the time-frequency distribution of energy in the two voices, and informational masking caused by the listener's inability to correctly segregate the acoustic elements of the two voices into distinct streams. This study attempted to isolate the effects of energetic masking on multitalker speech perception with ideal time-frequency binary masks that retained those spectro-temporal regions of the acoustic mixture that were dominated by the target speech but eliminated those regions that were dominated by the interfering speech. This procedure removed the same phonetic information from the target speech that would ordinarily be lost due to energetic masking, but eliminated the possibility for the kinds of target-masker confusions that are thought to produce informational masking. The results suggest that energetic masking may play a surprisingly small role in the overall masking that occurs in certain types of multitalker speech signals. They also indicate that the number of competing talkers has a much greater influence than target-masker similarity on the amount of energetic masking that occurs in a multitalker stimulus.

  20. A systematic approach for extracting verification patterns from an OPC test mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Mohammad K. A.; Al-Imam, Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) is a crucial step in Semiconductor manufacturing for technology of dimensions below the exposure wavelength. Light from the exposure source is diffracted when passing through mask dimensions below the exposure wavelength causing patterns on wafer to differ from the intent patterns. During OPC the design intent layout patterns are modified to compensate for light diffractions so that the final wafer patterns match the design intent patterns. OPC achieves this by using OPC models that model the optical conditions, resist, and etch behavior; and an OPC recipe that controls the patterns modification process. The OPC models are calibrated from test mask structures that are developed, exposed and measured when starting to set up the manufacturing process. Structures chosen to be placed on the test mask have a great impact on the capability to predict future layout patterns that were not present in the original test mask, referred to as model coverage. Test masks are usually composed of patterns used in model calibration and others used for verifying the calibrated model. In advanced technology nodes, both the feature size and the error budget are being shrunk. Hence to reach the best model coverage with acceptable accuracy, we need to ensure that the test mask contains all the possible structures in the real designs, while maintaining that the number of patterns does not consume long metrology tools time, cause extra overhead cost to the process, or delay the development cycle. This paper presents a systematic approach to optimize the number of patterns to be included in the test mask and split test patterns into calibration and verification patterns. Results from using the proposed method are compared to other methods of splitting that are based either on geometrical or random methods. The approach provided a significant reduction in model calibration time, the number of needed patterns in the test mask, and the total development

  1. Printed shadow masks for organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yoshiaki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2007-09-01

    We have manufactured organic field-effect transistors by using shadow masks that are patterned by a screen printing system. The 50-nm-thick pentacene layer is sublimed as a channel in the vacuum system through the shadow mask on the base film with a multilayer patterned by ink-jet. After the deposition of the pentacene layer, the shadow mask is peeled off from the base film without any mechanical damages to the lower structures. The mobility in the saturation regime is 0.4cm2/Vs and the on-off ratio exceeds 105.

  2. Evaluation of taste-masking effects of pharmaceutical sweeteners with an electronic tongue system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Hyung; Kim, Nam Ah; Nam, Tack Soo; Lee, Sangkil; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Electronic tongue systems have been developed for taste measurement of bitter drug substances in accurate taste comparison to development palatable oral formulations. This study was to evaluate the taste masking effect of conventional pharmaceutical sweeteners such as neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, sucrose, sucralose and aspartame. The model drugs were acetaminophen, ibuprofen, tramadol hydrochloride, and sildenafil citrate (all at 20 mM). The degree of bitterness was measured by a multichannel taste sensor system (an electronic tongue). The data was collected by seven sensors and analyzed by a statistical method of principal components analysis (PCA). The effect of taste masking excipient was dependent on the type of model drug. Changing the concentration of taste masking excipients affected the sensitivity of taste masking effect according to the type of drug. As the excipient concentration increased, the effect of taste masking increased. Moreover, most of the sensors showed a concentration-dependent pattern of the taste-masking agents as higher concentration provided higher selectivity. This might indicate that the sensors can detect small concentration changes of a chemical in solution. These results suggest that the taste masking could be evaluated based on the data of the electronic tongue system and that the formulation development process could be performed in a more efficient way.

  3. Actinic review of EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Heiko; Ruoff, Johannes; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kaiser, Winfried

    2010-04-01

    Management of mask defects is a major challenge for the introduction of EUV for HVM production. Once a defect has been detected, its printing impact needs to be predicted. Potentially the defect requires some repair, the success of which needs to be proven. This defect review has to be done with an actinic inspection system that matches the imaging conditions of an EUV scanner. During recent years, several concepts for such an aerial image metrology system (AIMS™) have been proposed. However, until now no commercial solution exists for EUV. Today, advances in EUV optics technology allow envisioning a solution that has been discarded before as unrealistic. We present this concept and its technical cornerstones.While the power requirement for the EUV source is less demanding than for HVM lithography tools, radiance, floor space, and stability are the main criteria for source selection. The requirement to emulate several generations of EUV scanners demands a large flexibility for the ilumination and imaging systems. New critical specifications to the EUV mirrors in the projection microscope can be satisfied using our expertise from lithographic mirrors. In summary, an EUV AIMS™ meeting production requirements seems to be feasible.

  4. When Bad Masks Turn Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,' this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  5. Auditory masking of speech in reverberant multi-talker environments.

    PubMed

    Weller, Tobias; Buchholz, Jörg M; Best, Virginia

    2016-03-01

    Auditory localization research needs to be performed in more realistic testing environments to better capture the real-world abilities of listeners and their hearing devices. However, there are significant challenges involved in controlling the audibility of relevant target signals in realistic environments. To understand the important aspects influencing target detection in more complex environments, a reverberant room with a multi-talker background was simulated and presented to the listener in a loudspeaker-based virtual sound environment. Masked thresholds of a short speech stimulus were measured adaptively for multiple target source locations in this scenario. It was found that both distance and azimuth of the target source have a strong influence on the masked threshold. Subsequently, a functional model was applied to analyze the factors influencing target detectability. The model is comprised of an auditory front-end that generates an internal representation of the stimuli in both ears, followed by a decision device combining d' information across time, frequency and both ears. The model predictions of the masked thresholds were overall in very good agreement with the experimental results. An analysis of the model processes showed that head shadow effects, signal spectrum, and reverberation have a strong impact on target audibility in the given scenario. PMID:27036267

  6. AIMS D2DB simulation for DUV and EUV mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Danping; Li, Ying; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Chen, Jerry; Hsu, S. C.; Lai, Rick; Lin, C. S.; Tuo, Laurent C. C.

    2012-02-01

    AIMS™ Die-to-Die (D2D) is widely used in checking the wafer printability of mask defects for DUV lithography. Two AIMS images, a reference and a defect image, are captured and compared with differences larger than certain tolerances identified as real defects. Since two AIMS images are needed, and since AIMS system time is precious, it is desirable to save image search and capture time by simulating reference images from the OPC mask pattern and AIMS optics. This approach is called Die-to-Database (D2DB). Another reason that D2DB is desirable is in single die mask, where the reference image from another die does not exist. This paper presents our approach to simulate AIMS optics and mask 3D effects. Unlike OPC model, whose major concern is predicting printed CD, AIMS D2DB model must produce simulated images that match measured images across the image field. This requires a careful modeling of all effects that impact the final image quality. We present a vector-diffraction theory that is based on solid theoretical foundations and a general formulation of mask model that are applicable to both rigorous Maxwell solver and empirical model that can capture the mask 3D-effects. We demonstrated the validity of our approach by comparing our simulated image with AIMS machine measured images. We also briefly discuss the necessary changes needed to model EUV optics. Simulation is particularly useful while the industry waits for an actinic EUV-AIMS tool.

  7. Investigation of EUV haze defect: molecular behaviors of mask cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Novak, Steve; Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Greg; Lee, Han-shin; Ma, Andy; Goodwin, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Photo-induced defects (or haze defects) on 193nm optic masks (haze defects) have been a serious problem not only to reticle engineers working for mask manufacturing and handling but also to photo-lithography engineers. The most widely accepted explanation of the root causes of haze defects is the cleaning chemical residues remaining on the mask surface and unavoidable outgassed molecules that outgas from pellicle materials when exposed to 193nm radiation. These have been significant challenges for reticle cleaning engineers who need to use cleaning chemicals whose residues do not lead to progressive defect formation on the mask and to find improved materials to minimize pellicle outgassing. It is assumed that contamination generation on EUV masks would have a higher probability than on optic masks, primarily since EUV masks are not protected by a pellicle and amorphous carbon films can accumulate during exposure to EUV light. While there is potential to mitigate the generation of carbon contamination by improving the exposure tool environment and removing carbon films using in-situ atomic hydrogen cleaning, it is not yet clear whether the reaction of mask cleaning chemicals to EUV radiation will lead to creation of progressive defects on EUV mask surfaces. With the work to being done it has been observed that carbon contamination on EUV masks dominates any effects of solvent chemicals under normal environmental or exposure conditions (from atmospheric pressure up to a vacuum level of 10-6 Torr) during EUV exposure. However, it is still unknown whether residual cleaning chemicals will provide a nucleus for progressive defect formation during exposure. This lack of understanding needs to be addressed by the industry as EUV masks are expected to undergo more frequent cleaning cycles. In this work, we will report on an investigation of the molecular behavior of cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces during EUV exposure. Movement (e.g., migration or aggregation) of

  8. Inverse lithography using sparse mask representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Radu C.; Hurley, Paul; Apostol, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel optimisation algorithm for inverse lithography, based on optimization of the mask derivative, a domain inherently sparse, and for rectilinear polygons, invertible. The method is first developed assuming a point light source, and then extended to general incoherent sources. What results is a fast algorithm, producing manufacturable masks (the search space is constrained to rectilinear polygons), and flexible (specific constraints such as minimal line widths can be imposed). One inherent trick is to treat polygons as continuous entities, thus making aerial image calculation extremely fast and accurate. Requirements for mask manufacturability can be integrated in the optimization without too much added complexity. We also explain how to extend the scheme for phase-changing mask optimization.

  9. Shadow-masked growth and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeester, Piet M. A.; Coudenys, G.; Vermeire, Gerrit; Moerman, Ingrid; Zhu, Youcai; Buydens, Luc; Eeckhout, C.; Van Daele, Peter

    1993-02-01

    In this paper we will review the shadow masked growth technique and its applications. The technique enables us to change the layer thicknesses over a substrate by the variation in dimensions of windows in the shadow mask. One of the major application areas is the realization of photonic integrated circuits where materials with a different bandgap have to be integrated on the same substrate. The combination of thickness variations with the use of quantum wells results in the required bandgap changes. In the paper we will first start with an overview of the basic technology of shadow masked growth and in a second part we will discuss some of the important applications. Note that we will limit ourselves to the shadow masked growth technique and no review will be given on other technologies such as selective growth.

  10. Noble approach for mask-wafer measurement by design-based metrology integration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, Hiroaki; Hayano, Katsuya; Maeda, Tatsuya; Mohri, Hiroshi; Sato, Hidetoshi; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Sukegawa, Shigeki

    2009-10-01

    OPC technique is getting more complicated toward 32nm and below technology node, i.e. from moderate OPC to aggressive OPC. Also, various types of phase shift mask have been introduced, and then the manufacturing process of them is complicated now. In order to shorten TAT (Turn around time) time, mask technique need be considered in addition to lithography technique. Furthermore, the lens aberration of the exposure system is getting smaller, so the current performance of it is very close to the ideal. On the other hand, when down sizing goes down to 32nm technology node, it starts to be reported that there are cases that size cannot be matched between a mask pattern and the corresponding printed pattern. Therefore, it is very indispensable to understand the pattern sizes correlation between a mask and the corresponding printed wafer in order to improve the accuracy and the quality, in the situation that the device size is so small that low k1 lithography had been developed and widely used in a production. Then it is thought that it is one of the approaches to improve an estimated accuracy of lithography by using contour that was extracted from mask SEM image in addition to mask model. This paper describes a newly developed integration system in order to solve issues above, and the applications. This is a system which integrates CG4500; CD-SEM for mask and CG4000; CD SEM for wafer; using DesignGauge; OPC evaluation system by Hitachi High-Technologies. It was investigated that a measurement accuracy improvement by executing a mask-wafer same point measurement with same measurement algorithm utilizing the new system. At first, we measured patterns described on a mask and verified the validity based on a measurement value, picture, measurement parameter and the coordinate. Then create a job file for a wafer CD-SEM using the system so as to measure the same patterns that were exposed using the mask. In addition, average CD measurement was tried in order to improve the

  11. New approach for mask-wafer measurement by design-based metrology integration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsuya; Hayano, Katsuya; Kawashima, Satoshi; Mohri, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hideo; Sato, Hiodetoshi; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Nishihara, Makoto; Sukegawa, Shigeki

    2009-03-01

    OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) technique is getting more complicated towards 32 nm technology node and beyond, i.e. from moderate OPC to aggressive OPC. Also, various types of phase shift mask have been introduced, and their manufacturing process is complicated. In order to shorten TAT (Turn around time), mask design technique needs be considered in addition to lithography technique. Furthermore, the lens aberration of the exposure system is getting smaller, so its current performance is very close to the ideal. On the other hand, when down sizing of device feature size reaches the 32nm technology node, cases begin to be reported where the feature dimension is not matched between a mask pattern and the corresponding printed pattern. Therefore, it is indispensable to understand the pattern size correlation between a mask and the corresponding printed wafer in order to improve the processing accuracy and the quality in the situation where the device size is so small that the low k1 lithography is widely used in production. One of the approaches to improve the estimated accuracy of lithography is the use of contour data extracted from mask SEM image in addition to the application of a mask model. This paper describes a newly developed integration system that aims to solve the issues above, and its applications. This is a system that integrates mask CD-SEM (Critical Dimension-Scanning Electron Microscope) CG4500, wafer CD-SEM CG4000, OPC evaluation system DesignGauge, all manufactured by Hitachi High-Technologies. The measurement accuracy improvement was examined by executing a mask-wafer same point measurement, i.e. measurement of the corresponding points, with same measurement algorithm utilizing the new system. First, we measured mask patterns and verified the validity based on the measurement value, the image, the measurement parameter and the coordinates. Then a job file was formulated for a wafer CD-SEM using the new system so as to measure the corresponding

  12. The neural processing of masked speech.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sophie K; McGettigan, Carolyn

    2013-09-01

    Spoken language is rarely heard in silence, and a great deal of interest in psychoacoustics has focused on the ways that the perception of speech is affected by properties of masking noise. In this review we first briefly outline the neuroanatomy of speech perception. We then summarise the neurobiological aspects of the perception of masked speech, and investigate this as a function of masker type, masker level and task. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Annual Reviews 2013". PMID:23685149

  13. Thorough characterization of a EUV mask

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, H.; McIntyre, G.; Koay, C.-W.; Burkhardt, M.; He, L.; Hartley, J.; Johnson, C.; Raghunathan, S.; Goldberg, K.; Mochi, I.; La Fontaine, B.; Wood, O.

    2009-06-25

    We reported that we were successful in our 45nm technology node device demonstration in February 2008 and 22nm node technology node device patterning in February 2009 using ASML's Alpha Demo Tool (ADT). In order to insert extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at the 15nm technology node and beyond, we have thoroughly characterized one EUV mask, a so-called NOVACD mask. In this paper, we report on three topics, The first topic is an analysis of line edge roughness (LER) using a mask Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) to compare resist images printed with the ASML ADT. The results of the analysis show a good correlation between the mask AFM and the mask SEM measurements, However, the resist printing results for the isolated space patterns are slightly different. The cause ofthis discrepancy may be resist blur, image log slope and SEM image quality and so on. The second topic is an analysis of mask topography using an AFM and relative reflectivity of mirror and absorber surface using the AIT, The AFM data show 6 and 7 angstrom rms roughness for mirror and absorber, respectively. The reflectivity measurements show that the mirror reflects EUV light about 20 times higher than absorber. The last topic is an analysis of a 32nm technology node SRAM cell which includes a comparison of mask SEM image, AIT image, resist image and simulation results. The ADT images of the SRAM pattern were of high quality even though the mask patters were not corrected for OPC or any EUV-specific effects. Image simulation results were in good agreement with the printing results.

  14. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  15. Accurate mask registration on tilted lines for 6F2 DRAM manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeth, K. D.; Choi, W.; Lee, Y.; Kim, S.; Yim, D.; Laske, F.; Ferber, M.; Daneshpanah, M.; Kwon, E.

    2015-10-01

    193nm immersion lithography is the mainstream production technology for the 22nm half pitch (HP) DRAM manufacturing. Considering multi-patterning as the technology to solve the very low k1 situation in the resolution equation puts extreme pressure on the intra-field overlay, to which mask registration error may be a significant error contributor [3]. The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS [1]) requests a registration error below 4 nm for each mask of a multi-patterning set forming one layer on the wafer. For mask metrology at the 22nm HP node, maintaining a precision-to-tolerance (P/T) ratio below 0.25 will be very challenging. Mask registration error impacts intra-field wafer overlay directly and has a major impact on wafer yield. DRAM makers moved several years ago to 6F2 (figure 1, [2]) cell design and thus printing tilted lines at 15 or 30 degree. Overlay of contact layer over buried line has to be well controlled. However, measuring mask registration performance accurately on tilted lines was a challenge. KLA Tencor applied the model-based algorithm to enable the accurate registration measurement of tilted lines on the Poly layer as well as the mask-to-mask overlay to the adjacent contact layers. The metrology solution is discussed and measurement results are provided.

  16. The effect of mask use on the spread of influenza during a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Brienen, Nicole C J; Timen, Aura; Wallinga, Jacco; van Steenbergen, Jim E; Teunis, Peter F M

    2010-08-01

    Face masks have traditionally been used in general infection control, but their efficacy at the population level in preventing transmission of influenza viruses has not been studied in detail. Data from published clinical studies indicate that the infectivity of influenza A virus is probably very high, so that transmission of infection may involve low doses of virus. At low doses, the relation between dose and the probability of infection is approximately linear, so that the reduction in infection risk is proportional to the reduction in exposure due to particle retention of the mask. A population transmission model was set up to explore the impact of population-wide mask use, allowing estimation of the effects of mask efficacy and coverage (fraction of the population wearing masks) on the basic reproduction number and the infection attack rate. We conclude that population-wide use of face masks could make an important contribution in delaying an influenza pandemic. Mask use also reduces the reproduction number, possibly even to levels sufficient for containing an influenza outbreak. PMID:20497389

  17. Improvement of mask write time for curvilinear assist features at 22nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Aki; Bork, Ingo; Kiuchi, Taiichi; Komagata, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yasutoshi; Hagiwara, Kazuyuki; Hara, Daisuke

    2010-09-01

    In writing 22nm logic contacts with 193nm immersion, curvilinear sub-resolution assist features will be desirable on masks. Curvilinear sub-resolution assist features are good for high volume chips where the wafer volume outweighs considerations for mask write times. For those chips, even 40 hour write times are tolerated for mask writing. For lower-volume production of SOC designs, such write times are economically unacceptable. 8 to 12 hours of write times are feasible for these designs. Previous papers at 2010 Photomask Japan described model-based mask data preparation (MB-MDP) techniques using circular apertures on production e-beam writers writing curvilinear ideal ILT patterns that reduced e-beam write-times by nearly a factor of two over conventional approach writing Manhattanized ILT patterns. This puts the curvilinear assist features within the realm of high-volume production. However, the write times are still too long for SOC designs. This paper describes a new technique that reduces mask write time further. Resist-exposed SEM images will be shown, written by JEOL JBX-3200MV. E-beam shot count comparisons for an ideal ILT mask pattern will be made with the conventional methods, demonstrating a 44% decrease in blanking time. In addition, a comparison study is shown indicating that an ideal ILT mask pattern that would take 63 hours with conventional fracturing can be written in about 14 hours using MB-MDP. AIMS projected images demonstrate the pattern fidelity on the wafer.

  18. VSP wave separation by adaptive masking filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-06-01

    In vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data processing, the first step might be to separate the down-going wavefield from the up-going wavefield. When using a masking filter for VSP wave separation, there are difficulties associated with two termination ends of the up-going waves. A critical challenge is how the masking filter can restore the energy tails, the edge effect associated with these terminations uniquely exist in VSP data. An effective strategy is to implement masking filters in both τ-p and f-k domain sequentially. Meanwhile it uses a median filter, producing a clean but smooth version of the down-going wavefield, used as a reference data set for designing the masking filter. The masking filter is implemented adaptively and iteratively, gradually restoring the energy tails cut-out by any surgical mute. While the τ-p and the f-k domain masking filters target different depth ranges of VSP, this combination strategy can accurately perform in wave separation from field VSP data.

  19. Thrifty metabolic programming in rats is induced by both maternal undernutrition and postnatal leptin treatment, but masked in the presence of both: implications for models of developmental programming

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal undernutrition leads to an increased risk of metabolic disorders in offspring including obesity and insulin resistance, thought to be due to a programmed thrifty phenotype which is inappropriate for a subsequent richer nutritional environment. In a rat model, both male and female offspring of undernourished mothers are programmed to become obese, however postnatal leptin treatment gives discordant results between males and females. Leptin treatment is able to rescue the adverse programming effects in the female offspring of undernourished mothers, but not in their male offspring. Additionally, in these rats, postnatal leptin treatment of offspring from normally-nourished mothers programmes their male offspring to develop obesity in later life, while there is no comparable effect in their female offspring. Results We show by microarray analysis of the female liver transcriptome that both maternal undernutrition and postnatal leptin treatment independently induce a similar thrifty transcriptional programme affecting carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress genes. Paradoxically, however, the combination of both stimuli restores a more normal transcriptional environment. This demonstrates that “leptin reversal” is a global phenomenon affecting all genes involved in fetal programming by maternal undernourishment and leptin treatment. The thrifty transcriptional programme was associated with pro-inflammatory markers and downregulation of adaptive immune mediators, particularly MHC class I genes, suggesting a deficit in antigen presentation in these offspring. Conclusions We propose a revised model of developmental programming reconciling the male and female observations, in which there are two competing programmes which collectively drive liver transcription. The first element is a thrifty metabolic phenotype induced by early life growth restriction independently of leptin levels. The second is a homeostatic set point

  20. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  3. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84... AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.111 Gas masks; required components. (a) Each gas mask described in § 84.110 shall, where its...

  4. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84... AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.111 Gas masks; required components. (a) Each gas mask described in § 84.110 shall, where its...

  5. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84... AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.111 Gas masks; required components. (a) Each gas mask described in § 84.110 shall, where its...

  6. Ceramic Masks--A Multi-Cultural Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Elizabeth E.

    1978-01-01

    The creation of ceramic masks in reaction to the film, Roots, focused on the functions of the masks themselves within a particular society, the materials and techniques used to create these masks, and the identification of typical shapes of heads and facial features on the masks in each culture. (Author/RK)

  7. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  8. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  9. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  10. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... AND PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask...

  11. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  12. Computational mask defect review for contamination and haze inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram; Wolf, Yulian; Shah, Pinkesh

    2013-09-01

    the mask manufacturing process. The latter characterization qualifies real defect signatures, such as pin-dots or pin-holes, extrusions or intrusions, assist-feature or dummy-fill defects, writeerrors or un-repairable defects, chrome-on-shifter or missing chrome-from-shifter defects, particles, etc., and also false defect signatures, such as those due to inspection tool registration or image alignment, interlace artifacts, CCD camera artifacts, optical shimmer, focus errors, etc. Such qualitative characterization of defects has enabled better inspection tool SPC and process defect control in the mask shop. In this paper, the same computational approach to defect review has been extended to contamination style defect inspections, including Die-to-Die reflected, and non Die-to-Die or single-die inspections. In addition to the computational methods used for transmitted aerial images, defects detected in die-to-die reflected light mode are analyzed based on special defect and background coloring in reflected-light, and other characteristics to determine the exact type and severity. For those detected in the non Die-to-Die mode, only defect images are available from the inspection tool. Without a reference, i.e., defect-free image, it is often difficult to determine the true nature or impact of the defect in question. Using a combination of inspection-tool modeling and image inversion techniques, Luminescent's LAIPHTM system generates an accurate reference image, and then proceeds with automated defect characterization as if the images were simply from a die-to-die inspection. The disposition of contamination style defects this way, filters out >90% of false and nuisance defects that otherwise would have been manually reviewed or measured on AIMSTM. Such computational defect review, unifying defect disposition across all available inspection modes, has been imperative to ensuring no yield losses due to errors in operator defect classification on one hand, and on the other

  13. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajeev B; Skaria, Shaji D; Mansour, Mohamed M; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2016-07-01

    Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an "N95 respirator") with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection. PMID:26225807

  14. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajeev B.; Skaria, Shaji D.; Mansour, Mohamed M.; Smaldone, Gerald C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an “N95 respirator”) with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection. PMID:26225807

  15. Mask topography effect in chromeless phase lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipsen, Vicky; Bekaert, Joost; Vandenberghe, Geert; Jonckheere, Rik; Van Den Broeke, Douglas; Socha, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Different types of phase-shift masks (PSM) in combination with the proper illumination condition are widely used to allow 193nm lithography to print ever-decreasing pitches with a sufficient process window. A viable option for the 65nm node is Chromeless Phase Lithography (CPL), which combines a chromeless phase shift mask and 193nm off-axis illumination. It has been demonstrated that CPL has a high flexibility for through pitch imaging. Also concerning mask making CPL masks showed advantages over alternating and attenuated PSM [1]. This paper discusses how the mask quality and its topography influence the imaging performance of CPL. It is shown that mask topography is an important factor for CPL, as the imaging relies also on the quartz depth differences in the mask. The wafer image is sensitive to phase variations induced by the quartz etch depth and the sidewall profile. Their impact is separately studied using rigorous 3D mask electro-magnetic field simulations (Sigma-C Solid-CM). Correlation of experimental results to simulation explains that the observed pitch-dependent tilt in the Bossung curves is mainly related to the 3D character of the mask. In search for a global compensation valid through pitch, the simulation study also evaluates the effect of other contributors such as lens aberrations in the optical system, assist features and half-toning Cr zebra lines in the design. However, as the tilt is inherent to the CPL mask fabrication, a compensation of the Bossung tilt effect can only be obtained for specific combinations of all sources, as will be shown. We concentrate on the imaging of 70nm lines and 100nm contact holes in pitches ranging from dense up to isolated. The wafers are exposed on an ASML PAS5500/1100 ArF scanner working with a 0.75NA projection lens and various types of off-axis illumination. The wafers are evaluated on a top-down CD SEM (KLA-Tencor 8250XR).

  16. Hidden data transmission using time delay for separating useful signals from masking oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kal'Yanov, Er. V.

    2009-03-01

    A new method of hidden data transmission based on the use of time delay for the separation of useful signals from masking noise-like (chaotic or stochastic) oscillations is described. Mathematical models involving a source of chaotic oscillations have been studied using numerical methods. The transmission of a masked non-encoded signal and the pulsed data transmission using 0/1 bit code are considered.

  17. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  18. High-radiance LDP source: clean, reliable, and stable EUV source for mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Bergmann, Klaus; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Taniguchi, Yuta; Shirai, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kazuya; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput and -resolution actinic mask inspection tools are needed as EUVL begins to enter into volume production phase. To realize such inspection tools, a high-radiance EUV source is necessary. Ushio's laser-assisted discharge-produced plasma (LDP) source is able to meet industry's requirements in radiance, cleanliness, stability and reliability. Ushio's LDP source has shown the peak radiance at plasma of 180 W/mm2/sr and the area-averaged radiance in a 200-μm-diameter circle behind the debris mitigation system of 120 W/mm2/sr. A new version of the debris mitigation system is in testing phase. Its optical transmission was confirmed to be 73 %, which is 4 % lower than that of the previous version and therefore will be improved. Cleanliness of the system is evaluated by exposing Ru mirrors placed behind the debris mitigation system. Ru sputter rate was proven to be sufficiently low as 3~5 nm/Gpulse at 7 kHz, whereas frequency-dependent sputter rate was 1~3 nm/Gpulse at 5~9 kHz as previously reported. Sn deposition remained very low (< 0.05 nm) and did not grow over time. A new technique to suppress debris was tested and preliminary results were promising. Time-of-flight signal of fast ions was completely suppressed and Ru sputter rate of exposed mirrors at 3 kHz was approximately 1.3 nm/Gpulse, whereas the conventional mitigation system (new version) resulted in Ru sputter rate of 0.7 nm/Gpulse. This new technique also allows increasing the radiance efficiency by 30 %. Stability tests were done at several different discharge frequencies. Pulse energy stability was approximately 10 %. Dose energy stability dropped from approximately 2 % to 0.1 % when feedback control was activated. EUV emission position stability was studied at 3 kHz. Deviation of the plasma center of gravity was 6 μm, which is 3 % of plasma diameter and therefore considered to be negligible. Reliability tests were performed on both R and D and prototype machines and up to 200 hours of non

  19. Phase analysis of amplitude binary mask structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Shaping of light behind masks using different techniques is the milestone of the printing industry. The aerial image distribution or the intensity distribution at the printing distances defines the resolution of the structure after printing. Contrast and phase are the two parameters that play a major role in shaping of light to get the desired intensity pattern. Here, in contrast to many other contributions that focus on intensity, we discuss the phase evolution for different structures. The amplitude or intensity characteristics of the structures in a binary mask at different proximity gaps have been analyzed extensively for many industrial applications. But the phase evolution from the binary mask having OPC structures is not considered so far. The mask we consider here is the normal amplitude binary mask but having high resolution Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) structures for corners. The corner structures represent a two dimensional problem which is difficult to handle with simple rules of phase masks design and therefore of particular interest. The evolution of light from small amplitude structures might lead to high contrast by creating sharp phase changes or phase singularities which are points of zero intensity. We show the phase modulation at different proximity gaps and can visualize the shaping of light according to the phase changes. The analysis is done with an instrument called High Resolution Interference Microscopy (HRIM), a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that gives access to three-dimensional phase and amplitude images. The current paper emphasizes on the phase measurement of different optical proximity correction structures, and especially on corners of a binary mask.

  20. Unconscious processing of dichoptically masked words.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, A G; Klinger, M R; Liu, T J

    1989-01-01

    In three experiments, the subjects' task was to decide whether each of a series of words connoted something good (e.g., fame, comedy, rescue) or bad (stress, detest, malaria). One-half second before the presentation of each such target word, an evaluatively polarized priming word was presented briefly to the nondominant eye and was masked dichoptically by either the rapidly following (Experiment 1) or simultaneous (Experiments 2 and 3) presentation of a random letter-fragment pattern to the dominant eye. (The effectiveness of the masking procedure was demonstrated by the subjects' inability to discriminate the left vs. right position of a test series of words.) In all experiments, significant masked priming effects were obtained; evaluative decisions to congruent masked prime-target combinations (such as a positive masked prime followed by a positive target) were significantly faster than those to incongruent (e.g., negative prime/positive target) or noncongruent (e.g., neutral prime/positive target) combinations. Also, in two of the three experiments, when subjects were at chance accuracy in discriminating word position, their position judgments were nevertheless significantly influenced by the irrelevant semantic content (LEFT vs. RIGHT) of the masked position-varying words. The series of experiments demonstrated that two very different tasks--speeded judgment of evaluative meaning and nonspeeded judgment of word position--yielded statistically significant and replicable influences of the semantic content of apparently undetectable words. Coupled with previous research by others using the lexical decision task, these findings converge in establishing the reliability of the empirical phenomenon of semantic processing of words that are rendered undetectable by dichoptic pattern masking.

  1. The Intervenor Effect in Masked Priming: How Does Masked Priming Survive across an Intervening Word?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Four masked priming experiments are reported investigating the effect of inserting an unrelated word between the masked prime and the target. When the intervening word is visible, identity priming is reduced to the level of one-letter-different form priming, but form priming is largely unaffected. However, when the intervening word is itself…

  2. Stimulus detection after interruption of the feedforward response in a backward masking paradigm.

    PubMed

    Romeo, August; Puig, Maria Sole; Zapata, Laura Pérez; Lopez-Moliner, Joan; Supèr, Hans

    2012-10-01

    In backward masking, a target stimulus is rendered invisible by the presentation of a second stimulus, the mask. When the mask is effective, neural responses to the target are suppressed. Nevertheless, weak target responses sometimes may produce a behavioural response. It remains unclear whether the reduced target response is a purely feedforward response or that it includes recurrent activity. Using a feedforward neural network of biological plausible spiking neurons, we tested whether a transient spike burst is sufficient for face categorization. After training the network, the system achieved face/non-face categorization for sets of grayscale images. In a backward masking paradigm, the transient burst response was cut off thereby reducing the feedforward target response. Despite the suppressed feedforward responses stimulus classification remained robust. Thus according to our model data stimulus detection is possible with purely, suppressed feedforward responses.

  3. Mask and lithography techniques for FPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Wahlsten, M.; Sundelin, E.; Hansson, G.; Svensson, A.

    2015-09-01

    Large-field projection lithography for FPDs has developed gradually since the 90s. The LCD screen technology has remained largely unchanged and incremental development has given us better image quality, larger screen sizes, and above all lower cost per area. Recently new types of mobile devices with very high pixel density and/or OLED displays have given rise to dramatically higher requirem ents on photomask technology. Devices with 600 ppi or m ore need lithography with higher optical resolution and better linewidth control. OLED di splays pose new challenges with high sensitivity to transistor parameters and to capacitive cross-talk. New mask requirements leads to new maskwriter requirements and Mycronic has developed a new generation of large -area mask writers with significantly improved properties. This paper discusses and shows data for the improved writers. Mask production to high er quality stan dards also need metrology to verify the quality and Mycronic has introduced a 2D metrology tool with accuracy adequate for current and future masks. New printing or additive methods of producing disp lays on plastic or metal foil will make low-cost disp lays available. This inexpensive type of disp lays will exist side by side with the photographic quality displays of TVs and mobile devices, which will continue to be a challenge in terms of mask and production quality.

  4. Calculating aerial images from EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistor, Thomas V.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1999-06-01

    Aerial images for line/space patterns, arrays of posts and an arbitrary layout pattern are calculated for EUV masks in a 4X EUV imaging system. Both mask parameters and illumination parameters are varied to investigate their effects on the aerial image. To facilitate this study, a parallel version of TEMPEST with a Fourier transform boundary condition was developed and run on a network of 24 microprocessors. Line width variations are observed when absorber thickness or sidewall angle changes. As the line/space pattern scales to smaller dimensions, the aspect ratios of the absorber features increase, introducing geometric shadowing and reducing aerial image intensity and contrast. 100nm square posts have circular images of diameter close to 100nm, but decreasing in diameter significantly when the corner round radius at the mask becomes greater than 50 nm. Exterior mask posts image slightly smaller and with higher ellipticity than interior mask posts. The aerial image of the arbitrary test pattern gives insight into the effects of the off-axis incidence employed in EUV lithography systems.

  5. Metrology on phase-shift masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeth, Klaus-Dieter; Maurer, Wilhelm; Blaesing-Bangert, Carola

    1992-06-01

    In the evaluation of new manufacturing processes, metrology is a key function, beginning with the first step of process development through the final step of everyday mass production at the fabrication floor level. RIM-type phase shift masks are expected to be the first application of phase shift masks in high volume production, since they provide improved lithography process capability at the expense of only moderate complexity in their manufacturing. Measurements of critical dimension (CD) and pattern position (overlay) on experimental rim-type and chromeless phase shift masks are reported. Pattern placement (registration) was measured using the Leitz LMS 2000. The overall design and important components were already described. The pattern placement of the RIM type phase shift structures on the photomask described above was determined within a tolerance of 25 nm (3s); nominal accuracy was within 45 nm (3s). On the chromeless phase shift mask the measurement results were easily obtained using a wafer intensity algorithm available with the system. The measurement uncertainties were less than 25 nm and 50 nm for precision and nominal accuracy respectively. The measurement results from the Leitz CD 200 using transmitted light were: a CD- distribution of 135 nm (3s) on a typical 6 micrometers structure all over the mask; the 0.9 micrometers RIM structure had a distribution of 43 nm (3s). Typical long term precision performance values for the CD 200 on both chrome and phase shift structures have been less than 15 nm.

  6. EUV mask process specifics and development challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesladek, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    EUV lithography is currently the favorite and most promising candidate among the next generation lithography (NGL) technologies. Decade ago the NGL was supposed to be used for 45 nm technology node. Due to introduction of immersion 193nm lithography, double/triple patterning and further techniques, the 193 nm lithography capabilities was greatly improved, so it is expected to be used successfully depending on business decision of the end user down to 10 nm logic. Subsequent technology node will require EUV or DSA alternative technology. Manufacturing and especially process development for EUV technology requires significant number of unique processes, in several cases performed at dedicated tools. Currently several of these tools as e.g. EUV AIMS or actinic reflectometer are not available on site yet. The process development is done using external services /tools with impact on the single unit process development timeline and the uncertainty of the process performance estimation, therefore compromises in process development, caused by assumption about similarities between optical and EUV mask made in experiment planning and omitting of tests are further reasons for challenges to unit process development. Increased defect risk and uncertainty in process qualification are just two examples, which can impact mask quality / process development. The aim of this paper is to identify critical aspects of the EUV mask manufacturing with respect to defects on the mask with focus on mask cleaning and defect repair and discuss the impact of the EUV specific requirements on the experiments needed.

  7. Optimization of the WFC3 Cold Stop Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavalisco, M.; Stiavelli, M.; Robberto, M.

    2001-07-01

    We have modeled the contribution by the OTA and the instrument assembly to the WFC3 IR channel internal background in order to identify the optimal design of the cold stop mask. We have found that the contribution of the secondary mirror spiders and primary mirror hold-down pads are negligible for any value of the detector wavelength cut-off. The background coming from the hole in the primary mirror, which is reflected into the optical path by the secondary mirror, can also be neglected if the detector has a cut-off at ~1.75 μm or less. However, this contribution to the background is highly uncertain, because the temperatures of the various components within the hole are not well constrained. In any case, it becomes the dominant component if the detector's cut-off is at 1.9 μm. The background from the primary hole may also be a function of the aft-shroud temperature, and could increase after the installation of ACS and the NICMOS cryo-coolers. We recommend a minimal cold stop mask that, while ensuring good alignement, should not include spiders and pads. Compared to the current design by BATC, the optimized cold stop mask will increase the IR channel throughput by ~7 % without causing any significant increase in the instrument background.

  8. International Space Station (ISS) Emergency Mask (EM) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Hahn, Jeffrey; Fowler, Michael; Young, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Emergency Mask (EM) is considered a secondary response emergency Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) designed to provide respiratory protection to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers in response to a post-fire event or ammonia leak. The EM is planned to be delivered to ISS in 2012 to replace the current air purifying respirator (APR) onboard ISS called the Ammonia Respirator (AR). The EM is a one ]size ]fits ]all model designed to fit any size crewmember, unlike the APR on ISS, and uses either two Fire Cartridges (FCs) or two Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) 3M(Trademark). Ammonia Cartridges (ACs) to provide the crew with a minimum of 8 hours of respiratory protection with appropriate cartridge swap ]out. The EM is designed for a single exposure event, for either post ]fire or ammonia, and is a passive device that cannot help crewmembers who cannot breathe on their own. The EM fs primary and only seal is around the wearer fs neck to prevent a crewmember from inhaling contaminants. During the development of the ISS Emergency Mask, several design challenges were faced that focused around manufacturing a leak free mask. The description of those challenges are broadly discussed but focuses on one key design challenge area: bonding EPDM gasket material to Gore(Registered Trademark) fabric hood.

  9. Sparse aperture mask for low order wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Cavanagh, Kathleen; Riggs, A. J. E.

    2015-09-01

    A high contrast is required for direct imaging of exoplanets. Ideally, the level of contrast required for direct imaging of exoplanets can be achieved by coronagraphic imaging, but in practice, the contrast is degraded by wavefront aberrations. To achieve the required contrast, low-order wavefront aberrations such as tip-tilt, defocus and coma must be determined and corrected. In this paper, we present a technique that integrates a sparse- aperture mask (SAM) with a shaped pupil coronagraph (SPC) to make precise estimates of these low-order aberrations. Starlight rejected by the coronagraph's focal plane stop is collimated to a relay pupil, where the mask forms an interference fringe pattern on a detector. Using numerical simulations, we show that the SAM can estimate rapidly varying tip-tilt errors in space telescopes arising from line-of-sight pointing oscillations as well as other higher-order modes. We also show that a Kalman filter can be used with the SAM to improve the estimation. At Princetons High Contrast Imaging Laboratory, we have recently created a testbed devoted to low-order wavefront sensing experiments. The testbed incorporates custom-fabricated masks (shaped pupil, focal plane, and sparse aperture) with a deformable mirror and a CCD camera to demonstrate the estimation and correction of low-order aberrations. Our first experiments aim to replicate the results of the SAM wavefront sensor (SAM WFS) Fourier propagation models.

  10. Communication masking in marine mammals: A review and research strategy.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine; Reichmuth, Colleen; Cunningham, Kane; Lucke, Klaus; Dooling, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Underwater noise, whether of natural or anthropogenic origin, has the ability to interfere with the way in which marine mammals receive acoustic signals (i.e., for communication, social interaction, foraging, navigation, etc.). This phenomenon, termed auditory masking, has been well studied in humans and terrestrial vertebrates (in particular birds), but less so in marine mammals. Anthropogenic underwater noise seems to be increasing in parts of the world's oceans and concerns about associated bioacoustic effects, including masking, are growing. In this article, we review our understanding of masking in marine mammals, summarise data on marine mammal hearing as they relate to masking (including audiograms, critical ratios, critical bandwidths, and auditory integration times), discuss masking release processes of receivers (including comodulation masking release and spatial release from masking) and anti-masking strategies of signalers (e.g. Lombard effect), and set a research framework for improved assessment of potential masking in marine mammals.

  11. Metacontrast masking is processed before grapheme-color synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Michael Patrick; Bridgeman, Bruce; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the physiological mechanism of grapheme-color synesthesia using metacontrast masking. A metacontrast target is rendered invisible by a mask that is delayed by about 60 ms; the target and mask do not overlap in space or time. Little masking occurs, however, if the target and mask are simultaneous. This effect must be cortical, because it can be obtained dichoptically. To compare the data for synesthetes and controls, we developed a metacontrast design in which nonsynesthete controls showed weaker dichromatic masking (i.e., the target and mask were in different colors) than monochromatic masking. We accomplished this with an equiluminant target, mask, and background for each observer. If synesthetic color affected metacontrast, synesthetes should show monochromatic masking more similar to the weak dichromatic masking among controls, because synesthetes could add their synesthetic color to the monochromatic condition. The target-mask pairs used for each synesthete were graphemes that elicited strong synesthetic colors. We found stronger monochromatic than dichromatic U-shaped metacontrast for both synesthetes and controls, with optimal masking at an asynchrony of 66 ms. The difference in performance between the monochromatic and dichromatic conditions in the synesthetes indicates that synesthesia occurs at a later processing stage than does metacontrast masking.

  12. An integrated source/mask/DSA optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fühner, Tim; Michalak, Przemysław; Welling, Ulrich; Orozco-Rey, Juan Carlos; Müller, Marcus; Erdmann, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of DSA for lithography is still obstructed by a number of technical issues including the lack of a comprehensive computational platform. This work presents a direct source/mask/DSA optimization (SMDSAO) method, which incorporates standard lithographic metrics and figures of merit such as the maximization of process windows. The procedure is demonstrated for a contact doubling example, assuming grapho-epitaxy-DSA. To retain a feasible runtime, a geometry-based Interface Hamiltonian DSA model is employed. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated through several results and their comparison with more rigorous DSA models.

  13. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.-J.; Yankulin, L.; Thomas, P.; Mbanaso, C.; Antohe, A.; Garg, R.; Wang, Y.; Murray, T.; Wuest, A.; Goodwin, F.; Huh, S.; Cordes, A.; Naulleau, P.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Gullikson, E.; Denbeaux, G.

    2010-03-12

    The impact of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks is significant due to throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance. Current carbon contamination research primarily focuses on the lifetime of the multilayer surfaces, determined by reflectivity loss and reduced throughput in EUV exposure tools. However, contamination on patterned EUV masks can cause additional effects on absorbing features and the printed images, as well as impacting the efficiency of cleaning process. In this work, several different techniques were used to determine possible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations were also performed and the results compared with the experimental data.

  14. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  15. Peak oxygen consumption and lactate threshold in full mask versus mouth mask conditions during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Dooly, C R; Johnson, A T; Dotson, C O; Vaccaro, P; Soong, P

    1996-01-01

    Respirator masks vary in inhalation and exhalation resistance, and in dead volume. It is believed that these factors may contribute significantly to an early anaerobic threshold in mask wearers during maximal exercise. Very little is known concerning the effect of respirator masks on maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and the lactate threshold (LT). The purpose of the present study was to assess peak VO2 (VO2peak), LT and the ventilatory threshold (VT) of 14 experienced cyclists performing two maximal cycle exercise protocols while wearing a full respirator mask (FM) (M17 type) and a mouth mask (MM). VO2peak was 10% lower under FM conditions. Peak values for ventilation (VEpeak), respiratory rate (fbpeak) and tidal volume (VTpeak) were all significantly lower under with FM versus MM conditions. Performance time and maximal heart rate (fcpeak) were not different between mask conditions. The LT and VT when expressed in %VO2peak, and the lactate concentration (mmol.l-1) at LT and VT were not significantly different across mask conditions. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated longer inhalation times, decreased Fr values and greater oxygen extraction under FM conditions. Thus, perhaps due to the increased inhalation resistance of the FM condition, subjects were unable to attain their "normal" VO2 despite similar performance times and maximal fc. Furthermore, despite a diminished VO2peak with FM, LT and VT appeared to be the same as with a MM.

  16. Cosmic Ballet or Devil's Mask?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    Stars like our Sun are members of galaxies, and most galaxies are themselves members of clusters of galaxies. In these, they move around among each other in a mostly slow and graceful ballet. But every now and then, two or more of the members may get too close for comfort - the movements become hectic, sometimes indeed dramatic, as when galaxies end up colliding. ESO PR Photo 12/04 shows an example of such a cosmic tango. This is the superb triple system NGC 6769-71, located in the southern Pavo constellation (the Peacock) at a distance of 190 million light-years. This composite image was obtained on April 1, 2004, the day of the Fifth Anniversary of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It was taken in the imaging mode of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on Melipal, one of the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the VLT at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). The two upper galaxies, NGC 6769 (upper right) and NGC 6770 (upper left), are of equal brightness and size, while NGC 6771 (below) is about half as bright and slightly smaller. All three galaxies possess a central bulge of similar brightness. They consist of elderly, reddish stars and that of NGC 6771 is remarkable for its "boxy" shape, a rare occurrence among galaxies. Gravitational interaction in a small galaxy group NGC 6769 is a spiral galaxy with very tightly wound spiral arms, while NGC 6770 has two major spiral arms, one of which is rather straight and points towards the outer disc of NGC 6769. NGC 6770 is also peculiar in that it presents two comparatively straight dark lanes and a fainter arc that curves towards the third galaxy, NGC 6771 (below). It is also obvious from this new VLT photo that stars and gas have been stripped off NGC 6769 and NGC 6770, starting to form a common envelope around them, in the shape of a Devil's Mask. There is also a weak hint of a tenuous bridge between NGC 6769 and NGC 6771. All of these features testify to strong gravitational interaction between the three galaxies

  17. Influence of auditory fatigue on masked pure-tone thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Tubbs, R. L.; Johnston, P. A.; Johnston, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of four related experiments involving conditions of 3-kHz low-intensity masking, a replication of experiment I with slight variations, 3-kHz high-intensity masking, and 6-kHz low-intensity masking. The frequencies of the tones which the observers detected were 3 and 6 kHz. The observed change in masked-tone threshold as a function of fatigue is discussed. It is found that masked-tone-detection thresholds remain essentially unchanged following fatigue if the masking-noise intensity is sufficiently great.

  18. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  19. Hearing Mechanisms and Noise Metrics Related to Auditory Masking in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Branstetter, Brian K; Bakhtiari, Kimberly L; Trickey, Jennifer S; Finneran, James J

    2016-01-01

    Odontocete cetaceans are acoustic specialists that depend on sound to hunt, forage, navigate, detect predators, and communicate. Auditory masking from natural and anthropogenic sound sources may adversely affect these fitness-related capabilities. The ability to detect a tone in a broad range of natural, anthropogenic, and synthesized noise was tested with bottlenose dolphins using a psychophysical, band-widening procedure. Diverging masking patterns were found for noise bandwidths greater than the width of an auditory filter. Despite different noise types having equal-pressure spectral-density levels (95 dB re 1 μPa(2)/Hz), masked detection threshold differences were as large as 22 dB. Consecutive experiments indicated that noise types with increased levels of amplitude modulation resulted in comodulation masking release due to within-channel and across-channel auditory mechanisms. The degree to which noise types were comodulated (comodulation index) was assessed by calculating the magnitude-squared coherence between the temporal envelope from an auditory filter centered on the signal and temporal envelopes from flanking filters. Statistical models indicate that masked thresholds in a variety of noise types, at a variety of levels, can be explained with metrics related to the comodulation index in addition to the pressure spectral-density level of noise. This study suggests that predicting auditory masking from ocean noise sources depends on both spectral and temporal properties of the noise. PMID:26610950

  20. Conceptual design of a hybrid parallel mechanism for mask exchanging of TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianping; Zhou, Hongfei; Li, Kexuan; Zhou, Zengxiang; Zhai, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Mask exchange system is an important part of the Multi-Object Broadband Imaging Echellette (MOBIE) on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). To solve the problem of stiffness changing with the gravity vector of the mask exchange system in the MOBIE, the hybrid parallel mechanism design method was introduced into the whole research. By using the characteristics of high stiffness and precision of parallel structure, combined with large moving range of serial structure, a conceptual design of a hybrid parallel mask exchange system based on 3-RPS parallel mechanism was presented. According to the position requirements of the MOBIE, the SolidWorks structure model of the hybrid parallel mask exchange robot was established and the appropriate installation position without interfering with the related components and light path in the MOBIE of TMT was analyzed. Simulation results in SolidWorks suggested that 3-RPS parallel platform had good stiffness property in different gravity vector directions. Furthermore, through the research of the mechanism theory, the inverse kinematics solution of the 3-RPS parallel platform was calculated and the mathematical relationship between the attitude angle of moving platform and the angle of ball-hinges on the moving platform was established, in order to analyze the attitude adjustment ability of the hybrid parallel mask exchange robot. The proposed conceptual design has some guiding significance for the design of mask exchange system of the MOBIE on TMT.

  1. Hearing Mechanisms and Noise Metrics Related to Auditory Masking in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Branstetter, Brian K; Bakhtiari, Kimberly L; Trickey, Jennifer S; Finneran, James J

    2016-01-01

    Odontocete cetaceans are acoustic specialists that depend on sound to hunt, forage, navigate, detect predators, and communicate. Auditory masking from natural and anthropogenic sound sources may adversely affect these fitness-related capabilities. The ability to detect a tone in a broad range of natural, anthropogenic, and synthesized noise was tested with bottlenose dolphins using a psychophysical, band-widening procedure. Diverging masking patterns were found for noise bandwidths greater than the width of an auditory filter. Despite different noise types having equal-pressure spectral-density levels (95 dB re 1 μPa(2)/Hz), masked detection threshold differences were as large as 22 dB. Consecutive experiments indicated that noise types with increased levels of amplitude modulation resulted in comodulation masking release due to within-channel and across-channel auditory mechanisms. The degree to which noise types were comodulated (comodulation index) was assessed by calculating the magnitude-squared coherence between the temporal envelope from an auditory filter centered on the signal and temporal envelopes from flanking filters. Statistical models indicate that masked thresholds in a variety of noise types, at a variety of levels, can be explained with metrics related to the comodulation index in addition to the pressure spectral-density level of noise. This study suggests that predicting auditory masking from ocean noise sources depends on both spectral and temporal properties of the noise.

  2. A new approach for defect inspection on large area masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, Gerd; Döbereiner, Stefan; Hillmann, Frank; Falk, Günther; Brück, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-02-01

    Besides the mask market for IC manufacturing, which mainly uses 6 inch sized masks, the market for the so called large area masks is growing very rapidly. Typical applications of these masks are mainly wafer bumping for current packaging processes, color filters on TFTs, and Flip Chip manufacturing. To expose e.g. bumps and similar features on 200 mm wafers under proximity exposure conditions 9 inch masks are used, while in 300 mm wafer bumping processes (Fig. 1) 14 inch masks are handled. Flip Chip manufacturing needs masks up to 28 by 32 inch. This current maximum mask dimension is expected to hold for the next 5 years in industrial production. On the other hand shrinking feature sizes, just as in case of the IC masks, demand enhanced sensitivity of the inspection tools. A defect inspection tool for those masks is valuable for both the mask maker, who has to deliver a defect free mask to his customer, and for the mask user to supervise the mask behavior conditions during its lifetime. This is necessary because large area masks are mainly used for proximity exposures. During this process itself the mask is vulnerable by contacting the resist on top of the wafers. Therefore a regular inspection of the mask after 25, 50, or 100 exposures has to be done during its whole lifetime. Thus critical resist contamination and other defects, which lead to yield losses, can be recognized early. In the future shrinking feature dimensions will require even more sensitive and reliable defect inspection methods than they do presently. Besides the sole inspection capability the tools should also provide highly precise measurement capabilities and extended review options.

  3. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  4. Clean induced feature CD shift of EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesládek, Pavel; Schedel, Thorsten; Bender, Markus

    2016-05-01

    EUV developed in the last decade to the most promising <7nm technology candidate. Defects are considered to be one of the most critical issues of the EUV mask. There are several contributors which make the EUV mask so different from the optical one. First one is the significantly more complicated mask stack consisting currently of 40 Mo/Si double layers, covered by Ru capping layer and TaN/TaO absorber/anti-reflective coating on top of the front face of the mask. Backside is in contrary to optical mask covered as well by conductive layer consisting of Cr or CrN. Second contributor is the fact that EUV mask is currently in contrary to optical mask not yet equipped with sealed pellicle, leading to much higher risk of mask contamination. Third reason is use of EUV mask in vacuum, possibly leading to deposition of vacuum contaminants on the EUV mask surface. Latter reason in combination with tight requirements on backside cleanliness lead to the request of frequent recleaning of the EUV mask, in order to sustain mask lifetime similar to that of optical mask. Mask cleaning process alters slightly the surface of any mask - binary COG mask, as well as phase shift mask of any type and naturally also of the EUV mask as well. In case of optical masks the changes are almost negligible, as the mask is exposed to max. 10-20 re-cleans within its life time. These modifications can be expressed in terms of different specified parameters, e.g. CD shift, phase/trans shift, change of the surface roughness etc. The CD shift, expressed as thinning (or exceptionally thickening) of the dark features on the mask is typically in order of magnitude 0.1nm per process run, which is completely acceptable for optical mask. Projected on the lifetime of EUV mask, assuming 100 clean process cycles, this will lead to CD change of about 10nm. For this reason the requirements for EUV mask cleaning are significantly tighter, << 0.1 nm per process run. This task will look even more challenging, when

  5. A new mask exposure and analysis facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    te Sligte, Edwin; Koster, Norbert; Deutz, Alex; Staring, Wilbert

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of ever higher source powers in EUV systems causes increased risks for contamination and degradation of EUV masks and pellicles. Appropriate testing can help to inventory and mitigate these risks. To this end, we propose EBL2: a laboratory EUV exposure system capable of operating at high EUV powers and intensities, and capable of exposing and analyzing EUV masks. The proposed system architecture is similar to the EBL system which has been operated jointly by TNO and Carl Zeiss SMT since 2005. EBL2 contains an EUV Beam Line, in which samples can be exposed to EUV irradiation in a controlled environment. Attached to this Beam Line is an XPS system, which can be reached from the Beam Line via an in-vacuum transfer system. This enables surface analysis of exposed masks without breaking vacuum. Automated handling with dual pods is foreseen so that exposed EUV masks will still be usable in EUV lithography tools to assess the imaging impact of the exposure. Compared to the existing system, large improvements in EUV power, intensity, reliability, and flexibility are proposed. Also, in-situ measurements by e.g. ellipsometry is foreseen for real time monitoring of the sample condition. The system shall be equipped with additional ports for EUVR or other analysis tools. This unique facility will be open for external customers and other research groups.

  6. Testing Tactile Masking between the Forearms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2016-01-01

    Masking, in which one stimulus affects the detection of another, is a classic technique that has been used in visual, auditory, and tactile research, usually using stimuli that are close together to reveal local interactions. Masking effects have also been demonstrated in which a tactile stimulus alters the perception of a touch at a distant location. Such effects can provide insight into how components of the body's representations in the brain may be linked. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at corresponding contralateral locations. To explore the matching of corresponding points across the body, we can measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on contralateral masking. Careful controls are required to rule out direct effects of the remote stimulus, for example by mechanical transmission, and also attention effects in which thresholds may be altered by the participant's attention being drawn away from the stimulus of interest. The use of this technique is beneficial as a behavioural measure for exploring which parts of the body are functionally connected and whether the two sides of the body interact in a somatotopic representation. This manuscript describes a behavioural protocol that can be used for studying contralateral tactile masking. PMID:26889736

  7. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  8. Associative Learning of Discrimination with Masked Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    Great controversy exists on whether associative learning occurs without awareness. In Experiment 1, 31 participants received discrimination training by repeated presentations of two stimulus sequences (S1[subscript A] right arrow S2[subscript A], and S1[subscript B] right arrow S2[subscript B]), S1 being a masked stimulus. S2 were imperative…

  9. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-07-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) EUV mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of not only a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope (PEM), but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam (EB) techniques such as CD metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) of the candidate materials for conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair-ML, 16 nm sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in hp 44 nm, 40 nm, and 32 nm line and space (L/S) patterns. Reducing 40-pair-ML to 20-pair-ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16 nm sized defects remained detectable. A double layer structure with 2.5-nm-thik B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  10. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-10-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) EUV mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of not only a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope (PEM), but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam (EB) techniques such as CD metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) of the candidate materials for conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair-ML, 16 nm sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in hp 44 nm, 40 nm, and 32 nm line and space (L/S) patterns. Reducing 40-pair-ML to 20-pair-ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16 nm sized defects remained detectable. These defects were also detected after the etched part was refilled with Si. Moreover, the simulation shows a high sensitivity for detecting the residual-type defects (etching residues). A double layer structure with 2.5-nm-thik B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  11. Differential effects of forward and backward masks on the relationship between perception and action.

    PubMed

    Deplancke, A; Madelain, L; Coello, Y

    2016-03-01

    A recent series of experiments has shown that the effects of near-threshold stimuli on perceptual and motor responses are highly dependent on experimental conditions. In particular, motor influences of near-threshold distractors were observed when using low-contrast unmasked stimuli and high-contrast masked stimuli although only the latter affected motor responses in the absence of stimulus awareness. These results are compatible with neurophysiological models of visual masking, suggesting that early neural responses to a visual stimulus can be decomposed in feedforward activations to-and feedback activations from-higher visual areas, correlating respectively with the actual presence of the stimulus and its conscious perception. We tested the compatibility between these neurophysiological models and the behavioural data obtained in near-threshold experiments. We recorded fast reaching movements directed to a highly visible target followed by a report of the presence of a near-threshold distractor presented either at low contrast without mask or at high contrast with a backward or forward mask. Analysis of hand trajectories revealed that deviations toward the distractor were observed in the no-mask condition when the distractor was present and reported, and when it was present but not reported in the backward and forward mask conditions, although the effect was weaker in the latter condition. These data reveal that the presence or absence of perception-action dissociations in behavioural studies are well accounted for by neurophysiological models of visual masking and that behavioural effects of near-threshold distractors cannot result merely from on a dichotomic visual system for perception and action.

  12. Sensitivity to masked conditioned stimuli predicts conditioned response magnitude under masked conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Echiverri, Aileen M.; Grillon, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Expression of conditioned fear has been reported to be independent of perceptual awareness of conditioned stimuli (CSs). Previous studies have been criticized, however, for not adequately assessing perceptual awareness. We fear-conditioned participants to one of two symbols and measured skin conductance responses to dichoptically masked and unmasked CSs. Participants also performed a target detection task and sensitivity (d′) to the masked conditioned stimuli (CS+, CS−) was measured. Results showed that sensitivity under masking conditions was related to conditioned responses to masked CSs but not unmasked CSs. Thus, a strong relationship between expression of conditioned fear and awareness of the CS+ emerges when the latter is assessed by signal detection methods. Without consensus on how awareness should be defined, these findings bring balance to previous studies that have typically used less sensitive assessments of awareness. PMID:17433097

  13. Disentangling neural processing of masked and masking stimulus by means of event-related contralateral - ipsilateral differences of EEG potentials.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the excellent temporal resolution of event-related EEG potentials (ERPs), the overlapping potentials evoked by masked and masking stimuli are hard to disentangle. However, when both masked and masking stimuli consist of pairs of relevant and irrelevant stimuli, one left and one right from fixation, with the side of the relevant element varying between pairs, effects of masked and masking stimuli can be distinguished by means of the contralateral preponderance of the potentials evoked by the relevant elements, because the relevant elements may independently change sides in masked and masking stimuli. Based on a reanalysis of data from which only selected contralateral-ipsilateral effects had been previously published, the present contribution will provide a more complete picture of the ERP effects in a masked-priming task. Indeed, effects evoked by masked primes and masking targets heavily overlapped in conventional ERPs and could be disentangled to a certain degree by contralateral-ipsilateral differences. Their major component, the N2pc, is interpreted as indicating preferential processing of stimuli matching the target template, which process can neither be identified with conscious perception nor with shifts of spatial attention. The measurements showed that the triggering of response preparation by the masked stimuli did not depend on their discriminability, and their priming effects on the processing of the following target stimuli were qualitatively different for stimulus identification and for response preparation. These results provide another piece of evidence for the independence of motor-related and perception-related effects of masked stimuli.

  14. Ocular barotrauma caused by mask squeeze during a scuba dive.

    PubMed

    Rudge, F W

    1994-07-01

    I describe the case of a 25-year-old man who, after a scuba dive, had ocular barotrauma caused by mask squeeze. As in most cases, the condition occurred because the patient failed to exhale into the mask during descent to equalize the pressure within the mask. Although alarming in appearance, the condition is generally mild and self-limited. Patients should be instructed in the proper technique of mask clearing before they return to diving to prevent a recurrence.

  15. A formal approach to discovering simultaneous additive masking between auditory medical alarms.

    PubMed

    Hasanain, Bassam; Boyd, Andrew D; Edworthy, Judy; Bolton, Matthew L

    2017-01-01

    The failure of humans to respond to auditory medical alarms has resulted in numerous patient injuries and deaths and is thus a major safety concern. A relatively understudied source of response failures has to do with simultaneous masking, a condition where concurrent sounds interact in ways that make one or more of them imperceptible due to physical limitations of human perception. This paper presents a method, which builds on a previous implementation, that uses a novel combination of psychophysical modeling and formal verification with model checking to detect masking in a modeled configuration of medical alarms. Specifically, the new method discussed here improves the original method by adding the ability to detect additive masking while concurrently improving method usability and scalability. This paper describes how these additions to our method were realized. It then demonstrates the scalability and detection improvements via three different case studies. Results and future research are discussed. PMID:27633247

  16. Serial robot for the trajectory optimization and error compensation of TMT mask exchange system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianping; Zhang, Feifan; Zhou, Zengxiang; Zhai, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Mask exchange system is the main part of Multi-Object Broadband Imaging Echellette (MOBIE) on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). According to the conception of the TMT mask exchange system, the pre-design was introduced in the paper which was based on IRB 140 robot. The stiffness model of IRB 140 in SolidWorks was analyzed under different gravity vectors for further error compensation. In order to find the right location and path planning, the robot and the mask cassette model was imported into MOBIE model to perform different schemes simulation. And obtained the initial installation position and routing. Based on these initial parameters, IRB 140 robot was operated to simulate the path and estimate the mask exchange time. Meanwhile, MATLAB and ADAMS software were used to perform simulation analysis and optimize the route to acquire the kinematics parameters and compare with the experiment results. After simulation and experimental research mentioned in the paper, the theoretical reference was acquired which could high efficient improve the structure of the mask exchange system parameters optimization of the path and precision of the robot position.

  17. On the Nature of Phonological Assembly: Evidence from Backward Masking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Conrad; Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2002-01-01

    Used backward masking paradigm to investigate nature and time course of phonological assembly. Two experiments examined to what extent phonological assembly is a serial process. One showed recognition rates in a backward masking task varied as a function of the serial position of phonemes that were shared between backward masks and target words;…

  18. Attributes of tinnitus and the acceptance of masking.

    PubMed

    Vernon, J; Griest, S; Press, L

    1990-01-01

    Various characteristics of tinnitus were surveyed to determine whether they were associated with the acceptance of masking, which is used as a relief procedure for tinnitus. The characteristics considered were duration, loudness match, minimum masking level, and residual inhibition. Data for the characteristics of tinnitus were obtained from the Tinnitus Data Registry at the Oregon Hearing Research Center, which contains information on 784 tinnitus patients. The acceptance of masking was determined by each individual patient based on actual tests with wearable masking units. Variations in the individual characteristics listed above were not found to be significantly associated with the acceptance of masking and thus should not be used a priori to deny patients the opportunity for possible relief of their tinnitus. A masking indicator was found to be significantly (P = .03) associated with the acceptance of masking. This masking indicator is obtained by subtracting the loudness match of the tinnitus from the minimum masking level. When the masking indicator was 10 dB or less, the acceptance of masking was in excess of 50%. The data presented may help to dispel some current misconceptions about the masking of tinnitus. PMID:2181884

  19. How color, regularity, and good Gestalt determine backward masking.

    PubMed

    Sayim, Bilge; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael

    2014-06-18

    The strength of visual backward masking depends on the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between target and mask. Recently, it was shown that the conjoint spatial layout of target and mask is as crucial as SOA. Particularly, masking strength depends on whether target and mask group with each other. The same is true in crowding where the global spatial layout of the flankers and target-flanker grouping determine crowding strength. Here, we presented a vernier target followed by different flanker configurations at varying SOAs. Similar to crowding, masking of a red vernier target was strongly reduced for arrays of 10 green compared with 10 red flanking lines. Unlike crowding, single green lines flanking the red vernier showed strong masking. Irregularly arranged flanking lines yielded stronger masking than did regularly arranged lines, again similar to crowding. While cuboid flankers reduced crowding compared with single lines, this was not the case in masking. We propose that, first, masking is reduced when the flankers are part of a larger spatial structure. Second, spatial factors counteract color differences between the target and the flankers. Third, complex Gestalts, such as cuboids, seem to need longer processing times to show ungrouping effects as observed in crowding. Strong parallels between masking and crowding suggest similar underlying mechanism; however, temporal factors in masking additionally modulate performance, acting as an additional grouping cue.

  20. How Does Target Duration Affect Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield; Guest, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is typically studied using a brief search display. The target item may be indicated by a cue/mask surrounding but not overlapping it. Report of the target is reduced when mask offset trails target offset rather than being simultaneous with it. We report 5 experiments investigating whether OSM can be obtained if…

  1. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  4. Does "Darkness" Lead to "Happiness"? Masked Suffix Priming Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunabeitia, Jon Andoni; Perea, Manuel; Carreiras, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Masked affix priming effects have usually been obtained for words sharing the initial affix (e.g., "reaction"-"REFORM"). However, prior evidence on masked suffix priming effects (e.g., "baker"-"WALKER") is inconclusive. In the present series of masked priming lexical decision experiments, a target word was briefly preceded by a morphologically or…

  5. Homophone Dominance Modulates the Phonemic-Masking Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berent, Iris; Van Orden, Guy C.

    2000-01-01

    Finds (1) positive phonemic-masking effects occurred for dominant homophones; (2) null phonemic-masking effects occurred for subordinate homophones; and (3) subordinate homophones were much more likely to be falsely identified as their dominant mate. Suggests the source of these null phonemic-masking is itself a phonology effect. Concludes…

  6. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  7. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  8. Temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during LIGA exposure.

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Aili

    2004-11-01

    Deep X-ray lithography on PMMA resist is used in the LIGA process. The resist is exposed to synchrotron X-rays through a patterned mask and then is developed in a liquid developer to make high aspect ratio microstructures. The limitations in dimensional accuracies of the LIGA generated microstructure originate from many sources, including synchrotron and X-ray physics, thermal and mechanical properties of mask and resist, and from the kinetics of the developer. This work addresses the thermal analysis and temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during exposure in air at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron. The concern is that dimensional errors generated at the mask and the resist due to thermal expansion will lower the accuracy of the lithography. We have developed a three-dimensional finite-element model of the mask and resist assembly that includes a mask with absorber, a resist with substrate, three metal holders, and a water-cooling block. We employed the LIGA exposure-development software LEX-D to calculate volumetric heat sources generated in the assembly by X-ray absorption and the commercial software ABAQUS to calculate heat transfer including thermal conduction inside the assembly, natural and forced convection, and thermal radiation. at assembly outer and/or inner surfaces. The calculations of assembly maximum temperature. have been compared with temperature measurements conducted at ALS. In some of these experiments, additional cooling of the assembly was produced by forced nitrogen flow ('nitrogen jets') directed at the mask surface. The temperature rise in the silicon mask and the mask holder comes directly from the X-ray absorption, but nitrogen jets carry away a significant portion of heat energy from the mask surface, while natural convection carries away negligibly small amounts energy from the holder. The temperature rise in PMMA resist is mainly from heat conducted from the silicon substrate backward to the resist and from the inner

  9. Multi-part mask for implanting workpieces

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.

    2016-05-10

    A multi-part mask has a pattern plate, which includes a planar portion that has the desired aperture pattern to be used during workpiece processing. The multi-part mask also has a mounting frame, which is used to hold the pattern plate. Prior to assembly, the pattern plate has an aligning portion, which has one or more holes through which reusable alignment pins are inserted. These alignment pins enter kinematic joints disposed on the mounting frame, which serve to precisely align the pattern plate to the mounting frame. After the pattern plate has been secured to the mounting frame, the aligning portion can be detached from the pattern plate. The alignment pins can be reused at a later time. In some embodiments, the pattern plate can later be removed from the mounting frame, so that the mounting frame may be reused.

  10. Tunable lithography masks using chiral nematic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon Su; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-03-01

    We present a facile route for pattern formation using chiral nematic fluids as tunable masks in lithography process. The chiral nematic phase prepared by adding a chiral dopant (CB15) to 5CB acted as a set of parallel cylindrical lenses and as a polarization selective photomask for the preparation of periodic line patterns. The pitch of the helical twist was easily controlled by the concentration of chiral agent and the feature size of the resulting pattern was easily tuned. Because of the high mobility of the small liquid crystalline compound, the preparation of chiral nematic fluids based lithography masks requires only a few seconds. This approach has significant advantages including facility, range of surface ordering, and rate of forming periodic arrays. Current affiliation: SK Innovation, Daejeon, Korea

  11. Informational masking of speech in dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Calcus, Axelle; Colin, Cécile; Deltenre, Paul; Kolinsky, Régine

    2015-06-01

    Studies evaluating speech perception in noise have reported inconsistent results regarding a potential deficit in dyslexic children. So far, most of them investigated energetic masking. The present study evaluated situations inducing mostly informational masking, which reflects cognitive interference induced by the masker. Dyslexic children were asked to identify a female target syllable presented in quiet, babble, unmodulated, and modulated speech-shaped noise. Whereas their performance was comparable to normal-reading children in quiet, it dropped significantly in all noisy conditions compared to age-, but not reading level-matched controls. Interestingly, noise affected similarly the reception of voicing, place, and manner of articulation in dyslexic and normal-reading children. PMID:26093461

  12. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  13. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  14. Masking in three-dimensional auditory displays.

    PubMed

    Doll, T J; Hanna, T E; Russotti, J S

    1992-06-01

    The extent to which simultaneous inputs in a three-dimensional (3D) auditory display mask one another was studied in a simulated sonar task. The minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to detect an amplitude-modulated 500-Hz tone in a background of broadband noise was measured using a loudspeaker array in a free field. Three aspects of the 3D array were varied: angular separation of the sources, degree of correlation of the background noises, and listener head movement. Masking was substantially reduced when the sources were uncorrelated. The SNR needed for detection decreased with source separation, and the rate of decrease was significantly greater with uncorrelated sources than with partially or fully correlated sources. Head movement had no effect on the SNR required for detection. Implications for the design and application of 3D auditory displays are discussed.

  15. Masked hypertension: A common but insidious presentation of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Donald W; Myers, Martin G; Bolli, Peter; Chockalingam, Arun

    2006-01-01

    A patient has masked hypertension when his office blood pressure is less than 140/90 mmHg but his ambulatory or home blood pressure readings are in the hypertensive range. Several recent studies have demonstrated that cardiovascular risk is similar between those with masked hypertension and those with sustained hypertension. The prevalence of masked hypertension in Canada is not known, but data from other countries suggest rates greater than 8%. Physicians need to use careful clinical judgment to identify and treat subjects with masked hypertension. The present review discusses masked hypertension, its importance to clinical practice and some aspects of patient management. PMID:16755318

  16. Numerically designed phase-mask for stellar coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Naoshi; Murakami, Naoshi; Miura, Noriaki; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-09-01

    Phase-mask coronagraph holds the ability to detect exoplanets very close to their parent star. We report a new kind of phase mask that performs the contrast ratio of more than the tenth power of 10 for a circular aperture with shades of a secondary mirror and spiders. The phase distribution of the phase mask is numerically obtained by making the leaked light distribute outside the transparent part of the pupil. We applied the hybrid input-output algorithm, one of phase retrieval methods, to find the phase distribution of the phase mask. We show the characteristics of thus obtained phase mask.

  17. Similar results for face mask versus mouthpiece during incremental exercise to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Dale R; Clark, Nicolas W

    2016-01-01

    Investigations in the 1990s evaluated the influence of breathing assemblies on respiratory variables at rest and during exercise; however, research on new models of breathing assemblies is lacking. This study compared metabolic gas analysis data from a mouthpiece with a noseclip (MOUTH) and a face mask (MASK). Volunteers (7 males, 7 females; 25.1 ± 2.7 years) completed two maximal treadmill tests within 1 week, one MOUTH and one MASK, in random order. The difference in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) between MOUTH (52.7 ± 11.3 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) and MASK (52.2 ± 11.7 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) was not significant (P = 0.53). Likewise, the mean MOUTH-MASK differences in minute ventilation (VE), fraction of expired oxygen (FEO2) and carbon dioxide (FECO2), respiration rate (RR), tidal volume (Vt), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) at maximal and submaximal intensities were not significant (P > 0.05). Furthermore, there was no systematic bias in the error scores (r = -0.13, P = 0.66), and 12 of the 14 participants had a VO2max difference of ≤3 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) between conditions. Finally, there was no clear participant preference for using the MOUTH or MASK. Selection of MOUTH or MASK will not affect the participant's gas exchange or breathing patterns. PMID:26238160

  18. The EOS CERES Global Cloud Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, T. A.; Welch, R. M.; Trepte, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Baum, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    To detect long-term climate trends, it is essential to produce long-term and consistent data sets from a variety of different satellite platforms. With current global cloud climatology data sets, such as the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment (ISCCP) or CLAVR (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), one of the first processing steps is to determine whether an imager pixel is obstructed between the satellite and the surface, i.e., determine a cloud 'mask.' A cloud mask is essential to studies monitoring changes over ocean, land, or snow-covered surfaces. As part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program, a series of platforms will be flown beginning in 1997 with the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and subsequently the EOS-AM and EOS-PM platforms in following years. The cloud imager on TRMM is the Visible/Infrared Sensor (VIRS), while the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is the imager on the EOS platforms. To be useful for long term studies, a cloud masking algorithm should produce consistent results between existing (AVHRR) data, and future VIRS and MODIS data. The present work outlines both existing and proposed approaches to detecting cloud using multispectral narrowband radiance data. Clouds generally are characterized by higher albedos and lower temperatures than the underlying surface. However, there are numerous conditions when this characterization is inappropriate, most notably over snow and ice of the cloud types, cirrus, stratocumulus and cumulus are the most difficult to detect. Other problems arise when analyzing data from sun-glint areas over oceans or lakes over deserts or over regions containing numerous fires and smoke. The cloud mask effort builds upon operational experience of several groups that will now be discussed.

  19. Mask Analysis Program (MAP) reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A document intended to serve as a User's Manual and a Programmer's Manual for the Mask Analysis Program is presented. The first portion of the document is devoted to the user. It contains all of the information required to execute MAP. The remainder of the document describes the details of MAP software logic. Although the information in this portion is not required to run the program, it is recommended that every user review it to gain an appreciation for the program functions.

  20. Mask-to-wafer alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Haney, Steven J.

    2003-11-04

    A modified beam splitter that has a hole pattern that is symmetric in one axis and anti-symmetric in the other can be employed in a mask-to-wafer alignment device. The device is particularly suited for rough alignment using visible light. The modified beam splitter transmits and reflects light from a source of electromagnetic radiation and it includes a substrate that has a first surface facing the source of electromagnetic radiation and second surface that is reflective of said electromagnetic radiation. The substrate defines a hole pattern about a central line of the substrate. In operation, an input beam from a camera is directed toward the modified beam splitter and the light from the camera that passes through the holes illuminates the reticle on the wafer. The light beam from the camera also projects an image of a corresponding reticle pattern that is formed on the mask surface of the that is positioned downstream from the camera. Alignment can be accomplished by detecting the radiation that is reflected from the second surface of the modified beam splitter since the reflected radiation contains both the image of the pattern from the mask and a corresponding pattern on the wafer.

  1. Envelope and intensity based prediction of psychoacoustic masking and speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Biberger, Thomas; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-08-01

    Human auditory perception and speech intelligibility have been successfully described based on the two concepts of spectral masking and amplitude modulation (AM) masking. The power-spectrum model (PSM) [Patterson and Moore (1986). Frequency Selectivity in Hearing, pp. 123-177] accounts for effects of spectral masking and critical bandwidth, while the envelope power-spectrum model (EPSM) [Ewert and Dau (2000). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196] has been successfully applied to AM masking and discrimination. Both models extract the long-term (envelope) power to calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Recently, the EPSM has been applied to speech intelligibility (SI) considering the short-term envelope SNR on various time scales (multi-resolution speech-based envelope power-spectrum model; mr-sEPSM) to account for SI in fluctuating noise [Jørgensen, Ewert, and Dau (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 436-446]. Here, a generalized auditory model is suggested combining the classical PSM and the mr-sEPSM to jointly account for psychoacoustics and speech intelligibility. The model was extended to consider the local AM depth in conditions with slowly varying signal levels, and the relative role of long-term and short-term SNR was assessed. The suggested generalized power-spectrum model is shown to account for a large variety of psychoacoustic data and to predict speech intelligibility in various types of background noise. PMID:27586734

  2. High Reading Skills Mask Dyslexia in Gifted Children.

    PubMed

    van Viersen, Sietske; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Slot, Esther M; de Bree, Elise H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with dyslexia, gifted children, gifted children with dyslexia). The test battery included measures of literacy (reading/spelling) and cognitive abilities related to literacy and language (phonological awareness [PA], rapid automatized naming [RAN], verbal short-term memory [VSTM], working memory [WM], grammar, and vocabulary). It was hypothesized that gifted children with dyslexia would outperform children with dyslexia on literacy tests. In addition, a core-deficit model including dyslexia-related weaknesses and a compensational model involving giftedness-related strengths were tested using Bayesian statistics to explain their reading/spelling performance. Gifted children with dyslexia performed on all literacy tests in between children with dyslexia and TD children. Their cognitive profile showed signs of weaknesses in PA and RAN and strengths in VSTM, WM, and language skills. Findings indicate that phonology is a risk factor for gifted children with dyslexia, but this is moderated by other skills such as WM, grammar, and vocabulary, providing opportunities for compensation of a cognitive deficit and masking of literacy difficulties.

  3. The narcissistic mask: an exploration of 'the defensive grandiosity hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justin; Hashmi, Amani Al; Chung, Man Cheung; Morgan, Keith; Lyons, Minna

    2013-05-01

    Narcissism has been conceptualized as involving attempts to defend against negative self-schemata (implicit negative beliefs about one's own self-worth). This idea has been termed the 'mask model of narcissism'. This study explores the mask model, examining the association between extreme narcissistic personality traits and performance on a task purported to assess the influence of negative self-schemata. Participants (n = 232) from the UK and the UAE completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and also performed an incidental learning task involving the surprise recall of self-referential adjectives (traits). A greater recall of negative adjectives was viewed as indicative of negative self-schemata. Looking at the sample as a whole, there were no associations between narcissistic traits and negative adjective recall. However, amongst those scoring in the upper quartile of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, narcissism scores were positively correlated with the recall of negative adjectives even after controlling for age and memory. Narcissism may reflect self-enhancement strategies rooted in negative self-beliefs. PMID:24343942

  4. Developing a Method to Mask Trees in Commercial Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Jain, D.; Karlekar, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    The US Army has an increasing focus on using automated remote sensing techniques with commercial multispectral imagery (MSI) to map urban and peri-urban agricultural and vegetative features; however, similar spectral profiles between trees (i.e., forest canopy) and other vegetation result in confusion between these cover classes. Established vegetation indices, like the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), are typically not effective in reliably differentiating between trees and other vegetation. Previous research in tree mapping has included integration of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) and LiDAR for tree detection and species identification, as well as the use of MSI to distinguish tree crowns from non-vegetated features. This project developed a straightforward method to model and also mask out trees from eight-band WorldView-2 (1.85 meter x 1.85 meter resolution at nadir) satellite imagery at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, MD spanning 2012 - 2015. The study site included tree cover, a range of agricultural and vegetative cover types, and urban features. The modeling method exploits the product of the red and red edge bands and defines accurate thresholds between trees and other land covers. Results show this method outperforms established vegetation indices including the NDVI, Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index, Normalized Difference Water Index, Simple Ratio, and Normalized Difference Red Edge Index in correctly masking trees while preserving the other information in the imagery. This method is useful when HSI and LiDAR collection are not possible or when using archived MSI.

  5. Challenges and requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Sinjeung; Lee, SookHyun; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Shin, In Kyun; Jeon, Chan Uk

    2015-07-01

    To overcome the resolution and throughput of current mask writer for advanced lithography technologies, the platform of e-beam writer have been evolved by the developments of hardware and software in writer. Especially, aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) for unprecedented extension of optical lithography and the needs of low sensitivity resist for high resolution result in the limit of variable shaped beam writer which is widely used for mass production. The multi-beam mask writer is attractive candidate for photomask writing of sub-10nm device because of its high speed and the large degree of freedom which enable high dose and dose modulation for each pixel. However, the higher dose and almost unlimited appetite for dose modulation challenge the mask data processing (MDP) in aspects of extreme data volume and correction method. Here, we discuss the requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer and presents new challenges of the data format, data flow, and correction method for user and supplier MDP tool.

  6. The masking of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) vocalizations by icebreaker noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbe, Christine

    1998-11-01

    This thesis examines the masking effect of underwater noise on beluga whale communication. As ocean water is greatly opaque for light but well conducting for sound, marine mammals rely primarily on their hearing for orientation and communication. Man-made underwater noise has the potential of interfering with sounds used by marine mammals. Masking to the point of incomprehensibility can have fatal results-for the individual, but ultimately for the entire species. As part of our understanding of whether marine mammals can cope with human impact on nature, this thesis is the first to study the interference of real ocean noises with complex animal vocalizations. At the Vancouver Aquarium, a beluga whale was trained for acoustic experiments, during which masked hearing thresholds were measured. Focus lay on noise created by icebreaking ships in the Arctic. As experiments with trained animals are time and cost expensive, various techniques were examined for their ability to model the whale's response. These were human hearing tests, visual spectrogram discrimination, matched filtering, spectrogram cross-correlation, critical band cross-correlation, adaptive filtering and various types of artificial neural networks. The most efficient method with respect to similarity to the whale's data and speed, was a backpropagation neural net. Masked hearing thresholds would be of little use if they could not be related to accessible quantities in the wild. An ocean sound propagation model was applied to determine critical distances between a noise source, a calling whale and a listening whale. Colour diagrams, called maskograms, were invented to illustrate zones of masking in the wild. Results are that bubbler system noise with a source level of 194 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m has a maximum radius of masking of 15 km in a 3- dimensional ocean. Propeller noise with a source level of 203 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m has a maximum radius of masking of 22 km. A naturally occurring icecracking event

  7. Developing a cloud mask climatology covering two Meteosat satellite generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, Rebekka; Stöckli, Reto; Liniger, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Long term cloud cover observations from satellites are fundamental for climate model validation and climate monitoring. Further, they support ground-based observations in regions with sparse coverage. Additionally, information on cloud cover is needed to derive other physical parameters such as surface radiation fluxes or clear sky and cloudy atmospheric states and is of high relevance for the solar energy sector. Within the current project phase of the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) an algorithm to calculate a climatological cloud mask (or cloud cover probability) from Meteosat satellites is developed. The algorithm shall be applicable for both Meteosat first generation (1983-2005) and Meteosat second generation (2004-present) which significantly differ in their spectral properties. The algorithm linearly aggregates a set of continuous scores instead of the commonly used decision tree approach. The scores are calculated for different channels as well as different spatial and temporal settings. Each score yields a probability for the pixel's cloud cover. The final result, the cloud cover probability, is obtained by combining all available scores taking into account the varying performance of the scores during day and night and over snow. The uncertainty of the final cloud cover estimate is an inherent part of the probability. The algorithm is calibrated using cloud cover measurements from SYNOP stations located on the Meteosat disc. The subsequent validation is done at an independent set of collocated SYNOP/ARSA (Automated Radiosonde Archive) stations. The presentation introduces the applied cloud mask algorithm and presents the results of the validation for both satellite generations. The comparison of the two satellite generations addresses the climatological homogeneity of the future cloud mask climate data record which will be distributed by CM SAF after 2016. Special attention is also drawn to issues like the day-night-bias of

  8. The effect of spatial competition between object-level representations of target and mask on object substitution masking.

    PubMed

    Guest, Duncan; Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael

    2011-11-01

    One of the processes determining object substitution masking (OSM) is thought to be the spatial competition between independent object file representations of the target and mask (e.g., Kahan & Lichtman, 2006). In a series of experiments, we further examined how OSM is influenced by this spatial competition by manipulating the overlap between the surfaces created by the modal completion of the target (an outline square with a gap in one of its sides) and the mask (a four-dot mask). The results of these experiments demonstrate that increasing the spatial overlap between the surfaces of the target and mask increases OSM. Importantly, this effect is not caused by the mask interfering with the processing of the target features it overlaps. Overall, the data indicate, consistent with Kahan and Lichtman, that OSM can arise through competition between independent target and mask representations.

  9. Double-sided structured mask for sub-micron resolution proximity i-line mask-aligner lithography.

    PubMed

    Bourgin, Yannick; Siefke, Thomas; Käsebier, Thomas; Genevée, Pascal; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Zeitner, Uwe D

    2015-06-29

    Diffractive mask-aligner lithography allows printing structures that have a sub-micrometer resolution by using non-contact mode. For such a purpose, masks are often designed to operate with monochromatic linearly polarized light, which is obtained by placing a spectral filter and a polarizer in the beam path. We propose here a mask design that includes a wire-grid polarizer (WGP) on the top side of a photo-mask and a diffractive element on the bottom one to print a 350 nm period grating by using a classical mask-aligner in proximity exposure mode. Linearly polarizing locally an unpolarized incident beam is only possible by using a WGP on the top side of the mask. This configuration opens the possibility to use different linear polarization orientation on a single mask and allows to print high resolution structures with different orientation within one exposure.

  10. Laboratory demonstration of an optical vortex mask coronagraph using photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, N.; Baba, N.; Ise, A.; Sakamoto, M.; Oka, K.

    2010-10-01

    Photonic crystal, artificial periodic nanostructure, is an attractive device for constructing focal-plane phase-mask coronagraphs such as segmented phase masks (four-quadrant, eight-octant, and 4N-segmented ones) and an optical vortex mask (OVM), because of its extremely small manufacturing defect. Recently, speckle-noise limited contrast has been demonstrated for two monochromatic lasers by using the eight-octant phase-mask made of the photonic crystal (Murakami et al. 2010, ApJ, 714, 772). We applied the photonic-crystal device to the OVM coronagraph. The OVM is more advantageous over the segmented phase masks because it does not have discontinuities other than a central singular point and provides a full on-sky field of view. For generating an achromatic optical vortex, we manufactured an axially-symmetric half-wave plate (ASHWP). It is expected that a size of the manufacturing defect due to the central singularity is an order of several hundreds nanometers. The ASHWP is placed between two circular polarizers for modulating a Pancharatnam phase. A continuous spiral phase modulation is then implemented achromatically. We carried out preliminary laboratory demonstration of the OVM coronagraph using two monochromatic lasers as a model star (wavelengths of 532 nm and 633 nm). We report a principle of the achromatic optical-vortex generation, and results of the laboratory demonstration of the OVM coronagraph.

  11. Feedforward and Feedback Control in Apraxia of Speech: Effects of Noise Masking on Vowel Production

    PubMed Central

    Mailend, Marja-Liisa; Guenther, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to test two hypotheses about apraxia of speech (AOS) derived from the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA) model (Guenther et al., 2006): the feedforward system deficit hypothesis and the feedback system deficit hypothesis. Method The authors used noise masking to minimize auditory feedback during speech. Six speakers with AOS and aphasia, 4 with aphasia without AOS, and 2 groups of speakers without impairment (younger and older adults) participated. Acoustic measures of vowel contrast, variability, and duration were analyzed. Results Younger, but not older, speakers without impairment showed significantly reduced vowel contrast with noise masking. Relative to older controls, the AOS group showed longer vowel durations overall (regardless of masking condition) and a greater reduction in vowel contrast under masking conditions. There were no significant differences in variability. Three of the 6 speakers with AOS demonstrated the group pattern. Speakers with aphasia without AOS did not differ from controls in contrast, duration, or variability. Conclusion The greater reduction in vowel contrast with masking noise for the AOS group is consistent with the feedforward system deficit hypothesis but not with the feedback system deficit hypothesis; however, effects were small and not present in all individual speakers with AOS. Theoretical implications and alternative interpretations of these findings are discussed. PMID:25565143

  12. The masked priming toolbox: an open-source MATLAB toolbox for masked priming researchers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew D; Tresilian, James; Schlaghecken, Friederike

    2011-03-01

    The Masked Priming Toolbox is an open-source collection of MATLAB functions that utilizes the free third-party PsychToolbox-3 (PTB3: Brainard, Spatial Vision, 10, 433-436, 1997; Kleiner, Brainard & Pelli, Perception, 36, 2007; Pelli, Spatial Vision, 10, 437-442, 1997). It is designed to allow a researcher to run masked (and unmasked) priming experiments using a variety of response devices (including keyboards, graphics tablets and force transducers). Very little knowledge of MATLAB is required; experiments are generated by creating a text file with the required parameters, and raw and analyzed data are output to Excel (as well as MATLAB) files for further analysis. The toolbox implements a variety of stimuli for use as primes and targets, as well as a variety of masks. Timing, size, location, and orientation of stimuli are all parameterizable. The code is open-source and made available on the Web under a Creative Commons License.

  13. Aerial imaging study of the mask-induced line-width roughness of EUV lithography masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdyla, Antoine; Donoghue, Alexander; Benk, Markus P.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography uses reflective photomasks to print features on a wafer through the formation of an aerial image. The aerial image is influenced by the mask's substrate and pattern roughness and by photon shot noise, which collectively affect the line-width on wafer prints, with an impact on local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). We have used SHARP, an actinic mask-imaging microscope, to study line-width roughness (LWR) in aerial images at sub-nanometer resolution. We studied the impact of photon density and the illumination partial coherence on recorded images, and found that at low coherence settings, the line-width roughness is dominated by photon noise, while at high coherence setting, the effect of speckle becomes more prominent, dominating photon noise for exposure levels of 4 photons/nm2 at threshold on the mask size.

  14. Binaural release from informational masking in a speech identification task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallun, Frederick J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2005-09-01

    Binaural release from informational masking (IM) was examined in a speech identification task. Target and masker sentences were processed into mutually exclusive frequency bands, thus limiting energetic masking (EM), and presented over headphones. In a baseline condition, both were presented monotically to the same ear (TmMm). Despite minimal frequency overlap between target and masker, the presence of the masker resulted in reduced performance, or IM. Presenting the target monotically and the masker diotically (TmM0) resulted in a release from IM. Release was also obtained by imposing interaural differences in level (ILDs) and in time (ITDs) on the maskers (TmMILD,TmMITD). Any masker with a perceived lateral position that differed from that of a truly monaural stimulus resulted in a similar amount of release from IM relative to TmMm. For binaural targets and maskers (T0MILD,T0MITD), release was seen whenever ITDs or ILDs differed between target and masker. These results suggest that binaural cues can be very effective in reducing IM. Because mechanisms based on differences in perceived location make predictions that are similar to those of nonlocation-based binaural mechanisms, a variant of the equalization-cancellation model is also considered.

  15. Noise masking of S-cone increments and decrements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanhong; Richters, David P.; Eskew, Rhea T.

    2014-01-01

    S-cone increment and decrement detection thresholds were measured in the presence of bipolar, dynamic noise masks. Noise chromaticities were the L-, M-, and S-cone directions, as well as L−M, L+M, and achromatic (L+M+S) directions. Noise contrast power was varied to measure threshold Energy versus Noise (EvN) functions. S+ and S− thresholds were similarly, and weakly, raised by achromatic noise. However, S+ thresholds were much more elevated by S, L+M, L–M, L- and M-cone noises than were S− thresholds, even though the noises consisted of two symmetric chromatic polarities of equal contrast power. A linear cone combination model accounts for the overall pattern of masking of a single test polarity well. L and M cones have opposite signs in their effects upon raising S+ and S− thresholds. The results strongly indicate that the psychophysical mechanisms responsible for S+ and S− detection, presumably based on S-ON and S-OFF pathways, are distinct, unipolar mechanisms, and that they have different spatiotemporal sampling characteristics, or contrast gains, or both. PMID:25391300

  16. Penetration of diesel exhaust particles through commercially available dust half masks.

    PubMed

    Penconek, Agata; Drążyk, Paulina; Moskal, Arkadiusz

    2013-04-01

    Half masks are certified by the competent, national institutions--National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the USA and the respective European national institutions applying common European regulations. However, certification testing is conducted with particles of NaCl, paraffin oil, or dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and at the constant flow rate, whereas particles commonly found in workplaces may differ in size, shape, and morphology from these particles. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate filtration efficiency of commercially available filtering facepiece half masks under the condition of exposure to diesel fumes. In this study, we focused on the particulate phase [diesel exhaust particles (DEP)] of three (petroleum diesel, ecodiesel, and biodiesel) diesel fuel combustion types. Two types of European standard-certified half masks, FFP2 and FFP - Filtering Facepiece, and three types of popular diesel fuels were tested. The study showed that the filtration efficiencies for each examined half mask and for each of diesel exhaust fumes were lower than the minimum filtration efficiency required for the standard test aerosols by the European standards. For FFP2 and FFP3 particulate half masks, standard minimum filtration efficiency is 94 and 99%, respectively, whereas 84-89% of mass of DEP from various fuels were filtered by the tested FFP2 and only 75-86% by the FFP3. The study indicated that DEP is more penetrating for these filters than the standard salt or paraffin oil test aerosols. The study also showed that the most penetrating DEP are probably in the 30- to 300-nm size range, regardless of the fuel type and the half-mask model. Finally, the pressure drops across both half masks during the 80-min tests remained below an acceptable maximum of breathing resistance-regardless of the fuel types. The respiratory system, during 40-min test exposures, may be exposed to 12-16mg of DEP if a FFP2 or FFP3 particulate half mask is used. To

  17. Actinic imaging and evaluation of phase structures on EUV lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth; Huh, Sungmin

    2010-09-28

    The authors describe the implementation of a phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct phase and complex amplitude of structures on EUV lithography masks. Many native defects commonly found on EUV reticles are difficult to detect and review accurately because they have a strong phase component. Understanding the complex amplitude of mask features is essential for predictive modeling of defect printability and defect repair. Besides printing in a stepper, the most accurate way to characterize such defects is with actinic inspection, performed at the design, EUV wavelength. Phase defect and phase structures show a distinct through-focus behavior that enables qualitative evaluation of the object phase from two or more high-resolution intensity measurements. For the first time, phase of structures and defects on EUV masks were quantitatively reconstructed based on aerial image measurements, using a modified version of a phase-retrieval algorithm developed to test optical phase shifting reticles.

  18. A challenging dissociation in masked identity priming with the lexical decision task.

    PubMed

    Perea, Manuel; Jiménez, María; Gómez, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The masked priming technique has been used extensively to explore the early stages of visual-word recognition. One key phenomenon in masked priming lexical decision is that identity priming is robust for words, whereas it is small/unreliable for nonwords. This dissociation has usually been explained on the basis that masked priming effects are lexical in nature, and hence there should not be an identity prime facilitation for nonwords. We present two experiments whose results are at odds with the assumption made by models that postulate that identity priming is purely lexical, and also challenge the assumption that word and nonword responses are based on the same information. Our experiments revealed that for nonwords, but not for words, matched-case identity PRIME-TARGET pairs were responded to faster than mismatched-case identity prime-TARGET pairs, and this phenomenon was not modulated by the lowercase/uppercase feature similarity of the stimuli. PMID:24525167

  19. A challenging dissociation in masked identity priming with the lexical decision task.

    PubMed

    Perea, Manuel; Jiménez, María; Gómez, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The masked priming technique has been used extensively to explore the early stages of visual-word recognition. One key phenomenon in masked priming lexical decision is that identity priming is robust for words, whereas it is small/unreliable for nonwords. This dissociation has usually been explained on the basis that masked priming effects are lexical in nature, and hence there should not be an identity prime facilitation for nonwords. We present two experiments whose results are at odds with the assumption made by models that postulate that identity priming is purely lexical, and also challenge the assumption that word and nonword responses are based on the same information. Our experiments revealed that for nonwords, but not for words, matched-case identity PRIME-TARGET pairs were responded to faster than mismatched-case identity prime-TARGET pairs, and this phenomenon was not modulated by the lowercase/uppercase feature similarity of the stimuli.

  20. Masking LED hot spots in a thin direct lit backlight unit using semitransparent and perforated masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ramachandra; Mos, Barry; Overes, Theo; Langendijk, Erno H. A.

    2014-03-01

    As the demand for thin displays with more features accelerates, the need for backlight systems to become thinner and capable of multiple features increases. Direct lit concepts supporting 2-D dimming provide higher contrast ratios. However masking led hot spots with thinner backlight thicknesses is yet a significant design challenge. Efficient light coupling and recycling mechanisms in combination with relatively high optical efficiencies are key parameters in overall system design. We demonstrate an optimal masking design of the led hot spot for a thin light guide plate in the direct lit architecture. The overall concept system is simulated and prototyped. The resultant performance is discussed.

  1. Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

  2. Strategy optimization for mask rule check in wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, Shaina; Lin, Roger; Wang, Alice; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Photolithography process is getting more and more sophisticated for wafer production following Moore's law. Therefore, for wafer fab, consolidated and close cooperation with mask house is a key to achieve silicon wafer success. However, generally speaking, it is not easy to preserve such partnership because many engineering efforts and frequent communication are indispensable. The inattentive connection is obvious in mask rule check (MRC). Mask houses will do their own MRC at job deck stage, but the checking is only for identification of mask process limitation including writing, etching, inspection, metrology, etc. No further checking in terms of wafer process concerned mask data errors will be implemented after data files of whole mask are composed in mask house. There are still many potential data errors even post-OPC verification has been done for main circuits. What mentioned here are the kinds of errors which will only occur as main circuits combined with frame and dummy patterns to form whole reticle. Therefore, strategy optimization is on-going in UMC to evaluate MRC especially for wafer fab concerned errors. The prerequisite is that no impact on mask delivery cycle time even adding this extra checking. A full-mask checking based on job deck in gds or oasis format is necessary in order to secure acceptable run time. Form of the summarized error report generated by this checking is also crucial because user friendly interface will shorten engineers' judgment time to release mask for writing. This paper will survey the key factors of MRC in wafer fab.

  3. Simulation of the polarization effects induced by the bilayer absorber alternating phase-shift mask in conical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Ke

    2013-09-01

    Hyper numerical aperture (NA) and off-axis illumination enable extension of ArF lithography for 45 nm technology node and beyond. Also, rigorous electromagnetic field modeling is taken into account for the optical and topographical properties of the mask. A rigorous three-dimensional mask model for bilayer absorber alternating phase shift mask (AltPSM) with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is established. First, the harmonic waves are expanded based on the least common multiple of the periods in order to model the diffraction of multiple grating layers with different periods. Second, Lalanne's formulation is used to improve the convergence of RCWA for multiple grating layers in conical diffraction. Third, the enhanced transmittance matrix approach is also extended to conical diffraction to avoid the numerical instability. Given the chromium oxide/chromium AltPSM, the change of polarization state as a function of mask and incident light properties is investigated. When the linewidth is below 30 nm, the mask acts as a transverse magnetic field polarizer, which is not preferred in terms of image quality, so the mask-induced polarization effects must be considered in the hyper NA lithography.

  4. Generic hierarchical engine for mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalus, Christian K.; Roessl, Wolfgang; Schnitker, Uwe; Simecek, Michal

    2002-07-01

    Electronic layouts are usually flattened on their path from the hierarchical source downstream to the wafer. Mask data preparation has certainly been identified as a severe bottleneck since long. Data volumes are not only doubling every year along the ITRS roadmap. With the advent of optical proximity correction and phase-shifting masks data volumes are escalating up to non-manageable heights. Hierarchical treatment is one of the most powerful means to keep memory and CPU consumption in reasonable ranges. Only recently, however, has this technique acquired more public attention. Mask data preparation is the most critical area calling for a sound infrastructure to reduce the handling problem. Gaining more and more attention though, are other applications such as large area simulation and manufacturing rule checking (MRC). They all would profit from a generic engine capable to efficiently treat hierarchical data. In this paper we will present a generic engine for hierarchical treatment which solves the major problem, steady transitions along cell borders. Several alternatives exist how to walk through the hierarchy tree. They have, to date, not been thoroughly investigated. One is a bottom-up attempt to treat cells starting with the most elementary cells. The other one is a top-down approach which lends itself to creating a new hierarchy tree. In addition, since the variety, degree of hierarchy and quality of layouts extends over a wide range a generic engine has to take intelligent decisions when exploding the hierarchy tree. Several applications will be shown, in particular how far the limits can be pushed with the current hierarchical engine.

  5. A novel approach to mask defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiv, Amir; Shirman, Yuri; Mangan, Shmoolik

    2008-10-01

    Memory chips, now constituting a major part of semiconductor market, posit a special challenge for inspection, as they are generally produced with the smallest half-pitch available with today's technology. This is true, in particular, to photomasks of advanced memory devices, which are at the forefront of the "low-k1" regime. In this paper we present a novel photomask inspection approach, that is particularly suitable for low-k1 layers of advanced memory chips, owing to their typical dense and periodic structure. The method we present can produce a very strong signal for small mask defects, by suppression of the modulation of the pattern's image. Unlike dark-field detection, however, here a single diffraction order associated with the pattern generates a constant "gray" background image, that is used for signal enhancement. We define the theoretical basis for the new detection technique, and show, both analytically and numerically, that it can easily achieve a detection line past the printability spec, and that in cases it is at least as sensitive as high-resolution based detection. We also demonstrate this claim experimentally on a customer mask, using the platform of Applied Material's newly released Aera2TM mask inspection tool. The high sensitivity demonstrates the important and often overlooked concept that resolution is not synonymous with sensitivity. The novel detection method is advantageous in several other aspects, such as the very simple implementation, the high throughput, and the relatively simple pre- and post-processing algorithms required for signal extraction. These features, and in particular the very high sensitivity, make this novel detection method an attractive inspection option for advanced memory devices.

  6. Simple method for decreasing wafer topography effect for implant mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Taejun; Lee, Taehyeong; Yoo, Gyun; Park, Youngjoon; Kim, Cheolkyun; Yim, Donggyu

    2016-03-01

    Controlling critical dimension (CD) of implant blocking layers during photolithography has been challenging due to reflection caused by wafer topography. Unexpected reflection which comes from wafer topography makes severe CD variation on mask patterns of implant layer. Using bottom antireflective coatings(BARCs) can reduce the topography effect, but it could also damage wafer surface during BARCs dry etching. Developable BARCs(D-BARCs) could be alternative solution for wafer topography effect. However there are some issues that should be considered in D-BARCs process such as sensitive temperature control and managing defects. There are also papers introducing model based topography aware OPC as a solution for wafer topography effect implant layer. But building topography aware OPC model is very complex and it takes too much time to build. In this paper, we will introduce experimental results of wafer topography effect using various test patterns and propose a simple method that could effectively reduce wafer topography effect.

  7. Crowding is unlike ordinary masking: distinguishing feature integration from detection.

    PubMed

    Pelli, Denis G; Palomares, Melanie; Majaj, Najib J

    2004-12-30

    A letter in the peripheral visual field is much harder to identify in the presence of nearby letters. This is "crowding." Both crowding and ordinary masking are special cases of "masking," which, in general, refers to any effect of a "mask" pattern on the discriminability of a signal. Here we characterize crowding, and propose a diagnostic test to distinguish it from ordinary masking. In ordinary masking, the signal disappears. In crowding, it remains visible, but is ambiguous, jumbled with its neighbors. Masks are usually effective only if they overlap the signal, but the crowding effect extends over a large region. The width of that region is proportional to signal eccentricity from the fovea and independent of signal size, mask size, mask contrast, signal and mask font, and number of masks. At 4 deg eccentricity, the threshold contrast for identification of a 0.32 deg signal letter is elevated (up to six-fold) by mask letters anywhere in a 2.3 deg region, 7 times wider than the signal. In ordinary masking, threshold contrast rises as a power function of mask contrast, with a shallow log-log slope of 0.5 to 1, whereas, in crowding, threshold is a sigmoidal function of mask contrast, with a steep log-log slope of 2 at close spacing. Most remarkably, although the threshold elevation decreases exponentially with spacing, the threshold and saturation contrasts of crowding are independent of spacing. Finally, ordinary masking is similar for detection and identification, but crowding occurs only for identification, not detection. More precisely, crowding occurs only in tasks that cannot be done based on a single detection by coarsely coded feature detectors. These results (and observers' introspections) suggest that ordinary masking blocks feature detection, so the signal disappears, while crowding (like "illusory conjunction") is excessive feature integration - detected features are integrated over an inappropriately large area because there are no smaller integration

  8. Feedforward and Feedback Control in Apraxia of Speech: Effects of Noise Masking on Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Edwin; Mailend, Marja-Liisa; Guenther, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to test two hypotheses about apraxia of speech (AOS) derived from the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA) model (Guenther et al., 2006): the feedforward system deficit hypothesis and the feedback system deficit hypothesis. Method: The authors used noise masking to minimize auditory feedback during…

  9. The influence of feature sidewall tolerance on minimum absorber thickness for LIGA x-ray masks

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; J. M. Hruby; A. Ting

    1999-02-01

    Minimizing mask absorber thickness is an important practical concern in producing very small features by the LIGA process. To assist in this minimization, the authors have developed coupled numerical models describing both the exposure and development of a thick PMMA resist. The exposure model addresses multi-wavelength, one-dimensional x-ray transmission through multiple beam filters, through the mask substrate and absorber, and the subsequent attenuation and photon absorption in the PMMA resist. The development model describes one-dimensional dissolution of a feature and its sidewalls, taking into account the variation in absorbed dose through the PMMA thickness. These exposure and development models are coupled in a single interactive code, permitting the automated adjustment of mask absorber thickness to yield a prescribed sidewall taper or dissolution distance. They have used this tool to compute the minimum required absorber thickness yielding a prescribed sidewall tolerance for exposures performed at the ALS, SSRL and NSLS synchrotron sources. Results are presented as a function of the absorbed dose for a range of the prescribed sidewall tolerance, feature size, PMMA thickness, mask substrate thickness and the development temperature.

  10. Fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We establish a generalization of the fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics. We introduce a partial entropy production with a subset of all possible transitions, and show that the partial entropy production satisfies the integral fluctuation theorem. Our result reveals the fundamental properties of a broad class of autonomous as well as nonautonomous nanomachines. In particular, our result gives a unified fluctuation theorem for both autonomous and nonautonomous Maxwell's demons, where mutual information plays a crucial role. Furthermore, we derive a fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates nonequilibrium stationary current to two kinds of equilibrium fluctuations. PMID:25679593

  11. Fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We establish a generalization of the fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics. We introduce a partial entropy production with a subset of all possible transitions, and show that the partial entropy production satisfies the integral fluctuation theorem. Our result reveals the fundamental properties of a broad class of autonomous as well as nonautonomous nanomachines. In particular, our result gives a unified fluctuation theorem for both autonomous and nonautonomous Maxwell's demons, where mutual information plays a crucial role. Furthermore, we derive a fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates nonequilibrium stationary current to two kinds of equilibrium fluctuations.

  12. Defectivity and particle reduction for mask life extension, and imprint mask replication for high-volume semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, Keiji; Sakai, Fumio; Sato, Chiaki; Takabayashi, Yukio; Nakano, Hitoshi; Takabayashi, Tsuneo; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Hattori, Tadashi; Hiura, Mitsuru; Ando, Toshiaki; Kawanobe, Yoshio; Azuma, Hisanobu; Iwanaga, Takehiko; Choi, Jin; Aghili, Ali; Jones, Chris; Irving, J. W.; Fletcher, Brian; Ye, Zhengmao

    2016-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. Criteria specific to any lithographic process for the semiconductor industry include overlay, throughput and defectivity. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technology advancements made in the reduction of particle adders in an imprint tool and introduce the new mask replication tool that will enable the fabrication of replica masks with added residual image placement errors suitable for memory devices with half pitches smaller than 15nm. Hard particles on a wafer or mask create the possibility of creating a permanent defect on the mask that can impact device yield and mask life. By using material methods to reduce particle shedding and by introducing an air curtain system, test stand results demonstrate the potential for extending mask life to better than 1000 wafers. Additionally, a new replication tool, the FPA-1100 NR2 is introduced. Mask chuck flatness simulation results were also performed and demonstrate that residual image placement errors can be reduced to as little as 1nm.

  13. Masked repetition priming and proportion effects under cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Glen E; Stalinski, Stephanie M

    2008-06-01

    The authors used a cognitive load manipulation (rehearsing a string of digits during the trial) to test the automaticity of (a) masked repetition priming and (b) the masked repetition proportion (RP) effect (i.e., greater priming when the proportion of repetition-prime trials is higher) in the lexical decision task. The RP (.2 vs. .8) was varied across blocks. Masked priming was not reduced under load compared with a no-load group. Surprisingly, only the load group showed an RP effect in response latencies, although the no-load group showed an RP effect in the error rates. Our results show that masked priming is automatic, yet the influence of masked primes can nonetheless be adjusted at an unconscious level. Implications for accounts of masked priming are discussed. PMID:18572990

  14. Focal Plane Phase Masks for PIAA: Design and Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, K.; Conway, J.; Belikov, R.; Guyon, O.

    2016-05-01

    The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) is a coronagraph architecture for the direct detection of extrasolar planets, which can achieve close to the theoretical performance limit of any direct detection system. The primary components of a PIAACMC system are the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) optics and the complex phase-shifting focal plane mask. PIAA optics have been produced and demonstrated with high coronagraph performance. In this paper, we describe the design process for the phase-shifting focal plane mask, and strategies for smoothing the mask profile. We describe the mask manufacturing process and show manufacturing results. Errors in the fabricated mask profile degrade the system performance, but we can recover performance by refining the manufacturing process and implementing wavefront control.

  15. Face mask ventilation--the dos and don'ts.

    PubMed

    Wood, Fiona E; Morley, Colin J

    2013-12-01

    Face mask ventilation provides respiratory support to newly born or sick infants. It is a challenging technique and difficult to ensure that an appropriate tidal volume is delivered because large and variable leaks occur between the mask and face; airway obstruction may also occur. Technique is more important than the mask shape although the size must appropriately fit the face. The essence of the technique is to roll the mask on to the face from the chin while avoiding the eyes, with a finger and thumb apply a strong even downward pressure to the top of the mask, away from the stem and sloped sides or skirt of the mask, place the other fingers under the jaw and apply a similar upward pressure. Preterm infants require continuous end-expiratory pressure to facilitate lung aeration and maintain lung volume. This is best done with a T-piece device, not a self-inflating or flow-inflating bag.

  16. On the relations between crowding and visual masking.

    PubMed

    Huckauf, Anke; Heller, Dieter

    2004-05-01

    To study the question of which processes contribute to crowding and whether these are comparable to those of visual temporal masking, we varied the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between target and flankers in a crowding setting. Monotonically increasing Type A masking functions observedfor small spacings and large eccentricities indicate that the integration of information from target and flankers underlies crowding. Decreasing masking functions obtained for large spacings and small eccentricities relate processes of crowding to those contributing to Type B masking. In addition, Type B masking was more frequent with letter-like nonletter flankers than with letter flankers, suggesting that Type B masking, just like crowding over large areas, is due to higher level interactions. The rapid decrease of the effects of interletter spacing and eccentricity with increasing SOA indicates that positional information is transient.

  17. Constellation-masked secure communication technique for OFDM-PON.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun; Yu, Jianjun

    2012-10-22

    This paper proposes a novel secure communication technique using constellation masking for applications in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing passive optical network (OFDM-PON). The constellation masking is applied both on each subcarrier and among different subcarriers. The Arnold mapping is utilized as the parameter function for the mask factors. A interleave length is employed to provide a scalable masking granularity for different ONUs. A 15.54 Gb/s constellation-masked 32QAM-OFDM signal has been successfully transmitted over 25-km single mode fiber in the experiment. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can effectively protect the system from illegal ONU without wasting the bandwidth. The constellation-masked technique suggests an effective solution for the physical secure communication in future OFDM access network.

  18. EUV mask surface cleaning effects on lithography process performance

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Baclea-an, Lorie Mae; Naulleau, Patrick; Chen, Robert J.; Liang, Ted

    2010-06-18

    The reflective, multilayer based, mask architectures for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are highly susceptible to surface oxidation and contamination. As a result, EUV masks are expected to undergo cleaning processes in order to maintain the lifetimes necessary for high volume manufacturing. For this study, the impact of repetitive cleaning of EUV masks on imaging performance was evaluated. Two, high quality industry standard, EUV masks are used for this study with one of the masks undergoing repeated cleaning and the other one kept as a reference. Lithographic performance, in terms of process window analysis and line edge roughness, was monitored after every two cleans and compared to the reference mask performance. After 8x clean, minimal degradation is observed. The cleaning cycles will be continued until significant loss imaging fidelity is found.

  19. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  20. OSIRIS Multi-Object Spectroscopy: Mask Design Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Velarde, G.; García-Alvarez, D.; Cabrerra-Lavers, A.

    2016-10-01

    The OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging and Low-Intermediate Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy) instrument at the 10.4 m GTC has offered a multi-object spectroscopic mode since March 2014. In this paper we describe the detailed process of designing a MOS mask for OSIRIS by using the Mask Designer Tool, and give some numbers on the accuracy of the mask manufacture achievable at the telescope for its scientific use.

  1. Evidence for differential modulation of primary and nonprimary auditory cortex by forward masking in tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Larry E; Bosnyak, Daniel J; Bruce, Ian C; Gander, Phillip E; Paul, Brandon T

    2015-09-01

    It has been proposed that tinnitus is generated by aberrant neural activity that develops among neurons in tonotopic of regions of primary auditory cortex (A1) affected by hearing loss, which is also the frequency region where tinnitus percepts localize (Eggermont and Roberts 2004; Roberts et al., 2010, 2013). These models suggest (1) that differences between tinnitus and control groups of similar age and audiometric function should depend on whether A1 is probed in tinnitus frequency region (TFR) or below it, and (2) that brain responses evoked from A1 should track changes in the tinnitus percept when residual inhibition (RI) is induced by forward masking. We tested these predictions by measuring (128-channel EEG) the sound-evoked 40-Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR) known to localize tonotopically to neural sources in A1. For comparison the N1 transient response localizing to distributed neural sources in nonprimary cortex (A2) was also studied. When tested under baseline conditions where tinnitus subjects would have heard their tinnitus, ASSR responses were larger in a tinnitus group than in controls when evoked by 500 Hz probes while the reverse was true for tinnitus and control groups tested with 5 kHz probes, confirming frequency-dependent group differences in this measure. On subsequent trials where RI was induced by masking (narrow band noise centered at 5 kHz), ASSR amplitude increased in the tinnitus group probed at 5 kHz but not in the tinnitus group probed at 500 Hz. When collapsed into a single sample tinnitus subjects reporting comparatively greater RI depth and duration showed comparatively larger ASSR increases after masking regardless of probe frequency. Effects of masking on ASSR amplitude in the control groups were completely reversed from those in the tinnitus groups, with no change seen to 5 kHz probes but ASSR increases to 500 Hz probes even though the masking sound contained no energy at 500 Hz (an "off-frequency" masking

  2. Tachistoscopic illumination and masking of real scenes

    PubMed Central

    Chichka, David; Philbeck, John W.; Gajewski, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Tachistoscopic presentation of scenes has been valuable for studying the emerging properties of visual scene representations. The spatial aspects of this work have generally been focused on the conceptual locations (e.g., next to the refrigerator) and the directional locations of objects in 2D arrays and/or images. Less is known about how the perceived egocentric distance of objects develops. Here we describe a novel system for presenting brief glimpses of a real-world environment, followed by a mask. The system includes projectors with mechanical shutters for projecting the fixation and masking images, a set of LED floodlights for illuminating the environment, and computer-controlled electronics to set the timing and initiate the process. Because a real environment is used, most visual distance and depth cues may be manipulated using traditional methods. The system is inexpensive, robust, and its components are readily available in the marketplace. This paper describes the system and the timing characteristics of each component. Verification of the ability to control exposure to time scales as low as a few milliseconds is demonstrated. PMID:24519496

  3. Sparse aperture mask wavefront sensor testbed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Riggs, A. J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Coronagraphic exoplanet detection at very high contrast requires the estimation and control of low-order wave- front aberrations. At Princeton High Contrast Imaging Lab (PHCIL), we are working on a new technique that integrates a sparse-aperture mask (SAM) with a shaped pupil coronagraph (SPC) to make precise estimates of these low-order aberrations. We collect the starlight rejected from the coronagraphic image plane and interfere it using a sparse aperture mask (SAM) at the relay pupil to estimate the low-order aberrations. In our previous work we numerically demonstrated the efficacy of the technique, and proposed a method to sense and control these differential aberrations in broadband light. We also presented early testbed results in which the SAM was used to sense pointing errors. In this paper, we will briefly overview the SAM wavefront sensor technique, explain the design of the completed testbed, and report the experimental estimation results of the dominant low-order aberrations such as tip/tit, astigmatism and focus.

  4. SEVIRI Cloud mask by Cumulative Discriminant Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, M. G.; Serio, C.; Masiello, G.; Venafra, S.; Liuzzi, G.

    2015-09-01

    In the context of cloud detection for satellite observations we want to use the method of Cumulative Discriminant Analysis (CDA) as a tool to distinguish between clear and cloudy sky applied to Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) data. The methodology is based on the choice of several statistics related to the cloud properties, whose correlation has been analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Results have been compared with the SEVIRI reference cloud mask provided by the European Centre for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellite (EUMETSAT), in order to find suitable thresholds able to discriminate between clear or cloudy conditions. We trained the statistics on a selected region, the Basilicata area, located in the south of Italy, in different periods of the year 2012, in order to take into account the seasonal variability. Moreover we separated land and sea surface and distinguished between day-time or night-time. The validation of thresholds, obtained through SEVIRI observations analysis, shows a good agreement with the reference cloud mask.

  5. Method and apparatus for inspecting an EUV mask blank

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2005-11-08

    An apparatus and method for at-wavelength EUV mask-blank characterization for inspection of moderate and low spatial frequency coating uniformity using a synchrotron or other source of EUV light. The apparatus provides for rapid, non-destruction, non-contact, at-wavelength qualification of large mask areas, and can be self-calibrating or be calibrated to well-characterized reference samples. It can further check for spatial variation of mask reflectivity or for global differences among masks. The apparatus and method is particularly suited for inspection of coating uniformity and quality and can detect defects in the order of 50 .mu.m and above.

  6. Thermal management of masks for deep x-ray lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.; Chojnowski, D.; Mancini, D.C.; Lai, B.; Dejus, R.

    1997-11-18

    This paper addresses some options and techniques in the thermal management of masks used in deep x-ray lithography. The x-ray masks are thin plates made of low-atomic-number materials on which a patterned thin film of a high-atomic-number metal has been deposited. When they are exposed to an x-ray beam, part of the radiation is transmitted to replicate the pattern on a downstream photoresist, and the remainder is absorbed in the mask in the form of heat. This heat load can cause deformation of the mask and thus image distortion in the lithography process. The mask geometry considered in the present study is 100 mm x 100 mm in area, and about 0.1 to 2 mm thick. The incident radiation is a bending magnet x-ray beam having a footprint of 60 mm x 4 mm at the mask. The mask is scanned vertically about {+-} 30 mm so that a 60 mm x 60 mm area is exposed. the maximum absorbed heat load in the mask is 80 W, which is significantly greater than a few watts encountered in previous systems. In this paper, cooling techniques, substrate material selection, transient and steady state thermal and structural behavior, and other thermo-mechanical aspects of mask design are discussed. It is shown that, while diamond and graphite remain attractive candidates, at present beryllium is a more suitable material for this purpose and, when properly cooled, can provide the necessary dimensional tolerance.

  7. Practical mask inspection system with printability and pattern priority verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Hideo; Ozaki, Fumio; Takahara, Kenichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kikuiri, Nobutaka

    2011-05-01

    Through the four years of study in Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) on reducing mask manufacturing Turn Around Time (TAT) and cost, we have been able to establish a technology to improve the efficiency of the review process by applying a printability verification function that utilizes computational lithography simulations to analyze defects detected by a high-resolution mask inspection system. With the advent of Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) and other technologies that extend the life of existing optical lithography, it is becoming extremely difficult to judge a defect only by the shape of a mask pattern, while avoiding pseudo-defects. Thus, printability verification is indispensable for filtering out nuisance defects from high-resolution mask inspection results. When using computational lithography simulations to verify printability with high precision, the image captured by the inspection system must be prepared with extensive care. However, for practical applications, this preparation process needs to be simplified. In addition, utilizing Mask Data Rank (MDR) to vary the defect detection sensitivity according to the patterns is also useful for simultaneously inspecting minute patterns and avoiding pseudo-defects. Combining these two technologies, we believe practical mask inspection for next generation lithography is achievable. We have been improving the estimation accuracy of the printability verification function through discussion with several customers and evaluation of their masks. In this report, we will describe the progress of these practical mask verification functions developed through customers' evaluations.

  8. Intelligibility of reverberant noisy speech with ideal binary masking.

    PubMed

    Roman, Nicoleta; Woodruff, John

    2011-10-01

    For a mixture of target speech and noise in anechoic conditions, the ideal binary mask is defined as follows: It selects the time-frequency units where target energy exceeds noise energy by a certain local threshold and cancels the other units. In this study, the definition of the ideal binary mask is extended to reverberant conditions. Given the division between early and late reflections in terms of speech intelligibility, three ideal binary masks can be defined: an ideal binary mask that uses the direct path of the target as the desired signal, an ideal binary mask that uses the direct path and early reflections of the target as the desired signal, and an ideal binary mask that uses the reverberant target as the desired signal. The effects of these ideal binary mask definitions on speech intelligibility are compared across two types of interference: speech shaped noise and concurrent female speech. As suggested by psychoacoustical studies, the ideal binary mask based on the direct path and early reflections of target speech outperforms the other masks as reverberation time increases and produces substantial reductions in terms of speech reception threshold for normal hearing listeners. PMID:21973369

  9. Exploring EUV mask backside defectivity and control methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, Christina; Rankin, Jed; Kindt, Louis; Lawliss, Mark; Bolton, Luke; Collins, Kevin; Cheong, Lin; Bonam, Ravi; Poro, Richard; Isogawa, Takeshi; Narita, Eisuke; Kagawa, Masayuki

    2015-07-01

    The backside of photomasks have been largely ignored during the last several decades of development, with the exception of avoiding gross damage or defects, as almost all problems are far enough out of the focal plane to have minimal effect on imaging. Since EUV masks are reflective, and the column is held in a vacuum, scanners have been designed to utilize electrostatic chucking. With the chucking system for EUV, the requirements for the backside of the mask must be redefined to integrate concerns in substrate design, mask manufacturing, and usage. The two key concerns with respect to an electrostatic chuck are defects and durability. Backside defects can affect imaging, while potentially damaging or contaminating the tool, the mask, or even subsequently used masks. Compromised durability, from either usage or cleaning, can affect the ability of the chuck to hold the mask in place. In this study, these concerns are evaluated in three stages: minimizing defects created during mask fabrication, actions taken upon discovery of defects, and durability of the backside film with continued cleans and chucking. Data incorporated in this study includes: sheet resistance, film thickness, and optical inspection images. Incorporating the data from the three stages of fabrication, disposition, and lifetime will help us define how to structure backside EUV mask handling during mask manufacture and indicate what further solutions are needed as EUV technology transitions into manufacturing.

  10. Quantification of mammographic masking risk with volumetric breast density maps: how to select women for supplemental screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Katharina; van Gils, Carla H.; Wanders, Johanna OP; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity of mammograms is low for women with dense breasts, since cancers may be masked by dense tissue. In this study, we investigated methods to identify women with density patterns associated with a high masking risk. Risk measures are derived from volumetric breast density maps. We used the last negative screening mammograms of 93 women who subsequently presented with an interval cancer (IC), and, as controls, 930 randomly selected normal screening exams from women without cancer. Volumetric breast density maps were computed from the mammograms, which provide the dense tissue thickness at each location. These were used to compute absolute and percentage glandular tissue volume. We modeled the masking risk for each pixel location using the absolute and percentage dense tissue thickness and we investigated the effect of taking the cancer location probability distribution (CLPD) into account. For each method, we selected cases with the highest masking measure (by thresholding) and computed the fraction of ICs as a function of the fraction of controls selected. The latter can be interpreted as the negative supplemental screening rate (NSSR). Between the models, when incorporating CLPD, no significant differences were found. In general, the methods performed better when CLPD was included. At higher NSSRs some of the investigated masking measures had a significantly higher performance than volumetric breast density. These measures may therefore serve as an alternative to identify women with a high risk for a masked cancer.

  11. Masking Release for Igbo and English

    PubMed Central

    Ebem, Deborah U.; Desloge, Joseph G.; Reed, Charlotte M.; Braida, Louis D.; Uguru, Joy O.

    2014-01-01

    In this research, we explored the effect of noise interruption rate on speech intelligibility. Specifically, we used the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) procedure with the original HINT stimuli (English) and Igbo stimuli to assess speech reception ability in interrupted noise. For a given noise level, the HINT test provides an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required for 50%-correct speech intelligibility. The SNR for 50%-correct intelligibility changes depending upon the interruption rate of the noise. This phenomenon (called Masking Release) has been studied extensively in English but not for Igbo – which is an African tonal language spoken predominantly in South Eastern Nigeria. This experiment explored and compared the phenomenon of Masking Release for (i) native English speakers listening to English, (ii) native Igbo speakers listening to English, and (iii) native Igbo speakers listening to Igbo. Since Igbo is a tonal language and English is a non-tonal language, this allowed us to compare Masking Release patterns on native speakers of tonal and non-tonal languages. Our results for native English speakers listening to English HINT show that the SNR and the masking release are orderly and consistent with other English HINT data for English speakers. Our result for Igbo speakers listening to English HINT sentences show that there is greater variability in results across the different Igbo listeners than across the English listeners. This result likely reflects different levels of ability in the English language across the Igbo listeners. The masking release values in dB are less than for English listeners. Our results for Igbo speakers listening to Igbo show that in general, the SNRs for Igbo sentences are lower than for English/English and Igbo/English. This means that the Igbo listeners could understand 50% of the Igbo sentences at SNRs less than those required for English sentences by either native or non-native listeners. This result can be

  12. Semantic transparency and masked morphological priming: An ERP investigation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joanna; Frank, Tiffany; Grainger, Jonathan; Holcomb, Phillip J.

    2009-01-01

    The role of semantics in the segmentation of morphologically complex words was examined using event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded to target words primed by semantically transparent (hunter–hunt,) opaque (corner–corn), and orthographically related (scandal–scan) masked primes. Behavioral data showed that only transparent items gave rise to priming. The ERP data showed both N250 and the N400 effects with transparent items generating greater priming than orthographic or opaque. Furthermore, priming effects across conditions revealed the existence of a significant linear trend, with transparent items showing the greatest effects and orthographic items the smallest, suggesting that these priming effects vary as a function of morphological structure and semantic transparency. The results are discussed in terms of a model of morphological processing. PMID:17498223

  13. Impact of mask topography and resist effects on optical proximity correction in advanced alternating phase-shift process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mosong; Ho, Benjamin C. P.; Guenther, Doug E.

    2003-06-01

    This paper develops and validates a methodology for rigorously modeling the pattern transfer in alternating Phase Shift Mask (altPSM) process by incorporating mask structure, partially coherent illumination, polarization and resist in a full-vector electromagnetic (EM) model. Mask topography is included in EM simulation to solve for the field immediately after the mask. To model the partially coherent illumination, the light source is decomposed into a set of plane waves with different angles of incidence on mask. Each wave requires an EMF simulation over the mask. A perturbation approach is developed in this paper to reduce the EM simulation time by over 50%, thus enabling the vector model of partial coherence. Then the field after mask is decomposed into TE and TM polarized waves so as to calculate the field in resist/BARC/silicon multilayer. At high NA, this full vector model is needed to investigate altPSM because there exists appreciable difference between the images due to TE and TM waves. TM wave degrades more severely in resist, thus TE is more desirable. The experiments were conducted at Tokyo Electron Texas LLC. on a 248nm KrF stepper, NA 0.6, σ 0.3. Both experiments and simulations show that transmission imbalance depends on defocus. When the focal plane is moved towards the lens, the 180° space can be brighter than 0°.The 0° space is more sensitive to defocus and has larger CD variation than 180° does. Finally the simulated patterns are compared with experimental SEM picture.

  14. Applying ILT mask synthesis for co-optimizing design rules and DSA process characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, Thuc; Stanton, William

    2014-03-01

    During early stage development of a DSA process, there are many unknown interactions between design, DSA process, RET, and mask synthesis. The computational resolution of these unknowns can guide development towards a common process space whereby manufacturing success can be evaluated. This paper will demonstrate the use of existing Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) to co-optimize the multitude of parameters. ILT mask synthesis will be applied to a varied hole design space in combination with a range of DSA model parameters under different illumination and RET conditions. The design will range from 40 nm pitch doublet to random DSA designs with larger pitches, while various effective DSA characteristics of shrink bias and corner smoothing will be assumed for the DSA model during optimization. The co-optimization of these design parameters and process characteristics under different SMO solutions and RET conditions (dark/bright field tones and binary/PSM mask types) will also help to provide a complete process mapping of possible manufacturing options. The lithographic performances for masks within the optimized parameter space will be generated to show a common process space with the highest possibility for success.

  15. Repair of phase defects in extreme-ultraviolet lithography mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Barty, Anton; Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Baker, Sherry; Coy, Michael A.; Mita, Masaaki; Robertson, Vernon E.; Liang, Ted; Stivers, Alan

    2004-12-01

    Phase defects that introduce errors in the printed image are one of the major yield limiters for reticles in extreme-ultraviolet lithography. The basis for a reticle is a mask blank, consisting of an ultra-low-expansion substrate and a reflective multilayer stack that is made up of Mo and Si. A potential methodology for repairing phase defects in these mask blanks is to locally irradiate it with a high-resolution electron beam to induce structural deformations that cancel out the distortion of the multilayer. We present experimental and modeling results that show that the interaction of an electron beam with a mask blank can only be understood when the contraction of the multilayer through silicide formation and substrate compaction, as well as the mechanical response of the mask blank, are considered. One of the consequences is that electron beams with energies around 10 keV that are less than 20 nm in diameter induce depressions in multilayers made up of 50 Mo/Si bilayers that have a surprisingly large diameter of about a micrometer. Our models suggest that these unacceptably large diameters can only be reduced if the compaction of the substrate is prevented.

  16. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not interfere... attached to the mouthpiece or gas mask and provide an airtight seal. (e) Facepieces shall be designed...

  17. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not interfere... attached to the mouthpiece or gas mask and provide an airtight seal. (e) Facepieces shall be designed...

  18. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not interfere... attached to the mouthpiece or gas mask and provide an airtight seal. (e) Facepieces shall be designed...

  19. Asymmetry in Object Substitution Masking Occurs Relative to the Direction of Spatial Attention Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    A sparse mask that persists beyond the duration of a target can reduce its visibility, a phenomenon called "object substitution masking". Y. Jiang and M. M. Chun (2001a) found an asymmetric pattern of substitution masking such that a mask on the peripheral side of the target caused stronger substitution masking than on the central side. Assuming…

  20. Nanostructure Secondary-Mirror Apodizing Mask for Transmitter Signal Suppression in a Duplex Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Livas, Jeffrey; Shiri, Shahram; Getty, Stephanie; Tveekrem, June; Butler, James

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a nanostructure apodizing mask, made of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, that is applied to the centers (or in and around the holes) of the secondary mirrors of telescopes that are used to interferometrically measure the strain of space-time in response to gravitational waves. The shape of this ultra-black mask can be adjusted to provide a smooth transition to the clear aperture of the secondary mirror to minimize diffracted light. Carbon nanotubes grown on silicon are a viable telescope mirror substrate, and can absorb significantly more light than other black treatments. The hemispherical reflectance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown at GSFC is approximately 3 to 10 times better than a standard aerospace paint used for stray light control. At the LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) wavelength of 1 micron, the advantage over paint is a factor of 10. Primarily, in the center of the secondary mirror (in the region of central obscuration, where no received light is lost) a black mask is applied to absorb transmitted light that could be reflected back into the receiver. In the LISA telescope, this is in the center couple of millimeters. The shape of this absorber is critical to suppress diffraction at the edge. By using the correct shape, the stray light can be reduced by approximately 10 to the 9 orders of magnitude versus no center mask. The effect of the nanotubes has been simulated in a stray-light model. The effect of the apodizing mask has been simulated in a near-field diffraction model. Specifications are geometry-dependent, but the baseline design for the LISA telescope has been modeled as well. The coatings are somewhat fragile, but work is continuing to enhance adhesion.

  1. Gray scale x-ray mask

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela

    2006-03-07

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

  2. Bunch Profiling Using a Rotating Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mitchell; /SLAC /IIT, Chicago

    2012-08-24

    The current method for measuring profiles of proton bunches in accelerators is severely lacking. One must dedicate a great deal of time and expensive equipment to achieve meaningful results. A new method to complete this task uses a rotating mask with slots of three different orientations to collect this data. By scanning over the beam in three different directions, a complete profile for each bunch is built in just seconds, compared to the hours necessary for the previous method. This design was successfully tested using synchrotron radiation emitted by SPEAR3. The profile of the beam was measured in each of the three desired directions. Due to scheduled beam maintenance, only one set of data was completed and more are necessary to solve any remaining issues. The data collected was processed and all of the RMS sizes along the major and minor axes, as well as the tilt of the beam ellipse were measured.

  3. Coherent diffractive imaging using randomly coded masks

    SciTech Connect

    Seaberg, Matthew H.; D'Aspremont, Alexandre; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-12-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an extension to coherent diffractive imaging that encodes additional information through the use of a series of randomly coded masks, removing the need for typical object-domain constraints while guaranteeing a unique solution to the phase retrieval problem. Phase retrieval is performed using a numerical convex relaxation routine known as “PhaseCut,” an iterative algorithm known for its stability and for its ability to find the global solution, which can be found efficiently and which is robust to noise. The experiment is performed using a laser diode at 532.2 nm, enabling rapid prototyping for future X-ray synchrotron and even free electron laser experiments.

  4. Laryngeal mask airway: uses in anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Pinosky, M

    1996-06-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA), developed in 1983, is a new device to assist in the management of the pediatric and adult airway. In 1991, the Food and Drug Administration gave its approval for use of the LMA in the United States. The LMA is reusable and appears to provide cost-effective airway management in numerous situations. The LMA is simple to use, atraumatic to insert, and helpful in overcoming an obstructed airway. Its role in management of the difficult airway and the traumatic airway is still evolving. This review will introduce the LMA to the nonanesthesiologist and review for the anesthesiologist the origins of the LMA, its physical structure, the technical aspects of insertion, problems with aspiration, its role in the difficult airway, and experience with the pediatric population.

  5. Optimal motor control may mask sensory dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kiemel, Tim; Cowan, Noah J.; Jeka, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Properties of neural controllers for closed-loop sensorimotor behavior can be inferred with system identification. Under the standard paradigm, the closed-loop system is perturbed (input), measurements are taken (output), and the relationship between input and output reveals features of the system under study. Here we show that under common assumptions made about such systems (e.g. the system implements optimal control with a penalty on mechanical, but not sensory, states) important aspects of the neural controller (its zeros mask the modes of the sensors) remain hidden from standard system identification techniques. Only by perturbing or measuring the closed-loop system “between” the sensor and the control can these features be exposed with closed-loop system identification methods; while uncommon, there exist noninvasive techniques such as galvanic vestibular stimulation that perturb between sensor and controller in this way. PMID:19408009

  6. Adaptive multiwavelet-based watermarking through JPW masking.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lihong; Li, Wenguo

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a multibit, multiplicative, spread spectrum watermarking using the discrete multiwavelet (including unbalanced and balanced multiwavelet) transform is presented. Performance improvement with respect to existing algorithm is obtained by means of a new just perceptual weighting (JPW) model. The new model incorporates various masking effects of human visual perception by taking into account the eye's sensitivity to noise changes depending on spatial frequency, luminance and texture of all the image subbands. In contrast to conventional JND threshold model, JPW describing minimum perceptual sensitivity weighting to noise changes, is fitter for nonadditive watermarking. Specifically, watermarking strength is adaptively adjusted to obtain minimum perceptual distortion by employing the JPW model. Correspondingly, an adaptive optimum decoding is derived using a statistic model based on generalized-Gaussian distribution (GGD) for multiwavelet coefficients of the cover-image. Furthermore, the impact of multiwavelet characteristics on proposed watermarking scheme is also analyzed. Finally, the experimental results show that proposed JPW model can improve the quality of the watermarked image and give more robustness of the watermark as compared with a variety of state-of-the-art algorithms.

  7. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  8. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  9. The Masked Onset Priming Effect in Picture Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Niels O.

    2008-01-01

    Reading aloud is faster when targets (e.g., "PAIR") are preceded by visually masked primes sharing just the onset (e.g., "pole") compared to all different primes (e.g., "take"). This effect is known as the "masked onset priming effect" (MOPE). One crucial feature of this effect is its presumed non-lexical basis. This aspect of the MOPE is tested…

  10. The Role of Polysemy in Masked Semantic and Translation Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkbeiner, Matthew; Forster, Kenneth; Nicol, Janet; Nakamura, Kumiko

    2004-01-01

    A well-known asymmetry exists in the bilingual masked priming literature in which lexical decision is used: namely, masked primes in the dominant language (L1) facilitate decision times on targets in the less dominant language (L2), but not vice versa. In semantic categorization, on the other hand, priming is symmetrical. In Experiments 1-3 we…

  11. Self-masking: Listening during vocalization. Normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Borg, Erik; Bergkvist, Christina; Gustafsson, Dan

    2009-06-01

    What underlying mechanisms are involved in the ability to talk and listen simultaneously and what role does self-masking play under conditions of hearing impairment? The purpose of the present series of studies is to describe a technique for assessment of masked thresholds during vocalization, to describe normative data for males and females, and to focus on hearing impairment. The masking effect of vocalized [a:] on narrow-band noise pulses (250-8000 Hz) was studied using the maximum vocalization method. An amplitude-modulated series of sound pulses, which sounded like a steam engine, was masked until the criterion of halving the perceived pulse rate was reached. For masking of continuous reading, a just-follow-conversation criterion was applied. Intra-session test-retest reproducibility and inter-session variability were calculated. The results showed that female voices were more efficient in masking high frequency noise bursts than male voices and more efficient in masking both a male and a female test reading. The male had to vocalize 4 dBA louder than the female to produce the same masking effect on the test reading. It is concluded that the method is relatively simple to apply and has small intra-session and fair inter-session variability. Interesting gender differences were observed. PMID:19507970

  12. Performance characterization of a PIAA complex focal plane mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) is an architecture for directly observing extrasolar planets, and can achieve performance near the theoretical limits for any direct-detection instrument. PIAACMC can be designed for centrally-obscured and segmented apertures, which is particularly useful for next-generation telescopes. The PIAACMC architecture includes aspheric PIAA optics, and a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask that provides a pi phase shift to a portion of the on-axis starlight. The phase-shifted starlight is forced to interfere destructively with the un-shifted starlight, causing the starlight to be eliminated, and allowing a region for high-contrast imaging near the star.The main challenge in designing the complex focal plane mask is to achieve deep contrast over a wide spectral band. Another challenge for the mask design is to avoid sharp features, which can be difficult to manufacture. We present a solution to the design challenge by dividing the mask into sections and optimizing the phase shift produced by each section. We also demonstrate a method to design the mask with a smooth profile. One remaining challenge is to measure the performance of the mask. We present a method to compute the phase profile of the mask based on measurements of the diffraction pattern. The computed phase profile is used to simulate the expected coronagraph performance.

  13. My Other Half Manifested in Mask-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Xanthippi

    2010-01-01

    Every fall season, each grade level of Rowland Hall St. Mark's Lower School in Salt Lake City, Utah, completes a mask-making project to be featured in a schoolwide parade. This sparked an opportunity to incorporate the fourth-grade unit of realistic and observational drawing with mask making. In this article, the author describes how her students…

  14. Self-masking: Listening during vocalization. Normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Borg, Erik; Bergkvist, Christina; Gustafsson, Dan

    2009-06-01

    What underlying mechanisms are involved in the ability to talk and listen simultaneously and what role does self-masking play under conditions of hearing impairment? The purpose of the present series of studies is to describe a technique for assessment of masked thresholds during vocalization, to describe normative data for males and females, and to focus on hearing impairment. The masking effect of vocalized [a:] on narrow-band noise pulses (250-8000 Hz) was studied using the maximum vocalization method. An amplitude-modulated series of sound pulses, which sounded like a steam engine, was masked until the criterion of halving the perceived pulse rate was reached. For masking of continuous reading, a just-follow-conversation criterion was applied. Intra-session test-retest reproducibility and inter-session variability were calculated. The results showed that female voices were more efficient in masking high frequency noise bursts than male voices and more efficient in masking both a male and a female test reading. The male had to vocalize 4 dBA louder than the female to produce the same masking effect on the test reading. It is concluded that the method is relatively simple to apply and has small intra-session and fair inter-session variability. Interesting gender differences were observed.

  15. Difficult mask ventilation: simple step to make the impossible, possible!

    PubMed

    Chong, Soon Eu; Mohammad Zaini, Rhendra Hardy; Wan Mohd Rubi, Ikhwan; Lim, Jo Anne

    2016-11-01

    Mask ventilation is one of the most important skills in airway management. Difficulty in mask ventilation can become life threatening if it is associated with difficulty in intubation during general anesthesia. We report a potential impossible ventilation condition which was safely and easily overcome with appropriate innovative modification of an Opsite adhesive film. PMID:27687458

  16. Mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta S.; Jones, Chris; Doyle, Gary F.; Brown, Laura; Imhof, Joseph; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-11-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required to satisfy the needs of a manufacturing environment. Electron-beam patterning is too slow to feasibly deliver these volumes, but instead can provide a high quality "master" mask which can be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool. This strategy has the capability to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the mask form factor, imprint replication tools and the semiconductor mask replication process. A PerfectaTM MR5000 mask replication tool has been developed specifically to pattern replica masks from an ebeam written master. Performance results, including image placement, critical dimension uniformity, and pattern transfer are covered in detail.

  17. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask....

  18. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask....

  19. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....

  20. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap....