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Sample records for modeling euvl mask

  1. EUVL alternating phase shift mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Myers, Alan; Shroff, Yashesh; Chandhok, Manish; Zhang, Guojing; Gullikson, Eric; Salmassi, Farhad

    2011-04-01

    Extreme ultra-violet Lithography (EUVL) alternating phase shift mask (APSM) or other optical enhancement techniques are likely needed for 16nm (half pitch) technology generation and beyond. One possible option is the combination of EUVL and APSM. The fabrication of EUVL APSM is more difficult than either the fabrication of an EUVL binary mask or a conventional optical APSM mask. In the case of EUVL APSM, the phase difference in the two regions (0 and 180-degree phase regions) is created by a phase step in the substrate prior to the multilayer (ML) coating. The step height that induces 180-degree phase mismatch in the ML is determined by [λ/(4cosθ)](2m+1), where m are integers (0, 1, 2,...). In this experiment, we targeted for a step height with m=1. The same mask design also contains the standard binary structures so that the comparison between the EUVL APSM and the EUVL binary mask can be performed under the same illumination and wafer process conditions. The EUVL APSM mask was exposed using Nikon's EUV1 scanner in Kumagaya Japan. The wafer level results showed higher dense line resolution for EUVL APSM as compared to that of EUVL binary mask. APSM also showed improved line width roughness (LWR) and depth of focus (DoF) as compared to the best EUVL binary results obtained with C-dipole off-axis illumination (OAI). The wafer CD resolution improvement obtained by APSM in this experiment is partially limited by the resist resolution and the mask phase edge spread during ML deposition. We believe that wafer CD resolution and can further be improved with imaging imbalance compensation mask design and improvements in resist resolution and the phase generation portion of the mask fabrication process. In this paper, we will discuss in detail the mask fabrication process, wafer level data analysis, and our understanding of EUVL APSM related issues.

  2. SEMATECH EUVL mask program status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Henry; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Orvek, Kevin; Cha, Brian; Rastegar, Abbas; Kearney, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    As we approach the 22nm half-pitch (hp) technology node, the industry is rapidly running out of patterning options. Of the several lithography techniques highlighted in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the leading contender for the 22nm hp insertion is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Despite recent advances with EUV resist and improvements in source power, achieving defect free EUV mask blank and enabling the EUV mask infrastructure still remain critical issues. To meet the desired EUV high volume manufacturing (HVM) insertion target date of 2013, these obstacles must be resolved on a timely bases. Many of the EUV mask related challenges remain in the pre-competitive stage and a collaborative industry based consortia, such as SEMATECH can play an important role to enable the EUVL landscape. SEMATECH based in Albany, NY is an international consortium representing several of the largest manufacturers in the semiconductor market. Full members include Intel, Samsung, AMD, IBM, Panasonic, HP, TI, UMC, CNSE (College of Nanoscience and Engineering), and Fuller Road Management. Within the SEMATECH lithography division a major thrust is centered on enabling the EUVL ecosystem from mask development, EUV resist development and addressing EUV manufacturability concerns. An important area of focus for the SEMATECH mask program has been the Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). At the MBDC key issues in EUV blank development such as defect reduction and inspection capabilities are actively pursued together with research partners, key suppliers and member companies. In addition the mask program continues a successful track record of working with the mask community to manage and fund critical mask tools programs. This paper will highlight recent status of mask projects and longer term strategic direction at the MBDC. It is important that mask technology be ready to support pilot line development HVM by 2013. In several areas progress has been

  3. EUVL masks: paving the path for commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Hector, Scott D.

    2001-09-01

    Optical projection lithography has been the principal vehicle of semiconductor manufacturing for more than 20 years and is marching aggressively to satisfy the needs of semiconductor manufacturers for 100nm devices. However, the complexity of optical lithography continues to increase as wavelength reduction continues to 157nm. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL), with wavelength from 13-14 nm, is evolving as a leading next generation lithography option for semiconductor industry to stay on the path laid by Moore's Law. Masks are a critical part of the success of any technology and are considered to be high risk both for optical lithography and NGL technologies for sub-100nm lithography. Two key areas of EUV mask fabrication are reflective multilayer deposition and absorber patterning. In the case of reflective multilayers, delivering defect free multilayers for mask blanks is the biggest challenge. Defect mitigation is being explored as a possible option to smooth the multilayer defects in addition to optimization of the deposition process to reduce defect density. The mask patterning process needs focus on the defect-free absorber stack patterning process, mask cleaning, inspection and repair. In addition, there is considerable effort to understand by simulations, the defect printability, thermal and mechanical distortions, and non-telecentric illumination, to mention a few. To protect the finished mask from defects added during use, a removable pellicle strategy combined with thermophoretic protection during exposure is being developed. Recent migration to square form factor using low thermal expansion material (LTEM) is advantageous as historical developments in optical masks can be applied to EUV mask patterning. This paper addresses recent developments in the EUV mask patterning and highlights critical manufacturing process controls needed to fabricate defect-free full field masks with CD and image placement specifications for sub-70nm node lithography. No

  4. EUVL mask manufacturing: technologies and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letzkus, Florian; Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Sailer, Holger; Dersch, Uwe; Holfeld, Christian

    2005-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the favourite next generation lithography candidate for IC device manufacturing with feature sizes beyond 32nm. Different stacks and manufacturing concepts have been published for the fabrication of the reflective EUVL masks. Patterning processes for two different absorber-buffer combinations on top of the reflective multi layer mirror have been developed. A TaN/SiO2 absorber-buffer stack was provided by supplier A and TaBN/Cr by supplier B. In addition both absorbers were covered by an anti reflective coating (ARC) layer. An e-beam patterned 300nm thick film of Fuji FEP171 was used as resist mask. We optimized the etching processes for maximum selectivities between absorber, buffer and capping layers on the one hand and rectangular profiles and low etch bias on the other hand. While both TaN based absorbers have been dry etched in an UNAXIS mask etcher III, wet and dry etch steps have been evaluated for the two different buffer layers. The minimum feature size of lines and holes in our test designs was 100nm. After freezing the processes a proximity correction was determined considering both, the influence of electron scattering due to e-beam exposure and the influence of the patterning steps. Due to the correction an outstanding linearity and iso/dense bias on different test designs was achieved. Various masks for printing experiments at the small-field Micro Exposure Tool (MET) in Berkeley and the fabrication of the ASML α-tool setup mask within the European MEDEA+ EXTUMASK project were done using the developed processes. Finally, we will compare and discuss the results of the two stack approaches.

  5. Mask substrate requirements and development for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    SciTech Connect

    Hector, S D; Shell, M; Taylor, J S; Tong, W M

    1999-09-28

    The mask is deemed one of the areas that require significant research and development in EUVL. Silicon wafers will be used for mask substrates for an alpha-class EUVL exposure tool due to their low-defect levels and high quality surface finish. However, silicon has a large coefficient of thermal expansion that leads to unacceptable image distortion due to absorption of EUV light. A low thermal expansion glass or glass-ceramic is likely to be required in order to meet error budgets for the 70nm node and beyond. Since EUVL masks are used in reflection, they are coated with multilayers prior to patterning. Surface imperfections, such as polishing marks, particles, scratches, or digs, are potential nucleation sites for defects in the multilayer coating, which could result in the printed defects. Therefore we are accelerating developments in the defect reduction and surface finishing of low thermal expansion mask substrates in order to understand long-term issues in controlling printable defects, and to establish the infrastructure for supplying masks. In this paper, we explain the technical requirements for EUVL mask substrates and describe our efforts in establishing a SEMI standard for EUVL masks. We will also report on the early progress of our suppliers in producing low thermal-expansion mask substrates for our development activities.

  6. Advances in Low-Defect Multilayers for EUVL Mask Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J A; Davidson, J C; Larson, C C; Walton, C C; Kearney, P A

    2002-04-15

    Low-defect multilayer coatings are required to fabricate mask blanks for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blanks consist of high reflectance E W multilayers on low thermal expansion substrates. A defect density of 0.0025 printable defects/cm{sup 2} for both the mask substrate and the multilayer is required to provide a mask blank yield of 60%. Current low defect multilayer coating technology allows repeated coating-added defect levels of 0.05/cm{sup 2} for defects greater than 90 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) equivalent size for lots of 20 substrates. Extended clean operation of the coating system at levels below 0.08/cm{sup 2} for 3 months of operation has also been achieved. Two substrates with zero added defects in the quality area have been fabricated, providing an existence proof that ultra low defect coatings are possible. Increasing the ion source-to-target distance from 410 to 560 mm to reduce undesired coating of the ion source caused the defect density to increase to 0.2/cm{sup 2}. Deposition and etching diagnostic witness substrates and deposition pinhole cameras showed a much higher level of ion beam spillover (ions missing the sputter target) than expected. Future work will quantify beam spillover, and test designs to reduce spillover, if it is confirmed to be the cause of the increased defect level. The LDD system will also be upgraded to allow clean coating of standard format mask substrates. The upgrade will confirm that the low defect process developed on Si wafers is compatible with the standard mask format 152 mm square substrates, and will provide a clean supply of EUVL mask blanks needed to support development of EUVL mask patterning processes and clean mask handling technologies.

  7. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplate microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K; Naulleau, P; Barty, A; Rekawa, S; Kemp, C; Gunion, R; Salmassi, F; Gullikson, E; Anderson, E; Han, H

    2007-09-25

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  8. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplatemicroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Barty, Anton; Rekawa,Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Gunion, Robert F.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.; Han, Hak-Seung

    2007-08-20

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  9. Evaluation of the Capability of a Multibeam Confocal Inspection System for Inspection of EUVL Mask Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivers, Alan R.; Liang, Ted; Penn, Michael J.; Lieberman, Barry; Shelden, Gilbert V.; Folta, James A.; Larson, Cindy C.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Walton, Christopher C.; Gulliksong, Eric M.; Yi, Moonsuk

    2002-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer defects (phase defects) are a defect type unique to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. A manufacturable inspection capability for these defects is key to the success of EUV lithography. Simulations of EUV scattering from multilayer defects suggest that defect printability is related to the phase error induced by the defect, which is in turn strongly coupled to the size of a multilayer surface protrusion or intrusion. We can adopt a strategy of measuring the multilayer surface to detect phase defects. During the past year a working group composed of members of Intel Corporation, Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and International Sematech searched for a commercial tool for EUVL mask substrate and blank inspection. This working group established the tool requirements, methodologies for tool evaluation, collected data and recommended a supplier for further development with International Sematech. We collected data from several vendors and found that a multibeam confocal inspection (MCI) system had a capability significantly better than the tools used today. We will present our strategy, requirements, methodologies and results. We will discuss in detail our unique programmed substrate and multilayer defect masks used to support the tool selection, including their actinic characterization. We will present data that quantifies the inspection capability of the MCI system.

  10. Report on EUVL Mask Substrate Development: Low-Expansion Substrate Finishing II

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.M.; Taylor, J.S.; Hector, S.D.; Shell, M.

    1999-12-08

    This report is a continuation of our assessment of the finishing of low thermal expansion material wafers obtained through three different commercial pathways. This quarter we have patterned and printed a ULE{reg_sign} wafer (Rodel 1) and saw no difference between its images and those from silicon wafer substrates. This further demonstrated that ULE{reg_sign} can be used as the EUVL mask substrate material. We have also evaluated substrates produced by three vendors: Hoya, General Optics, and Rodel. Consistent with our results reported last quarter, surface roughness of the bare substrates from all three companies does not depend on the position. For Hoya, the wafers it produced had a low roughness than those from last quarter. However, the cleanliness of the wafers needs to be improved. For General Optics, the wafer roughness has increased, and it was only able to deliver one wafer this quarter. General Optics will be replaced by Schott ML next quarter. For Rodel, one of its wafers (Rodel 1) that had been cleaned in-house showed excellent finishing and was selected to be patterned. We also observed that the sleeks on the substrates were smoothed by the ML coating. The other two Rodel wafers (Rodel 2 and Rodel 4) had too many defects and the roughness values derived from AFM are not reliable.

  11. Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

  12. Analysis and control of thin film stresses during extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liang

    2010-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the leading candidate for Next-Generation Lithography (NGL) in the sub-45 nm regime. One of the critical technical problems to be solved before the commercialization of EUVL is the control of image placement errors during EUVL mask blank fabrication. This paper focuses on the characterization of image placement errors induced by the thin film stresses during EUVL mask blank fabrication. Firstly, the causes and classifications of the stresses in the thin films were discussed. Then an analytical analysis was developed to reveal the effects of the thin film stresses on the distortions of the EUVL mask. Lastly, finite element (FE) models were established to simulate each process step in EUVL mask blank fabrication. The out-of-plane distortions (OPD) and inplane distortions (IPD) were tracked for each process step. The numerical results are compared with the analytical results to validate the FE models. Comparison indicated that numerical results and theoretical results agree very well with each other. The research in this paper provides a solid support for EUVL mask blank fabrication, theoretically and numerically. Further mounting and chucking procedures can keep image placement errors within the allotted error budget as well as provide the necessary flatness.

  13. Development of element technologies for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroo; Watanabe, Takeo; Harada, Tetsuo

    2015-08-01

    Thirty years have passed since the first report on extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) was presented at the annual meeting of the Japanese Society of Applied Physics in 1986. This technology is now in the manufacturing development stage. The high-volume manufacturing of dynamic-random-access-memory (DRAM) chips with a line width of 15 nm is expected in 2016. However, there are critical development issues that remain: generating a stand-alone EUV source with a higher power and producing a mask inspection tool for obtaining zero-defect masks. The Center for EUVL at the University of Hyogo was established in 2010. At present, it utilizes various types of equipment, such as an EUV mask defect inspection tool, an interference-lithography system, a device for measuring the thickness of carbon contamination film deposited by resist outgassing, and reflectivity measurement systems.

  14. Challenges and solutions ensuring EUVL photomask integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brux, O.; Dreß, P.; Schmalfuß, H.; Jonckheere, R.; Koolen-Hermkens, W.

    2012-06-01

    Industry roadmaps indicate that the introduction of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is on track for high volume manufacturing. Although, there has been significant progress in each of the individual subsets of the EUVL infrastructure, the absolute management of the process outside of the scanner and up to the point-of-exposure has been highlighted as critical requirement for the adoption of EUVL. Significant changes in the EUV system environment and mask architecture are driving a zero process tolerance level. Any unforeseen contamination introduced to the scanner environment from the EUV mask could cause considerable downtime and yield loss. Absolute mask integrity at the point-of-exposure must be guaranteed. EUV mask cleaning processes-of-record have been developed and introduced to the industry [1]. The issue is not longer "how to clean the mask" but, "how to keep it clean". With the introduction of EUVL, mask cleanliness extends out beyond the traditional mask cleaning tool. Complete control of contamination and/or particles during transportation, handling and storage will require a holistic approach to mask management. A new environment specifically for EUV mask integrity must be developed and fully tested for the sub 16nm half-pitch node introduction. The SUSS MaskTrack Pro (MTP) InSync was introduced as the solution for EUV mask integrity. SUSS demonstrated the fully automated handling of EUV masks into and out of a Dual Pod System [2]. Intrinsic cleanliness of each individual handling and storage step of the inner pod (EIP) and EUV mask inside the MTP InSync Tool was investigated and reported. A target specification of a PRP <= 0.08 as criterion for the cross contamination between EIP and the EUV reticle during handling within MTP InSync has been achieved and therefore proofing the applicability for the Dual Pod automation. Moreover an appropriate automated handling, other aspects like backside particle contamination and EIP cleanliness plays a

  15. Evaluating Printability of Buried Native EUV Mask Phase Defects through a Modeling and Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Mihir; Jindal, Vibhu; Basavalingappa, Adarsh; Herbol, Henry; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Jang, Il-Yong; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Marokkey, Sajan; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Pistor, Thomas V.; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2015-03-16

    The availability of defect-free masks is considered to be a critical issue for enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) as the next generation technology. Since completely defect-free masks will be hard to achieve, it is essential to have a good understanding of the printability of the native EUV mask defects. In this work, we performed a systematic study of native mask defects to understand the defect printability caused by them. The multilayer growth over native substrate mask blank defects was correlated to the multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects having similar profiles in terms of their width and height. To model the multilayer growth over the defects, a novel level-set multilayer growth model was used that took into account the tool deposition conditions of the Veeco Nexus ion beam deposition tool. The same tool was used for performing the actual deposition of the multilayer stack over the characterized native defects, thus ensuring a fair comparison between the actual multilayer growth over native defects, and modeled multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects. Further, the printability of the characterized native defects was studied with the SEMATECH-Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV mask-imaging microscope at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Printability of the modeled regular-shaped defects, which were propagated up the multilayer stack using level-set growth model was studied using defect printability simulations implementing the waveguide algorithm. Good comparison was observed between AIT and the simulation results, thus demonstrating that multilayer growth over a defect is primarily a function of a defect’s width and height, irrespective of its shape. This would allow us to predict printability of the arbitrarily-shaped native EUV mask defects in a systematic and robust manner.

  16. Recent results from extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask inspection for 11 nm half-pitch generation using projection electron microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a promising technique for 1X nm half-pitch (hp) generation lithography. The inspection of patterned EUVL masks is one of the main issues that must be addressed during mask fabrication for manufacture of devices with 11 nm hp feature sizes. We have already designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics that have been integrated into a new inspection system called Model EBEYE-V30 (where "Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) and this system seems quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL patterned mask inspection. The defect inspection sensitivity of this system was evaluated via capture of an electron image that was generated at the mask by focusing the image through the projection optics onto a time-delay integration (TDI) image sensor. For increased throughput and higher defect detection sensitivity, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and a simultaneous deflector for the image capture area that follows the mask scanning motion have been developed. Using a combination of synchronous deflection and mask scanning, the image can be integrated into both the fixed area image sensor and the TDI image sensor. We describe our experimental results for EUV patterned mask inspection using the above system. Elements have been developed for inspection tool integration and the designed specification has been verified. The system performance demonstrates the defect detectability required for 11 nm hp generation EUVL masks.

  17. An automated image-based tool for pupil plane characterization of EUVL tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Zac; Smith, Jack S.; Fenger, Germain; Smith, Bruce W.

    2016-03-01

    Pupil plane characterization will play a critical role in image process optimization for EUV lithography (EUVL), as it has for several lithography generations. In EUVL systems there is additional importance placed on understanding the ways that thermally-induced system drift affect pupil variation during operation. In-situ full pupil characterization is therefore essential for these tools. To this end we have developed Quick Inverse Pupil (QUIP)—a software suite developed for rapid characterization of pupil plane behavior based on images formed by that system. The software consists of three main components: 1) an image viewer, 2) the model builder, and 3) the wavefront analyzer. The image viewer analyzes CDSEM micrographs or actinic mask micrographs to measure either CDs or through-focus intensity volumes. The software is capable of rotation correction and image registration with subpixel accuracy. The second component pre-builds a model for a particular imaging system to enable rapid pupil characterization. Finally, the third component analyzes the results from the image viewer and uses the optional pre-built model for inverse solutions of pupil plane behavior. Both pupil amplitude and phase variation can be extracted using this software. Inverse solutions are obtained through a model based algorithm which is built on top of commercial rigorous full-vector simulation software.

  18. Simulation study of CD variation caused by field edge effects and out-of-band radiation in EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weimin; Niroomand, Ardavan; Lorusso, Gian F.; Boone, Robert; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Although extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) remains a promising candidate for semiconductor device manufacturing of the 1x nm half pitch node and beyond, many technological burdens have to be overcome. The "field edge effect" in EUVL is one of them. The image border region of an EUV mask,also known as the "black border" (BB), reflects a few percent of the incident EUV light, resulting in a leakage of light into neighboring exposure fields, especially at the corner of the field where three adjacent exposures take place. This effect significantly impacts on CD uniformity (CDU) across the exposure field. To avoid this phenomenon, a light-shielding border is introduced by etching away the entire absorber and multi-layer (ML)at the image border region of the EUV mask. In this paper, we present a method of modeling the field edge effect (also called the BB effect) by using rigorous lithography simulation with a calibrated resist model. An additional "flare level" at the field edge is introduced on top of the exposure tool flare map to account for the BB effect. The parameters in this model include the reflectivity and the width of the BB, which are mainly determining the leakage of EUV light and its influence range, respectively. Another parameter is the transition width which represents the half shadow effect of the reticle masking blades. By setting the corresponding parameters, the simulation results match well the experimental results obtained at the imec's NXE:3100 EUV exposure tool. Moreover, these results indicate that the out-of-band (OoB) radiation also contributes to the CDU. Using simulation we can also determine the OoB effect rigorouslyusing the methodology of an "effective mask blank". The study in this paper demonstrates that the impact of BB and OoB effects on CDU can be well predicted by simulations.

  19. Automated mask creation from a 3D model using Faethm.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2007-11-01

    We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micro-machining. The masks produced by this design tool can be generic, process independent masks, or if given process constraints, specific for a target process. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology of the model.

  20. Visual backward masking: Modeling spatial and temporal aspects

    PubMed Central

    Hermens, Frouke; Ernst, Udo

    2008-01-01

    In modeling visual backward masking, the focus has been on temporal effects. More specifically, an explanation has been sought as to why strongest masking can occur when the mask is delayed with respect to the target. Although interesting effects of the spatial layout of the mask have been found, only a few attempts have been made to model these phenomena. Here, we elaborate a structurally simple model which employs lateral excitation and inhibition together with different neural time scales to explain many spatial and temporal aspects of backward masking. We argue that for better understanding of visual masking, it is vitally important to consider the interplay of spatial and temporal factors together in one single model. PMID:20517501

  1. Attentional gating models of object substitution masking.

    PubMed

    Põder, Endel

    2013-11-01

    Di Lollo, Enns, and Rensink (2000) proposed the computational model of object substitution (CMOS) to explain their experimental results with sparse visual maskers. This model supposedly is based on reentrant hypotheses testing in the visual system, and the modeled experiments are believed to demonstrate these reentrant processes in human vision. In this study, I analyze the main assumptions of this model. I argue that CMOS is a version of the attentional gating model and that its relationship with reentrant processing is rather illusory. The fit of this model to the data indicates that reentrant hypotheses testing is not necessary for the explanation of object substitution masking (OSM). Further, the original CMOS cannot predict some important aspects of the experimental data. I test 2 new models incorporating an unselective processing (divided attention) stage; these models are more consistent with data from OSM experiments. My modeling shows that the apparent complexity of OSM can be reduced to a few simple and well-known mechanisms of perception and memory.

  2. A model of PSF estimation for coded mask infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ao; Jin, Jie; Wang, Qing; Yang, Jingyu; Sun, Yi

    2014-11-01

    The point spread function (PSF) of imaging system with coded mask is generally acquired by practical measure- ment with calibration light source. As the thermal radiation of coded masks are relatively severe than it is in visible imaging systems, which buries the modulation effects of the mask pattern, it is difficult to estimate and evaluate the performance of mask pattern from measured results. To tackle this problem, a model for infrared imaging systems with masks is presented in this paper. The model is composed with two functional components, the coded mask imaging with ideal focused lenses and the imperfection imaging with practical lenses. Ignoring the thermal radiation, the systems PSF can then be represented by a convolution of the diffraction pattern of mask with the PSF of practical lenses. To evaluate performances of different mask patterns, a set of criterion are designed according to different imaging and recovery methods. Furthermore, imaging results with inclined plane waves are analyzed to achieve the variation of PSF within the view field. The influence of mask cell size is also analyzed to control the diffraction pattern. Numerical results show that mask pattern for direct imaging systems should have more random structures, while more periodic structures are needed in system with image reconstruction. By adjusting the combination of random and periodic arrangement, desired diffraction pattern can be achieved.

  3. Progress on EUV mask fabrication for 32-nm technology node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojing; Yan, Pei-Yang; Liang, Ted; Park, Seh-jin; Sanchez, Peter; Shu, Emily Y.; Ultanir, Erdem A.; Henrichs, Sven; Stivers, Alan; Vandentop, Gilroy; Lieberman, Barry; Qu, Ping

    2007-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tool development achieved a big milestone last year as two full-field Alpha Demo Tools (ADT) were shipped to customers by ASML. In the future horizon, a full field "EUV1" exposure tool from Nikon will be available by the end of 20071 and the pre-production EUV exposure tools from ASML are targeted for 20092. It is essential that high quality EUVL masks can be made and delivered to the EUVL tool users to support the technology development. In the past year, we have demonstrated mask fabrication with low stress absorber deposition and good etch process control yielding a vertical etch profile and a mask CD control of 5.7 nm for 32 nm (1x) space and 7.4 nm for 32 nm (1x) lines. Mask pattern resolution of 15 nm (1x) dense lines was achieved. Full field reflective mask die-to-die inspection at a 125nm pixel size was demonstrated after low defect multilayer blanks became available. In this paper, we will present details of the Intel EUVL Mask Pilot Line progress in EUVL mask defect reduction, pattern CD performance, program defect mask design and inspection, in-house absorber film development and its performance, and EUVL metrology tool development. We will demonstrate an overall improvement in EUV mask manufacturing readiness due to our Pilot Line activities.

  4. Source mask optimization using 3D mask and compact resist models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sewefy, Omar; Chen, Ao; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Chung, Angeline; Foong, Yee Mei; Adam, Kostas; Sturtevant, John

    2016-03-01

    Source Mask Optimization (SMO) has played an important role in technology setup and ground rule definition since the 2x nm technology node. While improvements in SMO algorithms have produced higher quality and more consistent results, the accuracy of the overall solution is critically linked to how faithfully the entire patterning system is modeled, from mask down to substrate. Fortunately, modeling technology has continued to advance to provide greater accuracy in modeling 3D mask effects, 3D resist behavior, and resist phenomena. Specifically, the Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) approximates the 3D mask response as a superposition of edge-responses.1 The DDM can be applied to a sectorized illumination source based on Hybrid-Hopkins Abbe approximation,2 which provides an accurate and fast solution for the modeling of 3D mask effects and has been widely used in OPC modeling. The implementation of DDM in the SMO flow, however, is more challenging because the shape and intensity of the source, unlike the case in OPC modeling, is evolving along the optimization path. As a result, it gets more complicated. It is accepted that inadequate pupil sectorization results in reduced accuracy in any application, however in SMO the required uniformity and density of pupil sampling is higher than typical OPC and modeling cases. In this paper, we describe a novel method to implement DDM in the SMO flow. The source sectorization is defined by following the universal pixel sizes used in SMO. Fast algorithms are developed to enable computation of edge signals from each fine pixel of the source. In this case, each pixel has accurate information to describe its contribution to imaging and the overall objective function. A more continuous angular spectrum from 3D mask scattering is thus captured, leading to accurate modeling of 3D mask effects throughout source optimization. This method is applied on a 2x nm middle-of-line layer test case. The impact of the 3D mask model accuracy on

  5. Modeling Spatial and Temporal Aspects of Visual Backward Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Luksys, Gediminas; Gerstner, Wulfram; Herzog, Michael H.; Ernst, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Visual backward masking is a versatile tool for understanding principles and limitations of visual information processing in the human brain. However, the mechanisms underlying masking are still poorly understood. In the current contribution, the authors show that a structurally simple mathematical model can explain many spatial and temporal…

  6. Model-based mask data preparation (MB-MDP) for ArF and EUV mask process correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Kazuyuki; Bork, Ingo; Fujimura, Aki

    2011-05-01

    Using Model-Based Mask Data Preparation (MB-MDP) complex masks with complex sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) can be written in practical write times with today's leading-edge production VSB machines by allowing overlapping VSB shots. This simulation-based approach reduces shot count by taking advantage of the added flexibility in being able to overlap shots. The freedom to overlap shots, it turns out, also increases mask fidelity, CDU on the mask, and CDU on the wafer by writing sub-100nm mask features more accurately, and with better dose margin. This paper describes how overlapping shots enhance mask and wafer quality for various sub-100nm features on ArF masks. In addition, this paper describes how EUV mask accuracy can be enhanced uniquely by allowing overlapping shots.

  7. Integrated mask and optics simulations for mask corner rounding effect in OPC modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jing; Deng, Zhijie; Koo, Kyoil; Shiely, James; Lee, Sooryong; Zhang, Yunqiang; Fan, Yongfa; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a novel mask corner rounding (MCR) modeling approach based on Synopsys' Integrated Mask and Optics (IMO) modeling framework. The point spread functions of single, double, and elliptical Gaussians are applied to the IMO mask kernels to simulate MCR effects. The simulation results on two dimensional patterns indicate that the aerial image intensity variation is proportional to the MCR induced effective area variations for single type corners. The relationship may be reversed when multiple types of corners exist, where the corners close to the maximum intensity region have a greater influence than others. The CD variations due to MCR can be estimated by the effective area variation ratio and the image slope around the threshold. The good fitting results on line-end patterns indicate that the ΔCD is the quadratic function of the Gaussian standard deviations. OPC modeling on 28nm-node contacts shows that MCR has significant impact on model fitting results and process window controls. By considering the real mask geometry effects and allowing in-line calibration of model parameters, the IMO simulation framework significantly improves the OPC model accuracy, and maintains the calibration speed at a good level.

  8. Total source mask optimization: high-capacity, resist modeling, and production-ready mask solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhry, Moutaz; Granik, Yuri; Adam, Kostas; Lai, Kafai

    2011-11-01

    As the demand for taking Source Mask Optimization (SMO) technology to the full-chip level is increasing, the development of a flow that overcomes the limitations which hinder this technology's moving forward to the production level is a priority for Litho-Engineers. The aim of this work is to discuss advantages of using a comprehensive novel SMO flow that outperforms conventional techniques in areas of high capacity simulations, resist modeling and the production of a final manufacturable mask. We show results that indicate the importance of adding large number of patterns to the SMO exploration space, as well as taking into account resist effects during the optimization process and how this flow incorporates the final mask as a production solution. The high capacity of this flow increases the number of patterns and their area by a factor of 10 compared to other SMO techniques. The average process variability band is improved up to 30% compared to the traditional lithography flows.

  9. MASKED AREAS IN SHEAR PEAK STATISTICS: A FORWARD MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; Kratochvil, J. M.; Dawson, W.

    2016-03-10

    The statistics of shear peaks have been shown to provide valuable cosmological information beyond the power spectrum, and will be an important constraint of models of cosmology in forthcoming astronomical surveys. Surveys include masked areas due to bright stars, bad pixels etc., which must be accounted for in producing constraints on cosmology from shear maps. We advocate a forward-modeling approach, where the impacts of masking and other survey artifacts are accounted for in the theoretical prediction of cosmological parameters, rather than correcting survey data to remove them. We use masks based on the Deep Lens Survey, and explore the impact of up to 37% of the survey area being masked on LSST and DES-scale surveys. By reconstructing maps of aperture mass the masking effect is smoothed out, resulting in up to 14% smaller statistical uncertainties compared to simply reducing the survey area by the masked area. We show that, even in the presence of large survey masks, the bias in cosmological parameter estimation produced in the forward-modeling process is ≈1%, dominated by bias caused by limited simulation volume. We also explore how this potential bias scales with survey area and evaluate how much small survey areas are impacted by the differences in cosmological structure in the data and simulated volumes, due to cosmic variance.

  10. MASKED AREAS IN SHEAR PEAK STATISTICS: A FORWARD MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; Kratochvil, J. M.; Dawson, W.

    2016-03-09

    The statistics of shear peaks have been shown to provide valuable cosmological information beyond the power spectrum, and will be an important constraint of models of cosmology in forthcoming astronomical surveys. Surveys include masked areas due to bright stars, bad pixels etc., which must be accounted for in producing constraints on cosmology from shear maps. We advocate a forward-modeling approach, where the impacts of masking and other survey artifacts are accounted for in the theoretical prediction of cosmological parameters, rather than correcting survey data to remove them. We use masks based on the Deep Lens Survey, and explore the impact of up to 37% of the survey area being masked on LSST and DES-scale surveys. By reconstructing maps of aperture mass the masking effect is smoothed out, resulting in up to 14% smaller statistical uncertainties compared to simply reducing the survey area by the masked area. We show that, even in the presence of large survey masks, the bias in cosmological parameter estimation produced in the forward-modeling process is ≈1%, dominated by bias caused by limited simulation volume. We also explore how this potential bias scales with survey area and evaluate how much small survey areas are impacted by the differences in cosmological structure in the data and simulated volumes, due to cosmic variance.

  11. On-line simulations of models for backward masking.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gregory

    2003-11-01

    Five simulations of quantitative models of visual backward masking are available on the Internet at http://www.psych.purdue.edu/-gfrancis/Publications/BackwardMasking/. The simulations can be run in a Web browser that supports the Java programming language. This article describes the motivation for making the simulations available and gives a brief introduction as to how the simulations are used. The source code is available on the Web page, and this article describes how the code is organized.

  12. Mask model calibration for MPC applications utilizing shot dose assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Mishra, Kushlendra; Bürgel, Christian; Standiford, Keith; Chua, Gek Soon

    2014-10-01

    Shrinking feature sizes and the need for tighter CD (Critical Dimension) control require the introduction of new technologies in mask making processes. One of those methods is the dose assignment of individual shots on VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) mask writers to compensate CD non-linearity effects and improve dose edge slope. Using increased dose levels only for most critical features, generally only for the smallest CDs on a mask, the change in mask write time is minimal while the increase in image quality can be significant. However, this technology requires accurate modeling of the mask effects, especially the CD/dose dependencies. This paper describes a mask model calibration flow for Mask Process Correction (MPC) applications with shot dose assignment. The first step in the calibration flow is the selection of appropriate test structures. For this work, a combination of linespace patterns as well as a series of contact patterns are used for calibration. Features sizes vary from 34 nm up to several micrometers in order to capture a wide range of CDs and pattern densities. After mask measurements are completed the results are carefully analyzed and measurements very close to the process window limitation and outliers are removed from the data set. One key finding in this study is that by including patterns exposed at various dose levels the simulated contours of the calibrated model very well match the SEM contours even if the calibration was based entirely on gauge based CD values. In the calibration example shown in this paper, only 1D line and space measurements as well as 1D contact measurements are used for calibration. However, those measurements include patterns exposed at dose levels between 75% and 150% of the nominal dose. The best model achieved in this study uses 2 e-beam kernels and 4 kernels for the simulation of development and etch effects. The model error RMS on a large range of CD down to 34 nm line CD is 0.71 nm. The calibrated model is then

  13. Extreme ultraviolet lithography mask etch study and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Chandrachood, Madhavi; Sabharwal, Amitabh

    2013-04-01

    An overview of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask etch is presented and a EUVL mask etch study was carried out. Today, EUVL implementation has three critical challenges that hinder its adoption: extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source power, resist resolution-line width roughness-sensitivity, and a qualified EUVL mask. The EUVL mask defect challenges result from defects generated during blank preparation, absorber and multilayer deposition processes, as well as patterning, etching and wet clean processes. Stringent control on several performance criteria including critical dimension (CD) uniformity, etch bias, micro-loading, profile control, defect control, and high etch selectivity requirement to capping layer is required during the resist pattern duplication on the underlying absorber layer. EUVL mask absorbers comprise of mainly tantalum-based materials rather than chrome- or MoSi-based materials used in standard optical masks. Compared to the conventional chrome-based absorbers and phase shift materials, tantalum-based absorbers need high ion energy to obtain moderate etch rates. However, high ion energy may lower resist selectivity, and could introduce defects. Current EUVL mask consists of an anti-reflective layer on top of the bulk absorber. Recent studies indicate that a native oxide layer would suffice as an anti-reflective coating layer during the electron beam inspection. The absorber thickness and the material properties are optimized based on optical density targets for the mask as well as electromagnetic field effects and optics requirements of the patterning tools. EUVL mask etch processes are modified according to the structure of the absorber, its material, and thickness. However, etch product volatility is the fundamental requirement. Overlapping lithographic exposure near chip border may require etching through the multilayer, resulting in challenges in profile control and etch selectivity. Optical proximity correction is applied to further

  14. Investigation and modeling of CPL mask profiles using OCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsuan-Chen; Lin, Ren-Hao; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Huang, Cheng-Hsuan; Lien, Ta-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Jen; Lee, Gaston; Lee, Hsin-Chang; Yen, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Mask profile of chromeless phase-shifting lithography (CPL) defined by OCD has been investigated. In CPL masks, unbalanced bombardments caused by different ion accelerations lead to the formation of micro-notch structures. A better understanding of micro-notch structures is essential for quality gating of mask processes to improve of CPL mask profiles. By measuring 12 of 16 elements of Mueller matrix, we are able to set up a model to simulate the depth of micro-notch structure profile which shows good correlation with TEM images. Moreover, values of CD, quartz etching depth and side wall angle acquired by OCD are presented and compared with those obtained by SEM, TEM and AFM, respectively.

  15. EUV mask inspection study for sub-20nm device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Inkyun; Yoon, Gisung; Na, Ji Hoon; Chung, Paul D. H.; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2012-11-01

    Reflected light inspection has been used to inspect EUVL mask which consists of multi layers and metal absorber. However, sub-wavelength half pitch patterns and reflected inspection make unprecedented phenomenon like tone inversion. These lead EUV inspection more difficult in detectability and inspectability for separating out defects and false. In this study, we report the evaluation result of inspection dependency of illumination conditions like OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), sigma and polarization for sub-20nm EUVL PDM(programmed defect mask). With inspection of sub- 20nm device mask, we finally address the inspection feasibility for sub-20nm device and the future direction of inspection technology.

  16. Model-based virtual VSB mask writer verification for efficient mask error checking and optimization prior to MDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Robert C.; Standiford, Keith; Lukanc, Todd; Ning, Guo Xiang; Verma, Piyush; Batarseh, Fadi; Chua, Gek Soon; Fujimura, Akira; Pang, Linyong

    2014-10-01

    A methodology is described wherein a calibrated model-based `Virtual' Variable Shaped Beam (VSB) mask writer process simulator is used to accurately verify complex Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) mask designs prior to Mask Data Preparation (MDP) and mask fabrication. This type of verification addresses physical effects which occur in mask writing that may impact lithographic printing fidelity and variability. The work described here is motivated by requirements for extreme accuracy and control of variations for today's most demanding IC products. These extreme demands necessitate careful and detailed analysis of all potential sources of uncompensated error or variation and extreme control of these at each stage of the integrated OPC/ MDP/ Mask/ silicon lithography flow. The important potential sources of variation we focus on here originate on the basis of VSB mask writer physics and other errors inherent in the mask writing process. The deposited electron beam dose distribution may be examined in a manner similar to optical lithography aerial image analysis and image edge log-slope analysis. This approach enables one to catch, grade, and mitigate problems early and thus reduce the likelihood for costly long-loop iterations between OPC, MDP, and wafer fabrication flows. It moreover describes how to detect regions of a layout or mask where hotspots may occur or where the robustness to intrinsic variations may be improved by modification to the OPC, choice of mask technology, or by judicious design of VSB shots and dose assignment.

  17. Potential energy sputtering of EUVL materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, J M; Ratliff, L P; Gillaspy, J D; Bajt, S

    2004-07-02

    Of the many candidates employed for understanding the erosion of critical Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) components, potential energy damage remains relatively uninvestigated. Unlike the familiar kinetic energy sputtering, which is a consequence of the momentum transferred by an ion to atoms in the target, potential energy sputtering occurs when an ion rapidly collects charge from the target as it neutralizes. Since the neutralization energy of a singly charged ion is typically on the order of 10 eV, potential energy effects are generally neglected for low charge state ions, and hence the bulk of the sputtering literature. As an ion's charge state is increased, the potential energy (PE) increases rapidly, e.g. PE(Xe{sup 1+})= 11 eV, PE(Xe{sup 10+}) = 810 eV, PE(Xe{sup 20+}) = 4.6 keV, etc. By comparison, the binding energy of a single atom on a surface is typically about 5 eV, so even relatively inefficient energy transfer mechanisms can lead to large quantities of material being removed, e.g. 25% efficiency for Xe{sup 10+} corresponds to {approx} 40 atoms/ion. By comparison, singly charged xenon ions with {approx} 20 keV of kinetic energy sputter only about 5 atoms/ion at normal incidence, and less than 1 atom/ion at typical EUV source energies. EUV light sources are optimized for producing approximately 10{sup 16} xenon ions per shot with an average charge state of q=10 in the core plasma. At operational rates of {approx}10 kHz, the number of ions produced per second becomes a whopping 10{sup 20}. Even if only one in a billion ions reaches the collector, erosion rates could reach {approx}10{sup 12} atoms per second, severely reducing the collector lifetime (for an average yield of 10 atoms/ion). In addition, efforts to reduce contamination effects may contribute to reduced neutralization and even larger potential energy damages rates (discussed further below). In order to provide accurate estimates for collector lifetimes and to develop mitigation schemes

  18. The difficult business model for mask equipment makers and mask infrastructure development support from consortia and governments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    The extension of optical projection lithography through immersion to patterning features with half pitch <=65 nm is placing greater demands on the mask. Strong resolution enhancement techniques (RETs), such as embedded and alternating phase shift masks and complex model-based optical proximity correction, are required to compensate for diffraction and limited depth of focus (DOF). To fabricate these masks, many new or upgraded tools are required to write patterns, measure feature sizes and placement, inspect for defects, review defect printability and repair defects on these masks. Beyond the significant technical challenges, suppliers of mask fabrication equipment face the challenge of being profitable in the small market for mask equipment while encountering significant R&D expenses to bring new generations of mask fabrication equipment to market. The total available market for patterned masks is estimated to be $2.5B to $2.9B per year. The patterned mask market is about 20% of the market size for lithography equipment and materials. The total available market for mask-making equipment is estimated to be about $800M per year. The largest R&D affordability issue arises for the makers of equipment for fabricating masks where total available sales are typically less than ten units per year. SEMATECH has used discounted cash flow models to predict the affordable R&D while maintaining industry accepted internal rates of return. The results have been compared to estimates of the total R&D cost to bring a new generation of mask equipment to market for various types of tools. The analysis revealed that affordability of the required R&D is a significant problem for many suppliers of mask-making equipment. Consortia such as SEMATECH and Selete have played an important role in cost sharing selected mask equipment and material development projects. Governments in the United States, in Europe and in Japan have also helped equipment suppliers with support for R&D. This paper

  19. System for generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model using topological analysis

    DOEpatents

    Schiek, Richard

    2006-06-20

    A method of generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model comprises providing a three-dimensional model representing a micro-electro-mechanical structure for manufacture and a description of process mask requirements, reducing the three-dimensional model to a topological description of unique cross sections, and selecting candidate masks from the unique cross sections and the cross section topology. The method further can comprise reconciling the candidate masks based on the process mask requirements description to produce two-dimensional process masks.

  20. Phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph mask fabrication, characterization, and modeling for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Wilson, Daniel; Muller, Richard; Sidick, Erkin; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a second-generation occulting mask for a phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph, designed for use on the WFIRST-AFTA mission. The mask has many small features (˜micron lateral scales) and was fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory, then characterized using a scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and optical interferometric microscope. The measured fabrication errors were then fed to a wavefront control model which predicts the contrast performance of a full coronagraph. The expected coronagraphic performance using this mask is consistent with observing ˜15 planetary targets with WFIRST-AFTA in a reasonable time (<1 day/target).

  1. Binaural Masking: An Analysis of Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-15

    predictions of the model suggest that the commonly used combination of the 2AFC procedure and the "l up 2 down" rule is the least efficient method of...consistent, but generally show the combination of the 2AFC procedure and the "l up 2 down" rule to be one of the least efficient methods. A manuscript is

  2. Binaural Masking: An Analysis of Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    model suggest that the commonly used (’mbination of the 2AFC procedure and the " I up 2 down" rule is the least efficienl mellod of estimating a...geneirally show the combination of the 2AFC procedLire and (he "I up 2 down" rule to be one of ihe least efficient nethods. A manuscript has been

  3. Mask process matching using a model based data preparation solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Brian; Saib, Mohamed; Figueiro, Thiago; Petroni, Paolo; Progler, Chris; Schiavone, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Process matching is the ability to precisely reproduce the signature of a given fabrication process while using a different one. A process signature is typically described as systematic CD variation driven by feature geometry as a function of feature size, local density or distance to neighboring structures. The interest of performing process matching is usually to address differences in the mask fabrication process without altering the signature of the mask, which is already validated by OPC models and already used in production. The need for such process matching typically arises from the expansion of the production capacity within the same or different mask fabrication facilities, from the introduction of new, perhaps more advanced, equipment to deliver same process of record masks and/or from the re-alignment of processes which have altered over time. For state-of-the-art logic and memory mask processes, such matching requirements can be well below 2nm and are expected to reduce below 1nm in near future. In this paper, a data preparation solution for process matching is presented and discussed. Instead of adapting the physical process itself, a calibrated model is used to modify the data to be exposed by the source process in order to induce the results to match the one obtained while running the target process. This strategy consists in using the differences among measurements from the source and target processes, in the calibration of a single differential model. In this approach, no information other than the metrology results is required from either process. Experimental results were obtained by matching two different processes at Photronics. The standard deviation between both processes was of 2.4nm. After applying the process matching technique, the average absolute difference between the processes was reduced to 1.0nm with a standard deviation of 1.3nm. The methods used to achieve the result will be described along with implementation considerations, to

  4. Chromatic induction and contrast masking: similar models, different goals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Sandra; Otazu, Xavier; Laparra, Valero; Malo, Jesús

    2013-03-01

    Normalization of signals coming from linear sensors is an ubiquitous mechanism of neural adaptation.1 Local interaction between sensors tuned to a particular feature at certain spatial position and neighbor sensors explains a wide range of psychophysical facts including (1) masking of spatial patterns, (2) non-linearities of motion sensors, (3) adaptation of color perception, (4) brightness and chromatic induction, and (5) image quality assessment. Although the above models have formal and qualitative similarities, it does not necessarily mean that the mechanisms involved are pursuing the same statistical goal. For instance, in the case of chromatic mechanisms (disregarding spatial information), different parameters in the normalization give rise to optimal discrimination or adaptation, and different non-linearities may give rise to error minimization or component independence. In the case of spatial sensors (disregarding color information), a number of studies have pointed out the benefits of masking in statistical independence terms. However, such statistical analysis has not been performed for spatio-chromatic induction models where chromatic perception depends on spatial configuration. In this work we investigate whether successful spatio-chromatic induction models,6 increase component independence similarly as previously reported for masking models. Mutual information analysis suggests that seeking an efficient chromatic representation may explain the prevalence of induction effects in spatially simple images.

  5. Better numerical model for shape-dependent dose margin correction using model-based mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yasuki; Kubota, Takao; Kouno, Kenji; Hagiwara, Kazuyuki; Matsushita, Shohei; Hara, Daisuke

    2013-06-01

    For the mask making community, maintaining acceptable dose margin has been recognized as a critical factor in the mask-making process. This is expected to be more critical for 20nm logic node masks and beyond. To deal with this issue, model-based mask data preparation (MB-MDP) had been presented as a useful method to obtain sufficient dose margin for these complex masks, in addition to reducing shot count. When the MB-MDP approach is applied in the actual mask production, the prediction of the dose margin and the CD in the finished mask is essential. This paper describes an improved model of mask process which predicts dose margin and CD in finished masks better compared with the single Gaussian model presented in previous work. The better predictions of this simple numerical model are confirmed with simulation by D2S and actual mask written by HOYA using JEOL JBX-3200MV.

  6. Analysis of a relation between the spatial frequency of electrostatic chuck and induced mask inplane distortion (IPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Ota, Kazuya; Nishimura, Naosuke; Warisawa, Shin'ichi; Ishihara, Sunao

    2009-03-01

    Due to potential applications of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) to 22 nm half-pitch (hp) generations, EUVL is well researched. However, current SEMI standards about the chuck are based on only the local slope of roughness. Herein chuck standards, which consider the spatial frequency of the chuck surface roughness as well as the local slope of the shape, are proposed by examining the chuck roughness. To prevent a mask pattern shift when an EUVL mask is clamped by an electrostatic chuck, the roughness height must be limited. Thus, the in-plane distortion (IPD) and out-of-plane distortion (OPD) are introduced to evaluate the mask pattern shift. This research utilizes ANSYS to evaluate the relationship between the spatial frequency of chuck roughness and IPD/OPD induced on the mask surface after an EUVL mask is clamped by the chuck. The IPD depends on the local slope of the surface roughness shape of the electrostatic chuck (ESC) as well as the spatial frequency of the roughness. Therefore, re-polishing the chuck surface can decrease IPD. Moreover, the spatial frequency of roughness must be considered when a mask pattern shift correction is performed according to the surface roughness shape of the EUVL mask and ESC.

  7. 3D mask modeling with oblique incidence and mask corner rounding effects for the 32nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saied, Mazen; Foussadier, Franck; Belledent, Jérôme; Trouiller, Yorick; Schanen, Isabelle; Yesilada, Emek; Gardin, Christian; Urbani, Jean Christophe; Sundermann, Frank; Robert, Frédéric; Couderc, Christophe; Vautrin, Florent; LeCam, Laurent; Kerrien, Gurwan; Planchot, Jonathan; Martinelli, Catherine; Wilkinson, Bill; Rody, Yves; Borjon, Amandine; Morgana, Nicolo; Di-Maria, Jean-Luc; Farys, Vincent

    2007-10-01

    The perpetual shrinking in critical dimensions in semiconductor devices is driving the need for increased resolution in optical lithography. Increasing NA to gain resolution also increases Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) model complexity. Some optical effects which have been completely neglected in OPC modeling become important. Over the past few years, off-axis illumination has been widely used to improve the imaging process. OPC models which utilize such illumination still use the thin film mask approximation (Kirchhoff approach), during optical model generation, which utilizes a normal incidence. However, simulating a three dimensional mask near-field using an off-axis illumination requires OPC models to introduce oblique incidence. In addition, the use of higher NA systems introduces high obliquity field components that can no longer be assimilated as normal incident waves. The introduction of oblique incidence requires other effects, such as corner rounding of mask features, to be considered, that are seldom taken into account in OPC modeling. In this paper, the effects of oblique incidence and corner rounding of mask features on resist contours of 2D structures (i.e. line-ends and corners) are studied. Rigorous electromagnetic simulations are performed to investigate the scattering properties of various lithographic 32nm node mask structures. Simulations are conducted using a three dimensional phase shift mask topology and an off-axis illumination at high NA. Aerial images are calculated and compared with those obtained from a classical normal incidence illumination. The benefits of using an oblique incidence to improve hot-spot prediction will be discussed.

  8. Calibration of a Spatial-Temporal Discrimination Model from Forward, Simultaneous, and Backward Masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.; Beard, B. L.; Stone, Leland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have been developing a simplified spatial-temporal discrimination model similar to our simplified spatial model in that masking is assumed to be a function of the local visible contrast energy. The overall spatial-temporal sensitivity of the model is calibrated to predict the detectability of targets on a uniform background. To calibrate the spatial-temporal integration functions that define local visible contrast energy, spatial-temporal masking data are required. Observer thresholds were measured (2IFC) for the detection of a 12 msec target stimulus in the presence of a 700 msec mask. Targets were 1, 3 or 9 c/deg sine wave gratings. Masks were either one of these gratings or two of them combined. The target was presented in 17 temporal positions with respect to the mask, including positions before, during and after the mask. Peak masking was found near mask onset and offset for 1 and 3 c/deg targets, while masking effects were more nearly uniform during the mask for the 9 c/deg target. As in the purely spatial case, the simplified model can not predict all the details of masking as a function of masking component spatial frequencies, but overall the prediction errors are small.

  9. Modeling mask pellicle effects for OPC/RET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalova, Lena; Song, Hua; Lucas, Kevin; Zhang, Qiaolin; Shiely, James

    2008-05-01

    A thin membrane called a pellicle is commonly used to protect the mask from contamination. The thickness of the pellicle material is usually optimized at normal incident angle to minimize the thin film optics interference effect by cancellation of the reflected light from the top ambient/pellicle interface with the reflected light from the bottom pellicle/ambient interface. In previous lithography generations the maximum angle collected by the projection lens (NA) was low, hence the normal incidence approach was valid, and the transmission loss for the non-normal incident angles was minor and ignored. With modern hyper-NA imaging for 45nm and smaller nodes, this transmission attenuation becomes larger. The more stringent CD error budget of these technology nodes demands that this effect should not be ignored anymore. In this paper, we present a modeling framework that takes into consideration the high angle pellicle effects. Taking the pellicle's polarization state dependent transmission data, which can be measured or computed with a rigorous simulator, we first present the pellicle transmission property as Jones matrices on the pupil plane, and then incorporate pellicle modeling into the existing vector model for lithography imaging computation. Existing modeling software for modelbased OPC/RET tools is easily enhanced to include pellicle modeling. Using Synopsys' OPC/RET modeling software ProGen, we investigate the necessity of pellicle effect modeling for mask synthesis for 45 nm and smaller nodes. Numerical experiments are performed to study the impact of illumination polarization on the accuracy of lithography simulation and the quality of OPC results.

  10. Simple model for spatial-frequency masking and contrast discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barten, Peter G. J.

    1995-04-01

    After some principal considerations about noise and the psychometric function,we present a model for the masking of a spatial frequency patten by nonwhite noise. From threshold elevation measurements by Stromeyer and Julesz, we derive a distribution function for the disturbing effect of one frequency on the detection of another frequency. We apply the resulting formulas on contrast sensitivity measurements with nonwhite noise by van Meeteren and Valeton. Next we use the same principles to derive a simple model for contrast discrimination. We consider the pedestal modulation as a nonwhite noise source of a single spatial frequency that hampers contrast detection. We show that contrast discrimination plots for different spatial frequencies will coincide if they are plotted in a normalized way. After a slight practical correction the model appears to be in very good agreement with measurements of various authors published in literature.

  11. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  12. Process liability evaluation for beyond 22nm node using EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawarayama, Kazuo; Aoyama, Hajime; Matsunaga, Kentaro; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Uno, Taiga; Magoshi, Shunko; Kyoh, Suigen; Nakajima, Yumi; Inanami, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kobiki, Ayumi; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kawamura, Daisuke; Takai, Kosuke; Murano, Koji; Hayashi, Yumi; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the most promising candidate for the manufacture of devices with a half pitch of 32 nm and beyond. We are now evaluating the process liability of EUVL in view of the current status of lithography technology development. In a previous study, we demonstrated the feasibility of manufacturing 32-nm-node devices by means of a wafer process that employed the EUV1, a full-field step-and-scan exposure tool. To evaluate yield, a test pattern was drawn on a multilayer resist and exposed. After development, the pattern was replicated in SiO2 film by etching, and metal wires were formed by a damascene process. Resolution enhancement is needed to advance to the 22- nm node and beyond, and a practical solution is off-axis illumination (OAI). This paper presents the results of a study on yield improvement that used a 32-nm-node test chip, and also clarifies a critical issue in the use of EUVL in a wafer process for device manufacture at the 22-nm node and beyond.

  13. EUV mask making: an approach based on the direct patterning of the EUV reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovino, Christian; Dieu, Laurent; Johnstone, Eric; Reyes, Julio; La Fontaine, Bruno M.; Levinson, Harry J.; Pawloski, Adam R.

    2003-12-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the leading candidate for manufacturing integrated circuits beyond the 45-nm technology node. The masks for EUVL are reflective and significantly different from current transmission masks for deep UV lithography. Many authors have demonstrated the patterning of EUVL masks using different types of absorber stacks that were deposited on top of the multilayer reflector. More recently, a new approach based on the etching of the multilayer reflector in order to define the mask pattern was proposed [2]. Using rigorous electro-magnetic simulations, it was shown that this subtractive approach could provide better process latitude, less H-V bias and smaller image-placement errors compared to the traditional masks based on the additive method. Even though the mask processing shows interesting challenges, this approach might offer immediate advantages over the more traditional patterning technique using the absorber stack, beyond those predicted for lithography imaging. These include the possibility to use optical inspection in transmission mode, which can provide the high-contrast images that are essential for high-sensitivity detection of small defects. In this paper, we present the first results on the patterning of EUVL masks using the direct etching the EUVL multilayer reflector (Mo/Si type) to produce EUV binary masks. In particular, we show how the process parameters can be adjusted to control the pattern sidewall angle. We also present an analysis of the influence of this sidewall angle on lithography imaging, based on lithography simulations. Finally, we show results from the optical inspection of these etched-multilayer binary masks (EMBM).

  14. DIET Processes on Ruthenium Surfaces Related to Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL)

    SciTech Connect

    Yakshinskiy, B.; Wasielewski, R; Loginova, E; Hedhili, M; Madey, T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide insights into desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) processes that affect the reflectivity of ruthenium-capped Mo/Si multilayer mirrors working under EUVL (extreme ultraviolet lithography) operating conditions (high vacuum, and 13.5 nm (92 eV) photons). Critical issues are associated with possible oxidation of the 2 nm thick Ru capping layer due to the inevitable background pressure of H{sub 2}O, and carbon build up due to background hydrocarbons. In the present work, we discuss aspects of the radiation-induced surface chemistry of Ru irradiated by 100 eV electrons and 92 eV photons. The cross section for electron-stimulated desorption of oxygen from O-covered Ru is 6 x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}. Carbon accumulation several nm thick occurs on the Ru surface during electron irradiation in methyl methacrylate (MMA) vapor, a model background impurity hydrocarbon. Radiation damage by low-energy secondary electrons is believed to dominate over direct photoexcitation of adsorbates under EUVL conditions. The secondary electron yield from Ru varies strongly with photon energy, and is 0.02 electrons/photon at 92 eV.

  15. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  16. Mechanisms of Masked Priming: Testing the Entry Opening Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    Since it was introduced in Forster and Davis (1984), masked priming has been widely adopted in the psycholinguistic research on visual word recognition, but there has been little consensus on its actual mechanisms, i.e. how it occurs and how it should be interpreted. This dissertation addresses two different interpretations of masked priming, one…

  17. Near-field diffraction simulation on three-dimensional mask model with off-axis illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lin; Cao, Peng-fei; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xiao-ping

    2009-05-01

    In 45nm technology node and beyond with hyper NA and Off-axis Illumination(OAI) lithography simulation, mask topography effect is not ignorable, for calculating near-field distribution based on scalar diffraction theory is insufficient on accuracy. Real three-dimensional (3D) simulation is required for precise evaluation of printing performance and the accuracy of 3D mask model on simulation is a key issue, especially for the mask with contact holes, corners or island patterns, even for 3D defect detection. In this paper, a general 3D mask model on simulation is presented and its near-field diffraction distributions can be described by the thickness of mask, the oblique incident angle, azimuth angle and polarization. Example of simulations are implemented on 3D mask with contact hole without or with optical proximity correction (OPC) assistant patterns, we get the same results as those from rigorous electromagnetic field simulation (REMFS).

  18. Modeling and Observations of Phase-Mask Trapezoidal Profiles with Grating-Fiber Image Reproduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Lindesay, James V.; Lee, Hyung R.; Ndlela, Zolili U.; Thompso, Erica J.

    2000-01-01

    We report on an investigation of the trapezoidal design and fabrication defects in phase masks used to produce Bragg reflection gratings in optical fibers. We used a direct visualization technique to examine the nonuniformity of the interference patterns generated by several phase masks. Fringe patterns from the phase masks are compared with the analogous patterns resulting from two-beam interference. Atomic force microscope imaging of the actual phase gratings that give rise to anomalous fringe patterns is used to determine input parameters for a general theoretical model. Phase masks with pitches of 0.566 and 1.059 microns are modeled and investigated.

  19. Actinic review of EUV masks: performance data and status of the AIMS EUV System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Dirk; Perlitz, Sascha; Magnusson, Krister; Capelli, Renzo; Koch, Markus; Malloy, Matt

    2016-03-01

    The EUV mask infrastructure is of key importance for the successful introduction of EUV lithography into volume production. In particular, for the production of defect free masks an actinic review of potential defect sites is required. ZEISS and the SUNY POLY SEMATECH EUVL Mask Infrastructure consortium started a development program for such an EUV aerial image metrology system, the AIMS EUV. In this paper, we provide measurement data on the system's key specifications and discuss its performance and capability status.

  20. Accurate, full chip 3D electromagnetic field model for non-Manhattan mask corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael; Clifford, Chris; Oliver, Michael; Fryer, David; Tejnil, Edita; Adam, Kostas

    2015-03-01

    The physical process of mask manufacturing produces absorber geometry with significantly less than 90 degree fidelity at corners. The non-Manhattan mask geometry is an essential contributor to the aerial image and resulting patterning performance through focus. Current state of the art models for corner rounding employ "chopping" a 90 degree mask corner, replacing the corner with a small 45 degree edge. In this paper, a methodology is presented to approximate the impact of 3D EMF effects introduced by corners with rounded edges. The approach is integrated into a full chip 3D mask simulation methodology based on the Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) with edge to edge crosstalk correction.

  1. Shape-dependent dose margin correction using model-based mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yasuki; Yamamoto, Ryuuji; Kubota, Takao; Kouno, Kenji; Matsushita, Shohei; Hagiwara, Kazuyuki; Hara, Daisuke

    2012-11-01

    Dose Margin has always been known to be a critical factor in mask making. This paper describes why the issue is far more critical than ever before with the 20-nm logic node and beyond using ArF Immersion lithography. Model-Based Mask Data Preparation (MB-MDP) had been presented [references] to show shot count improvements for these complex masks. This paper describes that MBMDP also improves the dose margin. The improvement predicted with theoretical simulation with D2S is confirmed by the results of real mask written by JBX-3200MV (JEOL) by HOYA.

  2. Automated and integrated mask generation from a CAD constructed 3D model.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-03-01

    We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micromachining. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology to the model. The 3D model is first separated into bodies that are non-intersecting, made from different materials or only linked through a ground plane. Next, for each body unique horizontal cross sections are located and arranged into a tree based on their topological relationship. A branch-wise search of the tree uncovers locations where deposition boundaries must lie and identifies candidate masks creating a generic mask set for the 3D model. Finally, in the last step specific process requirements are considered that may constrain the generic mask set.

  3. A study of defects on EUV mask using blank inspection, patterned mask inspection, and wafer inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S.; Ren, L.; Chan, D.; Wurm, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Nakajima, T.; Kishimoto, M.; Ahn, B.; Kang, I.; Park, J.-O.; Cho, K.; Han, S.-I.; Laursen, T.

    2010-03-12

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. yet link data is available for understanding native defects on real masks. In this paper, a full-field EUV mask is fabricated to investigate the printability of various defects on the mask. The printability of defects and identification of their source from mask fabrication to handling were studied using wafer inspection. The printable blank defect density excluding particles and patterns is 0.63 cm{sup 2}. Mask inspection is shown to have better sensitivity than wafer inspection. The sensitivity of wafer inspection must be improved using through-focus analysis and a different wafer stack.

  4. Efficient full-chip mask 3D model for off-axis illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Yan, Qiliang; Zhang, Lin; Croffie, Ebo; Brooker, Peter; Ren, Qian; Fan, Yongfa

    2013-09-01

    Mask topography (Mask3D) effect is one of the most influential factors in sub-28 nm technology node. To build a successful Mask3D compact model, the runtime efficiency, accuracy and the flexibility to handle various geometry patterns are the three most important criterion to fulfill. In the meanwhile, Mask3D modeling must be able to handle the off-axis illumination (OAI) condition accurately. In this paper, we propose our full chip Mask3D modeling method which is an extension to the edge-based Mask3D model. In our modeling flow, we first review the edge-based Mask3D model and then analyze the impact from the off-axis source. We propose a parameter-based extension to characterize the off-axis impact efficiently. We further introduce two methods to calibrate the OAI-aware parameters by using rigorous or wafer data as the reference. Our experimental results show the great calibration accuracy throughout the defocus range with OAI sources, and validate the accuracy of our two parameter calibration approach.

  5. Accurate, full-chip, three-dimensional electromagnetic field model for non-Manhattan mask corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael C.; Clifford, Chris; Oliver, Mike; Fryer, David; Tejnil, Edita; Adam, Kostas

    2016-04-01

    The physical process of mask manufacturing produces absorber geometry with significant deviations from the 90-deg corners, which are typically assumed in the mask design. The non-Manhattan mask geometry is an essential contributor to the aerial image and resulting patterning performance through focus. Current state-of-the-art models for corner rounding employ "chopping" a 90-deg mask corner, replacing the corner with a small 45-deg edge. A methodology is presented to approximate the impact of three-dimensional (3-D) EMF effects introduced by corners with rounded edges. The approach is integrated into a full-chip 3-D mask simulation methodology based on the domain decomposition method with edge to edge crosstalk correction.

  6. Masked Translation Priming with Semantic Categorization: Testing the Sense Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xin; Forster, Kenneth I.

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments are reported which were designed to test hypotheses concerning the asymmetry of masked translation priming. Experiment 1 confirmed the presence of L2-L1 priming with a semantic categorization task and demonstrated that this effect was restricted to exemplars. Experiment 2 showed that the translation priming effect was not due to…

  7. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  8. Sensitivity-Limiting Factors of at-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Blank Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Tomie, Toshihisa

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity-limiting factors of at-wavelength inspection for extreme UV lithography (EUVL) mask blanks have been analyzed. The sensitivity of the inspection tool is modeled on the basis of the inspection image of programmed multilayer defects and the characterized attributes of the tool components. The characterization includes point spread function (PSF) analysis of the imaging optics and the back-illuminated charge-coupled-device (BI-CCD) sensor as well as power spectral density (PSD) analysis of the mask blank surface. The statistical scaling of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in conjunction with the variables of optics, sensors, and mask blanks has predicted effective improvement paths of its sensitivity. Increasing the magnification of optics, reducing the total PSF, and improving the roughness of mask blanks will address the needs for its application in future generations. Signal intensity dependency on the geometrical attributes of defects is also studied by both experiment and electromagnetic simulation. It is revealed that the bottom height of defects and defect smoothing throughout the multilayer deposition significantly influence defect signal intensity. Comprehensive measures to accommodate a variety of defects and to mitigate associated risks are also discussed.

  9. An engineered design of a diffractive mask for high precision astrometry [Modeling a diffractive mask that calibrates optical distortions

    DOE PAGES

    Dennison, Kaitlin; Ammons, S. Mark; Garrel, Vincent; ...

    2016-06-26

    AutoCAD, Zemax Optic Studio 15, and Interactive Data Language (IDL) with the Proper Library are used to computationally model and test a diffractive mask (DiM) suitable for use in the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) on the Gemini South Telescope. Systematic errors in telescope imagery are produced when the light travels through the adaptive optics system of the telescope. DiM is a transparent, flat optic with a pattern of miniscule dots lithographically applied to it. It is added ahead of the adaptive optics system in the telescope in order to produce diffraction spots that will encode systematic errors inmore » the optics after it. Once these errors are encoded, they can be corrected for. DiM will allow for more accurate measurements in astrometry and thus improve exoplanet detection. Furthermore, the mechanics and physical attributes of the DiM are modeled in AutoCAD. Zemax models the ray propagation of point sources of light through the telescope. IDL and Proper simulate the wavefront and image results of the telescope. Aberrations are added to the Zemax and IDL models to test how the diffraction spots from the DiM change in the final images. Based on the Zemax and IDL results, the diffraction spots are able to encode the systematic aberrations.« less

  10. An engineered design of a diffractive mask for high precision astrometry [Modeling a diffractive mask that calibrates optical distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, Kaitlin; Ammons, S. Mark; Garrel, Vincent; Marin, Eduardo; Sivo, Gaetano; Bendek, Eduardo; Guyon, Oliver

    2016-06-26

    AutoCAD, Zemax Optic Studio 15, and Interactive Data Language (IDL) with the Proper Library are used to computationally model and test a diffractive mask (DiM) suitable for use in the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) on the Gemini South Telescope. Systematic errors in telescope imagery are produced when the light travels through the adaptive optics system of the telescope. DiM is a transparent, flat optic with a pattern of miniscule dots lithographically applied to it. It is added ahead of the adaptive optics system in the telescope in order to produce diffraction spots that will encode systematic errors in the optics after it. Once these errors are encoded, they can be corrected for. DiM will allow for more accurate measurements in astrometry and thus improve exoplanet detection. Furthermore, the mechanics and physical attributes of the DiM are modeled in AutoCAD. Zemax models the ray propagation of point sources of light through the telescope. IDL and Proper simulate the wavefront and image results of the telescope. Aberrations are added to the Zemax and IDL models to test how the diffraction spots from the DiM change in the final images. Based on the Zemax and IDL results, the diffraction spots are able to encode the systematic aberrations.

  11. A non-delta-chrome OPC methodology for process models with three-dimensional mask effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Philip C. W.; Tsai, Kuen-Yu; Tang, Chih-Hsien; Melvin, Lawrence

    2010-04-01

    Delta-chrome optical proximity correction (OPC) has been widely adopted in lithographic patterning for semiconductor manufacturing. During the delta-chrome OPC iteration, a predetermined amount of chrome is added or subtracted from the mask pattern. With this chrome change, the change of exposure intensity error (IE) or the change of edge placement error (EPE) between the printed contour and the target pattern is then calculated based on standard Kirchhoff approximation. Linear approximation is used to predict the amount of the proper chrome change to remove the correction error. This approximation can be very fast and effective, but must be performed iteratively to capture interactions between chrome changes. As integrated circuit (IC) design shrinks to the deep sub-wavelength regime, previously ignored nonlinear process effects, such as three-dimensional (3D) mask effects and resist development effects, become significant for accurate prediction and correction of proximity effects. These nonlinearities challenge the deltachrome OPC methodology. The model response to mask pattern perturbation by linear approximation can be readily computed but inaccurate. In fact, computation of the mask perturbation response becomes complex and expensive. A non-delta-chrome OPC methodology with IE-based feedback compensation is proposed. It determines the amount of the proper chrome change based on IE without intensive computation of mask perturbation response. Its effectiveness in improving patterning fidelity and runtime is examined on a 50-nm practical circuit layout. Despite the presence and the absence of nonlinear 3D mask effects, our results show the proposed non-delta-chrome OPC outperforms the deltachrome one in terms of patterning fidelity and runtime. The results also demonstrate that process models with 3D mask effects limit the use of delta-chrome OPC methodology.

  12. Considering mask pellicle effect for more accurate OPC model at 45nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Heng; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Liguo

    2008-11-01

    Now it comes to the 45nm technology node, which should be the first generation of the immersion micro-lithography. And the brand-new lithography tool makes many optical effects, which can be ignored at 90nm and 65nm nodes, now have significant impact on the pattern transmission process from design to silicon. Among all the effects, one that needs to be pay attention to is the mask pellicle effect's impact on the critical dimension variation. With the implement of hyper-NA lithography tools, light transmits the mask pellicle vertically is not a good approximation now, and the image blurring induced by the mask pellicle should be taken into account in the computational microlithography. In this works, we investigate how the mask pellicle impacts the accuracy of the OPC model. And we will show that considering the extremely tight critical dimension control spec for 45nm generation node, to take the mask pellicle effect into the OPC model now becomes necessary.

  13. Method for fabricating an ultra-low expansion mask blank having a crystalline silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) using Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE) substrates and crystalline silicon. ULE substrates are required for the necessary thermal management in EUVL mask blanks, and defect detection and classification have been obtained using crystalline silicon substrate materials. Thus, this method provides the advantages for both the ULE substrate and the crystalline silicon in an Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) mask blank. The method is carried out by bonding a crystalline silicon wafer or member to a ULE wafer or substrate and thinning the silicon to produce a 5-10 .mu.m thick crystalline silicon layer on the surface of the ULE substrate. The thinning of the crystalline silicon may be carried out, for example, by chemical mechanical polishing and if necessary or desired, oxidizing the silicon followed by etching to the desired thickness of the silicon.

  14. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  15. Determining the critical size of EUV mask substrate defects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Han, Hakseung; Cho, Wonil; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-05-26

    Determining the printability of substrate defects beneath the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflecting multilayer stack is an important issue in EUVL lithography. Several simulation studies have been performed in the past to determine the tolerable defect size on EUV mask blank substrates but the industry still has no exact specification based on real printability tests. Therefore, it is imperative to experimentally determine the printability of small defects on a mask blanks that are caused by substrate defects using direct printing of programmed substrate defect in an EUV exposure tools. SEMATECH fabricated bump type program defect masks using standard electron beam lithography and performed printing tests with the masks using an EUV exposure tool. Defect images were also captured using SEMATECH's Berkeley Actinic Imaging Tool in order to compare aerial defect images with secondary electron microscope images from exposed wafers. In this paper, a comprehensive understanding of substrate defect printability will be presented and printability specifications of EUV mask substrate defects will be discussed.

  16. Determining the Critcial Size of EUV Mask Substrate Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mccall, Monnikue M; Han, Hakseung; Cho, Wonil; Goldberg, Kenneth; Gullikson, Eric; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-02-28

    Determining the printability of substrate defects beneath the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflecting multilayer stack is an important issue in EUVL lithography. Several simulation studies have been performed in the past to determine the tolerable defect size on EUV mask blank substrates but the industry still has no exact specification based on real printability tests. Therefore, it is imperative to experimentally determine the printability of small defects on a mask blanks that are caused by substrate defects using direct printing of programmed substrate defect in an EUV exposure tool. SEMATECH fabricated bump type program defect masks using standard electron beam lithography and performed printing tests with the masks using an EUV exposure tool. Defect images were also captured using SEMATECH's Berkeley Actinic Imaging Tool in order to compare aerial defect images with secondary electron microscope images from exposed wafers. In this paper, a comprehensive understanding of substrate defect printability will be presented and printability specifications of EUV mask substrate defects will be discussed.

  17. Model-based mask data preparation (MB-MDP) and its impact on resist heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Aki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Bork, Ingo

    2011-04-01

    Complex mask shapes will be required on critical layer masks for 20nm logic node, threatening to explode the mask write times. Model-Based Mask Data Preparation (MB-MDP) has been introduced to reduce the shot count required to write complex masks while simultaneously improving resolution and dose margin of sub-100nm features. For production use of MB-MDP, a number of questions have been raised and answered. This paper summarizes these potential issues and their resolutions. In particular, the paper takes an in-depth look at one of the questions: impact of overlapping shots on heating effect. The paper concludes that while heating effect is an important issue for all e-beam writing even with conventional non-overlapping shots, overall dose density per unit time over microns of space is the principal driver behind heating effects. Highly local shot density and shot sequencing does not affect heating significantly, particularly for smaller shots. MB-MDP does not introduce any additional concerns.

  18. Growth and Printability of Multilayer Phase Defects on EUV MaskBlanks

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ted; Ultanir, Erdem; Zhnag, Guojing; Park, Seh-Jin; Anderson, Erik; Gullikson, Eric; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mirkarimi, Paul; Spiller, Eberhard; Baker, Sherry

    2007-06-10

    The ability to fabricate defect-free mask blanks is a well-recognized challenge in enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) for semiconductor manufacturing. Both the specification and reduction of defects necessitate the understanding of their printability and how they are generated and grow during Mo-Si multilayer (ML) deposition. A ML phase defect can be depicted by its topographical profile on the surface as either a bump or pit, which is then characterized by height or depth and width. The complexity of such seemingly simple phase defects lies in the many ways they can be generated and the difficulties of measuring their physical shape/size and optical effects on printability. An effective way to study phase defects is to use a programmed defect mask (PDM) as 'model' test sample where the defects are produced with controlled growth on a ML blank and accurate placement in varying proximity to absorber patterns on the mask. This paper describes our recent study of ML phase defect printability with resist data from exposures of a ML PDM on the EUV micro-exposure tool (MET, 5X reduction with 0.3NA).

  19. Mathematical modeling of pattern formation caused by drying of colloidal film under a mask.

    PubMed

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu; Vodolazskaya, Irina V; Sakharova, Lyudmila V

    2016-02-01

    In our model, we simulate an experiment (D.J. Harris, H. Hu, J.C. Conrad, J.A. Lewis, Patterning colloidal films via evaporative lithography, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 148301 (2007)). A thin colloidal sessile droplet is allowed to dry out on a horizontal hydrophilic surface. A mask just above the droplet predominantly allows evaporation from the droplet free surface directly beneath the holes in the mask. We consider one special case, when the holes in the mask are arranged so that the system has rotational symmetry of order m . We use a speculative evaporative flux to mimic the real system. Advection, diffusion, and sedimentation are taken into account. FlexPDE is utilized to solve an advection-diffusion equation using the finite element method. The simulation demonstrates that the colloidal particles accumulate below the holes as the solvent evaporates. Diffusion can reduce this accumulation.

  20. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 μm wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  1. Properites of ultrathin films appropriate for optics capping layers in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL)

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Edwards, N V; Madey, T E

    2007-06-25

    The contamination of optical surfaces by irradiation shortens optics lifetime and is one of the main concerns for optics used in conjunction with intense light sources, such as high power lasers, 3rd and 4th generation synchrotron sources or plasma sources used in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tools. This paper focuses on properties and surface chemistry of different materials, which as thin layers, could be used as capping layers to protect and extend EUVL optics lifetime. The most promising candidates include single element materials such as ruthenium and rhodium, and oxides such as TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  2. Computational Model for Liquid Phase Electro-Epitaxial Crystal Growth on Partially Masked Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenner, Mikhail; Braun, Richard J.

    2003-03-01

    A computational model for semiconductor crystal growth on a partially masked substrate under simplified LPEE conditions is developed. The model assumes isothermal diffusional growth from molten metal solution, which is enhanced by applied DC current through crystal/melt interface. Finite-difference, front-tracking method is used to numerically evolve the interface according to the set of governing partial differential equations and boundary conditions. Computed examples show strong influence of the electromigration on growth rates in vertical and lateral directions and the dependence of growth on electrical conductivities of substrate and mask materials as well as on wetting contact angle. The study presented is the first attempt to model LPEE growth on patterned substrates commonly employed in semiconductor industry.

  3. Compensation of flare-induced CD changes EUVL

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkholm, John E.; Stearns, Daniel G.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Hector, Scott D.

    2004-11-09

    A method for compensating for flare-induced critical dimensions (CD) changes in photolithography. Changes in the flare level results in undesirable CD changes. The method when used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography essentially eliminates the unwanted CD changes. The method is based on the recognition that the intrinsic level of flare for an EUV camera (the flare level for an isolated sub-resolution opaque dot in a bright field mask) is essentially constant over the image field. The method involves calculating the flare and its variation over the area of a patterned mask that will be imaged and then using mask biasing to largely eliminate the CD variations that the flare and its variations would otherwise cause. This method would be difficult to apply to optical or DUV lithography since the intrinsic flare for those lithographies is not constant over the image field.

  4. Simulated masking of right whale sounds by shipping noise: incorporating a model of the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kane A; Mountain, David C

    2014-03-01

    Many species of large, mysticete whales are known to produce low-frequency communication sounds. These low-frequency sounds are susceptible to communication masking by shipping noise, which also tends to be low frequency in nature. The size of these species makes behavioral assessment of auditory capabilities in controlled, captive environments nearly impossible, and field-based playback experiments are expensive and necessarily limited in scope. Hence, it is desirable to produce a masking model for these species that can aid in determining the potential effects of shipping and other anthropogenic noises on these protected animals. The aim of this study was to build a model that combines a sophisticated representation of the auditory periphery with a spectrogram-based decision stage to predict masking levels. The output of this model can then be combined with a habitat-appropriate propagation model to calculate the potential effects of noise on communication range. For this study, the model was tested on three common North Atlantic right whale communication sounds, both to demonstrate the method and to probe how shipping noise affects the detection of sounds with varying spectral and temporal characteristics.

  5. Theoretical modeling of masking DNA application in aptamer-facilitated biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Cherney, Leonid T; Obrecht, Natalia M; Krylov, Sergey N

    2013-04-16

    In aptamer-facilitated biomarker discovery (AptaBiD), aptamers are selected from a library of random DNA (or RNA) sequences for their ability to specifically bind cell-surface biomarkers. The library is incubated with intact cells, and cell-bound DNA molecules are separated from those unbound and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The partitioning/amplification cycle is repeated multiple times while alternating target cells and control cells. Efficient aptamer selection in AptaBiD relies on the inclusion of masking DNA within the cell and library mixture. Masking DNA lacks primer regions for PCR amplification and is typically taken in excess to the library. The role of masking DNA within the selection mixture is to outcompete any nonspecific binding sequences within the initial library, thus allowing specific DNA sequences (i.e., aptamers) to be selected more efficiently. Efficient AptaBiD requires an optimum ratio of masking DNA to library DNA, at which aptamers still bind specific binding sites but nonaptamers within the library do not bind nonspecific binding sites. Here, we have developed a mathematical model that describes the binding processes taking place within the equilibrium mixture of masking DNA, library DNA, and target cells. An obtained mathematical solution allows one to estimate the concentration of masking DNA that is required to outcompete the library DNA at a desirable ratio of bound masking DNA to bound library DNA. The required concentration depends on concentrations of the library and cells as well as on unknown cell characteristics. These characteristics include the concentration of total binding sites on the cell surface, N, and equilibrium dissociation constants, K(nsL) and K(nsM), for nonspecific binding of the library DNA and masking DNA, respectively. We developed a theory that allows the determination of N, K(nsL), and K(nsM) based on measurements of EC50 values for cells mixed separately with the library and masking DNA

  6. Rapid modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipoles for a masked density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Taylor, A. N.; de la Torre, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we reformulate the forward modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipole moments for a masked density field, as encountered in galaxy redshift surveys. Exploiting the symmetries of the redshift-space correlation function, we provide a masked-field generalization of the Hankel transform relation between the multipole moments in real and Fourier space. Using this result, we detail how a likelihood analysis requiring computation for a broad range of desired P(k) models may be executed 103-104 times faster than with other common approaches, together with significant gains in spectral resolution. We present a concrete application to the complex angular geometry of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey PDR-1 release and discuss the validity of this technique for finite-angle surveys.

  7. Method for characterizing mask defects using image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns

    DOEpatents

    Hau-Riege, Stefan Peter

    2007-05-01

    The invention applies techniques for image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns on the three-dimensional imaging of defects in EUVL multilayer films. The reconstructed image gives information about the out-of-plane position and the diffraction strength of the defect. The positional information can be used to select the correct defect repair technique. This invention enables the fabrication of defect-free (since repaired) X-ray Mo--Si multilayer mirrors. Repairing Mo--Si multilayer-film defects on mask blanks is a key for the commercial success of EUVL. It is known that particles are added to the Mo--Si multilayer film during the fabrication process. There is a large effort to reduce this contamination, but results are not sufficient, and defects continue to be a major mask yield limiter. All suggested repair strategies need to know the out-of-plane position of the defects in the multilayer.

  8. Recent advances in SEMATECH's mask blank development program, the remaining technical challenges, and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Frank; Kearney, Patrick; Kadaksham, Arun J.; Wurm, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    The ability of optical lithography to steadily produce images at increasingly smaller dimension while maintaining pattern fidelity of devices with greater complexity has enabled the success of Moore's Law. Although 193 nm immersion and double patterning techniques have proven successful in extending optical lithography, the strategies proposed for further extension are too costly to support device manufacturing. As a result, greater focus has been shifted to resolving the challenges hindering extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) adoption as the mainstream lithography solution. While similar to conventional optical lithography, there are unique challenges to EUVL, one of which is the change from transmission masks to the reflective masks required for EUVL. The use of reflective reticles greatly increases complexity of EUV reticle structure when compared to the binary masks used with optical lithography. Maximizing the reflectance an EUV mask requires the use of a multilayer Bragg reflector deposited on a finely polished substrate with a thin absorber film on top used to define the device pattern. Although similar in form to the substrates used in optical lithography, the tolerances on figure, surface finish, and defects are significantly more stringent for EUV substrates. Control of aberrations and maintaining pattern fidelity places tight constraints on the flatness and roughness of the EUV substrate; imperfections and particles can result in printable defects. The Bragg reflector of the EUV mask consists of 40 to 50 Si/Mo bi-layers deposited using an ion beam deposition tool. This film stack must be deposited to meet the reflectivity and uniformity requirements of the exposure tool and must be completely free of defects. The absorber film is typically a tantalum-based nitride layer selected for its ability to absorb EUV radiation and maintain thermal stability. The thickness and morphology of this film must be tightly controlled to enable use as the patterning

  9. Actinic review of EUV masks: status and recent results of the AIMSTM EUV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlitz, Sascha; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Weiss, Markus; Hellweg, Dirk; Capelli, Renzo; Magnusson, Krister; Malloy, Matt; Wurm, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Key enabler of the successful introduction of EUV lithography into volume production is the EUV mask infrastructure. For the production of defect free masks, actinic review of potential defect sites to decide on the need for repair or compensation is required. Also, the repair or compensation with the ZEISS MERiT electron beam repair tool needs actinic verification in a closed loop mask repair solution. For the realization of actinic mask review, ZEISS and the SEMATECH EUVL Mask Infrastructure consortium started a development program for an EUV aerial image metrology system, the AIMSTM EUV, with realization of a prototype tool. The development and prototype realization of the AIMSTM EUV has entered the tool calibration and qualification phase utilizing the achieved capabilities of EUV aerial image acquisition and EUV mask handling. In this paper, we discuss the current status of the prototype qualification and show recent measurement results.

  10. Electron beam inspection of 16nm HP node EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Narukawa, Shogo; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Lin, Chia-Wen; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Jau, Jack

    2012-11-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for 16nm HP node semiconductor device manufacturing and beyond. The fabrication of defect free EUV mask is one of the most challenging roadblocks to insert EUVL into high volume manufacturing (HVM). To fabricate and assure the defect free EUV masks, electron beam inspection (EBI) tool will be likely the necessary tool since optical mask inspection systems using 193nm and 199nm light are reaching a practical resolution limit around 16nm HP node EUV mask. For production use of EBI, several challenges and potential issues are expected. Firstly, required defect detection sensitivity is quite high. According to ITRS roadmap updated in 2011, the smallest defect size needed to detect is about 18nm for 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Secondly, small pixel size is likely required to obtain the high sensitivity. Thus, it might damage Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer due to accumulated high density electron beam bombardments. It also has potential of elevation of nuisance defects and reduction of throughput. These challenges must be solved before inserting EBI system into EUV mask HVM line. In this paper, we share our initial inspection results for 16nm HP node EUV mask (64nm HP absorber pattern on the EUV mask) using an EBI system eXplore® 5400 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). In particularly, defect detection sensitivity, inspectability and damage to EUV mask were assessed. As conclusions, we found that the EBI system has capability to capture 16nm defects on 64nm absorber pattern EUV mask, satisfying the sensitivity requirement of 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Furthermore, we confirmed there is no significant damage to susceptible Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer. We also identified that low throughput and high nuisance defect rate are critical challenges needed to address for the 16nm HP node EUV mask inspection. The high nuisance defect rate could be generated by poor LWR and stitching errors during EB writing

  11. Formal specification and verification of a fault-masking and transient-recovery model for digital flight-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John

    1991-01-01

    The formal specification and mechanically checked verification for a model of fault-masking and transient-recovery among the replicated computers of digital flight-control systems are presented. The verification establishes, subject to certain carefully stated assumptions, that faults among the component computers are masked so that commands sent to the actuators are the same as those that would be sent by a single computer that suffers no failures.

  12. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micro-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Barty, Anton; Anderson, Erik; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-02-01

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. They describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV) wavelength microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. The defects present in EUV masks can appear in many well-known forms: as particles that cause amplitude or phase variations in the reflected field; as surface contamination that reduces reflectivity and contrast; and as damage from inspection and use that reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating. This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. They describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in defect repair studies, observations of laser damage, actinic inspection following scanning electron microscopy, and the detection of both native and programmed defects.

  13. A pattern- and optics-independent compact model of Mask3D under off-axis illumination with significant efficiency and accuracy improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Yan, Qiliang; Wei, David; Croffie, Ebo

    2015-03-01

    As the critical dimension keeps shrinking, mask topography effect (Mask3D) becomes considerable to impact the lithography modeling accuracy and the quality of full-chip OPC. Among many challenges in Mask3D modeling, it is critical and particularly demanding to treat off-axis illumination (OAI) properly. In this paper, we present a novel Mask3D model that is completely test pattern- and optics- independent. Such model property enables greatly improved performance in terms of accuracy and consistency on various pattern types (1D/2D) and through a wide range of focus conditions, while no runtime overhead is incurred. The novel model and formulation will be able to save significant modeling time and greatly improve the model reliability, predictability and ease of use. Experimental results validate the claims and demonstrate the superiority to the current state-of-the-art Mask3D modeling method. This is a new generation Mask3D modeling process.

  14. Attenuated phase-shift mask for mitigation of photon shot noise effect in contact hole pattern for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Sik; Hong, Seongchul; Lee, Jae Uk; Lee, Seung Min; Ahn, Jinho

    2014-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), insufficient light source power is the biggest concern for high-volume manufacturing. Additionally, the photon shot noise (PSN) effect is believed to be the main source of degradation in various aspects of imaging performance. In this study, we propose an attenuated phase-shift mask (PSM) as a solution to both of these issues, yielding improved mask performance for the printing of small contact hole (C/H) patterns. Our PSM shows superior imaging performance over that of a binary intensity mask. We speculate that the stochastic imaging characteristics are improved by the enhanced diffraction efficiency of the PSM.

  15. Control of the sidewall angle of an absorber stack using the Faraday cage system for the change of pattern printability in EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Il-Yong; Huh, Sung-Min; Moon, Seong-Yong; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Lee, Jin-Kwan; Moon, Sang Heup; Cho, HanKu

    2008-10-01

    A patterned TaN substrate, which is candidate for a mask absorber in extreme ultra-violet lithography (EUVL), was etched to have inclined sidewalls by using a Faraday cage system under the condition of a 2-step process that allowed the high etch selectivity of TaN over the resist. The sidewall angle (SWA) of the patterned substrate, which was in the shape of a parallelogram after etching, could be controlled by changing the slope of a substrate holder that was placed in the Faraday cage. The performance of an EUV mask, which contained the TaN absorber of an oblique pattern over the molybdenum/silicon multi-layer, was simulated for different cases of SWA. The results indicated that the optical properties, such as the critical dimension (CD), an offset in the CD bias between horizontal and vertical patterns (H-V bias), and a shift in the image position on the wafer, could be controlled by changing the SWA of the absorber stack. The simulation result showed that the effect of the SWA on the optical properties became more significant at larger thicknesses of the absorber and smaller sizes of the target CD. Nevertheless, the contrast of the aerial images was not significantly decreased because the shadow effect caused by either sidewall of the patterned substrate cancelled with each other.

  16. AutoMOPS- B2B and B2C in mask making: Mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction improvement through better information flow management using generic models and standardized languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filies, Olaf; de Ridder, Luc; Rodriguez, Ben; Kujiken, Aart

    2002-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing has become a global business, in which companies of different size unite in virtual enterprises to meet new opportunities. Therefore Mask manufacturing is a key business, but mask ordering is a complex process and is always critical regarding design to market time, even though mask complexity and customer base are increasing using a wide variety of different mask order forms which are frequently faulty and very seldom complete. This is effectively blocking agile manufacturing and can tie wafer fabs to a single mask The goal of the project is elimination of the order verification through paperless, electronically linked information sharing/exchange between chip design, mask production and production stages, which will allow automation of the mask preparation. To cover these new techniques and their specifications as well as the common ones with automated tools a special generic Meta-model will be generated, based on the current standards for mask specifications, including the requirements from the involved partners (Alcatel Microelectronics, Altis, Compugraphics, Infineon, Nimble, Sigma-C), the project works out a pre-normative standard. The paper presents the current status of work. This work is partly funded by the Commission of the European Union under the Fifth Framework project IST-1999-10332 AutoMOPS.

  17. Experimental study of particle-free mask handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Mitsuaki; Ota, Kazuya; Taguchi, Takao; Suga, Osamu

    2009-03-01

    One of the critical issues for EUVL masks is clean and particle-free mask handling. We reported that the number of particle adders on the front side of a mask in the dual pod during the process from the load port to putting on the Electrostatic chuck (ESC) in vacuum could be reduce to less than 0.01 particle/cycle (>=46 nm). In addition, we found that chucking the mask on the ESC caused two serious issues. The first is that many particles stick to on the backside of the mask after chucking on the ESC, raising the question of whether the particle adders on the backside will travel to the front side. We examined the travel of these particles using the substrates after chucking and polystyrene latex (PSL) substrates that were dispersed on the backside. These experiments show that there is very little probability that particles on the backside will travel to the front side. The second issue is whether the mask blanks will charge up by chucking on the ESC and some particles will add on the front side. We measured the electric potential of the back and front sides of the mask and examined the particle adders. Our experiments revealed that to protect the mask from the particles, the mask must be grounded from the beginning to the end. For these two issues, we confirmed that a dual pod system works effectively to protect the mask from particles. This work is supported by NEDO as a part of the EUV mask program.

  18. Computer models for masked hearing experiments with beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Erbe, C; King, A R; Yedlin, M; Farmer, D M

    1999-05-01

    Environmental assessments of manmade noise and its effects on marine mammals need to address the question of how noise interferes with animal vocalizations. Seeking the answer with animal experiments is very time consuming, costly, and often infeasible. This article examines the possibility of estimating results with software models. A matched filter, spectrogram cross-correlation, critical band cross-correlation, and a back-propagation neural network detected a beluga vocalization in three types of ocean noise. Performance was compared to masked hearing experiments with a beluga whale [C. Erbe and D. M. Farmer, Deep-Sea Res. II 45, 1373-1388 (1998)]. The artificial neural network simulated the animal data most closely and raised confidence in its ability to predict the interference of a variety of noise source with a variety of vocalizations.

  19. Efficient modeling of immersion lithography in an aggressive RET mask synthesis flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Min; Lei, Junjiang; Zhang, Lin; Shiely, James P.

    2005-06-01

    Immersion lithography has been accepted as the major breakthrough for enabling next generation deep subwavelength chip production. As it extends the resolution capability of optical lithography to the next technology node, it brings fresh challenges to resolution enhancement techniques (RET). Accurate lithography modeling becomes even more critical for RET at the sub-65nm nodes. On the other hand, immersion models need to be fully compatible within the context of existing optical proximity correction (OPC) flow. With the hyper NA approach, modeling of immersion lithography requires full vector treatment of the electric fields in the propagating light wave. We developed a comprehensive vector model that considers not only the plane wave decomposition from the mask to the wafer plane, but also the light propagation through a thin film stack on the wafer. With the integration of this model into Synopsys OPC modeling tool ProGen, we have simulated and demonstrated several important enhancements introduced by immersion. In the mean time, the modeling and correction flow for immersion is completely compatible with the current OPC infrastructure.

  20. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, S.B.; Kemp, C.D.; Barty, A.; Anderson, E.H.; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-05-26

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. We describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV wavelength) microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. Types of defects: (a) Buried Substrate Defects: particles & pits (causes amplitude and/or phase variations); (b) Surface Contamination (reduces reflectivity and (possibly) contrast); (c) Damage from Inspection and Use (reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating). This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. We describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in four cases: defect repair studies; observations of laser damage; after scanning electron microscopy; and native and programmed defects.

  1. A cocktail party model of spatial release from masking by both noise and speech interferers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gary L; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2011-09-01

    A mathematical formula for estimating spatial release from masking (SRM) in a cocktail party environment would be useful as a simpler alternative to computationally intensive algorithms and may enhance understanding of underlying mechanisms. The experiment presented herein was designed to provide a strong test of a model that divides SRM into contributions of asymmetry and angular separation [Bronkhorst (2000). Acustica 86, 117-128] and to examine whether that model can be extended to include speech maskers. Across masker types the contribution to SRM of angular separation of maskers from the target was found to grow at a diminishing rate as angular separation increased within the frontal hemifield, contrary to predictions of the model. Speech maskers differed from noise maskers in the overall magnitude of SRM and in the contribution of angular separation (both greater for speech). These results were used to develop a modified model that achieved good fits to data for noise maskers (ρ=0.93) and for speech maskers (ρ=0.94) while using the same functions to describe separation and asymmetry components of SRM for both masker types. These findings suggest that this approach can be used to accurately model SRM for speech maskers in addition to primarily "energetic" noise maskers.

  2. A cocktail party model of spatial release from masking by both noise and speech interferers a)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gary L.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical formula for estimating spatial release from masking (SRM) in a cocktail party environment would be useful as a simpler alternative to computationally intensive algorithms and may enhance understanding of underlying mechanisms. The experiment presented herein was designed to provide a strong test of a model that divides SRM into contributions of asymmetry and angular separation [Bronkhorst (2000). Acustica 86, 117–128] and to examine whether that model can be extended to include speech maskers. Across masker types the contribution to SRM of angular separation of maskers from the target was found to grow at a diminishing rate as angular separation increased within the frontal hemifield, contrary to predictions of the model. Speech maskers differed from noise maskers in the overall magnitude of SRM and in the contribution of angular separation (both greater for speech). These results were used to develop a modified model that achieved good fits to data for noise maskers (ρ = 0.93) and for speech maskers (ρ = 0.94) while using the same functions to describe separation and asymmetry components of SRM for both masker types. These findings suggest that this approach can be used to accurately model SRM for speech maskers in addition to primarily “energetic” noise maskers. PMID:21895087

  3. Masked translation priming asymmetry in Chinese-English bilinguals: making sense of the Sense Model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Violet; Andrews, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Masked translation priming asymmetry is the robust finding that priming from a bilingual's first language (L1) to their second language (L2) is stronger than priming from L2 to L1. This asymmetry has been claimed to be task dependent. The Sense Model proposed by Finkbeiner, Forster, Nicol, and Nakamura (2004) claims that the asymmetry is reduced in semantic categorization relative to lexical decision due to a category filtering mechanism that limits the features considered in categorization decisions to dominant, category-relevant features. This paper reports two pairs of semantic categorization and lexical decision tasks designed to test the Sense Model's predictions. The experiments replicated the finding of Finkbeiner et al. that L2-L1 priming is somewhat stronger in semantic categorization than lexical decision, selectively for exemplars of the category. However, the direct comparison of L2-L1 and L1-L2 translation priming across tasks failed to confirm the Sense Model's central prediction that translation priming asymmetry is significantly reduced in semantic categorization. The data therefore fail to support the category filtering account of translation priming asymmetry. Rather, they suggest that pre-activation of conceptual features of the target category provides feedback to lexical forms that compensates for the weak connections between the lexical and conceptual representations of L2 words.

  4. Compensation methods using a new model for buried defects in extreme ultraviolet lithography masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Chris H.; Chan, Tina T.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Li, Ying; Peng, Danping; Pang, Linyong

    2010-09-01

    A new method for predicting the reflection from an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer is described which when implemented into the new Defect Printability Simulator (DPS) can calculate the image produced by an EUV mask with a buried defect several orders of magnitude faster than the finite difference time domain (FDTD). A new buried defect compensation method is also demonstrated to correct the in focus image of a line space pattern containing a buried defect. The new multilayer model accounts for the disruption of the magnitude and phase of the reflected field from an EUV multilayer defect. It does this by sampling the multilayer on a non-uniform grid and calculating the analytic complex local reflection coefficient at each point. After this step, the effect of the optical path difference due to the surface defect profile is added to the total reflected field to accurately predict the reflected magnitude and phase at all points on the multilayer surface. The accuracy of the new multilayer model and the full DPS simulator is verified by comparisons to FDTD simulations. The largest difference between the two methods was 0.8nm for predicting the CD change due to a buried defect through focus. This small difference is within the margin of error for FDTD simulations of EUV multilayers. The runtime of DPS is compared to extrapolated FDTD runtimes for many simulation domain sizes and DPS is 4-5 orders of magnitude faster for all cases. For example, DPS can calculate the reflected image from a 1μm x 1μm mask area in less than 30 seconds on a single processor. FDTD would take a month on four processors. The new compensation strategy demonstrated in this work is able to remove all CD error in the simulated image due to a buried defect in a 22nm dense line space pattern. The method is iterative and a full DPS simulation is run for every iteration. After each simulation, the absorber pattern is adjusted based on the difference of the thresholded target image and

  5. Mask requirements for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trybula, Walter J.; Engelstad, Roxann L.

    1998-06-01

    Within the n ext 10 years, sub-100 nm features will be required for state-of-the-industry devices. The tolerances for errors at 100 nm or less are substantially smaller than can be achieved today. A critical element of the error budget is the mask. For the 100 nm generation, the 4x mask image placement requirement is 20 nm with CD requirements as low as 9 nm. The challenge would be significant if the only improvement were to develop superior optical masks. There are multiple advanced technologies that are vying to be the successor to optical lithography. Each of these has a unique mask requirement. The leading contenders for the next generation are 1x x-ray, projection e-beam, ion beam, EUV and cell projection e-beam. The x-ray design is a proximity system that employs a 1x membrane mask. Projection e-beam uses a membrane mask with stabilizing struts. Ion beam lithography employs a stencil membrane mask with a carbon coating. EUV employs a 13 nm radiation source that requires a reflective mask. Cell projection e-beam has 25x or greater image masks that are stitched on the wafer. All the technologies indicated above. Once a total error budget for the mask is known, it is necessary to divide the total into the constituent parts. The major sources of distortion can be categorized into eight areas: mask blank processing, e- beam writing, pattern transfer, pellicle effects, mounting, thermal loadings, dynamic effects during exposure and radiation damage. The distortions introduced by each of these depend upon the type of mask; so, individual mask calculations must be made. The purpose of this paper is to review the modeling requirements of each of the categories and to highlight some results from each of the mask configurations.

  6. TinyTim modeling of NICMOS PSF subtraction: effects of focus breathing, cold mask wiggling, and color variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, A.; Krist, J.

    1998-11-01

    We conduct TinyTim modeling of NICMOS camera 2 PSFs to assess limits to the accuracy of PSF subtraction imposed by color dependence, OTA focus breathing, and cold mask wiggling. The results suggest that effects of both cold mask wiggling and focus breathing can be described as a noise in a PSF-subtracted image, well above 20% of the PSF signal in narrow band filters, with a spatial scale of a few pixels. The main effect of the PSF color dependence is adding a systemic component to the PSF subtracted image. The effect is quite large if the color of the PSF used for subtraction is very different from the image PSF color. It is pronounced in blue, wide filters, like F110W, while in filters like F187W or redder/ narrower it is essentially negligible.

  7. Mask cost and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hisashi; Higashikawa, Iwao

    2003-12-01

    At the panel discussion of Photomask Japan 2003, we discussed about Mask cost and specification. The topics are (1) Mask price trend and its impact, (2) How to reduce the mask costs; solutions from a mask shop, mask writing tool and mask inspection tool 3) Partnering mask suppliers with mask users; reasonable mask specification and OPC strategies. The choice of DUV laser writer instead of e-beam writer is one solution for reduction of mask cost. The continuous improvement of e-beam writer and resist sensitivity for high throughput is another solution. The partnership between designer, EDA vender, mask maker and wafer lithographer becomes more important.

  8. Neural mechanisms of rhythmic masking release in monkey primary auditory cortex: implications for models of auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Yonatan I; Micheyl, Christophe; Steinschneider, Mitchell

    2012-05-01

    The ability to detect and track relevant acoustic signals embedded in a background of other sounds is crucial for hearing in complex acoustic environments. This ability is exemplified by a perceptual phenomenon known as "rhythmic masking release" (RMR). To demonstrate RMR, a sequence of tones forming a target rhythm is intermingled with physically identical "Distracter" sounds that perceptually mask the rhythm. The rhythm can be "released from masking" by adding "Flanker" tones in adjacent frequency channels that are synchronous with the Distracters. RMR represents a special case of auditory stream segregation, whereby the target rhythm is perceptually segregated from the background of Distracters when they are accompanied by the synchronous Flankers. The neural basis of RMR is unknown. Previous studies suggest the involvement of primary auditory cortex (A1) in the perceptual organization of sound patterns. Here, we recorded neural responses to RMR sequences in A1 of awake monkeys in order to identify neural correlates and potential mechanisms of RMR. We also tested whether two current models of stream segregation, when applied to these responses, could account for the perceptual organization of RMR sequences. Results suggest a key role for suppression of Distracter-evoked responses by the simultaneous Flankers in the perceptual restoration of the target rhythm in RMR. Furthermore, predictions of stream segregation models paralleled the psychoacoustics of RMR in humans. These findings reinforce the view that preattentive or "primitive" aspects of auditory scene analysis may be explained by relatively basic neural mechanisms at the cortical level.

  9. Clay Mask Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Masks can represent so many things, such as emotions (happy, sad, fearful) and power. The familiar "comedy and tragedy" masks, derived from ancient Greek theater, are just one example from mask history. Death masks from the ancient Egyptians influenced the ancient Romans into creating similar masks for their departed. Masks can represent many…

  10. Scanning coherent scattering methods for actinic EUV mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Y.; Helfenstein, P.; Rajeev, R.; Mochi, I.; Mohacsi, I.; Gobrecht, J.; Yoshitake, S.

    2016-10-01

    Actinic mask inspection for EUV lithography with targeted specifications of resolution, sensitivity, and throughput remains a big hurdle for the successful insertion of EUVL into high volume manufacturing and effective solutions are needed to address this. We present a method for actinic mask inspection based on scanning coherent scattering microscopy. In this method, the mask is scanned with an EUV beam of relatively small spot size and the scattered light is recorded with a pixel detector. Customized algorithms reconstruct the aerial image by iteratively solving the phaseproblem using over-determined diffraction data gathered by scanning across the specimen with a finite illumination. This approach provides both phase and amplitude of actinic aerial images of the mask with high resolution without the need to use high NA (numerical aperture) lenses. Futher, we describe a reflective mode EUV mask scanning lensless imaging tool (RESCAN), which was installed at the XIL-II beamline and later at the SIM beamline of the Swiss Light Source and show reconstructed aerial images down to 10 nm (on-wafer) resolution. As a complementary method, the a-priori knowledge of the sample is employed to identify potential defect sites by analyzing the diffraction patterns. In this method, the recorded diffraction patterns are compared with the die or database data (i.e. previously measured or calculated diffraction data from the defect-free mask layout respectively) and their difference is interpreted as the defect signal. Dynamic software filtering helps to suppress the strong diffraction from defect-free structures and allows registration of faint defects with high sensitivity. Here, we discuss the basic principles of these Fourier domain techniques and its potential for actinic mask inspection with high signal-to-noise ratio and high throughput.

  11. Image-based pupil plane characterization via principal component analysis for EUVL tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Zac; Burbine, Andrew; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert; Mangat, Pawitter; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Smith, Bruce W.

    2016-03-01

    We present an approach to image-based pupil plane amplitude and phase characterization using models built with principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is a statistical technique to identify the directions of highest variation (principal components) in a high-dimensional dataset. A polynomial model is constructed between the principal components of through-focus intensity for the chosen binary mask targets and pupil amplitude or phase variation. This method separates model building and pupil characterization into two distinct steps, thus enabling rapid pupil characterization following data collection. The pupil plane variation of a zone-plate lens from the Semiconductor High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Project (SHARP) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will be examined using this method. Results will be compared to pupil plane characterization using a previously proposed methodology where inverse solutions are obtained through an iterative process involving least-squares regression.

  12. Modeling the anti-masking effects of the olivocochlear reflex in auditory nerve responses to tones in sustained noise.

    PubMed

    Chintanpalli, Ananthakrishna; Jennings, Skyler G; Heinz, Michael G; Strickland, Elizabeth A

    2012-04-01

    The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) has been hypothesized to provide benefit for listening in noise. Strong physiological support for an anti-masking role for the MOCR has come from the observation that auditory nerve (AN) fibers exhibit reduced firing to sustained noise and increased sensitivity to tones when the MOCR is elicited. The present study extended a well-established computational model for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired AN responses to demonstrate that these anti-masking effects can be accounted for by reducing outer hair cell (OHC) gain, which is a primary effect of the MOCR. Tone responses in noise were examined systematically as a function of tone level, noise level, and OHC gain. Signal detection theory was used to predict detection and discrimination for different spontaneous rate fiber groups. Decreasing OHC gain decreased the sustained noise response and increased maximum discharge rate to the tone, thus modeling the ability of the MOCR to decompress AN fiber rate-level functions. Comparing the present modeling results with previous data from AN fibers in decerebrate cats suggests that the ipsilateral masking noise used in the physiological study may have elicited up to 20 dB of OHC gain reduction in addition to that inferred from the contralateral noise effects. Reducing OHC gain in the model also extended the dynamic range for discrimination over a wide range of background noise levels. For each masker level, an optimal OHC gain reduction was predicted (i.e., where maximum discrimination was achieved without increased detection threshold). These optimal gain reductions increased with masker level and were physiologically realistic. Thus, reducing OHC gain can improve tone-in-noise discrimination even though it may produce a “hearing loss” in quiet. Combining MOCR effects with the sensorineural hearing loss effects already captured by this computational AN model will be beneficial for exploring the implications of their interaction

  13. Compact model experimental validation for grapho-epitaxy hole processes and its impact in mask making tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenger, Germain; Torres, J. Andres; Ma, Yuansheng; Granik, Yuri; Krasnova, Polina; Fouquet, Antoine; Belledent, Jérôme; Gharbi, Ahmed; Tiron, Raluca

    2014-10-01

    There has been significant research in the area of modeling self-assembling molecular systems. Directed self-assembly (DSA) has proven to be a promising candidate for cost reduction of processes which use double patterning and an enabler of new technology nodes. Self-consistent field theory and Monte Carlo simulators have the capability to probe and explore the mechanisms driving the different phases of a diblock copolymer system. While such methods are appropriate to study the nature of the self-assembly process, they are computationally expensive and they cannot be used to perform mask synthesis operations nor full chip verification. In this case we focus our effort in establishing the minimum set of conditions that a compact model for the manufacture of contact holes using a grapho epitaxy process for a PS-b-PMMA diblock copolymer system needs. The compact model's main objectives are to find the guiding pattern that produces the lowest possible placement error, as well as verifying that the intended target structures are present after processing. Given that masks are not perfect, and lithographic process variations are not negligible, it is necessary to understand the mask requirements and the types of Optical Proximity Correction techniques that will be used to build guiding patterns. This paper explores the guiding pattern conditions under which proper assembly is achieved, and how the compact model formulation is able to determine placement of reliably assembling structures as well as identification of the guiding patterns which lead to improper assembly. The research leading to these results has been performed in the frame of the industrial collaborative consortium IDeAL focused on the development of Directed Self-assembly technique by block copolymers.

  14. Dynamic mask for producing uniform or graded-thickness thin films

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    2006-06-13

    A method for producing single layer or multilayer films with high thickness uniformity or thickness gradients. The method utilizes a moving mask which blocks some of the flux from a sputter target or evaporation source before it deposits on a substrate. The velocity and position of the mask is computer controlled to precisely tailor the film thickness distribution. The method is applicable to any type of vapor deposition system, but is particularly useful for ion beam sputter deposition and evaporation deposition; and enables a high degree of uniformity for ion beam deposition, even for near-normal incidence of deposition species, which may be critical for producing low-defect multilayer coatings, such as required for masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The mask can have a variety of shapes, from a simple solid paddle shape to a larger mask with a shaped hole through which the flux passes. The motion of the mask can be linear or rotational, and the mask can be moved to make single or multiple passes in front of the substrate per layer, and can pass completely or partially across the substrate.

  15. Challenges in constructing EUV metrology tools to qualify the EUV masks for HVM implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, David C.; Dong, Feng; Perera, Chami N.; Perera, Rupert C. C.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography is still viewed as the most promising approach for maintaining the pace of Moore's Law. Recent real achievements in EUV Lithography (EUVL) have encouraged semiconductor manufacturers to reconsider their road maps. One of the principal challenges in the ongoing EUVL implementation for high volume manufacturing (HVM) is the availability of necessary clean at wavelength metrology tools. EUV Tech is the world's leading manufacturer of at-wavelength EUV metrology equipment. Founded in 1997, EUV Tech has pioneered the development of several stand-alone inspection, metrology, and calibration tools for EUV lithographic applications that can be operated in a clean room environment on the floor of a fab. In this paper, EUV Tech's R&D program to minimize particle adders in our EUV Reflectometer along with the ongoing effort to enhance the reflectivity and wavelength, precision and accuracy required to qualify the EUV masks for HVM. In addition to preliminary results from our stand alone EUV Scatterometer developed to characterize the phase roughness of a EUV mask and the introduction of EUV Tech's Pellicle test suite for testing EUV pellicles.

  16. Masks: Interpretations and Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Presents a high school art teacher's views of and experiences with masks. Outlines a maskmaking activity in which students were required to create variations on existing masks. Emphasizes use of experimental materials. Displays examples of student-created masks. (DB)

  17. Enhancing EUV mask blanks usability through smart shift and blank-design pairing optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Rakesh Kumar; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter; Thwaite, Peter

    2016-10-01

    EUV Defect avoidance techniques will play a vital role in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) photomask fabrication with the anticipation that defect free mask blanks won't be available and that cost effective techniques will not be available for defect repairing. In addition, mask shops may not have a large inventory of expensive EUV mask blanks. Given these facts, defect avoidance can be used as cost effective technique to optimize the mask blank and design data (mask data) pair selection across mask blank manufacturers and mask shops so that overall mask blank utilization can be enhanced. In previous work, it was determined that the pattern shift based solution increases the chance that a defective mask blank can be used that would otherwise be discarded [1]. In pattern shift, design data is shifted such that defects are either moved to isolated regions or hidden under the patterns that are written. However pattern shifts techniques don't perform well with masks with higher defect counts. Pattern shift techniques in this form assume all defects to be equally critical. In addition, a defect is critical or important only if it lands on the main pattern. A defect landing on fill, sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) or fiducial areas may not be critical. In this paper we assess the performance of pattern shift techniques assuming defects that are not critical based upon size or type, as well as defects landing in non-critical areas (smart shift) can be ignored. In a production mask manufacturing environment it is necessary to co-optimize and prioritize blank-design pairing for multiple mask layouts in the queue with the available blanks. A blank-design pairing tool maximizes the utilization of blanks by finding the best pairing between blanks and design data so that the maximum number of mask blanks can be used. In this paper we also propose a novel process which would optimize the usage of costly EUV mask blanks across mask blank manufacturers and mask shops

  18. Masks and Other Disguises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Debra

    Instructions for making simple masks are provided in this guide for teachers of elementary children. Directions with illustrations are given for constructing masks from paper plates, construction paper, plastic milk jugs, and papier-mache. Ideas include a clown mask, a flower mask, a top hat, a paper crown, and "Groucho" glasses. Types…

  19. History and future of mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ken L.

    1996-12-01

    The history of the mask industry has three main periods, which I call the Classical Period, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, by analogy with those periods in the history of Western Europe. During the Classical Period, people developed 1X masks and the technology to make them. In the Dark Ages, people exploited the equipment developed during the Classical Period to make 5X reduction reticle, ending the nobility of mask making. In today's Renaissance of mask making, a proliferation of mask types is requiring a rebirth of innovation and creativity. The Renaissance resembles the Classical Period: masks are once again strategic, and technological capability is once again the driver. Meanwhile, the mask industry is carrying forward the productivity and efficiency gains it achieved during the Dark Ages. We must create a new business and economic model to support these changes in the characteristics of the marketplace.

  20. A computational feedforward model predicts categorization of masked emotional body language for longer, but not for shorter, latencies.

    PubMed

    Stienen, Bernard M C; Schindler, Konrad; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2012-07-01

    Given the presence of massive feedback loops in brain networks, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of feedforward and feedback processing to the recognition of visual stimuli, in this case, of emotional body expressions. The aim of the work presented in this letter is to shed light on how well feedforward processing explains rapid categorization of this important class of stimuli. By means of parametric masking, it may be possible to control the contribution of feedback activity in human participants. A close comparison is presented between human recognition performance and the performance of a computational neural model that exclusively modeled feedforward processing and was engineered to fulfill the computational requirements of recognition. Results show that the longer the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), the closer the performance of the human participants was to the values predicted by the model, with an optimum at an SOA of 100 ms. At short SOA latencies, human performance deteriorated, but the categorization of the emotional expressions was still above baseline. The data suggest that, although theoretically, feedback arising from inferotemporal cortex is likely to be blocked when the SOA is 100 ms, human participants still seem to rely on more local visual feedback processing to equal the model's performance.

  1. Damage Free Particle Removal from Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Layers by High Energy Laser Shock Wave Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Gon; Yoo, Young-Sam; Kim, Tae-Geun; Ahn, Jinho; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Choi, Jae-Sung; Busnaina, Ahmed A.; Park, Jin-Goo

    2008-06-01

    Plasma shock waves induced by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at a maximum energy of 1.8 J in air were characterized by a laser beam deflection method and were applied to 50 nm silica particle removal from a Al2O3/TaN/Ru/MoSi 40 pairs as the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask layers on silicon wafer. A high energy laser induced shock wave effectively removed 50 nm silica particles from the EUVL mask layers. The change of sample topography before and after laser shock cleaning was measured by an atomic force microscope. Surface damage was observed at a gap distance of 1.5 mm. The dimensions of the plasma plume were characterized as a function of the laser energy and focus-to-surface gap distance. The plasma plume was the main source for damaging the surface. A high energy laser induced shock wave with a gap distance of over 3 mm achieved damage-free sub-100 nm particle removal.

  2. Variations in backward masking with different masking stimuli: I. Local interaction versus attentional switch.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Talis; Luiga, Iiris; Põder, Endel

    2005-01-01

    The types of stimuli used as targets and masks considerably change the masking functions in a way that requires us to abandon any single mechanism of masking as the sole explanation of backward masking. In the first of two reports in which the problem of the mask-dependence of masking is addressed, we explore the role of the relative spatial positioning of targets and masks in order to differentiate between local interaction and attentional models. If single letters were masked by double-letter masks then the relative spatial arrangement of the letters, which was changed in order to vary the involvement of metacontrast-like processes, had an effect at shorter SOAs, but not at longer SOAs where strong masking still persisted. This poses difficulties for proposing local contour interaction as the main mechanism of masking. Similarly, crowding effects alone cannot explain the results. Backward masking also involves attention being directed to working-memory processing of the succeeding object while abandoning the preceding object.

  3. Investigating the intrinsic cleanliness of automated handling designed for EUV mask pod-in-pod systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brux, O.; van der Walle, P.; van der Donck, J. C. J.; Dress, P.

    2011-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for technology nodes 16nm (hp) and below. However, several unique EUV mask challenges must be resolved for a successful launch of the technology into the market. Uncontrolled introduction of particles and/or contamination into the EUV scanner significantly increases the risk for device yield loss and potentially scanner down-time. With the absence of a pellicle to protect the surface of the EUV mask, a zero particle adder regime between final clean and the point-of-exposure is critical for the active areas of the mask. A Dual Pod concept for handling EUV masks had been proposed by the industry as means to minimize the risk of mask contamination during transport and storage. SuSS-HamaTech introduces MaskTrackPro InSync as a fully automated solution for the handling of EUV masks in and out of this Dual Pod System and therefore constitutes an interface between various tools inside the Fab. The intrinsic cleanliness of each individual handling and storage step of the inner shell (EIP) of this Dual Pod and the EUV mask inside the InSync Tool has been investigated to confirm the capability for minimizing the risk of cross-contamination. An Entegris Dual Pod EUV-1000A-A110 has been used for the qualification. The particle detection for the qualification procedure was executed with the TNO's RapidNano Particle Scanner, qualified for particle sizes down to 50nm (PSL equivalent). It has been shown that the target specification of < 2 particles @ 60nm per 25 cycles has been achieved. In case where added particles were measured, the EIP has been identified as a potential root cause for Ni particle generation. Any direct Ni-Al contact has to be avoided to mitigate the risk of material abrasion.

  4. Masks in Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, David

    2016-01-01

    In Drama Education mask work is undertaken and presented as both a methodology and knowledge base. There are numerous workshops and journal articles available for teachers that offer knowledge or implementation of mask work. However, empirical examination of the context or potential implementation of masks as a pedagogical tool remains…

  5. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  6. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  7. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  8. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  9. Detecting drawdowns masked by environmental stresses with water-level models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Halford, K.J.; Fenelon, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying small drawdown at observation wells distant from the pumping well greatly expands the characterized aquifer volume. However, this detection is often obscured by water level fluctuations such as barometric and tidal effects. A reliable analytical approach for distinguishing drawdown from nonpumping water-level fluctuations is presented and tested here. Drawdown is distinguished by analytically simulating all pumping and nonpumping water-level stresses simultaneously during the period of record. Pumping signals are generated with Theis models, where the pumping schedule is translated into water-level change with the Theis solution. This approach closely matched drawdowns simulated with a complex three-dimensional, hypothetical model and reasonably estimated drawdowns from an aquifer test conducted in a complex hydrogeologic system. Pumping-induced changes generated with a numerical model and analytical Theis model agreed (RMS as low as 0.007 m) in cases where pumping signals traveled more than 1 km across confining units and fault structures. Maximum drawdowns of about 0.05 m were analytically estimated from field investigations where environmental fluctuations approached 0.2 m during the analysis period.

  10. Cognitive Development Masks Support for Attributional Style Models of Depression in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitlauf, Amy S.; Cole, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Attributional style models of depression in adults (Abramson et al. 1989, 1978) have been adapted for use with children; however, most applications do not consider that children's understanding of causal relations may be qualitatively different from that of adults. If children's causal attributions depend on children's level of cognitive…

  11. Detecting Drawdowns Masked by Environmental Stresses with Water-Level Models

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, CA; Halford, KJ; Fenelon, JM

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying small drawdown at observation wells distant from the pumping well greatly expands the characterized aquifer volume. However, this detection is often obscured by water level fluctuations such as barometric and tidal effects. A reliable analytical approach for distinguishing drawdown from nonpumping water-level fluctuations is presented and tested here. Drawdown is distinguished by analytically simulating all pumping and nonpumping water-level stresses simultaneously during the period of record. Pumping signals are generated with Theis models, where the pumping schedule is translated into water-level change with the Theis solution. This approach closely matched drawdowns simulated with a complex three-dimensional, hypothetical model and reasonably estimated drawdowns from an aquifer test conducted in a complex hydrogeologic system. Pumping-induced changes generated with a numerical model and analytical Theis model agreed (RMS as low as 0.007 m) in cases where pumping signals traveled more than 1 km across confining units and fault structures. Maximum drawdowns of about 0.05 m were analytically estimated from field investigations where environmental fluctuations approached 0.2 m during the analysis period. PMID:23469925

  12. Wafer topography modeling for ionic implantation mask correction dedicated to 2x nm FDSOI technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Jean-Christophe; Le Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Sungauer, Elodie; Robert, Frédéric; Yesilada, Emek; Armeanu, Ana-Maria; Entradas, Jorge; Sturtevant, John L.; Do, Thuy; Granik, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    Reflection by wafer topography and underlying layers during optical lithography can cause unwanted exposure in the resist [1]. This wafer stack effect phenomenon which is neglected for larger nodes than 45nm, is becoming problematic for 32nm technology node and below at the ionic implantation process. This phenomenon is expected to be attenuated by the use of anti-reflecting coating but increases process complexity and adds cost and cycle time penalty. As a consequence, an OPC based solution is today under evaluation to cope with stack effects involved in ionic implantation patterning [2] [3]. For the source drain (SD) ionic implantation process step on 28nm Fully Depleted Silicon-on-Insulator (FDSOI) technology, active silicon areas, poly silicon patterns, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI), Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) areas and the transitions between these different regions result in significant SD implant pattern critical dimension variations. The large number of stack variations involved in these effects implies a complex modeling to simulate pattern degradations. This paper deals with the characterization of stack effects on 28nm node using SOI substrates. The large number of measurements allows to highlight all individual and combined stack effects. A new modeling flow has been developed in order to generate wafer stack aware OPC model. The accuracy and the prediction of the model is presented in this paper.

  13. Analyzing EUV mask costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lercel, Michael; Kasprowicz, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) as a replacement for multiple patterning is based on improvements of cycle time, yield, and cost. Earlier cost studies have assumed a simple assumption that EUV masks (being more complex with the multilayer coated blank) are not more than three times as expensive as advanced ArFi (ArF immersion) masks. EUV masks are expected to be more expensive during the ramp of the technology because of the added cost of the complex mask blank, the use of EUV specific mask tools, and a ramp of yield learning relative to the more mature technologies. This study concludes that, within a range of scenarios, the hypothesis that EUV mask costs are not more than three times that of advanced ArFi masks is valid and conservative.

  14. Aperture masking interferometry research simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Luo, Qiufeng; Fan, Weijun; Zhang, Xian Ling; Tao, Chunkan; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhou, Bifang; Chen, Hanliang

    2004-10-01

    Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) is one of the high-resolution astronomical image observation technologies. It is also an important research way to the Optical Aperture Synthesis (OAS). The theory of OAS is simply introduced and AMI simulation method is raised. The mathematics model is built and the interferogram fringes are got. The aperture mask u-v coverage is discussed and one image reconstruction method is done. The reconstructed image result is got with CLEAN method. Shortcoming of this work is also referred and the future research work is mentioned at last.

  15. Vendor Capability for Low Thermal Expansion Mask Substrates for EUV Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Taylor, J S; Hector, S D; Yan, P Y; Ramamoorthy, A; Brooker, P D

    2002-04-12

    Development of manufacturing infrastructure is required to ensure a commercial source of mask substrates for the timely introduction of EUVL. Improvements to the low thermal expansion materials that compose the substrate have been made, but need to be scaled to production quantities. We have been evaluating three challenging substrate characteristics to determine the state of the infrastructure for the finishing of substrates. First, surface roughness is on track and little risk is associated with achieving the roughness requirement as an independent specification. Second, with new flatness-measuring equipment just coming on line, the vendors are poised for improvement toward the SEMI P37 flatness specification. Third, significant acceleration is needed in the reduction of defect levels on substrates. The lack of high-sensitivity defect metrology at the vendors' sites is limiting progress in developing substrates for EWL.

  16. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  17. Mask industry assessment: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2003-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was initiated in 2002 with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition.1 This paper presents the results of the second annual survey which is an enhanced version of the inaugural survey building upon its strengths and improving the weak points. The original survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. The assessment is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the critical mask industry. An objective is to create a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. As subsequent years are added, historical profiles can also be created. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers representing approximately 80% of the global mask market (using revenue as the measure) and making this the most comprehensive mask industry survey ever. The participating companies are: Compugraphics, Dai Nippon Printing, Dupont Photomask, Hoya, IBM, Infineon, Intel, Taiwan Mask Company, Toppan, and TSMC. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry.

  18. Object Substitution Masking: When Does Mask Preview Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Chua, Fook K.

    2008-01-01

    When a target is enclosed by a 4-dot mask that persists after the target disappears, target identification is worse than it is when the mask terminates with the target. This masking effect is attributed to object substitution masking (OSM). Previewing the mask, however, attenuates OSM. This study investigated specific conditions under which mask…

  19. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2010-01-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener’s task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model’s interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed

  20. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  1. Mitigation of image contrast loss due to mask-side non-telecentricity in an EUV scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chih-Tsung; Yu, Shinn-Sheng; Lu, Yen-Cheng; Chung, Chia-Chun; Chen, Jack J. H.; Yen, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Due to the use of reflective optics in extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the chief ray angle of incidence at the object (mask) side (CRAO) cannot be zero. If the conventional resolution enhancement technique (RET) of off-axis illumination (OAI) is used, such mask-side non-telecentricity degrades aerial image contrast partly because of asymmetry (w.r.t. the mask) of the two beams in an incident beam pair and partly because of asymmetry (w.r.t. the mask) of the two diffraction orders of either incident beam. The former leads to intensity imbalance of the two incident beams (after leaving the mask) and the latter leads to amplitude and phase imbalance of the two diffraction orders of either incident beam. Solutions proposed previously only alleviate the former and have little help for the latter. In this paper, we introduce n=1 absorber to eliminate the phase imbalance so that the transverse shift between the two aerial images formed by the two incident beams can be minimized and the contrast of the final aerial image (by superposition of the two) can be restored.

  2. Sensorimotor supremacy: Investigating conscious and unconscious vision by masked priming

    PubMed Central

    Ansorge, Ulrich; Neumann, Odmar; Becker, Stefanie I.; Kälberer, Holger; Cruse, Holk

    2008-01-01

    According to the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis, conscious perception draws on motor action. In the present report, we will sketch two lines of potential development in the field of masking research based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis. In the first part of the report, evidence is reviewed that masked, invisible stimuli can affect motor responses, attention shifts, and semantic processes. After the review of the corresponding evidence – so-called masked priming effects – an approach based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis is detailed as to how the question of a unitary mechanism of unconscious vision can be pursued by masked priming studies. In the second part of the report, different models and theories of backward masking and masked priming are reviewed. Types of models based on the sensorimotor hypothesis are discussed that can take into account ways in which sensorimotor processes (reflected in masked priming effects) can affect conscious vision under backward masking conditions. PMID:20517513

  3. Enhancement in Informational Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xiang; Richards, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to detect a tone added to a random masker improves when a preview of the masker is provided. In 2 experiments, the authors explored the role that perceptual organization plays in this release from masking. Method: Detection thresholds were measured in informational masking studies. The maskers were drawn at random prior to…

  4. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  5. Lithographic performance evaluation of a contaminated EUV mask after cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Holfeld, Christian; Wuest, Andrea

    2009-11-16

    The effect of surface contamination and subsequent mask surface cleaning on the lithographic performance of a EUV mask is investigated. SEMATECH's Berkeley micro-field exposure tool (MET) printed 40 nm and 50 nm line and space (L/S) patterns are evaluated to compare the performance of a contaminated and cleaned mask to an uncontaminated mask. Since the two EUV masks have distinct absorber architectures, optical imaging models and aerial image calculations were completed to determine any expected differences in performance. Measured and calculated Bossung curves, process windows, and exposure latitudes for the two sets of L/S patterns are compared to determine how the contamination and cleaning impacts the lithographic performance of EUV masks. The observed differences in mask performance are shown to be insignificant, indicating that the cleaning process did not appreciably affect mask performance.

  6. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  7. A practical alternating PSM modeling and OPC approach to deal with 3D mask effects for the 65nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapeau, Martin; van Adrichem, Paul J. M.; van Look, Lieve; Kasprowicz, Bryan S.

    2005-11-01

    Alternating PSM (Alt-PSM) has been recognized as a logical Resolution Enhancement Technique (RET) candidate for the 65nm technology node. One of the key properties this technique has to offer is high Depth of Focus (DOF) and lower Mask Error Enhancement Factor (MEEF). The so-called image imbalance is an Alt-PSM specific property which, if not dealt with correctly, constrains the added DOF. Because of mask topography, intensity differences caused by light scattering become evident between π (180°) and zero degree phase shifters. This causes a line shift that is inversely proportional to the pitch. The traditional solution of applying a fixed trench bias increases the width if the π phase shifter to level out intensities and thus minimize image imbalance. This technique may no longer be sufficient at the 65nm technology node. With the requirement to print even smaller pitches together with a tighter Critical Dimension (CD) budget, intensity imbalance is a larger concern. It may be necessary to apply a pitch dependent or variable trench bias. In this paper, we present a practical OPC modeling approach that accounts for image imbalance. The 2D modeling approach uses boundary layers to represent the 3D effect of light scattering. We demonstrate that with the boundary layer model, it is possible to predict image imbalance caused by mask 3D effects. The model can then be used either to determine the nominal trench bias or can be integrated into the OPC engine to apply a variable trench bias. Results are compared to rigorous Electro Magnetic Field (EMF) simulations and experimental exposures using an ArF scanner, targeting pitches of 130nm and above.

  8. 2012 Mask Industry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.

    2012-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to semiconductor industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. 2012 marks the 11th consecutive year for the mask industry survey. This year's survey and reporting structure are similar to those of the previous years with minor modifications based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics. Categories include general mask information, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, and maintenance and returns. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. Results, initial observations, and key comparisons between the 2011 and 2012 survey responses are shown here, including multiple indications of a shift towards the manufacturing of higher end photomasks.

  9. Masking by Gratings Predicted by an Image Sequence Discriminating Model: Testing Models for Perceptual Discrimination Using Repeatable Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adding noise to stimuli to be discriminated allows estimation of observer classification functions based on the correlation between observer responses and relevant features of the noisy stimuli. Examples will be presented of stimulus features that are found in auditory tone detection and visual vernier acuity. using the standard signal detection model (Thurstone scaling), we derive formulas to estimate the proportion of the observers decision variable variance that is controlled by the added noise. one is based on the probability of agreement of the observer with him/herself on trials with the same noise sample. Another is based on the relative performance of the observer and the model. When these do not agree, the model can be rejected. A second derivation gives the probability of agreement of observer and model when the observer follows the model except for internal noise. Agreement significantly less than this amount allows rejection of the model.

  10. New mask technology challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2001-09-01

    Mask technology development has accelerated dramatically in recent years from the glacial pace of the last three decades to the rapid and sometimes simultaneous introductions of new wavelengths and mask-based resolution enhancement techniques. The nature of the semiconductor business has also become one driven by time-to-market as an overwhelming factor in capturing market share and profit. These are among the factors that have created enormous stress on the mask industry to produce masks with enhanced capabilities, such as phase-shifting attenuators, sub-resolution assist bars, and optical proximity correction (OPC) features, while maintaining or reducing cost and cycle time. The mask can no longer be considered a commodity item that is purchased form the lowest-cost supplier. Instead, it must now be promoted as an integral part of the technical and business case for a total lithographic solution. Improving partnership between designer, mask-maker, and wafer lithographer will be the harbinger of success in finding a profitable balance of capability, cost, and cycle time. Likewise for equipment infrastructure development, stronger partnership on the international level is necessary to control development cost and mitigate schedule and technical risks.

  11. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  12. Mask Industry Assessment: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Chan, David Y.

    2010-09-01

    A survey created supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the ninth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was basically the same as the 2005 through 2009 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  13. Masks: The Artist in Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Whether masks are made from cardboard, papier-mache, metal, wood, leather, fabric, clay or any combination of these materials, they bring out the artist in people. Young children like to wear masks when they play to pretend they were another person or animal. Masks let them fantasize and be creative. The author's students made masks representing…

  14. Mask cost of ownership for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Edward G.; Seidel, Philip K.

    2000-07-01

    As technology advances, becoming more difficult and more expensive, the cost of ownership (CoO) metric becomes increasingly important in evaluating technical strategies. The International SEMATECH CoC analysis has steadily gained visibility over the past year, as it attempts to level the playing field between technology choices, and create a fair relative comparison. In order to predict mask cots for advanced lithography, mask process flows are modeled using bets-known processing strategies, equipment cost, and yields. Using a newly revised yield mode, and updated mask manufacture flows, representative mask flows can be built. These flows are then used to calculate mask costs for advanced lithography down to the 50 nm node. It is never the goal of this type of work to provide absolute cost estimates for business planning purposes. However, the combination of a quantifiable yield model with a clearly defined set of mask processing flows and a cost model based upon them serves as an excellent starting point for cost driver analysis and process flow discussion.

  15. Active Mask Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C.; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D.; Kovačević, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the “contour” to that of “inside and outside”, or, masks, allowing for easy multidimensional segmentation. It adapts to the topology of the image through the use of multiple masks. The algorithm is almost invariant under initialization, allowing for random initialization, and uses a few easily tunable parameters. Experiments show that the active mask algorithm matches the ground truth well, and outperforms the algorithm widely used in fluorescence microscopy, seeded watershed, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. PMID:19380268

  16. Overview of Mask Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Bryan J.; Jindal, Vibhu; Lin, C. C.; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Kwon, Hyuk Joo; Ma, Hsing-Chien; Goldstein, Michael; Chan, Yau-Wai; Goodwin, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the successor to optical lithography and will enable advanced patterning in semiconductor manufacturing processes down to the 8 nm half pitch technology node and beyond. However, before EUV can successfully be inserted into high volume manufacturing a few challenges must be overcome. Central among these remaining challenges is the requirement to produce "defect free" EUV masks. Mask blank defects have been one of the top challenges in the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. To determine defect sources and devise mitigation solutions, detailed characterization of defects is critical. However, small defects pose challenges in metrology scale-up. SEMATECH has a comprehensive metrology strategy to address any defect larger than a 20 nm core size to obtain solutions for defect-free EUV mask blanks. SEMATECH's Mask Blank Development Center has been working since 2003 to develop the technology to support defect free EUV mask blanks. Since 2003, EUV mask blank defects have been reduced from 10000 of size greater than 100 nm to about a few tens at size 70 nm. Unfortunately, today's state of the art defect levels are still about 10 to 100 times higher than needed. Closing this gap requires progress in the various processes associated with glass substrate creation and multilayer deposition. That process development improvement in turn relies upon the availability of metrology equipment that can resolve and chemically characterize defects as small as 30 nm. The current defect reduction efforts at SEMATECH have intensively included a focus on inspection and characterization. The facility boasts nearly 100M of metrology hardware, including an FEI Titan TEM, Lasertec M1350 and M7360 tools, an actinic inspection tool, AFM, SPM, and scanning auger capabilities. The newly established Auger tool at SEMATECH can run a standard 6-inch mask blank and is already providing important information on sub-100 nm defects on EUV

  17. MSB for ILT masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramss, Juergen; Weidenmueller, Ulf; Stoeckel, Arnd; Jaritz, Renate; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Boettcher, Monika

    2011-03-01

    Multi Shaped Beam (MSB) throughput simulation results have already been published in the past. An IC mask set of a 32nm node logic device was one of the applications that had been analyzed in more detail. In this paper we want to highlight results of shot count and write time evaluations done for Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) masks targeting the 22nm technology node. The test pattern data we used for these practice-oriented analyses was designed by DNP / Japan and created by Luminescent Technologies, Inc. / USA. To achieve reliable evaluation results, the influence of different MSB configurations on shot count and mask write time has been taken into account and will be discussed here. Exposure results of pattern details are presented and compared with the fracturing result. The MSB engineering tool we used for our investigations covers such major components like an electron-optical column, a precision x/y stage and the MSB data path.

  18. Mask characterization for critical dimension uniformity budget breakdown in advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    As the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors critical dimension uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. We will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for advanced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 1D (dense lines) and 2D (dense contacts) feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CDs and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples. Mask stack reflectivity variations should also be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We also observed mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) through field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may play a role towards the total intrafield CDU and may need to be taken into account for EUV lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, with results herein, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to quantifying the mask part of

  19. Incomplete figure perception and invisible masking.

    PubMed

    Chikhman, Valery; Shelepin, Yuri; Foreman, Nigel; Merkuljev, Aleksey; Pronin, Sergey

    2006-01-01

    The Gollin test (measuring recognition thresholds for fragmented line drawings of everyday objects and animals) has traditionally been regarded as a test of incomplete figure perception or 'closure', though there is a debate about how such closure is achieved. Here, figural incompleteness is considered to be the result of masking, such that absence of contour elements of a fragmented figure is the result of the influence of an 'invisible' mask. It is as though the figure is partly obscured by a mask having parameters identical to those of the background. This mask is 'invisible' only consciously, but for the early stages of visual processing it is real and has properties of multiplicative noise. Incomplete Gollin figures were modeled as the figure covered by the mask with randomly distributed transparent and opaque patches. We adjusted the statistical characteristics of the contour image and empty noise patches and processed those using spatial and spatial-frequency measures. Across 73 figures, despite inter-subject variability, mean recognition threshold was always approximately 15% of total contour in naive observers. Recognition worsened with increasing spectral similarity between the figure and the 'invisible' mask. Near threshold, the spectrum of the fragmented image was equally similar to that of the 'invisible' mask and complete image. The correlation between spectral parameters of figures at threshold and complete figures was greatest for figures that were most easily recognised. Across test sessions, thresholds reduced when either figure or mask parameters were familiar. We argue that recognition thresholds for Gollin stimuli in part reflect the extraction of signal from noise.

  20. Robust source and mask optimization compensating for mask topography effects in computational lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Lam, Edmund Y

    2014-04-21

    Mask topography effects need to be taken into consideration for a more accurate solution of source mask optimization (SMO) in advanced optical lithography. However, rigorous 3D mask models generally involve intensive computation and conventional SMO fails to manipulate the mask-induced undesired phase errors that degrade the usable depth of focus (uDOF) and process yield. In this work, an optimization approach incorporating pupil wavefront aberrations into SMO procedure is developed as an alternative to maximize the uDOF. We first design the pupil wavefront function by adding primary and secondary spherical aberrations through the coefficients of the Zernike polynomials, and then apply the conjugate gradient method to achieve an optimal source-mask pair under the condition of aberrated pupil. We also use a statistical model to determine the Zernike coefficients for the phase control and adjustment. Rigorous simulations of thick masks show that this approach provides compensation for mask topography effects by improving the pattern fidelity and increasing uDOF.

  1. Masked mycotoxins: A review

    PubMed Central

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders. PMID:23047235

  2. COAs: Behind the Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birke, Szifra

    1993-01-01

    Provides information on alcoholism and codependency to help teachers identify and respond to children of alcoholics (COAs). Discusses characteristics of alcoholic homes and problems encountered by children and adult COAs. Examines survival "masks" of COAs, including hero, rebel, adjustor, clown, and caretaker. Lists organizational,…

  3. Apodized Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Among the optical instruments proposed to detect and characterize exoplanets, phase masks coronagraphs offer very small inner working angles. Designed for off-axis telescopes, their performance is greatly reduced when used with centrally obstructed apertures such as those of the Palomar telescope, the very large telescope, or the James Webb space telescope. However, a clear circular aperture is not the only pupil shape for which a phase mask coronagraph can work properly. In fact, for a given centrally obstructed aperture, we show that it is possible to compute optimal apodizers that help achieve stellar extinction levels similar to those obtained in the ideal case of an off-axis telescope. Trade-offs exist between these levels, the transmission of the apodizer, and the area covered by the Lyot stop. We detail the Fourier optics formalism that makes these optimizations possible, as well as a few examples of shaped pupils. Some are designed for a four-quadrants phase mask, and some others for a vortex phase mask. We also offer a comparison with a coronagraph solely composed of a shaped pupil.

  4. Masked mycotoxins: a review.

    PubMed

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders.

  5. Competing for Consciousness: Prolonged Mask Exposure Reduces Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    In object substitution masking (OSM) a sparse, temporally trailing 4-dot mask impairs target identification, even though it has different contours from, and does not spatially overlap with the target. Here, we demonstrate a previously unknown characteristic of OSM: Observers show reduced masking at prolonged (e.g., 640 ms) relative to intermediate…

  6. Compensation of overlay errors due to mask bending and non-flatness for EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandhok, Manish; Goyal, Sanjay; Carson, Steven; Park, Seh-Jin; Zhang, Guojing; Myers, Alan M.; Leeson, Michael L.; Kamna, Marilyn; Martinez, Fabian C.; Stivers, Alan R.; Lorusso, Gian F.; Hermans, Jan; Hendrickx, Eric; Govindjee, Sanjay; Brandstetter, Gerd; Laursen, Tod

    2009-03-01

    EUV blank non-flatness results in both out of plane distortion (OPD) and in-plane distortion (IPD) [3-5]. Even for extremely flat masks (~50 nm peak to valley (PV)), the overlay error is estimated to be greater than the allocation in the overlay budget. In addition, due to multilayer and other thin film induced stresses, EUV masks have severe bow (~1 um PV). Since there is no electrostatic chuck to flatten the mask during the e-beam write step, EUV masks are written in a bent state that can result in ~15 nm of overlay error. In this article we present the use of physically-based models of mask bending and non-flatness induced overlay errors, to compensate for pattern placement of EUV masks during the e-beam write step in a process we refer to as E-beam Writer based Overlay error Correction (EWOC). This work could result in less restrictive tolerances for the mask blank non-flatness specs which in turn would result in less blank defects.

  7. Advances in mask fabrication and alignment for masked ion-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumbo, David P.; Damm, George A.; Engler, D. W.; Fong, F. O.; Sen, S.; Wolfe, John C.; Randall, John N.; Mauger, Phillip E.; Shimkunas, Alex R.; Loeschne, Hans

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes recent developments in three areas ofmasked ion beam lithography (MIBL). These are 1) fabrication oflarge area, low distortion, silicon stencilmasks for demagnifying ion projection lithography, 2) fabrication ofstencil masks with nanometer scale resolution for 1:1 proximity printing, and 3) development of a direct method of alignment using the ion beam induced fluorescence of Si02. These topics are discussed below. Demagnifying ion projection masks: We describe the fabrication of stencil masks in large area, low stress (10 MPa), n-type silicon membranes. The projection masks have a silicon foil area 95 mm in diameter, thicknesses between 1.5-5 and resolution of0.6um. Measured distortion (3a) in the IPL masks ranges between 0.23gm and 0.65,um, with an experimental error of 0.20 1um. Proximity printing masks: A process is described for fabricating stencil masks with 50 nm resolution in low stress, n-type silicon membranes. Membranes less than 0.5 ,ttm thick are shown to be free of the sidewall taper that limits resolution in thicker masks. These thin membranes show a slightly flared profile due to the imperfectly collimated etching ions. Alignment: A direct method of alignment is being developed which uses the ion beam induced fluorescence of Si02 marks. Fluorescence yield is characterized as a function of ion energy and resist coating thickness. The yield for Si02 is in the range between 0.1-1.0 photons/proton, while the yields for Si, Al, and photoresist are negligibly small. Thus, a simple alignment technique can be implemented where registration of a grating in the mask with a corresponding oxide pattern is detected as a fluorescence maximum. A simple model predicts that 50 nm alignment can be accomplished, following a 1 im prealignment, in 2 seconds.

  8. Evaluation of mask manufacturing efficiency using mask data rank information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kokoro; Endo, Masakazu; Inoue, Tadao; Yamabe, Masaki; Nakatake, Shigetoshi

    2010-05-01

    The photomask cost is becoming one of the challenging issues in the semiconductor industry, as the cost of photomasks has been rising year by year. ASET started Mask D2I (Mask Design, Drawing and Inspection Technology) project with the sponsorship from the NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) in 2006 for the purpose of the mask cost reduction. In earlier papers[1-5], we introduced the idea of photomask data prioritization method which is referred to as Mask Data Rank (MDR). We have built our software system to convert Design Intent (DI) to MDR with cooperation of STARC. Then we showed the results of experiments with mask data provided by semiconductor companies. In this paper we show the additional report of mask inspection experiments using real photomasks. Then we show the evaluation results about mask drawing time reduction using MDR flow. Finally we introduce detailed algorithm to extract design intent from analog circuits.

  9. Microscale rarefied gas dynamics and surface interactions for EUVL and MEMS applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2004-11-01

    A combined experimental/modeling study was conducted to better understand the critical role of gas-surface interactions in rarefied gas flows. An experimental chamber and supporting diagnostics were designed and assembled to allow simultaneous measurements of gas heat flux and inter-plate gas density profiles in an axisymmetric, parallel-plate geometry. Measurements of gas density profiles and heat flux are made under identical conditions, eliminating an important limitation of earlier studies. The use of in situ, electron-beam fluorescence is demonstrated as a means to measure gas density profiles although additional work is required to improve the accuracy of this technique. Heat flux is inferred from temperature-drop measurements using precision thermistors. The system can be operated with a variety of gases (monatomic, diatomic, polyatomic, mixtures) and carefully controlled, well-characterized surfaces of different types (metals, ceramics) and conditions (smooth, rough). The measurements reported here are for 304 stainless steel plates with a standard machined surface coupled with argon, helium, and nitrogen. The resulting heat-flux and gas-density-profile data are analyzed using analytic and computational models to show that a simple Maxwell gas-surface interaction model is adequate to represent all of the observations. Based on this analysis, thermal accommodation coefficients for 304 stainless steel coupled with argon, nitrogen, and helium are determined to be 0.88, 0.80, and 0.38, respectively, with an estimated uncertainty of {+-}0.02.

  10. Quality enhancement of parallel MDP flows with mask suppliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Erwin; Lee, Rachel; Lee, Chun Der

    2013-06-01

    For many maskshops, designed parallel mask data preparation (MDP) flows accompanying with a final data comparison are viewed as a reliable method that could reduce quality risks caused by mis-operation. However, in recent years, more and more mask data mistakes have shown that present parallel MDP flows could not capture all mask data errors yet. In this paper, we will show major failure models of parallel MDP flows from analyzing MDP quality accidents and share our approaches to achieve further improvement with mask suppliers together.

  11. RHIC Prefire Protection Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Biscardi, C.; Curcio, T.; Gassner, D.; DeMonte, V.; DeSanto, L.; Fu, W.; Liaw, C. J.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2015-01-07

    The protection of the RHIC experimental detectors from damage due to beam hitting close upstream elements in cases of abort kicker prefires requires some dedicated precautionary measures with two general options: to bring the beam close to a limiting aperture (i.e. the beam pipe wall), as far upstream of the detector components as possible or, alternatively, to bring a limiting aperture close to the circulating beam. During the FY 2014 RHIC Heavy Ion run the first option was chosen because of the limited time available for preparation before the start of the run. For future runs the second option, in this case the installation of dual-sided movable masks, is preferred. The installation of the masks, one per ring, is planned before the start of the FY 2015 run.

  12. On Masking Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    solution will perform better than the others and present experimental data supportive of the analysis. This investigation is based on simulated robot...solution will perform better than the agent’s task is to catch the evasion agent. Both agents others, and present experimental data supportive of the...Masking interception, and the resultant time lost from hiding and The previous section ruled out refinement stratgies replanning. Without the learned rule

  13. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, Alan L.; Kroop, David C.; McGee, Marilyn K.; Lenkszus, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  14. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, A.L.; Kroop, D.C.; McGee, M.K.; Lenkszus, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  15. Masks: Culture and Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, MaryEllen; And Others

    This guide describes a 7-day lesson plan to be used with bilingual 3rd and 4th graders and 6th, 7th, and 8th graders in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classes. The guide shows how mask making can be tied into each class, and then how to pull the classes together for the older students to become peer tutors to the younger ones in the…

  16. The Attentional Dynamics of Masked Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Philip L.; Wolfgang, Bradley J.

    2004-01-01

    A dichoptic masking procedure was used to test whether the mask-dependent cuing effects found in luminance detection by P. L. Smith (2000a) were due to integration masking or interruption masking. Attentional cuing enhanced detection sensitivity (d') when stimuli were backwardly masked with either dichoptic or monoptic masks, whereas no cuing…

  17. Mask strategy at International SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-08-01

    International SEMATECH (ISMT) is a consortium consisting of 13 leading semiconductor manufacturers from around the globe. Its objective is to develop the infrastructure necessary for its member companies to realize the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) through efficiencies of shared development resources and knowledge. The largest area of effort is lithography, recognized as a crucial enabler for microelectronics technology progress. Within the Lithography Division, most of the efforts center on mask-related issues. The development strategy at International SEMATCH will be presented and the interlock of lithography projects clarified. Because of the limited size of the mask production equipment market, the business case is weak for aggressive investment commensurate with the pace of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. With masks becoming the overwhelming component of lithography cost, new ways of reducing or eliminating mask costs are being explored. Will mask technology survive without a strong business case? Will the mask industry limit the growth of the semiconductor industry? Are advanced masks worth their escalating cost? An analysis of mask cost from the perspective of mask value imparted to the user is presented with examples and generic formulas for the reader to apply independently. A key part to the success for both International SEMATECH and the industry globally will be partnerships on both the local level between mask-maker and mask-user, and the macro level where global collaborations will be necessary to resolve technology development cost challenges.

  18. EUV mask black border evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, Christina; Bonam, Ravi; Gallagher, Emily; Grohs, Jonathan; Kagawa, Masayuki; Kindt, Louis; Narita, Eisuke; Nash, Steven; Sakamoto, Yoshifumi

    2014-10-01

    The black border is a frame created by removing all the multilayers on the EUV mask in the region around the chip. It is created to prevent exposure of adjacent fields when printing an EUV mask on a wafer. Papers have documented its effectiveness. As the technology transitions into manufacturing, the black border must be optimized from the initial mask making process through its life. In this work, the black border is evaluated in three stages: the black border during fabrication, the final sidewall profile, and extended lifetime studies. This work evaluates the black border through simulations and physical experiments. The simulations address concerns for defects and sidewall profiles. The physical experiments test the current black border process. Three masks are used: one mask to test how black border affects the image placement of features on mask and two masks to test how the multilayers change through extended cleans. Data incorporated in this study includes: registration, reflectivity, multilayer structure images and simulated wafer effects. By evaluating the black border from both a mask making perspective and a lifetime perspective, we are able to characterize how the structure evolves. The mask data and simulations together predict the performance of the black border and its ability to maintain critical dimensions on wafer. In this paper we explore what mask changes occur and how they will affect mask use.

  19. Lithographic characterization of improved projection optics in the EUVL engineering test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Donna J.; Lee, Sang Hun; Ballard, William P.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Bernardez, Louis J., II; Haney, Steven J.; Johnson, Terry A.; Barr, Pamela K.; Leung, Alvin H.; Jefferson, Karen L.; Replogle, William C.; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Chapman, Henry N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Wurm, Stefan; Panning, Eric M.

    2003-06-01

    Static and scanned images of 100nm dense features for a developmental set of l/14 optics (projection optics box # 1, POB 1) in the Engineering Test Stand (ETS) were successfully obtained with various LPP source powers last year. The ETS with POB1 has been used to understand initial system performance and lithographic learning. Since then, numerous system upgrades have been made to improve ETS lithographic performance to meet or exceed the original design objectives. The most important upgrade is the replacement of POB 1 with an improved projection optics system, POB2, having lower figure error (l/20 rms wavefront error) and lower flare. Both projection optics boxes are a four-mirror design with a 0.1 numerical aperture. Scanned 70-nm dense features have been successfully printed using POB2. Aerial image contrast measurements have been made using the resist clearing method. The results are in good agreement to previous POB2 aerial image contrast measurements at the subfield exposure station (SES) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. For small features the results deviate from the modeling predictions due to the inherent resolution limit of the resist. The intrinsic flare of POB2 was also characterized. The experimental results were in excellent agreement with modeling predictions. As predicted, the flare in POB2 is less than 20% for 2μm features, which is two times lower than the flare in POB1. EUV flare is much easier to compensate for than its DUV counterpart due to its greater degree of uniformity and predictability. The lithographic learning obtained from the ETS will be used in the development of EUV High Volume Manufacturing tools. This paper describes the ETS tool ETS tool setup, both static and scanned, that was required after the installation of POB2. The paper will also describe the lithographic characterization of POB2 in the ETS and cmpare those results to the lithographic results obtained last year with POB1.

  20. Masks in imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Dominical, Venina; Samsel, Leigh; McCoy, J Philip

    2017-01-01

    Data analysis in imaging flow cytometry incorporates elements of flow cytometry together with other aspects of morphological analysis of images. A crucial early step in this analysis is the creation of a mask to distinguish the portion of the image upon which further examination of specified features can be performed. Default masks are provided by the manufacturer of the imaging flow cytometer but additional custom masks can be created by the individual user for specific applications. Flawed or inaccurate masks can have a substantial negative impact on the overall analysis of a sample, thus great care must be taken to ensure the accuracy of masks. Here we discuss various types of masks and cite examples of their use. Furthermore we provide our insight for how to approach selecting and assessing the optimal mask for a specific analysis.

  1. Mask Design for the Space Interferometry Mission Internal Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, David; Zhao, Feng; Korechoff, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the mask design used for the internal metrology of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). Included is information about the project, the method of measurements with SIM, the internal metrology, numerical model of internal metrology, wavefront examples, performance metrics, and mask design

  2. Metabolic power of European starlings Sturnus vulgaris during flight in a wind tunnel, estimated from heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water and mask respirometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, S; Möller, U; Rayner, J M V; Jackson, D M; Nachtigall, W; Speakman, J R

    2004-11-01

    It is technically demanding to measure the energetic cost of animal flight. Each of the previously available techniques has some disadvantage as well advantages. We compared measurements of the energetic cost of flight in a wind tunnel by four European starlings Sturnus vulgaris made using three independent techniques: heat transfer modelling, doubly labelled water (DLW) and mask respirometry. We based our heat transfer model on thermal images of the surface temperature of the birds and air flow past the body and wings calculated from wing beat kinematics. Metabolic power was not sensitive to uncertainty in the value of efficiency when estimated from heat transfer modelling. A change in the assumed value of whole animal efficiency from 0.19 to 0.07 (the range of estimates in previous studies) only altered metabolic power predicted from heat transfer modelling by 13%. The same change in the assumed value of efficiency would cause a 2.7-fold change in metabolic power if it were predicted from mechanical power. Metabolic power did not differ significantly between measurements made using the three techniques when we assumed an efficiency in the range 0.11-0.19, although the DLW results appeared to form a U-shaped power-speed curve while the heat transfer model and respirometry results increased linearly with speed. This is the first time that techniques for determining metabolic power have been compared using data from the same birds flying under the same conditions. Our data provide reassurance that all the techniques produce similar results and suggest that heat transfer modelling may be a useful method for estimating metabolic rate.

  3. Mask alignment system for semiconductor processing

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.; Weaver, William T.; Grant, Christopher N.

    2017-02-14

    A mask alignment system for providing precise and repeatable alignment between ion implantation masks and workpieces. The system includes a mask frame having a plurality of ion implantation masks loosely connected thereto. The mask frame is provided with a plurality of frame alignment cavities, and each mask is provided with a plurality of mask alignment cavities. The system further includes a platen for holding workpieces. The platen may be provided with a plurality of mask alignment pins and frame alignment pins configured to engage the mask alignment cavities and frame alignment cavities, respectively. The mask frame can be lowered onto the platen, with the frame alignment cavities moving into registration with the frame alignment pins to provide rough alignment between the masks and workpieces. The mask alignment cavities are then moved into registration with the mask alignment pins, thereby shifting each individual mask into precise alignment with a respective workpiece.

  4. Mask fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  5. Masks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    2003-05-01

    Preface; Introducing the masks; Part I. Worlds in the Making: 1. The magic Universe; 2. The mythic Universe; 3. The geometric Universe; 4. The medieval Universe; 5. The infinite Universe; 6. The mechanistic Universe; Part II. The Heart Divine: 7. Dance of the atoms and waves; 8. Fabric of space and time; 9. Nearer to the heart's desire; 10. The cosmic tide; 11. Do dreams ever come true?; Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: 12. The witch universe; 13. The spear of Archytas; 14. All that is made; 15. The cloud of unknowing; 16. Learned ignorance.

  6. Trends in mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Aki; Pang, Liyong; Su, Bo; Choi, Yohan

    2014-10-01

    Whether for VSB mask writing or for multibeam mask writing, the shapes we need to write on masks are increasingly complex, increasingly curvilinear, and smaller in minimum width and space. The overwhelming trend in mask data preparation (MDP) is the shift from deterministic, rule-based, geometric, context-independent, shape-modulated, rectangular processing to statistical, simulation-based, context-dependent, dose- and shape-modulated any-shape processing. The paper briefly surveys the history of MDP, and explains through a simulation-based study that 50nm line and space is the tipping point where rule-based processing gives away to simulation-based processing.

  7. A Masked Photocathode in Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a masked photocathode inside the photoinjector for generating high brightness election beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto an electrode, an electrode with small hole is used as a mask to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material easy by rotating the photocathode behind the electrode into the hole. Furthermore, this helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode material. The masked photocathode also provides transverse cut-off to a Gaussian laser beam that reduces electron beam emittance growth from nonlinear space-charge effects.

  8. Masked hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bobrie, Guillaume; Clerson, Pierre; Ménard, Joël; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; Chatellier, Gilles; Plouin, Pierre-François

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to review the literature on masked hypertension. Studies, reviews and editorials on masked hypertension were identified by PubMed, Pascal BioMed and Cochrane literature systematic searches. Then, we carried out a meta-analysis of the six cohort studies reporting quantitative data for masked hypertension prognosis. There is still no clear consensus definition of masked hypertension and the reproducibility of the phenomenon is unknown. Nevertheless, the prevalence of masked hypertension seems to lie between 8 and 20%, and can be up to 50% in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects with masked hypertension have a higher risk of cardiovascular accidents [hazard ratios: 1.92 (1.51-2.44)] than normotensive subjects. This is due to a possible failure to recognize and appropriately manage this particular form of hypertension, the frequent association with other risk factors and coexisting target organ damage. The remaining unresolved questions are as follows: is masked hypertension a clinical entity that requires identification and characterization or a statistical phenomenon linked to the variability of blood pressure measurements?; because screening of the entire population is not feasible, how to identify individuals with masked hypertension?; and, in the absence of randomized trial, how to treat masked hypertension?

  9. Akathisia masked by hypokinesia.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, K; Lauerma, H; Holi, M M; Honkonen, T; Rimon, R

    2000-07-01

    Here, we will discuss the concept of subjective akathisia and present a patient case. Our patient was suffering from neuroleptic-induced hypokinesia and akathisia at the same time. The typical motor manifestations of akathisia were masked by hypokinesia, which made the diagnosis difficult. However, the subjective symptoms of akathisia were evident and distressing. Although not observable to bare eye, the pathognomonic pattern of motor activity detected in akathisia was demonstrated by actometric recording. Changing the conventional neuroleptic to an atypical one brought relief to the subjective symptoms of akathisia and hypokinesia, while the motor activity was clearly diminished in actometric recording. Actometric recording may be useful in diagnosing akathisia masked by hypokinesia, but the typical subjective symptoms of akathisia should not be ignored, even when actometry is not available to demonstrate the missing motor component of akathisia. Not only akathisia defined by DSM-IV but also subjective akathisia should be adequately treated to relieve the subjective distress, and to diminish the unfavorable effects on psychotic symptoms, behavior, and drug compliance.

  10. EFFECT OF MASKED REGIONS ON WEAK-LENSING STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-10

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple {chi}{sup 2} analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg{sup 2} survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting {chi}{sup 2}/n{sub dof} = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard {Lambda}CDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  11. Optimal mask characterization by Surrogate Wafer Print (SWaP) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.; Hoellein, Ingo; Peters, Jan Hendrick; Ackmann, Paul; Connolly, Brid; West, Craig

    2008-10-01

    enhancement to mask characterization quality including defectivity, dimensional control, pattern fidelity, and in-plane distortion. We present a thorough analysis of both the technical and logistical challenges coupled with an objective view of the advantages and disadvantages from both the technical and financial perspectives. The analysis and model used by the AMTC will serve to provoke other mask shops to prepare their own analyses then consider this new paradigm for mask characterization and qualification.

  12. Removal of particles from lithographic masks through plasma-assisted cleaning by metastable atomic neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, W. M.; Szybilski, D. S.; Das, C. E.; Raju, R.; Surla, V.; Neumann, M. J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2008-11-01

    For extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) to become a high volume manufacturing technology for integrated circuit manufacturing, the cleanliness of the system, especially the photomask, is of high importance. For EUV photomasks, which cannot be protected from contamination by the use of a pellicle, an effective and quick cleaning technology needs to be ready in order to maintain wafer throughput. There are challenges to extend current wet cleaning technologies to meet the future needs for damage-free and high efficiency mask cleaning. Accordingly, a unique process for cleaning particulates from surfaces, specifically photomasks as well as wafers, has been evaluated at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. The removal technique utilizes a high density plasma source as well as pulsed substrate biases to provide for removal. Helium is used as the primary gas in the plasma, which under ionization, provides for a large density of helium metastable atoms present in the plasma. These metastable helium atoms have on the order of 20 eV of energy which can transfer to particles on the substrate to be cleaned. When the substrate is under a small flux of ion bombardment, these bonds then remain broken and it is theorized that this allows the particles to be volatilized for their subsequent removal. 100 % particle removal efficiency has been obtained for 30 nm, 80 nm, and 200 nm polystyrene latex particles. In addition, removal rate has been correlated with helium metastable population density determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

  13. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  14. Simplified tooling for spray masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinbar, B. J.; Hammons, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Tooling technique involves positioning tiles within acrylic plastic masking frames that attach magnetically to holding fixture. Plastics are "magnetized" with adhesive mangetic-rubber strips. Technique is simpler and less expensive than conventional methods. L-shaped masks are easily cut and altered.

  15. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  16. Masked object registration in the Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Padfield, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Registration is one of the most common tasks of image analysis and computer vision applications. The requirements of most registration algorithms include large capture range and fast computation so that the algorithms are robust to different scenarios and can be computed in a reasonable amount of time. For these purposes, registration in the Fourier domain using normalized cross-correlation is well suited and has been extensively studied in the literature. Another common requirement is masking, which is necessary for applications where certain regions of the image that would adversely affect the registration result should be ignored. To address these requirements, we have derived a mathematical model that describes an exact form for embedding the masking step fully into the Fourier domain so that all steps of translation registration can be computed efficiently using Fast Fourier Transforms. We provide algorithms and implementation details that demonstrate the correctness of our derivations. We also demonstrate how this masked FFT registration approach can be applied to improve the Fourier-Mellin algorithm that calculates translation, rotation, and scale in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate the computational efficiency, advantages, and correctness of our algorithm on a number of images from real-world applications. Our framework enables fast, global, parameter-free registration of images with masked regions.

  17. Optimization of mask shot count using MB-MDP and lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Gek Soon; Wang, Wei Long; Choi, Byoung IL; Zou, Yi; Tabery, Cyrus; Bork, Ingo; Nguyen, Tam; Fujimura, Aki

    2011-11-01

    In order to maintain manageable process windows, mask shapes at the 20nm technology node and below become so complex that mask write times reach 40 hours or might not be writeable at all since the extrapolated write time reaches 80 hours. The recently introduced Model Based Mask Data Preparation (MB-MDP) technique is able to reduce shot count and therefore mask write time by using overlapping shots. Depending on the amount of shot count reduction the contour of the mask shapes is changed leading to the question how the mask contour influences wafer performance. This paper investigates the tradeoff between mask shot count reduction using MB-MDP and wafer performance using lithography simulation. A typical Source-Mask-Optimization (SMO) result for a 20nm technology will be used as an example.

  18. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  19. Biological Activity of Masked Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Harald; Gornicec, Jan; Neuper, Theresa; Parigiani, Maria Alejandra; Wallner, Michael; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2017-01-01

    Low endotoxin recovery (LER) is a recently discovered phenomenon describing the inability of limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assays to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) because of a “masking effect” caused by chelators or detergents commonly used in buffer formulations for medical products and recombinant proteins. This study investigates the masking capacities of different buffer formulations and whether masked endotoxin is biologically active. We show that both naturally occurring endotoxin as well as control standard endotoxin can be affected by LER. Furthermore, whereas masked endotoxin cannot be detected in Factor C based assays, it is still detectable in a cell-based TLR4-NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene assay. Moreover, in primary human monocytes, masked LPS induces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and surface activation markers even at very low concentrations. We therefore conclude that masked LPS is a potent trigger of immune responses, which emphasizes the potential danger of masked LPS, as it may pose a health threat in pharmaceutical products or compromise experimental results. PMID:28317862

  20. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  1. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  2. Hg-Mask Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assus, P.; Colas, F.

    In order to optimize the occulting process of a Lyot coronagraph and to provide a high dynamic range imaging, a new kind of occulting disk has been developed at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro. A mercury (Hg) drop glued onto an optical window by molecular cohesion and compressed by a pellicle film is used as the occulting disk. The minimum of the superficial tension potential function provides an optical precision (lambda/100) of the toric free surface of the mercury. This process provides a size control for the adaptation to the seeing conditions and to the apparent diameter of a resolved object, and in the case of adaptive optics, to the Airy diameter fraction needed. The occultation is a three dimensional process near the focal plane on the toric free surface that provides an apodization of the occultation. The Hg-Mask coronagraph has been projected for astrometric observations of faint satellites near to Jovian planets and works since 2000 at the 1.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory (OPD - Brazil).

  3. Mechanical alignment of substrates to a mask

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.; Honan, Michael; Amato, Luigi G.; Grant, Christopher Neil; Strassner, James D.

    2016-11-08

    A plurality of masks is attached to the underside of a mask frame. This attachment is made such that each mask can independently move relative to the mask frame in three directions. This relative movement allows each mask to adjust its position to align with respective alignment pins disposed on a working surface. In one embodiment, each mask is attached to the mask frame using fasteners, where the fasteners have a shaft with a diameter smaller than the diameter of the mounting hole disposed on the mask. A bias element may be used to allow relative movement between the mask and the mask frame in the vertical direction. Each mask may also have kinematic features to mate with the respective alignment pins on the working surface.

  4. Vibrotactile masking through the body.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2014-09-01

    Touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at contralateral locations on the opposite side of the body. These interactions suggest an intimate connection between the two sides of the body. Here, we explore the effect of masking not across the body but through the body by measuring the effect of a masking stimulus on the back on the tactile sensitivity of the corresponding point on the front. Tactile sensitivity was measured on each side of the stomach, while vibrotactile masking stimulation was applied to one side of the front and to points on the back including the point directly behind the test point on the front. Results were compared to sensitivity, while vibrotactile stimulation was applied to a control site on the shoulder. A reduction in sensitivity of about .8 dB was found that required the masking stimulus to be within about 2 cm of the corresponding point on the back.

  5. Review of biomedical aspects of CB masks and their relationship to military performance. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Muza, S.R.

    1986-11-01

    This review describes the most important factors affecting military work performance while wearing a CB mask: (1) the additional inspiratory and expiratory breathing resistance; (2) increased external dead space; (3) thermal stress of the mask and hood; (4) restriction of functional vision; (5) hindrance of speech transmission and reception; (6) weight, size, and pressure on the face by the CB mask; (7) claustrophobic reactions, and (8) sleep loss and lack of nutrient intake due to long-term wear. In assessing the biomedical aspects of these factors, rather than making comparisons between specific models of CB masks, the review addresses these factors as they apply to CB masks in general.

  6. Block-based mask optimization for optical lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Song, Zhiyang; Li, Yanqiu; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-05-10

    Pixel-based optical proximity correction (PBOPC) methods have been developed as a leading-edge resolution enhancement technique (RET) for integrated circuit fabrication. PBOPC independently modulates each pixel on the reticle, which tremendously increases the mask's complexity and, at the same time, deteriorates its manufacturability. Most current PBOPC algorithms recur to regularization methods or a mask manufacturing rule check (MRC) to improve the mask manufacturability. Typically, these approaches either fail to satisfy manufacturing constraints on the practical product line, or lead to suboptimal mask patterns that may degrade the lithographic performance. This paper develops a block-based optical proximity correction (BBOPC) algorithm to pursue the optimal masks with manufacturability compliance, where the mask is shaped by a set of overlapped basis blocks rather than pixels. BBOPC optimization is formulated based on a vector imaging model, which is adequate for both dry lithography with lower numerical aperture (NA), and immersion lithography with hyper-NA. The BBOPC algorithm successively optimizes the main features (MF) and subresolution assist features (SRAF) based on a modified conjugate gradient method. It is effective at smoothing any unmanufacturable jogs along edges. A weight matrix is introduced in the cost function to preserve the edge fidelity of the printed images. Simulations show that the BBOPC algorithm can improve lithographic imaging performance while maintaining mask manufacturing constraints.

  7. Subdivisions with infinitely supported mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Pan, Yali

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the convergence of subdivision schemes associated with masks being polynomially decay sequences. Two-scale vector refinement equations are the formwhere the vector of functions [phi]=([phi]1,E..,[phi]r)T is in and is polynomially decay sequence of rxr matrices called refinement mask. Associated with the mask a is a linear operator on given byBy using same methods in [B. Han, R. Q. Jia, Characterization of Riesz bases of wavelets generated from multiresolution analysis, manuscript]; [BE Han, Refinable functions and cascade algorithms in weighted spaces with infinitely supported masks, manuscript]; [R.Q. Jia, Q.T. Jiang, Z.W. Shen, Convergence of cascade algorithms associated with nonhomogeneous refinement equations, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 129 (2001) 415-427]; [R.Q. Jia, Convergence of vector subdivision schemes and construction of biorthogonal multiple wavelets, in: Advances in Wavelet, Hong Kong,1997, Springer, Singapore, 1998, pp. 199-227], a characterization of convergence of the sequences in the L2-norm is given, which extends the main results in [R.Q. Jia, S.D. Riemenschneider, D.X. Zhou, Vector subdivision schemes and multiple wavelets, Math. Comp. 67 (1998) 1533-1563] on convergence of the subdivision schemes associated with a finitely supported mask to the case in which mask a is polynomially decay sequence. As an application, we also obtain a characterization of smoothness of solutions of the refinement equation mentioned above for the case r=1.

  8. Visual Masking During Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    Visual masking occurs when one stimulus interferes with the perception of another stimulus. Investigates which matters more for visual masking--that the target and masking stimuli are flashed on the same part of the retina, or, that the target and mask appear in the same place. (Author/RK)

  9. Comparison of univariate and multivariate models for prediction of major and minor elements from laser-induced breakdown spectra with and without masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb I.; Giguere, Stephen; Lepore, Kate; Byrne, Sarah; Boucher, Thomas; Carey, CJ; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-09-01

    This study uses 1356 spectra from 452 geologically-diverse samples, the largest suite of LIBS rock spectra ever assembled, to compare the accuracy of elemental predictions in models that use only spectral regions thought to contain peaks arising from the element of interest versus those that use information in the entire spectrum. Results show that for the elements Si, Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ni, Mn, Cr, Co, and Zn, univariate predictions based on single emission lines are by far the least accurate, no matter how carefully the region of channels/wavelengths is chosen and despite the prominence of the selected emission lines. An automated iterative algorithm was developed to sweep through all 5485 channels of data and select the single region that produces the optimal prediction accuracy for each element using univariate analysis. For the eight major elements, use of this technique results in a 35% improvement in prediction accuracy; for minors, the improvement is 13%. The best wavelength region choice for any given univariate analysis is likely to be an inherent property of the specific training set that cannot be generalized. In comparison, multivariate analysis using partial least-squares (PLS) almost universally outperforms univariate analysis. PLS using all the same wavelength regions from the univariate analysis produces results that improve in accuracy by 63% for major elements and 3% for minor element. This difference is likely a reflection of signal to noise ratios, which are far better for major elements than for minor elements, and likely limit their prediction accuracy by any technique. We also compare predictions using specific wavelength ranges for each element against those employing all channels. Masking out channels to focus on emission lines from a specific element that occurs decreases prediction accuracy for major elements but is useful for minor elements with low signals and proportionally much higher noise; use of PLS rather than univariate

  10. New method of contour-based mask-shape compiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Onizawa, Akira; Sato, Hidetoshi; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a new method of accurately profiling a mask shape by utilizing a Mask CD-SEM. The method is intended to realize high accuracy, stability and reproducibility of the Mask CD-SEM adopting an edge detection algorithm as the key technology used in CD-SEM for high accuracy CD measurement. In comparison with a conventional image processing method for contour profiling, it is possible to create the profiles with much higher accuracy which is comparable with CD-SEM for semiconductor device CD measurement. In this report, we will introduce the algorithm in general, the experimental results and the application in practice. As shrinkage of design rule for semiconductor device has further advanced, an aggressive OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) is indispensable in RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology). From the view point of DFM (Design for Manufacturability), a dramatic increase of data processing cost for advanced MDP (Mask Data Preparation) for instance and surge of mask making cost have become a big concern to the device manufacturers. In a sense, it is a trade-off between the high accuracy RET and the mask production cost, while it gives a significant impact on the semiconductor market centered around the mask business. To cope with the problem, we propose the best method for a DFM solution in which two dimensional data are extracted for an error free practical simulation by precise reproduction of a real mask shape in addition to the mask data simulation. The flow centering around the design data is fully automated and provides an environment where optimization and verification for fully automated model calibration with much less error is available. It also allows complete consolidation of input and output functions with an EDA system by constructing a design data oriented system structure. This method therefore is regarded as a strategic DFM approach in the semiconductor metrology.

  11. Masking mediated print defect visibility predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaochen; Nachlieli, Hila; Shaked, Doron; Shiffman, Smadar; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Banding is a well-known artifact produced by printing systems. It usually appears as lines perpendicular to the process direction of the print. Therefore, banding is an important print quality issue which has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers. However, little literature has focused on the study of the masking effect of content for this kind of print quality issue. Compared with other image and print quality research, our work is focused on the print quality of typical documents printed on a digital commercial printing press. In this paper, we propose a Masking Mediated Print Defect Visibility Predictor (MMPDVP) to predict the visibility of defects in the presence of customer content. The parameters of the algorithm are trained from ground-truth images that have been marked by subjects. The MMPDVP could help the press operator decide whether the print quality is acceptable for specific customer requirements. Ultimately, this model can be used to optimize the print-shop workflow.

  12. Stray-light sources from pupil mask edges and mitigation techniques for the TPF Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, Daniel; Neureuther, Andrew; Miller, Marshall; Lieber, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2006-06-01

    Stray-light sources from pupil plane masks that may limit Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) performance are characterized 1,2 and mitigation strategies are discussed to provide a guide for future development. Rigorous vector simulation with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method is used to characterize waveguiding effects in narrow openings, sidewall interactions, manufacturing tool-marks, manufacturing roughness, mask tilt, and cross-wavelength performance of thick Silicon mask structures. These effects cause stray-light that is not accounted for in scalar thin-mask diffraction theory, the most important of which are sidewall interactions, waveguiding effects in narrow openings, and tilt. These results have been used to improve the scalar thin-mask theory used to simulate the TPF-C with the Integrated Telescope Model. 3 Of particular interest are simulations of 100m thick vertical sidewall openings that model features typically found on Ripple masks 4 fabricated by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) processes. 5 This paper contributes fundamental data for systematically modeling these effects in end-to-end system simulation. Leakage straight through the mask material varies greatly with wavelength, especially in Silicon (an attractive mask material due to the precision manufacturing techniques developed by the IC industry). Coating Silicon with 200nm of Chrome effectively mitigates the leakage without causing additional scattering. Thick-mask diffraction differs from the predictions of scalar thin-mask theory because diffraction spreading is confined by the mask's sidewalls. This confinement can make a mask opening look electro-magnetically larger or smaller than designed, by up to 3λ per vertical sidewall on a 50μm thick mask yet this can be reduced an order of magnitude by undercutting the sidewalls 20°. These confinement effects are sensitive to mask tilt (if light reaches the sidewalls) which can lead to an imbalance in stray-light sources and

  13. Mask roughness induced LER: a rule of thumb -- paper

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2010-03-12

    Much work has already been done on how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and currently factor into LER limits. Here, we propose a 'rule-of-thumb' simplified solution that provides a fast and powerful method to obtain mask roughness induced LER. We present modeling data on an older generation mask with a roughness of 230 pm as well as the ultimate target roughness of 50 pm. Moreover, we consider feature sizes of 50 nm and 22 nm, and show that as a function of correlation length, the LER peaks at the condition that the correlation length is approximately equal to the resolution of the imaging optic.

  14. Visual masking: past accomplishments, present status, future developments

    PubMed Central

    Breitmeyer, Bruno G.

    2008-01-01

    Visual masking, throughout its history, has been used as an investigative tool in exploring the temporal dynamics of visual perception, beginning with retinal processes and ending in cortical processes concerned with the conscious registration of stimuli. However, visual masking also has been a phenomenon deemed worthy of study in its own right. Most of the recent uses of visual masking have focused on the study of central processes, particularly those involved in feature, object and scene representations, in attentional control mechanisms, and in phenomenal awareness. In recent years our understanding of the phenomenon and cortical mechanisms of visual masking also has benefited from several brain imaging techniques and from a number of sophisticated and neurophysiologically plausible neural network models. Key issues and problems are discussed with the aim of guiding future empirical and theoretical research. PMID:20517494

  15. Contralateral tactile masking between forearms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2014-03-01

    Masking effects have been demonstrated in which tactile sensitivity is affected when one touch is close to another on the body surface. Such effects are likely a result of local lateral inhibitory circuits that sharpen the spatial tuning of a given tactile receptor. Mutually inhibitory pathways have also been demonstrated between cortical tactile maps of the two halves of the body. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at contralateral locations. Here, we measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on this contralateral masking effect. Tactile sensitivity was measured on one forearm, while vibrotactile masking stimulation was applied to the opposite arm. Results were compared to sensitivity while vibrotactile stimulation was applied to a control site on the right shoulder. Sensitivity on the forearm was reduced by over 3 dB when the arms were touching and by 0.52 dB when they were held parallel. The masking effect depended on the position of the masking stimulus. Its effectiveness fell off by 1 STD when the stimulus was 29 % of arm length from the corresponding contralateral point. This long-range inhibitory effect in the tactile system suggests a surprisingly intimate relationship between the two sides of the body.

  16. Fabless company mask technology approach: fabless but not fab-careless

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisamura, Toshiyuki; Wu, Xin

    2009-10-01

    There are two different foundry-fabless working models in the aspect of mask. Some foundries have in-house mask facility while others contract with merchant mask vendors. Significant progress has been made in both kinds of situations. Xilinx as one of the pioneers of fabless semiconductor companies has been continually working very closely with both merchant mask vendors and mask facilities of foundries in past many years, contributed well in both technology development and benefited from corporations. Our involvement in manufacturing is driven by the following three elements: The first element is to understand the new fabrication and mask technologies and then find a suitable design / layout style to better utilize these new technologies and avoid potential risks. Because Xilinx has always been involved in early stage of advanced technology nodes, this early understanding and adoption is especially important. The second element is time to market. Reduction in mask and wafer manufacturing cycle-time can ensure faster time to market. The third element is quality. Commitment to quality is our highest priority for our customers. We have enough visibility on any manufacturing issues affecting the device functionality. Good correlation has consistently been observed between FPGA speed uniformity and the poly mask Critical Dimension (CD) uniformity performance. To achieve FPGA speed uniformity requirement, the manufacturing process as well as the mask and wafer CD uniformity has to be monitored. Xilinx works closely with the wafer foundries and mask suppliers to improve productivity and the yield from initial development stage of mask making operations. As an example, defect density reduction is one of the biggest challenges for mask supplier in development stage to meet the yield target satisfying the mask cost and mask turn-around-time (TAT) requirement. Historically, masks were considered to be defect free but at these advanced process nodes, that assumption no longer

  17. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  18. Temporal integration in vision: masking can aid detection.

    PubMed

    Swift, Dan J

    2013-04-01

    Temporal form-part integration is the process whereby two discrete sets of stimuli, presented at different times, are perceived by the visual system as a single integrated percept. Dixon and Di Lollo (Cognitive Psychology 26(1):33-63, 1994) proposed a temporal correlation model that was able to quantitatively account for a number of findings related to both form-part integration tasks and partial report. The present study demonstrates a novel approach to form-part integration--the addition of a whole-field mask stimulus at the termination of the second set of stimuli. According to an extension of the correlation model, the mask stimulus should reduce the visual system's response to the trailing display, thus increasing the relative overlap of the two displays, fostering integration. Experiment 1 supported this hypothesis, showing a maximum benefit when the mask followed the trailing display immediately, as opposed to after a delay of 60 ms. Experiment 2 showed that this same mask actually did yield worse performance when presented immediately after a single set of stimuli. The third experiment collected detailed data for a few observers over a larger number of mask delays. Taken together, these experiments provide a rare example of masking degrading a target stimulus, and yet aiding perception.

  19. Dissolution methodology for taste masked oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Gittings, Sally; Turnbull, Neil; Roberts, Clive J; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2014-01-10

    Conventional adult dosage forms are often not suitable for the paediatric and geriatric populations due to either swallowing difficulties or patient repulsion and a requirement for tailored dosing to individual compliance or physiological needs. Alternative formulations are available; however these often require the incorporation of more complex taste masking techniques. One approach to taste masking is to reduce contact between the bitter Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) and oral cavity taste bud regions. This is achieved by hindering release in the oral cavity, or including competitive inhibition of bitter sensation for example by using flavours or sweeteners. There may also be other sensational complications from the API such as residual burning, reflux or metallic taste sensations to deal with. In vitro dissolution testing is employed to elucidate taste masking capability by quantifying release of the drug in simulated oral cavity conditions. Dissolution testing approaches may also be used to potentially predict or quantify the effect of the taste masking technique on the resultant pharmacokinetic profile. The present review investigates the anatomy and physiology of the oral cavity and current approaches to taste masking. In vitro dissolution methodologies adopted in the evaluation of taste masked formulations are discussed for their relative merits and drawbacks. A vast array of methodologies has been employed, with little agreement between approaches, and a lack of biorelevance. Future directions in dissolution methodology such as TNO Intestinal Model (TIM) and the Artificial Stomach and Duodenum model (ASD) are also discussed.

  20. Fixing the focus shift caused by 3D mask diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenikaya, Bayram; Chuyeshov, Constantin; Bakir, Onur; Han, Youngae

    2014-03-01

    As the feature sizes printed with optical lithography get smaller, Kirchhoff's thin mask approximation used in full chip optical proximity corrections (OPC) fails to yield acceptable accuracy due to thick mask diffraction effects. One of the most observed effects of the thick mask diffraction is that it creates different focus shift for different patterns. When Bossung curves (CD plots with respect to defocus) of various patterns are observed from rigorous simulations and from actual wafer data one can notice that each pattern has a different best focus. Depending on the pattern, Bossung curves can be offset in either positive or negative direction. This significantly reduces the common depth of focus (DOF) for which all patterns print with acceptable fidelity. Even though each pattern by itself may have an acceptable DOF, the common DOF may not be acceptable. Several extensions to the thin mask approximation have been developed that model this behavior accurately, such as boundary layer approximations and domain decomposition methods. These methods provide a more accurate approximation than the thin mask model while still being computationally efficient to be useful for full chip OPC. Even though these approximations model and predict the focus shift accurately, to the best knowledge of the authors no method has been published to use these modeling capabilities to automatically fix this focus shift during OPC. In this paper we provide an optimization method to significantly reduce focus shift due to 3D mask effects during OPC. We show that our 3D mask model can predict this focus shift fairly accurately and we also demonstrate how we use this model in OPC to reduce focus shift, which significantly improves the common DOF for the entire layout.

  1. Informational masking and musical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Fligor, Brian J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  2. Production mask composition checking flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shou-Yuan; Yang, Chuen-Huei; Tsai, Joe; Wang, Alice; Lin, Roger; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin; Lin, Ling-Chieh; Liao, Hung-Yueh; Tsai, Jenny; Bowhill, Amanda; Vu, Hien; Russell, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The mask composition checking flow is an evolution of the traditional mask rule check (MRC). In order to differentiate the flow from MRC, we call it Mask Data Correctness Check (MDCC). The mask house does MRC only to identify process limitations including writing, etching, metrology, etc. There still exist many potential errors that could occur when the frame, main circuit and dummies all together form a whole reticle. The MDCC flow combines the design rule check (DRC) and MRC concepts to adapt to the complex patterns in today's wafer production technologies. Although photomask data has unique characteristics, the MRC tool in Calibre® MDP can easily achieve mask composition by using the Extended MEBES job deck (EJB) format. In EJB format, we can customize the combination of any input layers in an IC design layout format, such as OASIS. Calibre MDP provides section-based processing for many standard verification rule format (SVRF) commands that support DRC-like checks on mask data. Integrating DRC-like checking with EJB for layer composition, we actually perform reticle-level DRC, which is the essence of MDCC. The flow also provides an early review environment before the photomask pattern files are available. Furthermore, to incorporate the MDCC in our production flow, runtime is one of the most important indexes we consider. When the MDCC is included in the tape-out flow, the runtime impact is very limited. Calibre, with its multi-threaded processes and good scalability, is the key to achieving acceptable runtime. In this paper, we present real case runtime data for 28nm and 14nm technology nodes, and prove the practicability of placing MDCC into mass production.

  3. The man in the mask.

    PubMed

    Zugibe, F T; Costello, J T; Breithaupt, M K

    1987-05-01

    A skeletonized body, wearing a black leather bondage mask, was found in a Revolutionary War smokehouse cave with two bullet holes in the back of the head. The body was skeletonized up to the maxillary area but the head region under the mask was well preserved and permitted a positive visual identification. There was evidence that the body had been eaten by small animals and subsequently burned. Investigations into this brutal murder revealed a tale of a bizarre sadomasochistic ritual that attained national prominence.

  4. The Marine Mask of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-10

    America’s Army. To the Marines, it is teamwork and the subordination of the individual to the common good of the unit. First person pronouns are shunned...As demonstrated over the last decade, this versatility and cost effectiveness is a good deal for the American taxpayer. Having examined the Mask

  5. Imaging With the IBIS Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berná, J. A.; Torrejón, J. M.; Bernabeu, G.

    2001-03-01

    We present very preliminary results on the imaging capabilities of the IBIS instrument, the gamma ray imager on board ESA's INTEGRAL satellite, regarding the coded mask subsystem. For this purpose we perform a simulation of a pointed observation to the Galactic Centre region and investigate the detection of the most prominent sources.

  6. Perceptual masking of boar taint in Swedish fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Stolzenbach, Sandra; Lindahl, Gunilla; Lundström, Kerstin; Chen, Gang; Byrne, Derek V

    2009-04-01

    Surgical castration of male piglets has traditionally been practiced to avoid development of boar taint in pork meat which can occur if entire male pigs are raised. Boar taint is commonly characterised as exhibiting the odour and flavour of urine and manure. This study involves sensory characterisation of the possibilities to mask boar taint in meat from entire male pigs by fermentation and smoking to maintain high sensory quality in meat products if castration is prohibited. Model and commercial type Swedish fermented sausage products based on low or high levels of boar tainted fat, three different starter cultures and two different levels of smoking were studied. In the model sausages, liquid smoke masked the perception of boar taint. In contrast, the smoking procedure of the commercial sausages was insufficient to totally mask the perception of boar taint. In both the model and commercial sausages, the aroma development from the starter cultures lowered the perception of boar taint but was insufficient for total perceptual masking. Due to the total masking effect of smoking in the model sausages, it was clear that smoke may present a potential solution to remove the perception of boar taint in fermented sausages if the smoking procedure is optimised.

  7. Ultrahigh efficiency EUV contact-hole printing with chromeless phase shift mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Chao, Weilun; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric; Salmassi, Farhad; Wojdyla, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Contact-hole layer patterning is expected to be one of the first applications for EUV lithography. Conventional darkfield absorber masks, however, are extremely inefficient for these layers, placing even more burden on the already challenging source power demands. To address this concern, a checkerboard phase shift mask configuration has been proposed yielding theoretical throughput gains of 5x assuming a thin-mask modeling. In this manuscript we describe the fabrication of such a mask and demonstrate its imaging performance using the SHARP EUV microscope and MET exposure tool at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. For 25-nm dense features, the phase shift mask was shown to provide a throughput gain of 8x based on SHARP and 7x based on the Berkeley MET. The higher then predicted gain is expected to be due to the fact that the thin mask modeling used in the initial prediction misses shadowing effects.

  8. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P<0.0001) among 229 diabetics (29.3%, n=67) than among 5486 nondiabetics (18.8%, n=1031). Over a median of 11.0 years of follow-up, the adjusted risk for a composite cardiovascular end point in untreated diabetic-masked hypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  9. "The Mask Who Wasn't There": Visual Masking Effect with the Perceptual Absence of the Mask

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Amandine Eve; Riou, Benoit; Muller, Dominique; Dabic, Stéphanie; Versace, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Does a visual mask need to be perceptually present to disrupt processing? In the present research, we proposed to explore the link between perceptual and memory mechanisms by demonstrating that a typical sensory phenomenon (visual masking) can be replicated at a memory level. Experiment 1 highlighted an interference effect of a visual mask on the…

  10. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  11. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  12. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  13. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (m)...

  14. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (o)...

  15. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (o)...

  16. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (m)...

  17. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (m)...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  3. Object Substitution Masking Induced by Illusory Masks: Evidence for Higher Object-Level Locus of Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    A briefly presented target can be rendered invisible by a lingering sparse mask that does not even touch it. This form of visual backward masking, called object substitution masking, is thought to occur at the object level of processing. However, it remains unclear whether object-level interference alone produces substitution masking because…

  4. Trade-off between inverse lithography mask complexity and lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung-Gook; Suh, Sung Soo; Kim, Byung-Sung; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Tolani, Vikram; Dai, Grace; Irby, Dave; Wang, Kechang; Xiao, Guangming; Kim, David; Baik, Ki-Ho; Gleason, Bob

    2009-04-01

    Improvements in resolution of exposure systems have not kept pace with increasing density of semiconductor products. In order to keep shrinking circuits using equipment with the same basic resolution, lithographers have turned to options such as double-patterning, and have moved beyond model-based OPC in the search for optimal mask patterns. Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) is becoming one of the strong candidates in 32nm & below single patterning, low-k1 lithography regime. It enables computation of optimum mask patterns to minimize deviations of images from their targets not only at nominal but also over a range of process variations, such as dose, defocus, and mask CD errors. When optimizing for a factor, such as process window, more complex mask patterns are often necessary to achieve the desired depth of focus. Complex mask patterns require more shots when written with VSB systems, increasing the component of mask cost associated with writing time. It can also be more difficult to inspect or repair certain types of complex patterns. Inspection and repair may take more time, or require more expensive equipment compared to the case with simpler masks. For these reasons, we desire to determine the simplest mask patterns that meet necessary lithographic manufacturing objectives. Luminescent ILT provides means to constrain complexity of mask solutions, each of which is optimized to meet lithographic objectives within the bounds of the constraints. Results presented here show trade-offs to process window performance with varying degrees of mask complexity. The paper details ILT mask simplification schemes on contact arrays and random logic, comparing process window trade-offs in each case. Ultimately this method enables litho and mask engineers balance lithographic requirements with mask manufacturing complexity and related cost.

  5. Performance of GFIS mask repair system for various mask materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Fumio; Kozakai, Tomokazu; Matsuda, Osamu; Yasaka, Anto; Yoshikawa, Shingo; Kanno, Koichi; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Naoya

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new focused ion beam (FIB) technology using a gas field ion source (GFIS) for mask repair. Meanwhile, since current high-end photomasks do not have high durability in exposure nor cleaning, some new photomask materials are proposed. In 2012, we reported that our GFIS system had repaired a representative new material "A6L2". It is currently expected to extend the application range of GFIS technology for various new materials and various defect shapes. In this study, we repaired a single bridge, a triple bridge and a missing hole on a phase shift mask (PSM) of "A6L2", and also repaired single bridges on a binary mask of molybdenum silicide (MoSi) material "W4G" and a PSM of high transmittance material "SDC1". The etching selectivity between those new materials and quartz were over 4:1. There were no significant differences of pattern shapes on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images between repair and non-repair regions. All the critical dimensions (CD) at repair regions were less than +/-3% of those at normal ones on an aerial image metrology system (AIMS). Those results demonstrated that GFIS technology is a reliable solution of repairing new material photomasks that are candidates for 1X nm generation.

  6. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  7. Improving vision by pupil masking

    PubMed Central

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  8. Multiple beam mask writers: an industry solution to the write time crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Lloyd C.

    2010-09-01

    The semiconductor industry is under constant pressure to reduce production costs even as technology complexity increases. Lithography represents the most expensive process due to its high capital equipment costs and the implementation of low-k1 lithographic processes, which has added to the complexity of making masks through the greater use of optical proximity correction, pixelated masks, and double or triple patterning. Each of these mask technologies allows the production of semiconductors at future nodes while extending the utility of current immersion tools. Low k1 patterning complexity combined with increased data due to smaller feature sizes is driving extremely long mask write times. While a majority of the industry is willing to accept mask write times of up to 24 hours, evidence suggests that the write times for many masks at the 22 nm node and beyond will be significantly longer. It has been estimated that $50M+ in non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs will be required to develop a multiple beam mask writer system, yet the business case to recover this kind of investment is not strong. Moreover, funding such a development is a high risk for an individual supplier. The problem is compounded by a disconnect between the tool customer (the mask supplier) and the final mask customer that will bear the increased costs if a high speed writer is not available. Since no individual company will likely risk entering this market, some type of industry-wide funding model will be needed. Because SEMATECH's member companies strongly support a multiple beam technology for mask writers to reduce the write time and cost of 193 nm and EUV masks, SEMATECH plans to pursue an advanced mask writer program in 2011 and 2012. In 2010, efforts will focus on identifying a funding model to address the investment to develop such a technology.

  9. Combining mask and OPC process verification for improved wafer patterning and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Ayman; Abdelghany, Hesham

    2016-10-01

    As technology advances into deep submicron nodes, the mask manufacturing process accuracy become more important. Mask Process Correction (MPC) has been transitioning from Rules-Based Mask Process correction to Model-Based Mask Process Correction mode. MPC is a subsequent step to OPC, where additional perturbation is applied to the mask shapes to correct for the mask manufacturing process. Shifting towards full model-based MPC is driven mainly by the accuracy requirements in advanced technology nodes, both for DUV and EUV processes. In the current state-of-the-art MPC process, MPC is completely decoupled from OPC, where each of them assumes that the other is executing perfectly. However, this decoupling is not suitable anymore due to the limited tolerance in the mask CDU budget and the increased wafer CDU requirements required from OPC. It is becoming more important to reduce any systematic mask errors, especially where they matter the most. In this work, we present a new combined-verification methodology that allows testing the combined effect of mask process and lithography process together and judging the final wafer patterning quality. This has the potential to intercept risks due to superposition of OPC and MPC correction residual errors, and capturing and correcting such a previously hidden source of patterning degradation.

  10. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  11. Spatial release from informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakerd, Brad; Aaronson, Neil L.

    2001-05-01

    A new method for investigating spatial release from informational masking was developed and employed in two experiments. The new method is computer controlled and efficient. It employs the versatile coordinate response measure speech stimulus set [Bolia et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 1065 (2000)]. The experiments were conducted in an anechoic room, with a primary loudspeaker in front of the listener and a secondary loudspeaker at 60 deg to the right. Target messages were presented from the primary speaker only. For a standard, distractor messages, simultaneous with the target, were also presented from the primary speaker only. Spatial release was measured by presenting the distractors from both primary and secondary speakers with a temporal offset. Experiment 1 fixed the offset (secondary leading, +4 ms) and varied the number of distractors (1 to 3) and the target-to-distractor ratio (-12 to +4 dB). Masking release, sometimes as large as 10 dB, was found for all combinations of these variables. Experiment 2 varied the offset over a wide range of values. Substantial release from masking was found for both positive and negative offsets, but only in the range in which speech echoes are suppressed (<50 ms). [Work supported by NIDCD grant DC 00181.

  12. Fabrication and commercialization of scalpel masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novembre, Anthony E.; Peabody, Milton L., Jr.; Blakey, Myrtle I.; Farrow, Reginald C.; Kasica, Richard J.; Liddle, James A.; Saunders, Thomas E.; Tennant, Donald M.

    1998-09-01

    SCALPEL masks have been fabricated for use in the Proof-of- Lithography system and to demonstrate the feasibility of having them produced by a commercial blank manufacturer and optical mask shops. Masks blanks are formed from 100 mm diameter silicon wafers. A 100-150 nm thick SiNx layer is LPCVD deposited onto the wafers followed by magnetron sputter deposition of a thin Cr/W metal layer which is used as the scatterer layer for the mask>the mask is supported by an underlying network of struts which are arranged to be compatible with the step and scan writing strategy of the exposure tool and to provide robustness to the mask. Crystallographic wet etching of the silicon wafer forms membranes and struts. To date over 300 mask blanks have been formed and yield data as a function of the thickness of the silicon nitride membrane has been quantified. Recent developments in the mask blank formation process include the production of blanks by MCNC who serve as a commercial source of SCALPEL mask blanks. They have successfully delivered 36 blanks that exhibit equivalent properties to those produced at Lucent. Mask patterning has been performed at the commercial optical mask shops of PHOTRONICS and DUPONT. In this investigation a MEBES exposure system has been used to write patterns. The resist used is ZEP-520 and development and pattern transfer processes are performed in the STEAG-Hammatech spray/spin processing tool. Metrology is performed using a KMS 310 RT optical microscope. Pattern placement accuracy is measured on the LMS 2020 system without modification. The masks are inspected for defects using the optical based KLA 300 series inspection system in a die to die mode and in transmission. Results to date suggest feasibility of producing SCALPEL masks by a commercial blank supplier and by merchant optical mask shops.

  13. Economics of automation for the design-to-mask interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erck, Wesley

    2009-04-01

    Mask order automation has increased steadily over the years through a variety of individual mask customer implementations. These have been supported by customer-specific software at the mask suppliers to support the variety of customer output formats. Some customers use the SEMI P10 1 standard, some use supplier-specific formats, and some use customer-specific formats. Some customers use little automation and depend instead on close customer-supplier relationships. Implementations are varied in quality and effectiveness. A major factor which has prolonged the adoption of more advanced and effective solutions has been a lack of understanding of the economic benefits. Some customers think standardized automation mainly benefits the mask supplier in order entry automation, but this ignores a number of other significant benefits which differ dramatically for each party in the supply chain. This paper discusses the nature of those differing advantages and presents simple models suited to four business cases: integrated device manufacturers (IDM), fabless companies, foundries and mask suppliers. Examples and estimates of the financial advantages for these business types will be shown.

  14. Masked priming effect reflects evidence accumulated by the prime.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Sachiko; Norris, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    In the same-different match task, masked priming is observed with the same responses but not different responses. Norris and Kinoshita's (2008) Bayesian reader account of masked priming explains this pattern based on the same principle as that explaining the absence of priming for nonwords in the lexical decision task. The pattern of priming follows from the way the model makes optimal decisions in the two tasks; priming does not depend on first activating the prime and then the target. An alternative explanation is in terms of a bias towards responding "same" that exactly counters the facilitatory effect of lexical access. The present study tested these two views by varying both the degree to which the prime predicts the response and the visibility of the prime. Unmasked primes produced effects expected from the view that priming is influenced by the degree to which the prime predicts the response. In contrast, with masked primes, the size of priming for the same response was completely unaffected by predictability. These results rule out response bias as an explanation of the absence of masked priming for different responses and, in turn, indicate that masked priming is not a consequence of automatic lexical access of the prime.

  15. A novel method to quantify the complex mask patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yu-Lung; Sun, Che-Yuan; Chuang, Shu-Chuan; Luo, Woei-Bin; Hu, Jia-Rui; Chen, Hsiang-Lin; Lin, Hua-Tai; Ke, Chih-Ming; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Immersion technology has successfully extends the application of ArF lithography in the semiconductor. However, as we further push the k1 factor below 0.3, the patterning fidelities degrade significantly. In this paper, a novel method to quantify the mask fidelity of complex 2D patterns is proposed. With this method, the critical dimension (CD) error of both edge placement error (EPE) and corner rounding can be well described by using 2 indices "bias" and "blur" respectively. The "bias" is defined as the CD offset between the mask and the targets, and the "blur" is a derived term that can well represent the mask rounding. These 2 indices are not only able to describe the mask quality but also able to link with model parameters that are used in optical proximity correction (OPC) and some other applications. In this paper, we demonstrate the methodology and quantify the actual mask quality on the complex and critical 2D patterning in the advanced nodes.

  16. Auditory Time-Frequency Masking for Spectrally and Temporally Maximally-Compact Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Laback, Bernhard; Savel, Sophie; Ystad, Sølvi; Balazs, Peter; Meunier, Sabine; Kronland-Martinet, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Many audio applications perform perception-based time-frequency (TF) analysis by decomposing sounds into a set of functions with good TF localization (i.e. with a small essential support in the TF domain) using TF transforms and applying psychoacoustic models of auditory masking to the transform coefficients. To accurately predict masking interactions between coefficients, the TF properties of the model should match those of the transform. This involves having masking data for stimuli with good TF localization. However, little is known about TF masking for mathematically well-localized signals. Most existing masking studies used stimuli that are broad in time and/or frequency and few studies involved TF conditions. Consequently, the present study had two goals. The first was to collect TF masking data for well-localized stimuli in humans. Masker and target were 10-ms Gaussian-shaped sinusoids with a bandwidth of approximately one critical band. The overall pattern of results is qualitatively similar to existing data for long maskers. To facilitate implementation in audio processing algorithms, a dataset provides the measured TF masking function. The second goal was to assess the potential effect of auditory efferents on TF masking using a modeling approach. The temporal window model of masking was used to predict present and existing data in two configurations: (1) with standard model parameters (i.e. without efferents), (2) with cochlear gain reduction to simulate the activation of efferents. The ability of the model to predict the present data was quite good with the standard configuration but highly degraded with gain reduction. Conversely, the ability of the model to predict existing data for long maskers was better with than without gain reduction. Overall, the model predictions suggest that TF masking can be affected by efferent (or other) effects that reduce cochlear gain. Such effects were avoided in the experiment of this study by using maximally

  17. High performance mask fabrication process for the next-generation mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagawa, Keisuke; Ugajin, Kunihiro; Suenaga, Machiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihito; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Saito, Masato; Itoh, Masamitsu

    2014-07-01

    ArF immersion lithography combined with double patterning has been used for fabricating below half pitch 40nm devices. However, when pattern size shrinks below 20nm, we must use new technology like quadruple patterning process or next generation lithography (NGL) solutions. Moreover, with change in lithography tool, next generation mask production will be needed. According to ITRS 2013, fabrication of finer patterns less than 15nm will be required on mask plate in NGL mask production 5 years later [1]. In order to fabricate finer patterns on mask, higher resolution EB mask writer and high performance fabrication process will be required. In a previous study, we investigated a potential of mask fabrication process for finer patterning and achieved 17nm dense line pattern on mask plate by using VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) type EB mask writer and chemically amplified resist [2][3]. After a further investigation, we constructed higher performance mask process by using new EB mask writer EBM9000. EBM9000 is the equipment supporting hp16nm generation's photomask production and has high accuracy and high throughput. As a result, we achieved 15.5nm pattern on mask with high productivity. Moreover, from evaluation of isolated pattern, we proved that current mask process has the capability for sub-10nm pattern. These results show that the performance of current mask fabrication process have the potential to fabricate the next-generation mask.

  18. Early, Equivalent ERP Masked Priming Effects for Regular and Irregular Morphology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Joanna; Stockall, Linnaea

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from behavioral masked priming (Rastle & Davis, 2008), EEG masked priming (Morris, Frank, Grainger, & Holcomb, 2007) and single word MEG (Zweig & Pylkkanen, 2008) experiments has provided robust support for a model of lexical processing which includes an early, automatic, visual word form based stage of morphological parsing…

  19. BAYESIAN INSIGHTS ON DISCLOSURE LIMITATION: MASK OR IMPUTE?

    SciTech Connect

    S. KELLER-MCNULTY; G. DUNCAN

    2000-10-01

    Statistical agencies seek to disseminate useful data while keeping low the risk of statistical confidentiality disclosure. Recognizing that reidentification of data is generally inadequate to protect its confidentiality against attack by a data snooper, agencies restrict the data they release for general use. Typically, these restricted data procedures have involved transformation or masking of the original, collected data through such devices as adding noise, topcoding, data swapping, and recoding. Recently, proposals have been put forth for the release of synthetic data, simulated from models constructed from the original data. This paper gives a framework for the comparison of masking and synthetic data as two approaches to disclosure limitation. Particular attention is paid to data utility and disclosure risk. Examples of instantiation of masking and of synthetic data construction are provided to illustrate the concepts. Particular attention is paid to data swapping. Insights drawn from the Bayesian paxadigm are provided.

  20. "Perplex't paths": youth and authority in Milton's Mask.

    PubMed

    Greteman, Blaine

    2009-01-01

    This essay argues that John Milton's "A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle" (1634) is influenced by early modern concepts of childhood in a way that critics have not recognized. Childhood was a problematic concept in contemporary religious, pedagogical, and legal discourses. Children were depicted as models of submission, but prone to impetuous indiscretion, and their path to adult agency was strewn with pitfalls, especially in the liminal period of youth. "A Mask" engages with and transforms these discourses. It rejects the political quietism routinely associated with childhood and shows that the child's unique sensitivity may offer a route to a particularly powerful kind of voice.

  1. Mask roughness and its implications for LER at the 22- and 16-nm nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; George, Simi A.; McClinton, Brittany M.

    2010-02-16

    Line-edge roughness (LER) remains the most significant challenge facing the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resist. The mask, however, has been found to be a significant contributor to image-plane LER. This has long been expected based on modeling and has more recently been demonstrated experimentally. Problems arise from both mask-absorber LER as well as mask multilayer roughness leading to random phase variations in the reflected beam and consequently speckle. Understanding the implications this has on mask requirements for the 22-nm half pitch node and below is crucial. Modeling results indicate a replicated surface roughness (RSR) specification of 50 pm and a ruthenium capping layer roughness specification of 440 pm. Moreover, modeling indicates that it is crucial to achieve the current ITRS specifications for mask absorber LER which is significantly smaller than current capabilities.

  2. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2011-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked…

  3. Masked Inhibitory Priming in English: Evidence for Lexical Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Colin J.; Lupker, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Predictions derived from the interactive activation (IA) model were tested in 3 experiments using the masked priming technique in the lexical decision task. Experiment 1 showed a strong effect of prime lexicality: Classifications of target words were facilitated by orthographically related nonword primes (relative to unrelated nonword primes) but…

  4. Holographically Encoded Volume Phase Masks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-13

    experiments have been performed using an HPM recorded in a 1.97-mm thick photo -thermo-refractive (PTR) glass sample as illustrated in Fig. 1. PTR glass is a...spiral phase plate,” Appl. Opt. 43(12), 2397–2399 (2004). 19. K. Peithmann et al., “Low-spatial-frequency refractive-index changes in iron- doped ...Binary volume phase masks in photo -thermo-refrac- tive glass,” Opt. Lett. 37(7), 1190–1192 (2012). 21. M. Bass, Handbook of Optics, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill

  5. Polyurethane Masks Large Areas in Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam provides effective mask in electroplating of copper or nickel. Thin layer of Turco maskant painted on area to be masked: Layer ensures polyurethane foam removed easily after served its purpose. Component A, isocyanate, and component B, polyol, mixed together and brushed or sprayed on mask area. Mixture reacts, yielding polyurethane foam. Foam prevents deposition of nickel or copper on covered area. New method saves time, increases productivity and uses less material than older procedures.

  6. Influence of Planck foreground masks in the large angular scale quadrant CMB asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, L.; Cabella, P.; Villela, T.; Zhao, W.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The measured cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular distribution shows high consistency with the ΛCDM model, which predicts cosmological isotropy as one of its fundamental characteristics. However, isotropy violations were reported in CMB temperature maps of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and confirmed by Planck satellite data. Aims: Our purpose is to investigate the influence of different sky cuts (masks) employed in the analysis of CMB angular distribution, in particular in the excess of power in the southeastern quadrant (SEQ) and the lack of power in the northeastern quadrant (NEQ), found in both WMAP and Planck data. Methods: We compared the two-point correlation function (TPCF) computed for each quadrant of the CMB foreground-cleaned temperature maps to 1000 Monte Carlo (MC) simulations generated assuming the ΛCDM best-fit power spectrum using four different masks, from the least to the most severe one: mask-rulerminimal, UT78, U73, and U66. In addition to the quadrants and for a better understanding of these anomalies, we computed the TPCF using the mask-rulerminimal for circular regions in the map where the excess and lack of power are present. We also compared, for completeness, the effect of Galactic cuts (+/-10, 20, 25, and 30 degrees above/below the Galactic plane) in the TPCF calculations as compared to the MC simulations. Results: We found consistent results for three masks, namely mask-rulerminimal, U73, and U66. The results indicate that the excess of power in the SEQ tends to vanish as the portion of the sky covered by the mask increases and the lack of power in the NEQ remains virtually unchanged. A different result arises for the newly released UT78 Planck mask. When this mask is applied, the NEQ is no longer anomalous. On the other hand, the excess of power in the SEQ becomes the most significant one among the masks. Nevertheless, the asymmetry between the SEQ and NEQ is independent of the mask and it disagrees

  7. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory.

  8. Terahertz coded aperture mask using vanadium dioxide bowtie antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadri, Souheil; Percy, Rebecca; Kittiwatanakul, Lin; Arsenovic, Alex; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stu; Weikle, Robert M.

    2014-09-01

    Terahertz imaging systems have received substantial attention from the scientific community for their use in astronomy, spectroscopy, plasma diagnostics and security. One approach to designing such systems is to use focal plane arrays. Although the principle of these systems is straightforward, realizing practical architectures has proven deceptively difficult. A different approach to imaging consists of spatially encoding the incoming flux of electromagnetic energy prior to detection using a reconfigurable mask. This technique is referred to as "coded aperture" or "Hadamard" imaging. This paper details the design, fabrication and testing of a prototype coded aperture mask operating at WR-1.5 (500-750 GHz) that uses the switching properties of vanadium dioxide(VO2). The reconfigurable mask consists of bowtie antennas with vanadium dioxide VO2 elements at the feed points. From the symmetry, a unit cell of the array can be represented by an equivalent waveguide whose dimensions limit the maximum operating frequency. In this design, the cutoff frequency of the unit cell is 640 GHz. The VO2 devices are grown using reactive-biased target ion beam deposition. A reflection coefficient (S11) measurement of the mask in the WR-1.5 (500-750 GHz) band is conducted. The results are compared with circuit models and found to be in good agreement. A simulation of the transmission response of the mask is conducted and shows a transmission modulation of up to 28 dB. This project is a first step towards the development of a full coded aperture imaging system operating at WR-1.5 with VO2 as the mask switching element.

  9. [A new bite block for laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Ohe, Y; Ota, M; Tachibana, C; Aoyama, Y

    2001-05-01

    We devised a new bite block made of a used connector of anesthesia machine (ACOMA medical industry CO., LTD.) for laryngeal mask. Fitness for laryngeal mask and strength against patient's biting are the key for its use. Cutting lengthwise the connector (the outside diameter 22 mm, inside diameter 15-19 mm, 55 mm in length) we made a bite block for laryngeal mask. We studied the strength of a new bite block experimentally and recognized its ability to bear the human biting. We conclude a new bite block for laryngeal mask is clinically useful and can be used during anesthesia for its fitness and safety.

  10. Temporal masking of multidimensional tactual stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hong Z.; Reed, Charlotte M.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.; Wan, Natasha

    2003-12-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the temporal masking properties of multidimensional tactual stimulation patterns delivered to the left index finger. The stimuli consisted of fixed-frequency sinusoidal motions in the kinesthetic (2 or 4 Hz), midfrequency (30 Hz), and cutaneous (300 Hz) frequency ranges. Seven stimuli composed of one, two, or three spectral components were constructed at each of two signal durations (125 or 250 ms). Subjects identified target signals under three different masking paradigms: forward masking, backward masking, and sandwiched masking (in which the target is presented between two maskers). Target identification was studied as a function of interstimulus interval (ISI) in the range 0 to 640 ms. For both signal durations, percent-correct scores increased with ISI for each of the three masking paradigms. Scores with forward and backward masking were similar and significantly higher than scores obtained with sandwiched masking. Analyses of error trials revealed that subjects showed a tendency to respond, more often than chance, with the masker, the composite of the masker and target, or the combination of the target and a component of the masker. The current results are compared to those obtained in previous studies of tactual recognition masking with brief cutaneous spatial patterns. The results are also discussed in terms of estimates of information transfer (IT) and IT rate, are compared to previous studies with multidimensional tactual signals, and are related to research on the development of tactual aids for the deaf.

  11. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  12. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  13. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  14. Comparative study of simulations and experiments for contact array patterns on attenuated phase shifting mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Thomas; Sczyrba, Martin; Noelscher, Christoph

    2005-11-01

    Experiments and full resist simulations of contact patterns using both infinitely thin masks (2D) and 3-dimensional mask topography (3D) were performed to examine the quality of prediction by simulation. Experimental data were acquired by CD-SEM measurements of contact patterns in resist which were generated using a 193 nm scanner with a numerical aperture of 0.75, circular illumination (σ=0.5), and an attenuated phase shifting mask with 6% transmission. Analysis of the data is performed in terms of dose to size, process window, mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), and printed critical dimension (CD) in resist. Furthermore, an error analysis is performed with respect to mask CD, illumination source, dose and focus error. For the same contact size in resist a parabola like dependence of the mask contact length on contact width was found by experiment and simulation. Fair agreement between 2D and 3D simulation was obtained above 180 nm mask CD whereas a strong difference was observed below this region. Especially the location of the minimum at around 140 nm mask CD can be reasonably described only by 3D simulation. Thus, the prediction of accurate mask biases and process windows in the lower mask CD region is only possible by 3D simulation. Simple corrections of the 3D effect like the consideration of a mask CD offset or dose offset fail. Apart from that, 2D simulation in conjunction with a well calibrated resist model is sufficient for delivering reliable predictions for process window, MEEF, and CD.

  15. Set Size and Mask Duration Do Not Interact in Object-Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Ioannis; Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield

    2013-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a mask, such as four dots that surround a brief target item, onsets simultaneously with the target and offsets a short time after the target, rather than simultaneously with it. OSM is a reduction in accuracy of reporting the target with the temporally trailing mask, compared with the simultaneously…

  16. Alternating phase-shifted mask for logic gate levels, design, and mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebmann, Lars W.; Graur, Ioana C.; Leipold, William C.; Oberschmidt, James M.; O'Grady, David S.; Regaill, Denis

    1999-07-01

    While the benefits of alternating phase shifted masks in improving lithographic process windows at increased resolution are well known throughout the lithography community, broad implementation of this potentially powerful technique has been slow due to the inherent complexity of the layout design and mask manufacturing process. This paper will review a project undertaken at IBM's Semiconductor Research and Development Center and Mask Manufacturing and Development facility to understand the technical and logistical issues associated with the application of alternating phase shifted mask technology to the gate level of a full microprocessor chip. The work presented here depicts an important milestone toward integration of alternating phase shifted masks into the manufacturing process by demonstrating an automated design solution and yielding a functional alternating phase shifted mask. The design conversion of the microprocessor gate level to a conjugate twin shifter alternating phase shift layout was accomplished with IBM's internal design system that automatically scaled the design, added required phase regions, and resolved phase conflicts. The subsequent fabrication of a nearly defect free phase shifted mask, as verified by SEM based die to die inspection, highlights the maturity of the alternating phase shifted mask manufacturing process in IBM's internal mask facility. Well defined and recognized challenges in mask inspection and repair remain and the layout of alternating phase shifted masks present a design and data preparation overhead, but the data presented here demonstrate the feasibility of designing and building manufacturing quality alternating phase shifted masks for the gate level of a microprocessor.

  17. Hybrid source mask optimization for robust immersion lithography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Han, Chunying; Li, Yanqiu; Wu, Bingliang; Song, Zhiyang; Dong, Lisong; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-06-20

    To keep pace with the shrinkage of critical dimension, source and mask optimization (SMO) has emerged as a promising resolution enhancement technique to push the resolution of 193 nm argon fluoride immersion lithography systems. However, most current pixelated SMO approaches relied on scalar imaging models that are no longer accurate for immersion lithography systems with hyper-NA (NA>1). This paper develops a robust hybrid SMO (HSMO) algorithm based on a vector imaging model capable of effectively improving the robustness of immersion lithography systems to defocus and dose variations. The proposed HSMO algorithm includes two steps. First, the individual source optimization approach is carried out to rapidly reduce the cost function. Subsequently, the simultaneous SMO approach is applied to further improve the process robustness by exploiting the synergy in the joint optimization of source and mask patterns. The conjugate gradient method is used to update the source and mask pixels. In addition, a source regularization approach and source postprocessing are both used to improve the manufacturability of the optimized source patterns. Compared to the mask optimization method, the HSMO algorithm achieves larger process windows, i.e., extends the depth of focus and exposure latitude, thus more effectively improving the process robustness of 45 nm immersion lithography systems.

  18. A novel 3D constellation-masked method for physical security in hierarchical OFDMA system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijia; Liu, Bo; Xin, Xiangjun; Liu, Deming

    2013-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel 3D constellation-masked method to ensure the physical security in hierarchical optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access (OFDMA) system. The 3D constellation masking is executed on the two levels of hierarchical modulation and among different OFDM subcarriers, which is realized by the masking vectors. The Lorenz chaotic model is adopted for the generation of masking vectors in the proposed scheme. A 9.85 Gb/s encrypted hierarchical QAM OFDM signal is successfully demonstrated in the experiment. The performance of illegal optical network unit (ONU) with different masking vectors is also investigated. The proposed method is demonstrated to be secure and efficient against the commonly known attacks in the experiment.

  19. The attentional blink is not affected by backward masking of T2, T2-mask SOA, or level of T2 impoverishment.

    PubMed

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M; Lagroix, Hayley E P; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Identification of the second of two targets (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is thought to arise from a delay in T2 processing during which T2 is vulnerable to masking. Conventional studies have measured T2 accuracy which is constrained by the 100% ceiling. We avoided this problem by using a dynamic threshold-tracking procedure that is inherently free from ceiling constraints. In two experiments we examined how AB magnitude is affected by three masking-related factors: (a) presence/absence of T2 mask, (b) T2-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and (c) level of T2 impoverishment (signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]). In Experiment 1, overall accuracy decreased with T2-mask SOA. The magnitude of the AB, however, was invariant with SOA and with mask presence/absence. Experiment 2 further showed that the AB was invariant with T2 SNR. The relationship among mask presence/absence, SOA, and T2 SNR and the AB is encompassed in a qualitative model.

  20. A facial mask comprising Dead Sea mud.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A

    2006-01-01

    Many investigators have proved that Dead Sea salt and mud are useful in treating skin disorders and skin diseases. Therefore, the black mud has been extensively used as a base for the preparation of soaps, creams, and unguents for skin care. This study concerns a facial mask made mainly of Dead Sea mud. The effects of temperature and shearing conditions on the rheological behavior of the facial mask were investigated. The mud facial mask exhibited a shear thinning behavior with a yield stress. It was found that the apparent viscosity of the mask has a strong dependence on the shear rate as well as on the temperature. The facial mask exhibited a maximum yield stress and very shear thinning behavior at 40 degrees C, which is attributed to the gelatinization of the polysaccharide used to stabilize the mud particles. On the other hand, the mud mask exhibited a time-independent behavior at low temperatures and shear rates and changed to a thixotropic behavior upon increasing both the temperature and the shear rate. The shear thinning and thixotropic behaviors have a significant importance in the ability of the facial mask to spread on the skin: the Dead Sea mud mask can break down for easy spreading, and the applied film can gain viscosity instantaneously to resist running. Moreover, particle sedimentation, which in this case would negatively affect consumer acceptance of the product, occurs slowly due to high viscosity at rest conditions.

  1. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  3. Spatial processing and visual backward masking.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Michael H

    2008-07-15

    Most theories of visual masking focus prima-rily on the temporal aspects of visual information processing, strongly neglecting spatial factors. In recent years, however, we have shown that this position is not tenable. Spatial aspects cannot be neglected in metacontrast, pattern and un-masking. Here, we review these results.

  4. Spatial processing and visual backward masking

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Most theories of visual masking focus prima-rily on the temporal aspects of visual information processing, strongly neglecting spatial factors. In recent years, however, we have shown that this position is not tenable. Spatial aspects cannot be neglected in metacontrast, pattern and un-masking. Here, we review these results. PMID:20517500

  5. Masking the Feeling of Being Stupid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sally L.

    1988-01-01

    Teaching experience at The Lab School of Washington has shown that learning-disabled children and adults cope with their lack of self-esteem and feelings of stupidity by developing masks to hide their hurt. These include masks of super-competence, helplessness, invisibility, clowning, injustice collecting, indifference, boredom, outrageousness,…

  6. Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research on visual perception has uncovered many phenomena, such as binocular rivalry, backward masking, and the attentional blink, that reflect "failures of consciousness". Although stimuli do not reach awareness in these paradigms, there is evidence that they nevertheless undergo semantic processing. Object substitution masking (OSM),…

  7. Computing Challenges in Coded Mask Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This slide presaentation reviews the complications and challenges in developing computer systems for Coded Mask Imaging telescopes. The coded mask technique is used when there is no other way to create the telescope, (i.e., when there are wide fields of view, high energies for focusing or low energies for the Compton/Tracker Techniques and very good angular resolution.) The coded mask telescope is described, and the mask is reviewed. The coded Masks for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) instruments are shown, and a chart showing the types of position sensitive detectors used for the coded mask telescopes is also reviewed. Slides describe the mechanism of recovering an image from the masked pattern. The correlation with the mask pattern is described. The Matrix approach is reviewed, and other approaches to image reconstruction are described. Included in the presentation is a review of the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) / High Energy Telescope (HET), with information about the mission, the operation of the telescope, comparison of the EXIST/HET with the SWIFT/BAT and details of the design of the EXIST/HET.

  8. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients. PMID:27625477

  9. Lithographic plane review (LPR) for sub-32nm mask defect disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolani, Vikram; Peng, Danping; He, Lin; Hwa, George; Chang, Hsien-Min; Dai, Grace; Corcoran, Noel; Dam, Thuc; Pang, Linyong; Tuo, Laurent C.; Chen, C. J.; Lai, Rick

    2010-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into low-k1 regime, resolution of mask patterns under mask inspection optical conditions continues to diminish. Furthermore, as mask complexity and MEEF has also increased, it requires detecting even smaller defects in the already narrower pitch mask patterns. This leaves the mask inspection engineer with the option to either purchase a higher resolution mask inspection tool or increase the detector sensitivity on the existing inspection system or maybe even both. In order to meet defect sensitivity requirements in critical features of sub-32nm node designs, increasing sensitivity typically results in increased nuisance (i.e., small sub-specification) defect detection by 5-20X defects making post-inspection defect review non-manufacturable. As a solution for automatically dispositioning the increased number of nuisance and real defects detected at higher inspection sensitivity, Luminescent has successfully extended Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and its patented level-set methods to reconstruct the defective mask from its inspection image, and then perform simulated AIMS dispositioning on the reconstructed mask. In this technique, named Lithographic Plane Review (LPR), inspection transmitted and reflected light images of the test (i.e. defect) and reference (i.e., corresponding defect-free) regions are provided to the "inversion" engine which then computes the corresponding test and reference mask patterns. An essential input to this engine is a well calibrated model incorporating inspection tool optics, mask processing and 3D effects, and also the subsequent AIMS tool optics to be able to then simulate the aerial image impact of the defects. This flow is equivalent to doing an actual AIMS tool measurement of every defect detected during mask inspection, while at the same time maintaining inspection at high enough resolution. What makes this product usable in mask volume production is the high degree of accuracy of

  10. Masking property of quantum random cipher with phase mask encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohma, Masaki; Hirota, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    The security analysis of physical encryption protocol based on coherent pulse position modulation (CPPM) originated by Yuen is one of the most interesting topics in the study of cryptosystem with a security level beyond the Shannon limit. Although the implementation of CPPM scheme has certain difficulty, several methods have been proposed recently. This paper deals with the CPPM encryption in terms of symplectic transformation, which includes a phase mask encryption as a special example, and formulates a unified security analysis for such encryption schemes. Specifically, we give a lower bound of Eve's symbol error probability using reliability function theory to ensure that our proposed system exceeds the Shannon limit. Then we assume the secret key is given to Eve after her heterodyne measurement. Since this assumption means that Eve has a great advantage in the sense of the conventional cryptography, the lower bound of her error indeed ensures the security level beyond the Shannon limit. In addition, we show some numerical examples of the security performance.

  11. Implications of Sustained and Transient Channels for Theories of Visual Pattern Masking, Saccadic Suppression, and Information Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breitmeyer, Bruno G.; Ganz, Leo

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviewed briefly the major types of masking effects obtained with various methods and the major theories or models that have been proposed to account for these effects, and outlined a three-mechanism model of visual pattern masking based on psychophysical and neurophysiological properties of the visual system. (Author/RK)

  12. The Sensitivity of Coded Mask Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2008-01-01

    Simple formulae are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask X-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but t,hese are strictly only applicable if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given which allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimisation of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  13. Achievements and challenges of EUV mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; van Setten, Eelco; de Kruif, Robert; Connolly, Brid; Fukugami, Norihito; Kodera, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Sakata, Yo; Kotani, Jun; Kondo, Shinpei; Imoto, Tomohiro; Rolff, Haiko; Ullrich, Albrecht; Lammers, Ad; Schiffelers, Guido; van Dijk, Joep

    2014-07-01

    The impact of various mask parameters on CDU combined in a total mask budget is presented, for 22 nm lines, for reticles used for NXE:3300 qualification. Apart from the standard mask CD measurements, actinic spectrometry of multilayer is used to qualify reflectance uniformity over the image field; advanced 3D metrology is applied for absorber profile characterization including absorber height and side wall angle. The predicted mask impact on CDU is verified using actual exposure data collected on multiple NXE:3300 scanners. Mask 3D effects are addressed, manifesting themselves in best focus shifts for different structures exposed with off-axis illumination. Experimental NXE:3300 results for 16 nm dense lines and 20 nm (semi-)isolated spaces are shown: best focus range reaches 24 nm. A mitigation strategy by absorber height optimization is proposed based on experimental results of a special mask with varying absorber heights. Further development of a black image border for EUV mask is considered. The image border is a pattern free area surrounding image field preventing exposure the image field neighborhood on wafer. Normal EUV absorber is not suitable for this purpose as it has 1-3% EUV reflectance. A current solution is etching of ML down to substrate reducing EUV reflectance to <0.05%. A next step in the development of the black border is the reduction of DUV Out-of-Band reflectance (<1.5%) in order to cope with DUV light present in EUV scanners. Promising results achieved in this direction are shown.

  14. Mask Fabrication Using Electron Beam Exposure System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watakabe, Y.; Shigetomi, A.; Morimoto, H.; Kato, T.

    1981-07-01

    This study describes the results of feature size distribution, pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error on chrominum master masks fabricated by EeBES-40. This system has the capability of high speed electron beam blanking at 40MHz, the capacity for large size masks (with 6 inch mask cassette), and the automatic cassette handling system. OEBR-100(PGMA), as the electron beam negative resist, is used for 5 inch and 6 inch chrominum masks. The chrominum etching process is used for both wet and dry plasma technology. Test patterns and 64 K bit memory TEG, as the practical pattern, are used in this study. More than 40 measurements are taken, uniformly distributed over 96 to 112mm square, and the feature size distribution is measured by a laser interferometer X-Y measuring system. Pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error are obtained using EeBES-40 quality assurance programs called MARKET/PLOTMARKET. This program operates by scanning over the resist image of the test pattern, utilizing the normal fiducial mark location hardware. The followinc results are obtained; (1) Feature size distribution within 6 inch mask : -/+0.1 μm (2) Level-to-level registration error2 : less than 0.1 pm High quality masks with about 0.02 defects/cm2 , and rapid throughput of 6 hr./10 masks using the auto-matic 10-cassette handling system are obtained.

  15. Intact crowding and temporal masking in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Doron, Adi; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael H; Ahissar, Merav

    2015-01-01

    Phonological deficits in dyslexia are well documented. However, there is an ongoing discussion about whether visual deficits limit the reading skills of people with dyslexia. Here, we investigated visual crowding and backward masking. We presented a Vernier (i.e., two vertical bars slightly offset to the left or right) and asked observers to indicate the offset direction. Vernier stimuli are visually similar to letters and are strongly affected by crowding, even in the fovea. To increase task difficulty, Verniers are often followed by a mask (i.e., backward masking). We measured Vernier offset discrimination thresholds for the basic Vernier task, under crowding, and under backward masking, in students with dyslexia (n = 19) and age and intelligence matched students (n = 27). We found no group differences in any of these conditions. Controls with fast visual processing (good backward masking performance), were faster readers. By contrast, no such correlation was found among the students with dyslexia, suggesting that backward masking does not limit their reading efficiency. These findings indicate that neither elevated crowding nor elevated backward masking pose a bottleneck to reading skills of people with dyslexia.

  16. Psychophysical estimates of cochlear phase response: masking by harmonic complexes.

    PubMed

    Lentz, J J; Leek, M R

    2001-12-01

    Harmonic complexes with identical component frequencies and amplitudes but different phase spectra may be differentially effective as maskers. Such harmonic waveforms, constructed with positive or negative Schroeder phases, have similar envelopes and identical long-term power spectra, but the positive Schroeder-phase waveform is typically a less effective masker than the negative Schroeder-phase waveform. These masking differences have been attributed to an interaction between the masker phase spectrum and the phase characteristic of the basilar membrane. To explore this relationship, the gradient of stimulus phase change across masker bandwidth was varied by systematically altering the Schroeder-phase algorithm. Observers detected a signal tone added in-phase to a single component of a masker whose frequencies ranged from 200 to 5000 Hz, with a fundamental frequency of 100 Hz. For signal frequencies of 1000-4000 Hz, differences in masking across the harmonic complexes could be as large as 5-10 dB for phase gradients changing by only 10%. The phase gradient that resulted in a minimum amount of masking varied with signal frequency, with low frequencies masked least effectively by stimuli with rapidly changing component phases and high frequencies masked by stimuli with more shallow phase gradients. A gammachirp filter was implemented to model these results, predicting the qualitative changes in curvature of the phase-byfrequency function estimated from the empirical data: In some cases, small modifications to the gammachirp filter produced better quantitative predictions of curvature changes across frequency, but this filter, as implemented here, was unable to accurately represent all the data.

  17. Behavior of imperfect band-limited coronagraphic masks in a high-contrast imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sidick, Erkin; Wilson, Daniel W

    2007-03-20

    We investigate the behavior of imperfect band-limited occulting masks in a high-contrast imaging system through modeling and simulations. Grayscale masks having 1D Sinc(2) (linear-Sinc(2)) amplitude transmission coefficient (Sinc(4) intensity transmittance) profiles as well as optical density and wavelength-dependent parasitic phases are considered occulters. We compare the behaviors of several, slightly different occulter transmittance profiles by evaluating the contrast performance of the high-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). These occulters include a measured occulter, a standard Sinc(2) occulter, and several of its variations. We show that when an occulting mask has a parasitic phase, a modified Sinc(2) transmittance profile works much better than the standard Sinc(2) mask. We examine the impact of some fabrication errors of the occulter on the HCIT's contrast performance. We find through modeling and simulations that starlight suppression by a factor of more than 10(10) is achievable at least monochromatically on the HCIT with the occulting mask and the optics currently being used on the testbed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that we investigate the behavior of a real (or fabricated) focal plane occulting mask in a high-contrast imaging system. We also briefly describe the approach used at JPL in fabricating a grayscale occulting mask and characterizing its transmittance and phase profiles.

  18. Masking water ice on small icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetto, R.

    2011-10-01

    Additional clues on the surface composition of small icy bodies come from the laboratory study of cometary grains, such as some interplanetary dust particles collected in the Earth's stratosphere. These studies indicate the presence of refractory carbonaceous units that are usually sub-micron in size, i.e. smaller than the wavelength commonly used in remote sensing spectral observations of icy bodies. Based on this evidence, it has been suggested [2] that reddening of small icy bodies may be caused by submicron particles of organic material of pre-solar origin trapped in ice. According to this model, the amount of reddening varies with the concentration of organics to ice. To extend these results, we are developing a space weathering spectral model for small icy bodies that is compatible with laboratory measurements of collected cometary particles [3], and that takes into account the surface processing by solar and cosmic ions. Following the approach of Grundy [2], our model makes use of the Hapke scattering theory and of the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory to approximate the effect of carbon subwavelength inclusions. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed in view of their application to icy body surfaces. The conditions for the NIR spectral detection of water ice will be estimated. We will show that up to ~50% of water ice can be spectroscopically masked at 10% detection sensitivity due to the strong absorption of the sub-micron carbonaceous component, similarly to what previously found in the case of carbon-enriched crusts [4].

  19. When Bad Masks Turn Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,' this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  20. Investigation of EUV haze defect: molecular behaviors of mask cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Novak, Steve; Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Greg; Lee, Han-shin; Ma, Andy; Goodwin, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Photo-induced defects (or haze defects) on 193nm optic masks (haze defects) have been a serious problem not only to reticle engineers working for mask manufacturing and handling but also to photo-lithography engineers. The most widely accepted explanation of the root causes of haze defects is the cleaning chemical residues remaining on the mask surface and unavoidable outgassed molecules that outgas from pellicle materials when exposed to 193nm radiation. These have been significant challenges for reticle cleaning engineers who need to use cleaning chemicals whose residues do not lead to progressive defect formation on the mask and to find improved materials to minimize pellicle outgassing. It is assumed that contamination generation on EUV masks would have a higher probability than on optic masks, primarily since EUV masks are not protected by a pellicle and amorphous carbon films can accumulate during exposure to EUV light. While there is potential to mitigate the generation of carbon contamination by improving the exposure tool environment and removing carbon films using in-situ atomic hydrogen cleaning, it is not yet clear whether the reaction of mask cleaning chemicals to EUV radiation will lead to creation of progressive defects on EUV mask surfaces. With the work to being done it has been observed that carbon contamination on EUV masks dominates any effects of solvent chemicals under normal environmental or exposure conditions (from atmospheric pressure up to a vacuum level of 10-6 Torr) during EUV exposure. However, it is still unknown whether residual cleaning chemicals will provide a nucleus for progressive defect formation during exposure. This lack of understanding needs to be addressed by the industry as EUV masks are expected to undergo more frequent cleaning cycles. In this work, we will report on an investigation of the molecular behavior of cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces during EUV exposure. Movement (e.g., migration or aggregation) of

  1. High-radiance LDP source: clean, reliable, and stable EUV source for mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Bergmann, Klaus; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Taniguchi, Yuta; Shirai, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kazuya; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput and -resolution actinic mask inspection tools are needed as EUVL begins to enter into volume production phase. To realize such inspection tools, a high-radiance EUV source is necessary. Ushio's laser-assisted discharge-produced plasma (LDP) source is able to meet industry's requirements in radiance, cleanliness, stability and reliability. Ushio's LDP source has shown the peak radiance at plasma of 180 W/mm2/sr and the area-averaged radiance in a 200-μm-diameter circle behind the debris mitigation system of 120 W/mm2/sr. A new version of the debris mitigation system is in testing phase. Its optical transmission was confirmed to be 73 %, which is 4 % lower than that of the previous version and therefore will be improved. Cleanliness of the system is evaluated by exposing Ru mirrors placed behind the debris mitigation system. Ru sputter rate was proven to be sufficiently low as 3~5 nm/Gpulse at 7 kHz, whereas frequency-dependent sputter rate was 1~3 nm/Gpulse at 5~9 kHz as previously reported. Sn deposition remained very low (< 0.05 nm) and did not grow over time. A new technique to suppress debris was tested and preliminary results were promising. Time-of-flight signal of fast ions was completely suppressed and Ru sputter rate of exposed mirrors at 3 kHz was approximately 1.3 nm/Gpulse, whereas the conventional mitigation system (new version) resulted in Ru sputter rate of 0.7 nm/Gpulse. This new technique also allows increasing the radiance efficiency by 30 %. Stability tests were done at several different discharge frequencies. Pulse energy stability was approximately 10 %. Dose energy stability dropped from approximately 2 % to 0.1 % when feedback control was activated. EUV emission position stability was studied at 3 kHz. Deviation of the plasma center of gravity was 6 μm, which is 3 % of plasma diameter and therefore considered to be negligible. Reliability tests were performed on both R and D and prototype machines and up to 200 hours of non

  2. An Improved Chaotic Masking Scheme via System-Alternating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Xu, Bing; Ma, Yutian

    2013-10-01

    Aiming at the drawbacks of the chaotic masking scheme, this paper optimizes this conventional scheme by using improved state observer method and system-alternating method, proposes a new secure communication scheme which can improve these drawbacks of chaotic method: (1) Restriction that the power of useful signal must be smaller than that of chaotic signal. (2) Low security. In addition, the model of this whole communication system is constructed under the system simulation environment of Simulink.

  3. Masking properties of APD communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J. G.; Larrondo, H. A.; Slavin, H. A.; Levin, D. G.; Hidalgo, R. M.; Rivera, R. R.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we explore the ability of wavelet multilevel analysis to unmask the information hidden in a chaotic mask. This digital filtering technique has been recently reported as particularly well suited for the detection of coherent structures. In a recent paper the capability of wavelets to unmask a message, in cases where a chaotic signal is just added to the information, has also been demonstrated. The case of an active passive decomposition scheme, where message is mixed with the chaotic signal, is studied here. A representative case employing Daubechies wavelets and a typical Rossler-oscillator-based communication system is reported. Using a time scaling parameter modifies the spectrum of the mask. The results show that wavelets are effective only in particular cases with poor masking. The fast Fourier transform analysis demonstrates that the spectrum of the chaotic mask shows no holes and then other digital filtering techniques such as Wiener filters or comb filters must also been disregarded.

  4. Correction of deflection under mask's own weight by bending mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagami, Takashi; Kambayashi, Takashi; Azumi, Minako

    2016-10-01

    It is known that the photomask substrate deflects when the mask is set on the frame and the deflection is an obstacle to light exposure. In this study, we introduce "the bending mask" to cancel out the deflection. The surface of the bending mask has the height distribution in advance to cancel out the deflection, owing to Nikon's accurate polishing technology and Nikon's accurate measurement machine.

  5. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  6. Achromatic phase shifting focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin

    The search for life on other worlds is an exciting scientific endeavor that could change the way we perceive our place in the universe. Thousands of extrasolar planets have been discovered using indirect detection techniques. One of the most promising methods for discovering new exoplanets and searching for life is direct imaging with a coronagraph. Exoplanet coronagraphy of Earth-like planets is a challenging task, but we have developed many of the tools necessary to make it feasible. The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph is one of the highest-performing architectures for direct exoplanet imaging. With a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask, the PIAA Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) can approach the theoretical performance limit for any direct detection technique. The architecture design is flexible enough to be applied to any arbitrary aperture shape, including segmented and obscured apertures. This is an important feature for compatibility with next-generation ground and space-based telescopes. PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks have been demonstrated in monochromatic light. An important next step for high-performance coronagraphy is the development of broadband phase-shifting focal plane masks. In this dissertation, we present an algorithm for designing the PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks to operate in broadband. We also demonstrate manufacturing of the focal plane masks, and show laboratory results. We use simulations to show the potential performance of the coronagraph system, and the use of wavefront control to correct for mask manufacturing errors. Given the laboratory results and simulations, we show new areas of exoplanet science that can potentially be explored using coronagraph technology. The main conclusion of this dissertation is that we now have the tools required to design and manufacture PIAA and PIAACMC achromatic focal plane masks. These tools can be applied to current and future telescope systems to enable new

  7. No masking between test and mask components in perceptually different depth planes.

    PubMed

    Hibbeler, Patrick J; Olzak, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    2-D cues to perceived depth organization have been used to segregate test and mask stimulus components in a discrimination task. Observers made either spatial-frequency or orientation judgments on a rectangular test component by itself or in the presence of constant rectangular masks. There were two basic masking conditions: same-plane or different-plane. In the same-plane conditions, the test components and masks are perceived as existing in the same depth plane. In the different-plane conditions, the test and mask components are perceived to exist in different depth planes. The perception of different depth planes was achieved by using perceived occlusion, which could place either component closer or further from the observer. The results suggest that when test and mask components are separated into different depth planes they no longer influence one another. This effect could be observed in either depth organization, test components in front of the masks or mask components in front of the test. These results indicate that the figure-ground organization of components is not important. Only the designation as existing in the same or different depth planes affects whether or not a mask is effective.

  8. VSP wave separation by adaptive masking filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-06-01

    In vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data processing, the first step might be to separate the down-going wavefield from the up-going wavefield. When using a masking filter for VSP wave separation, there are difficulties associated with two termination ends of the up-going waves. A critical challenge is how the masking filter can restore the energy tails, the edge effect associated with these terminations uniquely exist in VSP data. An effective strategy is to implement masking filters in both τ-p and f-k domain sequentially. Meanwhile it uses a median filter, producing a clean but smooth version of the down-going wavefield, used as a reference data set for designing the masking filter. The masking filter is implemented adaptively and iteratively, gradually restoring the energy tails cut-out by any surgical mute. While the τ-p and the f-k domain masking filters target different depth ranges of VSP, this combination strategy can accurately perform in wave separation from field VSP data.

  9. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  10. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  11. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  12. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  13. Out of Their Heads: Developing the Character behind the Mask.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecure, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Discusses mask building as a theatrical exercise. Provides a simple method for building masks. Outlines a format for the classes that follow mask construction, in which a character is gradually built to suit the finished mask, including the birthing process, physical character and voice development, getting to know the character, and what happens…

  14. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  19. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  20. Thrifty metabolic programming in rats is induced by both maternal undernutrition and postnatal leptin treatment, but masked in the presence of both: implications for models of developmental programming

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal undernutrition leads to an increased risk of metabolic disorders in offspring including obesity and insulin resistance, thought to be due to a programmed thrifty phenotype which is inappropriate for a subsequent richer nutritional environment. In a rat model, both male and female offspring of undernourished mothers are programmed to become obese, however postnatal leptin treatment gives discordant results between males and females. Leptin treatment is able to rescue the adverse programming effects in the female offspring of undernourished mothers, but not in their male offspring. Additionally, in these rats, postnatal leptin treatment of offspring from normally-nourished mothers programmes their male offspring to develop obesity in later life, while there is no comparable effect in their female offspring. Results We show by microarray analysis of the female liver transcriptome that both maternal undernutrition and postnatal leptin treatment independently induce a similar thrifty transcriptional programme affecting carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress genes. Paradoxically, however, the combination of both stimuli restores a more normal transcriptional environment. This demonstrates that “leptin reversal” is a global phenomenon affecting all genes involved in fetal programming by maternal undernourishment and leptin treatment. The thrifty transcriptional programme was associated with pro-inflammatory markers and downregulation of adaptive immune mediators, particularly MHC class I genes, suggesting a deficit in antigen presentation in these offspring. Conclusions We propose a revised model of developmental programming reconciling the male and female observations, in which there are two competing programmes which collectively drive liver transcription. The first element is a thrifty metabolic phenotype induced by early life growth restriction independently of leptin levels. The second is a homeostatic set point

  1. OPC mask simplification using over-designed timing slack of standard cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yifan; Heng, Chun Huat; Tay, Arthur; Lee, Tong Heng

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that VLSI circuits must be designed to sustain the variations in process, voltage, temperature, etc. As a result, standard cell libraries (collections of the basic circuit components) are usually designed with large margin (also known as "timing slack"). However, in circuit manufacturing, only part of the margin will be utilized. The knowledge of the rest of the margin (over-designed timing slack), armed with models that link between timing domain and shape domain, can help to reduce the complexity of mask patterns and manufacturing cost. This paper proposed a novel methodology to simplify mask patterns in optical proximity correction (OPC) by using extra margin in timing (over-designed timing slack). This methodology can be applied after a conventional OPC, and is compatible with the current application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design flow. This iterative method is applied to each occurrence of over-designed timing slack. The actual value of timing slack can be estimated from post-OPC simulation. A timing cost function is developed in this work to map timing slack in timing domain to mask patterns in shape domain. This enables us to adjust mask patterns selectively based on the outcome of the cost function. All related mask patterns with over-designed timing slack will be annotated and simplified using our proposed mask simplification algorithm, which is in fact to merge the nearby edge fragments on the mask patterns. Simulations are conducted on a standard cell library and a full chip design to validate this proposed approach. When compared to existing OPC methods without mask simplification in the literature, our approach achieved a 51% reduction in mask fragment count, and this directly leads to a large saving in lithography manufacturing cost. The result also shows that timing closure is ensured, though part of the timing slack has been sacrificed.

  2. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajeev B; Skaria, Shaji D; Mansour, Mohamed M; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2016-07-01

    Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an "N95 respirator") with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection.

  3. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajeev B.; Skaria, Shaji D.; Mansour, Mohamed M.; Smaldone, Gerald C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an “N95 respirator”) with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection. PMID:26225807

  4. Auditory Masking Patterns in Bottlenose Dolphins from Anthropogenic and Natural Noise Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    e.g., critical ratios ) are often used to describe and predict auditory masking. For this task, detection thresholds for a 10 kHz tone were measured in...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 determine the relationship between noise metrics and masked tonal ...the residual errors (FIG 3) demonstrates that the two-parameter model produces much better fits than critical ratio predictions, while still being

  5. Computational mask defect review for contamination and haze inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram; Wolf, Yulian; Shah, Pinkesh

    2013-09-01

    the mask manufacturing process. The latter characterization qualifies real defect signatures, such as pin-dots or pin-holes, extrusions or intrusions, assist-feature or dummy-fill defects, writeerrors or un-repairable defects, chrome-on-shifter or missing chrome-from-shifter defects, particles, etc., and also false defect signatures, such as those due to inspection tool registration or image alignment, interlace artifacts, CCD camera artifacts, optical shimmer, focus errors, etc. Such qualitative characterization of defects has enabled better inspection tool SPC and process defect control in the mask shop. In this paper, the same computational approach to defect review has been extended to contamination style defect inspections, including Die-to-Die reflected, and non Die-to-Die or single-die inspections. In addition to the computational methods used for transmitted aerial images, defects detected in die-to-die reflected light mode are analyzed based on special defect and background coloring in reflected-light, and other characteristics to determine the exact type and severity. For those detected in the non Die-to-Die mode, only defect images are available from the inspection tool. Without a reference, i.e., defect-free image, it is often difficult to determine the true nature or impact of the defect in question. Using a combination of inspection-tool modeling and image inversion techniques, Luminescent's LAIPHTM system generates an accurate reference image, and then proceeds with automated defect characterization as if the images were simply from a die-to-die inspection. The disposition of contamination style defects this way, filters out >90% of false and nuisance defects that otherwise would have been manually reviewed or measured on AIMSTM. Such computational defect review, unifying defect disposition across all available inspection modes, has been imperative to ensuring no yield losses due to errors in operator defect classification on one hand, and on the other

  6. Energetic and informational masking in a simulated restaurant environment.

    PubMed

    Culling, John F

    2013-01-01

    Participants were seated at a central table for two in a virtual restaurant, simulated over headphones. They listened to the person across the table. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured as a function of the number of interfering sources distributed across other tables in the room; those sources were either speech-shaped noises or competing speech. The restaurant either was enclosed by acoustically reflective surfaces or was anechoic. Variations in SRT for speech-shaped noises were accurately predicted (r = 0.96) by a model of spatial release from masking based on the additive combination of better-ear listening and binaural unmasking. However, SRTs for interfering voices followed a different pattern. A single interfering voice gave a lower SRT than a single speech-shaped noise source (by 6.3 dB in anechoic conditions and 1.2 dB in reverberant conditions). This difference can be attributed to the effects of dip listening and to the exploitation of differences between voices in fundamental frequency (F0). SRTs for two interfering voices were markedly higher than for a single voice, particularly when the interfering voice was the same as the target voice. Multiple speech interferers produced more masking than multiple noise interferers. This effect can be attributed to informational masking (IM). These results indicate that current models require some elaboration before they will produce accurate predictions of intelligibility in noisy social environments.

  7. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked morphological priming with magneto-encephalography (MEG), a technique particularly adept at indexing processes involved in lexical access. The latency of an MEG component peaking, on average, 220 msec post-onset of the target in left occipito-temporal brain regions was found to be sensitive to the morphological prime– target relationship under masked priming conditions in a visual lexical decision task. Shorter latencies for related than unrelated conditions were observed both for semantically transparent (cleaner–CLEAN) and opaque (corner–CORN) prime–target pairs, but not for prime–target pairs with only an orthographic relationship (brothel–BROTH). These effects are likely to reflect a prelexical level of processing where form-based representations of stems and affixes are represented and are in contrast to models positing no morphological structure in lexical representations. Moreover, we present data regarding the transitional probability from stem to affix in a post hoc comparison, which suggests that this factor may modulate early morphological decomposition, particularly for opaque words. The timing of a robust MEG component sensitive to the morphological relatedness of prime–target pairs can be used to further understand the neural substrates and the time course of lexical processing. PMID:21557645

  8. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  9. Optical inspection of EPL stencil masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, James; McCallum, Martin; Okada, Masashi

    2003-06-01

    We are now at a major junction in lithography where non-optical lithographies, such as Electron Projection Lithography (EPL) [1], are being introduced. The mask used in EPL is a non-transparent silicon substrate with a thin silicon (~2μm) membrane with openings for electrons to pass through acting as a scatterer. This must be inspected as defects may cause printable defects. Initial mask inspection work has used SEM inspection to find these defects. However, we have historically used optical mask inspection tools, utilising wavelengths at or above what we are using for imaging, to qualify masks. This technology has been increasingly difficult to sustain as we have moved from imaging using mercury lamp based sources to pulsed excimer laser based sources that are not very suited to the inspection imaging. Indeed, review of defects found has moved from optical microscopes to SEM based tools. Inspection tools have also evolved, with the first SEM based mask inspection tools being developed to find the smallest defects, however these have the penalty of very low throughput. We will show the potential of using optical systems for the transmissive inspection of these EPL masks. The high potential of existing tools will be shown together with the need for a next generation of inspection tools. We will show that simulations indicate that an inspection source with 193nm wavelength would be required for the detection of 50nm defects on a mask used to print 70nm dense lines. It will also be shown how the position of the defect within the membrane greatly influences detection as well as the implications of moving to a thinner silicon membrane.

  10. The Intervenor Effect in Masked Priming: How Does Masked Priming Survive across an Intervening Word?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Four masked priming experiments are reported investigating the effect of inserting an unrelated word between the masked prime and the target. When the intervening word is visible, identity priming is reduced to the level of one-letter-different form priming, but form priming is largely unaffected. However, when the intervening word is itself…

  11. A parallel multibeam mask writing method and its impact on data volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, N.; Luo, Y.; Savari, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The pattern requirements for mask writers have steadily been growing, and there is considerable interest in multibeam mask writers to handle the throughput and resolution challenges associated with the needs of sub- 10nm technology nodes. The mask writer of the future will process terabits of information per second and deal with petabytes of data. In this paper, we investigate lossless data compression and system parallelism together to address part of the data transfer problem. We explore simple compression algorithms and the effect of parallelism on the total compressed data in a multibeam system architecture motivated by the IMS Nanofabrication multibeam mask writer series eMET. We model the shot assignment problem and beam shot overlap by means of two-dimensional linear spatial filtering on an image. We describe a fast scanning strategy and investigate data volumes for a family of beam arrays with 2N ×(2N -1) beams, where N is an odd integer.

  12. Fast adaptive unsharp masking with programmable mediaprocessors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Unmin; Shamdasani, Vijay; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2003-06-01

    Unsharp masking is a widely used image-enhancement method in medical imaging. Hardware-based solutions can be developed to support high computational demand for unsharp masking, but they suffer from limited flexibility. Software solutions can easily incorporate new features and modify key parameters, such as filtering kernel size, but they have not been able to meet the fast computing requirement. Modern programmable mediaprocessors can meet both fast computing and flexibility requirements, which will benefit medical image computing. In this article, we present fast adaptive unsharp masking on two leading mediaprocessors or high-end digital signal processors, Hitachi/Equator Technologies MAP-CA and Texas Instruments TMS320C64x. For a 2k x 2k 16-bit image, our adaptive unsharp masking with a 201 x 201 boxcar kernel takes 225 ms on a 300-MHz MAP-CA and 74 ms on a 600-MHz TMS320C64x. This fast unsharp masking enables technologists and/or physicians to adjust parameters interactively for optimal quality assurance and image viewing.

  13. Efficient adaptive thresholding with image masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young-Taek; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Bang, Won-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Adaptive thresholding is a useful technique for document analysis. In medical image processing, it is also helpful for segmenting structures, such as diaphragms or blood vessels. This technique sets a threshold using local information around a pixel, then binarizes the pixel according to the value. Although this technique is robust to changes in illumination, it takes a significant amount of time to compute thresholds because it requires adding all of the neighboring pixels. Integral images can alleviate this overhead; however, medical images, such as ultrasound, often come with image masks, and ordinary algorithms often cause artifacts. The main problem is that the shape of the summing area is not rectangular near the boundaries of the image mask. For example, the threshold at the boundary of the mask is incorrect because pixels on the mask image are also counted. Our key idea to cope with this problem is computing the integral image for the image mask to count the valid number of pixels. Our method is implemented on a GPU using CUDA, and experimental results show that our algorithm is 164 times faster than a naïve CPU algorithm for averaging.

  14. Binaural Masking: An Analysis of Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-21

    choice ( 2AFC ) procedure that the functions do not intersect at At = 0. Further, these was used to obtain thresholds. The beginning of each trial...C) 2AFc RH 5.9 is 3.5 0.7941. Average 6.1 The two conditions tested in experiment 3, QUIET- No-QUIET masker configuration [Fig. 2(b)] and Nr- No...the observation inter- ( 2AFC procedure), and the bottom panel shows values vals is quite large. Indeed, under the NoSi’ condition, from experiment 4

  15. International Space Station (ISS) Emergency Mask (EM) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Hahn, Jeffrey; Fowler, Michael; Young, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Emergency Mask (EM) is considered a secondary response emergency Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) designed to provide respiratory protection to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers in response to a post-fire event or ammonia leak. The EM is planned to be delivered to ISS in 2012 to replace the current air purifying respirator (APR) onboard ISS called the Ammonia Respirator (AR). The EM is a one ]size ]fits ]all model designed to fit any size crewmember, unlike the APR on ISS, and uses either two Fire Cartridges (FCs) or two Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) 3M(Trademark). Ammonia Cartridges (ACs) to provide the crew with a minimum of 8 hours of respiratory protection with appropriate cartridge swap ]out. The EM is designed for a single exposure event, for either post ]fire or ammonia, and is a passive device that cannot help crewmembers who cannot breathe on their own. The EM fs primary and only seal is around the wearer fs neck to prevent a crewmember from inhaling contaminants. During the development of the ISS Emergency Mask, several design challenges were faced that focused around manufacturing a leak free mask. The description of those challenges are broadly discussed but focuses on one key design challenge area: bonding EPDM gasket material to Gore(Registered Trademark) fabric hood.

  16. Evaluating Texture Compression Masking Effects Using Objective Image Quality Assessment Metrics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Wesley; Olano, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Texture compression is widely used in real-time rendering to reduce storage and bandwidth requirements. Recent research in compression algorithms has explored both reduced fixed bit rate and variable bit rate algorithms. The results are evaluated at the individual texture level using mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, or visual image inspection. We argue this is the wrong evaluation approach. Compression artifacts in individual textures are likely visually masked in final rendered images and this masking is not accounted for when evaluating individual textures. This masking comes from both geometric mapping of textures onto models and the effects of combining different textures on the same model such as diffuse, gloss, and bump maps. We evaluate final rendered images using rigorous perceptual error metrics. Our method samples the space of viewpoints in a scene, renders the scene from each viewpoint using variations of compressed textures, and then compares each to a ground truth using uncompressed textures from the same viewpoint. We show that masking has a significant effect on final rendered image quality, masking effects and perceptual sensitivity to masking varies by the type of texture, graphics hardware compression algorithms are too conservative, and reduced bit rates are possible while maintaining final rendered image quality.

  17. Cochlear implant speech intelligibility outcomes with structured and unstructured binary mask errors.

    PubMed

    Kressner, Abigail A; Westermann, Adam; Buchholz, Jörg M; Rozell, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that intelligibility can be improved for cochlear implant (CI) recipients with the ideal binary mask (IBM). In realistic scenarios where prior information is unavailable, however, the IBM must be estimated, and these estimations will inevitably contain errors. Although the effects of both unstructured and structured binary mask errors have been investigated with normal-hearing (NH) listeners, they have not been investigated with CI recipients. This study assesses these effects with CI recipients using masks that have been generated systematically with a statistical model. The results demonstrate that clustering of mask errors substantially decreases the tolerance of errors, that incorrectly removing target-dominated regions can be as detrimental to intelligibility as incorrectly adding interferer-dominated regions, and that the individual tolerances of the different types of errors can change when both are present. These trends follow those of NH listeners. However, analysis with a mixed effects model suggests that CI recipients tend to be less tolerant than NH listeners to mask errors in most conditions, at least with respect to the testing methods in each of the studies. This study clearly demonstrates that structure influences the tolerance of errors and therefore should be considered when analyzing binary-masking algorithms.

  18. Character Projection Mask Set Optimization for Enhancing Throughput of MCC Projection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Makoto; Matsunaga, Yusuke; Murakami, Kazuaki

    Character projection (CP) lithography is utilized for maskless lithography and is a potential for the future photomask manufacture because it can project ICs much faster than point beam projection or variable-shaped beam (VSB) projection. In this paper, we first present a projection mask set development methodology for multi-column-cell (MCC) systems, in which column-cells can project patterns in parallel with the CP and VSB lithographies. Next, we present an INLP (integer nonlinear programming) model as well as an ILP (integer linear programming) model for optimizing a CP mask set of an MCC projection system so that projection time is reduced. The experimental results show that our optimization has achieved 33.4% less projection time in the best case than a naive CP mask development approach. The experimental results indicate that our CP mask set optimization method has virtually increased cell pattern objects on CP masks and has decreased VSB projection so that it has achieved higher projection throughput than just parallelizing two column-cells with conventional CP masks.

  19. A level set methodology for predicting the effect of mask wear on surface evolution of features in abrasive jet micro-machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzynski, T.; Papini, M.

    2012-07-01

    A previous implementation of narrow-band level set methodology developed by the authors was extended to allow for the modelling of mask erosive wear in abrasive jet micro-machining (AJM). The model permits the prediction of the surface evolution of both the mask and the target simultaneously, by representing them as a hybrid and continuous mask-target surface. The model also accounts for the change in abrasive mass flux incident to both the target surface and, for the first time, the eroding mask edge, that is brought about by the presence of the mask edge itself. The predictions of the channel surface and eroded mask profiles were compared with measurements on channels machined in both glass and poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) targets at both normal and oblique incidence, using tempered steel and elastomeric masks. A much better agreement between the predicted and measured profiles was found when mask wear was taken into account. Mask wear generally resulted in wider and deeper glass target profiles and wider PMMA target profiles, respectively, when compared to cases where no mask wear was present. This work has important implications for the AJM of complex MEMS and microfluidic devices that require longer machining times.

  20. Development of an advanced mask and its fabrication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, Tadahiro; Tojo, Toru; Ogawa, Yoji; Koyama, Kiyomi; Ono, Akira; Inoue, Soichi; Ito, Shinichi; Goto, Mineo

    1995-07-01

    Masks and their fabrication technologies are keys to the further advancement of optical lithography. A stable SiNx single layer attenuated masks for DUV have been developed. A 0.2 micrometers contact hole pattern was fabricated using a KrF stepper with the SiNx attenuated mask. Toshiba mask fabrication system, including an electron beam writing system, a data base inspection system, and a data conversion system, has been developed for 64 Mbit DRAM class. Required mask improvements for increasing optical lithography resolution include better critical dimension (CD) uniformity, higher mask writing system resolution, and automatic shifter patten generation of alternating phase shifting masks. In addition, improved mask pattern positioning accuracy is also required. In this paper, experimental CD uniformity and resolution improvements, automatic phase shifter assignment method, and improvement in positioning accuracy, are described. The future development of masks will incorporate these key technologies.

  1. Communication masking in marine mammals: A review and research strategy.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine; Reichmuth, Colleen; Cunningham, Kane; Lucke, Klaus; Dooling, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Underwater noise, whether of natural or anthropogenic origin, has the ability to interfere with the way in which marine mammals receive acoustic signals (i.e., for communication, social interaction, foraging, navigation, etc.). This phenomenon, termed auditory masking, has been well studied in humans and terrestrial vertebrates (in particular birds), but less so in marine mammals. Anthropogenic underwater noise seems to be increasing in parts of the world's oceans and concerns about associated bioacoustic effects, including masking, are growing. In this article, we review our understanding of masking in marine mammals, summarise data on marine mammal hearing as they relate to masking (including audiograms, critical ratios, critical bandwidths, and auditory integration times), discuss masking release processes of receivers (including comodulation masking release and spatial release from masking) and anti-masking strategies of signalers (e.g. Lombard effect), and set a research framework for improved assessment of potential masking in marine mammals.

  2. Protective mask for airborne toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, C.J.; Scavnicky, J.A.; Little, M.E.; Hagy, E.M.; Bloom, A.

    1983-10-21

    A protective mask is described which includes a one-piece face piece molded of a transparent elastomer. A visor in the face piece provides panoramic visibility and is resilient enough to deform under applied force to permit improved use of optical devices. Identical left and right cheek fittings permit installation of a canister on either side so that the same mask can be used by right-handed and left-handed wearers voice for use with a telephone and the like. Air deflectors inside the mask adjacent the left and right cheek fittings deflect de-foging air along the inside surface of the visor when either left or right or both cheek fittings are used for attachment of a canister. A sealing adapter permits sealing around earpiece shafts of eyeglasses.

  3. Layer aware source mask target optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ao; Foong, Yee Mei; Schramm, Jessy; Ji, Liang; Hsu, Stephen; Guerrero, James; Li, Xiaoyang; Shaw, Joe; Wang, Joe

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present the approach and results of layer-aware source mask target optimization. In this approach, the design target is co-optimized during source mask optimization (SMO) by considering inter-layer constraints. We tested the method on a 2x nm node metal layer by using both standard and customized cost functions for source optimization. Variable targets were defined for two process window limiting critical pattern cells, with contact-to-metal and metal-tovia coverage rules taken into consideration. The results indicate that layer-aware source mask target optimization gives consistent process window improvement over conventional SMO. The optimized targets prove to be a good balance between lithography process window and post-etch inter-layer coverage margin.

  4. Metacontrast masking is processed before grapheme-color synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Michael Patrick; Bridgeman, Bruce; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the physiological mechanism of grapheme-color synesthesia using metacontrast masking. A metacontrast target is rendered invisible by a mask that is delayed by about 60 ms; the target and mask do not overlap in space or time. Little masking occurs, however, if the target and mask are simultaneous. This effect must be cortical, because it can be obtained dichoptically. To compare the data for synesthetes and controls, we developed a metacontrast design in which nonsynesthete controls showed weaker dichromatic masking (i.e., the target and mask were in different colors) than monochromatic masking. We accomplished this with an equiluminant target, mask, and background for each observer. If synesthetic color affected metacontrast, synesthetes should show monochromatic masking more similar to the weak dichromatic masking among controls, because synesthetes could add their synesthetic color to the monochromatic condition. The target-mask pairs used for each synesthete were graphemes that elicited strong synesthetic colors. We found stronger monochromatic than dichromatic U-shaped metacontrast for both synesthetes and controls, with optimal masking at an asynchrony of 66 ms. The difference in performance between the monochromatic and dichromatic conditions in the synesthetes indicates that synesthesia occurs at a later processing stage than does metacontrast masking.

  5. Illumination pupil optimization in 0.33NA EUVL by intensity balancing for semi-iso dark field two-bar M1 building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, T.; de Winter, L.; van Adrichem, P.; Finders, J.

    2016-10-01

    We will shed light on the optimization of lithographic metrics for the semi-isolated dark field two-bar logic building block. Under standard D90Y illumination this building block suffers from large mask 3D induced relative focus dependent CD asymmetries. Such behavior limits its overlapping process window and gives rise to untenable full wafer CDU and intra-field pattern shifts. We have found that besides a Ta absorber thickness reduction an illumination pupil optimization is necessary to fully remove these CD asymmetries. The pupil optimization is achieved by relating the aerial image decomposition (here: symmetrization and balancing of intensities across the diffracted orders) with lithographic metrics per pupil plane location. The resulting pupil allows us (i) to lift the focus-dependent CD asymmetries and (ii) to co-optimize a number of lithographic metrics such as overlapping process window, contrast, non-telecentricity and pattern shift. The importance of subsidiary conditions (e.g. symmetry of the pupil, required DOF) will be discussed.

  6. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.-J.; Yankulin, L.; Thomas, P.; Mbanaso, C.; Antohe, A.; Garg, R.; Wang, Y.; Murray, T.; Wuest, A.; Goodwin, F.; Huh, S.; Cordes, A.; Naulleau, P.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Gullikson, E.; Denbeaux, G.

    2010-03-12

    The impact of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks is significant due to throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance. Current carbon contamination research primarily focuses on the lifetime of the multilayer surfaces, determined by reflectivity loss and reduced throughput in EUV exposure tools. However, contamination on patterned EUV masks can cause additional effects on absorbing features and the printed images, as well as impacting the efficiency of cleaning process. In this work, several different techniques were used to determine possible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations were also performed and the results compared with the experimental data.

  7. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Visual Masking and Visibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    the 2AFC task. Harmonically Pure Stimuli and the Method of Adjustment The evidence presented so far supports our two-criterion 0 hypothesis for masking...the subject can still recognize this repetitive beat pattern. Figure 7 sh3ws 2AFC thresholds in the presence of a 2 c/deg mask for several tests...at all 4 rr 1.2- 1.0 W S08 N."- 0.6 b L0 12 14 16 REPLICATIONS Figlure 4 ilope of the 2AFC mssinq function with a continuall coanginq ai$& 1solid lines

  9. Extinction controlled adaptive mask coronagraph Lyot and phase mask dual concept for wide extinction area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Schuhler, N.; Mawet, D.; Haguenauer, P.; Girard, J.; Gonte, Frederic

    2012-09-01

    A dual coronagraph based on the Adaptive Mask concept is presented in this paper. ALyot coronagraph with a variable diameter occulting disk anda nulling stellar coronagraph based on the Adaptive Phase Mask concept using polarization interferometry are presented in this work. Observations on sky and numerical simulations show the usefulness of the proposed method to optimize the nulling efficiency of the coronagraphs. In the case of the phase mask, the active control system will correct for the detrimental effects of image instabilities on the destructive interference (low-order aberrations such as tip-tilt and focus). The phase mask adaptability both in size, phase and amplitude also compensate for manufacturing errors of the mask itself, and potentially for chromatic effects. Liquid-crystal properties are used to provide variable transmission of an annulus around the phase mask, but also to achieve the achromatic π phase shift in the core of the PSF by rotating the polarization by 180°.A compressed mercury (Hg) drop is used as an occulting disk for the Lyot mask, its size control offers an adaptation to the seeing conditions and provides an optimization of the Tip-tilt correction.

  10. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  11. Conceptual design of a hybrid parallel mechanism for mask exchanging of TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianping; Zhou, Hongfei; Li, Kexuan; Zhou, Zengxiang; Zhai, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Mask exchange system is an important part of the Multi-Object Broadband Imaging Echellette (MOBIE) on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). To solve the problem of stiffness changing with the gravity vector of the mask exchange system in the MOBIE, the hybrid parallel mechanism design method was introduced into the whole research. By using the characteristics of high stiffness and precision of parallel structure, combined with large moving range of serial structure, a conceptual design of a hybrid parallel mask exchange system based on 3-RPS parallel mechanism was presented. According to the position requirements of the MOBIE, the SolidWorks structure model of the hybrid parallel mask exchange robot was established and the appropriate installation position without interfering with the related components and light path in the MOBIE of TMT was analyzed. Simulation results in SolidWorks suggested that 3-RPS parallel platform had good stiffness property in different gravity vector directions. Furthermore, through the research of the mechanism theory, the inverse kinematics solution of the 3-RPS parallel platform was calculated and the mathematical relationship between the attitude angle of moving platform and the angle of ball-hinges on the moving platform was established, in order to analyze the attitude adjustment ability of the hybrid parallel mask exchange robot. The proposed conceptual design has some guiding significance for the design of mask exchange system of the MOBIE on TMT.

  12. Critical ratios of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and masked signal duration.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine

    2008-10-01

    This article examines the masking of a complex beluga vocalization by natural and anthropogenic noise. The call consisted of six 150 ms pulses exhibiting spectral peaks between 800 Hz and 8 kHz. Comparing the spectra and spectrograms of the call and noises at detection threshold showed that the animal did not hear the entire call at threshold. It only heard parts of the call in frequency and time. From the masked hearing thresholds in broadband continuous noises, critical ratios were computed. Fletcher critical bands were narrower than either 15 or 111 of an octave at the low frequencies of the call (<2 kHz), depending on which frequency the animal cued on. From the masked hearing thresholds in intermittent noises, the audible signal duration at detection threshold was computed. The intermittent noises differed in gap length, gap number, and masking, but the total audible signal duration at threshold was the same: 660 ms. This observation supports a multiple-looks model. The two amplitude modulated noises exhibited weaker masking than the unmodulated noises hinting at a comodulation masking release.

  13. A fast and flexible library-based thick-mask near-field calculation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xu; Gao, Jie; Chen, Xuanbo; Dong, Lisong; Li, Yanqiu

    2015-03-01

    Aerial image calculation is the basis of the current lithography simulation. As the critical dimension (CD) of the integrated circuits continuously shrinks, the thick mask near-field calculation has increasing influence on the accuracy and efficiency of the entire aerial image calculation process. This paper develops a flexible librarybased approach to significantly improve the efficiency of the thick mask near-field calculation compared to the rigorous modeling method, while leading to much higher accuracy than the Kirchhoff approximation method. Specifically, a set of typical features on the fullchip are selected to serve as the training data, whose near-fields are pre-calculated and saved in the library. Given an arbitrary test mask, we first decompose it into convex corners, concave corners and edges, afterwards match each patch to the training layouts based on nonparametric kernel regression. Subsequently, we use the matched near-fields in the library to replace the mask patches, and rapidly synthesize the near-field for the entire test mask. Finally, a data-fitting method is proposed to improve the accuracy of the synthesized near-field based on least square estimate (LSE). We use a pair of two-dimensional mask patterns to test our method. Simulations show that the proposed method can significantly speed up the current FDTD method, and effectively improve the accuracy of the Kirchhoff approximation method.

  14. Cosmic Ballet or Devil's Mask?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    Stars like our Sun are members of galaxies, and most galaxies are themselves members of clusters of galaxies. In these, they move around among each other in a mostly slow and graceful ballet. But every now and then, two or more of the members may get too close for comfort - the movements become hectic, sometimes indeed dramatic, as when galaxies end up colliding. ESO PR Photo 12/04 shows an example of such a cosmic tango. This is the superb triple system NGC 6769-71, located in the southern Pavo constellation (the Peacock) at a distance of 190 million light-years. This composite image was obtained on April 1, 2004, the day of the Fifth Anniversary of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It was taken in the imaging mode of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on Melipal, one of the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the VLT at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). The two upper galaxies, NGC 6769 (upper right) and NGC 6770 (upper left), are of equal brightness and size, while NGC 6771 (below) is about half as bright and slightly smaller. All three galaxies possess a central bulge of similar brightness. They consist of elderly, reddish stars and that of NGC 6771 is remarkable for its "boxy" shape, a rare occurrence among galaxies. Gravitational interaction in a small galaxy group NGC 6769 is a spiral galaxy with very tightly wound spiral arms, while NGC 6770 has two major spiral arms, one of which is rather straight and points towards the outer disc of NGC 6769. NGC 6770 is also peculiar in that it presents two comparatively straight dark lanes and a fainter arc that curves towards the third galaxy, NGC 6771 (below). It is also obvious from this new VLT photo that stars and gas have been stripped off NGC 6769 and NGC 6770, starting to form a common envelope around them, in the shape of a Devil's Mask. There is also a weak hint of a tenuous bridge between NGC 6769 and NGC 6771. All of these features testify to strong gravitational interaction between the three galaxies

  15. Characterizing edge-generated stray light sources for TPF Coronagraph pupil masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, Daniel; Neureuther, Andrew; Lieber, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2005-08-01

    The edge generated stray-light from corner boundary conditions, interactions with the lower mask structure, and surface plasmon polaritons that may limit Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph performance are characterized. Previously a number of stray light sources, unaccounted for by the ideal thin mask theory used to design the pupil-plane masks, were identified. In this paper we illustrate and quantify the most important outstanding stray-light sources in the near-field in order to improve the model of pupil-plane mask transmission used by the Integrated Telescope Model. Corner spikes, caused by the need to bring the ideal top-hat field into compliance with the boundary conditions set forth by Maxwell's equations, form the strongest source of stray-light, accounting for up to a 1λ shift in the effective opening width per edge. Undercutting mask edges by 20° reduces this source of stray-light by more than a factor of five. Interactions between light and the lower mask structure, a secondary effect, account for only a few percent of the stray-light in the TE polarization but account for up to 50% of the stray-light in the TM polarization due to surface plasmon polaritons. Surface plasmon polaritons, surface waves that run for tens of microns and radiate at corners, form the final stray-light source. On thin masks they may account for up to a 1λ shift in the effective opening width; however, their effects can be easily mitigated by choosing a poor surface plasmon material, such as Chrome. The results presented here are being used to facilitate end-to-end system modeling through the Integrated Telescope Model.

  16. TMS effects on subjective and objective measures of vision: stimulation intensity and pre- versus post-stimulus masking.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Tom A; Cornelsen, Sonja; Jacobs, Christianne; Sack, Alexander T

    2011-12-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used to mask visual stimuli, disrupting visual task performance or preventing visual awareness. While TMS masking studies generally fix stimulation intensity, we hypothesized that varying the intensity of TMS pulses in a masking paradigm might inform several ongoing debates concerning TMS disruption of vision as measured subjectively versus objectively, and pre-stimulus (forward) versus post-stimulus (backward) TMS masking. We here show that both pre-stimulus TMS pulses and post-stimulus TMS pulses could strongly mask visual stimuli. We found no dissociations between TMS effects on the subjective and objective measures of vision for any masking window or intensity, ruling out the option that TMS intensity levels determine whether dissociations between subjective and objective vision are obtained. For the post-stimulus time window particularly, we suggest that these data provide new constraints for (e.g. recurrent) models of vision and visual awareness. Finally, our data are in line with the idea that pre-stimulus masking operates differently from conventional post-stimulus masking.

  17. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  18. Clean induced feature CD shift of EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesládek, Pavel; Schedel, Thorsten; Bender, Markus

    2016-05-01

    EUV developed in the last decade to the most promising <7nm technology candidate. Defects are considered to be one of the most critical issues of the EUV mask. There are several contributors which make the EUV mask so different from the optical one. First one is the significantly more complicated mask stack consisting currently of 40 Mo/Si double layers, covered by Ru capping layer and TaN/TaO absorber/anti-reflective coating on top of the front face of the mask. Backside is in contrary to optical mask covered as well by conductive layer consisting of Cr or CrN. Second contributor is the fact that EUV mask is currently in contrary to optical mask not yet equipped with sealed pellicle, leading to much higher risk of mask contamination. Third reason is use of EUV mask in vacuum, possibly leading to deposition of vacuum contaminants on the EUV mask surface. Latter reason in combination with tight requirements on backside cleanliness lead to the request of frequent recleaning of the EUV mask, in order to sustain mask lifetime similar to that of optical mask. Mask cleaning process alters slightly the surface of any mask - binary COG mask, as well as phase shift mask of any type and naturally also of the EUV mask as well. In case of optical masks the changes are almost negligible, as the mask is exposed to max. 10-20 re-cleans within its life time. These modifications can be expressed in terms of different specified parameters, e.g. CD shift, phase/trans shift, change of the surface roughness etc. The CD shift, expressed as thinning (or exceptionally thickening) of the dark features on the mask is typically in order of magnitude 0.1nm per process run, which is completely acceptable for optical mask. Projected on the lifetime of EUV mask, assuming 100 clean process cycles, this will lead to CD change of about 10nm. For this reason the requirements for EUV mask cleaning are significantly tighter, << 0.1 nm per process run. This task will look even more challenging, when

  19. Mask cycle time reduction for foundry projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2011-11-01

    One of key deliverables of foundry based manufacturing is low cycletime. Building new and enhancing existing products by mask changes involves significant logistical effort, which could be reduced by standardizing data management and communication procedures among design house, mask shop, and foundry (fab) [1]. As an example, a typical process of taping out can take up to two weeks in addition to technical effort, for database handling, mask form completion, management approval, PO signoff and JDV review, translating into loss of revenue. In order to reduce this delay, we are proposing to develop a unified online system which should assist with the following functions: database edits, final verifications, document approvals, mask order entries, and JDV review with engineering signoff as required. This would help a growing number of semiconductor products to be flexibly manufactured at different manufacturing sites. We discuss how the data architecture based on a non-relational database management system (NRDMBS) extracted into a relational one (RDMBS) should provide quality information [2], to reduce cycle time significantly beyond 70% for an example 2 week tapeout schedule.

  20. Associative Learning of Discrimination with Masked Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    Great controversy exists on whether associative learning occurs without awareness. In Experiment 1, 31 participants received discrimination training by repeated presentations of two stimulus sequences (S1[subscript A] right arrow S2[subscript A], and S1[subscript B] right arrow S2[subscript B]), S1 being a masked stimulus. S2 were imperative…

  1. Testing Tactile Masking between the Forearms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2016-02-10

    Masking, in which one stimulus affects the detection of another, is a classic technique that has been used in visual, auditory, and tactile research, usually using stimuli that are close together to reveal local interactions. Masking effects have also been demonstrated in which a tactile stimulus alters the perception of a touch at a distant location. Such effects can provide insight into how components of the body's representations in the brain may be linked. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at corresponding contralateral locations. To explore the matching of corresponding points across the body, we can measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on contralateral masking. Careful controls are required to rule out direct effects of the remote stimulus, for example by mechanical transmission, and also attention effects in which thresholds may be altered by the participant's attention being drawn away from the stimulus of interest. The use of this technique is beneficial as a behavioural measure for exploring which parts of the body are functionally connected and whether the two sides of the body interact in a somatotopic representation. This manuscript describes a behavioural protocol that can be used for studying contralateral tactile masking.

  2. Differential effects of forward and backward masks on the relationship between perception and action.

    PubMed

    Deplancke, A; Madelain, L; Coello, Y

    2016-03-01

    A recent series of experiments has shown that the effects of near-threshold stimuli on perceptual and motor responses are highly dependent on experimental conditions. In particular, motor influences of near-threshold distractors were observed when using low-contrast unmasked stimuli and high-contrast masked stimuli although only the latter affected motor responses in the absence of stimulus awareness. These results are compatible with neurophysiological models of visual masking, suggesting that early neural responses to a visual stimulus can be decomposed in feedforward activations to-and feedback activations from-higher visual areas, correlating respectively with the actual presence of the stimulus and its conscious perception. We tested the compatibility between these neurophysiological models and the behavioural data obtained in near-threshold experiments. We recorded fast reaching movements directed to a highly visible target followed by a report of the presence of a near-threshold distractor presented either at low contrast without mask or at high contrast with a backward or forward mask. Analysis of hand trajectories revealed that deviations toward the distractor were observed in the no-mask condition when the distractor was present and reported, and when it was present but not reported in the backward and forward mask conditions, although the effect was weaker in the latter condition. These data reveal that the presence or absence of perception-action dissociations in behavioural studies are well accounted for by neurophysiological models of visual masking and that behavioural effects of near-threshold distractors cannot result merely from on a dichotomic visual system for perception and action.

  3. Green binary and phase shifting mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shy, S. L.; Hong, Chao-Sin; Wu, Cheng-San; Chen, S. J.; Wu, Hung-Yu; Ting, Yung-Chiang

    2009-12-01

    SixNy/Ni thin film green mask blanks were developed , and are now going to be used to replace general chromium film used for binary mask as well as to replace molydium silicide embedded material for AttPSM for I-line (365 nm), KrF (248 nm), ArF (193 nm) and Contact/Proximity lithography. A bilayer structure of a 1 nm thick opaque, conductive nickel layer and a SixNy layer is proposed for binary and phase-shifting mask. With the good controlling of plasma CVD of SixNy under silane (50 sccm), ammonia (5 sccm) and nitrogen (100 sccm), the pressure is 250 mTorr. and RF frequency 13.56 MHz and power 50 W. SixNy has enough deposition latitude to meet the requirements as an embedded layer for required phase shift 180 degree, and the T% in 193, 248 and 365 nm can be adjusted between 2% to 20% for binary and phase shifting mask usage. Ni can be deposited by E-gun, its sheet resistance Rs is less than 1.435 kΩ/square. Jeol e-beam system and I-line stepper are used to evaluate these thin film green mask blanks, feature size less than 200 nm half pitch pattern and 0.558 μm pitch contact hole can be printed. Transmission spectrums of various thickness of SixNy film are inspected by using UV spectrometer and FTIR. Optical constants of the SixNy film are measured by n & k meter and surface roughness is inspected by using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

  4. Variations in backward masking with different masking stimuli: II. The effects of spatially quantised masks in the light of local contour interaction, interchannel inhibition, perceptual retouch, and substitution theories.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Talis; Luiga, Iiris; Põder, Endel

    2005-01-01

    In part I we showed that with spatially non-overlapping targets and masks both local metacontrast-like interactions and attentional processes are involved in backward masking. In this second part we extend the strategy of varying the contents of masks to pattern masking where targets and masks overlap in space, in order to compare different masking theories. Images of human faces were backward-masked by three types of spatially quantised masks (the same faces as targets, faces different from targets, and Gaussian noise with power spectra typical for faces). Configural characteristics, rather than the spectral content of the mask, predicted the extent of masking at relatively long stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). This poses difficulties for the theory of transient-on-sustained inhibition as the principal mechanism of masking and also for local contour interaction being a decisive factor in pattern masking. The scale of quantisation had no effect on the masking capacity of noise masks and a strong effect on the capacity of different-face masks. Also, the decrease of configural masking with an increase in the coarseness of the quantisation of the mask highlights ambiguities inherent in the re-entrance-based substitution theory of masking. Different masking theories cannot solve the problems of masking separately. They should be combined in order to create a complex, yet comprehensible mode of interaction for the different mechanisms involved in visual backward masking.

  5. Fire, snowball, mask, movie: how leaders spark and sustain change.

    PubMed

    Fuda, Peter; Badham, Richard

    2011-11-01

    What does it take for an average manager to become a highly effective leader? There are countless books, models, and formulas for success. But the truth is that leadership transformation is deeply dependent on circumstances. The key for those who seek it is to absorb the insights that can be drawn from the successful experiences of others. During their in-depth study of seven CEOs, Fuda and Badham uncovered seven interdependent metaphors, which they went on to test with more than 10,000 managers on four continents. The authors discuss four of those metaphors--fire, snowball, mask, and movie--here, in the context of individual managers' experiences.

  6. Error-budget paradigms and laser mask pattern generator evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaker, H. Christopher; Jolley, Matthew J.; Berwick, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the ALTA(R) series of laser mask pattern generators has increased the relative contribution of intensity errors on critical-dimension (CD) control to those from placement errors. This paradigm shift has driven a change in rasterization strategy wherein aerial image sharpness is improved at the cost of a slight decrease in the averaging of column-to-column placement errors. Print performance evaluation using small-area CD test patterns show improvements in stripe-axis local CD uniformity (CDU) 3σ values of 15-25% using the new strategy, and systematic brush-error contributions were reduced by 50%. The increased importance of intensity errors, coupled with the improvement of ALTA system performance, has also made the mask-blank and process-induced errors a more significant part of the overall error budget. A simple model based on two components, a pattern-invariant footprint and one related to the exposure density ρ(x, y), is shown to describe adequately the errors induced by these sources. The first component is modeled by a fourth-order, two-dimensional polynomial, whereas the second is modeled as a convolution of ρ(x, y) with one or more Gaussian kernels. Implementation of this model on the ALTA 4700 system shows improvements in global CDU of 50%.

  7. Serial robot for the trajectory optimization and error compensation of TMT mask exchange system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianping; Zhang, Feifan; Zhou, Zengxiang; Zhai, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Mask exchange system is the main part of Multi-Object Broadband Imaging Echellette (MOBIE) on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). According to the conception of the TMT mask exchange system, the pre-design was introduced in the paper which was based on IRB 140 robot. The stiffness model of IRB 140 in SolidWorks was analyzed under different gravity vectors for further error compensation. In order to find the right location and path planning, the robot and the mask cassette model was imported into MOBIE model to perform different schemes simulation. And obtained the initial installation position and routing. Based on these initial parameters, IRB 140 robot was operated to simulate the path and estimate the mask exchange time. Meanwhile, MATLAB and ADAMS software were used to perform simulation analysis and optimize the route to acquire the kinematics parameters and compare with the experiment results. After simulation and experimental research mentioned in the paper, the theoretical reference was acquired which could high efficient improve the structure of the mask exchange system parameters optimization of the path and precision of the robot position.

  8. X-Ray Lithography Mask Metrology: Use of Transmitted Electrons in an SEM for Linewidth Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Postek, Michael T.; Lowney, Jeremiah R.; Vladar, Andras E.; Keery, William J.; Marx, Egon; Larrabee, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray masks present a measurement object that is different from most other objects used in semiconductor processing because the support membrane is, by design, x-ray transparent. This characteristic can be used as an advantage in electron beam-based x-ray mask metrology since, depending upon the incident electron beam energies, substrate composition and substrate thickness, the membrane can also be essentially electron transparent. The areas of the mask where the absorber structures are located are essentially x-ray opaque, as well as electron opaque. This paper shows that excellent contrast and signal-to-noise levels can be obtained using the transmitted-electron signal for mask metrology rather than the more commonly collected secondary electron signal. Monte Carlo modeling of the transmitted electron signal was used to support this work in order to determine the optimum detector position and characteristics, as well as in determining the location of the edge in the image profile. The comparison between the data from the theoretically-modeled electron beam interaction and actual experimental data were shown to agree extremely well, particularly with regard to the wall slope characteristics of the structure. Therefore, the theory can be used to identify the location of the edge of the absorber line for linewidth measurement. This work provides one approach to improved x-ray mask linewidth metrology and a more precise edge location algorithm for measurement of feature sizes on x-ray masks in commercial instrumentation. This work also represents an initial step toward the first SEM-based accurate linewidth measurement standard from NIST, as well as providing a viable metrology for linewidth measurement instruments of x-ray masks for the lithography community. PMID:28053482

  9. How Does Target Duration Affect Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield; Guest, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is typically studied using a brief search display. The target item may be indicated by a cue/mask surrounding but not overlapping it. Report of the target is reduced when mask offset trails target offset rather than being simultaneous with it. We report 5 experiments investigating whether OSM can be obtained if…

  10. How color, regularity, and good Gestalt determine backward masking.

    PubMed

    Sayim, Bilge; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael

    2014-06-18

    The strength of visual backward masking depends on the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between target and mask. Recently, it was shown that the conjoint spatial layout of target and mask is as crucial as SOA. Particularly, masking strength depends on whether target and mask group with each other. The same is true in crowding where the global spatial layout of the flankers and target-flanker grouping determine crowding strength. Here, we presented a vernier target followed by different flanker configurations at varying SOAs. Similar to crowding, masking of a red vernier target was strongly reduced for arrays of 10 green compared with 10 red flanking lines. Unlike crowding, single green lines flanking the red vernier showed strong masking. Irregularly arranged flanking lines yielded stronger masking than did regularly arranged lines, again similar to crowding. While cuboid flankers reduced crowding compared with single lines, this was not the case in masking. We propose that, first, masking is reduced when the flankers are part of a larger spatial structure. Second, spatial factors counteract color differences between the target and the flankers. Third, complex Gestalts, such as cuboids, seem to need longer processing times to show ungrouping effects as observed in crowding. Strong parallels between masking and crowding suggest similar underlying mechanism; however, temporal factors in masking additionally modulate performance, acting as an additional grouping cue.

  11. Homophone Dominance Modulates the Phonemic-Masking Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berent, Iris; Van Orden, Guy C.

    2000-01-01

    Finds (1) positive phonemic-masking effects occurred for dominant homophones; (2) null phonemic-masking effects occurred for subordinate homophones; and (3) subordinate homophones were much more likely to be falsely identified as their dominant mate. Suggests the source of these null phonemic-masking is itself a phonology effect. Concludes…

  12. Scatterometry on pelliclized masks: an option for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Benson, Craig; Higuchi, Masaru; Okumoto, Yasuhiro; Kwon, Michael; Yedur, Sanjay; Li, Shifang; Lee, Sangbong; Tabet, Milad

    2007-03-01

    Optical scatterometry-based metrology is now widely used in wafer fabs for lithography, etch, and CMP applications. This acceptance of a new metrology method occurred despite the abundance of wellestablished CD-SEM and AFM methods. It was driven by the desire to make measurements faster and with a lower cost of ownership. Over the last year, scatterometry has also been introduced in advanced mask shops for mask measurements. Binary and phase shift masks have been successfully measured at all desired points during photomask production before the pellicle is mounted. There is a significant benefit to measuring masks with the pellicle in place. From the wafer fab's perspective, through-pellicle metrology would verify mask effects on the same features that are characterized on wafer. On-site mask verification would enable quality control and trouble-shooting without returning the mask to a mask house. Another potential application is monitoring changes to mask films once the mask has been delivered to the fab (haze, oxide growth, etc.). Similar opportunities apply to the mask metrologist receiving line returns from a wafer fab. The ability to make line-return measurements without risking defect introduction is clearly attractive. This paper will evaluate the feasibility of collecting scatterometry data on pelliclized masks. We explore the effects of several different pellicle types on scatterometry measurements made with broadband light in the range of 320-780 nm. The complexity introduced by the pellicles' optical behavior will be studied.

  13. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  18. An unattended mask makes an attended target disappear.

    PubMed

    Veenemans, Arielle A; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In pattern masking, the target and mask are presented at the same location and follow one another very closely in time. When the observer attends to the target, he or she must also attend to the mask, as the switching time for attention is quite slow. In a series of experiments, we present mask-target-mask sequences staggered in time and location (Cavanagh, Holcombe, & Chou, 2008) that allow participants to attentively track the target location without attending to the masks. The results show that the strength of masking is on average unaffected by the removal of attention from the masks. Moreover, after isolating the target location perceptually with moving attention, it is clear that the target, when at threshold, has not been degraded or integrated with a persisting mask but it has vanished. We also show that the strength of masking is unaffected by the lateral spacing between adjacent target and mask sequences until the spacing is so large that the apparent motion driving the attentive tracking breaks down. Finally, we compare the effect of the pre- and postmask and find that the premask is responsible for the larger part of the masking.

  19. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  20. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  1. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  2. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  3. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  4. Temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during LIGA exposure.

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Aili

    2004-11-01

    Deep X-ray lithography on PMMA resist is used in the LIGA process. The resist is exposed to synchrotron X-rays through a patterned mask and then is developed in a liquid developer to make high aspect ratio microstructures. The limitations in dimensional accuracies of the LIGA generated microstructure originate from many sources, including synchrotron and X-ray physics, thermal and mechanical properties of mask and resist, and from the kinetics of the developer. This work addresses the thermal analysis and temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during exposure in air at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron. The concern is that dimensional errors generated at the mask and the resist due to thermal expansion will lower the accuracy of the lithography. We have developed a three-dimensional finite-element model of the mask and resist assembly that includes a mask with absorber, a resist with substrate, three metal holders, and a water-cooling block. We employed the LIGA exposure-development software LEX-D to calculate volumetric heat sources generated in the assembly by X-ray absorption and the commercial software ABAQUS to calculate heat transfer including thermal conduction inside the assembly, natural and forced convection, and thermal radiation. at assembly outer and/or inner surfaces. The calculations of assembly maximum temperature. have been compared with temperature measurements conducted at ALS. In some of these experiments, additional cooling of the assembly was produced by forced nitrogen flow ('nitrogen jets') directed at the mask surface. The temperature rise in the silicon mask and the mask holder comes directly from the X-ray absorption, but nitrogen jets carry away a significant portion of heat energy from the mask surface, while natural convection carries away negligibly small amounts energy from the holder. The temperature rise in PMMA resist is mainly from heat conducted from the silicon substrate backward to the resist and from the inner

  5. Effects Of Unsharp Masking On Color Reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, R. K.

    1990-06-01

    Unsharp Masking, abbreviated as USM, is one of the few terms that is transferred from photographic color separation technique to modern electronic separation in a scanner. In photographic separation, the color correction mask is made unsharp to enhance details in the reproduction. In a color separation scanner, the principles remained the same, however, a different technique is used to create an optical illusion to enhance sharpness or details in the reproduction. During scanning, when there is a change of density in the copy, two fine lines are generated at the borders of the transition, a lighter line and a darker line at the borders of light and dark edges respectively of the density change. This is possible by scanning the copy with the main aperture as well as a separate larger aperture called unsharp masking aperture. When the separation is in progress, the signal from the unsharp masking aperture is compared with the signal from the main scanning aperture at a differential stage in the computer. If there is a density change in the copy, the larger unsharp masking aperture senses the change sooner than the smaller main aperture, and at this point, an additional signal is generated and added to the main signal. This makes it possible to create the black and white lines at the borders of a density change. In addition to this function, the same black and white lines can also be produced at the borders of transition of a color by transmitting the unsharp masking beam through any one of red, green, or blue filters. A combination of these apertures and filters can be selected by adjusting a pair of wheels located on the scanning head as in Hell scanners, or by changing specific inserts as in Dainippon Screen scanners. When used moderately, the black and white lines at the borders of a density or color change will create the effects of sharper details in the reproduction. In addition to the above mechanical controls, electronic controls are also provided in most

  6. The serial nature of the masked onset priming effect revisited.

    PubMed

    Mousikou, Petroula; Coltheart, Max

    2014-01-01

    Reading aloud is faster when target words/nonwords are preceded by masked prime words/nonwords that share their first sound with the target (e.g., save-SINK) compared to when primes and targets are unrelated to each other (e.g., farm-SINK). This empirical phenomenon is the masked onset priming effect (MOPE) and is known to be due to serial left-to-right processing of the prime by a sublexical reading mechanism. However, the literature in this domain lacks a critical experiment. It is possible that when primes are real words their orthographic/phonological representations are activated in parallel and holistically during prime presentation, so any phoneme overlap between primes and targets (and not just initial-phoneme overlap) could facilitate target reading aloud. This is the prediction made by the only computational models of reading aloud that are able to simulate the MOPE, namely the DRC1.2.1, CDP+, and CDP++ models. We tested this prediction in the present study and found that initial-phoneme overlap (blip-BEST), but not end-phoneme overlap (flat-BEST), facilitated target reading aloud compared to no phoneme overlap (junk-BEST). These results provide support for a reading mechanism that operates serially and from left to right, yet are inconsistent with all existing computational models of single-word reading aloud.

  7. Host-guest kinetic interactions between HP-β-cyclodextrin and drugs for prediction of bitter taste masking.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Wu, Fei; Singh, Vikramjeet; Guo, Tao; Ren, Xiaohong; Yin, Xianzhen; Shao, Qun; York, Peter; Patterson, Laurence H; Zhang, Jiwen

    2017-03-20

    Cyclodextrins (CD) are widely used bitter taste masking agents, for which the binding equilibrium constant (K) for the drug-CD complex is a conventional parameter for quantitating the taste masking effects. However, some exceptions have been reported to the expected relationship between K and bitterness reduction and the relationship between kinetic parameters of a drug-CD interaction, including association rate constant (Ka) and disassociation rate constant (Kd), and taste masking remains unexplored. In this study, based upon a database of kinetic parameters of drugs-HP-β-CD generated by Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging for 485 drugs, the host-guest kinetic interactions between drugs and HP-β-CD for prediction of taste masking effects have been investigated. The taste masking effects of HP-β-CD for 13 bitter drugs were quantitatively determined using an electronic gustatory system (α-Astree e-Tongue). Statistical software was used to establish a model based on Euclidean distance measurements, Ka and Kd of the bitter drugs/HP-β-CD-complexes (R(2)=0.96 and P<0.05). Optimized parameters, Ka(3), Kd, KaKd, Kd(3), Ka(2) and Ka/Kd with notable influence, were obtained by stepwise regression from 12 parameters derived from Ka, Kd and K (Ka/Kd). 10-fold cross-validation was used to verify the reliability of the model (correlation coefficient of 0.84, P<0.05). The established model indicated a relationship between Ka, Kd, K and taste masking by HP-β-CD and was successful in predicting the extent of taste masking by HP-β-CD of 44 bitter drugs, which was in accordance with the literature reported. In conclusion, the relationship between kinetics of drug-CD interactions and taste masking was established and providing a new strategy for predicting the cyclodextrin mediated bitter taste masking.

  8. Oronasal Masks Require a Higher Pressure than Nasal and Nasal Pillow Masks for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sheetal; Joosten, Simon; Turton, Anthony; Edwards, Bradley A.; Landry, Shane; Mansfield, Darren R.; Hamilton, Garun S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Oronasal masks are frequently used for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to (1) determine if CPAP requirements are higher for oronasal masks compared to nasal mask interfaces and (2) assess whether polysomnography and patient characteristics differed among mask preference groups. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all CPAP implementation polysomnograms between July 2013 and June 2014. Prescribed CPAP level, polysomnography results and patient data were compared according to mask type (n = 358). Results: Oronasal masks were used in 46%, nasal masks in 35% and nasal pillow masks in 19%. There was no difference according to mask type for baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), body mass index (BMI), waist or neck circumference. CPAP level was higher for oronasal masks, 12 (10–15.5) cm H2O compared to nasal pillow masks, 11 (8–12.5) cm H2O and nasal masks, 10 (8–12) cm H2O, p < 0.0001 (Median [interquartile range]). Oronasal mask type, AHI, age, and BMI were independent predictors of a higher CPAP pressure (p < 0.0005, adjusted R2 = 0.26.). For patients with CPAP ≥ 15 cm H2O, there was an odds ratio of 4.5 (95% CI 2.5–8.0) for having an oronasal compared to a nasal or nasal pillow mask. Residual median AHI was higher for oronasal masks (11.3 events/h) than for nasal masks (6.4 events/h) and nasal pillows (6.7 events/h), p < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to nasal mask types, oronasal masks are associated with higher CPAP pressures (particularly pressures ≥ 15 cm H2O) and a higher residual AHI. Further evaluation with a randomized control trial is required to definitively establish the effect of mask type on pressure requirements. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1209. Citation: Deshpande S, Joosten S, Turton A, Edwards BA, Landry S, Mansfield DR, Hamilton GS. Oronasal masks require a higher pressure than nasal and

  9. In collaboration with mask suppliers for change management enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Erwin; Lee, Chun Der; Lee, Rachel

    2013-06-01

    For those wafer fabs that have no their own maskshops, the main target of mask quality department is to gain stable mask quality performance through effective supplier management, and therefore achieves competitive business results. After dealing with lots of mask data preparation (MDP) quality problems with suppliers, we have found that incomplete change management procedures are one of major sources that induce incorrect mask data for writing. This article will share our experience in how to enhance change management flows with mask suppliers together and will also show the utility after a series of flow improvement actions.

  10. Applicability of e-beam mask inspection to EUV mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoval, Lior; Mangan, Shmoolik; Schwarzband, Ishai; Khristo, Sergey; Balasubramanian, Vivek; Goldstein, Shay; Brikman, Ran; Shoshani, Nir

    2012-03-01

    Ever since the 180nm technology node the semiconductor industry has been battling the sub-wavelength regime in optical lithography. During the same time development for a 13.5nm Extreme Ultraviolet [EUV] solution has been in development, which would take us back from a λ/10 to a >λ regime again - at least for one node. Add to this the potential to increase the wafer size as well, and we are at a major crossroads. The introduction of EUV has been marred by many delays, but we are finally seeing the hardware development efforts converge and multiple customers around the world embarking on this adventure. As it becomes clear that this preproduction phase will occur at or below 20nmHP, it also becomes clear that this will happen at the limiting edge of existing 19x-based patterned mask inspection technology, reaching the practical resolution limits at around 20nm HP mask densities. Resolution is coupled with sensitivity and throughput such that the extended sensitivity may come at an unreasonable throughput. Loss of resolution also badly impacts defect dispositioning, or classification, which becomes impractical. As resolution is especially critical for die to database inspection, single die masks and masks with high flare bias are at risk of not being inspectable with 19xnm based inspectors. E-Beam based mask inspection has been proposed and demonstrated as a viable technology for patterned EUV mask inspection. In this paper, we study the key questions of sensitivity and throughput, in both die-to-die and die-to-database applications. We present new results, based on a new generation of E-Beam inspection technology, which has a higher data rate at smaller spot sizes. We will demonstrate the feasibility of acceptable inspection time with EBMI. We also will discuss die-to-data-base inspection and the advantage of using E-Beam imaging for meeting future requirements of single- die EUV masks.

  11. Building 3D aerial image in photoresist with reconstructed mask image acquired with optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; Tang, Y. P.; Chu, F. S.; Huang, W. C.; Liu, R. G.; Gau, T. S.

    2012-03-01

    Calibration of mask images on wafer becomes more important as features shrink. Two major types of metrology have been commonly adopted. One is to measure the mask image with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to obtain the contours on mask and then simulate the wafer image with optical simulator. The other is to use an optical imaging tool Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMSTM) to emulate the image on wafer. However, the SEM method is indirect. It just gathers planar contours on a mask with no consideration of optical characteristics such as 3D topography structures. Hence, the image on wafer is not predicted precisely. Though the AIMSTM method can be used to directly measure the intensity at the near field of a mask but the image measured this way is not quite the same as that on the wafer due to reflections and refractions in the films on wafer. Here, a new approach is proposed to emulate the image on wafer more precisely. The behavior of plane waves with different oblique angles is well known inside and between planar film stacks. In an optical microscope imaging system, plane waves can be extracted from the pupil plane with a coherent point source of illumination. Once plane waves with a specific coherent illumination are analyzed, the partially coherent component of waves could be reconstructed with a proper transfer function, which includes lens aberration, polarization, reflection and refraction in films. It is a new method that we can transfer near light field of a mask into an image on wafer without the disadvantages of indirect SEM measurement such as neglecting effects of mask topography, reflections and refractions in the wafer film stacks. Furthermore, with this precise latent image, a separated resist model also becomes more achievable.

  12. Temperature rise of the silicon mask-PMMA resist assembly during LIGA exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Aili

    2005-01-01

    Deep X-ray lithography on PMMA resist is used in the LIGA process. The resist is exposed to synchrotron X-rays through a patterned mask and then is developed in a liquid developer to make high aspect ratio microstructures. This work addresses the thermal analysis and temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during exposure at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron. The concern is that the thermal expansion will lower the accuracy of the lithography. We have developed a three-dimensional finite-element model of the mask and resist assembly. We employed the LIGA exposure-development software LEX-D and the commercial software ABAQUS to calculate heat transfer of the assembly during exposure. The calculations of assembly maximum temperature have been compared with temperature measurements conducted at ALS. The temperature rise in the silicon mask and the mask holder comes directly from the X-ray absorption, but forced convection of nitrogen jets carry away a significant portion of heat energy from the mask surface, while natural convection plays a negligible role. The temperature rise in PMMA resist is mainly from heat conducted from the silicon substrate backward to the resist and from the mask plate through inner cavity air forward to the resist, while the X-ray absorption is only secondary. Therefore, reduction of heat flow conducted from both substrate and cavity air to the resist is essential. An improved water-cooling block is expected to carry away most heat energy along the main heat conductive path, leaving the resist at a favorable working temperature.

  13. Multi-part mask for implanting workpieces

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.

    2016-05-10

    A multi-part mask has a pattern plate, which includes a planar portion that has the desired aperture pattern to be used during workpiece processing. The multi-part mask also has a mounting frame, which is used to hold the pattern plate. Prior to assembly, the pattern plate has an aligning portion, which has one or more holes through which reusable alignment pins are inserted. These alignment pins enter kinematic joints disposed on the mounting frame, which serve to precisely align the pattern plate to the mounting frame. After the pattern plate has been secured to the mounting frame, the aligning portion can be detached from the pattern plate. The alignment pins can be reused at a later time. In some embodiments, the pattern plate can later be removed from the mounting frame, so that the mounting frame may be reused.

  14. IBIS mask pre-calibration matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reglero, V.; Sánchez, F.; Rodrigo, J.; Velasco, T.; Gasent, J. L.; Chato, R.; Alamo, J.; Burgos, J. A.; Suso, J.; Blay, P.; Martínez, S.; Doñate, M.; Reina, M.; Sabau, D.; Ruiz-Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.; Vázquez, J.

    2001-09-01

    Coded Aperture System performances are defined by the geometry of the code, detector pixel geometry relationship and focal length. Physical Coded Aperture Systems deviate from the ideal ones on two basic aspects: uncertainties on pixel location and size coming form the manufacturing process and deviations from their theoretical transparency/opacity values (1/0, 0/1), when support structures are required. Mask support structure imposes penalties on transparency as a function of the energy and angle of the incident photons. Pixel position and size values include uncertainties coming from the code cut in tungsten plates and assembly process. The scope of this paper is to summarize the results of the code elements position and size, as well as transparency/opacity values found for the IBIS Coded Aperture System. Both sets of data define the optical performances of the IBIS Mask required to perform accurate imaging of celestial gamma-ray sources.

  15. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; ...

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  16. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  17. Latent inhibition in human adults without masking.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Arcediano, Francisco; Miller, Ralph R

    2003-09-01

    Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to Cue X observed when the X-outcome pairings are preceded by X-alone presentations. It has proven difficult to obtain in human adults unless the preexposure (X-alone) presentations are embedded within a masking (i.e., distracting) task. The authors hypothesized that the difficulty in obtaining latent inhibition with unmasked tasks is related to the usual training procedures, in which the preexposure and conditioning experiences are separated by a set of instructions. Experiment 1 reports latent inhibition without masking in a task in which preexposure and conditioning occur without interruption. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that this attenuation in responding to target Cue X does not pass a summation test for conditioned inhibition and is context specific, thereby confirming that it is latent inhibition. Experiments 3 and 4 confirm that introducing instructions between preexposure and conditioning disrupts latent inhibition.

  18. The EOS CERES Global Cloud Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, T. A.; Welch, R. M.; Trepte, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Baum, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    To detect long-term climate trends, it is essential to produce long-term and consistent data sets from a variety of different satellite platforms. With current global cloud climatology data sets, such as the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment (ISCCP) or CLAVR (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), one of the first processing steps is to determine whether an imager pixel is obstructed between the satellite and the surface, i.e., determine a cloud 'mask.' A cloud mask is essential to studies monitoring changes over ocean, land, or snow-covered surfaces. As part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program, a series of platforms will be flown beginning in 1997 with the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and subsequently the EOS-AM and EOS-PM platforms in following years. The cloud imager on TRMM is the Visible/Infrared Sensor (VIRS), while the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is the imager on the EOS platforms. To be useful for long term studies, a cloud masking algorithm should produce consistent results between existing (AVHRR) data, and future VIRS and MODIS data. The present work outlines both existing and proposed approaches to detecting cloud using multispectral narrowband radiance data. Clouds generally are characterized by higher albedos and lower temperatures than the underlying surface. However, there are numerous conditions when this characterization is inappropriate, most notably over snow and ice of the cloud types, cirrus, stratocumulus and cumulus are the most difficult to detect. Other problems arise when analyzing data from sun-glint areas over oceans or lakes over deserts or over regions containing numerous fires and smoke. The cloud mask effort builds upon operational experience of several groups that will now be discussed.

  19. Mask Analysis Program (MAP) reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A document intended to serve as a User's Manual and a Programmer's Manual for the Mask Analysis Program is presented. The first portion of the document is devoted to the user. It contains all of the information required to execute MAP. The remainder of the document describes the details of MAP software logic. Although the information in this portion is not required to run the program, it is recommended that every user review it to gain an appreciation for the program functions.

  20. Mask image position correction for double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masato; Itoh, Masamitsu; Ikenaga, Osamu; Ishigo, Kazutaka

    2008-05-01

    Application of double patterning technique has been discussed for lithography of HP 3X nm device generation. In this case, overlay budget for lithography becomes so hard that it is difficult to achieve it with only improvement of photomask's position accuracy. One of the factors of overlay error will be induced by distortion of photomask after chucking on the mask stage of exposure tool, because photomasks are bended by the force of vacuum chucking. Recently, mask flatness prediction technique was developed. This technique is simulating the surface shape of mask when it is on the mask stage by using the flatness data of free-standing state blank and the information of mask chucking stage. To use this predicted flatness data, it is possible to predict a pattern position error after exposed and it is possible to correct it on the photomask. A blank supplier developed the flatness data transfer system to mask vender. Every blanks are distinguished individually by 2D barcode mark on blank which including serial number. The flatness data of each blank is linked with this serial number, and mask vender can use this serial number as a key code to mask flatness data. We developed mask image position correction system by using 2D barcode mark linked to predicted flatness data, and position accuracy assurance system for these masks. And with these systems, we made some masks actually.

  1. Mask-to-wafer alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Haney, Steven J.

    2003-11-04

    A modified beam splitter that has a hole pattern that is symmetric in one axis and anti-symmetric in the other can be employed in a mask-to-wafer alignment device. The device is particularly suited for rough alignment using visible light. The modified beam splitter transmits and reflects light from a source of electromagnetic radiation and it includes a substrate that has a first surface facing the source of electromagnetic radiation and second surface that is reflective of said electromagnetic radiation. The substrate defines a hole pattern about a central line of the substrate. In operation, an input beam from a camera is directed toward the modified beam splitter and the light from the camera that passes through the holes illuminates the reticle on the wafer. The light beam from the camera also projects an image of a corresponding reticle pattern that is formed on the mask surface of the that is positioned downstream from the camera. Alignment can be accomplished by detecting the radiation that is reflected from the second surface of the modified beam splitter since the reflected radiation contains both the image of the pattern from the mask and a corresponding pattern on the wafer.

  2. High Reading Skills Mask Dyslexia in Gifted Children.

    PubMed

    van Viersen, Sietske; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Slot, Esther M; de Bree, Elise H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how gifted children with dyslexia might be able to mask literacy problems and the role of possible compensatory mechanisms. The sample consisted of 121 Dutch primary school children that were divided over four groups (typically developing [TD] children, children with dyslexia, gifted children, gifted children with dyslexia). The test battery included measures of literacy (reading/spelling) and cognitive abilities related to literacy and language (phonological awareness [PA], rapid automatized naming [RAN], verbal short-term memory [VSTM], working memory [WM], grammar, and vocabulary). It was hypothesized that gifted children with dyslexia would outperform children with dyslexia on literacy tests. In addition, a core-deficit model including dyslexia-related weaknesses and a compensational model involving giftedness-related strengths were tested using Bayesian statistics to explain their reading/spelling performance. Gifted children with dyslexia performed on all literacy tests in between children with dyslexia and TD children. Their cognitive profile showed signs of weaknesses in PA and RAN and strengths in VSTM, WM, and language skills. Findings indicate that phonology is a risk factor for gifted children with dyslexia, but this is moderated by other skills such as WM, grammar, and vocabulary, providing opportunities for compensation of a cognitive deficit and masking of literacy difficulties.

  3. The narcissistic mask: an exploration of 'the defensive grandiosity hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justin; Hashmi, Amani Al; Chung, Man Cheung; Morgan, Keith; Lyons, Minna

    2013-05-01

    Narcissism has been conceptualized as involving attempts to defend against negative self-schemata (implicit negative beliefs about one's own self-worth). This idea has been termed the 'mask model of narcissism'. This study explores the mask model, examining the association between extreme narcissistic personality traits and performance on a task purported to assess the influence of negative self-schemata. Participants (n = 232) from the UK and the UAE completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and also performed an incidental learning task involving the surprise recall of self-referential adjectives (traits). A greater recall of negative adjectives was viewed as indicative of negative self-schemata. Looking at the sample as a whole, there were no associations between narcissistic traits and negative adjective recall. However, amongst those scoring in the upper quartile of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, narcissism scores were positively correlated with the recall of negative adjectives even after controlling for age and memory. Narcissism may reflect self-enhancement strategies rooted in negative self-beliefs.

  4. Mask design rules (45 nm): time for standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Mark; Progler, Christopher J.; Martin, Patrick; Ham, Young-Mog; Dillon, Brian; Pack, Robert; Heins, Mitch; Gookassian, John; Garcia, John; Boksha, Victor

    2005-11-01

    Time-to-mask (ttm) has been growing exponentially in the subwavelength era with the increased application of advanced RET's (Resolution Enhancement Technology). Not only are a greater number of design/mask layers impacted but more-and-more layers also have more severe restrictions on critical dimension uniformity (CDU) despite operating at a very low k1 factors necessitating rigorous but practical tolerancing. Furthermore, designs are also more complex, may be built up from blocks spanning different design styles, and occupy increasingly-large Rayleigh field areas. Given these factors and scales, it's no wonder that the cycle time for verification of a design following RET, is growing however it is doing so exponentially and that this is a critical factor impeding ttm. Until an unambiguously interprable and standard Mask Design Rule (MaskDR) set is created, neither the designer nor the mask supplier can reliably verify manufacturability of the mask for the simple reason that ambiguity and inter-rule conflict are at the source of the problem and that the problem increasingly requires cooperation spanning a large ecosystem of tool, IP, and mask suppliers all needing to essentially speak the same language. Since the 130 nm node, Texas Instruments has enforced a strict set of mask rule checks (MRCs) in their mask data preparation (MDP) flow based on MaskDRs negotiated with their mask suppliers. The purpose of this effort has been to provide an a-priori guarantee that the data shipped to the mask shop can be used to manufacture a mask reliably and with high yield both from a mask standpoint and from the silicon standpoint. As has been reported earlier, mask manufacturing rules are usually determined from assumed or experimentally acquired/validated mask-manufacturing limits. These rules are then applied during RET/MDP data treatment to guide and/or limit pattern correction strategies. With increasing RET and low-k1 lithography challenges, the importance of MRCs

  5. Direct 3D printed shadow mask on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahiminejad, S.; Köhler, E.; Enoksson, P.

    2016-10-01

    A 3D printed shadow mask method is presented. The 3D printer prints ABS plastic directly on the wafer, thus avoiding gaps between the wafer and the shadow mask, and deformation during the process. The wafer together with the 3D printed shadow mask was sputtered with Ti and Au. The shadow mask was released by immersion in acetone. The sputtered patches through the shadow mask were compared to the opening of the 3D printed shadow mask and the design dimensions. The patterned Au patches were larger than the printed apertures, however they were smaller than the design widths. The mask was printed in 4 min, the cost is less than one euro cent, and the process is a low temperature process suitable for temperature sensitive components.

  6. The masking of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) vocalizations by icebreaker noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbe, Christine

    1998-11-01

    This thesis examines the masking effect of underwater noise on beluga whale communication. As ocean water is greatly opaque for light but well conducting for sound, marine mammals rely primarily on their hearing for orientation and communication. Man-made underwater noise has the potential of interfering with sounds used by marine mammals. Masking to the point of incomprehensibility can have fatal results-for the individual, but ultimately for the entire species. As part of our understanding of whether marine mammals can cope with human impact on nature, this thesis is the first to study the interference of real ocean noises with complex animal vocalizations. At the Vancouver Aquarium, a beluga whale was trained for acoustic experiments, during which masked hearing thresholds were measured. Focus lay on noise created by icebreaking ships in the Arctic. As experiments with trained animals are time and cost expensive, various techniques were examined for their ability to model the whale's response. These were human hearing tests, visual spectrogram discrimination, matched filtering, spectrogram cross-correlation, critical band cross-correlation, adaptive filtering and various types of artificial neural networks. The most efficient method with respect to similarity to the whale's data and speed, was a backpropagation neural net. Masked hearing thresholds would be of little use if they could not be related to accessible quantities in the wild. An ocean sound propagation model was applied to determine critical distances between a noise source, a calling whale and a listening whale. Colour diagrams, called maskograms, were invented to illustrate zones of masking in the wild. Results are that bubbler system noise with a source level of 194 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m has a maximum radius of masking of 15 km in a 3- dimensional ocean. Propeller noise with a source level of 203 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m has a maximum radius of masking of 22 km. A naturally occurring icecracking event

  7. Challenges and requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Sinjeung; Lee, SookHyun; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Shin, In Kyun; Jeon, Chan Uk

    2015-07-01

    To overcome the resolution and throughput of current mask writer for advanced lithography technologies, the platform of e-beam writer have been evolved by the developments of hardware and software in writer. Especially, aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) for unprecedented extension of optical lithography and the needs of low sensitivity resist for high resolution result in the limit of variable shaped beam writer which is widely used for mass production. The multi-beam mask writer is attractive candidate for photomask writing of sub-10nm device because of its high speed and the large degree of freedom which enable high dose and dose modulation for each pixel. However, the higher dose and almost unlimited appetite for dose modulation challenge the mask data processing (MDP) in aspects of extreme data volume and correction method. Here, we discuss the requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer and presents new challenges of the data format, data flow, and correction method for user and supplier MDP tool.

  8. HMM-Based Mask Estimation for a Speech Recognition Front-End Using Computational Auditory Scene Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hun; Yoon, Jae Sam; Kim, Hong Kook

    In this paper, we propose a new mask estimation method for the computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) of speech using two microphones. The proposed method is based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) in order to incorporate an observation that the mask information should be correlated over contiguous analysis frames. In other words, HMM is used to estimate the mask information represented as the interaural time difference (ITD) and the interaural level difference (ILD) of two channel signals, and the estimated mask information is finally employed in the separation of desired speech from noisy speech. To show the effectiveness of the proposed mask estimation, we then compare the performance of the proposed method with that of a Gaussian kernel-based estimation method in terms of the performance of speech recognition. As a result, the proposed HMM-based mask estimation method provided an average word error rate reduction of 61.4% when compared with the Gaussian kernel-based mask estimation method.

  9. Characterizing the dependence of thick-mask edge effects on illumination angle using AIMS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Aamod; Sczyrba, Martin; Lange, Falk; Connolly, Brid; Neureuther, Andy; Waller, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Mask topography contributes diffraction-induced phase near edges, affecting the through-focus intensity variation and hence the process window at the wafer. We analyze the impact of edge diffraction on projection printing directly with experiments on an aerial image measurement system (AIMS). We show here that topographic effects change with illumination angle and can be quantified using through-focus intensity measurements. Off- axis incidence influences not just defocus image behavior (as for normal incidence), but also the at-focus intensity at wafer. Moreover, with oblique illumination, mask diffraction varies for left-facing and right-facing sidewalls, the nature of the asymmetry being polarization dependent. The image degradation due the polarization parallel to the sidewall (TE) is seen to be stronger, owing to the interplay of mask topography and pupil filtering in the imaging system. This translates to a CD variation of 2% between the two polarizations, even at focus. A simple thin-mask boundary layer model that treats each sidewall independently is shown to be able to approximate mask topography induced diffraction for both polarizations with 5-10nm wide boundary layers.

  10. A challenging dissociation in masked identity priming with the lexical decision task.

    PubMed

    Perea, Manuel; Jiménez, María; Gómez, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The masked priming technique has been used extensively to explore the early stages of visual-word recognition. One key phenomenon in masked priming lexical decision is that identity priming is robust for words, whereas it is small/unreliable for nonwords. This dissociation has usually been explained on the basis that masked priming effects are lexical in nature, and hence there should not be an identity prime facilitation for nonwords. We present two experiments whose results are at odds with the assumption made by models that postulate that identity priming is purely lexical, and also challenge the assumption that word and nonword responses are based on the same information. Our experiments revealed that for nonwords, but not for words, matched-case identity PRIME-TARGET pairs were responded to faster than mismatched-case identity prime-TARGET pairs, and this phenomenon was not modulated by the lowercase/uppercase feature similarity of the stimuli.

  11. Actinic imaging and evaluation of phase structures on EUV lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth; Huh, Sungmin

    2010-09-28

    The authors describe the implementation of a phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct phase and complex amplitude of structures on EUV lithography masks. Many native defects commonly found on EUV reticles are difficult to detect and review accurately because they have a strong phase component. Understanding the complex amplitude of mask features is essential for predictive modeling of defect printability and defect repair. Besides printing in a stepper, the most accurate way to characterize such defects is with actinic inspection, performed at the design, EUV wavelength. Phase defect and phase structures show a distinct through-focus behavior that enables qualitative evaluation of the object phase from two or more high-resolution intensity measurements. For the first time, phase of structures and defects on EUV masks were quantitatively reconstructed based on aerial image measurements, using a modified version of a phase-retrieval algorithm developed to test optical phase shifting reticles.

  12. Study of x-ray lithography mask distortion during electron-beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hongyan; Wang, Yongkun

    2008-10-01

    Three-dimensional finite element model was developed to simulate the X-ray lithography mask distortion during electron-beam writing (EBW). Equivalent heat flux density method was proposed and the transient thermal stress simulation was done. The results show that the in-plane distortion (IPD) of the mask fluctuates with the time. The maximum value is 8.24 nm, and the direction is deviated from the electron beam center. The maximum out-of-plane distortion (OPD) is 9.75μm. The direction is normal to the pattern window, and occurred in the center of the beam center.

  13. Binaural release from informational masking in a speech identification task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallun, Frederick J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2005-09-01

    Binaural release from informational masking (IM) was examined in a speech identification task. Target and masker sentences were processed into mutually exclusive frequency bands, thus limiting energetic masking (EM), and presented over headphones. In a baseline condition, both were presented monotically to the same ear (TmMm). Despite minimal frequency overlap between target and masker, the presence of the masker resulted in reduced performance, or IM. Presenting the target monotically and the masker diotically (TmM0) resulted in a release from IM. Release was also obtained by imposing interaural differences in level (ILDs) and in time (ITDs) on the maskers (TmMILD,TmMITD). Any masker with a perceived lateral position that differed from that of a truly monaural stimulus resulted in a similar amount of release from IM relative to TmMm. For binaural targets and maskers (T0MILD,T0MITD), release was seen whenever ITDs or ILDs differed between target and masker. These results suggest that binaural cues can be very effective in reducing IM. Because mechanisms based on differences in perceived location make predictions that are similar to those of nonlocation-based binaural mechanisms, a variant of the equalization-cancellation model is also considered.

  14. Strategy optimization for mask rule check in wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, Shaina; Lin, Roger; Wang, Alice; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Photolithography process is getting more and more sophisticated for wafer production following Moore's law. Therefore, for wafer fab, consolidated and close cooperation with mask house is a key to achieve silicon wafer success. However, generally speaking, it is not easy to preserve such partnership because many engineering efforts and frequent communication are indispensable. The inattentive connection is obvious in mask rule check (MRC). Mask houses will do their own MRC at job deck stage, but the checking is only for identification of mask process limitation including writing, etching, inspection, metrology, etc. No further checking in terms of wafer process concerned mask data errors will be implemented after data files of whole mask are composed in mask house. There are still many potential data errors even post-OPC verification has been done for main circuits. What mentioned here are the kinds of errors which will only occur as main circuits combined with frame and dummy patterns to form whole reticle. Therefore, strategy optimization is on-going in UMC to evaluate MRC especially for wafer fab concerned errors. The prerequisite is that no impact on mask delivery cycle time even adding this extra checking. A full-mask checking based on job deck in gds or oasis format is necessary in order to secure acceptable run time. Form of the summarized error report generated by this checking is also crucial because user friendly interface will shorten engineers' judgment time to release mask for writing. This paper will survey the key factors of MRC in wafer fab.

  15. Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

  16. Masking reduces orientation selectivity in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Alwis, Dasuni S; Richards, Katrina L; Price, Nicholas S C

    2016-11-01

    In visual masking the perception of a target stimulus is impaired by a preceding (forward) or succeeding (backward) mask stimulus. The illusion is of interest because it allows uncoupling of the physical stimulus, its neuronal representation, and its perception. To understand the neuronal correlates of masking, we examined how masks affected the neuronal responses to oriented target stimuli in the primary visual cortex (V1) of anesthetized rats (n = 37). Target stimuli were circular gratings with 12 orientations; mask stimuli were plaids created as a binarized sum of all possible target orientations. Spatially, masks were presented either overlapping or surrounding the target. Temporally, targets and masks were presented for 33 ms, but the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) of their relative appearance was varied. For the first time, we examine how spatially overlapping and center-surround masking affect orientation discriminability (rather than visibility) in V1. Regardless of the spatial or temporal arrangement of stimuli, the greatest reductions in firing rate and orientation selectivity occurred for the shortest SOAs. Interestingly, analyses conducted separately for transient and sustained target response components showed that changes in orientation selectivity do not always coincide with changes in firing rate. Given the near-instantaneous reductions observed in orientation selectivity even when target and mask do not spatially overlap, we suggest that monotonic visual masking is explained by a combination of neural integration and lateral inhibition.

  17. Practical use of the repeating patterns in mask writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Masahiro; Inoue, Tadao; Yamabe, Masaki

    2010-03-01

    In May 2006, the Mask Design, Drawing, and Inspection Technology Research Department (Mask D2I) at the Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) launched a 4-year program for reducing mask manufacturing cost and TAT by concurrent optimization of MDP, mask writing, and mask inspection. As one of the tasks being pursued at the Mask Design Data Technology Research Laboratory, we have evaluated the effect of reducing the drawing shot counts by utilizing the repeating patterns, and showed positive impact on mask making by using CP drawing. During the past four years, we have developed a software to extract repeating patterns from fractured OPCed mask data which can be used to minimize the shot counts. In this evaluation, we have used an actual device production data obtained from the member companies of MaskD2I. To the extraction software we added new functions for extracting common repeating patterns from a set of multiple masks, and studied how this step can reduce the counts in comparison to the shot counts required during the conventional mask writing techniques. We have also developed software that uses the extraction result of repeating patterns and prepares drawing-data for the MCC/CP drawing system, which has been developed at the Mask Writing Equipment Technology Research Laboratory. With this software, we have simulated EB proximity effect on CP writing and examined how it affect the shot count reduction where CP shots with large CD errors are to be divided into VSB shots. In this paper, we will report the evaluation result of the practical application of repeating patterns in mask writing with this software.

  18. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  19. Feedforward and Feedback Control in Apraxia of Speech: Effects of Noise Masking on Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Edwin; Mailend, Marja-Liisa; Guenther, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to test two hypotheses about apraxia of speech (AOS) derived from the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA) model (Guenther et al., 2006): the feedforward system deficit hypothesis and the feedback system deficit hypothesis. Method: The authors used noise masking to minimize auditory feedback during…

  20. Generic hierarchical engine for mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalus, Christian K.; Roessl, Wolfgang; Schnitker, Uwe; Simecek, Michal

    2002-07-01

    Electronic layouts are usually flattened on their path from the hierarchical source downstream to the wafer. Mask data preparation has certainly been identified as a severe bottleneck since long. Data volumes are not only doubling every year along the ITRS roadmap. With the advent of optical proximity correction and phase-shifting masks data volumes are escalating up to non-manageable heights. Hierarchical treatment is one of the most powerful means to keep memory and CPU consumption in reasonable ranges. Only recently, however, has this technique acquired more public attention. Mask data preparation is the most critical area calling for a sound infrastructure to reduce the handling problem. Gaining more and more attention though, are other applications such as large area simulation and manufacturing rule checking (MRC). They all would profit from a generic engine capable to efficiently treat hierarchical data. In this paper we will present a generic engine for hierarchical treatment which solves the major problem, steady transitions along cell borders. Several alternatives exist how to walk through the hierarchy tree. They have, to date, not been thoroughly investigated. One is a bottom-up attempt to treat cells starting with the most elementary cells. The other one is a top-down approach which lends itself to creating a new hierarchy tree. In addition, since the variety, degree of hierarchy and quality of layouts extends over a wide range a generic engine has to take intelligent decisions when exploding the hierarchy tree. Several applications will be shown, in particular how far the limits can be pushed with the current hierarchical engine.

  1. A novel approach to mask defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiv, Amir; Shirman, Yuri; Mangan, Shmoolik

    2008-10-01

    Memory chips, now constituting a major part of semiconductor market, posit a special challenge for inspection, as they are generally produced with the smallest half-pitch available with today's technology. This is true, in particular, to photomasks of advanced memory devices, which are at the forefront of the "low-k1" regime. In this paper we present a novel photomask inspection approach, that is particularly suitable for low-k1 layers of advanced memory chips, owing to their typical dense and periodic structure. The method we present can produce a very strong signal for small mask defects, by suppression of the modulation of the pattern's image. Unlike dark-field detection, however, here a single diffraction order associated with the pattern generates a constant "gray" background image, that is used for signal enhancement. We define the theoretical basis for the new detection technique, and show, both analytically and numerically, that it can easily achieve a detection line past the printability spec, and that in cases it is at least as sensitive as high-resolution based detection. We also demonstrate this claim experimentally on a customer mask, using the platform of Applied Material's newly released Aera2TM mask inspection tool. The high sensitivity demonstrates the important and often overlooked concept that resolution is not synonymous with sensitivity. The novel detection method is advantageous in several other aspects, such as the very simple implementation, the high throughput, and the relatively simple pre- and post-processing algorithms required for signal extraction. These features, and in particular the very high sensitivity, make this novel detection method an attractive inspection option for advanced memory devices.

  2. EBM-9000: EB mask writer for product mask fabrication of 16nm half-pitch generation and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takekoshi, Hidekazu; Nakayama, Takahito; Saito, Kenichi; Ando, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Hideo; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Nishimura, Rieko; Kojima, Yoshinori; Yashima, Jun; Anpo, Akihito; Nakazawa, Seiichi; Iijima, Tomohiro; Ohtoshi, Kenji; Anze, Hirohito; Katsap, Victor; Golladay, Steven; Kendall, Rodney

    2014-10-01

    In the half pitch (hp) 16nm generation, the shot count on a mask is expected to become bipolar. The multi-patterning technology in lithography seems to maintain the shot count around 300G shots instead of increase in the number of masks needed for one layer. However, as a result of mask multiplication, the better positional accuracy would be required especially in Mask-to-Mask overlay. On the other hand, in complex OPC, the shot count on a mask is expected to exceed 1T shots. In addition, regardless of the shot count forecast, the resist sensitivity needs to be lower to reduce the shot noise effect so as to get better LER. In other words, slow resist would appear on main stream, in near future. Hence, such trend would result in longer write time than that of the previous generations. At the same time, most mask makers request masks to be written within 24 hours. Thus, a faster mask writer with better writing accuracy than those of previous generations is needed. With this background, a new electron beam mask writing system, EBM- 9000, has been developed to satisfy such requirements of the hp 16nm generation. The development of EBM-9000 has focused on improving throughput for larger shot counts and improving the writing accuracy.

  3. Computer-assisted area detector masking.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher J; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2017-03-01

    Area detectors have become the predominant type of detector for the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction, small-angle scattering and total scattering. These detectors record the scattering for a large area, giving each shot good statistical significance to the resulting scattered intensity I(Q) pattern. However, many of these detectors have pixel level defects, which cause error in the resulting one-dimensional patterns. In this work, new software to automatically find and mask these dead pixels and other defects is presented. This algorithm is benchmarked with both ideal simulated and experimental datasets.

  4. Fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We establish a generalization of the fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics. We introduce a partial entropy production with a subset of all possible transitions, and show that the partial entropy production satisfies the integral fluctuation theorem. Our result reveals the fundamental properties of a broad class of autonomous as well as nonautonomous nanomachines. In particular, our result gives a unified fluctuation theorem for both autonomous and nonautonomous Maxwell's demons, where mutual information plays a crucial role. Furthermore, we derive a fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates nonequilibrium stationary current to two kinds of equilibrium fluctuations.

  5. Seismic Masking of an Underground Nuclear Explosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-31

    the microzone of the masked explosion, but excluded from further study 1. 21 February 1963 CARMEL 2. 12 February 1965 ALPACA Reason for...1965 15:10:29.49 ALPACA 0-20 737 2.44x105 l.52xl03 B. 25 June 1966 17:13:00.07 VULCAN 25 1057 58 23 526x77 9. 10 Aug. 1966 13:16:00.07 ROVENAb 0-20...19 Aug. 19’/) AL.A 4420 2016 2404 2550 1870 6. 9 Oct. 19b4 PAR 4368 1950 2418 2650 1950 7. 1? Feb. 1965 ALPACA 4402 1990 2412 1800 2602 8. 2b June

  6. On the relations between crowding and visual masking.

    PubMed

    Huckauf, Anke; Heller, Dieter

    2004-05-01

    To study the question of which processes contribute to crowding and whether these are comparable to those of visual temporal masking, we varied the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between target and flankers in a crowding setting. Monotonically increasing Type A masking functions observedfor small spacings and large eccentricities indicate that the integration of information from target and flankers underlies crowding. Decreasing masking functions obtained for large spacings and small eccentricities relate processes of crowding to those contributing to Type B masking. In addition, Type B masking was more frequent with letter-like nonletter flankers than with letter flankers, suggesting that Type B masking, just like crowding over large areas, is due to higher level interactions. The rapid decrease of the effects of interletter spacing and eccentricity with increasing SOA indicates that positional information is transient.

  7. Constellation-masked secure communication technique for OFDM-PON.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun; Yu, Jianjun

    2012-10-22

    This paper proposes a novel secure communication technique using constellation masking for applications in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing passive optical network (OFDM-PON). The constellation masking is applied both on each subcarrier and among different subcarriers. The Arnold mapping is utilized as the parameter function for the mask factors. A interleave length is employed to provide a scalable masking granularity for different ONUs. A 15.54 Gb/s constellation-masked 32QAM-OFDM signal has been successfully transmitted over 25-km single mode fiber in the experiment. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can effectively protect the system from illegal ONU without wasting the bandwidth. The constellation-masked technique suggests an effective solution for the physical secure communication in future OFDM access network.

  8. EUV mask surface cleaning effects on lithography process performance

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Baclea-an, Lorie Mae; Naulleau, Patrick; Chen, Robert J.; Liang, Ted

    2010-06-18

    The reflective, multilayer based, mask architectures for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are highly susceptible to surface oxidation and contamination. As a result, EUV masks are expected to undergo cleaning processes in order to maintain the lifetimes necessary for high volume manufacturing. For this study, the impact of repetitive cleaning of EUV masks on imaging performance was evaluated. Two, high quality industry standard, EUV masks are used for this study with one of the masks undergoing repeated cleaning and the other one kept as a reference. Lithographic performance, in terms of process window analysis and line edge roughness, was monitored after every two cleans and compared to the reference mask performance. After 8x clean, minimal degradation is observed. The cleaning cycles will be continued until significant loss imaging fidelity is found.

  9. Exoplanet coronagraph shaped pupil masks and laboratory scale star shade masks: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; White, Victor; Yee, Karl; Echternach, Pierre; Muller, Richard; Dickie, Matthew; Cady, Eric; Mejia Prada, Camilo; Ryan, Daniel; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Zhou, Hanying; Kern, Brian; Riggs, A. J.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Sirbu, Dan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    Star light suppression technologies to find and characterize faint exoplanets include internal coronagraph instruments as well as external star shade occulters. Currently, the NASA WFIRST-AFTA mission study includes an internal coronagraph instrument to find and characterize exoplanets. Various types of masks could be employed to suppress the host star light to about 10-9 level contrast over a broad spectrum to enable the coronagraph mission objectives. Such masks for high contrast internal coronagraphic imaging require various fabrication technologies to meet a wide range of specifications, including precise shapes, micron scale island features, ultra-low reflectivity regions, uniformity, wave front quality, achromaticity, etc. We present the approaches employed at JPL to produce pupil plane and image plane coronagraph masks by combining electron beam, deep reactive ion etching, and black silicon technologies with illustrative examples of each, highlighting milestone accomplishments from the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at JPL and from the High Contrast Imaging Lab (HCIL) at Princeton University. We also present briefly the technologies applied to fabricate laboratory scale star shade masks.

  10. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  11. Quantification of mammographic masking risk with volumetric breast density maps: how to select women for supplemental screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Katharina; van Gils, Carla H.; Wanders, Johanna OP; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity of mammograms is low for women with dense breasts, since cancers may be masked by dense tissue. In this study, we investigated methods to identify women with density patterns associated with a high masking risk. Risk measures are derived from volumetric breast density maps. We used the last negative screening mammograms of 93 women who subsequently presented with an interval cancer (IC), and, as controls, 930 randomly selected normal screening exams from women without cancer. Volumetric breast density maps were computed from the mammograms, which provide the dense tissue thickness at each location. These were used to compute absolute and percentage glandular tissue volume. We modeled the masking risk for each pixel location using the absolute and percentage dense tissue thickness and we investigated the effect of taking the cancer location probability distribution (CLPD) into account. For each method, we selected cases with the highest masking measure (by thresholding) and computed the fraction of ICs as a function of the fraction of controls selected. The latter can be interpreted as the negative supplemental screening rate (NSSR). Between the models, when incorporating CLPD, no significant differences were found. In general, the methods performed better when CLPD was included. At higher NSSRs some of the investigated masking measures had a significantly higher performance than volumetric breast density. These measures may therefore serve as an alternative to identify women with a high risk for a masked cancer.

  12. Method and apparatus for inspecting an EUV mask blank

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2005-11-08

    An apparatus and method for at-wavelength EUV mask-blank characterization for inspection of moderate and low spatial frequency coating uniformity using a synchrotron or other source of EUV light. The apparatus provides for rapid, non-destruction, non-contact, at-wavelength qualification of large mask areas, and can be self-calibrating or be calibrated to well-characterized reference samples. It can further check for spatial variation of mask reflectivity or for global differences among masks. The apparatus and method is particularly suited for inspection of coating uniformity and quality and can detect defects in the order of 50 .mu.m and above.

  13. Masking effect of music upon oral information processing.

    PubMed

    Tsaneva, L

    2003-09-01

    The masking effect of three types of music and white masking noise upon special audiometric tests was determined in laboratory c. The stimulus-noise (S/N) ratio was found to be the most considerable factor influencing oral information processing in spite of the type of music or noise used as a masking agent. All types of music (modern, classic or modern music records in backwards order) showed no significant differences in masking being in the same way stronger maskers as white noise. Some conclusions are made concerning hygienic and ergonomic aspects of the problem.

  14. Color masking of developmental enamel defects: a case series.

    PubMed

    Torres, C R G; Borges, A B

    2015-01-01

    Developmental defects involving color alteration of enamel frequently compromise the esthetic appearance of the tooth. The resin infiltration technique represents an alternative treatment for color masking of these lesions and uniformization of tooth color. This technique is considered relatively simple and microinvasive, since only a minimal portion of enamel is removed. This article illustrates the color-masking effect with resin infiltration of fluorosis and traumatic hypomineralization lesions with a case series. The final esthetic outcomes demonstrated the ability of the resin infiltrant to mask the color of white developmental defect lesions, resulting in satisfactory clinical esthetic improvements. However, in more severe cases, the color-masking effect was not complete.

  15. Mask manufacturing rules checking (MRC) as a DFM strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Peter; Gladhill, Richard; Straub, Joseph

    2007-03-01

    Mask Manufacturing Rules Checking (MRC) has been established as an automated process to detect mask pattern data that will cause mask inspection problems. This methodology is unique from the Design Rule Checking (DRC) or Design for Manufacturing (DFM) checks typically performed before sending pattern data to the mask manufacturer in that it examines the entire mask layout and the spatial relationship between multiple patterns in their final orientation, scale, and tone. In contrast, DRC and DFM checks are usually performed on individual pattern files. Also, DRC and DFM checks are not always performed after all pattern transformations are complete, and errors can be introduced that are not caught until the mask is eventually printed on wafers. Therefore, MRC can often be the only comprehensive geometric integrity test performed before the mask is manufactured and the last opportunity to catch critical errors that might have disastrous consequences to yield and consequently to product schedules. In this paper we review the concepts and implementation of MRC in a merchant mask manufacturing enterprise and introduce methods to empower DFM decisions by mask customers based on MRC results.

  16. Practical mask inspection system with printability and pattern priority verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Hideo; Ozaki, Fumio; Takahara, Kenichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kikuiri, Nobutaka

    2011-05-01

    Through the four years of study in Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) on reducing mask manufacturing Turn Around Time (TAT) and cost, we have been able to establish a technology to improve the efficiency of the review process by applying a printability verification function that utilizes computational lithography simulations to analyze defects detected by a high-resolution mask inspection system. With the advent of Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) and other technologies that extend the life of existing optical lithography, it is becoming extremely difficult to judge a defect only by the shape of a mask pattern, while avoiding pseudo-defects. Thus, printability verification is indispensable for filtering out nuisance defects from high-resolution mask inspection results. When using computational lithography simulations to verify printability with high precision, the image captured by the inspection system must be prepared with extensive care. However, for practical applications, this preparation process needs to be simplified. In addition, utilizing Mask Data Rank (MDR) to vary the defect detection sensitivity according to the patterns is also useful for simultaneously inspecting minute patterns and avoiding pseudo-defects. Combining these two technologies, we believe practical mask inspection for next generation lithography is achievable. We have been improving the estimation accuracy of the printability verification function through discussion with several customers and evaluation of their masks. In this report, we will describe the progress of these practical mask verification functions developed through customers' evaluations.

  17. Recent advances in CZT strip detectors and coded mask imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Hink, P. L.; Slavis, K. R.; Binns, W. R.; Tumer, T.; Visser, G.

    1999-09-01

    The UCSD, WU, UCR and Nova collaboration has made significant progress on the necessary techniques for coded mask imaging of gamma-ray bursts: position sensitive CZT detectors with good energy resolution, ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Results on coded mask imaging techniques appropriate for wide field imaging and localization of gamma-ray bursts are presented, including a shadowgram and deconvolved image taken with a prototype detector/ASIC and MURA mask. This research was supported by NASA Grants NAG5-5111, NAG5-5114, and NGT5-50170.

  18. Tachistoscopic illumination and masking of real scenes

    PubMed Central

    Chichka, David; Philbeck, John W.; Gajewski, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Tachistoscopic presentation of scenes has been valuable for studying the emerging properties of visual scene representations. The spatial aspects of this work have generally been focused on the conceptual locations (e.g., next to the refrigerator) and the directional locations of objects in 2D arrays and/or images. Less is known about how the perceived egocentric distance of objects develops. Here we describe a novel system for presenting brief glimpses of a real-world environment, followed by a mask. The system includes projectors with mechanical shutters for projecting the fixation and masking images, a set of LED floodlights for illuminating the environment, and computer-controlled electronics to set the timing and initiate the process. Because a real environment is used, most visual distance and depth cues may be manipulated using traditional methods. The system is inexpensive, robust, and its components are readily available in the marketplace. This paper describes the system and the timing characteristics of each component. Verification of the ability to control exposure to time scales as low as a few milliseconds is demonstrated. PMID:24519496

  19. Masking of a brief probe by sinusoidal frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B W; Viemeister, N F

    1997-02-01

    Contrary to level detection models, the thresholds for a brief-duration probe masked by a sinusoidal frequency modulation (FM) masker increases as the modulation index (beta) of FM increases [Zwicker, Acustica 31, 243-256 (1974)]. In this paper the reason for this phenomenon is investigated. In experiment 1, a 10-ms, 1-kHz probe was detected in the presence of an FM masker centered at 1 kHz and sinusoidally modulated at 16 Hz. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB with increasing beta, consistent with Zwicker's findings. In experiment 2, the instantaneous frequency changes of the masker used in experiment 1 were clipped and the resulting thresholds indicated that detection was determined primarily by the masker's total frequency excursion rather than by its instantaneous sweep rate. In experiment 3, the FM maskers from the first two experiments were passed through a roex filter centered at 1 kHz and the resulting envelope was used to amplitude modulate a 1-kHz tone, producing approximately the same effective envelope at 1 kHz as the FM maskers. Threshold functions for the amplitude modulated (AM) maskers were similar to those for their corresponding FM maskers. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB while the total energy of the AM masker decreased by over 10 dB, again contrary to standard level-detection models. The results from these experiments can be explained, at least qualitatively, by a model based on envelope shape discrimination: similarities between the envelopes of the masker alone and masker-plus-probe at the output of an auditory filter centered on the frequency of the probe are primarily responsible for the observed masking, particularly at large beta's.

  20. Semantic transparency and masked morphological priming: An ERP investigation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joanna; Frank, Tiffany; Grainger, Jonathan; Holcomb, Phillip J.

    2009-01-01

    The role of semantics in the segmentation of morphologically complex words was examined using event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded to target words primed by semantically transparent (hunter–hunt,) opaque (corner–corn), and orthographically related (scandal–scan) masked primes. Behavioral data showed that only transparent items gave rise to priming. The ERP data showed both N250 and the N400 effects with transparent items generating greater priming than orthographic or opaque. Furthermore, priming effects across conditions revealed the existence of a significant linear trend, with transparent items showing the greatest effects and orthographic items the smallest, suggesting that these priming effects vary as a function of morphological structure and semantic transparency. The results are discussed in terms of a model of morphological processing. PMID:17498223

  1. Optimized asymmetrical tangent phase mask to obtain defocus invariant modulation transfer function in incoherent imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Le, Van Nhu; Chen, Shouqian; Fan, Zhigang

    2014-04-01

    Wavefront coding as an optical-digital hybrid imaging technique can be used to extend the depth of field. The key to wavefront coding lies in the design of suitable phase masks to achieve the invariant imaging properties over a wide range of defocus. In this Letter, we propose another phase mask with a tangent function to enrich the odd symmetrical kind of phase masks. The performance of the tangent phase mask is evaluated by comparison with a cubic mask, improved-1 logarithmic mask, improved-2 logarithmic mask, and sinusoidal mask. The results demonstrate that the tangent phase mask has superior performance in extending the depth of field.

  2. Non-conscious modulation of cardiac defense by masked phobic pictures.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Padial, Elisabeth; Mata, José Luís; Rodríguez, Sonia; Fernández, María Carmen; Vila, Jaime

    2005-06-01

    The present study investigated the modulation of cardiac defense by presenting emotional pictures under both effective and non-effective masking procedures. The aim was to test Ohman's model of pre-attentive processing of fear. Participants were 48 women volunteers with intense fear of spiders. The stimulus to elicit cardiac defense was a white noise of 105 dB, 500 ms duration and instantaneous risetime. Subjects had two trials of picture-noise presentation-one with a picture of a spider and one with a picture of a flower-, either under an effective masking procedure (30 ms duration) or a non-effective masking procedure (500 ms duration). Order of presentation was counterbalanced. Dependent variables were heart rate and subjective assessment of the noise. Results showed an increased cardiac response in the first trial and a less reduced cardiac response in the second trial when the noise was preceded by the phobic picture under both masking procedures. The response was accompanied by an increase in the subjective unpleasantness of the noise. These results provide support to Ohman's theoretical model.

  3. In vivo evaluation of taste masking for developed chewable and orodispersible tablets in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Noorjahan, Aibani; Amrita, Bajaj; Kavita, Singh

    2014-05-01

    Rats have inherent licking behavior and responses to good and aversive tasting stimuli, which are comparable to humans. Taste masking of chewable and orodispersible tablets of an iron EDTA complex salt was evaluated using rat behavioral avoidance model, brief access test. Taste-masked chewable and orodispersible tablets of iron EDTA complex were prepared using various flavors and sweeteners as taste-masking agents. These formulations were presented to rats and their responses were recorded in terms of licking frequency and other avoidance responses. Formulations were also presented to human volunteers and a correlation between responses of humans and rats was tried to be established. Taste responses of rats were found to be similar to those of humans. A high correlation between the taste responses of rats and humans was observed. Evaluation of taste masking using human panels presents several difficulties such as ethical concerns, fatigue and subjectivity. Thus, rat behavioral avoidance model can be considered as a good alternative to taste assessment by human volunteers for further such investigations.

  4. Optimizing Mask Ventilation: Literature Review and Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    PubMed

    Saddawi-Konefka, Daniel; Hung, Susan L; Kacmarek, Robert M; Jiang, Yandong

    2015-12-01

    Mask ventilation is lifesaving, especially in cases of difficult intubation. Many publications have offered distinct techniques for optimizing mask ventilation. This article reviews currently available difficult mask ventilation literature and theory. We divide difficult mask ventilation into 3 broad categories based on etiology: inadequate mask seal, increased airway resistance, and decreased respiratory compliance. Published strategies for overcoming difficulty are presented and organized by etiology.

  5. Nanostructure Secondary-Mirror Apodizing Mask for Transmitter Signal Suppression in a Duplex Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Livas, Jeffrey; Shiri, Shahram; Getty, Stephanie; Tveekrem, June; Butler, James

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a nanostructure apodizing mask, made of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, that is applied to the centers (or in and around the holes) of the secondary mirrors of telescopes that are used to interferometrically measure the strain of space-time in response to gravitational waves. The shape of this ultra-black mask can be adjusted to provide a smooth transition to the clear aperture of the secondary mirror to minimize diffracted light. Carbon nanotubes grown on silicon are a viable telescope mirror substrate, and can absorb significantly more light than other black treatments. The hemispherical reflectance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown at GSFC is approximately 3 to 10 times better than a standard aerospace paint used for stray light control. At the LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) wavelength of 1 micron, the advantage over paint is a factor of 10. Primarily, in the center of the secondary mirror (in the region of central obscuration, where no received light is lost) a black mask is applied to absorb transmitted light that could be reflected back into the receiver. In the LISA telescope, this is in the center couple of millimeters. The shape of this absorber is critical to suppress diffraction at the edge. By using the correct shape, the stray light can be reduced by approximately 10 to the 9 orders of magnitude versus no center mask. The effect of the nanotubes has been simulated in a stray-light model. The effect of the apodizing mask has been simulated in a near-field diffraction model. Specifications are geometry-dependent, but the baseline design for the LISA telescope has been modeled as well. The coatings are somewhat fragile, but work is continuing to enhance adhesion.

  6. Bunch Profiling Using a Rotating Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mitchell; /SLAC /IIT, Chicago

    2012-08-24

    The current method for measuring profiles of proton bunches in accelerators is severely lacking. One must dedicate a great deal of time and expensive equipment to achieve meaningful results. A new method to complete this task uses a rotating mask with slots of three different orientations to collect this data. By scanning over the beam in three different directions, a complete profile for each bunch is built in just seconds, compared to the hours necessary for the previous method. This design was successfully tested using synchrotron radiation emitted by SPEAR3. The profile of the beam was measured in each of the three desired directions. Due to scheduled beam maintenance, only one set of data was completed and more are necessary to solve any remaining issues. The data collected was processed and all of the RMS sizes along the major and minor axes, as well as the tilt of the beam ellipse were measured.

  7. Coherent diffractive imaging using randomly coded masks

    SciTech Connect

    Seaberg, Matthew H.; D'Aspremont, Alexandre; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-12-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an extension to coherent diffractive imaging that encodes additional information through the use of a series of randomly coded masks, removing the need for typical object-domain constraints while guaranteeing a unique solution to the phase retrieval problem. Phase retrieval is performed using a numerical convex relaxation routine known as “PhaseCut,” an iterative algorithm known for its stability and for its ability to find the global solution, which can be found efficiently and which is robust to noise. The experiment is performed using a laser diode at 532.2 nm, enabling rapid prototyping for future X-ray synchrotron and even free electron laser experiments.

  8. Gray scale x-ray mask

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela

    2006-03-07

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

  9. Feature Masking in Computer Game Promotes Visual Imagery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Morey, Jim; Tjoe, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    Can learning of mental imagery skills for visualizing shapes be accelerated with feature masking? Chemistry, physics fine arts, military tactics, and laparoscopic surgery often depend on mentally visualizing shapes in their absence. Does working with "spatial feature-masks" (skeletal shapes, missing key identifying portions) encourage people to…

  10. My Other Half Manifested in Mask-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Xanthippi

    2010-01-01

    Every fall season, each grade level of Rowland Hall St. Mark's Lower School in Salt Lake City, Utah, completes a mask-making project to be featured in a schoolwide parade. This sparked an opportunity to incorporate the fourth-grade unit of realistic and observational drawing with mask making. In this article, the author describes how her students…

  11. Silver-palladium braze alloy recovered from masking materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cierniak, R.; Colman, G.; De Carlo, F.

    1966-01-01

    Method for recovering powdered silver-palladium braze alloy from an acrylic spray binder and rubber masking adhesive used in spray brazing is devised. The process involves agitation and dissolution of masking materials and recovery of suspended precious metal particles on a filter.

  12. Mask-making and the Art in Multicultural Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Mika M.

    1998-01-01

    Profiles the use of mask-making in an art education program at San Pedro Academy in Los Angeles. San Pedro is an all-male private school for elementary, middle and high school students with emotional and behavioral problems. Discusses the uses of mask-making from multicultural and therapeutic perspectives. (MJP)

  13. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  14. Evaluation of the Joint Service General Purpose Mask, XM50

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If Applicable) Joint Program Management Office - Individual Protection [ JPMO-IP 8c... protective mask, sweac, fogging, chemical agent, biological agent, radiological agent, toxic industrial chemicals, TIC, ammonia. 19. ABSTRACT...INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated the fogging resistance and sweat expulsion of the XM50 chemical protective mask. OBJECTIVES: This evaluation compared the

  15. The Role of Polysemy in Masked Semantic and Translation Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkbeiner, Matthew; Forster, Kenneth; Nicol, Janet; Nakamura, Kumiko

    2004-01-01

    A well-known asymmetry exists in the bilingual masked priming literature in which lexical decision is used: namely, masked primes in the dominant language (L1) facilitate decision times on targets in the less dominant language (L2), but not vice versa. In semantic categorization, on the other hand, priming is symmetrical. In Experiments 1-3 we…

  16. Self-masking: Listening during vocalization. Normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Borg, Erik; Bergkvist, Christina; Gustafsson, Dan

    2009-06-01

    What underlying mechanisms are involved in the ability to talk and listen simultaneously and what role does self-masking play under conditions of hearing impairment? The purpose of the present series of studies is to describe a technique for assessment of masked thresholds during vocalization, to describe normative data for males and females, and to focus on hearing impairment. The masking effect of vocalized [a:] on narrow-band noise pulses (250-8000 Hz) was studied using the maximum vocalization method. An amplitude-modulated series of sound pulses, which sounded like a steam engine, was masked until the criterion of halving the perceived pulse rate was reached. For masking of continuous reading, a just-follow-conversation criterion was applied. Intra-session test-retest reproducibility and inter-session variability were calculated. The results showed that female voices were more efficient in masking high frequency noise bursts than male voices and more efficient in masking both a male and a female test reading. The male had to vocalize 4 dBA louder than the female to produce the same masking effect on the test reading. It is concluded that the method is relatively simple to apply and has small intra-session and fair inter-session variability. Interesting gender differences were observed.

  17. Sputtered gold mask for deep chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisciotta, B. P.; Gross, C.; Olive, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Sputtered mask resists chemical attack from acid and has adherence to withstand prolonged submergence in etch solution without lifting from silicon surface. Even under prolonged etch conditions with significant undercutting, gold mask maintained excellent adhesion to silicon surface and imperviousness to acid.

  18. Respiratory Protection Provided by Five New Contagion Masks

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, H. Gerald; Decker, Herbert M.

    1963-01-01

    The effectiveness of five recently developed contagion masks in filtering air-borne particles (1 to 5 μ diam) has been reported. One mask, available in four sizes, was 99% efficient. This mask can be reused after sterilization. The other four masks are available in only one size and are intended to be used one time only. Two of these four disposable types were more than 90% efficient but the variability of their respective test results was much greater than that for the reusable mask. The two remaining disposable types were less than 80% efficient. Two of these contagion-mask types were worn by hospital personnel for periods of up to 8 hr to determine the effect of such prolonged use on aerosol filtration efficiency. No significant decrease in filtration efficiency was noted. Physicians, nurses, and other hospital personnel who wear masks will benefit from the increased individual respiratory protection afforded by improved contagion masks. Concurrently, the incidence of hospital patient air-borne infections should be greatly reduced. Images FIG. 1 PMID:13951516

  19. Modes of resonators with mirror reflectivity modulated by absorbing masks

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; Magni, V.; Svelto, O. )

    1989-09-01

    The modes of a stable laser resonator containing, near one mirror, an absorbing mask with two apertures have been calculated on the basis of scalar diffraction theory and experimentally observed in a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The mode structure has been investigated as a function of the mask geometry, and an interpretation in terms of supermodes is provided.

  20. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  1. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  2. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  3. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks §...

  4. Simulation-based mask quality control in a production environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Chen, Jiunn-Hung; Cai, Lynn; Lee, Don; Chu, Brian; Huang, Vinsent; Fang, Te-Yang

    2004-05-01

    Traditionally, mask defect analysis has been done through a visual inspection review. As the semiconductor industry moves into smaller process generations and the complexity of mask exponentially increases, "Mask" issues have emerged as one of the main production problems due to their rising cost and long turn-around time. Mask-making specifications related to defects found on advanced masks also becomes more difficult to define due to the complex features involved [e.g. OPC (Optical Proximity Correction), SRAF (Sub Resolution Assist Features), etc.]. The Automatic Defect Severity Scoring (ADSS) module of i-Virtual Stepper System from Synopsys offers a fast and highly accurate software solution for defect printability analysis of advanced masks in a real production environment. In this paper, we present our case study of production pilot run in which the ADSS is used to automatically quantify the impact of a given defect on the surrounding features, basically filtering out killer defects and nuisance defects in terms of production viewpoints to reduce operators" intervention. In addition, an automation workflow is also tested, in which the production issues, such as the communication feasibility of mask quality control between mask house and wafer fab, are also considered.

  5. Biologically Inspired Polymer Microfibrillar Arrays for Mask Sealing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Mask sealing Fibrillar adhesion Face masks Gecko adhesion Adhesion 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE...donning practices. One promising area is biologically inspired dry adhesives. Geckos , spiders, beetles, flies, and many other climbing lizards and

  6. Mask Making: The Use of Expressive Arts with Leadership Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Angela Thomas

    The process of making one's own mask and having one's mask made was offered as an experiential exercise for a group of Outward Bound students training to be Outward Bound instructors. The integration of expressive arts with outdoor experiential education was an attempt to encourage balance between the technical and interpersonal skill development…

  7. Migration from full-head mask to "open-face" mask for immobilization of patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Lovelock, D Michael; Mechalakos, James; Rao, Shyam; Della-Biancia, Cesar; Amols, Howard; Lee, Nancy

    2013-09-06

    To provide an alternative device for immobilization of the head while easing claustrophobia and improving comfort, an "open-face" thermoplastic mask was evaluated using video-based optical surface imaging (OSI) and kilovoltage (kV) X-ray radiography. A three-point thermoplastic head mask with a precut opening and reinforced strips was developed. After molding, it provided sufficient visible facial area as the region of interest for OSI. Using real-time OSI, the head motion of ten volunteers in the new mask was evaluated during mask locking and 15minutes lying on the treatment couch. Using a nose mark with reference to room lasers, forced head movement in open-face and full-head masks (with a nose hole) was compared. Five patients with claustrophobia were immobilized with open-face masks, set up using OSI and kV, and treated in 121 fractions, in which 61 fractions were monitored during treatment using real-time OSI. With the open-face mask, head motion was found to be 1.0 ± 0.6 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in volunteers during the experiment, and 0.8 ± 0.3 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in patients during treatment. These agree with patient motion calculated from pre-/post-treatment OSI and kV data using different anatomical landmarks. In volunteers, the head shift induced by mask-locking was 2.3 ± 1.7 mm and 1.8° ± 0.6°, and the range of forced movements in the open-face and full-head masks were found to be similar. Most (80%) of the volunteers preferred the open-face mask to the full-head mask, while claustrophobic patients could only tolerate the open-face mask. The open-face mask is characterized for its immobilization capability and can immobilize patients sufficiently (< 2 mm) during radiotherapy. It provides a clinical solution to the immobilization of patients with head and neck (HN) cancer undergoing radiotherapy, and is particularly beneficial for claustrophobic patients. This new open-face mask is readily adopted in radiotherapy clinic as a superior alternative to

  8. Antireflective surface patterned by rolling mask lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Oliver; Geddes, Joseph B.; Aryal, Mukti; Perez, Joseph; Wassei, Jonathan; McMackin, Ian; Kobrin, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of commercial products such as displays, solar panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs), automotive and architectural glass are driving demand for glass with high performance surfaces that offer anti-reflective, self-cleaning, and other advanced functions. State-of-the-art coatings do not meet the desired performance characteristics or cannot be applied over large areas in a cost-effective manner. "Rolling Mask Lithography" (RML™) enables highresolution lithographic nano-patterning over large-areas at low-cost and high-throughput. RML is a photolithographic process performed using ultraviolet (UV) illumination transmitted through a soft cylindrical mask as it rolls across a substrate. Subsequent transfer of photoresist patterns into the substrate is achieved using an etching process, which creates a nanostructured surface. The current generation exposure tool is capable of patterning one-meter long substrates with a width of 300 mm. High-throughput and low-cost are achieved using continuous exposure of the resist by the cylindrical photomask. Here, we report on significant improvements in the application of RML™ to fabricate anti-reflective surfaces. Briefly, an optical surface can be made antireflective by "texturing" it with a nano-scale pattern to reduce the discontinuity in the index of refraction between the air and the bulk optical material. An array of cones, similar to the structure of a moth's eye, performs this way. Substrates are patterned using RML™ and etched to produce an array of cones with an aspect ratio of 3:1, which decreases the reflectivity below 0.1%.

  9. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion.

  10. Study of critical dimension uniformity (CDU) using a mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mei-Chun; Yu, Ching-Fang; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Yen, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies the repeatability and the reliability of CDUs from a mask inspector and their correlation with CD SEM measurements on various pattern attributes such as feature sizes, tones, and orientations. Full-mask image analysis with a mask inspector is one of potential solutions for overcoming the sampling rate limitation of a mask CD SEM. By comparing the design database with the inspected dimension, the complete CDU behavior of specific patterns can be obtained without extra work and tool time. These measurements can be mapped and averaged over various spatial lengths to determine changes in relative CDU across the mask. Eventually, success of this methodology relies on the optical system of the inspector being highly stable.

  11. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  12. An improved land mask for the SSM/I grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martino, Michael G.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Gloersen, Per; Zwally, H. Jay; Acker, James G. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a new land/ocean/coastline mask for use with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data, and other types of data which are mapped to the polar stereographic SSM/I grid. Pre-existing land masks were found to disagree, to lack certain land features, and to disagree with land boundaries that are visible in high resolution sensor imagery, such as imagery from the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) on the Earth Resources Satellite (ERS-1). The Digital Chart of the World (DCW) database was initially selected as a source of shoreline data for this effort. Techniques for developing a land mask from these shoreline data are discussed. The resulting land mask, although not perfect, is seen to exhibit significant improvement over previous land mask products.

  13. Reentrant processing mediates object substitution masking: comment on Põder (2013).

    PubMed

    Di Lollo, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a target stimulus and a surrounding mask are displayed briefly together, and the display then continues with the mask alone. Target identification is accurate when the stimuli co-terminate but is progressively impaired as the duration of the trailing mask is increased. In reentrant accounts, OSM is said to arise from iterative exchanges between brain regions connected by two-way pathways. In an alternative account, OSM is explained on the basis of exclusively feed-forward processes, without recourse to reentry. Here I show that the feed-forward account runs afoul of the extant phenomenological, behavioral, brain-imaging, and electrophysiological evidence. Further, the feed-forward assumption that masking occurs when attention finds a degraded target is shown to be entirely ad hoc. In contrast, the evidence is uniformly consistent with a reentrant-processing account of OSM.

  14. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer mask designs

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2001-01-01

    In a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer, different image-plane mask designs can improve the operation of the interferometer. By keeping the test beam window of the mask small compared to the separation distance between the beams, the problem of energy from the reference beam leaking through the test beam window is reduced. By rotating the grating and mask 45.degree., only a single one-dimensional translation stage is required for phase-shifting. By keeping two reference pinholes in the same orientation about the test beam window, only a single grating orientation, and thus a single one-dimensional translation stage, is required. The use of a two-dimensional grating allows for a multiplicity of pinholes to be used about the pattern of diffracted orders of the grating at the mask. Orientation marks on the mask can be used to orient the device and indicate the position of the reference pinholes.

  15. Task-Dependent Masked Priming Effects in Visual Word Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Sachiko; Norris, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    A method used widely to study the first 250 ms of visual word recognition is masked priming: These studies have yielded a rich set of data concerning the processes involved in recognizing letters and words. In these studies, there is an implicit assumption that the early processes in word recognition tapped by masked priming are automatic, and masked priming effects should therefore be invariant across tasks. Contrary to this assumption, masked priming effects are modulated by the task goal: For example, only word targets show priming in the lexical decision task, but both words and non-words do in the same-different task; semantic priming effects are generally weak in the lexical decision task but are robust in the semantic categorization task. We explain how such task dependence arises within the Bayesian Reader account of masked priming (Norris and Kinoshita, 2008), and how the task dissociations can be used to understand the early processes in lexical access. PMID:22675316

  16. [Clark's head tent or "small mask"? Value of high oxygen flows administered through a mask].

    PubMed

    Landrieu, J P; Milhaud, A; Brille, P; Hermant, A; Tinturier, F

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of transcutaneous PtcO2 in eight normal adults prove a comparable efficacy of 50 l.min-1 O2 through facial "small mask" (61.5 kPa; 463 mmHg) and 20 l.min-1 O2 through head tent (65.1 kPa; 490 mmHg). First procedure, inexpensive, is very simple to use.

  17. Development of computer program ENMASK for prediction of residual environmental masking-noise spectra, from any three independent environmental parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.-S.; Liebich, R. E.; Chun, K. C.

    2000-03-31

    Residual environmental sound can mask intrusive4 (unwanted) sound. It is a factor that can affect noise impacts and must be considered both in noise-impact studies and in noise-mitigation designs. Models for quantitative prediction of sensation level (audibility) and psychological effects of intrusive noise require an input with 1/3 octave-band spectral resolution of environmental masking noise. However, the majority of published residual environmental masking-noise data are given with either octave-band frequency resolution or only single A-weighted decibel values. A model has been developed that enables estimation of 1/3 octave-band residual environmental masking-noise spectra and relates certain environmental parameters to A-weighted sound level. This model provides a correlation among three environmental conditions: measured residual A-weighted sound-pressure level, proximity to a major roadway, and population density. Cited field-study data were used to compute the most probable 1/3 octave-band sound-pressure spectrum corresponding to any selected one of these three inputs. In turn, such spectra can be used as an input to models for prediction of noise impacts. This paper discusses specific algorithms included in the newly developed computer program ENMASK. In addition, the relative audibility of the environmental masking-noise spectra at different A-weighted sound levels is discussed, which is determined by using the methodology of program ENAUDIBL.

  18. Mask and wafer evaluation of Sigma7500 pattern generator applied to 65nm logic metal and via layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Frank; Shi, Irene; Liu, Qingwei; Zhu, Likeit; Zhao, Shirley; Guo, Eric

    2009-04-01

    As pattern density and OPC complexity grow, photomask write times on electron beam tools increase in proportion. Reducing the write time would decrease mask-making costs, but the performance of any alternative mask writer must meet all of the technical requirements on both mask and wafer. In addition, it is desirable to use existing OPC models in order to avoid the costs of developing and maintaining separate OPC models for each writer. The Sigma7500 deep-UV pattern generator provides the highest resolution available from a laser-based tool, and it has the advantage of maintaining about a 3 hour write time even as the feature count increases. In this study, the Sigma7500 and a variable shaped e-beam (VSB) tool are compared on 65nm metal1 and via1 layers. In the first phase, the Sigma pattern positioning was matched to a SMIC reference grid and a registration value of 10 nm (3s) was achieved with scales removed. In the second phase, M1 and V1 masks were printed with both laser and e-beam writers using the same pattern data and compared on CD uniformity, linearity and proximity. The Sigma7500 met all of the photomask requirements for these layers. The masks were then printed on wafers and the wafer data was evaluated. The results were comparable to those for the e-beam masks and were within the requirements, indicating that the Sigma7500 can handle these layers without the need to revise the e-beam mask OPC models.

  19. A new diagnostic tool for masked hypertension: impaired sleep quality

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Fatma; Cakır, Ugur; Yıldırım, Osman; Alcelik, Aytekin; Donmez, Ibrahim; Tuman, Taha Can; Caglar, Sabri Onur; Yazıcı, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between masked hypertension and impaired sleep quality. Additionally, we evaluated the diagnostic role and prevalence of poor sleep quality among patients with newly diagnosed masked hypertension. Material and methods A total of 112 individuals, 72 patients with newly diagnosed masked hypertension and 40 normotensive healthy volunteers, were included in this study. All patients underwent evaluation comprising 12-lead electrocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, 24-hour Holter ECG, and basic laboratory tests. Additionally, all participants completed questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Results The total PSQI score was significantly higher in the masked hypertension group than in the normotensive healthy volunteers (4.13 ±2.43 vs. 2.33 ±1.67, p < 0.001). A PSQI score > 5 was found in 45.8% (n = 33) of patients in the masked hypertension group and 15% (n = 6) of patients in the normotensive group (p < 0.001). The non-dipper pattern was found in 17.5% of the healthy volunteer group and 59.94% (n = 41) of the masked hypertension group (p < 0.001). When we compared the dipping pattern of the masked hypertension groups, there was a significant difference in PSQI score between the dipper and non-dipper groups (4.87 ±3.21 vs. 3.58 ±2.33, p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that masked hypertension, LV mass, and LV mass index score were independent predictors of poor PSQI. Conclusions This study demonstrates impaired sleep quality in subjects with masked hypertension, particularly those with a non-dipper pattern. Additionally, this study indicates that impaired sleep quality may help diagnose masked hypertension, particularly in the non-dipper group. PMID:27904509

  20. Through-mask anodization of titania dot- and pillar-like nanostructures on bulk Ti substrates using a nanoporous anodic alumina mask.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Terje; Fox, Neil; Su, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Nanosized surface topography on an implant material has the capability of stimulating the acceptance of the material in its host surrounding. Fine-tuning of nanotopography feature size has been shown to trigger differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into bone cells in vitro. For this purpose we have created well defined nanosized titania dot- and pillar-like structures on mechanically polished Ti substrates using a through-mask anodization technique with an anodic porous alumina template. The anodization technique allowed the titania structure dimensions to be precisely tuned in the range 15-140 nm in a single electrolyte system. The fabricated surfaces serve as good model surfaces for precise studies of in vitro cell behaviour. The through-mask anodization technique was used directly on bulk Ti surfaces, thus demonstrating a potential application for patterning of actual Ti implant surfaces.

  1. Analysis of edge effects in attenuating phase-shift masks using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Aamod; Sczyrba, Martin; Connolly, Brid; Neureuther, Andy; Waller, Laura

    2013-09-01

    Thick mask electromagnetic edge effects in attenuating phase-shift masks (ATT-PSM) are analyzed by extracting optical phase at the wafer plane from a series of through focus aerial images with 193nm light. The thick edges of an ATT-PSM can lead to phase distortions, creating asymmetric intensity contrast on either side of focus. Here we use through focus intensity images from an AIMS tool to quantitatively recover phase via the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE). The TIE can recover the effective phase across the mask due to edge effects by analyzing the through focus image stack. We verify a previously proposed model for edge effects by adding quadrature phase boundary layers at the edges during simulation and compare the simulated through focus images with experimental data. After tuning the real and imaginary part of the boundary layer and the angle of the substrate, the simulated through focus behavior agrees with experiment, giving a measure of the edge effects. This leads to comparable quantitative phase profiles recovered at the wafer plane for simulation and experiment with the ATT-PSM. We expect that the method is applicable for the approximation of topographical effects in other types of thick masks as well.

  2. Theoretical and numerical analyses of a slit-masked chicane for modulated bunch generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaofang; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Shin, Young -Min

    2015-10-28

    Density modulations on electron beams can improve machine performance of beam-driven accelerators and FELs with resonance beam-wave coupling. The beam modulation is studied with a masked chicane by the analytic model and simulations with the beam parameters of the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. With the chicane design parameters (bending angle of 18o, bending radius of 0.95 m and R56 ~ –0.19 m) and a nominal beam of 3 ps bunch length, the analytic model showed that a slit-mask with slit period 900 μ m and aperture width 300 μ m induces a modulation of bunch-to-bunch spacing ~ 100 μ m to the bunch with 2.4% correlated energy spread. With the designed slit mask and a 3 ps bunch, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, including nonlinear energy distributions, space charge force, and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect, also result in beam modulation with bunch-to-bunch distance around 100 μ m and a corresponding modulation frequency of 3 THz. The beam modulation has been extensively examined with three different beam conditions, 2.25 ps (0.25 nC), 3.25 ps (1 nC), and 4.75 ps (3.2 nC), by tracking code Elegant. The simulation analysis indicates that the sliced beam by the slit-mask with 3 ~ 6% correlated energy spread has modulation lengths about 187 μ m (0.25 nC), 270 μ m (1 nC) and 325 μ m (3.2 nC). As a result, the theoretical and numerical data proved the capability of the designed masked chicane in producing modulated bunch train with micro-bunch length around 100 fs.

  3. Northern elephant seal field bioacoustics and aerial auditory masked hearing thresholds in three pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southall, Brandon Lee

    This dissertation comprises four interrelated studies on acoustic communication (including both signal production and signal reception) in pinnipeds, primarily northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). Field measurements of vocalization parameters were obtained in elephant seal breeding rookeries. Additionally, auditory masking experiments were conducted with individuals representing three pinniped species, including a northern elephant seal. This study quantified how aerial noise masks aerial hearing and provided preliminary data on auditory frequency filtering. All of these studies were conducted in air for a variety of practical and theoretical reasons. Some governmental, media, and research organizations have recently become concerned with the impacts of underwater anthropogenic noise on aquatic animals. However, little consideration has been given to the dual pressures imposed by aerial and underwater noise on amphibious marine mammals such as the pinnipeds. This dissertation sought to provide some basic data bearing on this matter by investigating aerial signals and aerial masked hearing. Data were obtained on aerial vocalization source levels, signal directivity patterns, natural aerial ambient noise, signal propagation properties, multi-modal aspects of signaling, motivation-specific signal variability, aerial critical masking ratios, and auditory filter bandwidths. The results indicate that different signal components may be more readily detectable in variable noise conditions, frequency resolution likely affects detection ranges, developmental and motivational factors affect signal parameters, and that some pinnipeds apparently detect signals over masking noise relatively well both in air and water. Using the northern elephant seal as a representative model, a model for quantifying constraints on vocal communication was developed to provide first-order predictions about detection ranges for signals in variable noise conditions.

  4. On the impact of masking and blocking hypotheses for measuring the efficacy of new tuberculosis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Joaquín; Marinova, Dessislava; Martín, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, the Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) has been used worldwide to prevent tuberculosis (TB). However, BCG has shown a very variable efficacy in different trials, offering a wide range of protection in adults against pulmonary TB. One of the most accepted hypotheses to explain these inconsistencies points to the existence of a pre-existing immune response to antigens that are common to environmental sources of mycobacterial antigens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Specifically, two different mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain this phenomenon: the masking and the blocking effects. According to masking hypothesis, previous sensitization confers some level of protection against TB that masks vaccine’s effects. In turn, the blocking hypothesis postulates that previous immune response prevents vaccine taking of a new TB vaccine. In this work we introduce a series of models to discriminate between masking and blocking mechanisms and address their relative likelihood. We apply our methodology to the data reported by BCG-REVAC clinical trials, which were specifically designed for studying BCG efficacy variability. Our results yield estimates that are consistent with high levels of blocking (41% in Manaus -95% CI [14–68]- and 96% in Salvador -95% CI [52–100]-). Moreover, we also show that masking does not play any relevant role in modifying vaccine’s efficacy either alone or in addition to blocking. The quantification of these effects around a plausible model constitutes a relevant step towards impact evaluation of novel anti-tuberculosis vaccines, which are susceptible of being affected by similar effects, especially if applied on individuals previously exposed to mycobacterial antigens. PMID:26893956

  5. Theoretical and numerical analyses of a slit-masked chicane for modulated bunch generation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Xiaofang; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Shin, Young -Min; ...

    2015-10-28

    Density modulations on electron beams can improve machine performance of beam-driven accelerators and FELs with resonance beam-wave coupling. The beam modulation is studied with a masked chicane by the analytic model and simulations with the beam parameters of the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. With the chicane design parameters (bending angle of 18o, bending radius of 0.95 m and R56 ~ –0.19 m) and a nominal beam of 3 ps bunch length, the analytic model showed that a slit-mask with slit period 900 μ m and aperture width 300 μ m induces a modulation of bunch-to-bunch spacing ~more » 100 μ m to the bunch with 2.4% correlated energy spread. With the designed slit mask and a 3 ps bunch, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, including nonlinear energy distributions, space charge force, and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect, also result in beam modulation with bunch-to-bunch distance around 100 μ m and a corresponding modulation frequency of 3 THz. The beam modulation has been extensively examined with three different beam conditions, 2.25 ps (0.25 nC), 3.25 ps (1 nC), and 4.75 ps (3.2 nC), by tracking code Elegant. The simulation analysis indicates that the sliced beam by the slit-mask with 3 ~ 6% correlated energy spread has modulation lengths about 187 μ m (0.25 nC), 270 μ m (1 nC) and 325 μ m (3.2 nC). As a result, the theoretical and numerical data proved the capability of the designed masked chicane in producing modulated bunch train with micro-bunch length around 100 fs.« less

  6. MEG masked priming evidence for form-based decomposition of irregular verbs

    PubMed Central

    Fruchter, Joseph; Stockall, Linnaea; Marantz, Alec

    2013-01-01

    To what extent does morphological structure play a role in early processing of visually presented English past tense verbs? Previous masked priming studies have demonstrated effects of obligatory form-based decomposition for genuinely affixed words (teacher-TEACH) and pseudo-affixed words (corner-CORN), but not for orthographic controls (brothel-BROTH). Additionally, MEG single word reading studies have demonstrated that the transition probability from stem to affix (in genuinely affixed words) modulates an early evoked response known as the M170; parallel findings have been shown for the transition probability from stem to pseudo-affix (in pseudo-affixed words). Here, utilizing the M170 as a neural index of visual form-based morphological decomposition, we ask whether the M170 demonstrates masked morphological priming effects for irregular past tense verbs (following a previous study which obtained behavioral masked priming effects for irregulars). Dual mechanism theories of the English past tense predict a rule-based decomposition for regulars but not for irregulars, while certain single mechanism theories predict rule-based decomposition even for irregulars. MEG data was recorded for 16 subjects performing a visual masked priming lexical decision task. Using a functional region of interest (fROI) defined on the basis of repetition priming and regular morphological priming effects within the left fusiform and inferior temporal regions, we found that activity in this fROI was modulated by the masked priming manipulation for irregular verbs, during the time window of the M170. We also found effects of the scores generated by the learning model of Albright and Hayes (2003) on the degree of priming for irregular verbs. The results favor a single mechanism account of the English past tense, in which even irregulars are decomposed into stems and affixes prior to lexical access, as opposed to a dual mechanism model, in which irregulars are recognized as whole forms

  7. Theoretical and numerical analyses of a slit-masked chicane for modulated bunch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Broemmelsiek, D. R.; Shin, Y.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Density modulations on electron beams can improve machine performance of beam-driven accelerators and FELs with resonance beam-wave coupling. The beam modulation is studied with a masked chicane by the analytic model and simulations with the beam parameters of the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. With the chicane design parameters (bending angle of 18o, bending radius of 0.95 m and R56 ~ -0.19 m) and a nominal beam of 3 ps bunch length, the analytic model showed that a slit-mask with slit period 900 μ m and aperture width 300 μ m induces a modulation of bunch-to-bunch spacing ~ 100 μ m to the bunch with 2.4% correlated energy spread. With the designed slit mask and a 3 ps bunch, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, including nonlinear energy distributions, space charge force, and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect, also result in beam modulation with bunch-to-bunch distance around 100 μ m and a corresponding modulation frequency of 3 THz. The beam modulation has been extensively examined with three different beam conditions, 2.25 ps (0.25 nC), 3.25 ps (1 nC), and 4.75 ps (3.2 nC), by tracking code Elegant. The simulation analysis indicates that the sliced beam by the slit-mask with 3 ~ 6% correlated energy spread has modulation lengths about 187 μ m (0.25 nC), 270 μ m (1 nC) and 325 μ m (3.2 nC). The theoretical and numerical data proved the capability of the designed masked chicane in producing modulated bunch train with micro-bunch length around 100 fs.

  8. 76 FR 9984 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ..., Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006-(), 174080-(), 174085-(), 174095... manufacturer and part number of the oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and...

  9. 76 FR 41669 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ..., Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006-( ), 174080-( ), 174085-( ), 174095... oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and corrective action for certain oxygen...

  10. Spatial-frequency-tuned mechanisms of the red-green channel estimated by oblique masking.

    PubMed

    Vimal, RamLakhan Pandey

    2002-02-01

    The sustained spatial-frequency-tuned (SF-tuned) mechanisms of nonoriented units were examined by means of orthogonal masking for the Red-Green (R-G) color channel, and those of oriented units by oblique masking for the achromatic channel but not for the color channels. An oblique-masking technique minimizes the artifacts that are due to spatial phase effects, local cues, spatial beats, spatial probability summation, and changing criteria. Therefore the spatial characteristics of the R-G color channel are now investigated by an oblique-masking technique and linked with my paper on orthogonal masking [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 15, 1 (1998)]. The R-G channel was defined by the minimum-flicker and hue-cancellation techniques. A color monitor system was used to generate spatially localized (D6) vertical color test patterns [0.063-8 cycles per degree (cpd)] and sinusoidal oblique color masks (0.031-16 cpd, 1.2-60% contrasts). Color contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs), threshold elevation (TE) versus mask SF (TvSF) curves, and TE versus mask contrast (TvC) curves were measured by the method of constant stimuli with a two-interval forced-choice technique by using Powell's achromatizing lens under sustained (Gaussian, 2-s-duration) conditions. Results show the following: (1) The color CSF is a low-pass function of SF with average half-height SF of 0.7 cpd and cutoff SF of 14 cpd with the use of a color-detection criterion. (2) TvSF curves are broadly bandpass and fall into five groups, peaking at approximately 0.13, 0.5, 2, 4, and 8 cpd. The root-mean-square cone-color CSF is 3.8-5.4 times the stimulus-color CSF. (3) A "crowding effect" similar to that of the TvSF curves of the achromatic channel was also found, but the TvSF curves of the R-G channel are not sharply peaked, similar to the result for orthogonal masking. Data analysis led to the following conclusions: (1) A simple multiple-mechanism model yields one low-pass color mechanism (with average half-height SF of 0

  11. Do Plant-Bound Masked Mycotoxins Contribute to Toxicity?

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Silvia W.

    2017-01-01

    Masked mycotoxins are plant metabolites of mycotoxins which co-contaminate common cereal crops. Since their discovery, the question has arisen if they contribute to toxicity either directly or indirectly through the release of the parent mycotoxins. Research in this field is rapidly emerging and the aim of this review is to summarize the latest knowledge on the fate of masked mycotoxins upon ingestion. Fusarium mycotoxins are the most prevalent masked mycotoxins and evidence is mounting that DON3Glc and possibly other masked trichothecenes are stable in conditions prevailing in the upper gut and are not absorbed intact. DON3Glc is also not toxic per se, but is hydrolyzed by colonic microbes and further metabolized to DOM-1 in some individuals. Masked zearalenone is rather more bio-reactive with some evidence on gastric and small intestinal hydrolysis as well as hydrolysis by intestinal epithelium and components of blood. Microbial hydrolysis of ZEN14Glc is almost instantaneous and further metabolism also occurs. Identification of zearalenone metabolites and their fate in the colon are still missing as is further clarification on whether or not masked zearalenone is hydrolyzed by mammalian cells. New masked mycotoxins continuously emerge and it is crucial that we gain detailed understanding of their individual metabolic fate in the body before we can assess synergistic effects and extrapolate the additive risk of all mycotoxins present in food. PMID:28264486

  12. CD-measurement technique for hole patterns on stencil mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Mikio; Yusa, Satoshi; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sano, Hisatake; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya

    2004-12-01

    EB lithography has a potential to successfully form hole patterns as small as 80 nm with a stencil mask. In a previous paper we proposed a technique using a HOLON dual-mode critical dimension (CD) SEM ESPA-75S in the transmission mode for CD measurement of line-and-space patterns on a stencil mask. In this paper we extend our effort of developing a CD measurement technique to contact hole features and determine it in comparison of measured values between features on mask and those printed on wafer. We have evaluated the width method and the area methods using designed 80-500 nm wide contact hole patterns on a large area membrane mask and their resist images on wafer printed by a LEEPL3000. We find that 1) the width method and the area methods show an excellent mask-wafer correlation for holes over 110 nm, and 2) the area methods show a better mask-wafer correlation than the width method does for holes below 110 nm. We conclude that the area calculated from the transmission SEM image is more suitable in defining the hole dimensions than the width for contact holes on a stencil mask.

  13. Do Plant-Bound Masked Mycotoxins Contribute to Toxicity?

    PubMed

    Gratz, Silvia W

    2017-02-28

    Masked mycotoxins are plant metabolites of mycotoxins which co-contaminate common cereal crops. Since their discovery, the question has arisen if they contribute to toxicity either directly or indirectly through the release of the parent mycotoxins. Research in this field is rapidly emerging and the aim of this review is to summarize the latest knowledge on the fate of masked mycotoxins upon ingestion. Fusarium mycotoxins are the most prevalent masked mycotoxins and evidence is mounting that DON3Glc and possibly other masked trichothecenes are stable in conditions prevailing in the upper gut and are not absorbed intact. DON3Glc is also not toxic per se, but is hydrolyzed by colonic microbes and further metabolized to DOM-1 in some individuals. Masked zearalenone is rather more bio-reactive with some evidence on gastric and small intestinal hydrolysis as well as hydrolysis by intestinal epithelium and components of blood. Microbial hydrolysis of ZEN14Glc is almost instantaneous and further metabolism also occurs. Identification of zearalenone metabolites and their fate in the colon are still missing as is further clarification on whether or not masked zearalenone is hydrolyzed by mammalian cells. New masked mycotoxins continuously emerge and it is crucial that we gain detailed understanding of their individual metabolic fate in the body before we can assess synergistic effects and extrapolate the additive risk of all mycotoxins present in food.

  14. Captive breeding and reintroduction of the endangered masked bobwhite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Gabel, R.R.; Goodwin, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Efforts to restore the endangered masked bobwhite (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi) to its former range have required 1) habitat acquisition, restoration, and preservation; 2) captive propagation; and 3) reintroduction .bf captive-bred stock. In its role to recover the masked bobwhite, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (U.S. Fish and Wildli e Service) has refined captive breeding techniques; provided captive-produced stock for release; conducted field research on the distribution, limiting factors, and habitat characteristics of this species; and developed release methods. Techniques for the husbandry and captive management, breeding, artificial incubation and hatching of eggs, and rearing of young of the masked bobwhite have been developed. Successful reintroduction techniques for the masked bobwhite have included prerelease conditioning and/or cross-fostering of captive-reared masked bobwhite chicks to a wild-caught, related, vasectomized bobwhite species and their release to the wild as family units. In addition, the establishment by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service of the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge in 1985 has further enhanced the potential for establishing a self-sustaining population of the masked bobwhite in the U. S. Through continued releases and active management of habitat, therefore, it is believed that the masked bobwhite can become permanently established at the refuge to ensure its continued survival in the wild.

  15. Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Kevin Edward; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in coronagraph technologies for exoplanet imaging have achieved contrasts close to 1e10 at 4 lambda/D and 1e-9 at 2 lambda/D in monochromatic light. A remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light; a challenge that is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask. The size of a star image scales linearly with wavelength. Focal plane masks are typically the same size at all wavelengths, and must be sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. However, this oversized mask blocks useful discovery space from the shorter wavelengths. We present here the design, development, and testing of an achromatic focal plane mask based on the concept of optical filtering by a diffractive optical element (DOE). The mask consists of an array of DOE cells, the combination of which functions as a wavelength filter with any desired amplitude and phase transmission. The effective size of the mask scales nearly linearly with wavelength, and allows significant improvement in the inner working angle of the coronagraph at shorter wavelengths. The design is applicable to almost any coronagraph configuration, and enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths than would otherwise be possible. We include initial results from a laboratory demonstration of the mask with the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph.

  16. Control of adhesion to the mask of epitaxial laterally overgrown GaAs layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Domagała, J.; Dobosz, D.

    2001-12-01

    Strain commonly observed in layers grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) and arising from interaction of the layers with the mask underneath is studied. We show that GaAs ELO layers grown by liquid-phase epitaxy on SiO2-coated GaAs substrates are strain free if the laterally overgrown parts ("wings") of the layers hang over and have no direct contact with the mask. In other cases, tilting of the wings can be efficiently tailored by controlling the ratio of vertical to lateral growth rates at the beginning of ELO growth. In particular, this has been achieved by growing GaAs ELO layers on SiO2-coated GaAs substrates with increasing density of dislocations. Then, the ratio of vertical to lateral growth rates at the beginning of the growth is increased which in turn leads to reduction of the adhesion-induced bending of the ELO wings, as we observe by high-resolution x-ray diffraction. In the limiting case of heavily dislocated substrates, namely, on GaAs-coated Si, the vertical growth of GaAs ELO is so fast that air-bridged structures without any wing adhesion to the SiO2 mask are obtained. Next, the same model is used to explain our earlier data on negligible bending of GaAs ELO layers on graphite-masked GaAs substrates. In this case, delayed start of lateral growth is caused by the change of the shape of the melt in the corner between the sidewall of the ELO layer and the mask when SiO2 was replaced by graphite film not wetted by the gallium melt.

  17. Potential of mask production process for finer pattern fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagawa, Keisuke; Ugajin, Kunihiro; Suenaga, Machiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihito; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Saito, Masato; Itoh, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Photomask used for optical lithography has been developed for purpose of fabrication a pattern along with finer designed rules and increase the productivity. With regard to pattern fabrication on mask, EB (Electron beam) mask writer has been used because it has high resolution beam. But in producing photomask, minimum pattern size on mask is hits a peak around 40nm by the resolution limit of ArF immersion systems. This value is easy to achieve by current EB writer. So, photomask process with EB writer has gotten attached to increase turnaround time. In next generation lithography such as EUV (Extreme ultraviolet) lithography and Nano-imprint lithography, it is enable to fabricate finer pattern beyond the resolution limit of ArF immersion systems. Thereby the pattern on a mask becomes finer rapidly. According to ITRS 2012, fabrication of finer patterns less than 20nm will be required on EUV mask and on NIL template. Especially in NIL template, less than 15nm pattern will be required half a decade later. But today's development of EB writer is aiming to increase photomask's productivity, so we will face a difficulty to fabricate finer pattern in near future. In this paper, we examined a potential of mask production process with EB writer from the view of finer pattern fabrication performances. We succeeded to fabricate hp (half-pitch) 17nm pattern on mask plate by using VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) type EB mask writer with CAR (Chemically Amplified Resist). This result suggests that the photomask fabrication process has the potential for sub-20nm generation mask production.

  18. Simultaneous source-mask optimization: a numerical combining method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülders, Thomas; Domnenko, Vitaliy; Küchler, Bernd; Klimpel, Thomas; Stock, Hans-Jürgen; Poonawala, Amyn A.; Taravade, Kunal N.; Stanton, William A.

    2010-09-01

    A new method for simultaneous Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) is presented. In order to produce optimum imaging fidelity with respect to exposure lattitude, depth of focus (DoF) and mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) the presented method aims to leverage both, the available degrees of freedom of a pixelated source and those available for the mask layout. The approach described in this paper is designed as to work with dissected mask polygons. The dissection of the mask patterns is to be performed in advance (before SMO) with the Synopsys Proteus OPC engine, providing the available degrees of freedom for mask pattern optimization. This is similar to mask optimization done for optical proximity correction (OPC). Additionally, however, the illumination source will be simultaneously optimized. The SMO approach borrows many of the performance enhancement methods of OPC software for mask correction, but is especially designed as to simultaneously optimize a pixelated source shape as nowadays available in production environments. Designed as a numerical optimization approach the method is able to assess in acceptable times several hundreds of thousands source-mask combinations for small, critical layout snippets. This allows a global optimization scheme to be applied to the SMO problem which is expected to better explore the optimization space and thus to yield an improved solution quality compared to local optimizations methods. The method is applied to an example system for investigating the impact of source constraints on the SMO results. Also, it is investigated how well possibly conflicting goals of low MEEF and large DoF can be balanced.

  19. Protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography masks. II. Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination [Protection of EUV lithography masks II: Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Torczynski, John R.; Geller, Anthony S.; Gallis, Michael A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Chilese, Frank C.; Garcia, Rudy F.; Delgado, Gil

    2015-03-27

    An analysis is presented of a method to protect the reticle (mask) in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask inspection tool using a showerhead plenum to provide a continuous flow of clean gas over the surface of a reticle. The reticle is suspended in an inverted fashion (face down) within a stage/holder that moves back and forth over the showerhead plenum as the reticle is inspected. It is essential that no particles of 10-nm diameter or larger be deposited on the reticle during inspection. Particles can originate from multiple sources in the system, and mask protection from each source is explicitly analyzed. The showerhead plate has an internal plenum with a solid conical wall isolating the aperture. The upper and lower surfaces of the plate are thin flat sheets of porous-metal material. These porous sheets form the top and bottom showerheads that supply the region between the showerhead plate and the reticle and the region between the conical aperture and the Optics Zone box with continuous flows of clean gas. The model studies show that the top showerhead provides robust reticle protection from particles of 10-nm diameter or larger originating from the Reticle Zone and from plenum surfaces contaminated by exposure to the Reticle Zone. Protection is achieved with negligible effect on EUV transmission. Furthermore, the bottom showerhead efficiently protects the reticle from nanoscale particles originating from the Optics Zone.

  20. Protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography masks. II. Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination [Protection of EUV lithography masks II: Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination

    DOE PAGES

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Torczynski, John R.; Geller, Anthony S.; ...

    2015-03-27

    An analysis is presented of a method to protect the reticle (mask) in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask inspection tool using a showerhead plenum to provide a continuous flow of clean gas over the surface of a reticle. The reticle is suspended in an inverted fashion (face down) within a stage/holder that moves back and forth over the showerhead plenum as the reticle is inspected. It is essential that no particles of 10-nm diameter or larger be deposited on the reticle during inspection. Particles can originate from multiple sources in the system, and mask protection from each source is explicitlymore » analyzed. The showerhead plate has an internal plenum with a solid conical wall isolating the aperture. The upper and lower surfaces of the plate are thin flat sheets of porous-metal material. These porous sheets form the top and bottom showerheads that supply the region between the showerhead plate and the reticle and the region between the conical aperture and the Optics Zone box with continuous flows of clean gas. The model studies show that the top showerhead provides robust reticle protection from particles of 10-nm diameter or larger originating from the Reticle Zone and from plenum surfaces contaminated by exposure to the Reticle Zone. Protection is achieved with negligible effect on EUV transmission. Furthermore, the bottom showerhead efficiently protects the reticle from nanoscale particles originating from the Optics Zone.« less