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Sample records for modeling group iv

  1. Modeling Group IV elements with new transferable tight-binding models

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.; Biswas, R.

    1993-10-01

    An outstanding problem in the computer-based microscopic description of Group IV materials, is the need for an accurate transferable model of the energetic and electronic properties of semiconductor structures. The three complementary approaches have been the ab-initio method including Car-Parinello simulations, the classical molecular dynamics method, and tight-binding molecular dynamics. While being very accurate, the ab-initio molecular dynamics has been performed on small systems ({approximately}100 atoms) for short time scales ({approximately}10 ps). On the other hand, classical potential models have had much success in describing melting of silicon, amorphous silicon structures, thin film growth and a variety of computationally intensive molecular dynamics simulations. However, the classical based models do not contain important electronic information which is essential in a variety of problems in electronic materials such as determining the gap states for structural defects. The accuracy of the classical models in configurations, far from the fitting database, may be uncertain. Our approach is to find transferable tight-binding models for silicon that are in between the ab-initio simulations and the classical models for molecular dynamics in level of sophistication.

  2. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  3. Stable kagome lattices from group IV elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaerts, O.; Schoeters, B.; Partoens, B.

    2015-03-01

    A thorough investigation of three-dimensional kagome lattices of group IV elements is performed with first-principles calculations. The investigated kagome lattices of silicon and germanium are found to be of similar stability as the recently proposed carbon kagome lattice. Carbon and silicon kagome lattices are both direct-gap semiconductors but they have qualitatively different electronic band structures. While direct optical transitions between the valence and conduction bands are allowed in the carbon case, no such transitions can be observed for silicon. The kagome lattice of germanium exhibits semimetallic behavior but can be transformed into a semiconductor after compression.

  4. Models, Part IV: Inquiry Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses models for information skills that include inquiry-oriented activities. Highlights include WebQuest, which uses Internet resources supplemented with videoconferencing; Minnesota's Inquiry Process based on the Big Six model for information problem-solving; Indiana's Student Inquiry Model; constructivist learning models for inquiry; and…

  5. Basic properties, growth and preparation methods of group IV heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, E.

    This document is part of subvolume C3 'Optical Properties' of volume 34 'Semiconductor quantum structures' of Landolt-Börnstein, Group III, Condensed Matter, on the optical properties of quantum heterostructures based on group IV semiconductors. It discusses basic properties, growth and preparation methods of group IV heterostructures, including epitaxial growth processes, lattice mismatch and its implication on critical thickness and interface structure, and virtual substrates and strain relaxation.

  6. Group IV photonics for the mid infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soref, Richard

    2013-02-01

    This paper outlines the challenges and benefits of applying silicon-based photonic techniques in the 2 to 5 μm midinfrared (MIR) wavelength range for chem.-bio-physical sensing, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, environmental monitoring, secure communications, Ladar, active imaging, and high-speed communications at 2 μm. Onchip passive and active components, mostly waveguided, will enable opto-electronic CMOS or BiCMOS integrated "circuits" for system-on-a-chip applications such as spectroscopy and lab-on-a-chip. Volume manufacture in a silicon foundry is expected to yield low-cost (or even disposable) chips with benefits in size-weight-power and ruggedness. This is "long-wavelength optoelectronic integration on silicon" which we call LIOS. Room temperature operation appears feasible, albeit with performance compromises at 4 to 5 μm. In addition to the electronics layer (which may include RF wireless), a 3-D LIOS chip can include several inter-communicating layers utilizing the photonic, plasmonic, photoniccrystal and opto-electro-mechanical technologies. The LIOS challenge can be met by (1) discovering new physics, (2) employing "new" IV and III-V alloys, (3) scaling-up and modifying telecom components, and (4) applying nonlinearoptical wavelength conversion in some cases. This paper presents proposals for MIR chip spectrometers employing frequency-comb and Ge blackbody sources. Active heterostructures employing Si, Ge, SiGe, GeSn and SiGeSn are key for laser diodes, photodetectors, LEDs, switches, amplifiers, and modulators that provide totally monolithic foundry integration, while numerous III-V semiconductor MIR devices within the InGaAsSb and InGaAsP families offer practical hybrid integration on Si PICs. Interband cascade and quantum cascade lasers on Ge waveguides are important in this context.

  7. Printed-Circuit-Board Soldering Training for Group IV Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooprich, E. A.; Matlock, E. W.

    As part of a larger program to determine which Navy skills can be learned by lower aptitude personnel, and which methods and techniques would be most effective, an experimental course in printed circuit board soldering was given to 186 Group IV students in 13 classes. Two different training approaches--one stressing instructor guidance and the…

  8. Beyond the Standard Model IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunion, John F.; Han, Tao; Ohnemus, James

    1995-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Organizing and Advisory Committees * PLENARY SESSIONS * Looking Beyond the Standard Model from LEP1 and LEP2 * Virtual Effects of Physics Beyond the Standard Model * Extended Gauge Sectors * CLEO's Views Beyond the Standard Model * On Estimating Perturbative Coefficients in Quantum Field Theory and Statistical Physics * Perturbative Corrections to Inclusive Heavy Hadron Decay * Some Recent Developments in Sphalerons * Searching for New Matter Particles at Future Colliders * Issues in Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking * Present Status of Fermilab Collider Accelerator Upgrades * The Extraordinary Scientific Opportunities from Upgrading Fermilab's Luminosity ≥ 1033 cm-2 sec-1 * Applications of Effective Lagrangians * Collider Phenomenology for Strongly Interacting Electroweak Sector * Physics of Self-Interacting Electroweak Bosons * Particle Physics at a TeV-Scale e+e- Linear Collider * Physics at γγ and eγ Colliders * Challenges for Non-Minimal Higgs Searchers at Future Colliders * Physics Potential and Development of μ+μ- Colliders * Beyond Standard Quantum Chromodynamics * Extracting Predictions from Supergravity/Superstrings for the Effective Theory Below the Planck Scale * Non-Universal SUSY Breaking, Hierarchy and Squark Degeneracy * Supersymmetric Phenomenology in the Light of Grand Unification * A Survey of Phenomenological Constraints on Supergravity Models * Precision Tests of the MSSM * The Search for Supersymmetry * Neutrino Physics * Neutrino Mass: Oscillations and Hot Dark Matter * Dark Matter and Large-Scale Structure * Electroweak Baryogenesis * Progress in Searches for Non-Baryonic Dark Matter * Big Bang Nucleosynthesis * Flavor Tests of Quark-Lepton * Where are We Coming from? What are We? Where are We Going? * Summary, Perspectives * PARALLEL SESSIONS * SUSY Phenomenology I * Is Rb Telling us that Superpartners will soon be Discovered? * Dark Matter in Constrained Minimal

  9. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Sevilla Torres, Galo A.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-06-01

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective.

  10. Synthesis and Properties of Group IV Graphane Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Joshua

    Similar to how carbon networks can be sculpted into low-dimensional allotropes such as fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene with fundamentally different properties, it is possible to create similar ligand terminated sp3-hybridized honeycomb graphane derivatives containing Ge or Sn that feature unique and tunable properties. Here, we will describe our recent success in the creation of hydrogen and organic-terminated group IV graphane analogues, from the topochemical deintercalation of precursor Zintl phases, such as CaGe2. We will discuss how the optical, electronic, and thermal properties of these materials can be systematically controlled by substituting either the surface ligand or via alloying with other Group IV elements. Additionally, we have also developed an epitopotaxial approach for integrating precise thicknesses of germanane layers onto Ge wafers that combines the epitaxial deposition of CaGe2 precursor phases with the topotactic interconversion into the 2D material. Finally, we will describe our recent efforts on the synthesis and crystal structures of Sn-containing graphane alloys in order to access novel topological phenomena predicted to occur in these graphanes.

  11. Polarization and valley switching in monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanakata, Paul Z.; Carvalho, Alexandra; Campbell, David K.; Park, Harold S.

    2016-07-01

    Group-IV monochalcogenides are a family of two-dimensional puckered materials with an orthorhombic structure that is comprised of polar layers. In this article, we use first principles calculations to show the multistability of monolayer SnS and GeSe, two prototype materials where the direction of the puckering can be switched by application of tensile stress or electric field. Furthermore, the two inequivalent valleys in momentum space, which are dictated by the puckering orientation, can be excited selectively using linearly polarized light, and this provides an additional tool to identify the polarization direction. Our findings suggest that SnS and GeSe monolayers may have observable ferroelectricity and multistability, with potential applications in information storage.

  12. Ferroelectricity and Phase Transitions in Monolayer Group-IV Monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Kang, Wei; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Ferroelectricity usually fades away as materials are thinned down below a critical value. We reveal that the unique ionic-potential anharmonicity can induce spontaneous in-plane electrical polarization and ferroelectricity in monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides M X (M =Ge , Sn; X =S , Se). An effective Hamiltonian has been successfully extracted from the parametrized energy space, making it possible to study the ferroelectric phase transitions in a single-atom layer. The ferroelectricity in these materials is found to be robust and the corresponding Curie temperatures are higher than room temperature, making them promising for realizing ultrathin ferroelectric devices of broad interest. We further provide the phase diagram and predict other potentially two-dimensional ferroelectric materials.

  13. Ferroelectricity and Phase Transitions in Monolayer Group-IV Monochalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ruixiang; Kang, Wei; Yang, Li

    2016-08-26

    Ferroelectricity usually fades away as materials are thinned down below a critical value. We reveal that the unique ionic-potential anharmonicity can induce spontaneous in-plane electrical polarization and ferroelectricity in monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides MX (M=Ge, Sn; X=S, Se). An effective Hamiltonian has been successfully extracted from the parametrized energy space, making it possible to study the ferroelectric phase transitions in a single-atom layer. The ferroelectricity in these materials is found to be robust and the corresponding Curie temperatures are higher than room temperature, making them promising for realizing ultrathin ferroelectric devices of broad interest. We further provide the phase diagram and predict other potentially two-dimensional ferroelectric materials. PMID:27610884

  14. Atmosphere of Mars: Mariner IV Models Compared.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, G; Fjeldbo, W C; Eshleman, V R

    1966-09-23

    Three classes of models for the atmosphere of Mars differ in identifying the main ionospheric layer measured by Mariner IV as being analogous to a terrestrial F(2), F(1), or E layer. At an altitude of several hundred kilometers, the relative atmospheric mass densities for these models (in the order named) are approximately 1, 10(2), and 10(4), and the temperatures are roughly 100 degrees , 200 degrees , and 400 degrees K. Theory and observation are in best agreement for an F, s model, for which photodissociation of CO(2), and diffusive separation result in an atomic-oxygen upper atmosphere, with O(+) being the principal ion in the isothermal topside of the ionosphere. The mesopause temperature minimum would be at or below the freezing point of CO(2), and dry ice particles would be expected to form. However, an F(1) model, with molecular ions in a mixed and warmer upper atmosphere, might result if photodissociation and diffusive separation are markedly less than would be expected from analogy with Earth's upper atmosphere. The E model proposed by Chamberlain and McElroy appears very unlikely; it is not compatible with the measured ionization profile unless rather unlikely assumptions are made about the values, and changes with height, of the effective recombination coefficient and the average ion mass. Moreover our theoretical heat-budget computations for the atmospheric region probed by Mariner IV indicate markedly lower temperatures and temperature gradients than were obtained for the E model. PMID:17749730

  15. Atmosphere of Mars: Mariner IV Models Compared.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, G; Fjeldbo, W C; Eshleman, V R

    1966-09-23

    Three classes of models for the atmosphere of Mars differ in identifying the main ionospheric layer measured by Mariner IV as being analogous to a terrestrial F(2), F(1), or E layer. At an altitude of several hundred kilometers, the relative atmospheric mass densities for these models (in the order named) are approximately 1, 10(2), and 10(4), and the temperatures are roughly 100 degrees , 200 degrees , and 400 degrees K. Theory and observation are in best agreement for an F, s model, for which photodissociation of CO(2), and diffusive separation result in an atomic-oxygen upper atmosphere, with O(+) being the principal ion in the isothermal topside of the ionosphere. The mesopause temperature minimum would be at or below the freezing point of CO(2), and dry ice particles would be expected to form. However, an F(1) model, with molecular ions in a mixed and warmer upper atmosphere, might result if photodissociation and diffusive separation are markedly less than would be expected from analogy with Earth's upper atmosphere. The E model proposed by Chamberlain and McElroy appears very unlikely; it is not compatible with the measured ionization profile unless rather unlikely assumptions are made about the values, and changes with height, of the effective recombination coefficient and the average ion mass. Moreover our theoretical heat-budget computations for the atmospheric region probed by Mariner IV indicate markedly lower temperatures and temperature gradients than were obtained for the E model.

  16. Ratchet model for type IV pilus retraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindén, Martin; Tuohimaa, Tomi; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Wallin, Mats

    2004-03-01

    Type IV pilus rectraction is required for twitching motility in a wide range of bacteriae, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Myxococcus xanthus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mechanism of retraction is believed to be filament disassembly mediated by PilT, a member of the AAA family of motor proteins. Recent laser tweezer measurements of the force-velocity relation of PilT in N. gonorrhoeae, reveal that single PilT complexes generate forces of over 100 pN. We assume that PilT forms a cyclic ATPase surrounding the base of the pilus and formulate a model of retraction in terms of coupled flashing ratchets. We obtain a force-velocity relation by numerical simulation of the model which is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  17. 77 FR 16508 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ..., was published on January 9, 2012 (77 FR 1268). EPA has established the public docket for the proposed...: Group IV Polymers and Resins; Pesticide Active Ingredient Production; and Polyether Polyols Production... pollutants: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and...

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for DSM-IV Among Four Racial Groups

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christina M.; Klenck, Suzanne C.; Norton, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report diagnostic measure of generalized anxiety disorder. Previous studies have established the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV revealing excellent diagnostic specificity and sensitivity as well as good test-retest reliability and convergent and discriminant validity (Newman et al., 2002). Recent analyses with other measures of anxiety symptoms have revealed differences across racial or national groups. Given that the GAD-Q-IV was tested primarily on Caucasian (78%) participants, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV across four racial groups: African American, Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian. A student sample of 585 undergraduate psychology students completed the GAD-Q-IV as well as other measures of anxiety symptoms. A clinical replication sample was obtained from 188 clinical participants who completed the GAD-Q-IV as part of a larger psychotherapy study. Results indicated excellent and very similar factor structures in the student sample, and similar psychometric properties across both samples across the racial groups. Implications for the use of the GAD-Q-IV across racial groups are discussed. PMID:20830629

  19. Wyoming's Early Settlement and Ethnic Groups, Unit IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming's early settlement and ethnic groups provides concepts, activities, stories, charts, and graphs for elementary school students. Concepts include the attraction Wyoming held for trappers; the major social, economic, and religious event called "The Rendezvous"; the different ethnic and religious groups that presently inhabit…

  20. Hydrogen-bond Specific Materials Modification in Group IV Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolk, Norman H.; Feldman, L. C.; Luepke, G.

    2015-09-14

    impurity states under transient compression. This research focused on the characterization of photon and ion stimulated hydrogen related defect and impurity reactions and migration in solid state matter, which requires a detailed understanding of the rates and pathways of vibrational energy flow, of the transfer channels and of the coupling mechanisms between local vibrational modes (LVMs) and phonon bath as well as the electronic system of the host material. It should be stressed that researchers at Vanderbilt and William and Mary represented a unique group with a research focus and capabilities for low temperature creation and investigation of such material systems. Later in the program, we carried out a vigorous research effort addressing the roles of defects, interfaces, and dopants on the optical and electronic characteristics of semiconductor crystals, using phonon generation by means of ultrafast coherent acoustic phonon (CAP) spectroscopy, nonlinear characterization using second harmonic generation (SHG), and ultrafast pump-and-probe reflectivity and absorption measurements. This program featured research efforts from hydrogen defects in silicon alone to other forms of defects such as interfaces and dopant layers, as well as other important semiconducting systems. Even so, the emphasis remains on phenomena and processes far from equilibrium, such as hot electron effects and travelling localized phonon waves. This program relates directly to the mission of the Department of Energy. Knowledge of the rates and pathways of vibrational energy flow in condensed matter is critical for understanding dynamical processes in solids including electronically, optically and thermally stimulated defect and impurity reactions and migration. The ability to directly probe these pathways and rates allows tests of theory and scaling laws at new levels of precision. Hydrogen embedded in model crystalline semiconductors and metal oxides is of particular interest, since the associated

  1. Adsorption and dynamics of group IV, V atoms and molecular oxygen on semiconductor group IV (0 0 1) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, T

    2016-08-10

    In this review we address (1) the co-adsorption of group V (As, Sb, Bi) atoms and molecular oxygen on the Si(0 0 1) surface and (2) the adsorption and dynamics of Sb, Bi, Si and Ge ad-dimers on the Si(0 0 1) and Ge(0 0 1) surfaces. The adsorption and diffusion processes of group IV and V atoms on the (0 0 1) surfaces of group IV semiconductor surfaces have been studied using multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and density functional theory calculations. Results obtained by various types of first-principle total energy calculations are mutually compared and discussed. Our results demonstrate the capability of these quantum chemistry methods to provide relevant and reliable information on the interaction between adsorbate and semiconductor surfaces.

  2. Adsorption and dynamics of group IV, V atoms and molecular oxygen on semiconductor group IV (0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasieva, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this review we address (1) the co-adsorption of group V (As, Sb, Bi) atoms and molecular oxygen on the Si(0 0 1) surface and (2) the adsorption and dynamics of Sb, Bi, Si and Ge ad-dimers on the Si(0 0 1) and Ge(0 0 1) surfaces. The adsorption and diffusion processes of group IV and V atoms on the (0 0 1) surfaces of group IV semiconductor surfaces have been studied using multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and density functional theory calculations. Results obtained by various types of first-principle total energy calculations are mutually compared and discussed. Our results demonstrate the capability of these quantum chemistry methods to provide relevant and reliable information on the interaction between adsorbate and semiconductor surfaces.

  3. Introduction of bifunctional groups into mesoporous silica for enhancing uptake of thorium(IV) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li-Yong; Bai, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Ran; Liu, Ya-Lan; Li, Zi-Jie; Chu, Sheng-Qi; Zheng, Li-Rong; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-04-01

    The potential industrial application of thorium (Th), as well as the environmental and human healthy problems caused by thorium, promotes the development of reliable methods for the separation and removal of Th(IV) from environmental and geological samples. Herein, the phosphonate-amino bifunctionalized mesoporous silica (PAMS) was fabricated by a one-step self-assembly approach for enhancing Th(IV) uptake from aqueous solution. The synthesized sorbent was found to possess ordered mesoporous structures with uniform pore diameter and large surface area, characterized by SEM, XRD, and N2 sorption/desorption measurements. The enhancement of Th(IV) uptake by PAMS was achieved by coupling of an access mechanism to a complexation mechanism, and the sorption can be optimized by adjusting the coverage of the functional groups in the PAMS sorbent. The systemic study on Th(IV) sorption/desorption by using one coverage of PAMS (PAMS12) shows that the Th(IV) sorption by PAMS is fast with equilibrium time of less than 1 h, and the sorption capacity is more than 160 mg/g at a relatively low pH. The sorption isotherm has been successfully modeled by the Langmuir isotherm and D-R isotherm, which reveals a monolayer homogeneous chemisorption of Th(IV) in PAMS. The Th(IV) sorption by PAMS is pH dependent but ionic strength independent. In addition, the sorbed Th(IV) can be completely desorbed using 0.2 mol/L or more concentrated nitric acid solution. The sorption test performed in the solution containing a range of competing metal ions suggests that the PAMS sorbent has a desirable selectivity for Th(IV) ions.

  4. EXPRESS: Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Renuka; Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  5. Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  6. IVS Working Group 2 for Product Specification and Observing Programs --- Status Report of the Chairman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Harald

    2001-12-01

    An important part of the IVS efforts is to provide the best products for the user community and to optimize the use of available global resources. During the 5th IVS Directing Board meeting on Feb 15th, 2001 the IVS products and related programs were discussed. It was decided to set up an IVS Working Group (WG2) for Product Specification and Observing Programs. Members of WG2 were chosen from among experts in the field of geodetic/astrometric VLBI. The charter to WG2 is: - Review the usefulness and appropriateness of the current definition of IVS products and suggest modifications. - Recommend guidelines for accuracy, timeliness, and redundancy of products. - Review the quality and appropriateness of existing observing programs with respect to the desired products. - Suggest a realistic set of observing programs which should result in achieving the desired products, taking into account existing agency programs. - Set goals for improvements in IVS products and suggest how these may possibly be achieved in the future. - Present a written report to the IVS Directing Board at its next meeting. An overview about the activities of Working Group 2 and the results achieved so far will be given.

  7. Mechanistic and cytotoxicity studies of group IV β-diketonate complexes.

    PubMed

    Lord, Rianne M; Mannion, James J; Hebden, Andrew J; Nako, Adi E; Crossley, Benjamin D; McMullon, Max W; Janeway, Felix D; Phillips, Roger M; McGowan, Patrick C

    2014-06-01

    Group IV metal complexes have previously shown promise as novel anticancer agents. Here, we discuss the mechanistic and cytotoxic nature of a series of group IV β-diketonate coordination complexes. Clear evidence that the ligands are exchangeable on the metal centre and that the β-diketonate ligands can act as potential drug delivery vehicles of the group IV metal ions was obtained. When evaluated for the cytotoxicity against human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell lines, a general trend of decreasing potency down the group IV metals was observed. The most promising results obtained were for the hafnium complexes, with the tris diphenyl β-diketonate hafnium complex exhibiting IC50 values of 4.9 ± 0.9 μM and 3.2 ± 0.3 μM against HT-29 and MCF-7, respectively, which are comparable with the activity of cisplatin against the same cell lines. This tri β-diketonate hafnium complex is the first to show potent in vitro cytotoxic activity. The results reported show that ligand design has a significant effect on the cytotoxic potential of the complexes, and that these group IV complexes warrant further evaluation as novel metal-containing anticancer agents.

  8. The Specification of Causal Models with Tetrad IV: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsheer, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Tetrad IV is a program designed for the specification of causal models. It is specifically designed to search for causal relations, but also offers the possibility to estimate the parameters of a structural equation model. It offers a remarkable graphical user interface, which facilitates building, evaluating, and searching for causal models. The…

  9. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  10. Spectrosmicroscopic and spectroscopic investigation of U(IV) speciation in model mineral-organic matter assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bone, S.; Dynes, J.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Both nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2) and non-crystalline U(IV) occur in anoxic sediments, controlling the fate and transport of U in contaminated aquifers. It is important to distinguish between these forms of U because non-crystalline species are more reactive towards oxidants and aqueous complexing ligands, increasing the likelihood of U re-release into groundwater in the presence of such solutes. Much work has been done to elucidate microbiological and geochemical conditions favoring non-crystalline U(IV) or UO2 formation, primarily in model systems containing a single type of U(VI)-reducing bacterium. Research suggests that microbial biomass, including cell walls and exopolymeric substances (EPS), can adsorb U(IV), likely via phosphoryl groups. Furthermore, conditions that favor EPS formation appear to promote non-crystalline U(IV) formation. Non-crystalline U(IV) formation is also favored in the presence of phosphate. However, U(IV) behavior in complicated systems containing competing U(IV) sorbents has not been studied. Investigations of U(IV) behavior in such systems are needed to understand uranium mobility in natural sediments, which contain multiple sinks for U(IV). We have developed a model system in which the native microbial consortia associated with partially decayed plant roots utilize homogenized root material to facilitate U(VI) reduction during anaerobic incubations. The model is intended to simulate an environment similar to that found in anoxic sediments where buried organic matter drives anaerobic respiration. We use this model to address the following questions: (1) Does U(IV) become associated with organic materials or minerals (or both)? (2) Does U(IV) form complexes with particular ligands, such as P? (3) Is UO2 produced when aqueous U(VI) concentrations are relatively low (~1 μM), which is typical of even contaminated sites? We have found that U(IV) does not form UO2 at low, environmentally relevant U:sorbent ratios. Furthermore

  11. Spectrosmicroscopic and spectroscopic investigation of U(IV) speciation in model mineral-organic matter assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booij, M. J.; Houtenbos, H.; Hoekstra, A. Y. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Both nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2) and non-crystalline U(IV) occur in anoxic sediments, controlling the fate and transport of U in contaminated aquifers. It is important to distinguish between these forms of U because non-crystalline species are more reactive towards oxidants and aqueous complexing ligands, increasing the likelihood of U re-release into groundwater in the presence of such solutes. Much work has been done to elucidate microbiological and geochemical conditions favoring non-crystalline U(IV) or UO2 formation, primarily in model systems containing a single type of U(VI)-reducing bacterium. Research suggests that microbial biomass, including cell walls and exopolymeric substances (EPS), can adsorb U(IV), likely via phosphoryl groups. Furthermore, conditions that favor EPS formation appear to promote non-crystalline U(IV) formation. Non-crystalline U(IV) formation is also favored in the presence of phosphate. However, U(IV) behavior in complicated systems containing competing U(IV) sorbents has not been studied. Investigations of U(IV) behavior in such systems are needed to understand uranium mobility in natural sediments, which contain multiple sinks for U(IV). We have developed a model system in which the native microbial consortia associated with partially decayed plant roots utilize homogenized root material to facilitate U(VI) reduction during anaerobic incubations. The model is intended to simulate an environment similar to that found in anoxic sediments where buried organic matter drives anaerobic respiration. We use this model to address the following questions: (1) Does U(IV) become associated with organic materials or minerals (or both)? (2) Does U(IV) form complexes with particular ligands, such as P? (3) Is UO2 produced when aqueous U(VI) concentrations are relatively low (~1 μM), which is typical of even contaminated sites? We have found that U(IV) does not form UO2 at low, environmentally relevant U:sorbent ratios. Furthermore

  12. The Structural Basis for Promoter −35 Element Recognition by the Group IV σ Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lane, William J; Darst, Seth A

    2006-01-01

    The control of bacterial transcription initiation depends on a primary σ factor for housekeeping functions, as well as alternative σ factors that control regulons in response to environmental stresses. The largest and most diverse subgroup of alternative σ factors, the group IV extracytoplasmic function σ factors, directs the transcription of genes that regulate a wide variety of responses, including envelope stress and pathogenesis. We determined the 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the −35 element recognition domain of a group IV σ factor, Escherichia coli σE4, bound to its consensus −35 element, GGAACTT. Despite similar function and secondary structure, the primary and group IV σ factors recognize their −35 elements using distinct mechanisms. Conserved sequence elements of the σE −35 element induce a DNA geometry characteristic of AA/TT-tract DNA, including a rigid, straight double-helical axis and a narrow minor groove. For this reason, the highly conserved AA in the middle of the GGAACTT motif is essential for −35 element recognition by σE4, despite the absence of direct protein–DNA interactions with these DNA bases. These principles of σE4/−35 element recognition can be applied to a wide range of other group IV σ factors. PMID:16903784

  13. Theory and modeling group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  14. FACES IV and the Circumplex Model: Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, David

    2011-01-01

    Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale (FACES) IV was developed to tap the full continuum of the cohesion and flexibility dimensions from the Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems. Six scales were developed, with two balanced scales and four unbalanced scales designed to tap low and high cohesion (disengaged and enmeshed) and…

  15. The Genus Veillonella IV. Serological Groupings, and Genus and Species Emendations

    PubMed Central

    Rogosa, M.

    1965-01-01

    Rogosa, M. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, Md.). The genus Veillonella. IV. Serological groupings, and genus and species emendations. J. Bacteriol. 90:704–709. 1965.—Seven serological groups of Veillonella were found. The generic and species descriptions are enlarged and corrected. The type species is Veillonella parvula (Veillon and Zuber) Prévot, 1933. The proposed species, subspecies (infraspecific serogroups), and American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strains are: Veillonella parvula subsp. parvula subsp. nov. (antigenic group VI), ATCC 10790; Veillonella parvula subsp. rodentium subsp. nov. (antigenic group II), ATCC 17743; Veillonella parvula subsp. atypica subsp. nov. (antigenic group V), ATCC 17744; Veillonella alcalescens subsp. alcalescens subsp. nov. (antigenic group IV), ATCC 17745; Veillonella alcalescens subsp. ratti subsp. nov. (antigenic group III), ATCC 17746; Veillonella alcalescens subsp. criceti subsp. nov. (antigenic group I), ATCC 17747; and Veillonella alcalescens subsp. dispar subsp. nov. (antigenic group VII), ATCC 17748. The following species listed in Bergey's Manual (7th ed.) are rejected as members of the genus: V. discoides, V. reniformis, V. orbiculus, and V. vulvovaginitidis. PMID:16562069

  16. Serotype IV and invasive group B Streptococcus disease in neonates, Minnesota, USA, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, Patricia; Lynfield, Ruth; Creti, Roberta; Flores, Aurea E

    2013-04-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in neonates in the United States. Surveillance of invasive GBS disease in Minnesota, USA, during 2000-2010 yielded 449 isolates from 449 infants; 257 had early-onset (EO) disease (by age 6 days) and 192 late-onset (LO) disease (180 at age 7-89 days, 12 at age 90-180 days). Isolates were characterized by capsular polysaccharide serotype and surface-protein profile; types III and Ia predominated. However, because previously uncommon serotype IV constitutes 5/31 EO isolates in 2010, twelve type IV isolates collected during 2000-2010 were studied further. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, they were classified into 3 profiles; by multilocus sequence typing, representative isolates included new sequence type 468. Resistance to clindamycin or erythromycin was detected in 4/5 serotype IV isolates. Emergence of serotype IV GBS in Minnesota highlights the need for serotype prevalence monitoring to detect trends that could affect prevention strategies.

  17. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  18. Purinergic 2 receptor blockade prevents the responses of group IV afferents to post-contraction circulatory occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, Angela E; Hayes, Shawn G; Kaufman, Marc P

    2007-01-01

    ATP, by activating purinergic 2 (P2) receptors on group III and IV afferents, is thought to evoke the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. Previously we have shown that injection of PPADS, a P2 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of skeletal muscle of decerebrated cats attenuated the responses of group III and IV afferents to static contraction while the muscles were freely perfused. We have now tested the hypothesis that injection of PPADS (10 mg kg−1) attenuated the responses of group III (n = 13) and group IV afferents (n = 9) to post-contraction circulatory occlusion. In the present study, we found that PPADS attenuated the group III afferent responses to static contraction during circulatory occlusion (P < 0.05). Likewise, PPADS abolished the group IV afferent responses to static contraction during occlusion (P = 0.001). During a 1 minute period of post-contraction circulatory occlusion, four of the 13 group III afferents and eight of the nine group IV afferents maintained their increased discharge. A Fischer's exact probability test revealed that more group IV afferents than group III afferents were stimulated by post-contraction circulatory occlusion (P < 0.02). In addition, the nine group IV afferents increased their mean discharge rate over baseline levels during the post-contraction circulatory occlusion period, whereas the 13 group III afferents did not (P < 0.05). PPADS abolished this post-contraction increase in discharge by the group IV afferents (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that P2 receptors on group IV afferents play a role in evoking the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:17038431

  19. Structure activity relationship modelling of milk protein-derived peptides with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative structure activity type models were developed in an attempt to predict the key features of peptide sequences having dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity. The models were then employed to help predict the potential of peptides, which are currently reported in the literature to be present in the intestinal tract of humans following milk/dairy product ingestion, to act as inhibitors of DPP-IV. Two models (z- and v-scale) for short (2-5 amino acid residues) bovine milk peptides, behaving as competitive inhibitors of DPP-IV, were developed. The z- and the v-scale models (p<0.05, R(2) of 0.829 and 0.815, respectively) were then applied to 56 milk protein-derived peptides previously reported in the literature to be found in the intestinal tract of humans which possessed a structural feature of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides (P at the N2 position). Ten of these peptides were synthetized and tested for their in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory properties. There was no agreement between the predicted and experimentally determined DPP-IV half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for the competitive peptide inhibitors. However, the ranking for DPP-IV inhibitory potency of the competitive peptide inhibitors was conserved. Furthermore, potent in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity was observed with two peptides, LPVPQ (IC50=43.8±8.8μM) and IPM (IC50=69.5±8.7μM). Peptides present within the gastrointestinal tract of human may have promise for the development of natural DPP-IV inhibitors for the management of serum glucose.

  20. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Invasive Serotype IV Group B Streptococcus, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; McGeer, Allison; Li, Aimin; Gomes, Janice; Seah, Christine; Demczuk, Walter; Martin, Irene; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Melano, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that 37/600 (6.2%) invasive infections with group B Streptococcus (GBS) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, were caused by serotype IV strains. We report a relatively high level of genetic diversity in 37 invasive strains of this emerging GBS serotype. Multilocus sequence typing identified 6 sequence types (STs) that belonged to 3 clonal complexes. Most isolates were ST-459 (19/37, 51%) and ST-452 (11/37, 30%), but we also identified ST-291, ST-3, ST-196, and a novel ST-682. We detected further diversity by performing whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis and found evidence of recombination events contributing to variation in some serotype IV GBS strains. We also evaluated antimicrobial drug resistance and found that ST-459 strains were resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin, whereas strains of other STs were, for the most part, susceptible to these antimicrobial drugs. PMID:25811284

  1. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-IV in MATXS Format.

    SciTech Connect

    MACFARLANE, ROBERT

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSl are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3, and those with photon scattering data in Table 4.

  2. 30-Group Neutron, 12-Group Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B-IV in MATXS Format.

    1985-12-30

    Version: 00 The library was prepared with a fusion + fission + l/E + thermal Maxwellian weight function and has proved useful for many high energy calculations, including criticals such as GODIVA. It works reasonably well for many shielding problems where resonance selfshielding is not too important. The energy group structures for MATXSl are listed in Table 1, the materials with neutron scattering data in Table 2, those with photon production data in Table 3,more » and those with photon scattering data in Table 4.« less

  3. Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNV) are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HuNV attaches to cell surface carbohydrate structures known as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) prior to internalization, and HBGA polymorphism among human populations is closely linked to susceptibility to HuNV. Noroviruses are divided into 6 genogroups, with human strains grouped into genogroups I (GI), II, and IV. Canine norovirus (CNV) is a recently discovered pathogen in dogs, with strains classified into genogroups IV and VI. Whereas it is known that GI to GIII noroviruses bind to HBGAs and GV noroviruses recognize terminal sialic acid residues, the attachment factors for GIV and GVI noroviruses have not been reported. This study sought to determine the carbohydrate binding specificity of CNV and to compare it to the binding specificities of noroviruses from other genogroups. A panel of synthetic oligosaccharides were used to assess the binding specificity of CNV virus-like particles (VLPs) and identified α1,2-fucose as a key attachment factor. CNV VLP binding to canine saliva and tissue samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunohistochemistry confirmed that α1,2-fucose-containing H and A antigens of the HBGA family were recognized by CNV. Phenotyping studies demonstrated expression of these antigens in a population of dogs. The virus-ligand interaction was further characterized using blockade studies, cell lines expressing HBGAs, and enzymatic removal of candidate carbohydrates from tissue sections. Recognition of HBGAs by CNV provides new insights into the evolution of noroviruses and raises concerns regarding the potential for zoonotic transmission of CNV to humans. IMPORTANCE Infections with human norovirus cause acute gastroenteritis in millions of people each year worldwide. Noroviruses can also affect nonhuman species and are divided into 6 different groups based on their capsid sequences. Human noroviruses in genogroups

  4. Direct band gaps in group IV-VI monolayer materials: Binary counterparts of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, C.; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-03-01

    We perform systematic investigation on the geometric, energetic, and electronic properties of group IV-VI binary monolayers (XY ), which are the counterparts of phosphorene, by employing density functional theory based electronic structure calculations. For this purpose, we choose the binary systems X Y consisting of equal numbers of group IV (X = C, Si, Ge, Sn) and group VI elements (Y = O, S, Se, Te) in three geometrical configurations, the puckered, buckled and planar structures. The results of binding energy calculations show that all the binary systems studied are energetically stable. It is observed that, the puckered structure, similar to that of phosphorene, is the energetically most stable geometric configuration. Moreover, the binding energies of buckled configuration are very close to those of the puckered configuration. Our results of electronic band structure predict that puckered SiO and CSe are direct band semiconductors with gaps of 1.449 and 0.905 eV, respectively. Band structure of CSe closely resembles that of phosphorene. Remaining group IV-VI binary monolayers in the puckered configuration and all the buckled monolayers are also semiconductors, but with indirect band gaps. Importantly, we find that the difference between indirect and direct band gaps is very small for many puckered monolayers. Thus there is a possibility of making these systems undergo transition from indirect to direct band gap semiconducting state by a suitable external influence. Indeed, we show in the present work that seven binary monolayers, namely, SnS, SiSe, GeSe, SnSe, SiTe, GeTe, and SnTe become direct band gap semiconductors when they are subjected to a small mechanical strain (≤3 % ). This makes nine out of sixteen binary monolayers studied in the present work direct band gap semiconductors. Thus there is a possibility of utilizing these binary counterparts of phosphorene in future light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  5. Synthesis of Group IV Nanowires on Graphene: The Case of Ge Nanocrawlers.

    PubMed

    Mataev, Elnatan; Rastogi, Sahil Kumar; Madhusudan, Atul; Bone, Jennifer; Lamprinakos, Nicholas; Picard, Yoosuf; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi

    2016-08-10

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using graphene as a synthesis platform for polymers, zero-dimensional (0D) materials, one-dimensional materials (1D), and two-dimensional (2D) materials. Here, we report the investigation of the growth of germanium nanowires (GeNWs) and germanium nanocrawlers (GeNCs) on single-layer graphene surfaces. GeNWs and GeNCs are synthesized on graphene films by gold nanoparticles catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. The addition of hydrogen chloride gas (HCl) at the nucleation step increased the propensity toward GeNCs growth on the surface. As the time lag before HCl introduction during the nucleation step increased, a significant change in the number of out-of-plane GeNWs versus in-plane GeNCs was observed. The nucleation temperature and time played a key role in the formation of GeNCs as well. The fraction of GeNCs (χNCs) decreased from 0.95 ± 0.01 to 0.66 ± 0.07 when the temperature was kept at 305 °C for 15 s versus maintained at 305 °C throughout the process, respectively. GeNCs exhibit ⟨112⟩ as the preferred growth direction whereas GeNWs exhibit both ⟨112⟩ and ⟨111⟩ as the preferred growth directions. Finally, our growth model suggests a possible mechanism for the preference of an in-plane GeNC growth on graphene versus GeNW on SiO2. These findings open up unique opportunities for fundamental studies of crystal growth on graphene, as well as enable exploration of new electronic interfaces between group IV materials and graphene, potentially toward designing new geometries for hybrid materials sensors. PMID:27400248

  6. Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2000-01-01

    A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

  7. Catalytic Ester–Amide Exchange Using Group (IV) Metal Alkoxide–Activator Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chong; Lee, Jonathan P.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Porco, John A.

    2005-01-01

    A process for preparation of amides from unactivated esters and amines has been developed using a catalytic system comprised of group (IV) metal alkoxides in conjunction with additives including 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt). In general, ester–amide exchange proceeds using a variety of structurally diverse esters and amines without azeotropic reflux to remove the alcohol byproduct. Initial mechanistic studies on the Zr(Ot-Bu)4–HOAt system revealed that the active catalyst is a novel, dimeric zirconium complex as determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:16011366

  8. PREFACE: Workshop on `The Physics of Group IV Materials', 7 10 April 2003, Exeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans-Freeman, Jan, Dr; Mainwood, Alison, Dr

    2003-10-01

    This special issue contains a collection of papers presented at the workshop entitled `The Physics of Group IV Materials' held in Exeter on 7-10 April 2003. The workshop was sponsored by the two EPSRC-funded Research Networks on `Defects in Silicon and Si/Ge' and `Diamond and Diamond-Like Carbon'. It was attended by about 100 delegates, most of them students and postdoctoral researchers from the UK, who heard 17 invited talks from speakers prominent in their fields from all over the world. Eight additional oral presentations selected from the contributed papers and 36 posters were presented at the workshop. The discussions were very illuminating, and we hope that the workshop fulfilled its objective in informing quite a wide, and generally young, audience about the very diverse and excellent current research work on Group IV materials. We would like to thank the local organizers, Professor Bob Jones and his students James Adey and Stephen Sque, for the smooth running of the workshop. We would like to thank the editorial committee: Dr David Carey, Professor Paul Coleman, Professor Phillip John, Dr Mark Newton and Professor Arthur Willoughby for their help with the selection of papers for the workshop and with the proceedings.

  9. Stability and electronic structure of two-dimensional allotropes of group-IV materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusalem, Filipe; Marques, Marcelo; Teles, Lara K.; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2015-07-01

    We study six different two-dimensional (2D) allotropes of carbon, silicon, germanium, and tin by means of the ab initio density functional theory for the ground state and approximate methods to calculate their electronic structures, including quasiparticle effects. Four of the investigated allotropes are based on dumbbell geometries, one on a kagome lattice, and one on the graphenelike hexagonal structure for comparison. Concerning carbon, our calculations of the cohesive energies clearly show that the hexagonal structure (graphene) is most stable. However, in the case of Si and Ge, the dumbbell structures, particularly the large honeycomb dumbbell (LHD) geometries, are energetically favored compared to the s p2/s p3 -bonded hexagonal lattice (i.e., silicene and germanene). The main reason for this is the opening of a band gap in the honeycomb dumbbell arrangements. The LHD sheet crystals represent indirect semiconductors with a K →Γ gap of about 0.5 eV. In the Sn case we predict the MoS2-like symmetry to be more stable, in contrast to the stanene and LHD geometries predicted in literature. Our results for freestanding group-IV layers shine new light on recent experimental studies of group-IV overlayers on various substrates.

  10. Structural phase stability in group IV metals under static high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Velisavljevic, Nenad; Chesnut, Garry N; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Vohra, Yogesh K; Stemshorn, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    In group IV metals (Ti, Zr, and Hf) room temperature compression leads to a martensitic transformation from a ductile {alpha} to a brittle {omega} phase. {alpha} {yields} {omega} phase boundary decreases to lower pressure at high temperature and can limit the use of group IV metals in industrial applications. There is a large discrepancy in the transition pressure reported in literature, with some of the variation attributed to experimental conditions (i.e. hydrostatic vs. non-hydrostatic). Shear deformation in non-hydrostatic experiments drives {alpha} {yields} {omega} transition and decreases transition pressure. Impurities can also aid or suppress {alpha} {yields} {omega} transition. By performing x-ray diffraction experiments on samples in a diamond anvil cell we show that interstitial impurities, such as C, N, and O can obstruct {alpha} {yields} {omega} transition and stabilize {alpha} phase to higher pressure. We also show that reduction in grain size can also influence {alpha} {yields} {omega} phase boundary and help stabilize {alpha} phase to higher pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions.

  11. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  12. Spectral synthesis in the ultraviolet. IV - A library of mean stellar groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanelli, Michael N.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Burstein, David; Wu, Chi-Chao

    1992-01-01

    A library of mean UV stellar energy distributions is derived from IUE spectrophotometry of 218 stars. The spectra cover 1230-3200 A with a spectral resolution of about 6 A. They have been corrected for interstellar extinction and converted to a common flux and wavelength scale. Individual stars were combined into standard groups according to their continuum colors, observed UV spectral morphology, MK luminosity class, and metal abundance. The library consists of 56 groups: 21 dwarf(V), 8 subgiant(IV), 16 giant(III), and supergiant(I + II) groups, covering O3-M4 spectral types. A metal-poor sequence is included, containing four dwarf and two giant groups, as is a metal-enhanced sequence with a single dwarf, subgiant, and giant group. Spectral indices characterizing the continuum and several strong absorption features are examined as temperature, luminosity, and abundance diagnostics. The library is intended to serve as a basis for interpreting the composite UV spectra of a wide variety of stellar systems, e.g., elliptical galaxies, starburst systems, and high-redshift galaxies.

  13. Vacancies and oxidation of two-dimensional group-IV monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Lídia C.; Carvalho, A.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    Point defects in the binary group-IV monochalcogenide monolayers of SnS, SnSe, GeS, and GeSe are investigated using density functional theory calculations. Several stable configurations are found for oxygen defects, however, we give evidence that these materials are less prone to oxidation than phosphorene, with which monochalcogenides are isoelectronic and share the same orthorhombic structure. Concurrent oxygen defects are expected to be vacancies and substitutional oxygen. We show that it is energetically favorable for oxygen to be incorporated into the layers substituting for a chalcogen (OS /Se defects), and different from most of the other defects investigated, this defect preserves the electronic structure of the material. Thus, we suggest that annealing treatments can be useful for the treatment of functional materials where loss mechanisms due to the presence of defects are undesirable.

  14. Covalently-controlled properties by design in group IV graphane analogues.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shishi; Arguilla, Maxx Q; Cultrara, Nicholas D; Goldberger, Joshua E

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The isolation of graphene has sparked a renaissance in the study of two-dimensional materials. This led to the discovery of new and unique phenomena such as extremely high carrier mobility, thermal conductivity, and mechanical strength not observed in the parent 3D structure. While the emergence of these phenomena has spurred widespread interest in graphene, the paradox between the high-mobility Fermi-Dirac electronic structure and the need for a sizable band gap has challenged its application in traditional semiconductor devices. While graphene is a fascinating and promising material, the limitation of its electronic structure has inspired researchers to explore other 2D materials beyond graphene. In this Account, we summarize our recent work on a new family of two-dimensional materials based on sp(3)-hybridized group IV elements. Ligand-terminated Si, Ge, and Sn graphane analogues are an emerging and unique class of two-dimensional materials that offer the potential to tailor the structure, stability, and properties. Compared with bulk Si and Ge, a direct and larger band gap is apparent in group IV graphane analogues depending on the surface ligand. These materials can be synthesized in gram-scale quantities and in thin films via the topotactic deintercalation of layered Zintl phase precursors. Few layers and single layers can be isolated via manual exfoliation and deintercalation of epitaxially grown Zintl phases on Si/Ge substrates. The presence of a fourth bond on the surface of the layers allows various surface ligand termination with different organic functional groups achieved via conventional soft chemical routes. In these single-atom thick materials, the electronic structure can be systematically controlled by varying the identities of the main group elements and by attaching different surface terminating ligands. In contrast to transition metal dichalcogenides, the weaker interlayer interaction allows the direct band gap single layer

  15. Chromospheric models for Altair (A7 IV-V)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, R. Freire; Gouttebroze, P.; Catalano, S.; Marilli, E.; Bruhweiler, F.; Kondo, Y.; Van Der Hucht, K.; Talavera, A.

    1995-01-01

    The star, Altair (A7 IV-V), is clearly shown to have Lyman-alpha emission of chromospheric origin, while no evidence is found for the Mg II emission reported in previous investigations. We present non-Local Thermodymanic Equilibrium (non-LTE) semiempirical models incorporating partial redistribution of the chromosphere of Altair that reproduce the observed Lyman-alpha emission and the Mg II resonance absorption at 2800 A. We unambiguously establihed that chromospheres exist at spectral types as early as A7 on the main sequence, and we also demonstrate that it very unlikely that the observed emission originates in a corotating expanding wind. This result represents a new challenge for chromospheric heating theories. It may indicate that both differential rotation and convection layers, at least near the equator, exist in this fast rotating (v sin i = 220 km/s) star.

  16. Y-shape spin-separator for two-dimensional group-IV nanoribbons based on quantum spin hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Gaurav Abdul Jalil, Mansoor Bin; Liang, Gengchiau; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-20

    An efficient spin-separator that operates in quantum spin hall phase has been investigated for two-dimensional group-IV materials. A three-terminal Y-shaped device has been simulated via non-equilibrium Green Function to demonstrate the separation of unpolarized current at source terminal into spin-polarized current of opposite polarity at the two drain terminals. Device controls, i.e., tunable buckling and perpendicular magnetic field have been modeled comprehensively to evaluate the device feasibility and performance. It is shown that these controls can preferentially steer current between the two drains to create a differential charge current with complementary spin polarization, thus enabling a convenient regulation of output signal.

  17. Validation of Nuclear Criticality Safety Software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.L. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The validation documented in this report is based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992, and was completed in June 1993. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Martin Marietta Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM 3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. When the validation results are treated as a single group, there is 95% confidence that 99.9% of future calculations of similar critical systems will have a calculated K{sub eff} > 0.9616. Based on this result the Portsmouth Nuclear Criticality Safety Department has adopted the calculational acceptance criteria that a k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} {le} 0.95 is safety subcritical. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25.

  18. Modeling Interactions in Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heise, David R.

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of interaction within small groups posits that group members initiate actions when tension mounts between the affective meanings of their situational identities and impressions produced by recent events. Actors choose partners and behaviors so as to reduce the tensions. A computer model based on this theory, incorporating reciprocal…

  19. Bifactor Modeling and the Estimation of Model-Based Reliability in the WAIS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gignac, Gilles E.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous confirmatory factor analytic research that has examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) has endorsed either higher order models or oblique factor models that tend to amalgamate both general factor and index factor sources of systematic variance. An alternative model that has not yet…

  20. Encoding of compressive stress during indentation by group III and IV muscle mechano-nociceptors in rat gracilis muscle.

    PubMed

    Ge, Weiqing; Khalsa, Partap S

    2003-02-01

    The mechanical state encoded by group III and IV muscle afferents, putative mechano-nociceptors, during indentation was examined using an isolated muscle-nerve preparation in a rat model. Gracilis muscle and its intact innervation were surgically removed from the medial thigh of the rat hindlimb and placed in a dish containing rodent synthetic interstitial fluid. The tendons of the muscle were coupled to an apparatus that could stretch and apply compression to the muscle. Using a standard teased-nerve preparation, the neural responses of single mechanically sensitive group III or IV afferents were identified. Afferents were classified as mechano-nociceptors on the basis of their graded response to noxious levels of compressive stress (or strain) as well as, in some cases, their polymodal response to noxious thermal stimuli. Mechano-nociceptors (n = 13) were stimulated using controlled compressive stress (10-30 kPa) or strain (40-80%) while simultaneously measuring displacement and force by compressing the muscle between a flat cylinder and a hard platform. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between neural response and mechanical stress, force, strain, and displacement. The mean neural response (threshold: 1.1 +/- 0.4 kPa; sensitivity: 0.5 +/- 0.1 Hz/kPa; means +/- SE) was significantly and substantially more highly correlated with compressive stress than force, strain, or displacement. The data from this study support the hypothesis that muscle nociceptors stimulated by indentation encode compressive stress rather than force, strain, or displacement. PMID:12574456

  1. Hybrid Group IV Nanophotonic Structures Incorporating Diamond Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Babinec, Thomas M; Radulaski, Marina; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Dory, Constantin; Dahl, Jeremy; Edgington, Robert; Soulière, Veronique; Ferro, Gabriel; Fokin, Andrey A; Schreiner, Peter R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV(-)) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid diamond-SiC structures are realized by combining the growth of nano- and microdiamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV(-) color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ion-implantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV(-) on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV(-) centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV(-) lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow line widths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV(-) lines from all-diamond nanopillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV(-) centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  2. Graphene challengers: silicene, germanene and stanene, group IV elemental synthetic electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Guy

    Silicene, germanene and stanene, graphene's group IV elemental cousins, have attracted considerable interest since the birth of silicene in 2012. These novel synthetic two-dimensional (2D) Si, Ge and Sn allotropes are artificially created in situ under ultra high vacuum, since, at variance with graphene, which descents from graphite, they have no parent crystal in nature. They are considered as promising candidates for ultimate scaling of nanoelectronic devices. Indeed, the recent fabrication of the first silicene field effect transistors with ambipolar characteristics operating at room temperature demonstrates their potential as emerging 2D electronic materials. In this invited talk, I will present the archetype 3x3 silicene phase formed on a silver (111) substrate, its sister phases and the growth of multilayer silicene, which hosts Dirac fermions and which is stable in ambient air, protected by its ultra-thin native oxide. The recent synthesis of single layer germanene and stanene, near room temperature 2D topological insulators will be also presented, while multilayer germanene will be further addressed. Challenging graphene, silicene, germanene and stanene, which are directly compatible with the current semiconductor industry, could lead to the development of a new class of low energy consumption nanoelectronic devices.

  3. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure of Heavy GroupIV-VI Diatomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-S.; Niu, B.; Lee, Yuan T.; Shirley, D.A.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1989-09-01

    Vibrationally-resolved HeI (584{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of the heavy group IV-VI diatomics SnSe, SnTe, PbSe, and PbTe were obtained with a new high temperature molecular beam source. Ionization potentials and spectroscopic constants are reported for all the ionic states observed. Relativistic complete active space MCSCF followed by multireference singles + doubles relativistic CI calculations which included up to 200,000 configurations were made on both the neutral diatomics and their positive ions. Ionization potentials and spectroscopic constants were calculated and were in good agreement with the experimentally-measured values. Relativistic CI potential energy curves were calculated for all the neutral ground states and the ionic states involved. Relativistic effects were shown to play an important role in these heavy diatomics. The {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub 1/2}{sup +} and {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} states for all four molecular ions showed avoided curve crossings, which resulted in pronounced shoulders in the {Omega} = 1/2 potential energy curves of PbTe{sup +}. Experimentally, autoionization transitions were also observed for the PbTe{sup +} spectrum. The importance of the relativistic effect and chemical bonding in the heavy diatomics are discussed.

  4. Structure and magnetism in novel group IV element-based magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Frank

    2013-08-14

    The project is to investigate structure, magnetism and spin dependent states of novel group IV element-based magnetic thin films and heterostructures as a function of composition and epitaxial constraints. The materials systems of interest are Si-compatible epitaxial films and heterostructures of Si/Ge-based magnetic ternary alloys grown by non-equilibrium molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, specifically doped magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and half-metallic Heusler alloys. Systematic structural, chemical, magnetic, and electrical measurements are carried out, using x-ray microbeam techniques, magnetotunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and magnetotransport. The work is aimed at elucidating the nature and interplay between structure, chemical order, magnetism, and spin-dependent states in these novel materials, at developing materials and techniques to realize and control fully spin polarized states, and at exploring fundamental processes that stabilize the epitaxial magnetic nanostructures and control the electronic and magnetic states in these complex materials. Combinatorial approach provides the means for the systematic studies, and the complex nature of the work necessitates this approach.

  5. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Victoria, M.

    2007-09-01

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors.

  6. Visualization and Modeling Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, S.J.; Dodrill, K.A.

    2007-03-01

    During the 2005 Hurricane season, many consequence predictions were available from 36 to 96 hours before landfalls, via the Department of Energy’s Visualization and Modeling Working Group (VMWG). Real-time data can be tapped by local officials and utilities, and can also be accessed for post-event regulatory audits. An overview of VMWG’s models, results and uses will be presented.

  7. Hybrid Group IV Nanophotonic Structures Incorporating Diamond Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Babinec, Thomas M; Radulaski, Marina; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Dory, Constantin; Dahl, Jeremy; Edgington, Robert; Soulière, Veronique; Ferro, Gabriel; Fokin, Andrey A; Schreiner, Peter R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV(-)) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid diamond-SiC structures are realized by combining the growth of nano- and microdiamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV(-) color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ion-implantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV(-) on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV(-) centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV(-) lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow line widths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV(-) lines from all-diamond nanopillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV(-) centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing. PMID:26695059

  8. First principles calculation of material properties of group IV elements and III-V compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Brad Dean

    This thesis presents first principles calculations on the properties of group IV elements and group III-V compounds. It includes investigations into what structure a material is likely to form in, and given that structure, what are its electronic, optical, and lattice dynamical properties as well as what are the properties of defects that might be introduced into the sample. The thesis is divided as follows: • Chapter 1 contains some of the conceptual foundations used in the present work. These involve the major approximations which allow us to approach the problem of systems with huge numbers of interacting electrons and atomic cores. • Then, in Chapter 2, we discuss one of the major limitations to the DFT formalism introduced in Chapter 1, namely its inability to predict the quasiparticle spectra of materials and in particular the band gap of a semiconductor. We introduce a Green's function approach to the electron self-energy Sigma known as the GW approximation and use it to compute the quasiparticle band structures of a number of group IV and III-V semiconductors. • In Chapter 3 we present a first-principles study of a number of high-pressure metastable phases of Si with tetrahedral bonding. The phases studied include all experimentally determined phases that result from decompression from the metallic beta-Sn phase, specifically the BC8 (Si-III), hexagonal diamond (Si-IV), and R8 (Si-XII). In addition to these, we also study the hypothetical ST12 structure found upon decompression from beta-Sn in germanium. • Our attention is then turned to the first principles calculations of optical properties in Chapter 4. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is then solved to obtain the optical spectrum of this material including electron-hole interactions. The calculated optical spectrum is compared with experimental data for other forms of silicon commonly used in photovoltaic devices, namely the cubic, polycrystalline, and amorphous forms. • In Chapter 5 we present

  9. A new group in the Leptospirillum clade: cultivation-independent community genomics, proteomics and transcriptomics of the new species Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS.

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsman, Daniela; Dasari, Mauna; Thomas, BC; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirillum spp. are widespread members of acidophilic microbial communities that catalyze ferrous iron oxidation, thereby increasing sulfide mineral dissolution rates. These bacteria play important roles in environmental acidification and are harnessed for bioleaching-based metal recovery. Known members of the Leptospirillum clade of the Nitrospira phylum are Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (group I), Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Leptospirillum rubarum (group II), and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum (group III). In the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system, biofilm formation is initiated by L. rubarum; L. ferrodiazotrophum appears in later developmental stages. Here we used community metagenomic data from unusual, thick floating biofilms to identify distinguishing metabolic traits in a rare and uncultivated community member, the new species Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS. These biofilms typically also contain a variety of Archaea, Actinobacteria, and a few other Leptospirillum spp. The Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species shares 98% 16S rRNA sequence identity and 70% average amino acid identity between orthologs with its closest relative, L. ferrodiazotrophum. The presence of nitrogen fixation and reverse tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle proteins suggest an autotrophic metabolism similar to that of L. ferrodiazotrophum, while hydrogenase proteins suggest anaerobic metabolism. Community transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrate expression of a multicopper oxidase unique to this species, as well as hydrogenases and core metabolic genes. Results suggest that the Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species might play important roles in carbon fixation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, and iron oxidation in some acidic environments.

  10. New Group in the Leptospirillum Clade: Cultivation-Independent Community Genomics, Proteomics, and Transcriptomics of the New Species “Leptospirillum Group IV UBA BS”

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Mauna; Thomas, Brian C.; Shah, Manesh B.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Hettich, Robert L.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirillum spp. are widespread members of acidophilic microbial communities that catalyze ferrous iron oxidation, thereby increasing sulfide mineral dissolution rates. These bacteria play important roles in environmental acidification and are harnessed for bioleaching-based metal recovery. Known members of the Leptospirillum clade of the Nitrospira phylum are Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (group I), Leptospirillum ferriphilum and “Leptospirillum rubarum” (group II), and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum (group III). In the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system, biofilm formation is initiated by L. rubarum; L. ferrodiazotrophum appears in later developmental stages. Here we used community metagenomic data from unusual, thick floating biofilms to identify distinguishing metabolic traits in a rare and uncultivated community member, the new species “Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS.” These biofilms typically also contain a variety of Archaea, Actinobacteria, and a few other Leptospirillum spp. The Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species shares 98% 16S rRNA sequence identity and 70% average amino acid identity between orthologs with its closest relative, L. ferrodiazotrophum. The presence of nitrogen fixation and reverse tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle proteins suggest an autotrophic metabolism similar to that of L. ferrodiazotrophum, while hydrogenase proteins suggest anaerobic metabolism. Community transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrate expression of a multicopper oxidase unique to this species, as well as hydrogenases and core metabolic genes. Results suggest that the Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species might play important roles in carbon fixation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, and iron oxidation in some acidic environments. PMID:23645189

  11. Yurt, Coracle, Neurexin IV and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase form a novel group of epithelial polarity proteins.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Patrick; Lau, Kimberly M; Harris, Kathryn P; Silva-Gagliardi, Nancy F; Paul, Sarah M; Beronja, Slobodan; Beitel, Greg J; McGlade, C Jane; Tepass, Ulrich

    2009-06-25

    The integrity of polarized epithelia is critical for development and human health. Many questions remain concerning the full complement and the function of the proteins that regulate cell polarity. Here we report that the Drosophila FERM proteins Yurt (Yrt) and Coracle (Cora) and the membrane proteins Neurexin IV (Nrx-IV) and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase are a new group of functionally cooperating epithelial polarity proteins. This 'Yrt/Cora group' promotes basolateral membrane stability and shows negative regulatory interactions with the apical determinant Crumbs (Crb). Genetic analyses indicate that Nrx-IV and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase act together with Cora in one pathway, whereas Yrt acts in a second redundant pathway. Moreover, we show that the Yrt/Cora group is essential for epithelial polarity during organogenesis but not when epithelial polarity is first established or during terminal differentiation. This property of Yrt/Cora group proteins explains the recovery of polarity in embryos lacking the function of the Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) group of basolateral polarity proteins. We also find that the mammalian Yrt orthologue EPB41L5 (also known as YMO1 and Limulus) is required for lateral membrane formation, indicating a conserved function of Yrt proteins in epithelial polarity. PMID:19553998

  12. Lymantria dispar iflavirus 1 (LdIV1), a new model to study iflaviral persistence in lepidopterans.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Krueger, Elizabeth N; Harrison, Robert L; Toth, Amy L; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-10-01

    The cell line IPLB-LD-652Y, derived from the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.), is routinely used to study interactions between viruses and insect hosts. Here we report the full genome sequence and biological characteristics of a small RNA virus, designated Lymantria dispar iflavirus 1 (LdIV1), that was discovered to persistently infect IPLB-LD-652Y. LdIV1 belongs to the genus Iflavirus. LdIV1 formed icosahedral particles of approx. 30 nm in diameter and contained a 10, 044 nt polyadenylated, positive-sense RNA genome encoding a predicted polyprotein of 2980 aa. LdIV1 was induced by a viral suppressor of RNA silencing, suggesting that acute infection is restricted by RNA interference (RNAi). We detected LdIV1 in all tested tissues of gypsy-moth larvae and adults, but the virus was absent from other L. dispar-derived cell lines. We confirmed LdIV1 infectivity in two of these cell lines (IPLB-LD-652 and IPLB-LdFB). Our results provide a novel system to explore persistent infections in lepidopterans and a new model for the study of iflaviruses, a rapidly expanding group of viruses, many of which covertly infect their hosts. PMID:24986084

  13. Validation of DSM-IV Model of Psychiatric Syndromes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecavalier, Luc; Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Edwards, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the internal construct validity of the DSM-IV as a conceptual model for characterizing behavioral syndromes in children with ASD. Parent and teachers completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4, a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale, for 6-to-12 year old clinic referrals with an ASD (N = 498). Ratings were…

  14. Development of group IV molecular catalysts for high temperature ethylene-α-olefin copolymerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Klosin, Jerzy; Fontaine, Philip P; Figueroa, Ruth

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes our research related to the development of molecular catalysts for solution phase olefin polymerization. Specifically, a series of constrained geometry and nonmetallocene (imino-amido-type) complexes were developed for high temperature olefin polymerization reactions. We have discovered many highly active catalysts that are capable of operating at temperatures above 120 °C and producing copolymers with a useful range of molecular weights (from medium to ultrahigh depending on precatalyst identity and polymerization conditions) and α-olefin incorporation capability. Constrained geometry catalysts (CGCs) exhibit very high activities and are capable of producing a variety of copolymers including ethylene-propylene and ethylene-1-octene copolymers at high reactor temperatures. Importantly, CGCs have much higher reactivity toward α-olefins than classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts, thus allowing for the production of copolymers with any desired level of comonomer. In search of catalysts with improved performance, we discovered 3-amino-substituted indenyl-based CGCs that exhibit the highest activity and produce copolymers with the highest molecular weight within this family of catalysts. Phenanthrenyl-based CGCs were found to be outstanding catalysts for the effective production of high styrene content ethylene-styrene copolymers under industrially relevant conditions. In contrast to CGC ligands, imino-amido-type ligands are bidentate and monoionic, leading to the use of trialkyl group IV precatalysts. The thermal instability of imino-amido complexes was addressed by the development of imino-enamido and amidoquinoline complexes, which are not only thermally very robust, but also produce copolymers with higher molecular weights, and exhibit improved α-olefin incorporation. Imido-amido and imino-enamido catalysts undergo facile chain transfer reactions with metal alkyls, as evidenced by a sharp decrease in polymer molecular weight when the

  15. Development of group IV molecular catalysts for high temperature ethylene-α-olefin copolymerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Klosin, Jerzy; Fontaine, Philip P; Figueroa, Ruth

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes our research related to the development of molecular catalysts for solution phase olefin polymerization. Specifically, a series of constrained geometry and nonmetallocene (imino-amido-type) complexes were developed for high temperature olefin polymerization reactions. We have discovered many highly active catalysts that are capable of operating at temperatures above 120 °C and producing copolymers with a useful range of molecular weights (from medium to ultrahigh depending on precatalyst identity and polymerization conditions) and α-olefin incorporation capability. Constrained geometry catalysts (CGCs) exhibit very high activities and are capable of producing a variety of copolymers including ethylene-propylene and ethylene-1-octene copolymers at high reactor temperatures. Importantly, CGCs have much higher reactivity toward α-olefins than classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts, thus allowing for the production of copolymers with any desired level of comonomer. In search of catalysts with improved performance, we discovered 3-amino-substituted indenyl-based CGCs that exhibit the highest activity and produce copolymers with the highest molecular weight within this family of catalysts. Phenanthrenyl-based CGCs were found to be outstanding catalysts for the effective production of high styrene content ethylene-styrene copolymers under industrially relevant conditions. In contrast to CGC ligands, imino-amido-type ligands are bidentate and monoionic, leading to the use of trialkyl group IV precatalysts. The thermal instability of imino-amido complexes was addressed by the development of imino-enamido and amidoquinoline complexes, which are not only thermally very robust, but also produce copolymers with higher molecular weights, and exhibit improved α-olefin incorporation. Imido-amido and imino-enamido catalysts undergo facile chain transfer reactions with metal alkyls, as evidenced by a sharp decrease in polymer molecular weight when the

  16. Analgesic effects of Huwentoxin-IV on animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Zhe; Tang, Dongfang; Xun, Xiaohong; Liu, Lichao; Li, Xianlei; Nie, Dongsong; Xiang, Yang; Yi, Jianming; Yi, Jizu

    2014-01-01

    Huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), a peptide with 35 amino acid residues, was discovered in the venom of spider Ornithoctonus huwena. The peptide had an inhibitory effect on a tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channel with highly sensitive to Nav1.7, an attractive target for pain release therapy. In this study we further demonstrated the analgesic effects of HWTX-IV using mouse and rat as an inflammatory pain model and/or a neuropathic pain models. In the both cases, the analgesic effects of the peptide were dose-dependent, and statistically significant. In the inflammatory model, 100 µg/kg of HWTX-IV produced an efficient reversal of hyperalgesia up to 63.6% after injection of formalin in rats with the efficiency equivalent to that of morphine at 50 µg/kg, and 200 µg/kg of HWTX-IV produced protective effect up to 55.6% after injection of acetic acid with the efficiency equivalent to that of morphine at 100 µg/kg. In the spinal nerve model, the peptide produced the longer and higher reversal effect on allodynia than Mexiletine. These results demonstrated that HWTX-IV released efficiently the acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in these animals, suggesting that HWTX-IV was a potential and efficient candidate for further clinical drug development against inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:24188048

  17. Group 10-group 14 metal complexes [E-TM](IV): the role of the group 14 site as an L, X and Z-type ligand.

    PubMed

    Wächtler, Erik; Gericke, Robert; Brendler, Erica; Gerke, Birgit; Langer, Thorsten; Pöttgen, Rainer; Zhechkov, Lyuben; Heine, Thomas; Wagler, Jörg

    2016-09-28

    A series of new complexes of a general motif [R2E(μ-N,S)2TM-L] (E: metalloid group 14 element; TM: group 10 metal; R: Cl, Ph, pyS, OH, (N,N,O)-chelating ligands; N,S: 1-methylimidazole-2-thiolate (methimazolyl, mt(-)), pyridine-2-thiolate (pyS(-)); L: PPh3, PCy3, pyS) was synthesised and characterised by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (13)C, (31)P, (119)Sn), (119)Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The E-TM bonding situation in these compounds can be described with various resonance structures which comprise E(ii)→TM(ii), E(iii)-TM(i) and E(iv)←TM(0) features. Thus, in these complexes the atoms of the group 14 based ligand sites reveal L-, X- and Z-type ligand characteristics. A systematic comparison between structural and spectroscopic parameters as well as the results from NLMO analyses of structurally related compounds provided information about the differences in the E-TM bonding situation upon alteration of the metal atoms or ligand patterns. Under investigation are the structurally related compounds [Cl2Sn(μ-pyS)2TM-PPh3] (1: TM = Pd; 2: TM = Ni; 3: TM = Pt), [Cl2Ge(μ-pyS)2Pd-PPh3] (4) and, for in silico analysis, [Cl2Si(μ-pyS)2Pd-PPh3] (5), which indicate a pronounced shift of the E-TM bond electron pair towards TM for TM = Pt. Further complexes serve as representatives of these compounds with different bridging ligands {[Cl2Sn(μ-mt)2Pd-PPh3] (8)}, different trans-E-TM-bound ligands {[Cl2Sn(μ-pyS)2Pd-PCy3] (9), [Cl2Sn(μ-pyS)2Pd]4 (10)} and with different substituents at Sn (including penta- and hexacoordinated tin compounds), i.e., [R2Sn(μ-pyS)2Pd-PPh3] with R = Ph (6) and pyS (7), [(O,N,N)Sn(μ-pyS)2Pd-PPh3] (11) and (12) having two different (O,N,N) tridentate ligands, and [(μ-OH)ClSn(μ-pyS)2Pd-PPh3]2 (13). The latter series indicates a shift of the E-TM (= Sn-Pd) bond electron pair towards Pd upon transition from penta- to hexacoordinated tin compounds. PMID:27534826

  18. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  19. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  20. Diagnostic validity across racial and ethnic groups in the assessment of adolescent DSM-IV disorders.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Gruber, Michael J; Kessler, Ronald C; Lin, Julia Y; McLaughlin, Katie A; Sampson, Nancy A; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Alegria, Margarita

    2012-12-01

    We examine differential validity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnoses assessed by the fully-structured Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI) among Latino, non-Latino Black, and non-Latino White adolescents in comparison to gold standard diagnoses derived from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-age Children (K-SADS). Results are based on the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement, a national US survey of adolescent mental health. Clinicians re-interviewed 347 adolescent/parent dyads with the K-SADS. Sensitivity and/or specificity of CIDI diagnoses varied significantly by ethnicity/race for four of ten disorders. Modifications to algorithms sometimes reduced bias in prevalence estimates, but at the cost of reducing individual-level concordance. These findings document the importance of assessing fully-structured diagnostic instruments for differential accuracy in ethnic/racial subgroups.

  1. Diagnostic validity across racial and ethnic groups in the assessment of adolescent DSM-IV disorders

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Gruber, Michael J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Lin, Julia Y.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Alegria, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    We examine differential validity of DSM-IV diagnoses assessed by the fully-structured Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI) among Latino, Non-Latino Black, and Non-Latino White adolescents in comparison to gold standard diagnoses derived from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS). Results are based on the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement, a national US survey of adolescent mental health. Clinicians re-interviewed 347 adolescent/parent dyads with the K-SADS. Sensitivity and/or specificity of CIDI diagnoses varied significantly by ethnicity/race for four of ten disorders. Modifications to algorithms sometimes reduced bias in prevalence estimates, but at the cost of reducing individual-level concordance. These findings document the importance of assessing fully-structured diagnostic instruments for differential accuracy in ethnic/racial subgroups. PMID:23148026

  2. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  3. Computational Performance of Group IV Personnel in Vocational Training Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Ray E.; Harrigan, Robert J.

    The document evaluates Navy Group Four personnel gains in basic arithmetic skills after taking experimental courses in linear measurement and recipe conversion. Categorized as Mental Group Four by receiving scores from the 10th to the 30th percentile of the Armed Forces Qualification Test, trainees received instruction tailored to the level of…

  4. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  5. D category IV: a group of clinically relevant and phylogenetically diverse partial D

    PubMed Central

    von Zabern, Inge; Wagner, Franz F.; Moulds, Joann M.; Moulds, John J.; Flegel, Willy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The D typing strategies in several European countries protect carriers of D category VI (DVI) from anti-D immunization but not carriers of other partial D. Besides DVI, one of the clinically most important partial D is D category IV (DIV). A detailed description and direct comparison of the different DIV types was missing. Study design and methods RHD nucleotide sequences were determined from genomic DNA. D epitope patterns were established with commercial monoclonal anti-D panels. Results DIV comprises several variants of the D antigen with distinct serology, molecular structures, evolutionary origins and ethnic prevalences. The DIV phenotype is determined by 350H shared by all, but not limited to, DIV variants which are further divided into DIVa and DIVb. The DIVa phenotype is expressed by DIV type 1.0 harboring 350H and the dispersed amino acids 62F, 137V and 152T. The DIVb phenotype is expressed by DIV type 3 to type 5 representing RHD-CE-D hybrids. 4 of the 6 postulated DIV variants were encountered among 23 DIV samples analyzed. Of 12 DIV carriers with anti-D, 10 were female and 7 likely immunized by pregnancy. 2 DIV related alleles are newly described: DWN which differs from DIV type 4 by 350D and epitope pattern. DNT carries 152T, known to cause a large D antigen density. Conclusion DIV alleles arose from at least 2 independent evolutionary events. DIV type 1.0 with DIVa phenotype belongs to the oldest extant human RHD alleles. DIV type 2 to type 5 with DIVb phenotype arose from more recent gene conversions. Anti-D immunization, especially dreaded in pregnancies, will be avoided not only in carriers of DVI but also in carriers of other D variants like DIV, if our proposed D typing strategy is adopted. PMID:23461862

  6. Effect of phase transition on quantum transport in group-IV two-dimensional U-shape device

    SciTech Connect

    Sadi, Mohammad Abdullah; Gupta, Gaurav Liang, Gengchiau

    2014-10-21

    The effect of phase-transition from the quantum-spin-hall to the band-insulator phase on the transport through a three-terminal U-shape spin-separator has been computationally investigated via non-equilibrium green function formalism. Two-dimensional group-IV elements have been comprehensively appraised as the device material. The device separates the unpolarized current injected at the source-terminal into nearly 100% spin-polarized currents of the opposite polarities at the two drain terminals. The phase-transition activated by the electric-field orthogonal to the device is shown to extensively influence the current magnitude and its spin-polarization, and the effect is stronger for materials with smaller intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the device length and the area under field are shown to critically affect the device characteristics on phase change. It is shown that the same device can be operated as a spin-filter by inducing phase-transition selectively in the channel. The results are important for designing spin-devices from Group-IV monolayers.

  7. Effect of phase transition on quantum transport in group-IV two-dimensional U-shape device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadi, Mohammad Abdullah; Gupta, Gaurav; Liang, Gengchiau

    2014-10-01

    The effect of phase-transition from the quantum-spin-hall to the band-insulator phase on the transport through a three-terminal U-shape spin-separator has been computationally investigated via non-equilibrium green function formalism. Two-dimensional group-IV elements have been comprehensively appraised as the device material. The device separates the unpolarized current injected at the source-terminal into nearly 100% spin-polarized currents of the opposite polarities at the two drain terminals. The phase-transition activated by the electric-field orthogonal to the device is shown to extensively influence the current magnitude and its spin-polarization, and the effect is stronger for materials with smaller intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the device length and the area under field are shown to critically affect the device characteristics on phase change. It is shown that the same device can be operated as a spin-filter by inducing phase-transition selectively in the channel. The results are important for designing spin-devices from Group-IV monolayers.

  8. Giant piezoelectricity of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides: SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li; Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju

    2015-10-26

    We predict enormous, anisotropic piezoelectric effects in intrinsic monolayer group IV monochalcogenides (MX, M=Sn or Ge, X=Se or S), including SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS. Using first-principle simulations based on the modern theory of polarization, we find that their piezoelectric coefficients are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than those of other 2D materials, such as MoS{sub 2} and GaSe, and bulk quartz and AlN which are widely used in industry. This enhancement is a result of the unique “puckered” C{sub 2v} symmetry and electronic structure of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides. Given the achieved experimental advances in the fabrication of monolayers, their flexible character, and ability to withstand enormous strain, these 2D structures with giant piezoelectric effects may be promising for a broad range of applications such as nano-sized sensors, piezotronics, and energy harvesting in portable electronic devices.

  9. Compact groups in theory and practice - IV. The connection to large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, J. Trevor; Ellison, Sara L.; Simard, Luc; Patton, David R.; McConnachie, Alan W.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the properties of photometrically selected compact groups (CGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, the fourth in a series, we focus on understanding the characteristics of our observed CG sample with particular attention paid to quantifying and removing contamination from projected foreground or background galaxies. Based on a simple comparison of pairwise redshift likelihoods, we find that approximately half of CGs in the parent sample contain one or more projected (interloping) members; our final clean sample contains 4566 galaxies in 1086 CGs. We show that half of the remaining CGs are associated with rich groups (or clusters), i.e. they are embedded sub-structure. The other half have spatial distributions and number-density profiles consistent with the interpretation that they are either independently distributed structures within the field (i.e. they are isolated) or associated with relatively poor structures. Comparisons of late-type and red-sequence fractions in radial annuli show that galaxies around apparently isolated CGs resemble the field population by 300 to 500 kpc from the group centre. In contrast, the galaxy population surrounding embedded CGs appears to remain distinct from the field out beyond 1 to 2 Mpc, consistent with results for rich groups. We take this as additional evidence that the observed distinction between CGs, i.e. isolated versus embedded, is a separation between different host environments.

  10. LBRIG Newsletter (Newsletter of the Language by Radio Interest Group). Vol. IV, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfinkel, Alan, Ed.; And Others

    The Language by Radio Interest Group (LBRIG) Newsletter, volume 4, number 1, opens with an appeal to subscribers to contribute articles, reports, notes etc. The annual ACTFL workshop held on 29 Nov. 1975 is then described. It features a report by Dolores Zesiger, instructor in Spanish at Logan (Ohio) High School, on the interesting use of local…

  11. Use of Improved Orbitals for CCSD(T) Calculations for Predicting Heats of Formation of Group IV and Group VI Metal Oxide Monomers and Dimers and UCl6.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zongtang; Lee, Zachary; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of the heats of formation of group IV and group VI metal oxide monomers and dimers with the coupled cluster CCSD(T) method has been improved by using Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) and Brueckner orbitals for the initial wave function. The valence and core-valence contributions to the total atomization energies for the CrO3 monomer and dimer are predicted to be significantly larger than when using the Hartree-Fock (HF) orbitals. The predicted heat of formation of CrO3 with CCSD(T)/PW91 is consistent with previous calculations including high-order corrections beyond CCSD(T) and agrees well with the experiment. The improved heats of formation with the DFT and Brueckner orbitals are due to these orbitals being closer to the actual orbitals. Pure DFT functionals perform slightly better than the hybrid B3LYP functional due to the presence of exact exchange in the hybrid functional. Comparable heats of formation for TiO2 and the second- and the third-row group IV and group VI metal oxides are predicted well using either the DFT PW91 orbitals, Brueckner orbitals, or HF orbitals. The normalized clustering energies for the dimers are consistent with our previous work except for a larger value predicted for Cr2O6. The prediction of the reaction energy for UF6 + 3Cl2 → UCl6 + 3F2 was significantly improved with the use of DFT or Brueckner orbitals as compared to HF orbitals. PMID:27398941

  12. Fossil group origins. IV. Characterization of the sample and observational properties of fossil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarattini, S.; Barrena, R.; Girardi, M.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Boschin, W.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Corsini, E. M.; del Burgo, C.; D'Onghia, E.; Herrera-Ruiz, N.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Jimenez Bailon, E.; Lozada Muoz, M.; Napolitano, N.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Virialized halos grow by the accretion of smaller ones in the cold dark matter scenario. The rate of accretion depends on the different properties of the host halo. Those halos for which this accretion rate was very fast and efficient resulted in systems dominated by a central galaxy surrounded by smaller galaxies that were at least two magnitudes fainter. These galaxy systems are called fossil systems, and they can be the fossil relics of ancient galaxy structures. Aims: We started an extensive observational program to characterize a sample of 34 fossil group candidates spanning a broad range of physical properties. Methods: Deep r-band images were obtained with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope and Nordic Optic Telescope. Optical spectroscopic observations were performed at the 3.5-m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo for ~1200 galaxies. This new dataset was completed with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 archival data to obtain robust cluster membership and global properties of each fossil group candidate. For each system, we recomputed the magnitude gaps between the two brightest galaxies (Δm12) and the first and fourth ranked galaxies (Δm14) within 0.5 R200. We consider fossil systems to be those with Δm12 ≥ 2 mag or Δm14 ≥ 2.5 mag within the errors. Results: We find that 15 candidates turned out to be fossil systems. Their observational properties agree with those of non-fossil systems. Both follow the same correlations, but the fossil systems are always extreme cases. In particular, they host the brightest central galaxies, and the fraction of total galaxy light enclosed in the brightest group galaxy is larger in fossil than in non-fossil systems. Finally, we confirm the existence of genuine fossil clusters. Conclusions: Combining our results with others in the literature, we favor the merging scenario in which fossil systems formed from mergers of L∗ galaxies. The large magnitude gap is a consequence of the extreme merger ratio within

  13. Effect of Astragaloside IV on Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Alzheimer's Disease Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Haiyan, Hu; Rensong, Yang; Guoqin, Jin; Xueli, Zhang; Huaying, Xia; Yanwu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying the maintenance of renewal and replacement capabilities of endogenous progenitor cells or engrafted stem cells in a pathological environment remains elusive. To investigate the effect of astragaloside IV (ASI) on the proliferation and differentiation of the engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs), we cultured NSCs from the hippocampus of E14 rat embryos, treated the cells with ASI, and then transplanted the cells into the hippocampus of rat AD models. In vitro experimentation showed that 10−5 M ASI induced NSCs to differentiate into β-tubulin III+ and GFAP+ cells. NSCs transplantation into rat AD models resulted in improvements in learning and memory, especially in the ASI-treated groups. ASI treatment resulted in an increase in the number of β-tubulin III+ cells in the hippocampus. Further investigation showed that ASI inhibited PS1 expression in vitro and in vivo. The high-dose ASI downregulated the Notch intracellular domain, whereas the low-dose ASI increased Notch-1 and NICD. In conclusion, ASI treatment resulted in improvements in learning and memory of AD models by promoting NSC proliferation and differentiation partly through the Notch signal pathway. PMID:27034688

  14. Phase Stability under Irradiation of Precipitates and Solid Solutions in Model ALloys and in ODS Alloys Relevant for Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert C. Birtcher

    2007-10-17

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the irradiation-altered phase stability of oxide precipitates in ODS steels and of model alloy solid solutions of associated systems. This information can be used to determine whether the favorable mechanical propertiies of these steels are maintained under irradiation, thus addressing one of the main materials research issues for this class of steels as identified by the GenIV working groups. The research program will also create fundamental understanding of the irradiation precipitation/dissolution problem by studying a "model" system in which the variables can be controlled and their effects understood individually.

  15. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbalm, K.F.

    1995-12-31

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  16. Long range ordered alloys modified by group IV-B metals

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Inouye, Henry; Schaffhauser, Anthony C.

    1983-01-01

    Ductile long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the (V,M)(Fe,Ni,Co).sub.3 system having the composition comprising by weight 20.6%-22.6% V, 14-50% Fe, 0-64% Co, and 0-40% Ni, and 0.4-1.4% M, where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf, and their mixtures. These modified alloys have an electron density no greater than 8.00 and exhibit marked increases at elevated temperature in ductility and other mechanical properties over previously known ordered alloys.

  17. H I Studies of the Sculptor Group Galaxies. IV - NGC 247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Puche, D.

    1995-07-01

    A VLA HI map was made of NGC 247. In this study, there is a continuum map (ngc0247.con), an HI data cube (ngc0247.cub), and moment maps (ngc0247.m0 = total HI, ngc0247.m1 = velocity field, and ngc0247.m2 = second moment). These maps have been used in an extensive dynamical and kinematical study of the Sculptor Group galaxies. The images and related TeX file come from the NRAO CDROM "Images From the Radio Universe" (c. 1992 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, used with permission).

  18. Viridans Group Streptococci Are Donors in Horizontal Transfer of Topoisomerase IV Genes to Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Balsalobre, Luz; Ferrándiz, María José; Liñares, Josefina; Tubau, Fe; de la Campa, Adela G.

    2003-01-01

    A total of 46 ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cipr) Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated from 1991 to 2001 at the Hospital of Bellvitge. Five of these strains showed unexpectedly high rates of nucleotide variations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of their parC, parE, and gyrA genes. The nucleotide sequence of the full-length parC, parE, and gyrA genes of one of these isolates revealed a mosaic structure compatible with an interspecific recombination origin. Southern blot analysis and nucleotide sequence determinations showed the presence of an ant-like gene in the intergenic parE-parC regions of the S. pneumoniae Cipr isolates with high rates of variations in their parE and parC QRDRs. The ant-like gene was absent from typical S. pneumoniae strains, whereas it was present in the intergenic parE-parC regions of the viridans group streptococci (Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis). These results suggest that the viridans group streptococci are acting as donors in the horizontal transfer of fluoroquinolone resistance genes to S. pneumoniae. PMID:12821449

  19. Planetary nebulae as standard candles. IV - A test in the Leo I group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.; Ford, Holland C.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, PN are used to determine accurate distances to three galaxies in the Leo I group - The E0 giant elliptical NGC 3379, its optical companion, the SB0 spiral NGC 3384, and the smaller E6 elliptical NGC 3377. In all three galaxies, the luminosity-specific PN number densities are roughly the same, and the derived stellar death rates are in remarkable agreement with the predictions of stellar evolution theory. It is shown that the shape of the forbidden O III 5007 A PN luminosity function is the same in each galaxy and indistinguishable from that observed in M31 and M81. It is concluded that the PN luminosity function is an excellent standard candle for early-type galaxies.

  20. Mössbauer parameters of Fe-related defects in group-IV semiconductors: First principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E.; Coutinho, J.; Öberg, S.; Torres, V. J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We employ a combination of pseudopotential and all-electron density functional calculations, to relate the structure of defects in supercells to the isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings observed in Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments. The methodology is comprehensively reviewed and applied to the technologically relevant case of iron-related defects in silicon, and to other group-IV hosts to a lesser degree. Investigated defects include interstitial and substitutional iron, iron-boron pairs, iron-vacancy, and iron-divacancy. We find that, in general, agreement between the calculations and Mössbauer data is within a 10% error bar. Nonetheless, we show that the methodology can be used to make accurate assignments, including to separate peaks of similar defects in slightly different environments.

  1. Terahertz emission upon the band-to-band excitation of Group-IV semiconductors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zakhar’in, A. O.; Bobylev, A. V.; Egorov, S. V.; Andrianov, A. V.

    2015-03-15

    Terahertz emission upon the band-to-band excitation of Group-IV semiconductors (Si:B and Ge:Ga) at room temperature by a semiconductor laser emitting in the visible range (660 nm) is observed and investigated. It is established that, as the crystal temperature is elevated above room temperature, the emission intensity increases considerably, while the emission spectrum shifts to higher frequencies. The terahertz-emission spectra of germanium and silicon are quite similar to each other. The pump-intensity dependence of the terahertz-emission intensity is nearly linear. The above features make it possible to attribute the observed terahertz emission to the effect of crystal heating by absorbed pump radiation.

  2. "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing, Characterization, and Novel Devices"

    SciTech Connect

    liu, feng

    2014-08-28

    This theoretical project has been carried out in close interaction with the experimental project at UW-Madison under the same title led by PI Max Lagally and co-PI Mark Eriksson. Extensive computational studies have been performed to address a broad range of topics from atomic structure, stability, mechanical property, to electronic structure, optoelectronic and transport properties of various nanoarchitectures in the context of Si and other solid nanomembranes. These have been done by using combinations of different theoretical and computational approaches, ranging from first-principles calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to finite-element (FE) analyses and continuum modeling.

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization and antimicrobial activities of diorganotin(IV) complexes with azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand: Crystal structure and topological study of a doubly phenoxide-bridged dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Manojit; Roy, Subhadip; Devi, N. Manglembi; Singh, Ch. Brajakishor; Singh, Keisham Surjit

    2016-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) complexes appended with free carboxylic acids were synthesized by reacting diorganotin(IV) dichlorides [R2SnCl2; R = Me (1), Bu (2) and Ph (3)] with an azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand i.e. 2-{4-hydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl]phenylazo}benzoic acid in presence of triethylamine. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 119Sn) spectroscopy. The structure of 1 in solid state has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure of 1 reveals that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c and is a dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups. In the structure of 1, the Sn(IV) atoms are hexacoordinated and have a distorted octahedral coordination geometry in which two phenoxy oxygen atoms and the azomethine nitrogen atom of the ligand coordinate to each tin atom. One of the phenoxy oxygen atom bridges the two tin centers resulting in a planar Sn2O2 core. Topological analysis is used for the description of molecular packing in 1. Tin NMR spectroscopy study indicates that the complexes have five coordinate geometry around tin atom in solution state. Since the complexes have free carboxylic acids, these compounds could be further used as potential metallo-ligands for the synthesis of other complexes. The synthesized diorganotin(IV) complexes were also screened for their antimicrobial activities and compound 2 showed effective antimicrobial activities.

  4. Homogeneous Ziegler-Natta polymerization of functionalized monomers catalyzed by cationic group IV metallocenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kesti, M.R.; Coates, G.W.; Waymouth, R.M.

    1992-11-18

    Ziegler-Natta catalysts are remarkable in their ability to polymerize {alpha}-olefins to high molecular weight, stereoregular polyolefins. One of the major limitations of conventional Ziegler-Natta catalysts is their intolerance to Lewis bases; catalysts based on titanium halides and alkylaluminum cocatalysts are poisoned by most types of monomers containing ethers, esters, amines, and carboxylic acids. The absence of functionality in hydrocarbon polymers seriously affects their adhesive properties, affinity for dyes, permeability, and compatibility with more polar polymers. Previous attempts to polymerize sterically hindered amines, esters and amides, alkyl halides, and carboxylic acids using catalysts derived from TiCl{sub 3} and AlR{sub 3-n}Cl{sub n} have achieved limited success due to the severe loss of catalytic activity in the presence of these monomers. This work reports that cationic, group four metallocenes are active catalysts for the homo-polymerization of {alpha}-olefins containing silyl-protected alcohols and tertiary amines. Employing different monomers and conditions, a table shows the starting monomer, reaction time and temperature, and spectroscopic analysis of the end products. A major advanatage of these metallocene-based catalysts is that the ligand system can be modified to proved the optimal combination of catalystic activity, stereospecificity, and tolerance to functionality. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Antiproliferative Pt(IV) complexes: synthesis, biological activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester; Luini, Mara; Monti, Elena; Gariboldi, Marzia B; Ravera, Mauro; Gabano, Elisabetta; Gaviglio, Luca; Osella, Domenico

    2010-09-01

    Several Pt(IV) complexes of the general formula [Pt(L)2(L')2(L'')2] [axial ligands L are Cl-, RCOO-, or OH-; equatorial ligands L' are two am(m)ine or one diamine; and equatorial ligands L'' are Cl- or glycolato] were rationally designed and synthesized in the attempt to develop a predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. Numerous theoretical molecular descriptors were used alongside physicochemical data (i.e., reduction peak potential, Ep, and partition coefficient, log Po/w) to obtain a validated QSAR between in vitro cytotoxicity (half maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC50, on A2780 ovarian and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines) and some features of Pt(IV) complexes. In the resulting best models, a lipophilic descriptor (log Po/w or the number of secondary sp3 carbon atoms) plus an electronic descriptor (Ep, the number of oxygen atoms, or the topological polar surface area expressed as the N,O polar contribution) is necessary for modeling, supporting the general finding that the biological behavior of Pt(IV) complexes can be rationalized on the basis of their cellular uptake, the Pt(IV)-->Pt(II) reduction, and the structure of the corresponding Pt(II) metabolites. Novel compounds were synthesized on the basis of their predicted cytotoxicity in the preliminary QSAR model, and were experimentally tested. A final QSAR model, based solely on theoretical molecular descriptors to ensure its general applicability, is proposed.

  6. Tidal Downsizing model - IV. Destructive feedback in planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2016-09-01

    The role of negative feedback from a massive solid core on its massive gas envelope in the Tidal Downsizing scenario of planet formation is investigated via one-dimensional planet evolution models followed by population synthesis calculations. It is shown that cores more massive than ˜10 M⊕ release enough energy to reverse contraction of their parent gas envelopes, culminating in their destruction. This process may help to explain why observed gas giant planets are so rare, why massive cores are so ubiquitous, and why there is a sharp rollover in the core mass function above ˜20 M⊕. Additionally, the short time-scales with which these massive cores are assembled in TD may help explain formation route of Uranus, Neptune and the suspected HL Tau planets. Given the negative role of cores in assembly of gas giants in the model, an antimony is found between massive cores and gas giants: cores in survived gas giant planets are on average less massive than cores free of massive envelopes. In rare circumstances when core feedback self-regulates, extremely metal-rich gas giants, such as CoRoT-20b, a gas giant made of heavy elements by up to ˜50 per cent, can be made.

  7. Neuronal activity of the cat supraoptic nucleus is influenced by muscle small-diameter afferent (groups III and IV) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kannan, H; Yamashita, H; Koizumi, K; Brooks, C M

    1988-08-01

    In anesthetized cats, responses of single neurosecretory neurons of the supraoptic nucleus to activation of muscle receptors were investigated. Electrical stimulation (1-3 pulses at 200 Hz) of group III and IV pure muscle afferents (gastrocnemius nerve) evoked excitation of greater than 50% of supraoptic nucleus neurons (n = 50), whereas stimulation of group Ia or Ib fibers was ineffective. Baroreceptor stimulation inhibited 95% of these supraoptic nucleus neurons that responded to activation of muscle afferents. Excitation of receptors in the gastrocnemius muscle by intra-arterial injection of chemicals (NaCl, KCl, and bradykinin) increased firing rates of most (84%, 74%, and 80%, respectively) neurosecretary neurons. The magnitude of the excitatory response was dose dependent--bradykinin being the most effective. The response disappeared after muscle denervation. When the gastrocnemius muscle alone was contracted phasically by ventral root stimulation, discharges of the supraoptic nucleus neurons increased, whereas quick stretch of the muscle had no effect. We conclude that activation of muscle receptors by chemical or mechanical stimulus can directly excite neurosecretory neurons in the supraoptic nucleus and that afferent impulses are carried by polymodal fibers of small diameter but not by the largest afferents (group I) from the muscle. The results may relate to increased concentrations of plasma vasopressin during exercise.

  8. Testing Structural Models of DSM-IV Symptoms of Common Forms of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, Benjamin B.; Rathouz, Paul J.; Van Hulle, Carol; Urbano, Richard C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Applegate, Brooks; Garriock, Holly A.; Chapman, Derek A.; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2008-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted of "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) symptoms of common mental disorders derived from structured interviews of a representative sample of 4,049 twin children and adolescents and their adult caretakers. A dimensional model based on the assignment of symptoms…

  9. Comparing factor analytic models of the DSM-IV personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Schmitt, Thomas A; Richard, David C S; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    There is little agreement about the latent factor structure of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) personality disorders (PDs). Factor analytic studies over the past 2 decades have yielded different results, in part reflecting differences in factor analytic technique, the measure used to assess the PDs, and the changing DSM criteria. In this study, we explore the latent factor structure of the DSM (4th ed.; IV) PDs in a sample of 1200 psychiatric outpatients evaluated with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV PDs (B. Pfohl, N. Blum, & M. Zimmerman, 1997). We first evaluated 2 a priori models of the PDs with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), reflecting their inherent organization in the DSM-IV: a 3-factor model and a 10-factor model. Fit statistics did not suggest that these models yielded an adequate fit. We then evaluated the latent structure with exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Multiple solutions produced more statistically and theoretically reasonable results, as well as providing clinically useful findings. On the basis of fit statistics and theory, 3 models were evaluated further--the 4-, 5-, and 10-factor models. The 10-factor model, which did not resemble the 10-factor model of the CFA, was determined to be the strongest of all 3 models. Future research should use contemporary methods of evaluating factor analytic results in order to more thoroughly compare various factor solutions.

  10. Modeling the personality of dyads and groups.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Richard; Griffin, Dale

    2002-12-01

    The paper presents a methodological approach for assessing the personality of a dyad or a group, a concept that is not equivalent to the sum, or mean, of the individual scores. We illustrate how the logic of the multitrait multimethod approach, which is a familiar technique for establishing construct validity, can be extended to assess the construct of a relationship "personality." The model, which we call the latent group model, provides a decomposition and comparison of individual-level and group-level variance in a given trait, and the individual-level and group-level covariance or correlation between two traits. The model is also extended to the assessment of stability of the individual and group level traits. Throughout the paper, we draw connections between related methods and show how the latent group model can be estimated through hierarchical linear modeling. PMID:12498359

  11. Diverse anisotropy of phonon transport in two-dimensional group IV-VI compounds: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Fang, Wu-Zhang; Zhang, Li-Chuan; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Yan, Qing-Bo; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2016-05-01

    New classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport is a fundamental physical parameter. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of the 2D orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds of GeS, GeSe, SnS and SnSe by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite their similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as phonon group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity (κ), etc. Especially, the κ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer GeS shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer SnS and SnSe show almost isotropy in phonon transport. The origin of the diverse anisotropy is fully studied and the underlying mechanism is discussed in details. With limited size, the κ could be effectively lowered, and the anisotropy could be effectively modulated by nanostructuring, which would extend the applications to nanoscale thermoelectrics and thermal management. Our study offers fundamental understanding of the anisotropic phonon transport properties of 2D materials, and would be of significance for further study, modulation and applications in emerging technologies.

  12. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IV-E. Supplementary Analyses: Reanalysis of Selected Data Sets. Volume IV-F. Supplementary Analyses: Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proper, Elizabeth C.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model discusses findings of analyses of achievement test data which have been adjusted to take into consideration the preschool experience of children in three Follow Through cohorts. These analyses serve as a supplement to analyses presented in Volume IV-A of…

  13. Joint Individual-Group Modeling for Tracking.

    PubMed

    Bazzani, Loris; Zanotto, Matteo; Cristani, Marco; Murino, Vittorio

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel probabilistic framework that jointly models individuals and groups for tracking. Managing groups is challenging, primarily because of their nonlinear dynamics and complex layout which lead to repeated splitting and merging events. The proposed approach assumes a tight relation of mutual support between the modeling of individuals and groups, promoting the idea that groups are better modeled if individuals are considered and vice versa. This concept is translated in a mathematical model using a decentralized particle filtering framework which deals with a joint individual-group state space. The model factorizes the joint space into two dependent subspaces, where individuals and groups share the knowledge of the joint individual-group distribution. The assignment of people to the different groups (and thus group initialization, split and merge) is implemented by two alternative strategies: using classifiers trained beforehand on statistics of group configurations, and through online learning of a Dirichlet process mixture model, assuming that no training data is available before tracking. These strategies lead to two different methods that can be used on top of any person detector (simulated using the ground truth in our experiments). We provide convincing results on two recent challenging tracking benchmarks. PMID:26353291

  14. Evolutionary models of in-group favoritism

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In-group favoritism is the tendency for individuals to cooperate with in-group members more strongly than with out-group members. Similar concepts have been described across different domains, including in-group bias, tag-based cooperation, parochial altruism, and ethnocentrism. Both humans and other animals show this behavior. Here, we review evolutionary mechanisms for explaining this phenomenon by covering recently developed mathematical models. In fact, in-group favoritism is not easily realized on its own in theory, although it can evolve under some conditions. We also discuss the implications of these modeling results in future empirical and theoretical research. PMID:25926978

  15. A Model of Small Group Facilitator Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Judith A.; Jin, Sungmi; Song, Ji Hoon

    2008-01-01

    This study used small group theory, quantitative and qualitative data collected from experienced practicing facilitators at three points of time, and a building block process of collection, analysis, further collection, and consolidation to develop a model of small group facilitator competencies. The proposed model has five components:…

  16. Epitaxial Development of Advanced Group IV Materials and High Performance Optical Devices for Applications in Silicon-photonics and Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Richard

    Group IV alloy films exhibit the ability to tune both band structure and lattice parameters and have recently attracted attention for their potential applications in Si-photonics and photovoltaics. In this work, several new approaches to produce these alloys directly on Si(100) and Ge(100) wafers are developed. For photovoltaics, use of Ge-buffered Si(100) wafers as a low cost platform for epitaxy of In1-xGaxAs layers was explored. The results indicate that this approach has promise for transitioning from bulk Ge platforms to virtual substrates for a significant cost reduction. The electrical and optical properties of Ge and Ge1-ySn y layers produced using several different techniques were explored via fabrication of high performance heterostructure photodiodes. First, a new CVD approach to Ge-like materials was developed in which germanium is alloyed with very small amounts of tin. These alloys exhibited no significant difference in their structural properties or band gap compared to pure Ge, however superior photo response and reduced dark currents were observed from fabricated devices relative to pure Ge on Si reference diodes. Additionally, pure Ge/Si(100) photodiodes were fabricated using layers grown via reactions of Ge4H 10 on Si(100) and found to exhibit low dark current densities with high collection efficiencies. Ge1-x-ySixSny materials represent the newest member of group IV alloy family. The ability to decouple the lattice constant and the band gap in this system has led to strong interest both for strain/confinement layers in quantum well structures, and as the possible "missing" 1 eV junction in multijunction photovoltaics. Recent progress in this field has allowed for the first time growth, fabrication and measurement of novel photodiodes based on Ge1-x-ySixSn y. This work presents the material, electrical and optical properties of Ge1-x-ySixSny layers and photodiodes grown directly on Ge and Si wafers using two different synthetic approaches. A

  17. Approximate Single-Diode Photovoltaic Model for Efficient I-V Characteristics Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Ting, T. O.; Zhang, Nan; Guan, Sheng-Uei; Wong, Prudence W. H.

    2013-01-01

    Precise photovoltaic (PV) behavior models are normally described by nonlinear analytical equations. To solve such equations, it is necessary to use iterative procedures. Aiming to make the computation easier, this paper proposes an approximate single-diode PV model that enables high-speed predictions for the electrical characteristics of commercial PV modules. Based on the experimental data, statistical analysis is conducted to validate the approximate model. Simulation results show that the calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics fit the measured data with high accuracy. Furthermore, compared with the existing modeling methods, the proposed model reduces the simulation time by approximately 30% in this work. PMID:24298205

  18. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  19. Validation of nuclear criticality safety software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; D`Aquila, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    The original validation report, POEF-T-3636, was documented in August 1994. The document was based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This revision is written to clarify the margin of safety being used at Portsmouth for nuclear criticality safety calculations. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Lockheed Martin Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. For calculations of Portsmouth systems using the specified codes and systems covered by this validation, a maximum k{sub eff} including 2{sigma} of 0.9605 or lower shall be considered as subcritical to ensure a calculational margin of safety of 0.02. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25.

  20. Emergence of Serotype IV Group B Streptococcus Adult Invasive Disease in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Canada, Is Driven by Clonal Sequence Type 459 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Athey, Taryn B. T.; Van Caeseele, Paul; Horsman, Greg; Alexander, David C.; Melano, Roberto G.; Li, Aimin; Flores, Anthony R.; Shelburne, Samuel A.; McGeer, Allison; Demczuk, Walter; Martin, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Serotype IV group B Streptococcus (GBS) is emerging in Canada and the United States with rates as high as 5% of the total burden of adult invasive GBS disease. To understand this emergence, we studied the population structure and assessed the antimicrobial susceptibility of serotype IV isolates causing adult invasive infection in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Canada, between 2010 and 2014. Whole-genome sequencing was used to determine multilocus sequence typing information and identify genes encoding antimicrobial resistance in 85 invasive serotype IV GBS strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by standard methods. Strain divergence was assessed using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Serotype IV strains were responsible for 16.9% of adult invasive GBS infections in Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the period. The majority of serotype IV isolates (89%) were clonally related, tetracycline-, erythromycin-, and clindamycin-resistant sequence type 459 (ST459) strains that possessed genes tetM and ermTR. Genome comparisons between ST459 and serotype V ST1 GBS identified several areas of recombination in an overall similar genomic background. Serotype IV ST459 GBS strains are expanding and causing a substantial percentage of adult invasive GBS disease. This emergence may be linked to the acquisition of resistance to tetracycline, macrolides, and lincosamides. PMID:26135871

  1. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  2. Introduction of LL-IV Distributed Hydrological Model and Applications in DMIP-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhang, H.; Yang, M.; Nicholson, A.

    2011-12-01

    Watershed hydrological models are an important tool for understanding hydrological processes on the earth, and they have been developed from empirical models to stochastic models, to lumped conceptual models, and finally to distributed conceptual models. Among them, the distributed hydrological model with physical bases is a great milestone in the development of hydrological models. The Hydrology Laboratory of the US National Weather Service paid high attention to the applications of distributed hydrological models. This department has proposed the Distributed Model Intercomparison Projects (DMIP-I and DMIP-II) since 2001, which made a major contribution to the development of distributed hydrological models. This paper introduces the development of the LL (Lan Li) distributed hydrological model, which produced satisfactory results in both DMIP-I and DIMP-II. LL-IV is the latest version of the LL distributed hydrological model and its basic equations and structures are detailed in this paper. LL-IV, for the first time, derives convection-diffusion equations for the interflow (in both saturated and unsaturated conditions) and underground flow. In addition, this model describes soil humidity, evaporation from soil, infiltration, overland flow, stream flow etc. by convection-diffusion equations. The advantages of using convection-diffusion equations in LL-IV to represent water cycle process for either the vertical change in a single grid or water interchange between grids are as follows: (1) Convection-diffusion equations require fewer variables compared with St. Venant equations. Whole and continuous data of the velocity and water stage, for example, are not usually available for most watersheds, which limits the application of distributed hydrological model. For LL-IV, however, these data are not always necessary when simulating. (2) LL-IV improves computational efficiency and requires less memory space by using convection-diffusion equations which focus mainly on

  3. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model...

  4. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part IV--Sport Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Lauren; Lucas, Mark; Jones, Jeffery; Humphreys, Dan; Cody, Ann; Vaughn, Bev; Storms, Tommie

    2013-01-01

    "Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part IV--Sport Groups" provides the the following articles: (1) "Sport Programming Offered by Camp Abilities and the United States Association for Blind Athletes" (Lauren Lieberman and Mark…

  5. The Development and Evaluation of Training Methods for Group IV Personnel. 1. Orientation and Implementation of the Training Methods Development School (TMDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinemann, John H.

    The investigation is part of continuing Navy research on the Trainability of Group IV (low ability) personnel intended to maximize the utilization and integration of marginal personnel in the fleet. An experimental Training Methods Development School (TMDS) was initiated to provide an experimental training program, with research controls, for…

  6. Food web models: a plea for groups.

    PubMed

    Allesina, Stefano; Pascual, Mercedes

    2009-07-01

    The concept of a group is ubiquitous in biology. It underlies classifications in evolution and ecology, including those used to describe phylogenetic levels, the habitat and functional roles of organisms in ecosystems. Surprisingly, this concept is not explicitly included in simple models for the structure of food webs, the ecological networks formed by consumer-resource interactions. We present here the simplest possible model based on groups, and show that it performs substantially better than current models at predicting the structure of large food webs. Our group-based model can be applied to different types of biological and non-biological networks, and for the first time merges in the same framework two important notions in network theory: that of compartments (sets of highly interacting nodes) and that of roles (sets of nodes that have similar interaction patterns). This model provides a basis to examine the significance of groups in biological networks and to develop more accurate models for ecological network structure. It is especially relevant at a time when a new generation of empirical data is providing increasingly large food webs.

  7. Costs and Their Assessment to Users of a Medical Library, Part IV: Differences in the Use of a Health Science Library by Various User Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bres, E.; And Others

    Part IV is a summary analysis of sample and survey data collected to facilitate the structure of the cost assessment models and to find out which, if any, subgroups of HAM-TMC user population make more (or less) use of various library services. Sampling data were obtained from brief interviews and in-house files of various user institutions to…

  8. DCG-IV but not other group-II metabotropic receptor agonists induces microglial BDNF mRNA expression in the rat striatum. Correlation with neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Venero, J L; Santiago, M; Tomás-Camardiel, M; Matarredona, E R; Cano, J; Machado, A

    2002-01-01

    We have previously described a neuroprotective action of (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2'3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV), an agonist for group-II metabotropic receptors, on dopaminergic nerve terminals against the degeneration induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). This effect was accompanied by an up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the rat striatum. We have now analyzed the phenotypic nature of the BDNF mRNA-expressing cells in response to intrastriatal injection of DCG-IV. Dual in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that microglial cells but not astrocytes were responsible for this induction. Subsequent analysis demonstrated that this effect was accompanied by striking loss of striatal glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) mRNA and massive appearance of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis. A dose-response study demonstrated that doses of DCG-IV as low as 5 nmol was very toxic in terms GAD mRNA and apoptosis. 0.5 nmol of DCG-IV did not induce toxicity at all in terms of GAD mRNA and apoptosis. Activation of group-II metabotropic receptors in striatum with N-Acetyl-Asp-Glu (NAAG; a mGlu3 agonist) and (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (a mGlu2 and mGlu3 agonist) did not induce neither loss of GAD mRNA nor appearance of apoptosis (doses up to 20 nmol). In additional experiments, NAAG, in contrast to DCG-IV, failed to protect the striatal dopaminergic system against the degeneration induced by MPP+ as studied by microdialysis. Finally, we studied the mechanism by which DCG-IV is highly toxic. For that, selective antagonists of either metabotropic--(R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine and LY 341495--or ionotropic (N-methyl-D-aspartate, NMDA)--DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5) glutamate receptors --were co-administered with DCG-IV. Only AP-5 highly protected the striatum against the degeneration induced by DCG-IV. Since DCG-IV also activates the NMDA receptor at

  9. Exploring Oxidovanadium(IV) Complexes as YopH Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Modeling Studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    YopH tyrosine phosphatase, a virulence factor produced by pathogenic species of Yersinia, is an attractive drug target. In this work, three oxidovanadium(IV) complexes were assayed against recombinant YopH and showed strong inhibition of the enzyme in the nanomolar range. Molecular modeling indicated that their binding is reinforced by H-bond, cation−π, and π–π interactions conferring specificity toward YopH. These complexes are thus interesting lead molecules for phosphatase inhibitor drug discovery. PMID:26617957

  10. Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality program KENO IV and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group-cross sections for high-assay uranium systems. [KENO IV criticality code

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, G. R.; Masters, L. C.; Stachowiak, R. V.

    1981-04-10

    Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality code, KENO IV, and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group cross sections was accomplished by calculating the effective neutron multiplication constant, k/sub eff/, of 29 experimentally critical assemblies which had uranium enrichments of 92.6% or higher in the uranium-235 isotope. The experiments were chosen so that a large variety of geometries and of neutron energy spectra were covered. Problems, calculating the k/sub eff/ of systems with high-uranium-concentration uranyl nitrate solution that were minimally reflected or unreflected, resulted in the separate examination of five cases.

  11. Modeling Success in FLOSS Project Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Justin M; Cui, Xiaohui; ST Charles, Jesse Lee; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    A significant challenge in software engineering is accurately modeling projects in order to correctly forecast success or failure. The primary difficulty is that software development efforts are complex in terms of both the technical and social aspects of the engineering environment. This is compounded by the lack of real data that captures both the measures of success in performing a process, and the measures that reflect a group s social dynamics. This research focuses on the development of a model for predicting software project success that leverages the wealth of available open source project data in order to accurately model the behavior of those software engineering groups. Our model accounts for both the technical elements of software engineering as well as the social elements that drive the decisions of individual developers. We use agent-based simulations to represent the complexity of the group interactions, and base the behavior of the agents on the real software engineering data acquired. For four of the five project success measures, our results indicate that the developed model represents the underlying data well and provides accurate predictions of open source project success indicators.

  12. Multidimensional Model of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Generation-IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, Tara; Antal, Steven P.; Podowski, Michael Z.

    2006-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the mechanistic modeling and theoretical/computational analysis of flow and heat transfer in future Generation-IV Supercritical Water Cooled Reactors (SCWR). The issues discussed in the paper include: the development of analytical models of the properties of supercritical water, and the application of full three-dimensional computational modeling framework to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in SCWRs. Several results of calculations are shown, including the evaluation of water properties (density, specific heat, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and Prandtl number) near the pseudo-critical temperature for various supercritical pressures, and the CFD predictions using the NPHASE computer code. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach is very promising for future mechanistic analyses of SCWR thermal-hydraulics and safety. (authors)

  13. The relationships between WAIS-IV factor index scores and educational level: A bifactor model approach.

    PubMed

    Abad, Francisco J; Sorrel, Miguel A; Román, Francisco J; Colom, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    IQ summary scores may not involve equivalent psychological meaning for different educational levels. Ultimately, this relates to the distinction between constructs and measurements. Here, we explore this issue studying the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) for Spain. A representative sample of 743 individuals (374 females and 369 males) who completed the 15 subtests comprising this intelligence battery was considered. We analyzed (a) the best latent factor structure for modeling WAIS-IV subtest performance, (b) measurement invariance across educational levels, and (c) the relationships of educational level/attainment with latent factors, Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), and index factor scores. These were the main findings: (a) the bifactor model provides the best fit; (b) there is partial invariance, and therefore it is concluded that the battery is a proper measure of the constructs of interest for the educational levels analyzed (nevertheless, the relevance of g decreases at high educational levels); (c) at the latent level, g and, to a lesser extent, Verbal Comprehension and Processing Speed, are positively related to educational level/attainment; (d) despite the previous finding, we find that Verbal Comprehension and Processing Speed factor index scores have reduced incremental validity beyond FSIQ; and (e) FSIQ is a slightly biased measure of g. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26322798

  14. Some Generalized Physical Models Through Homographic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agop, Maricel; Gavriluţ, Alina

    2015-10-01

    In the present paper some generalized physical models are established using differential and integral elements geometry of the homographic group. The generalization of the hyperbolic motions (with constant acceleration) on the Minkowskian space-time and classical Kepler problems is analyzed using a variational principle of Matzner-Misner type. This way the Skyrme theory is placed in an inherent continuity with respect to the Newtonian natural philosophy.

  15. A Comprehensive Health Group Practice Model.

    PubMed

    Pihlstrom, Daniel; White, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Permanente Dental Associates includes 17 offices in the Pacific Northwest. Among the distinguishing characteristics of this model are a predominantly HMO structure and integration of care in a general medical program. Staff dentists are on salary and are largely relieved of the business details of practice. Ultimate control of the system is vested in a group of shareholders--the dentists who practice chairside. One of the shareholder-practitioners discusses his perspective on this system.

  16. Group Chaos Theory: A Metaphor and Model for Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Edil Torres; Wilbur, Michael; Frank-Saraceni, James; Roberts-Wilbur, Janice; Phan, Loan T.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Group phenomena and interactions are described through the use of the chaos theory constructs and characteristics of sensitive dependence on initial conditions, phase space, turbulence, emergence, self-organization, dissipation, iteration, bifurcation, and attractors and fractals. These constructs and theoretical tenets are presented as applicable…

  17. Group Prenatal Care: Model Fidelity and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    NOVICK, Gina; REID, Allecia E.; LEWIS, Jessica; KERSHAW, Trace S.; RISING, Sharon S.; ICKOVICS, Jeannette R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care has been demonstrated to improve pregnancy outcomes. However, there is likely variation in how the model is implemented in clinical practice, which may be associated with efficacy, and therefore variation, in outcomes. We examined the association of fidelity to process and content of the CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care model with outcomes previously shown to be affected in a clinical trial: preterm birth, adequacy of prenatal care and breastfeeding initiation. Study Design Participants were 519 women who received CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care. Process fidelity reflected how facilitative leaders were and how involved participants were in each session. Content fidelity reflected whether recommended content was discussed in each session. Fidelity was rated at each session by a trained researcher. Preterm birth and adequacy of care were abstracted from medical records. Participants self-reported breastfeeding initiation at 6-months postpartum. Results Controlling for important clinical predictors, greater process fidelity was associated with significantly lower odds of both preterm birth (B=−0.43, Wald χ2=8.65, P=.001) and intensive utilization of care (B=−0.29, Wald χ2=3.91, P=.05). Greater content fidelity was associated with lower odds of intensive utilization of care (B=−0.03, Wald χ2=9.31, P=.001). Conclusion Maintaining fidelity to facilitative group processes in CenteringPregnancy was associated with significant reductions in preterm birth and intensive care utilization of care. Content fidelity also was associated with reductions in intensive utilization of care. Clinicians learning to facilitate group care should receive training in facilitative leadership, emphasizing the critical role that creating a participatory atmosphere can play in improving outcomes. PMID:23524175

  18. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:27451112

  19. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions.

  20. Computational social dynamic modeling of group recruitment.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Lee, Marinna; Pickett, Marc; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Smrcka, Julianne D.; Ko, Teresa H.; Moy, Timothy David; Wu, Benjamin C.

    2004-01-01

    The Seldon software toolkit combines concepts from agent-based modeling and social science to create a computationally social dynamic model for group recruitment. The underlying recruitment model is based on a unique three-level hybrid agent-based architecture that contains simple agents (level one), abstract agents (level two), and cognitive agents (level three). This uniqueness of this architecture begins with abstract agents that permit the model to include social concepts (gang) or institutional concepts (school) into a typical software simulation environment. The future addition of cognitive agents to the recruitment model will provide a unique entity that does not exist in any agent-based modeling toolkits to date. We use social networks to provide an integrated mesh within and between the different levels. This Java based toolkit is used to analyze different social concepts based on initialization input from the user. The input alters a set of parameters used to influence the values associated with the simple agents, abstract agents, and the interactions (simple agent-simple agent or simple agent-abstract agent) between these entities. The results of phase-1 Seldon toolkit provide insight into how certain social concepts apply to different scenario development for inner city gang recruitment.

  1. Compounds of tin(IV) - catalysts of amide formation. Effect of temperature and nature of leaving group

    SciTech Connect

    Oleinik, N.M.; Garkusha-Bozhko, I.P.; Usanova, I.V.

    1988-09-20

    The effect of substitution of the ester oxygen atom by sulfur in p-nitrophenyl acetate on its aminolysis rate with benzylamine in beneze at 25/degree/C in the presence of dibutyltin dibenzoate as catalyst was studied. Such substitution leads to a decrease in the catalytic activity by approximately a half, and this is explained by the smaller capacity of the sulfur atom for the formation of hydrogen bonds. The effect of temperature on the rate of the reaction of N-benzyl-oxycarbonylglycine p-nitrophenyl ester with glycine tert-butyl ester in benzene in the presence of dibutyltin dibenzoate was also investigated in the range of 10-50/degree/C. The Arrhenius equation is not fulfilled in this case. The obtained facts demonstrate the multistage character of the catalytic reaction and do not contradict the authors previously proposed bifunctional mechanism of catalysis by tin(IV) compounds.

  2. A Comparative Evaluation of Group IV Personnel Assigned to the U.S.S. Catskill; Followup Performance Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Nicholas H.; Harrigan, Robert J.

    A followup performance evaluation was conducted on a sample of Group 4 (low ability) personnel who had served 14 months aboard the mine contermeasures support ship U.S.S. Catskill (MCS-1). Shipboard assessments were made of the Group 4 sample and the non-Group 4 comparison sample in terms of performance test proficiency, supervisors' ratings, and…

  3. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation for modeling localized corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P; Wilson, L; Wesolowski, David J

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO{sub 2} has been determined at 80 C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl{sup 2+}) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH{sup 2+}, Mo(OH){sup 2+}, and Mo(OH){sub 3}{sup 0}) in addition to the Mo{sup 3+} ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  4. Modeling of Internet Influence on Group Emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    Long-range interactions are introduced to a two-dimensional model of agents with time-dependent internal variables ei = 0, ±1 corresponding to valencies of agent emotions. Effects of spontaneous emotion emergence and emotional relaxation processes are taken into account. The valence of agent i depends on valencies of its four nearest neighbors but it is also influenced by long-range interactions corresponding to social relations developed for example by Internet contacts to a randomly chosen community. Two types of such interactions are considered. In the first model the community emotional influence depends only on the sign of its temporary emotion. When the coupling parameter approaches a critical value a phase transition takes place and as result for larger coupling constants the mean group emotion of all agents is nonzero over long time periods. In the second model the community influence is proportional to magnitude of community average emotion. The ordered emotional phase was here observed for a narrow set of system parameters.

  5. Convergence between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic models for personality disorder: evaluation of strategies for establishing diagnostic thresholds.

    PubMed

    Morey, Leslie C; Skodol, Andrew E

    2013-05-01

    The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) recommended substantial revisions to the personality disorders (PDs) section of DSM-IV-TR, proposing a hybrid categorical-dimensional model that represented PDs as combinations of core personality dysfunctions and various configurations of maladaptive personality traits. Although the DSM-5 Task Force endorsed the proposal, the Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) did not, placing the Work Group's model in DSM-5 Section III ("Emerging Measures and Models") with other concepts thought to be in need of additional research. This paper documents the impact of using this alternative model in a national sample of 337 patients as described by clinicians familiar with their cases. In particular, the analyses focus on alternative strategies considered by the Work Group for deriving decision rules, or diagnostic thresholds, with which to assign categorical diagnoses. Results demonstrate that diagnostic rules could be derived that yielded appreciable correspondence between DSM-IV-TR and proposed DSM-5 PD diagnoses-correspondence greater than that observed in the transition between DSM-III and DSM-III-R PDs. The approach also represents the most comprehensive attempt to date to provide conceptual and empirical justification for diagnostic thresholds utilized within the DSM PDs.

  6. The Architectural Chromatin Factor High Mobility Group A1 Enhances DNA Ligase IV Activity Influencing DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Silvia; Ros, Gloria; Penzo, Carlotta; Triolo, Gianluca; Demarchi, Francesca; Sgarra, Riccardo; Vindigni, Alessandro; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2016-01-01

    The HMGA1 architectural transcription factor is an oncogene overexpressed in the vast majority of human cancers. HMGA1 is a highly connected node in the nuclear molecular network and the key aspect of HMGA1 involvement in cancer development is that HMGA1 simultaneously confers cells multiple oncogenic hits, ranging from global chromatin structural and gene expression modifications up to the direct functional alterations of key cellular proteins. Interestingly, HMGA1 also modulates DNA damage repair pathways. In this work, we provide evidences linking HMGA1 with Non-Homologous End Joining DNA repair. We show that HMGA1 is in complex with and is a substrate for DNA-PK. HMGA1 enhances Ligase IV activity and it counteracts the repressive histone H1 activity towards DNA ends ligation. Moreover, breast cancer cells overexpressing HMGA1 show a faster recovery upon induction of DNA double-strand breaks, which is associated with a higher survival. These data suggest that resistance to DNA-damaging agents in cancer cells could be partially attributed to HMGA1 overexpression thus highlighting the relevance of considering HMGA1 expression levels in the selection of valuable and effective pharmacological regimens. PMID:27723831

  7. Effects of a carrageenan-induced myositis on the discharge properties of group III and IV muscle receptors in the cat.

    PubMed

    Berberich, P; Hoheisel, U; Mense, S

    1988-05-01

    1. To see how muscle group III and IV receptors are affected by a myositis, the background activity and mechanical excitability of slowly conducting afferent units from normal and inflamed muscles were studied in chloralose-anesthetized cats. The inflammation was induced by infiltrating the gastrocnemius-soleus muscle with a suspension of 2% carrageenan. According to their responsiveness to local pressure stimulation the receptors were classified as touch units, moderate pressure units, and noxious pressure (probably nociceptive) units. The impulse activity in single afferent units was recorded up to 14 h after induction of the inflammation. 2. In inflamed muscle both group III and group IV receptors showed an increase in the proportion of units having a background activity and in the mean background activity. The differences reached statistically significant levels in group III fibers only. 3. A characteristic feature of the background activity of some receptors in inflamed muscle was its intermittent nature: the discharges occurred either as grouped impulses of short duration or as phases of relatively high discharge frequency alternating with long periods of silence. 4. In normal muscle no receptor exhibited intermittent discharges or had a discharge rate exceeding 7 imp/min. Thus the presence of an intermittent background activity or a high frequency of the background discharge can be considered as characteristic for afferent units from an inflamed muscle. 5. The time course of the background activity showed two peaks, one occurring 2-4 h, the other one 6-7 h after induction of the inflammation. Recordings of single units during the transition from the normal to the inflamed state demonstrated that the first increase in background discharge took place 1-1.5 h after injection of carrageenan. 6. The proportion of noxious pressure units was reduced and that of moderate pressure units increased in inflamed muscle. In this case the difference was significant for

  8. Antinociceptive activity of astragaloside IV in the animal model of chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guo-Bing; Fan, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Chen; Wang, Qi; Song, Juan; Gao, Yue; Hou, Ming-Xiao; Chen, Yu-Feng; Wang, Tong-Chao; Cai, Guo-Jun

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the applicability of astragaloside IV (AG) for the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain, we systemically evaluated the antinociceptive activity of AG in the animal model of chronic constriction injury. We studied behaviors, electrophysiology, and biochemistry from day 2 to day 23 after the surgery. We found that when administered intraperitoneally at the dose of 60 mg/kg, AG caused significant inhibition of allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by mechanic and thermal stimuli as well as downregulation of the expressions of a series of proteins involved in mediating neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia, such as P2X purinoceptor 3, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α1, and transient receptor potential cation channel subtypes A1 and V1. Further investigation showed that AG restored the nerve conduction velocity and the histological structure of the damaged sciatic nerve on day 23 after the surgery. Moreover, results from immunoelectron microscope showed that glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α1 induced by AG could form a circular band in the myelin debris between the injured axons and Schwann cells, contributing toward restoration of the damaged nerve. In conclusion, in our animal model, AG effectively inhibited the neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury.

  9. Ensemble Input of Group III/IV Muscle Afferents to CNS: A Limiting Factor of Central Motor Drive During Endurance Exercise from Normoxia to Moderate Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2016-01-01

    We recently hypothesized that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia the major determinant of central motor drive (CMD) during endurance exercise switches from a predominantly peripheral origin to a hypoxic-sensitive central component of fatigue. We found that peripheral locomotor muscle fatigue (pLMF) is the prevailing factor limiting central motor drive and therefore exercise performance from normoxia to moderate hypoxia (SaO2 > 75 %). In these levels of arterial hypoxemia, the development of pLMF is confined to a certain limit which varies between humans-pLMF does not develop to this limit in more severe hypoxia (SaO2 < 70 %) and exercise is prematurely terminated presumably to protect the brain from insufficient O2 supply. Based on the observations from normoxia to moderate hypoxia, we outlined a model suggesting that group III/IV muscle afferents impose inhibitory influences on the determination of CMD of working humans during high-intensity endurance exercise with the purpose to regulate and restrict the level of exercise-induced pLMF to an "individual critical threshold." To experimentally test this model, we pharmacologically blocked somatosensory pathways originating in the working limbs during cycling exercise in normoxia. After initial difficulties with a local anesthetic (epidural lidocaine, L3-L4) and associated loss of locomotor muscle strength we switched to an intrathecally applied opioid analgesic (fentanyl, L3-L4). These experiments were the first ever to selectively block locomotor muscle afferents during high-intensity cycling exercise without affecting maximal locomotor muscle strength. In the absence of opioid-mediated neural feedback from the working limbs, CMD was increased and end-exercise pLMF substantially exceeded, for the first time, the individual critical threshold of peripheral fatigue. The outcome of these studies confirm our hypothesis claiming that afferent feedback inhibits CMD and restricts the development of

  10. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of the Binary and Ternary Group-IV Alloys Si-Sn, Ge-Sn, and Si-Ge-Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatami, S. N.; Aksamija, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Efficient thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion requires materials with low thermal conductivity and good electronic properties. Si-Ge alloys, and their nanostructures such as thin films and nanowires, have been extensively studied for TE applications; other group-IV alloys, including those containing Sn, have not been given as much attention as TEs, despite their increasing applications in other areas including optoelectronics. We study the lattice thermal conductivity of binary (Si-Sn and Ge-Sn) and ternary (Si-Ge-Sn) alloys and their thin films in the Boltzmann transport formalisms, including a full phonon dispersion and momentum-dependent boundary-roughness scattering. We show that Si-Sn alloys have the lowest conductivity (3 W /mK ) of all the bulk alloys, more than 2 times lower than Si-Ge, attributed to the larger difference in mass between the two constituents. In addition, we demonstrate that thin films offer an additional reduction in thermal conductivity, reaching around 1 W /mK in 20-nm-thick Si-Sn, Ge-Sn, and ternary Si-Ge-Sn films, which is near the conductivity of amorphous SiO2 . We conclude that group-IV alloys containing Sn have the potential for high-efficiency TE energy conversion.

  11. On the relation between the microscopic structure and the sound velocity anomaly in elemental melts of groups IV, V, and VI.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Yaron; Yahel, Eyal; Caspi, El'ad N; Beuneu, Brigitte; Dariel, Moshe P; Makov, Guy

    2010-09-01

    The sound velocity of some liquid elements of groups IV, V, and VI, as reported in the literature, displays anomalous features that set them apart from other liquid metals. In an effort to determine a possible common origin of these anomalies, extensive neutron diffraction measurements of liquid Bi and Sb were carried out over a wide temperature range. The structure factors of liquid Sb and Bi were determined as a function of temperature. The structure of the two molten metals was carefully analyzed with respect to peak locations, widths, and coordination numbers in their respective radial distribution function. The width of the peaks in the radial distribution functions was not found to increase and even decreased within a certain temperature range. This anomalous temperature dependence of the peak widths correlates with the anomalous temperature dependence of the sound velocity. This correlation may be accounted for by increased rigidity of the liquid structure with temperature. A phenomenological correlation between the peak width and the sound velocity is suggested for metallic melts and is found to agree with available data for normal and anomalous elemental liquids in groups IV-VI. PMID:20831323

  12. 45 CFR 310.10 - What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System? 310.10 Section 310.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF... operations and to assess program performance through the audit of financial and statistical data...

  13. 45 CFR 310.10 - What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System? 310.10 Section 310.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF... operations and to assess program performance through the audit of financial and statistical data...

  14. Classification of Neisseria meningitidis Group B into Distinct Serotypes IV. Preliminary Chemical Studies on the Nature of the Serotype Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, Carl E.; Chapman, S. Stephen

    1972-01-01

    Group B Neisseria meningitidis has been subdivided into 11 distinct serotypes by a sensitive bactericidal inhibition technique. The antigens responsible for induction of bactericidal type-specific antibodies were found to be extractable from the group B cells with heating at 100 C either by 0.017 n HCl in saline or by normal saline. These extracted serotype antigens were detected by a capillary precipitin test. The development of methods for extraction and assay of the serotype antigens permitted studies on their immunochemistry. The serotype antigens were distinct from the group-specific substance. Acid extracts contained abundant serotype antigen, but were devoid of group-specific substance. The identity of serotype antigens as proteins was confirmed by their sensitivity to Pronase and trypsin. The molecular weight of these antigens as estimated by G-200 Sephadex chromatography and by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels is in excess of 200,000 daltons. Saline extracts containing the serotype antigen could be fractionated into three distinct fractions with acetic acid: pH 4.5 and pH 3.5 precipitated fractions and a pH 3.5 supernatant fraction. The pH 4.5 precipitated fraction contained the serotype antigen. Images PMID:4629202

  15. RAGBEEF: a FORTRAN IV implementation of a time-dependent model for radionuclide contamination of beef

    SciTech Connect

    Pleasant, J C; McDowell-Boyer, L M; Killough, G G

    1982-06-01

    RAGBEEF is a FORTRAN IV program that calculates radionuclide concentrations in beef as a result of ingestion of contaminated feeds, pasture, and pasture soil by beef cattle. The model implemented by RAGBEEF is dynamic in nature, allowing the user to consider age- and season-dependent aspects of beef cattle management in estimating concentrations in beef. It serves as an auxiliary code to RAGTIME, previously documented by the authors, which calculates radionuclide concentrations in agricultural crops in a dynamic manner, but evaluates concentrations in beef for steady-state conditions only. The time-dependent concentrations in feeds, pasture, and pasture soil generated by RAGTIME are used as input to the RAGBEEF code. RAGBEEF, as presently implemented, calculates radionuclide concentrations in the muscle of age-based cohorts in a beef cattle herd. Concentrations in the milk of lactating cows are also calculated, but are assumed age-dependent as in RAGTIME. Radionuclide concentrations in beef and milk are described in RAGBEEF by a system of ordinary linear differential equations in which the transfer rate of radioactivity between compartments is proportional to the inventory of radioactivity in the source compartment. This system is solved by use of the GEAR package for solution of systems of ordinary differential equations. The accuracy of this solution is monitored at various check points by comparison with explicit solutions of Bateman-type equations. This report describes the age- and season-dependent considerations making up the RAGBEEF model, as well as presenting the equations which describe the model and a documentation of the associated computer code. Listings of the RAGBEEF and updated RAGTIME codes are provided in appendices, as are the results of a sample run of RAGBEEF and a description of recent modifications to RAGTIME.

  16. Red giant model atmospheres. IV - Colors of K and M giant models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.; Johnson, H. R.

    1986-02-01

    Photometric parameters in the Johnson broad-band and Wing narrow-band photometric systems have been computed for 24 stellar atmospheric models of K and M giants of Johnson, Bernat, and Krupp (1980). Color temperatures, color indices, and certain molecular indices predicted by these models are compared with observations of M giant stars. Good agreement is obtained for effective temperatures of 3500 K or greater, which provides evidence for the overall accuracy of the models. The comparisons support the higher effective temperature scales of Tsuji (1978, 1981) and Ridgway et al. (1980). For models with effective temperatures below 3500 K, the TiO bands are systematically too weak relative to observations. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. The comparison of broadband color indices gives information concerning the surface gravities. The effects of limb darkening and possible variation of photospheric radius with wavelength on predicted broad-band model colors, and additional implications of comparison between theory and observations, are discussed.

  17. Diversity Competent Group Work Supervision: An Application of the Supervision of Group Work Model (SGW)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Rubel, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This article emphasizes the need for concrete descriptions of supervision to promote diversity-competent group work and presents an application of the supervision of group work model (SGW) to this end. The SGW, a supervision model adapted from the discrimination model, is uniquely suited for promoting diversity competence in group work, since it…

  18. Behavioral effects of hashish in mice. IV. Social dominance, food dominance, and sexual behavior within a group of males.

    PubMed

    Sieber, B; Frischknecht, H R; Waser, P G

    1981-01-01

    Within groups of three adult male mice the acute and subchronic effects of hashish extract (20 mg delta 9-THC/kg) on social dominance, food dominance, and sexual interactions with a female were investigated. An initial drug treatment of only the dominant male weakened his social position, but dominance was regained after treatment 2 or 3. In contrast, a persistent change in dominance was found when only the male which was dominant in the feeding test was treated with the extract. Simultaneous drug treatment of all three males did not affect the social dominance relationship but resulted in a reversible change in food dominance. The original feeding order was reestablished after drug treatment 3. Upon meeting an estrous female, no male of the group was distinctly dominant in mating. After treatment 1 was given to all members of the group, all types of behavior were impaired and total activity was significantly reduced. After treatment 2, animals showed tolerance to the sedative effects, and after treatment 3, sexual behavior was even more frequent in drugged animals than in controls. The results are discussed in relation to a possible dependence of behavioral drug effects and tolerance development on the experimental situation.

  19. “Structural Transformations in Ceramics: Perovskite-like Oxides and Group III, IV, and V Nitrides”

    SciTech Connect

    James P. Lewis , Dorian M. Hatch , and Harold T. Stokes

    2006-12-31

    1 Overview of Results and their Significance Ceramic perovskite-like oxides with the general formula (A. A0. ...)(B. B0. ...)O3and titanium-based oxides are of great technological interest because of their large piezoelectric and dielectric response characteristics.[1] In doped and nanoengineered forms, titantium dioxide finds increasing application as an organic and hydrolytic photocatalyst. The binary main-group-metal nitride compounds have undergone recent advancements of in-situ heating technology in diamond anvil cells leading to a burst of experimental and theoretical interest. In our DOE proposal, we discussed our unique theoretical approach which applies ab initio electronic calculations in conjunction with systematic group-theoretical analysis of lattice distortions to study two representative phase transitions in ceramic materials: (1) displacive phase transitions in primarily titanium-based perovskite-like oxide ceramics, and (2) reconstructive phase transitions in main-group nitride ceramics. A sub area which we have explored in depth is doped titanium dioxide electrical/optical properties.

  20. Model investigations for vanadium-protein interactions: vanadium(III) compounds with dipeptides and their oxovanadium(IV) analogues.

    PubMed

    Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J; Tolis, Evangelos J; Tsangaris, John M; Evangelou, Angelos; Woollins, DerekJ; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Pessoa, Costa; Correia, Isabel; Kabanos, Themistoklis A

    2002-04-01

    The reaction of VCl(3) with 1,10-phenanthroline and a series of dipeptides (H(2)dip), having aliphatic as well as aromatic side chains, in methyl alcohol and in the presence of triethylamine affords vanadium(III) compounds of the general formula [V(III)(dip)(MeOH)(phen)]Cl. Aerial oxidation/hydrolysis of the vanadium(III) species gives their oxovanadium(IV) analogues of the general formula [V(IV)O(dip)(phen)]. X-ray crystallographic characterization of the [V(IV)O(dip)(phen)] compounds (where dip(2-)=Gly- L-Ala, Gly- L-Val and Gly- L-Phe) revealed that the vanadium atom possesses a severely distorted octahedral coordination and is ligated to a tridentate dip(2-) ligand at the N(amine) atom, the deprotonated N(peptide) atom and one of the O(carboxylate) atoms, as well as an oxo group and two phenanthroline nitrogen atoms. Circular dichroism characterization of the V(III)/V(IV)O(2+)-dipeptide compounds revealed a strong signal for the V(IV)O(2+) species in the visible range of the spectrum, with a characteristic pattern which may be exploited to identify the N(am), N(pep) and O(car) ligation of a peptide or a protein to V(IV)O(2+) center, and a weak Cotton effect of opposite sign to their vanadium(III) analogues. The visible spectra of the V(III)-dipeptide compounds revealed two d-d bands with high intensity, thus indicating that the covalency of the metal-donor atoms is significant, i.e. the vanadium d orbitals are significantly mixed with the ligand orbitals, and this is confirmed by the low values of their Racah B parameters. The high-intensity band of the V(IV)O(2+)-dipeptide compounds at approximately 460 nm implies also a strong covalency of the metal with the equatorial donor atoms and this was supported by the EPR spectra of these compounds. Moreover, the V(III)/V(IV)O(2+)-dipeptide complexes were characterized by EPR and IR spectroscopies as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. PMID:11941494

  1. The group IV-A cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, CNGC19 and CNGC20, localize to the vacuole membrane in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Christen C. Y.; Christopher, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are implicated in the uptake of both essential and toxic cations, Ca2+ signalling, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. The 20 CNGC paralogues of Arabidopsis are divided into five evolutionary groups. Group IV-A is highly isolated and consists only of two closely spaced genes, CNGC19 and CNGC20. Prior studies have shown that both genes are induced by salinity and biotic stress. A unique feature of CNGC19 and CNGC20 is their long hydrophilic N-termini. To determine the subcellular locations of CNGC19 and CNGC20, partial and full-length fusions to GFP(S65T) were generated. Translational fusions of the N-termini of CNGC19 (residues 1–171) and CNGC20 (residues 1–200) to GFP(S65T) were targeted to punctate structures when transiently expressed in leaf protoplasts. In the case of CNGC20, but not CNGC19, the punctate structures were co-labelled with a marker for the Golgi. The full-length CNGC19-GFP fusion co-localized with markers for the vacuole membrane (αTIP- and γTIP-mCherry). Vacuole membrane labelling by the full-length CNGC20-GFP fusion was also observed, but the signal was weak and accompanied by numerous punctate signals that did not co-localize with αTIP- or γTIP-mCherry. These punctate structures diminished, and localization of full-length CNGC20-GFP to the vacuole increased, when it was co-expressed with the full-length CNGC19-mCherry. Vacuole membrane labelling was also detected in planta via immunoelectron microscopy using a CNGC20-antiserum on cryopreserved ultrathin sections of roots. We hypothesize that the role of group IV-A CNGCs is to mediate the movement of cations between the central vacuole and the cytosol in response to certain types of abiotic and biotic stress.

  2. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document

  3. Vanadium(V) and -(IV) complexes of anionic polysaccharides: Controlled release pharmaceutical formulations and models of vanadium biotransformation products.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Lauren E; McLeod, Andrew I; Aitken, Jade B; Levina, Aviva; Lay, Peter A

    2015-06-01

    Uncontrolled reactions in biological media are a main obstacle for clinical translation of V-based anti-diabetic or anti-cancer pro-drugs. We investigated the use of controlled-release pharmaceutical formulations to ameliorate this issue with a series of V(V) and (IV) complexes of anionic polysaccharides. Carboxymethyl cellulose, xanthan gum, or alginic acid formulations were prepared by the reactions of [VO4](3-) with one or two molar equivalents of biological reductants, L-ascorbic acid (AA) or L-cysteine (Cys), in the presence of excess polysaccharide at pH~7 or pH~4. XANES studies with the use of a previously developed library of model V(V), V(IV) and V(III) complexes showed that reactions in the presence of AA led mostly to the mixtures of five- and six-coordinate V(IV) species, while the reactions in the presence of Cys led predominantly to the mixtures of five- and six-coordinate V(V) species. The XANES spectra of some of these samples closely matched those reported previously for [VO4](3-) biotransformation products in isolated blood plasma, red blood cells, or cultured adipocytes, which supports the hypothesis that modified polysaccharides are major binders of V(V) and V(IV) in biological systems. Studies by EPR spectroscopy suggested predominant V(IV)-carboxylato binding in complexes with polysaccharides. One of the isolated products (a V(IV)-alginato complex) showed selective release of low-molecular-mass V species at pH~8, but not at pH~2, which makes it a promising lead for the development of V-containing formulations for oral administration that are stable in the stomach, but release the active ingredient in the intestines.

  4. Nomenclatural Studies Toward a World List of Diptera Genus-Group Names. Part IV: Charles Henry Tyler Townsend.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Neal L; Pont, Adrian C; Whitmore, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The Diptera genus-group names of Charles Henry Tyler Townsend are reviewed and annotated. A total of 1506 available genus-group names in 12 families of Diptera are listed alphabetically for each name, giving author, year and page of original publication, originally included species, type species and method of fixation, current status of the name, family placement, and a list of any emendations of it that have been found in the literature. Remarks are given to clarify nomenclatural and/or taxonomic information. In addition, an index to all the species-group names of Diptera proposed by Townsend (1595, of which 1574 are available names) is given with bibliographic reference (year and page) to each original citation. An appendix with a full bibliography of almost 650 papers written by Townsend is presented with accurate dates of publication.        Two new replacement names are proposed for preoccupied genus-group names and both are named to honor our good friend and colleague, James E. O'Hara, for his decades of work on tachinids: Oharamyia Evenhuis, Pont & Whitmore, n. name, for Lindigia Townsend, 1931 [Tachinidae] (preoccupied by Karsten, 1858); Jimimyia Evenhuis, Pont & Whitmore, n. name, for Siphonopsis Townsend, 1916 [Tachinidae] (preoccupied by Agassiz, 1846).        Earlier dates of availability are found for the following: Eucnephalia Townsend, 1892 [Tachinidae]; Gabanimyia Townsend, 1914 [Tachinidae]; Incamyia Townsend, 1912 [Tachinidae]; Muscopteryx Townsend, 1892 [Tachinidae]; Philippolophosia Townsend, 1927 [Tachinidae]; Pseudokea Townsend, 1927 [Tachinidae].        Corrected or clarified included species and/or corrected or clarified type-species and methods of typification are given for: Alitophasia Townsend, 1934 [Tachinidae]; Almugmyia Townsend, 1911 [Tachinidae]; Arachnidomyia Townsend, 1934 [Sarcophagidae]; Austenina Townsend, 1921 [Glossinidae]; Austrohartigia Townsend, 1937 [Sarcophagidae]; Awatia Townsend, 1921 [Muscidae

  5. Sensitivity of Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations to the vertical diffusion parameterization during convective meteorological situations

    SciTech Connect

    Nowacki, P.; Samson, P.J.; Sillman, S.

    1996-10-01

    It is shown that Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations during photochemical smog episodes in Atlanta, Georgia, depend strongly on the numerical parameterization of the daytime vertical diffusivity. Results found suggest that vertical mixing is overestimated by the UAM-IV during unstable daytime conditions, as calculated vertical diffusivity values exceed measured and comparable literature values. Although deviations between measured and UAM-IV calculated air pollutant concentrations may only in part be due the UAM-IV diffusivity parameterization, results indicate the large error potential in vertical diffusivity parameterization. Easily implemented enhancements to UAM-IV algorithms are proposed, thus improving UAM-IV modeling performance during unstable stratification. 38 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Geographic structure evidenced in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella - group IV (Whedon & Kofoid) Balech) along Japanese and Chinese coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, Benjamin; Berrebi, Patrick; Nagai, Satoshi; Reynaud, Nathalie; Wang, Jinhui; Masseret, Estelle

    2015-09-15

    The intra-specific diversity and genetic structure within the Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella - Group IV) populations along the Temperate Asian coasts, were studied among individuals isolated from Japan to China. The UPGMA dendrogram and FCA revealed the existence of 3 clusters. Assignment analysis suggested the occurrence of gene flows between the Japanese Pacific coast (cluster-1) and the Chinese Zhejiang coast (cluster-2). Human transportations are suspected to explain the lack of genetic difference between several pairs of distant Japanese samples, hardly explained by a natural dispersal mechanism. The genetic isolation of the population established in the Sea of Japan (cluster-3) suggested the existence of a strong ecological and geographical barrier. Along the Pacific coasts, the South-North current allows limited exchanges between Chinese and Japanese populations. The relationships between Temperate Asian and Mediterranean individuals suggested different scenario of large-scale dispersal mechanisms. PMID:26188429

  7. All-electron molecular Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations: Properties of the group IV monoxides GeO, SnO and PbO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.

    1991-01-01

    Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations have been carried out on the ground states of the group IV monoxides GeO, SnO and PbO. Geometries, dipole moments and infrared data are presented. For comparison, nonrelativistic, first-order perturbation and relativistic effective core potential calculations have also been carried out. Where appropriate the results are compared with the experimental data and previous calculations. Spin-orbit effects are of great importance for PbO, where first-order perturbation theory including only the mass-velocity and Darwin terms is inadequate to predict the relativistic corrections to the properties. The relativistic effective core potential results show a larger deviation from the all-electron values than for the hydrides, and confirm the conclusions drawn on the basis of the hydride calculations.

  8. Geographic structure evidenced in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella - group IV (Whedon & Kofoid) Balech) along Japanese and Chinese coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, Benjamin; Berrebi, Patrick; Nagai, Satoshi; Reynaud, Nathalie; Wang, Jinhui; Masseret, Estelle

    2015-09-15

    The intra-specific diversity and genetic structure within the Alexandrium pacificum Litaker (A. catenella - Group IV) populations along the Temperate Asian coasts, were studied among individuals isolated from Japan to China. The UPGMA dendrogram and FCA revealed the existence of 3 clusters. Assignment analysis suggested the occurrence of gene flows between the Japanese Pacific coast (cluster-1) and the Chinese Zhejiang coast (cluster-2). Human transportations are suspected to explain the lack of genetic difference between several pairs of distant Japanese samples, hardly explained by a natural dispersal mechanism. The genetic isolation of the population established in the Sea of Japan (cluster-3) suggested the existence of a strong ecological and geographical barrier. Along the Pacific coasts, the South-North current allows limited exchanges between Chinese and Japanese populations. The relationships between Temperate Asian and Mediterranean individuals suggested different scenario of large-scale dispersal mechanisms.

  9. Calorimetric, spectroscopic, and model studies provide insight into the transport of Ti(IV) by human serum transferrin.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Arthur D; Incarvito, Christopher D; Valentine, Ann M

    2007-03-21

    Evidence suggests that transferrin can bind Ti(IV) in an unhydrolyzed form (without bound hydroxide or oxide) or in a hydrolyzed form. Ti(IV) coordination by N,N'-di(o-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) at different pH values models the two forms of Ti(IV)-loaded transferrin spectrally and structurally. 13C NMR and stopped-flow kinetic experiments reveal that when the metal is delivered to the protein using an unhydrolyzed source, Ti(IV) can coordinate in the typical distorted octahedral environment with a bound synergistic anion. The crystal structure of TiHBED obtained at low pH models this type of coordination. The solution structure of the complex compares favorably with the solid state from pH 3.0 to 4.0, and the complex can be reduced with E1/2 = -641 mV vs NHE. Kinetic and thermodynamic competition studies at pH 3.0 reveal that Ti(citrate)3 reacts with HBED via a dissociative mechanism and that the stability of TiHBED (log beta = 34.024) is weaker than that of the Fe(III) complex. pH stability studies show that Ti(IV) hydrolyzes ligand waters at higher pH but still remains bound to HBED until pH 9.5. Similarly, at a pH greater than 8.0 the synergistic anion that binds Ti(IV) in transferrin is readily displaced by irreversible metal hydrolysis although the metal remains bound to the protein until pH 9.5. Thermal denaturation studies conducted optically and by differential scanning calorimetry reveal that Ti(IV)-bound transferrin experiences only minimal enhanced thermal stability unlike when Fe(III) is bound. The C- and N-lobe transition Tm values shift to a few degrees higher. The stability, competition, and redox studies performed provide insight into the possible mechanism of Ti2-Tf transport in cells. PMID:17315875

  10. Combination radiofrequency (RF) ablation and IV liposomal heat shock protein suppression: Reduced tumor growth and increased animal endpoint survival in a small animal tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Ahmed, Muneeb; Tasawwar, Beenish; Levchenko, Tatynana; Sawant, Rupa R.; Torchilin, Vladimir; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of IV liposomal quercetin (a known down-regulator of heat shock proteins) alone and with liposomal doxorubicin on tumor growth and end-point survival when combined with radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation in a rat tumor model. Methods Solitary subcutaneous R3230 mammary adenocarcinoma tumors (1.3–1.5 cm) were implanted in 48 female Fischer rats. Initially, 32 tumors (n=8, each group) were randomized into four experimental groups: (a) conventional monopolar RF alone (70°C for 5 min), (b) IV liposomal quercetin alone (1 mg/kg), (c) IV liposomal quercetin followed 24hr later with RF, and (d) no treatment. Next, 16 additional tumors were randomized into two groups (n=8, each) that received a combined RF and liposomal doxorubicin (15 min post-RF, 8 mg/kg) either with or without liposomal quercetin. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed using a tumor diameter of 3.0 cm as the defined survival endpoint. Results Differences in endpoint survival and tumor doubling time among the groups were highly significant (P<0.001). Endpoint survivals were 12.5±2.2 days for the control group, 16.6±2.9 days for tumors treated with RF alone, 15.5±2.1days for tumors treated with liposomal quercetin alone, and 22.0±3.9 days with combined RF and quercetin. Additionally, combination quercetin/RF/doxorubicin therapy resulted in the longest survival (48.3±20.4 days), followed by RF/doxorubicin (29.9±3.8 days). Conclusions IV liposomal quercetin in combination with RF ablation reduces tumor growth rates and improves animal endpoint survival. Further increases in endpoint survival can be seen by adding an additional anti-tumor adjuvant agent liposomal doxorubicin. This suggests that targeting several post-ablation processes with multi-drug nanotherapies can increase overall ablation efficacy. PMID:22230341

  11. Group Modeling in Social Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Slavomir; Glavinic, Vlado; Krpan, Divna

    2012-01-01

    Students' collaboration while learning could provide better learning environments. Collaboration assumes social interactions which occur in student groups. Social theories emphasize positive influence of such interactions on learning. In order to create an appropriate learning environment that enables social interactions, it is important to…

  12. A Model for Action Oriented Structured Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Robert J.

    This presentation describes an experiential group design which can be employed with large, diverse populations. It is especially applicable at the university level. The design encourages self-clarification and self-confrontation on personalized issues and culminates in an individual commitment to action. Techniques such as "life space" drawings…

  13. Modeling groups of plausible virtual pedestrians.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher; Ennis, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    In a proposed methodology for modeling dynamic crowd scenarios, a video corpus informs the modeling process, after which the resultant animations undergo perception-based evaluation. The aim is to improve the crowd's visual plausibility rather than the simulation's correctness. A real-life crowd animation system demonstrates the methodology's practical application. PMID:19798863

  14. Hydrolysis of the RNA model substrate catalyzed by a binuclear Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Luong, Thi Kim Nga; Absillis, Gregory; Shestakova, Pavletta; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-09-21

    The reactivity and solution behaviour of the binuclear Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin polyoxometalate (Et2NH2)8[{α-PW11O39Zr(μ-OH)(H2O)}2]·7H2O (ZrK 2 : 2) towards phosphoester bond hydrolysis of the RNA model substrate 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) was investigated at different reaction conditions (pD, temperature, concentration, and ionic strength). The hydrolysis of the phosphoester bond of HPNP, followed by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, proceeded with an observed rate constant, kobs = 11.5(±0.42) × 10(-5) s(-1) at pD 6.4 and 50 °C, representing a 530-fold rate enhancement in comparison with the spontaneous hydrolysis of HPNP. (1)H and (31)P NMR spectra indicate that at these reaction conditions the only products of hydrolysis are p-nitrophenol and the corresponding cyclic phosphate ester. The pD dependence of kobs exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest rate observed at pD 6.4. The formation constant (Kf = 455 M(-1)) and catalytic rate constant (kc = 42 × 10(-5) s(-1)) for the HPNP-ZrK 2 : 2 complex, activation energy (Ea) of 63.35 ± 1.82 kJ mol(-1), enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)) of 60.60 ± 2.09 kJ mol(-1), entropy of activation (ΔS(‡)) of -133.70 ± 6.13 J mol(-1) K(-1), and Gibbs activation energy (ΔG(‡)) of 102.05 ± 0.13 kJ mol(-1) at 37 °C were calculated from kinetic experiments. Binding between ZrK 2 : 2 and the P-O bond of HPNP was evidenced by the change in the (31)P chemical shift and signal line-broadening of the (31)P atom in HPNP upon addition of ZrK 2 : 2. Based on (31)P NMR experiments and isotope effect studies, a mechanism for HPNP hydrolysis in the presence of ZrK 2 : 2 was proposed.

  15. A zebrafish model for Waardenburg syndrome type IV reveals diverse roles for Sox10 in the otic vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Kirsten; Abbas, Leila; Spencer, Joanne; Brannon, Claire; Mowbray, Catriona; Nikaido, Masataka; Kelsh, Robert N.; Whitfield, Tanya T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In humans, mutations in the SOX10 gene are a cause of the auditory-pigmentary disorder Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4) and related variants. SOX10 encodes an Sry-related HMG box protein essential for the development of the neural crest; deafness in WS4 and other Waardenburg syndromes is usually attributed to loss of neural-crest-derived melanocytes in the stria vascularis of the cochlea. However, SOX10 is strongly expressed in the developing otic vesicle and so direct roles for SOX10 in the otic epithelium might also be important. Here, we examine the otic phenotype of zebrafish sox10 mutants, a model for WS4. As a cochlea is not present in the fish ear, the severe otic phenotype in these mutants cannot be attributed to effects on this tissue. In zebrafish sox10 mutants, we see abnormalities in all otic placodal derivatives. Gene expression studies indicate deregulated expression of several otic genes, including fgf8, in sox10 mutants. Using a combination of mutant and morphant data, we show that the three sox genes belonging to group E (sox9a, sox9b and sox10) provide a link between otic induction pathways and subsequent otic patterning: they act redundantly to maintain sox10 expression throughout otic tissue and to restrict fgf8 expression to anterior macula regions. Single-cell labelling experiments indicate a small and transient neural crest contribution to the zebrafish ear during normal development, but this is unlikely to account for the strong defects seen in the sox10 mutant. We discuss the implication that the deafness in WS4 patients with SOX10 mutations might reflect a haploinsufficiency for SOX10 in the otic epithelium, resulting in patterning and functional abnormalities in the inner ear. PMID:19132125

  16. The Beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    G. Azuelos et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated a number of aspects of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the running or planned TeV-scale colliders. For the most part, we have considered hadron colliders, as they will define particle physics at the energy frontier for the next ten years at least. The variety of models for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics has grown immensely. It is clear that only future experiments can provide the needed direction to clarify the correct theory. Thus, our focus has been on exploring the extent to which hadron colliders can discover and study BSM physics in various models. We have placed special emphasis on scenarios in which the new signal might be difficult to find or of a very unexpected nature. For example, in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY), we have considered: how to make fully precise predictions for the Higgs bosons as well as the superparticles of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) (parts III and IV); MSSM scenarios in which most or all SUSY particles have rather large masses (parts V and VI); the ability to sort out the many parameters of the MSSM using a variety of signals and study channels (part VII); whether the no-lose theorem for MSSM Higgs discovery can be extended to the next-to-minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in which an additional singlet superfield is added to the minimal collection of superfields, potentially providing a natural explanation of the electroweak value of the parameter {micro} (part VIII); sorting out the effects of CP violation using Higgs plus squark associate production (part IX); the impact of lepton flavor violation of various kinds (part X); experimental possibilities for the gravitino and its sgoldstino partner (part XI); what the implications for SUSY would be if the NuTeV signal for di-muon events were interpreted as a sign of R-parity violation (part XII). Our other main focus was on the phenomenological implications of extra

  17. Some Observations on Specifying Models of Group Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Paul; And Others

    The purpose of this paper is to identify some critical dimensions in specifying a model of group performance. In the first section, the boundaries of the paper, e.g., work groups that produce some identifiable good or service, are discussed. In the second section some models of group performance are explored in order to illustrate theories of…

  18. Toward a Communication Competency Model of Group Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barge, J. Kevin; Hirokawa, Randy Y.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that current models of group leadership fail to illuminate the relationship between leadership and group performance. Presents an alternative model of leadership based on communication competencies, which are influenced by task complexity, group climate, and role relationships. A series of heuristic propositions are offered linking…

  19. Computer Simulation of Small Group Decisions: Model Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, A.P.; Scheiblechner, Hartmann

    In a test of three computer models to simulate group decisions, data were used from 31 American and Austrian groups on a total of 307 trials. The task for each group was to predict a series of answers of an unknown subject on a value-orientation questionnaire, after being given a sample of his typical responses. The first model, used the mean of…

  20. Group Climate, Cohesion, Alliance, and Empathy in Group Psychotherapy: Multilevel Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer E.; Burlingame, Gary M.; Olsen, Joseph A.; Davies, D. Robert; Gleave, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the definitional and statistical overlap among 4 key group therapeutic relationship constructs--group climate, cohesion, alliance, and empathy--across member-member, member-group, and member-leader relationships. Three multilevel structural equation models were tested using self-report measures completed by 662 participants…

  1. Group analysis of an ideal plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamothe, Vincent

    2012-07-01

    A group analysis of a system describing an ideal plastic flow is made in order to obtain analytical solutions. The complete Lie algebra of point symmetries of this system are given. Two of the infinitesimal generators that span the Lie algebra are original to this paper. A classification into conjugacy classes of all one- and two-dimensional subalgebras is performed. Invariant and partially invariant solutions corresponding to certain conjugacy classes are obtained using the symmetry reduction method. Solutions of algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric and elliptic type are provided as illustrations and other solutions expressed in terms of one or two arbitrary functions have also been found. For some of these solutions, a physical interpretation allows one to determine the shape of feasible extrusion dies corresponding to these solutions. The corresponding tools could be used to curve rods or slabs, or to shape a ring in an ideal plastic material by an extrusion process.

  2. Symmetries of preon interactions modeled as a finite group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, James N.

    1997-07-01

    I model preon interactions as a finite group. Treating the elements of the group as the bases of a vector space, I examine those linear mappings under which the transformed bases may be treated as members of a group isomorphic to the original. In some cases these mappings are continuous Lie groups.

  3. Chemistry in disks. IV. Benchmarking gas-grain chemical models with surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Hersant, F.; Wakelam, V.; Dutrey, A.; Chapillon, E.; Guilloteau, St.; Henning, Th.; Launhardt, R.; Piétu, V.; Schreyer, K.

    2010-11-01

    Context. We describe and benchmark two sophisticated chemical models developed by the Heidelberg and Bordeaux astrochemistry groups. Aims: The main goal of this study is to elaborate on a few well-described tests for state-of-the-art astrochemical codes covering a range of physical conditions and chemical processes, in particular those aimed at constraining current and future interferometric observations of protoplanetary disks. Methods: We considered three physical models: a cold molecular cloud core, a hot core, and an outer region of a T Tauri disk. Our chemical network (for both models) is based on the original gas-phase osu_03_2008 ratefile and includes gas-grain interactions and a set of surface reactions for the H-, O-, C-, S-, and N-bearing molecules. The benchmarking was performed with the increasing complexity of the considered processes: (1) the pure gas-phase chemistry, (2) the gas-phase chemistry with accretion and desorption, and (3) the full gas-grain model with surface reactions. The chemical evolution is modeled within 109 years using atomic initial abundances with heavily depleted metals and hydrogen in its molecular form. Results: The time-dependent abundances calculated with the two chemical models are essentially the same for all considered physical cases and for all species, including the most complex polyatomic ions and organic molecules. This result, however, required a lot of effort to make all necessary details consistent through the model runs, e.g., definition of the gas particle density, density of grain surface sites, or the strength and shape of the UV radiation field. Conclusions: The reference models and the benchmark setup, along with the two chemical codes and resulting time-dependent abundances are made publicly available on the internet. This will facilitate and ease the development of other astrochemical models and provide nonspecialists with a detailed description of the model ingredients and requirements to analyze the cosmic

  4. L-selenomethionine reduces platinum(IV) anticancer model compounds at strikingly faster rates than L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shuying; Dong, Jingran; Shen, Shigang; Ren, Yanli; Song, Changying; Xu, Jianzhong; Shi, Tiesheng

    2014-11-01

    L-Selenomethionine (SeMet), the predominant form of selenium acquired from the diet by humans, has been used as a supplement, and exhibit some important functions like cancer prevention and antioxidative defense. Its interactions with Pt(II) anticancer drugs have been characterized, but its redox reactions with platinum(IV) anticancer prodrugs have not been exploited. In this work, the oxidation of SeMet by Pt(IV) anticancer model compounds trans-[PtX2(CN)4](2-) (X = Cl, Br) was characterized. A stopped-flow spectrometer was used to record the rapid scan spectra and to follow the reaction kinetics over a wide pH range. An overall second-order rate law was derived: -d[Pt(IV)]/dt = k'[Pt(IV)][SeMet], where k' pertains to the observed second-order rate constants. The k'-pH profiles showed that k' increased only about 6 times even though the solution pH was varied from 0.25 to 10.5. The redox stoichiometry was determined as Δ[Pt(IV)]/Δ[SeMet] = 1 : (1.07 ± 0.07), suggesting that SeMet was oxidized to selenomethionine selenoxide. The selenoxide together with its hydrated form was identified explicitly by high resolution mass spectral analysis. A reaction mechanism was proposed which encompassed three parallel rate-determining steps relying on the protolytic species of SeMet. Rate constants of the rate-determining steps were obtained from the simulations of the k'-pH profiles. Activation parameters were determined for the reactions of the zwitterionic form of SeMet with the Pt(IV) complexes. A bridged electron transfer process is delineated in the rate-determining steps and several lines of evidence support the bridged electron transfer mode. Strikingly, reduction of [PtX2(CN)4](2-) by SeMet is 3.7 × 10(3)-5.7 × 10(4) times faster than that by L-methionine. Some potential biological consequences resulting from the strikingly fast reduction are discussed.

  5. Stage IV and age over 45 years are the only prognostic factors of the International Prognostic Score for the outcome of advanced Hodgkin lymphoma in the Spanish Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group series.

    PubMed

    Guisado-Vasco, Pablo; Arranz-Saez, Reyes; Canales, Miguel; Cánovas, Araceli; Garcia-Laraña, José; García-Sanz, Ramón; Lopez, Andrés; López, José Luis; Llanos, Marta; Moraleda, José Maria; Rodriguez, José; Rayón, Consuelo; Sabin, Pilar; Salar, Antonio; Marín-Niebla, Ana; Morente, Manuel; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; Tomás, José Francisco; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Victor; Piris, Miguel A; Garcia, Juán F; Montalban, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    The International Prognostic Score (IPS) is the most widely used system to date for identifying risk groups for the outcome of patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, although important limitations have been recognized. We analyzed the value of the IPS in a series of 311 patients with advanced classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) (Ann Arbor stage III, IV or stage II with B symptoms and/or bulky masses) treated with first-line chemotherapy including adriamycin (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine [ABVD] or equivalent variants). In univariate and multivariate analyses, stage IV disease and age ≥ 45 years were the only factors with independent predictive significance for overall survival (OS) (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). Stage IV was still significant for freedom from progression (FFP) (p = 0.001) and age ≥ 45 years was borderline significant (p = 0.058). IPS separates prognostic groups, as in the original publication, but this is mainly due to the high statistical significance of stage IV and age ≥ 45 years. Moreover, the combination of these two factors enables a simpler system to be constructed that separates groups with different FFP and OS. In conclusion, in our series, stage IV and age ≥ 45 years are the key prognostic factors for the outcome of advanced cHL.

  6. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING THE B[e] PHENOMENON. IV. MODELING OF IRAS 00470+6429

    SciTech Connect

    Carciofi, A. C.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2010-10-01

    FS CMa type stars are a recently described group of objects with the B[e] phenomenon which exhibits strong emission-line spectra and strong IR excesses. In this paper, we report the first attempt for a detailed modeling of IRAS 00470+6429, for which we have the best set of observations. Our modeling is based on two key assumptions: the star has a main-sequence luminosity for its spectral type (B2) and the circumstellar (CS) envelope is bimodal, composed of a slowly outflowing disklike wind and a fast polar wind. Both outflows are assumed to be purely radial. We adopt a novel approach to describe the dust formation site in the wind that employs timescale arguments for grain condensation and a self-consistent solution for the dust destruction surface. With the above assumptions we were able to satisfactorily reproduce many observational properties of IRAS 00470+6429, including the H I line profiles and the overall shape of the spectral energy distribution. Our adopted recipe for dust formation proved successful in reproducing the correct amount of dust formed in the CS envelope. Possible shortcomings of our model, as well as suggestions for future improvements, are discussed.

  7. Multiple Group Analysis in Multilevel Structural Equation Model Across Level 1 Groups.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ehri

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces and evaluates a procedure for conducting multiple group analysis in multilevel structural equation model across Level 1 groups (MG1-MSEM; Ryu, 2014). When group membership is at Level 1, multiple group analysis raises two issues that cannot be solved by a simple extension of the standard multiple group analysis in single-level structural equation model. First, the Level 2 data are not independent between Level 1 groups. Second, the standard procedure fails to take into account the dependency between members of different Level 1 groups within the same cluster. The MG1-MSEM approach provides solutions to these problems. In MG1-MSEM, the Level 1 mean structure is necessary to represent the differences between Level 1 groups within clusters. The Level 2 model is the same regardless of Level 1 group membership. A simulation study examined the performance of MUML (Muthén's maximum likelihood) estimation in MG1-MSEM. The MG1-MSEM approach is illustrated for both a multilevel path model and a multilevel factor model using empirical data sets.

  8. Endomicrobium proavitum, the first isolate of Endomicrobia class. nov. (phylum Elusimicrobia)--an ultramicrobacterium with an unusual cell cycle that fixes nitrogen with a Group IV nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial tree contains many deep-rooting clades without any cultured representatives. One such clade is 'Endomicrobia', a class-level lineage in the phylum Elusimicrobia represented so far only by intracellular symbionts of termite gut flagellates. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the first free-living member of this clade from sterile-filtered gut homogenate of defaunated (starch-fed) Reticulitermes santonensis. Strain Rsa215 is a strictly anaerobic ultramicrobacterium that grows exclusively on glucose, which is fermented to lactate, acetate, hydrogen and CO2. Ultrastructural analysis revealed a Gram-negative cell envelope and a peculiar cell cycle. The genome contains a single set of nif genes that encode homologues of Group IV nitrogenases, which were so far considered to have functions other than nitrogen fixation. We documented nitrogenase activity and diazotrophic growth by measuring acetylene reduction activity and (15)N2 incorporation into cell mass, and demonstrated that transcription of nifH and nitrogenase activity occur only in the absence of ammonium. Based on the ancestral relationship to 'Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae' and other obligate endosymbionts, we propose the name 'Endomicrobium proavitum' gen. nov., sp. nov. for the first isolate of this lineage and the name 'Endomicrobia' class. nov. for the entire clade.

  9. Synthesis of Ge1-xSnx alloys by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting: Towards a group IV direct bandgap material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Smillie, Lachlan A.; Akey, Austin J.; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    The germanium-tin (Ge1-xSnx) material system is expected to be a direct bandgap group IV semiconductor at a Sn content of 6.5 - 11 at . % . Such Sn concentrations can be realized by non-equilibrium deposition techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy or chemical vapour deposition. In this report, the combination of ion implantation and pulsed laser melting is demonstrated to be an alternative promising method to produce a highly Sn concentrated alloy with a good crystal quality. The structural properties of the alloys such as soluble Sn concentration, strain distribution, and crystal quality have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, x ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that it is possible to produce a high quality alloy with up to 6.2 at . % Sn . The optical properties and electronic band structure have been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The introduction of substitutional Sn into Ge is shown to either induce a splitting between light and heavy hole subbands or lower the conduction band at the Γ valley. Limitations and possible solutions to introducing higher Sn content into Ge that is sufficient for a direct bandgap transition are also discussed.

  10. Fabrication of a Core-Shell-Type Photocatalyst via Photodeposition of Group IV and V Transition Metal Oxyhydroxides: An Effective Surface Modification Method for Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tsuyoshi; Pan, Chengsi; Nakabayashi, Mamiko; Shibata, Naoya; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    The design of optimal surface structures for photocatalysts is a key to efficient overall water splitting into H2 and O2. A unique surface modification method was devised for a photocatalyst to effectively promote overall water splitting. Photodeposition of amorphous oxyhydroxides of group IV and V transition metals (Ti, Nb, Ta) over a semiconductor photocatalyst from corresponding water-soluble metal peroxide complexes was examined. In this method, amorphous oxyhydroxide covered the whole surface of the photocatalyst particles, creating a core-shell structure. The water splitting behavior of the novel core-shell-type photocatalyst in relation to the permeation behavior of the coating layer was investigated in detail. Overall water splitting proceeded successfully after the photodeposition, owing to the prevention of the reverse reaction. The photodeposited oxyhydroxide layers were found to function as molecular sieves, selectively filtering reactant and product molecules. By exploiting the selective permeability of the coating layer, redox reactions on the photocatalyst surface could be suitably controlled, which resulted in successful overall water splitting.

  11. Important role of the non-uniform Fe distribution for the ferromagnetism in group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor GeFe

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Yuki K.; Ohya, Shinobu; Ban, Yoshisuke; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-11-07

    We investigate the growth-temperature dependence of the properties of the group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x} films (x = 6.5% and 10.5%), and reveal the correlation of the magnetic properties with the lattice constant, Curie temperature (T{sub C}), non-uniformity of Fe atoms, stacking-fault defects, and Fe-atom locations. While T{sub C} strongly depends on the growth temperature, we find a universal relationship between T{sub C} and the lattice constant, which does not depend on the Fe content x. By using the spatially resolved transmission-electron diffractions combined with the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, we find that the density of the stacking-fault defects and the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration are correlated with T{sub C}. Meanwhile, by using the channeling Rutherford backscattering and particle-induced X-ray emission measurements, we clarify that about 15% of the Fe atoms exist on the tetrahedral interstitial sites in the Ge{sub 0.935}Fe{sub 0.065} lattice and that the substitutional Fe concentration is not correlated with T{sub C}. Considering these results, we conclude that the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration plays an important role in determining the ferromagnetic properties of GeFe.

  12. The Lake Superior Oronto Group, a middle Proterozoic exploration model for the late Proterozoic Chuar Group of the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Dickas, A.B. ); Mudrey, M.G. Jr )

    1992-04-01

    The Lake Superior Oronto Group and the Grand Canyon Chuar Group are the most significant Precambrian hydrocarbon targets within the conterminous United States. These frontier terrains share common Proterozoic age, comparable total organic carbon source rock values, association with Indian-interest properties, plus similarities in reservoir, trap, and maturation characteristics. Extensively studied since 1980, the exploration philosophy applied to the Oronto Group is presented as a model for Chuar Group hydrocarbon evaluation. Hydrocarbon shows have been reported since 1852 from middle Proterozoic rocks of the Lake Superior basin. Occurrences include stains within stromatolitic facies of the Copper Harbor Conglomerate, live subsurface seeps within Nonesuch units in the White Pine copper mine of Michigan, and impsonite-like inclusions within calcite veins of the Freda Formation. These formations compose the Oronto Group, a synrift package infilling the Lake Superior basin of the mid-continent rift system. Seep analyses identify a low sulfur (0.02%), paraffinic (67%), 34 API crude indirectly dated (Rb/Sr) at a minimum of 1047{plus minus}35 Ma. Nonesuch Formation source shales are present within both central horst structures and flank half-grabens. Reservoir-quality criteria are associated with adjacent Copper Harbor and overlying Freda Formation units. Seismically identified traps range from anticlinal and drag folding to onlap, stratigraphic, and unconformity closures. The Lake Superior segment of the mid-continent rift system is subdivided into four structural units (I-IV). Association of oil seeps with stratiform copper deposits (unit III) suggests evidence of geochemical symbiosis. This crude entered oil-window status circa 1.0 Ga due to migrating cupriferous thermal systems.

  13. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    Asteroids are fascinating worlds. Considered the building blocks of our planets, many of the authors of this book have devoted their scientific careers to exploring them with the tools of our trade: ground- and spacebased observations, in situ space missions, and studies that run the gamut from theoretical modeling efforts to laboratory work. Like fossils for paleontologists, or DNA for geneticists, they allow us to construct a veritable time machine and provide us with tantalizing glimpses of the earliest nature of our solar system. By investigating them, we can probe what our home system was like before life or even the planets existed. The origin and evolution of life on our planet is also intertwined with asteroids in a different way. It is believed that impacts on the primordial Earth may have delivered the basic components for life, with biology favoring attributes that could more easily survive the aftermath of such energetic events. In this fashion, asteroids may have banished many probable avenues for life to relative obscurity. Similarly, they may have also prevented our biosphere from becoming more complex until more recent eras. The full tale of asteroid impacts on the history of our world, and how human life managed to emerge from myriad possibilities, has yet to be fully told. The hazard posed by asteroid impacts to our civilization is low but singular. The design of efficient mitigation strategies strongly relies on asteroid detection by our ground- and spacebased surveys as well as knowledge of their physical properties. A more positive motivation for asteroid discovery is that the proximity of some asteroids to Earth may allow future astronauts to harvest their water and rare mineral resources for use in exploration. A key goal of asteroid science is therefore to learn how humans and robotic probes can interact with asteroids (and extract their materials) in an efficient way. We expect that these adventures may be commonplace in the future

  14. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    Asteroids are fascinating worlds. Considered the building blocks of our planets, many of the authors of this book have devoted their scientific careers to exploring them with the tools of our trade: ground- and spacebased observations, in situ space missions, and studies that run the gamut from theoretical modeling efforts to laboratory work. Like fossils for paleontologists, or DNA for geneticists, they allow us to construct a veritable time machine and provide us with tantalizing glimpses of the earliest nature of our solar system. By investigating them, we can probe what our home system was like before life or even the planets existed. The origin and evolution of life on our planet is also intertwined with asteroids in a different way. It is believed that impacts on the primordial Earth may have delivered the basic components for life, with biology favoring attributes that could more easily survive the aftermath of such energetic events. In this fashion, asteroids may have banished many probable avenues for life to relative obscurity. Similarly, they may have also prevented our biosphere from becoming more complex until more recent eras. The full tale of asteroid impacts on the history of our world, and how human life managed to emerge from myriad possibilities, has yet to be fully told. The hazard posed by asteroid impacts to our civilization is low but singular. The design of efficient mitigation strategies strongly relies on asteroid detection by our ground- and spacebased surveys as well as knowledge of their physical properties. A more positive motivation for asteroid discovery is that the proximity of some asteroids to Earth may allow future astronauts to harvest their water and rare mineral resources for use in exploration. A key goal of asteroid science is therefore to learn how humans and robotic probes can interact with asteroids (and extract their materials) in an efficient way. We expect that these adventures may be commonplace in the future

  15. Complexes with Tunable Intramolecular Ferrocene to Ti(IV) Electronic Transitions: Models for Solid State Fe(II) to Ti(IV) Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Turlington, Michael D; Pienkos, Jared A; Carlton, Elizabeth S; Wroblewski, Karlee N; Myers, Alexis R; Trindle, Carl O; Altun, Zikri; Rack, Jeffrey J; Wagenknecht, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Iron(II)-to-titanium(IV) metal-to-metal-charge transfer (MMCT) is important in the photosensitization of TiO2 by ferrocyanide, charge transfer in solid-state metal-oxide photocatalysts, and has been invoked to explain the blue color of sapphire, blue kyanite, and some lunar material. Herein, a series of complexes with alkynyl linkages between ferrocene (Fc) and Ti(IV) has been prepared and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Complexes with two ferrocene substituents include Cp2Ti(C2Fc)2, Cp*2Ti(C2Fc)2, and Cp2Ti(C4Fc)2. Complexes with a single ferrocene utilize a titanocene with a trimethylsilyl derivatized Cp ring, (TMS)Cp, and comprise the complexes (TMS)Cp2Ti(C2Fc)(C2R), where R = C6H5, p-C6H4CF3, and CF3. The complexes are compared to Cp2Ti(C2Ph)2, which lacks the second metal. Cyclic voltammetry for all complexes reveals a reversible Ti(IV/III) reduction wave and an Fe(II/III) oxidation that is irreversible for all complexes except (TMS)Cp2Ti(C2Fc)(C2CF3). All of the complexes with both Fc and Ti show an intense absorption (4000 M(-1)cm(-1) < ε < 8000 M(-1)cm(-1)) between 540 and 630 nm that is absent in complexes lacking a ferrocene donor. The energy of the absorption tracks with the difference between the Ti(IV/III) and Fe(III/II) reduction potentials, shifting to lower energy as the difference in potentials decreases. Reorganization energies, λ, have been determined using band shape analysis (2600 cm(-1) < λ < 5300 cm(-1)) and are in the range observed for other donor-acceptor complexes that have a ferrocene donor. Marcus-Hush-type analysis of the electrochemical and spectroscopic data are consistent with the assignment of the low-energy absorption as a MMCT band. TD-DFT analysis also supports this assignment. Solvatochromism is apparent for the MMCT band of all complexes, there being a bathochromic shift upon increasing polarizability of the solvent. The magnitude of the shift is dependent on both the electron density at Ti(IV

  16. Complexes with Tunable Intramolecular Ferrocene to Ti(IV) Electronic Transitions: Models for Solid State Fe(II) to Ti(IV) Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Turlington, Michael D; Pienkos, Jared A; Carlton, Elizabeth S; Wroblewski, Karlee N; Myers, Alexis R; Trindle, Carl O; Altun, Zikri; Rack, Jeffrey J; Wagenknecht, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Iron(II)-to-titanium(IV) metal-to-metal-charge transfer (MMCT) is important in the photosensitization of TiO2 by ferrocyanide, charge transfer in solid-state metal-oxide photocatalysts, and has been invoked to explain the blue color of sapphire, blue kyanite, and some lunar material. Herein, a series of complexes with alkynyl linkages between ferrocene (Fc) and Ti(IV) has been prepared and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Complexes with two ferrocene substituents include Cp2Ti(C2Fc)2, Cp*2Ti(C2Fc)2, and Cp2Ti(C4Fc)2. Complexes with a single ferrocene utilize a titanocene with a trimethylsilyl derivatized Cp ring, (TMS)Cp, and comprise the complexes (TMS)Cp2Ti(C2Fc)(C2R), where R = C6H5, p-C6H4CF3, and CF3. The complexes are compared to Cp2Ti(C2Ph)2, which lacks the second metal. Cyclic voltammetry for all complexes reveals a reversible Ti(IV/III) reduction wave and an Fe(II/III) oxidation that is irreversible for all complexes except (TMS)Cp2Ti(C2Fc)(C2CF3). All of the complexes with both Fc and Ti show an intense absorption (4000 M(-1)cm(-1) < ε < 8000 M(-1)cm(-1)) between 540 and 630 nm that is absent in complexes lacking a ferrocene donor. The energy of the absorption tracks with the difference between the Ti(IV/III) and Fe(III/II) reduction potentials, shifting to lower energy as the difference in potentials decreases. Reorganization energies, λ, have been determined using band shape analysis (2600 cm(-1) < λ < 5300 cm(-1)) and are in the range observed for other donor-acceptor complexes that have a ferrocene donor. Marcus-Hush-type analysis of the electrochemical and spectroscopic data are consistent with the assignment of the low-energy absorption as a MMCT band. TD-DFT analysis also supports this assignment. Solvatochromism is apparent for the MMCT band of all complexes, there being a bathochromic shift upon increasing polarizability of the solvent. The magnitude of the shift is dependent on both the electron density at Ti(IV

  17. The Hourglass Approach: A Conceptual Model for Group Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriner, Lon S.; Goulet, Everett F.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a model to clarify the facilitator's role in working with groups. The Hourglass Approach model incorporates Carkhuff's empathetic levels of communication and Schultz's theory of personality. It is designed to be a systematic and comprehensive method usable with a variety of counseling approaches in all types of groups. (JAC)

  18. Interactive Group Modeling: Part 2. An Interactive Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vian, Kathleen Spangler; And Others

    This is the second of four reports of the Interactive Group Modeling project--an undertaking designed to extend group communication through computers to support the more task-focused communication required by those building computer models. The report focuses on the HUB system--a system that facilitates communication in four modes: computer…

  19. The Punctuated-Tuckman: Towards a New Group Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurt, Andrew C.; Trombley, Sarah M.

    2007-01-01

    Two commonly accepted theories of group development are the Tuckman model (Tuckman & Jensen, 1977) and the Punctuated-Equilibrium model (Gersick, 1988). Critiques of both are that they assume linear development and that they fail to account for outside influences. In contrast, Tubbs (2004) suggests that group development should be viewed from a…

  20. The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Luke, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for…

  1. C-H bond activation of the methyl group of the supporting ligand in an osmium(III) complex upon reaction with H2O2: formation of an organometallic osmium(IV) complex.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Ashikari, Kenji; Itoh, Shinobu

    2013-01-18

    Oxidation of the hydroxoosmium(III) complex resulted in C-H bond activation of the methyl group of the supporting ligand (N,N'-dimethyl-2,11-diaza[3.3](2,6)pyridinophane). The product was an osmium(IV) complex exhibiting a seven-coordinate structure with an additional Os-CH(2) bond.

  2. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  3. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    PubMed

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates.

  4. Branch structure of IV-characteristics in the capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model with the diffusion current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.; Seidel, P.

    2007-09-01

    We have solved numerically a system of dynamical equations for the gauge-invariant phase differences between superconducting layers for a stack of N intrinsic junctions and obtained a total branch structure in the current-voltage characteristics (IVC) of the stack. The coupling dependence of the branch’s slopes is investigated and demonstrated that the equidistance of the branch structure in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model is broken at small values of coupling parameter. Changes in the parameters of the boundary conditions and the use of periodic boundary conditions do not affect this result. In the framework of the CCJJ model with the diffusion current we simulate an experiment and obtain the IV-characteristic with equidistant branch structure at different values of model parameters.

  5. Group therapy for refugees and torture survivors: treatment model innovations.

    PubMed

    Kira, Ibrahim A; Ahmed, Asha; Wasim, Fatima; Mahmoud, Vanessa; Colrain, Joanna; Rai, Dhan

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses varieties of group therapies with refugees and torture survivors and the logic behind enhancing traditional group therapies to fit the unique experiences of refugees and torture survivors. It discusses some lessons learned from practice and from empirical research and some recommended adaptations. Finally, it discusses the Center for Torture and Trauma Survivors' therapy group model for torture survivors and describes two of its variants: The Bashal group for African and Somali women and the Bhutanese multi-family therapy group. Group therapies, in this model, extend to community healing. One of the essential and innovative features of the model is that it focuses not only on treating individual psychopathology but also extends to community healing by promoting the development of social clubs and organizations that promote the values and culture of the graduates of the therapy group and the continuation of social support. New graduates from the group join the club and become part of the social advocacy process and of group and community support and healing. This model adds an ecological dimension to the traditional group therapy.

  6. Group force mobility model and its obstacle avoidance capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Sean A.; Huang, Dijiang

    2009-10-01

    Many mobility models attempt to provide realistic simulation to many real world scenarios. However, existing mobility models, such as RPGM [X. Hong, M. Gerla, G. Pei, C. Chiang, A group mobility model for ad hoc wireless networks, in: Proceedings of ACM/IEEE MSWiM'99, Seattle, WA, August 1999, pp. 53-60] and others, fail to address many aspects. These limitations range from mobile node (MN) collision avoidance, obstacle avoidance, and the interaction of MNs within a group. Our research, the group force mobility model (GFMM) [S.A. Williams, D. Huang, A group force mobility model, Appeared at 9th Communications and Networking Simulation Symposium, April 2006], proposes a novel idea which introduces the concept of attraction and repulsion forces to address many of these limitations. Williams and Huang [A group force mobility model, Appeared at 9th Communications and Networking Simulation Symposium, April 2006] described some of the limitations and drawbacks that many models neglect. This model effectively simulates the interaction of MNs within a group, the interaction of groups to one another, the coherency of a group, and the avoidance of collision with groups, nodes, and obstacles. This paper provides an overview of GFMM and particularly illustrates the GFMM's ability to avoid collision with obstacles, which is a vital property to posses in order to provide a realistic simulaition. We compare our model with the commonly used RPGM model and provide statistical assessments based on connectivity metrics such as link changed, link duration, and relative speed. All will be detailed and explained in this paper.

  7. Two Models for Semi-Supervised Terrorist Group Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgul, Fatih; Erdem, Zeki; Bowerman, Chris

    Since discovery of organization structure of offender groups leads the investigation to terrorist cells or organized crime groups, detecting covert networks from crime data are important to crime investigation. Two models, GDM and OGDM, which are based on another representation model - OGRM are developed and tested on nine terrorist groups. GDM, which is basically depending on police arrest data and “caught together” information and OGDM, which uses a feature matching on year-wise offender components from arrest and demographics data, performed well on terrorist groups, but OGDM produced high precision with low recall values. OGDM uses a terror crime modus operandi ontology which enabled matching of similar crimes.

  8. ON THE USE OF NEXRAD STAGE IV DATA IN THE MULTIMEDIA MODELING OF POLLUTANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is designing the Multimedia Integrated Modeling System (MIMS) to model the cycling of pollutants and nutrients between the atmosphere and the earth's surface, including water bodies and groundwater. Our ability to accurately model both ...

  9. Therapeutic Enactment: Integrating Individual and Group Counseling Models for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Marvin J.; Keats, Patrice A.; Wilensky, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to a group-based therapy model known as therapeutic enactment. A description of this multimodal change model is provided by outlining the relevant background information, key concepts related to specific change processes, and the differences in this model compared to earlier psychodrama…

  10. Architecture Models and Data Flows in Local and Group Datawarehouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogza, R. M.; Zaharie, Dorin; Avasilcai, Silvia; Bacali, Laura

    Architecture models and possible data flows for local and group datawarehouses are presented, together with some data processing models. The architecture models consists of several layers and the data flow between them. The choosen architecture of a datawarehouse depends on the data type and volumes from the source data, and inflences the analysis, data mining and reports done upon the data from DWH.

  11. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  12. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV.

    PubMed

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E; Humphrey, Daniel M; Wang, Shirley L; Kiselyov, Kirill I; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1(-/-) brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1(-/-) and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development.

  13. Geology Lectures and Laboratories. A Model to Improve Preservice Elementary Science Teacher Development. Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Gary

    A group of scientists and science educators at Washington State University has developed and pilot tested an integrated physical science program designed for preservice elementary school teachers. This document includes the syllabus and class materials for the Geology block of the physical science courses developed by the group. Included are…

  14. Outcomes comparison of solo-practitioner and group practice models.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C A; Phillips, S L; Chasteen, J E

    1998-02-01

    A solo-practitioner care delivery model is utilized in the predoctoral teaching clinics at the University of Washington School of Dentistry. This model requires students to independently manage their practices using central resources. The model is perceived as cumbersome for patients and students and as failing to achieve optimum educational and productivity outcomes. During the 1995-96 academic year, a group practice model of patient care delivery was pilot tested to assess whether productivity, educational, and care delivery outcomes could be enhanced in comparison to the solo-practitioner model. This group practice model combined third- and fourth-year students for purposes of sharing resources and collaborating in patient care delivery. Resources dedicated to each group practice included a practice advisor, shared patient care coordinator, dental assistant, and shared clinic receptionist. Two group practices and twenty-five student solo practitioners participated in the study. Based upon an analysis of productivity, participant, and patient data, the group practice participants had greater billing volume, better attendance, enhanced satisfaction with the staff/faculty support and their ability to fill appointments, and generally comparable patient satisfaction ratings. These results suggest that the group practice model, through the dedication of resources and collaboration of providers, could enhance the outcomes of the clinical education program. PMID:9487303

  15. Biofunctionalization of electrospun PCL-based scaffolds with perlecan domain IV peptide to create a 3-D pharmacokinetic cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Olga; Zhang, Chu; Adams, Elizabeth L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Chase, Bruce D.; Rabolt, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Because prostate cancer cells metastasize to bone and exhibit osteoblastic features (osteomimicry), the interrelationships between bone-specific microenvironment and prostate cancer cells at sites of bone metastasis are critical to disease progression. In this work the bone marrow microenvironment in vitro was recreated both by tailoring scaffolds physical properties and by functionalizing electrospun polymer fibers with a bioactive peptide derived from domain IV of perlecan heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers and PCL/gelatin composite scaffolds were modified covalently with perlecan domain IV (PlnDIV) peptide. The expression of tight junction protein (E-cadherin) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397 also were investigated. The described bioactive motif significantly enhanced adherence and infiltration of the metastatic prostate cancer cells on all modified electrospun substrates by day 5 post-seeding. Cells cultured on PlnDIV-modified matrices organized stress fibers and increased proliferation at statistically significant rates. Additional findings suggest that presence of PlnDIV peptide in the matrix reduced expression of tight junction protein and binding to PlnDIV peptide was accompanied by increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397. We conclude that PlnDIV peptide supports key signaling events leading to proliferation, survival, and migration of C4-2B cancer cells; hence its incorporation into electrospun matrix is a key improvement to create a successful three-dimensional (3-D) pharmacokinetic cancer model. PMID:20417554

  16. Clinician judgments of clinical utility: A comparison of DSM-IV-TR personality disorders and the alternative model for DSM-5 personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Morey, Leslie C; Skodol, Andrew E; Oldham, John M

    2014-05-01

    This study compared the perceived clinical utility of DSM-IV-TR personality disorder diagnoses (retained in DSM-5) with the alternative model presented in DSM-5 Section III, using a national sample of clinicians applying both systems to their own patients. A sample of 337 mental health clinicians (26% psychiatrists, 63% psychologists, and 11% other professional disciplines) provided a complete assessment of all personality disorder features listed in DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Section III. After applying each diagnostic model, clinicians evaluated the clinical utility of that model with respect to communication with patients and with other professionals, comprehensiveness, descriptiveness, ease of use, and utility for treatment planning. These perceptions were compared across DSM-IV-TR and the 3 components of the DSM-5 Section III model, and between psychiatrists and nonpsychiatrists. Although DSM-IV-TR was seen as easy to use and useful for professional communication, in every other respect the DSM-5 Section III model was viewed as being equally or more clinically useful than DSM-IV-TR. In particular, the DSM-5 dimensional trait model was seen as more useful than DSM-IV-TR in 5 of 6 comparisons-by psychiatrists as well as other professionals. Although concerns were expressed about the clinical utility of the DSM-5 personality disorder system during its development, these criticisms were offered without data on the proposed system. The results of this study demonstrate that aside from the current familiarity of the DSM-IV-TR approach, it offers little advantage in perceived clinical utility over the DSM-5 Section III system, whereas the latter is viewed as being more useful in several respects.

  17. The Canon Group's effort: working toward a merged model.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, C; Huff, S M; Hersh, W R; Pattison-Gordon, E; Cimino, J J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a representational schema for clinical data for use in exchanging data and applications, using a collaborative approach. DESIGN: Representational models for clinical radiology were independently developed manually by several Canon Group members who had diverse application interests, using sample reports. These models were merged into one common model through an iterative process by means of workshops, meetings, and electronic mail. RESULTS: A core merged model for radiologic findings present in a set of reports that subsumed the models that were developed independently. CONCLUSIONS: The Canon Group's modeling effort focused on a collaborative approach to developing a representational schema for clinical concepts, using chest radiography reports as the initial experiment. This effort resulted in a core model that represents a consensus. Further efforts in modeling will extend the representational coverage and will also address issues such as scalability, automation, evaluation, and support of the collaborative effort. PMID:7895135

  18. Intergroup Conflict in Russia: Testing the Group Position Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minescu, Anca; Poppe, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    The group position model (Blumer 1958; Bobo and Tuan 2006) assumes that attempting to secure a privileged position for the ingroup is a main determinant of perceived intergroup conflict. This assumption is tested with survey data collected in 1999 and 2000 among eight titular groups in autonomous republics of the Russian Federation. The survey…

  19. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A.; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E.; Humphrey, Daniel M.; Wang, Shirley L.; Kiselyov, Kirill I.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development. PMID:26398942

  20. PRMS-IV, the precipitation-runoff modeling system, version 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Regan, Robert S.; Hay, Lauren E.; Viger, Roland J.; Webb, Richard M.; Payn, Robert A.; LaFontaine, Jacob H.

    2015-01-01

    Computer models that simulate the hydrologic cycle at a watershed scale facilitate assessment of variability in climate, biota, geology, and human activities on water availability and flow. This report describes an updated version of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System. The Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System is a deterministic, distributed-parameter, physical-process-based modeling system developed to evaluate the response of various combinations of climate and land use on streamflow and general watershed hydrology. Several new model components were developed, and all existing components were updated, to enhance performance and supportability. This report describes the history, application, concepts, organization, and mathematical formulation of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System and its model components. This updated version provides improvements in (1) system flexibility for integrated science, (2) verification of conservation of water during simulation, (3) methods for spatial distribution of climate boundary conditions, and (4) methods for simulation of soil-water flow and storage.

  1. Deciphering the Crowd: Modeling and Identification of Pedestrian Group Motion

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Zeynep; Zanlungo, Francesco; Ikeda, Tetsushi; Miyashita, Takahiro; Hagita, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Associating attributes to pedestrians in a crowd is relevant for various areas like surveillance, customer profiling and service providing. The attributes of interest greatly depend on the application domain and might involve such social relations as friends or family as well as the hierarchy of the group including the leader or subordinates. Nevertheless, the complex social setting inherently complicates this task. We attack this problem by exploiting the small group structures in the crowd. The relations among individuals and their peers within a social group are reliable indicators of social attributes. To that end, this paper identifies social groups based on explicit motion models integrated through a hypothesis testing scheme. We develop two models relating positional and directional relations. A pair of pedestrians is identified as belonging to the same group or not by utilizing the two models in parallel, which defines a compound hypothesis testing scheme. By testing the proposed approach on three datasets with different environmental properties and group characteristics, it is demonstrated that we achieve an identification accuracy of 87% to 99%. The contribution of this study lies in its definition of positional and directional relation models, its description of compound evaluations, and the resolution of ambiguities with our proposed uncertainty measure based on the local and global indicators of group relation. PMID:23344382

  2. Deciphering the crowd: modeling and identification of pedestrian group motion.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Zeynep; Zanlungo, Francesco; Ikeda, Tetsushi; Miyashita, Takahiro; Hagita, Norihiro

    2013-01-14

    Associating attributes to pedestrians in a crowd is relevant for various areas like surveillance, customer profiling and service providing. The attributes of interest greatly depend on the application domain and might involve such social relations as friends or family as well as the hierarchy of the group including the leader or subordinates. Nevertheless, the complex social setting inherently complicates this task. We attack this problem by exploiting the small group structures in the crowd. The relations among individuals and their peers within a social group are reliable indicators of social attributes. To that end, this paper identifies social groups based on explicit motion models integrated through a hypothesis testing scheme. We develop two models relating positional and directional relations. A pair of pedestrians is identified as belonging to the same group or not by utilizing the two models in parallel, which defines a compound hypothesis testing scheme. By testing the proposed approach on three datasets with different environmental properties and group characteristics, it is demonstrated that we achieve an identification accuracy of 87% to 99%. The contribution of this study lies in its definition of positional and directional relation models, its description of compound evaluations, and the resolution of ambiguities with our proposed uncertainty measure based on the local and global indicators of group relation.

  3. Space physiology IV: mathematical modeling of the cardiovascular system in space exploration.

    PubMed

    Keith Sharp, M; Batzel, Jerry Joseph; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Mathematical modeling represents an important tool for analyzing cardiovascular function during spaceflight. This review describes how modeling of the cardiovascular system can contribute to space life science research and illustrates this process via modeling efforts to study postflight orthostatic intolerance (POI), a key issue for spaceflight. Examining this application also provides a context for considering broader applications of modeling techniques to the challenges of bioastronautics. POI, which affects a large fraction of astronauts in stand tests upon return to Earth, presents as dizziness, fainting and other symptoms, which can diminish crew performance and cause safety hazards. POI on the Moon or Mars could be more critical. In the field of bioastronautics, POI has been the dominant application of cardiovascular modeling for more than a decade, and a number of mechanisms for POI have been investigated. Modeling approaches include computational models with a range of incorporated factors and hemodynamic sophistication, and also physical models tested in parabolic and orbital flight. Mathematical methods such as parameter sensitivity analysis can help identify key system mechanisms. In the case of POI, this could lead to more effective countermeasures. Validation is a persistent issue in modeling efforts, and key considerations and needs for experimental data to synergistically improve understanding of cardiovascular responses are outlined. Future directions in cardiovascular modeling include subject-specific assessment of system status, as well as research on integrated physiological responses, leading, for instance, to assessment of subject-specific susceptibility to POI or effects of cardiovascular alterations on muscular, vision and cognitive function.

  4. Coarse-grained dynamics of alignment in animal group models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sung Joon; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Yannis

    2006-03-01

    Coordinated motion in animal groups, such as bird flocks and fish schools, and their models gives rise to remarkable coherent structures. Using equation-free computational tools we explore the coarse-grained dynamics of a model for the orientational movement decision in animal groups, consisting of a small number of informed "leaders" and a large number of uninformed, nonidentical ``followers.'' The direction in which each group member is headed is characterized by a phase angle of a limit-cycle oscillator, whose dynamics are nonlinearly coupled with those of all the other group members. We identify a small number of proper coarse-grained variables (using uncertainty quantification methods) that describe the collective dynamics, and perform coarse projective integration and equation-free bifurcation analysis of the coarse-grained model behavior in these variables.

  5. The Relational-Cultural Model: A Framework for Group Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Dana L.; Duffey, Thelma; St. George, Holly

    2002-01-01

    The relational-cultural model of psychotherapy has been evolving for the past 20 years. Within this model, difficult group dynamics are conceptualized as the playing out of the central relational paradox. This paradox recognizes that an individual may yearn for connection but, out of a sense of fear, simultaneously employ strategies that restrict…

  6. Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

  7. Explaining Cooperation in Groups: Testing Models of Reciprocity and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biele, Guido; Rieskamp, Jorg; Czienskowski, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    What are the cognitive processes underlying cooperation in groups? This question is addressed by examining how well a reciprocity model, two learning models, and social value orientation can predict cooperation in two iterated n-person social dilemmas with continuous contributions. In the first of these dilemmas, the public goods game,…

  8. A Creative Therapies Model for the Group Supervision of Counsellors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Sets forth a model of group supervision, drawing on a creative therapies approach which provides an effective way of delivering process issues, conceptualization issues, and personalization issues. The model makes particular use of techniques drawn from art therapy and from psychodrama, and should be applicable to therapists of many orientations.…

  9. Freshman Interest Groups: Designing a Model for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    2008-01-01

    Freshman Interest Groups (FIGS) have become a popular model for academic and student affairs colleagues who are concerned that first-year students learn to reflect on life experiences and daily events as part of the learning process. A well-designed FIG model meets the academic, social and career concerns for first-year students by providing an…

  10. A Small Group Model for Early Intervention in Literacy: Group Size and Program Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homan, Susan; King, James R.; Hogarty, Kris

    Over the last 2 years, Accelerated Literacy Learning (ALL) has experimented with the small group model in early literacy intervention, with success comparable to that in one-to-one intervention. There can be little doubt that intervention provided to struggling readers is most effectively initiated at an early stage. The ALL program was conceived…

  11. SPARC Groups: A Model for Incorporating Spiritual Psychoeducation into Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmas, Christopher; Van Horn, Stacy M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of spirituality as a resource for clients within the counseling field is growing; however, the primary focus has been on individual therapy. The purpose of this article is to provide counseling practitioners, administrators, and researchers with an approach for incorporating spiritual psychoeducation into group work. The proposed model can…

  12. Modelling group navigation: transitive social structures improve navigational performance

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Andrea; Biro, Dora; Guilford, Tim; Freeman, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Collective navigation demands that group members reach consensus on which path to follow, a task that might become more challenging when the group's members have different social connections. Group decision-making mechanisms have been studied successfully in the past using individual-based modelling, although many of these studies have neglected the role of social connections between the group's interacting members. Nevertheless, empirical studies have demonstrated that individual recognition, previous shared experiences and inter-individual familiarity can influence the cohesion and the dynamics of the group as well as the relative spatial positions of specific individuals within it. Here, we use models of collective motion to study the impact of social relationships on group navigation by introducing social network structures into a model of collective motion. Our results show that groups consisting of equally informed individuals achieve the highest level of accuracy when they are hierarchically organized with the minimum number of preferred connections per individual. We also observe that the navigational accuracy of a group will depend strongly on detailed aspects of its social organization. More specifically, group navigation does not only depend on the underlying social relationships, but also on how much weight leading individuals put on following others. Also, we show that groups with certain social structures can compensate better for an increased level of navigational error. The results have broader implications for studies on collective navigation and motion because they show that only by considering a group's social system can we fully elucidate the dynamics and advantages of joint movements. PMID:26063820

  13. A model of interaction between anticorruption authority and corruption groups

    SciTech Connect

    Neverova, Elena G.; Malafeyef, Oleg A.

    2015-03-10

    The paper provides a model of interaction between anticorruption unit and corruption groups. The main policy functions of the anticorruption unit involve reducing corrupt practices in some entities through an optimal approach to resource allocation and effective anticorruption policy. We develop a model based on Markov decision-making process and use Howard’s policy-improvement algorithm for solving an optimal decision strategy. We examine the assumption that corruption groups retaliate against the anticorruption authority to protect themselves. This model was implemented through stochastic game.

  14. Group theory and biomolecular conformation: I. Mathematical and computational models

    PubMed Central

    Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2010-01-01

    Biological macromolecules, and the complexes that they form, can be described in a variety of ways ranging from quantum mechanical and atomic chemical models, to coarser grained models of secondary structure and domains, to continuum models. At each of these levels, group theory can be used to describe both geometric symmetries and conformational motion. In this survey, a detailed account is provided of how group theory has been applied across computational structural biology to analyze the conformational shape and motion of macromolecules and complexes. PMID:20827378

  15. Growing network model for community with group structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jae Dong; Jeong, Hyeong-Chai; Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Jeong, Hawoong

    2005-03-01

    We propose a growing network model for a community with a group structure. The community consists of individual members and groups, gatherings of members. The community grows as a new member is introduced by an existing member at each time step. The new member then creates a new group or joins one of the groups of the introducer. We investigate the emerging community structure analytically and numerically. The group size distribution shows a power-law distribution for a variety of growth rules, while the activity distribution follows an exponential or a power law depending on the details of the growth rule. We also present an analysis of empirical data from online communities the “Groups” in http://www.yahoo.com and the “Cafe” in http://www.daum.net, which show a power-law distribution for a wide range of group sizes.

  16. Renormalization-group calculation of excitation properties for impurity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Whitaker, M. A.; Oliveira, L. N.

    1990-05-01

    The renormalization-group method developed by Wilson to calculate thermodynamical properties of dilute magnetic alloys is generalized to allow the calculation of dynamical properties of many-body impurity Hamiltonians. As a simple illustration, the impurity spectral density for the resonant-level model (i.e., the U=0 Anderson model) is computed. As a second illustration, for the same model, the longitudinal relaxation rate for a nuclear spin coupled to the impurity is calculated as a function of temperature.

  17. Model Checking Verification and Validation at JPL and the NASA Fairmont IV and V Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Frank; Easterbrook, Steve; Callahan, Jack; Montgomery, Todd

    1999-01-01

    We show how a technology transfer effort was carried out. The successful use of model checking on a pilot JPL flight project demonstrates the usefulness and the efficacy of the approach. The pilot project was used to model a complex spacecraft controller. Software design and implementation validation were carried out successfully. To suggest future applications we also show how the implementation validation step can be automated. The effort was followed by the formal introduction of the modeling technique as a part of the JPL Quality Assurance process.

  18. Bayesian model reduction and empirical Bayes for group (DCM) studies.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl J; Litvak, Vladimir; Oswal, Ashwini; Razi, Adeel; Stephan, Klaas E; van Wijk, Bernadette C M; Ziegler, Gabriel; Zeidman, Peter

    2016-03-01

    This technical note describes some Bayesian procedures for the analysis of group studies that use nonlinear models at the first (within-subject) level - e.g., dynamic causal models - and linear models at subsequent (between-subject) levels. Its focus is on using Bayesian model reduction to finesse the inversion of multiple models of a single dataset or a single (hierarchical or empirical Bayes) model of multiple datasets. These applications of Bayesian model reduction allow one to consider parametric random effects and make inferences about group effects very efficiently (in a few seconds). We provide the relatively straightforward theoretical background to these procedures and illustrate their application using a worked example. This example uses a simulated mismatch negativity study of schizophrenia. We illustrate the robustness of Bayesian model reduction to violations of the (commonly used) Laplace assumption in dynamic causal modelling and show how its recursive application can facilitate both classical and Bayesian inference about group differences. Finally, we consider the application of these empirical Bayesian procedures to classification and prediction.

  19. Bayesian model reduction and empirical Bayes for group (DCM) studies

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Litvak, Vladimir; Oswal, Ashwini; Razi, Adeel; Stephan, Klaas E.; van Wijk, Bernadette C.M.; Ziegler, Gabriel; Zeidman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This technical note describes some Bayesian procedures for the analysis of group studies that use nonlinear models at the first (within-subject) level – e.g., dynamic causal models – and linear models at subsequent (between-subject) levels. Its focus is on using Bayesian model reduction to finesse the inversion of multiple models of a single dataset or a single (hierarchical or empirical Bayes) model of multiple datasets. These applications of Bayesian model reduction allow one to consider parametric random effects and make inferences about group effects very efficiently (in a few seconds). We provide the relatively straightforward theoretical background to these procedures and illustrate their application using a worked example. This example uses a simulated mismatch negativity study of schizophrenia. We illustrate the robustness of Bayesian model reduction to violations of the (commonly used) Laplace assumption in dynamic causal modelling and show how its recursive application can facilitate both classical and Bayesian inference about group differences. Finally, we consider the application of these empirical Bayesian procedures to classification and prediction. PMID:26569570

  20. Variability and singularity arising from poor compliance in a pharmacokinetic model I: the multi-IV case.

    PubMed

    Lévy Véhel, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lévy Véhel, Jacques

    2013-02-01

    We consider a simple multi-IV model for drug concentration in the case of poor patient compliance. The model is a stochastic one, and is thus able to take into account an irregular drug intake schedule. Under some assumptions, we study features of the drug concentration relevant for practical purposes such as its variability or the regularity of its cumulative probability distribution. We consider five variants: random instants for drug intake with either deterministic or random doses, both in continuous and discrete-time settings, plus a model with stochastically varying elimination rate. Our computations make it possible to assess in a precise way the effect of various significant parameters such as the mean rate of intake, the elimination rate, and the mean dose. They also quantify how much poor compliance will affect the regimen: in that view, we provide precise comparisons with the variability of concentration in the cases of (a) a fully compliant patient and (b) a population of fully compliant patients with lognormally distributed elimination rates. The time discretized version of our models reveal unexpected links with measures known as infinite Bernoulli convolutions. Our findings help in understanding the consequences of poor compliance, and may have practical outcomes in terms of drug dosing and scheduling. PMID:23275018

  1. OLI/ESP Modeling Of The Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant For Estimate Of Campaigns I-IV Simulant Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    CARL, BARNES

    2004-08-01

    Four SIPP campaigns have been planned to investigate the effect of recycle streams on the RPP-WTP pretreatment process such as the filter flux rate and other areas of interest. This document describes OLI/ESP modeling work done in support of the planning and operation of the SIPP. An existing OLI/ESP steady-state model was expanded to represent the pretreatment system through to the TLP evaporator for the LAW train and the washed sludge for the HLW train. The model was used to investigate alternative operating scenarios, determine the optimum volumetric waste feed ratio of AP-101 to AY-102, and, for each campaign, estimate the simulant and input recycle volumes corresponding to the target glass production rates of 6MT/day HLW glass and 80MT/day LAW glass and scaled to the target of 140L of Campaign I washed sludge. It was designed to quickly achieve steady state and simulation results indicate this was accomplished by Campaign IV. The alternative operating scenarios modeled differed only in the point at which the AP-101 and AY-102 waste feed streams were introduced to the process. The results showed no difference in the production rate between the scenarios. Therefore, for these specific waste feeds the process should be operated to maximize the energy efficiency and minimize scaling in the evaporator by feeding the AY-102 waste feed to the ultra-filtration feed prep tank, bypassing the waste feed evaporator.

  2. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. IV - Modeling chaotic and random processes with linear filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    1990-01-01

    While chaos arises only in nonlinear systems, standard linear time series models are nevertheless useful for analyzing data from chaotic processes. This paper introduces such a model, the chaotic moving average. This time-domain model is based on the theorem that any chaotic process can be represented as the convolution of a linear filter with an uncorrelated process called the chaotic innovation. A technique, minimum phase-volume deconvolution, is introduced to estimate the filter and innovation. The algorithm measures the quality of a model using the volume covered by the phase-portrait of the innovation process. Experiments on synthetic data demonstrate that the algorithm accurately recovers the parameters of simple chaotic processes. Though tailored for chaos, the algorithm can detect both chaos and randomness, distinguish them from each other, and separate them if both are present. It can also recover nonminimum-delay pulse shapes in non-Gaussian processes, both random and chaotic.

  3. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and {sup 137}Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of {sup 137}Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations.

  4. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  5. Modification through modeling and reinforcement in leaderless groups.

    PubMed

    Robins, G L; Wexley, K N

    1975-09-01

    This study compared the effects of modeling plus reinforcement (MR), reinforcement alone (R), and demand characteristics (D) on individual verbal output in a leaderless group discussion. Seventy-two male and female volunteers from undergraduate psychology courses (mean age 20.7 years) were assigned to three-person groups in the three conditions and participated in two 10 minute discussions. Ss who spoke the least in the first discussion were chosen as target persons (TPs). TPs in the R condition were reinforced for talking and punished for silence. TPs in the MR condition received the same treatment but were also exposed to a leadership modeling film. TPs in the D condition received no reinforcement, but were encouraged to become the group's leader. All conditions showed increases in verbral output, but the MR was superior to both the R (p less than .05) and D (p less than .01) conditions. The results were interpreted as consistent with Bandura's mediational theory of modeling.

  6. Emerging Trends in Heart Valve Engineering: Part IV. Computational Modeling and Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Kheradvar, Arash; Groves, Elliott M; Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Mofrad, Mohammad K; Hamed Alavi, S; Tranquillo, Robert; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simmons, Craig A; Jane Grande-Allen, K; Goergen, Craig J; Baaijens, Frank; Little, Stephen H; Canic, Suncica; Griffith, Boyce

    2015-10-01

    In this final portion of an extensive review of heart valve engineering, we focus on the computational methods and experimental studies related to heart valves. The discussion begins with a thorough review of computational modeling and the governing equations of fluid and structural interaction. We then move onto multiscale and disease specific modeling. Finally, advanced methods related to in vitro testing of the heart valves are reviewed. This section of the review series is intended to illustrate application of computational methods and experimental studies and their interrelation for studying heart valves.

  7. A thermodynamic adsorption/entrapment model for selenium(IV) coprecipitation with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberling, Frank; Vinograd, Victor L.; Polly, Robert; Gale, Julian D.; Heck, Stephanie; Rothe, Jörg; Bosbach, Dirk; Geckeis, Horst; Winkler, Björn

    2014-06-01

    Selenium is an environmentally relevant trace element, while the radioisotope 79Se is of particular concern in the context of nuclear waste disposal safety. Oxidized selenium species are relatively soluble and show only weak adsorption at common mineral surfaces. However, a possible sorption mechanism for selenium in the geosphere is the structural incorporation of selenium(IV) (selenite, SeO32-) into calcite (CaCO3). In this study we investigate the interactions between selenite and calcite by a series of experimental and computational methods with the aim to quantify selenite incorporation into calcite at standard conditions. We further seek to describe the thermodynamics of selenite-doped calcite, and selenite coprecipitation with calcite. The structure of the incorporated species is investigated using Se K-edge EXAFS (isotropic and polarization dependent) and results are compared to density functional theory (DFT) calculations. These investigations confirm structural incorporation of selenite into calcite by the substitution of carbonate for selenite, leading to the formation of a Ca(SeO3)X(CO3)(1-X) solid solution. Coprecipitation experiments at low supersaturation indicate a linear increase of the selenite to carbonate ratio in the solid with the increase of the selenite to carbonate ratio in the contact solution. This relationship can be described under the assumption of an ideal mixing between calcite and a virtual CaSeO3 endmember, whose standard Gibbs free energy (G0(CaSeO3_exp) = -953 ± 6 kJ/mol, log10(KSP(CaSeO3_exp)) = -6.7 ± 1.0) is defined by linear extrapolation of the excess free energy from the dilute Henry’s law domain to X(CaSeO3) = 1. In contrast to this experimental result, DFT and force field calculations predict the virtual bulk CaSeO3 endmember to be significantly less stable and more soluble: G0(CaSeO3 bulk) = -912 ± 10 kJ/mol and log10(KSP(CaSeO3_bulk)) = 0.5 ± 1.7. To explain this discrepancy we introduce a thermodynamic adsorption

  8. A Simplified Technique for Scoring DSM-IV Personality Disorders with the Five-Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joshua D.; Bagby, R. Michael; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Reynolds, Sarah K.; Lynam, Donald R.

    2005-01-01

    The current study compares the use of two alternative methodologies for using the Five-Factor Model (FFM) to assess personality disorders (PDs). Across two clinical samples, a technique using the simple sum of selected FFM facets is compared with a previously used prototype matching technique. The results demonstrate that the more easily…

  9. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

  10. Tensor renormalization group analysis of CP (N -1 ) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Hikaru; Takeda, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    We apply the higher-order tensor renormalization group to the lattice CP (N -1 ) model in two dimensions. A tensor network representation of the CP (N -1 ) model in the presence of the θ term is derived. We confirm that the numerical results of the CP(1) model without the θ term using this method are consistent with that of the O(3) model which is analyzed by the same method in the region β ≫1 and that obtained by the Monte Carlo simulation in a wider range of β . The numerical computation including the θ term is left for future challenges.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012...

  13. Binary choices in small and large groups: A unified model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischi, Gian-Italo; Merlone, Ugo

    2010-02-01

    Two different ways to model the diffusion of alternative choices within a population of individuals in the presence of social externalities are known in the literature. While Galam’s model of rumors spreading considers a majority rule for interactions in several groups, Schelling considers individuals interacting in one large group, with payoff functions that describe how collective choices influence individual preferences. We incorporate these two approaches into a unified general discrete-time dynamic model for studying individual interactions in variously sized groups. We first illustrate how the two original models can be obtained as particular cases of the more general model we propose, then we show how several other situations can be analyzed. The model we propose goes beyond a theoretical exercise as it allows modeling situations which are relevant in economic and social systems. We consider also other aspects such as the propensity to switch choices and the behavioral momentum, and show how they may affect the dynamics of the whole population.

  14. Invariance of the Measurement Model Underlying the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV in the United States and Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Stephen C.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Weiss, Lawrence G.

    2011-01-01

    A measurement model describes both the numerical and theoretical relationship between observed scores and the corresponding latent variables or constructs. Testing a measurement model across groups is required to determine if the tests scores are tapping the same constructs so that the same meaning can be ascribed to the scores. Contemporary tests…

  15. Stabilizing l1-norm prediction models by supervised feature grouping.

    PubMed

    Kamkar, Iman; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2016-02-01

    Emerging Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) have reformed the modern healthcare. These records have great potential to be used for building clinical prediction models. However, a problem in using them is their high dimensionality. Since a lot of information may not be relevant for prediction, the underlying complexity of the prediction models may not be high. A popular way to deal with this problem is to employ feature selection. Lasso and l1-norm based feature selection methods have shown promising results. But, in presence of correlated features, these methods select features that change considerably with small changes in data. This prevents clinicians to obtain a stable feature set, which is crucial for clinical decision making. Grouping correlated variables together can improve the stability of feature selection, however, such grouping is usually not known and needs to be estimated for optimal performance. Addressing this problem, we propose a new model that can simultaneously learn the grouping of correlated features and perform stable feature selection. We formulate the model as a constrained optimization problem and provide an efficient solution with guaranteed convergence. Our experiments with both synthetic and real-world datasets show that the proposed model is significantly more stable than Lasso and many existing state-of-the-art shrinkage and classification methods. We further show that in terms of prediction performance, the proposed method consistently outperforms Lasso and other baselines. Our model can be used for selecting stable risk factors for a variety of healthcare problems, so it can assist clinicians toward accurate decision making.

  16. Modelling Animal Group Fission Using Social Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sueur, Cédric; Maire, Anaïs

    2014-01-01

    Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion). This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems. PMID:24831471

  17. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Constance J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in particular the U4f level, has been widely used to elucidate the chemical state of uranium in various materials. In large part, previous experimental work has relied on comparing the U4f spectra of an unknown to some “standard” or using qualitative intuitive judgments on the expected behavior of the primary lines and satellite structures as a function of oxidation state and bonding environment. Such approaches are useful and can be sufficiently robust to make defensible claims. Nonetheless, there is no quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics that control satellite structures or even the shape of the primary peaks. To address this issue, we used a rigorous, strictly ab initio theoretical approach to investigate the U(4f) XPS of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our theoretical studies are based on the electronic structures of embedded cluster models, where bonding between U and O is explicitly incorporated. We demonstrate that treatment of the many-body character of the cluster wavefunctions is essential to correctly model and interpret the U4f XPS. Here we definitively show that shake configurations, where an electron is transferred from a dominantly O2p bonding orbital into dominantly 5f or 6d antibonding orbitals, are indeed responsible for the major satellite features. Based on this rigorous theoretical framework, it is possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and the chemistry of the material.

  18. Treating Families of Demented Patients: Two Group Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Joel

    The prevalence of dementias in the elderly is steadily increasing. While caring for a dementing patient at home, families are subject to tremendous physical stresses and emotional reactions such as guilt, anger, grief, role confusion, depression, resentment, and loneliness. Two group treatment models addressing the mental health needs of…

  19. Individual, Group, and Organizational Instructional Systems Development Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Yong-Kook

    1998-01-01

    Presents exploratory individual, group, and organizational learning instructional systems development (ISD) models based on four conditions: integration of the questions of what and why in instruction and learning; reflection of impacts of environmental factors; non-linear and flexible instructional processes; and future-centeredness in…

  20. Linear mixed-effects modeling approach to FMRI group analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S.; Britton, Jennifer C.; Pine, Daniel S.; Cox, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional group analysis is usually performed with Student-type t-test, regression, or standard AN(C)OVA in which the variance–covariance matrix is presumed to have a simple structure. Some correction approaches are adopted when assumptions about the covariance structure is violated. However, as experiments are designed with different degrees of sophistication, these traditional methods can become cumbersome, or even be unable to handle the situation at hand. For example, most current FMRI software packages have difficulty analyzing the following scenarios at group level: (1) taking within-subject variability into account when there are effect estimates from multiple runs or sessions; (2) continuous explanatory variables (covariates) modeling in the presence of a within-subject (repeated measures) factor, multiple subject-grouping (between-subjects) factors, or the mixture of both; (3) subject-specific adjustments in covariate modeling; (4) group analysis with estimation of hemodynamic response (HDR) function by multiple basis functions; (5) various cases of missing data in longitudinal studies; and (6) group studies involving family members or twins. Here we present a linear mixed-effects modeling (LME) methodology that extends the conventional group analysis approach to analyze many complicated cases, including the six prototypes delineated above, whose analyses would be otherwise either difficult or unfeasible under traditional frameworks such as AN(C)OVA and general linear model (GLM). In addition, the strength of the LME framework lies in its flexibility to model and estimate the variance–covariance structures for both random effects and residuals. The intraclass correlation (ICC) values can be easily obtained with an LME model with crossed random effects, even at the presence of confounding fixed effects. The simulations of one prototypical scenario indicate that the LME modeling keeps a balance between the control for false positives and the

  1. Physics Based Model for Cryogenic Chilldown and Loading. Part IV: Code Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchinsky, D. G.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Brown, B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the fourth report in a series of technical reports that describe separated two-phase flow model application to the cryogenic loading operation. In this report we present the structure of the code. The code consists of five major modules: (1) geometry module; (2) solver; (3) material properties; (4) correlations; and finally (5) stability control module. The two key modules - solver and correlations - are further divided into a number of submodules. Most of the physics and knowledge databases related to the properties of cryogenic two-phase flow are included into the cryogenic correlations module. The functional form of those correlations is not well established and is a subject of extensive research. Multiple parametric forms for various correlations are currently available. Some of them are included into correlations module as will be described in details in a separate technical report. Here we describe the overall structure of the code and focus on the details of the solver and stability control modules.

  2. Precipitation of calcium oxalates from high ionic strength solutions IV. Testing of kinetic models*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrtic, D.; Markovic, M.; Foredi-Milhofer, H.

    1986-12-01

    The following parameters characterizing the kinetics of precipitation from unseeded solutions are defined: the induction period ( ti), the maximum precipitation rate ( Rmax), the number of particles per cm 3 ( N), the order ( p) and rate constants ( Kα, Ks) of the crystal growth process, the critical time ( taggr∗), the critical supersaturation ( Saggr∗) and the rate constant of aggregation ( kj) as well as the relative changes in the surface area ( ΔP/ P) and the degree of the reaction (Δα/α) due to aggregation. The information which these parameters yield on nucleation, crystal growth and aggregation is evaluated. The model is applied to the precipitation of calcium oxalate trihydrate (COT) from 0.3 molar sodium chloride solutions, with and without the presence of tryptophan or ornithine. At the given concentrations both aminoacids inhibit crystal growth and change the mode of aggregation of COT.

  3. Photoregulation of Biological Activity by Photochromic Reagents, IV. A Model for Diurnal Variation of Enzymic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Bieth, Joseph; Wassermann, Norbert; Vratsanos, Spyros M.; Erlanger, Bernard F.

    1970-01-01

    Levels of acetylcholinesterase activity can be made to vary in response to the presence or absence of sunlight in a system that can be considered as a model for photoperiodic processes found in nature. The enzyme is rendered photosensitive by the presence of a photochromic inhibitor, N-p-phenylazophenylcarbamyl choline, which changes from a trans to a cis isomer under the influence of the light of the sun and reverts back to the trans isomer in the dark. The two isomers differ in their ability acetylcholinesterase, thus rendering the enzyme system responsive to sunlight. The relationship of this system to photoresponsive processes in nature is discussed, and a possible role in photoregulation is suggested for naturally occurring carotenoids. PMID:5269248

  4. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology IV: statistics and model fitting.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-06-01

    This is the fourth in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  5. School Improvement in Petersburg: A Comprehensive Three-Year Study of the Partnership for Achieving Successful Schools Initiative Model IV Intervention. Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Joanna; Smith, Karen; Marr, Linda; Wyshynski, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Jo Lynne DeMary, Virginia's state superintendent of public instruction, requested that the Appalachia Educational Laboratory at Edvantia work in partnership with the Virginia Department of Education and Petersburg City Schools to design and test the Partnership for Achieving Successful Schools Initiative (PA+SS) Model IV Intervention. The goal…

  6. A model for the formation of the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, P.J.E.; Melott, A.L.; Holmes, M.R.; Jiang, L.R. Kansas Univ., Lawrence )

    1989-10-01

    Observational tests of a model for the formation of the Local Group are presented and analyzed in which the mass concentration grows by gravitational accretion of local-pressure matter onto two seed masses in an otherwise homogeneous initial mass distribution. The evolution of the mass distribution is studied in an analytic approximation and a numerical computation. The initial seed mass and separation are adjusted to produce the observed present separation and relative velocity of the Andromeda Nebula and the Galaxy. If H(0) is adjusted to about 80 km/s/Mpc with density parameter Omega = 1, then the model gives a good fit to the motions of the outer members of the Local Group. The same model gives particle orbits at radius of about 100 kpc that reasonably approximate the observed distribution of redshifts of the Galactic satellites. 47 refs.

  7. NMR Studies Demonstrate a Unique AAB Composition and Chain Register for a Heterotrimeric Type IV Collagen Model Peptide Containing a Natural Interruption Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Sun, Xiuxia; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    All non-fibrillar collagens contain interruptions in the (Gly-X-Y)n repeating sequence, such as the more than 20 interruptions found in chains of basement membrane type IV collagen. Two selectively doubly labeled peptides are designed to model a site in type IV collagen with a GVG interruption in the α1(IV) and a corresponding GISLK sequence within the α2(IV) chain. CD and NMR studies on a 2:1 mixture of these two peptides support the formation of a single-component heterotrimer that maintains the one-residue staggering in the triple-helix, has a unique chain register, and contains hydrogen bonds at the interruption site. Formation of hydrogen bonds at interruption sites may provide a driving force for self-assembly and chain register in type IV and other non-fibrillar collagens. This study illustrates the potential role of interruptions in the structure, dynamics, and folding of natural collagen heterotrimers and forms a basis for understanding their biological role. PMID:26209635

  8. Managing Model Data Introduced Uncertainties in Simulator Predictions for Generation IV Systems via Optimum Experimental Design

    SciTech Connect

    Turinsky, Paul J; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S; Stover, Tracy E

    2011-03-31

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept’s core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment

  9. Relationships between convective storms and their environment in AVE IV determined from a three-dimensional subsynoptic-scale, trajectory model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes interrelationships between synoptic-scale and convective-scale systems obtained by following individual air parcels as they traveled within the convective storm environment of AVE IV. (NASA's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment, AVE IV, was a 36-hour study in April 1975 of the atmospheric variability and structure in regions of convective storms.) A three-dimensional trajectory model was used to calculate parcel paths, and manually digitized radar was employed to locate convective activity of various intensities and to determine those trajectories that traversed the storm environment. Spatial and temporal interrelationships are demonstrated by reference to selected time periods of AVE IV which contain the development and movement of the squall line in which the Neosho tornado was created.

  10. Collective behavior in animal groups: theoretical models and empirical studies

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Collective phenomena in animal groups have attracted much attention in the last years, becoming one of the hottest topics in ethology. There are various reasons for this. On the one hand, animal grouping provides a paradigmatic example of self-organization, where collective behavior emerges in absence of centralized control. The mechanism of group formation, where local rules for the individuals lead to a coherent global state, is very general and transcends the detailed nature of its components. In this respect, collective animal behavior is a subject of great interdisciplinary interest. On the other hand, there are several important issues related to the biological function of grouping and its evolutionary success. Research in this field boasts a number of theoretical models, but much less empirical results to compare with. For this reason, even if the general mechanisms through which self-organization is achieved are qualitatively well understood, a quantitative test of the models assumptions is still lacking. New analysis on large groups, which require sophisticated technological procedures, can provide the necessary empirical data. PMID:19404431

  11. Work group diversity and group performance: an integrative model and research agenda.

    PubMed

    van Knippenberg, Daan; De Dreu, Carsten K W; Homan, Astrid C

    2004-12-01

    Research on the relationship between work group diversity and performance has yielded inconsistent results. To address this problem, the authors propose the categorization-elaboration model (CEM), which reconceptualizes and integrates information/decision making and social categorization perspectives on work-group diversity and performance. The CEM incorporates mediator and moderator variables that typically have been ignored in diversity research and incorporates the view that information/decision making and social categorization processes interact such that intergroup biases flowing from social categorization disrupt the elaboration (in-depth processing) of task-relevant information and perspectives. In addition, the authors propose that attempts to link the positive and negative effects of diversity to specific types of diversity should be abandoned in favor of the assumption that all dimensions of diversity may have positive as well as negative effects. The ways in which these propositions may set the agenda for future research in diversity are discussed.

  12. Obstacle avoidance in social groups: new insights from asynchronous models.

    PubMed

    Croft, Simon; Budgey, Richard; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Wood, A Jamie

    2015-05-01

    For moving animals, the successful avoidance of hazardous obstacles is an important capability. Despite this, few models of collective motion have addressed the relationship between behavioural and social features and obstacle avoidance. We develop an asynchronous individual-based model for social movement which allows social structure within groups to be included. We assess the dynamics of group navigation and resulting collision risk in the context of information transfer through the system. In agreement with previous work, we find that group size has a nonlinear effect on collision risk. We implement examples of possible network structures to explore the impact social preferences have on collision risk. We show that any social heterogeneity induces greater obstacle avoidance with further improvements corresponding to groups containing fewer influential individuals. The model provides a platform for both further theoretical investigation and practical application. In particular, we argue that the role of social structures within bird flocks may have an important role to play in assessing the risk of collisions with wind turbines, but that new methods of data analysis are needed to identify these social structures.

  13. Obstacle avoidance in social groups: new insights from asynchronous models

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Simon; Budgey, Richard; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Wood, A. Jamie

    2015-01-01

    For moving animals, the successful avoidance of hazardous obstacles is an important capability. Despite this, few models of collective motion have addressed the relationship between behavioural and social features and obstacle avoidance. We develop an asynchronous individual-based model for social movement which allows social structure within groups to be included. We assess the dynamics of group navigation and resulting collision risk in the context of information transfer through the system. In agreement with previous work, we find that group size has a nonlinear effect on collision risk. We implement examples of possible network structures to explore the impact social preferences have on collision risk. We show that any social heterogeneity induces greater obstacle avoidance with further improvements corresponding to groups containing fewer influential individuals. The model provides a platform for both further theoretical investigation and practical application. In particular, we argue that the role of social structures within bird flocks may have an important role to play in assessing the risk of collisions with wind turbines, but that new methods of data analysis are needed to identify these social structures. PMID:25833245

  14. Obstacle avoidance in social groups: new insights from asynchronous models.

    PubMed

    Croft, Simon; Budgey, Richard; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Wood, A Jamie

    2015-05-01

    For moving animals, the successful avoidance of hazardous obstacles is an important capability. Despite this, few models of collective motion have addressed the relationship between behavioural and social features and obstacle avoidance. We develop an asynchronous individual-based model for social movement which allows social structure within groups to be included. We assess the dynamics of group navigation and resulting collision risk in the context of information transfer through the system. In agreement with previous work, we find that group size has a nonlinear effect on collision risk. We implement examples of possible network structures to explore the impact social preferences have on collision risk. We show that any social heterogeneity induces greater obstacle avoidance with further improvements corresponding to groups containing fewer influential individuals. The model provides a platform for both further theoretical investigation and practical application. In particular, we argue that the role of social structures within bird flocks may have an important role to play in assessing the risk of collisions with wind turbines, but that new methods of data analysis are needed to identify these social structures. PMID:25833245

  15. Determination of Uncertainties for +III and +IV Actinide Solubilities in the WIPP Geochemistry Model for the 2009 Compliance Recertification Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. E.; Xiong, Y.; Nowak, E. J.; Brush, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository in southeast New Mexico for defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. Every five years, the DOE is required to submit an application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) demonstrating the WIPP’s continuing compliance with the applicable EPA regulations governing the repository. Part of this recertification effort involves a performance assessment—a probabilistic evaluation of the repository performance with respect to regulatory limits on the amount of releases from the repository to the accessible environment. One of the models used as part of the performance assessment process is a geochemistry model, which predicts solubilities of the radionuclides in the brines that may enter the repository in the different scenarios considered by the performance assessment. The dissolved actinide source term comprises actinide solubilities, which are input parameters for modeling the transport of radionuclides as a result of brine flow through and from the repository. During a performance assessment, the solubilities are modeled as the product of a “base” solubility determined from calculations based on the chemical conditions expected in the repository, and an uncertainty factor that describes the potential deviations of the model from expected behavior. We will focus here on a discussion of the uncertainties. To compute a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the uncertainties, we compare published, experimentally measured solubility data to predictions made using the established WIPP geochemistry model. The differences between the solubilities observed for a given experiment and the calculated solubilities from the model are used to form the overall CDF, which is then sampled as part of the performance assessment. We will discuss the methodology used to update the CDF’s for the +III actinides, obtained from data for Nd, Am, and Cm, and the +IV actinides, obtained

  16. Cocaine self-administration punished by i.v. histamine in rat models of high and low drug abuse vulnerability: effects of saccharin preference, impulsivity, and sex.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Anker, Justin J; Regier, Paul S; Claxton, Alex; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2013-10-01

    A key feature of substance use disorders is continued drug consumption despite aversive consequences. This has been modeled in the animal laboratory by pairing drug self-administration with electric shock, thereby punishing drug intake (Deroche-Gamonet et al. 2004). In the present experiments, we examined the effects of punishment on i.v. cocaine self-administration by adding histamine to the cocaine solution with three different animal models of high and low vulnerability to drug abuse: rats selectively bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin consumption, rats selected for high (HiI) and low (LoI) impulsivity, and sex differences. Animals were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) to establish a baseline of operant responding. Histamine (4.0mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution and its consequent effects on self-administration were compared to baseline. The histamine+cocaine solution was then replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and the rats' operant responding was again compared to baseline. Concurrent histamine exposure was effective in reducing cocaine consumption in all groups of rats; however, LoS and female rats took longer to return to baseline levels of cocaine consumption after histamine was removed compared to HiS and male rats. These data suggest that the reduction of drug self-administration by aversive consequences may differ in groups that vary in drug use vulnerability . Such results may inform pharmacological strategies that enhance the negative aspects of drug consumption.

  17. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part IV: Improvement in the pressure distribution modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Fernàndez del Rincòn, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out by comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory global, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure distribution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with

  18. On the standard model group in F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kang-Sin

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the standard model gauge group constructed in F-theory. The non-Abelian part is described by a surface singularity of Kodaira type. Blow-up analysis shows that the non-Abelian part is distinguished from the naïve product of and , but that it should be a rank three group along the chain of groups, because it has non-generic gauge symmetry enhancement structure responsible for desirable matter curves. The Abelian part is constructed from a globally valid two-form with the desired gauge quantum numbers, using a similar method to the decomposition (factorization) method of the spectral cover. This technique makes use of an extra section in the elliptic fiber of the Calabi-Yau manifold, on which F-theory is compactified. Conventional gauge coupling unification of is achieved, without requiring a threshold correction from the flux along the hypercharge direction.

  19. Group association test using a hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yichen; Dai, James Y; Kooperberg, Charles

    2016-04-01

    In the genomic era, group association tests are of great interest. Due to the overwhelming number of individual genomic features, the power of testing for association of a single genomic feature at a time is often very small, as are the effect sizes for most features. Many methods have been proposed to test association of a trait with a group of features within a functional unit as a whole, e.g. all SNPs in a gene, yet few of these methods account for the fact that generally a substantial proportion of the features are not associated with the trait. In this paper, we propose to model the association for each feature in the group as a mixture of features with no association and features with non-zero associations to explicitly account for the possibility that a fraction of features may not be associated with the trait while other features in the group are. The feature-level associations are first estimated by generalized linear models; the sequence of these estimated associations is then modeled by a hidden Markov chain. To test for global association, we develop a modified likelihood ratio test based on a log-likelihood function that ignores higher order dependency plus a penalty term. We derive the asymptotic distribution of the likelihood ratio test under the null hypothesis. Furthermore, we obtain the posterior probability of association for each feature, which provides evidence of feature-level association and is useful for potential follow-up studies. In simulations and data application, we show that our proposed method performs well when compared with existing group association tests especially when there are only few features associated with the outcome. PMID:26420797

  20. Stochastic group selection model for the evolution of altruism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana T. C.; Fontanari, J. F.

    We study numerically and analytically a stochastic group selection model in which a population of asexually reproducing individuals, each of which can be either altruist or non-altruist, is subdivided into M reproductively isolated groups (demes) of size N. The cost associated with being altruistic is modelled by assigning the fitness 1- τ, with τ∈[0,1], to the altruists and the fitness 1 to the non-altruists. In the case that the altruistic disadvantage τ is not too large, we show that the finite M fluctuations are small and practically do not alter the deterministic results obtained for M→∞. However, for large τ these fluctuations greatly increase the instability of the altruistic demes to mutations. These results may be relevant to the dynamics of parasite-host systems and, in particular, to explain the importance of mutation in the evolution of parasite virulence.

  1. A group decision-making model for siting LULUs

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, C.H.; Wu, S.; Sheu, H.J.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a group decision-making model for siting locally unwanted land uses (LULUs) such as hazardous and nonhazardous solid waste landfills. The new model is based on fuzzy set theory, which has been proven to be effective and efficient in handling ambiguous information such as opinions expressed by a panel of representatives with diverse backgrounds. The model involves an operation called fuzzy weighted average (FWA) for aggregating opinions. The weights used in the FWA operation are determined by the entropy method. Entropy is a measure of the uncertainty associated with a piece of information such as an opinion. By measuring the entropy of each of the opinions to be aggregated, the weight of each opinion may be objectively determined. The result of the FWA operation may be used to aid in making decisions. Examples are presented to illustrate the proposed model.

  2. Tensor renormalization group methods for spin and gauge models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haiyuan

    The analysis of the error of perturbative series by comparing it to the exact solution is an important tool to understand the non-perturbative physics of statistical models. For some toy models, a new method can be used to calculate higher order weak coupling expansion and modified perturbation theory can be constructed. However, it is nontrivial to generalize the new method to understand the critical behavior of high dimensional spin and gauge models. Actually, it is a big challenge in both high energy physics and condensed matter physics to develop accurate and efficient numerical algorithms to solve these problems. In this thesis, one systematic way named tensor renormalization group method is discussed. The applications of the method to several spin and gauge models on a lattice are investigated. theoretically, the new method allows one to write an exact representation of the partition function of models with local interactions. E.g. O(N) models, Z2 gauge models and U(1) gauge models. Practically, by using controllable approximations, results in both finite volume and the thermodynamic limit can be obtained. Another advantage of the new method is that it is insensitive to sign problems for models with complex coupling and chemical potential. Through the new approach, the Fisher's zeros of the 2D O(2) model in the complex coupling plane can be calculated and the finite size scaling of the results agrees well with the Kosterlitz-Thouless assumption. Applying the method to the O(2) model with a chemical potential, new phase diagram of the models can be obtained. The structure of the tensor language may provide a new tool to understand phase transition properties in general.

  3. Density matrix renormalization group approach to the massive Schwinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, T. M.; Sriganesh, P.; Bursill, R. J.; Hamer, C. J.

    2002-07-01

    The massive Schwinger model is studied using a density matrix renormalization group approach to the staggered lattice Hamiltonian version of the model. Lattice sizes up to 256 sites are calculated, and the estimates in the continuum limit are almost two orders of magnitude more accurate than previous calculations. Coleman's picture of ``half-asymptotic'' particles at a background field θ=π is confirmed. The predicted phase transition at finite fermion mass (m/g) is accurately located and demonstrated to belong in the 2D Ising universality class.

  4. The monster sporadic group and a theory underlying superstring models

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1996-09-01

    The pattern of duality symmetries acting on the states of compactified superstring models reinforces an earlier suggestion that the Monster sporadic group is a hidden symmetry for superstring models. This in turn points to a supersymmetric theory of self-dual and anti-self-dual K3 manifolds joined by Dirac strings and evolving in a 13 dimensional spacetime as the fundamental theory. In addition to the usual graviton and dilaton this theory contains matter-like degrees of freedom resembling the massless states of the heterotic string, thus providing a completely geometric interpretation for ordinary matter. 25 refs.

  5. Discovering associations among diagnosis groups using topic modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ding Cheng; Thermeau, Terry; Chute, Christopher; Liu, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid growth of electronic medical records (EMR), there is an increasing need of automatically extract patterns or rules from EMR data with machine learning and data mining technqiues. In this work, we applied unsupervised statistical model, latent Dirichlet allocations (LDA), to cluster patient diagnoics groups from Rochester Epidemiology Projects (REP). The initial results show that LDA holds the potential for broad application in epidemiogloy as well as other biomedical studies due to its unsupervised nature and great interpretive power. PMID:25954576

  6. A model for amalgamation in group decision making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Montero, Javier

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we present a generalization of the model proposed by Montero, by allowing non-complete fuzzy binary relations for individuals. A degree of unsatisfaction can be defined in this case, suggesting that any democratic aggregation rule should take into account not only ethical conditions or some degree of rationality in the amalgamating procedure, but also a minimum support for the set of alternatives subject to the group analysis.

  7. Discovering Associations Among Diagnosis Groups Using Topic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ding Cheng; Thermeau, Terry; Chute, Christopher; Liu, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid growth of electronic medical records (EMR), there is an increasing need of automatically extract patterns or rules from EMR data with machine learning and data mining technqiues. In this work, we applied unsupervised statistical model, latent Dirichlet allocations (LDA), to cluster patient diagnoics groups from Rochester Epidemiology Projects (REP). The initial results show that LDA holds the potential for broad application in epidemiogloy as well as other biomedical studies due to its unsupervised nature and great interpretive power. PMID:25954576

  8. Saturation Group Psychotherapy in A Weekend Clinic: An Outcome Study. A Goal-Oriented Group Therapy Model for A Saturation Format. Therapists Participation in Saturation Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernallis, Francis F.; And Others

    Saturation Group Therapy was conducted on a small group of patients for 16 consecutive weekends with 15 hours of group therapy each weekend. The subjects all had recognizable psychiatric problems. Three separate papers are included: (1) the patients' participation, (2) therapists' participation, and (3) a goal-oriented group therapy model for a…

  9. Tensor renormalization group approach to classical dimer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Krishanu; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2015-05-01

    We analyze classical dimer models on a square and a triangular lattice using a tensor network representation of the dimers. The correlation functions are numerically calculated using the recently developed "tensor renormalization group" (TRG) technique. The partition function for the dimer problem can be calculated exactly by the Pfaffian method, which is used here as a platform for comparing the numerical results. The TRG approach turns out to be a powerful tool for describing gapped systems with exponentially decaying correlations very efficiently due to its fast convergence. This is the case for the dimer model on the triangular lattice. However, the convergence becomes very slow and unstable in the case of the square lattice where the model has algebraically decaying correlations. We highlight these aspects with numerical simulations and critically appraise the robustness of the TRG approach by contrasting the results for small and large system sizes against the exact calculations. Furthermore, we benchmark our TRG results with the classical Monte Carlo method.

  10. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    SciTech Connect

    Gillmann, Clarissa; Jäkel, Oliver; Schlampp, Ingmar; Karger, Christian P.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  11. Synthesis of tyrosine-involved corrole Cu(III), Mn(IV), and Mn(III) complexes as biomimetic models of oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, M.; Gao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Boc-protected tyrosine-attached corrole ligand on the " ortho" position compound 3, its corresponding copper (III) 4a, manganese (IV) 4b, and manganese (III) 4c complexes have been designed and synthesized based on the structures of active-centers of related biological systems. 1H NMR and electronic absorption spectra of these metal complexes are investigated. The crystal structure of 4a displays the relative position of TyrOH unit to the high valent metal center. Electrochemistry investigations display the possibilities of intramolecular electron or energy transfer between TyrOH group and metal corrole group.

  12. Structural characterization of the mesangial cell type IV collagenase and enhanced expression in a model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, D. H.; Johnson, R. J.; Marti, H. P.; Martin, J.; Davies, M.; Couser, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Secretion of glomerular cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their specific inhibitors, TIMP-1,2, may play an important role in the turnover of the glomerular extracellular matrix under basal and pathologic conditions. A 66-68 kd MMP secreted by cultured mesangial cells (MC) with activity against Type IV collagen and gelatin was purified and shown by amino-acid sequence analysis to be identical with a Type IV collagenase/gelatinase secreted by certain transformed tumor cell lines. The expression of the mesangial MMP in vivo was limited within the kidney to a small subset of the intrinsic glomerular mesangial cell population. After induction of acute anti-Thy 1.1 glomerulonephritis, there was a large increment in the number of Type IV collagenase-secreting MC, temporally coincident with the development of mesangial hypercellularity. The expression of the MMP inhibitor protein, TIMP-1, was not changed over this period. Ultrastructural studies localized the mesangial MMP to areas of evolving mesangiolysis and at sites of glomerular basement membrane disruption. Enhanced expression of the mesangial cell-derived Type IV collagenase may contribute to the evolution of glomerular injury in this model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis or may be involved in the extensive matrix remodeling process that accompanies this form of glomerular injury. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 and Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:1321565

  13. Polymer-bound oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes as catalysts for the oxidative desulfurization of model fuel diesel.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Mannar R; Arya, Aarti; Kumar, Amit; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Avecilla, Fernando; Costa Pessoa, João

    2010-07-19

    The Schiff base (Hfsal-dmen) derived from 3-formylsalicylic acid and N,N-dimethyl ethylenediamine has been covalently bonded to chloromethylated polystyrene to give the polymer-bound ligand, PS-Hfsal-dmen (I). Treatment of PS-Hfsal-dmen with [V(IV)O(acac)(2)] in the presence of MeOH gave the oxidovanadium(IV) complex PS-[V(IV)O(fsal-dmen)(MeO)] (1). On aerial oxidation in methanol, complex 1 was oxidized to PS-[V(V)O(2)(fsal-dmen)] (2). The corresponding neat complexes, [V(IV)O(sal-dmen)(acac)] (3) and [V(V)O(2)(sal-dmen)] (4) were similarly prepared. All these complexes are characterized by various spectroscopic techniques (IR, electronic, NMR, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)) and thermal as well as field-emission scanning electron micrographs (FE-SEM) studies, and the molecular structures of 3 and 4 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The EPR spectrum of the polymer supported V(IV)O-complex 1 is characteristic of magnetically diluted V(IV)O-complexes, the resolved EPR pattern indicating that the V(IV)O-centers are well dispersed in the polymer matrix. A good (51)V NMR spectrum could also be measured with 4 suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the chemical shift (-503 ppm) being compatible with a VO(2)(+)-center and a N,O binding set. The catalytic oxidative desulfurization of organosulfur compounds thiophene, dibenzothiophene, benzothiophene, and 2-methyl thiophene (model of fuel diesel) was carried out using complexes 1 and 2. The sulfur in model organosulfur compounds oxidizes to the corresponding sulfone in the presence of H(2)O(2). The systems 1 and 2 do not loose efficiency for sulfoxidation at least up to the third cycle of reaction, this indicating that they preserve their integrity under the conditions used. Plausible intermediates involved in these catalytic processes are established by UV-vis, EPR, (51)V NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) studies, and an outline of the mechanism is proposed. The (51)V NMR spectra

  14. The Task Demonstration Model: A Concurrent Model for Teaching Groups of Students with Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsh, Kathryn G.; Repp, Alan C.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the use of the Task Demonstration Model (TDM) with 3 groups of students (ages 16-21) with severe or moderate retardation and compared it with the Standard Prompting Hierarchy. Percent and rate of correct responses indicate that TDM can be effective in a concurrent model of group instruction. (Author/JDD)

  15. Exploring the Impact of Students' Learning Approach on Collaborative Group Modeling of Blood Circulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shinyoung; Kang, Eunhee; Kim, Heui-Baik

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect on group dynamics of statements associated with deep learning approaches (DLA) and their contribution to cognitive collaboration and model development during group modeling of blood circulation. A group was selected for an in-depth analysis of collaborative group modeling. This group constructed a model in a…

  16. Adsorption of thorium(IV) from simulated radioactive solutions using a novel electrospun PVA/TiO2/ZnO nanofiber adsorbent functionalized with mercapto groups: Study in single and multi-component systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Dariush; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Moosavian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-03-01

    The novel polyvinyl alcohol/titanium oxide/zinc oxide (PVA/TiO2/ZnO) nanofiber adsorbent functionalized with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (TMPTMS) was prepared by electrospinning method and its potential was investigated for the adsorption of thorium from single and multi-metal aqueous solutions. The prepared adsorbent was characterized by FTIR, SEM and BET analysis. The influences of different operational parameters such as pH, ionic strength, equilibrium time, initial concentration and temperature were studied in batch mode. Investigation of ionic strength effect showed that the addition of NaNO3 to metal solution has a slight effect on the thorium adsorption, whereas pH value has a serious effect on the thorium adsorption at pH values lower than 4. The double-exponential model described the adsorption of Th(IV) ions much better than other kinetic models within both the single and multi-component systems. Among various isotherm models used, the equilibrium data of Th(IV) conformed the Langmuir isotherm in the single system, while those were best fitted by Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm in multi-component system. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔG° indicated that the nature of adsorption process was spontaneous, endothermic and thermodynamically favored. The inhibitory effect of other metal ions on the adsorption capacity of Th(IV) was in order of Al(III) > Cu(II) > Cd(II) > Ni(II) > U(VI) > Fe(II).

  17. Group-based modeling of ecological trajectories in restored wetlands.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-01

    Repeated measures taken at the same restoration sites over time are used to describe restoration trajectories and identify sites that are trending toward unexpected outcomes. Analogously, social scientists use repeated measures of individuals to describe developmental trajectories of behaviors or other outcomes. Group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM) is one statistical method used in behavioral and health sciences for this purpose. I introduce the use of GBTM to identify clusters of similar restoration trajectories within a sample of sites. Data collected at 54 restored wetlands in Illinois for up to 15 years post-restoration were used to describe trajectories of six indicators: plant species richness, number of Carex (sedge) species, mean coefficient of conservatism (mean C), native plant cover, perennial plant cover, and planted species cover. For each indicator, I used GBTM to classify wetlands into three to four groups with distinct trajectories. In general, cover by native and planted species declined, while species richness and mean C increased over time or peaked then declined. Site context and management may explain trajectory group membership. Specifically, wetlands restored more recently and those restored within forested contexts were more likely to follow increasing trajectories. I show GBTM to be useful for identifying typical restoration trajectory patterns, developing hypotheses regarding factors driving those patterns and pinpointing critical times for intervention. Furthermore, GBTM might be applied more broadly in ecological research to identify common patterns of community assembly in large numbers of plots or sites.

  18. 45 CFR 310.10 - What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES... process the actions in the support collection and paternity determination processes under the Tribal IV-D plan, including: (1) Identifying information such as Social Security numbers, names, dates of...

  19. 45 CFR 310.10 - What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES... process the actions in the support collection and paternity determination processes under the Tribal IV-D plan, including: (1) Identifying information such as Social Security numbers, names, dates of...

  20. 45 CFR 310.10 - What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES... process the actions in the support collection and paternity determination processes under the Tribal IV-D plan, including: (1) Identifying information such as Social Security numbers, names, dates of...

  1. Lymantria dispar iflavirus 1 (LdIV1), a new model to study iflaviral persistence in lepidopterans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cell line IPLB-LD-652Y derived from the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar, Linn.) is routinely used to study insect virus-host interactions. Here we report the full genome sequence and biological characteristics of a small RNA virus, designated Lymantria dispar iflavirus 1 (LdIV1), that was discovere...

  2. A comparative study of the clinical efficacy and safety of agomelatine with escitalopram in major depressive disorder patients: A randomized, parallel-group, phase IV study

    PubMed Central

    Urade, Chetan S.; Mahakalkar, Sunil M.; Tiple, Prashant G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of agomelatine with escitalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), improve sleep in MDD patients and study the adverse effects of agomelatine. Materials and Methods: Randomized, parallel-group, open-label study. The primary efficacy outcome was change from baseline to last post-baseline value in Hamilton depression rating scale and Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire scale. Both parametric and nonparametric tests were applied for analysis. Results: Within-group and between-groups comparison of the mean HAMD17 scores showed statistically significant changes (P < 0.0001). Escitalopram showed early onset of response and remission compared to agomelatine at 10th week (P < 0.0001) and 14th week (P < 0.0001), respectively. In agomelatine, within-group and between-groups change of the mean LSEQ score was statistically significant at subsequent follow-up visits (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Escitalopram is superior to agomelatine in efficacy, considering the early response, early remission, and better relief from symptoms of MDD in adults. Agomelatine may be preferred in MDD patients having insomnia as a predominant symptom. Liver function monitoring should be done in patients on long-term agomelatine therapy. PMID:26813706

  3. One decade of the Data Fusion Information Group (DFIG) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik

    2015-05-01

    The revision of the Joint Directors of the Laboratories (JDL) Information Fusion model in 2004 discussed information processing, incorporated the analyst, and was coined the Data Fusion Information Group (DFIG) model. Since that time, developments in information technology (e.g., cloud computing, applications, and multimedia) have altered the role of the analyst. Data production has outpaced the analyst; however the analyst still has the role of data refinement and information reporting. In this paper, we highlight three examples being addressed by the DFIG model. One example is the role of the analyst to provide semantic queries (through an ontology) so that vast amount of data available can be indexed, accessed, retrieved, and processed. The second idea is reporting which requires the analyst to collect the data into a condensed and meaningful form through information management. The last example is the interpretation of the resolved information from data that must include contextual information not inherent in the data itself. Through a literature review, the DFIG developments in the last decade demonstrate the usability of the DFIG model to bring together the user (analyst or operator) and the machine (information fusion or manager) in a systems design.

  4. The group-as-a-whole-object relations model of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D; Stukenberg, K W; Saeks, S

    2001-01-01

    The authors review the theoretical basis of group psychotherapy performed at The Menninger Clinic and demonstrate how the theory has been put into practice on two different types of inpatient units. The fundamental elements of the theory and practice used can be traced to object relations theory as originally proposed by Melanie Klein. Her work with individuals was directly applied to working with groups by Ezriel and Bion, who focused on interpreting group tension. More modern approaches have reintegrated working with individual concerns while also attending to the group-as-a-whole. Historically, these principles have been applied to long-term group treatment. The authors apply the concepts from the group-as-a-whole literature to short- and medium-length inpatient groups with open membership. They offer clinical examples of the application of these principles in short-term inpatient settings in groups with open membership.

  5. The group-as-a-whole-object relations model of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D; Stukenberg, K W; Saeks, S

    2001-01-01

    The authors review the theoretical basis of group psychotherapy performed at The Menninger Clinic and demonstrate how the theory has been put into practice on two different types of inpatient units. The fundamental elements of the theory and practice used can be traced to object relations theory as originally proposed by Melanie Klein. Her work with individuals was directly applied to working with groups by Ezriel and Bion, who focused on interpreting group tension. More modern approaches have reintegrated working with individual concerns while also attending to the group-as-a-whole. Historically, these principles have been applied to long-term group treatment. The authors apply the concepts from the group-as-a-whole literature to short- and medium-length inpatient groups with open membership. They offer clinical examples of the application of these principles in short-term inpatient settings in groups with open membership. PMID:11761492

  6. Renormalization group analysis of a fermionic hot-spot model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitsitt, Seth; Sachdev, Subir

    2014-09-01

    We present a renormalization group (RG) analysis of a fermionic "hot-spot" model of interacting electrons on the square lattice. We truncate the Fermi-surface excitations to linearly dispersing quasiparticles in the vicinity of eight hot spots on the Fermi surface, with each hot spot separated from another by the wave vector (π,π). This is motivated by the importance of these Fermi-surface locations to the onset of antiferromagnetic order; however, we allow for all possible quartic interactions between the fermions, and also for all possible ordering instabilities. We compute the RG equations for our model, which depend on whether or not the hot spots are perfectly nested, and relate our results to earlier models. We also compute the RG flow of the relevant order parameters for both Hubbard and J,V interactions, and present our results for the dominant instabilities in the nested and non-nested cases. In particular, we find that non-nested hot spots with J,V interactions have competing singlet dx2-y2 superconducting and d-form factor incommensurate density wave instabilities. We also investigate the enhancement of incommensurate density waves near experimentally observed wave vectors, and find dominant d-form factor enhancement for a range of couplings.

  7. A maximum entropy model for opinions in social groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; Navarrete, Yasmín; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2014-04-01

    We study how the opinions of a group of individuals determine their spatial distribution and connectivity, through an agent-based model. The interaction between agents is described by a Hamiltonian in which agents are allowed to move freely without an underlying lattice (the average network topology connecting them is determined from the parameters). This kind of model was derived using maximum entropy statistical inference under fixed expectation values of certain probabilities that (we propose) are relevant to social organization. Control parameters emerge as Lagrange multipliers of the maximum entropy problem, and they can be associated with the level of consequence between the personal beliefs and external opinions, and the tendency to socialize with peers of similar or opposing views. These parameters define a phase diagram for the social system, which we studied using Monte Carlo Metropolis simulations. Our model presents both first and second-order phase transitions, depending on the ratio between the internal consequence and the interaction with others. We have found a critical value for the level of internal consequence, below which the personal beliefs of the agents seem to be irrelevant.

  8. Sensitivity in forward modeled hyperspectral reflectance due to phytoplankton groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana; Pinardi, Monica; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton is an integral part of the ecosystem, affecting trophic dynamics, nutrient cycling, habitat condition, and fisheries resources. The types of phytoplankton and their concentrations are used to describe the status of water and the processes inside of this. This study investigates bio-optical modeling of phytoplankton functional types (PFT) in terms of pigment composition demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to recognize freshwater phytoplankton. In particular, a sensitivity analysis of simulated hyperspectral water reflectance (with band setting of HICO, APEX, EnMAP, PRISMA and Sentinel-3) of productive eutrophic waters of Mantua lakes (Italy) environment is presented. The bio-optical model adopted for simulating the hyperspectral water reflectance takes into account the reflectance dependency on geometric conditions of light field, on inherent optical properties (backscattering and absorption coefficients) and on concentrations of water quality parameters (WQPs). The model works in the 400-750nm wavelength range, while the model parametrization is based on a comprehensive dataset of WQP concentrations and specific inherent optical properties of the study area, collected in field surveys carried out from May to September of 2011 and 2014. The following phytoplankton groups, with their specific absorption coefficients, a*Φi(λ), were used during the simulation: Chlorophyta, Cyanobacteria with phycocyanin, Cyanobacteria and Cryptophytes with phycoerythrin, Diatoms with carotenoids and mixed phytoplankton. The phytoplankton absorption coefficient aΦ(λ) is modelled by multiplying the weighted sum of the PFTs, Σpia*Φi(λ), with the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a). To highlight the variability of water reflectance due to variation of phytoplankton pigments, the sensitivity analysis was performed by keeping constant the WQPs (i.e., Chl-a=80mg/l, total suspended matter=12.58g/l and yellow substances=0.27m-1). The sensitivity analysis was

  9. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Relationships Between the Five-Factor Model and DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders: A Facet Level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Douglas B.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Theory and research have suggested that the personality disorders contained within the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) can be understood as maladaptive variants of the personality traits included within the five-factor model (FFM). The current meta-analysis of FFM personality disorder research both replicated and extended the 2004 work of Saulsman and Page (The five-factor model and personality disorder empirical literature: A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1055-1085) through a facet-level analysis that provides a more specific and nuanced description of each DSM-IV-TR personality disorder. The empirical FFM profiles generated for each personality disorder were generally congruent at the facet level with hypothesized FFM translations of the DSM-IV-TR personality disorders. However, notable exceptions to the hypotheses did occur and even some findings that were consistent with FFM theory could be said to be instrument specific. PMID:18708274

  10. Working Group Reports: Working Group 1 - Software Systems Design and Implementation for Environmental Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Interagency Steering Committee on Multimedia Environmental Modeling (ISCMEM) is to foster the exchange of information about environmental modeling tools, modeling frameworks, and environmental monitoring databases that are all in the public domain. It is compos...

  11. Testing Group Mean Differences of Latent Variables in Multilevel Data Using Multiple-Group Multilevel CFA and Multilevel MIMIC Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Sook; Cao, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Considering that group comparisons are common in social science, we examined two latent group mean testing methods when groups of interest were either at the between or within level of multilevel data: multiple-group multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MG ML CFA) and multilevel multiple-indicators multiple-causes modeling (ML MIMIC). The performance of these methods were investigated through three Monte Carlo studies. In Studies 1 and 2, either factor variances or residual variances were manipulated to be heterogeneous between groups. In Study 3, which focused on within-level multiple-group analysis, six different model specifications were considered depending on how to model the intra-class group correlation (i.e., correlation between random effect factors for groups within cluster). The results of simulations generally supported the adequacy of MG ML CFA and ML MIMIC for multiple-group analysis with multilevel data. The two methods did not show any notable difference in the latent group mean testing across three studies. Finally, a demonstration with real data and guidelines in selecting an appropriate approach to multilevel multiple-group analysis are provided.

  12. A Model for Group Treatment of Adults Molested as Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Shirley; McBride, Martha C.

    It has been estimated that 85% of all women seeking therapy are adults molested as children (AMACs). Group counseling with AMACs is recommended, with groups having homogeneity in terms of presenting problems and heterogeneity in group members' ability to deal with their sexual abuse. Groups should be closed, meet once or twice a week for 2-hour…

  13. Modeling phytoplankton community in reservoirs. A comparison between taxonomic and functional groups-based models.

    PubMed

    Di Maggio, Jimena; Fernández, Carolina; Parodi, Elisa R; Diaz, M Soledad; Estrada, Vanina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we address the formulation of two mechanistic water quality models that differ in the way the phytoplankton community is described. We carry out parameter estimation subject to differential-algebraic constraints and validation for each model and comparison between models performance. The first approach aggregates phytoplankton species based on their phylogenetic characteristics (Taxonomic group model) and the second one, on their morpho-functional properties following Reynolds' classification (Functional group model). The latter approach takes into account tolerance and sensitivity to environmental conditions. The constrained parameter estimation problems are formulated within an equation oriented framework, with a maximum likelihood objective function. The study site is Paso de las Piedras Reservoir (Argentina), which supplies water for consumption for 450,000 population. Numerical results show that phytoplankton morpho-functional groups more closely represent each species growth requirements within the group. Each model performance is quantitatively assessed by three diagnostic measures. Parameter estimation results for seasonal dynamics of the phytoplankton community and main biogeochemical variables for a one-year time horizon are presented and compared for both models, showing the functional group model enhanced performance. Finally, we explore increasing nutrient loading scenarios and predict their effect on phytoplankton dynamics throughout a one-year time horizon.

  14. Group chase and escape model with chasers' interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takuya; Nakamura, Tomomichi; Ohira, Toru

    2016-04-01

    Group chase and escape is a new direction of studying collective behaviors merged with the traditional mathematical problems of chases and escapes proposed by Kamimura and Ohira in 2010. In their model, the chasers recognize only the escapees and pursue the nearest neighbor escapee, and the escapees recognize only the chasers and flee from the nearest neighbor chaser. We call the basic moving rule the nearest opponent interaction (NOI) strategy. In this paper we introduce a new strategy in the model. It is a local interaction that the chasers do not get too close each other, where we call the chasers' local interaction (CLI) strategy. The result of comparisons of the two strategies shows that when the number of the chasers is relatively small compared to the number of the escapees, the trapping time by the CLI strategy is much shorter than that by the NOI strategy. On the other hand, when the number of the chasers is larger than that of the escapees, this advantage of the CLI strategy does not appear. Also, we find that although chasers form clusters (spatial aggregates of chasers) when we apply the NOI strategy, the clusters appear less when we apply the CLI strategy.

  15. Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group (IV): Basic principles and parameters for MR imaging within the frame of image based adaptive cervix cancer brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C A; Petrow, Peter; Tanderup, Kari; Petric, Primoz; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pedersen, Erik M; van Limbergen, Erik; Haie-Meder, Christine; Pötter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    The GYN GEC-ESTRO working group issued three parts of recommendations and highlighted the pivotal role of MRI for the successful implementation of 3D image-based cervical cancer brachytherapy (BT). The main advantage of MRI as an imaging modality is its superior soft tissue depiction quality. To exploit the full potential of MRI for the better ability of the radiation oncologist to make the appropriate choice for the BT application technique and to accurately define the target volumes and the organs at risk, certain MR imaging criteria have to be fulfilled. Technical requirements, patient preparation, as well as image acquisition protocols have to be tailored to the needs of 3D image-based BT. The present recommendation is focused on the general principles of MR imaging for 3D image-based BT. Methods and parameters have been developed and progressively validated from clinical experience from different institutions (IGR, Universities of Vienna, Leuven, Aarhus and Ljubljana) and successfully applied during expert meetings, contouring workshops, as well as within clinical and interobserver studies. It is useful to perform pelvic MRI scanning prior to radiotherapy ("Pre-RT-MRI examination") and at the time of BT ("BT MRI examination") with one MR imager. Both low and high-field imagers, as well as both open and close magnet configurations conform to the requirements of 3D image-based cervical cancer BT. Multiplanar (transversal, sagittal, coronal and oblique image orientation) T2-weighted images obtained with pelvic surface coils are considered as the golden standard for visualisation of the tumour and the critical organs. The use of complementary MRI sequences (e.g. contrast-enhanced T1-weighted or 3D isotropic MRI sequences) is optional. Patient preparation has to be adapted to the needs of BT intervention and MR imaging. It is recommended to visualise and interpret the MR images on dedicated DICOM-viewer workstations, which should also assist the contouring

  16. Main group bismuth(III), gallium(III) and diorganotin(IV) complexes derived from bis(2-acetylpyrazine)thiocarbonohydrazone: synthesis, crystal structures and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Tai, Yanxue; Li, Mingxue; Ma, Pengtao; Zhao, Junwei; Niu, Jingyang

    2014-04-01

    Up to now, the metal complexes with thiocarbonohydrazones have been comparatively rare. Herein, three main group monometallic complexes formulated as [Bi(HL)(NO3)2(H2O)] (1), [Ga(HL)2]OAc·EtOH (2) and [(Ph)2Sn(HL)(OAc)]·DMF (3), where H2L = bis(2-acetylpyrazine)thiocarbonohydrazone, have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of complexes 2 and 3 have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Growth inhibition assays have indicated that both the free ligand and the title complexes are capable of inhibiting cell proliferation growth and could slightly distinguish the human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells from normal hepatocyte QSG7701 cells. Of particular note is the fact that the bismuth(III) complex 1 is the most active compound of this study and is 14-fold more cytotoxic than H2L with an IC50 value of 2.96 ± 0.25 μM. Its possible apoptotic mechanism has been evaluated in HepG2 cells. Complex 1 promotes a dose-dependent apoptosis in HepG2 cells and the apoptosis is associated with an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP).

  17. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  18. Teaching Point-Group Symmetry with Three-Dimensional Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    Three tools for teaching symmetry in the context of an upper-level undergraduate or introductory graduate course on the chemical applications of group theory are presented. The first is a collection of objects that have the symmetries of all the low-symmetry and high-symmetry point groups and the point groups with rotational symmetries from 2-fold…

  19. A Life-Cycle Model of Human Social Groups Produces a U-Shaped Distribution in Group Size

    PubMed Central

    Salali, Gul Deniz; Whitehouse, Harvey; Hochberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    One of the central puzzles in the study of sociocultural evolution is how and why transitions from small-scale human groups to large-scale, hierarchically more complex ones occurred. Here we develop a spatially explicit agent-based model as a first step towards understanding the ecological dynamics of small and large-scale human groups. By analogy with the interactions between single-celled and multicellular organisms, we build a theory of group lifecycles as an emergent property of single cell demographic and expansion behaviours. We find that once the transition from small-scale to large-scale groups occurs, a few large-scale groups continue expanding while small-scale groups gradually become scarcer, and large-scale groups become larger in size and fewer in number over time. Demographic and expansion behaviours of groups are largely influenced by the distribution and availability of resources. Our results conform to a pattern of human political change in which religions and nation states come to be represented by a few large units and many smaller ones. Future enhancements of the model should include decision-making rules and probabilities of fragmentation for large-scale societies. We suggest that the synthesis of population ecology and social evolution will generate increasingly plausible models of human group dynamics. PMID:26381745

  20. A Life-Cycle Model of Human Social Groups Produces a U-Shaped Distribution in Group Size.

    PubMed

    Salali, Gul Deniz; Whitehouse, Harvey; Hochberg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    One of the central puzzles in the study of sociocultural evolution is how and why transitions from small-scale human groups to large-scale, hierarchically more complex ones occurred. Here we develop a spatially explicit agent-based model as a first step towards understanding the ecological dynamics of small and large-scale human groups. By analogy with the interactions between single-celled and multicellular organisms, we build a theory of group lifecycles as an emergent property of single cell demographic and expansion behaviours. We find that once the transition from small-scale to large-scale groups occurs, a few large-scale groups continue expanding while small-scale groups gradually become scarcer, and large-scale groups become larger in size and fewer in number over time. Demographic and expansion behaviours of groups are largely influenced by the distribution and availability of resources. Our results conform to a pattern of human political change in which religions and nation states come to be represented by a few large units and many smaller ones. Future enhancements of the model should include decision-making rules and probabilities of fragmentation for large-scale societies. We suggest that the synthesis of population ecology and social evolution will generate increasingly plausible models of human group dynamics. PMID:26381745

  1. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  2. Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV and Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference on Metabolic Engineering 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, Betty Kay; Martin, Sheryl A

    2006-02-01

    Welcome to the 2006 joint meeting of the fourth Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop and the six Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference. The vision and scope of the Genomics:GTL program continue to expand and encompass research and technology issues from diverse scientific disciplines, attracting broad interest and support from researchers at universities, DOE national laboratories, and industry. Metabolic engineering's vision is the targeted and purposeful alteration of metabolic pathways to improve the understanding and use of cellular pathways for chemical transformation, energy transduction, and supramolecular assembly. These two programs have much complementarity in both vision and technological approaches, as reflected in this joint workshop. GLT's challenge to the scientific community remains the further development and use of a broad array of innovative technologies and computational tools to systematically leverage the knowledge and capabilities brought to us by DNA sequencing projects. The goal is to seek a broad and predictive understanding of the functioning and control of complex systems--individual microbes, microbial communities, and plants. GTL's prominent position at the interface of the physical, computational, and biological sciences is both a strength and challenge. Microbes remain GTL's principal biological focus. In the complex 'simplicity' of microbes, they find capabilities needed by DOE and the nation for clean and secure energy, cleanup of environmental contamination, and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributes to global warming. An ongoing challenge for the entire GTL community is to demonstrate that the fundamental science conducted in each of your research projects brings us a step closer to biology-based solutions for these important national energy and environmental needs.

  3. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  4. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  5. Persistent improved results after adding vincristine and bleomycin to a cyclophosphamide/hydroxorubicin/Vm-26/prednisone combination (CHVmP) in stage III-IV intermediate- and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Carde, P; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Bron, D; Noordijk, E M; Cosset, J M; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A

    1997-01-01

    CHOP has been and still is regarded by many as the 'standard' treatment of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In 1980 the EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group started a study to evaluate the addition of vincristine and bleomycin to its standard four-drug combination chemotherapy, CHVmP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxorubicin, Vm-26, prednisone). Eligible patients were stage III or IV, intermediate- to high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Working Formulation E-I). One-hundred-eighty-nine patients were entered, of whom 140 were eligible and evaluable. A previous report showed an improved response rate and failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival for the combination CHVmP-VB. At ten years, the outcome still favors the addition of vincristine and bleomycin. The FFS was 34% vs. 23% and the overall survival 34% vs 22%. This difference was mainly due to a difference in CR rate (74% vs. 49%), Relapse-free survival for patients reaching a CR was the same in both arms. When the patients were grouped according to the International Prognostic Factor Index, no statistically significant difference could be observed in favor of one treatment within either group. This trial clearly demonstrates the benefit gained by the addition of vincristine and bleomycin to 'standard' chemotherapy for intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:9187434

  6. Persistent improved results after adding vincristine and bleomycin to a cyclophosphamide/hydroxorubicin/Vm-26/prednisone combination (CHVmP) in stage III-IV intermediate- and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Carde, P; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Bron, D; Noordijk, E M; Cosset, J M; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A

    1997-01-01

    CHOP has been and still is regarded by many as the 'standard' treatment of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In 1980 the EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group started a study to evaluate the addition of vincristine and bleomycin to its standard four-drug combination chemotherapy, CHVmP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxorubicin, Vm-26, prednisone). Eligible patients were stage III or IV, intermediate- to high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Working Formulation E-I). One-hundred-eighty-nine patients were entered, of whom 140 were eligible and evaluable. A previous report showed an improved response rate and failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival for the combination CHVmP-VB. At ten years, the outcome still favors the addition of vincristine and bleomycin. The FFS was 34% vs. 23% and the overall survival 34% vs 22%. This difference was mainly due to a difference in CR rate (74% vs. 49%), Relapse-free survival for patients reaching a CR was the same in both arms. When the patients were grouped according to the International Prognostic Factor Index, no statistically significant difference could be observed in favor of one treatment within either group. This trial clearly demonstrates the benefit gained by the addition of vincristine and bleomycin to 'standard' chemotherapy for intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  7. What Works in Group Care? – A Structured Review of Treatment Models for Group Homes and Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a structured review of treatment models that are relevant to group care and residential treatment settings for children involved with the child welfare system. Initiated and guided by The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare, five treatment models – Positive Peer Culture, Teaching Family Model, Sanctuary Model, Stop-Gap Model, and Re-ED – were reviewed for effectiveness. In this paper, each model s treatment features are described and relevant outcome studies reviewed in terms of their effectiveness as well as relevance for child welfare practice. Findings indicate that four of the models are either supported or promising in terms of evidence for effectiveness. Implications for group care practice and research are discussed. PMID:22468014

  8. Group V allergens in grass pollens: IV. Similarities in amino acid compositions and NH2-terminal sequences of the group V allergens from Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis and Dactylis glomerata.

    PubMed

    Klysner, S; Welinder, K G; Løwenstein, H; Matthiesen, F

    1992-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (PpV4) raised against Phleum pratense group V allergen were used for immuno-affinity chromatography of cross-reacting group V allergens from related grass species. Fractions enriched in group V allergen were obtained from Lolium perenne, Poa pratense and Dactylis glomerata extracts. The major components in these fractions were found in the Mwr range 25-28 kD. IgE binding to these components was shown using a pool of grass allergic sera, by SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. These fractions were electroblotted from tricine SDS-PAGE gels onto a polyvinylidene-difluoride membrane and selected group V bands were directly cut out and used for amino acid analysis and NH2-terminal sequencing. Both the amino acid compositions and the NH2-terminal sequences obtained for each group V allergen were almost similar to each other and to the sequence and composition of the previously described allergen Phl p V from Phleum pratense. A common trait of the investigated allergens, is the very high contents of alanine (25-32%) and the presence of the modified amino acid, hydroxyproline.

  9. Pu(V) transport through Savannah River Site soils - an evaluation of a conceptual model of surface- mediated reduction to Pu (IV).

    PubMed

    Powell, Brian A; Kaplan, Daniel I; Serkiz, Steven M; Coates, John T; Fjeld, Robert A

    2014-05-01

    Over the last fifteen years the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA, was selected as the site of three new plutonium facilities: the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility, and the Pu Immobilization Plant. In order to assess the potential human and environmental risk associated with these recent initiatives, improved understanding of the fate and transport of Pu in the SRS subsurface environment is necessary. The hypothesis of this study was that the more mobile forms of Pu, Pu(V) and Pu(VI), would be reduced to the less mobile Pu(III/IV) oxidation states under ambient SRS subsurface conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic flow experiments (i.e., column studies) indicated that Pu(V) was very mobile in SRS sediments. At higher pH values the mobility of Pu decreased and the fraction of Pu that became irreversibly sorbed to the sediment increased, albeit, only slightly. Conversely, these column experiments showed that Pu(IV) was essentially immobile and was largely irreversibly sorbed to the sediment. More than 100 batch sorption experiments were also conducted with four end-member sediments, i.e., sediments that include the chemical, textural, and mineralogical properties likely to exist in the SRS. These tests were conducted as a function of initial Pu oxidation state, pH, and contact time and consistently demonstrated that although Pu(V) sorbed initially quite weakly to sediments, it slowly, over the course of <33 days, sorbed very strongly to sediments, to approximately the same degree as Pu(IV). This is consistent with our hypothesis that Pu(V) is reduced to the more strongly sorbing form of Pu, Pu(IV). These studies provide important experimental support for a conceptual geochemical model for dissolved Pu in a highly weathered subsurface environment. That is that, irrespective of the initial oxidation state of the dissolved Pu introduced into a SRS sediment system, Pu(IV) controls the environmental transport

  10. A Model for Training Master's Level Addiction Counselors in Group Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Eileen McCabe; Demask, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a model for teaching group at the master's level that integrates classroom with experiential group practice. The basis for this adult learning model is an understanding of addiction, a model of how people change, and an appreciation of the stages of group development. The components of the model are didactic presentation, class…

  11. IV Administered Gadodiamide Enters the Lumen of the Prostatic Glands: X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy Examination of a Mouse Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Dougherty, Urszula; Zamora, Marta; Markiewicz, Erica; Binder, David C.; Antic, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Karczmar, Gregory S.; et al

    2015-09-01

    In our objective, we descibe how dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has become a standard component of multiparametric protocols for MRI examination of the prostate, and its use is incorporated into current guidelines for prostate MRI examination. Analysis of DCE-MRI data for the prostate is usually based on the distribution of gadolinium-based agents, such as gadodiamide, into two well-mixed compartments, and it assumes that gadodiamide does not enter into the glandular lumen. However, this assumption has not been directly tested. The purpose of this study was to use x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) imaging in situ to measure the concentration of gadodiamidemore » in the epithelia and lumens of the prostate of healthy mice after IV injection of the contrast agent. For our materials and methods, six C57Bl6 male mice (age, 28 weeks) were sacrificed 10 minutes after IV injection of gadodiamide (0.13 mmol/kg), and three mice were sacrificed after saline injection. Prostate tissue samples obtained from each mouse were harvested and frozen; 7-μm-thick slices were sectioned for XFM imaging, and adjacent 5-μm-thick slices were sectioned for H and E staining. Elemental concentrations were determined from XFM images. Our results show mean (± SD) baseline concentration of gadolinium of 0.01 ± 0.01 mM was determined from XFM measurements of prostatic tissue samples when no gadodiamide was administered, and it was used to determine the measurement error. When gadodiamide was added, the mean concentrations of gadolinium in the epithelia and lumens in 32 prostatic glands from six mice were 1.00 ± 0.13 and 0.36 ± 0.09 mM, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that IV administration of gadodiamide results in uptake of contrast agent by the glandular lumens of the mouse prostate. We were able to quantitatively determine gadodiamide distributions in mouse prostatic epithelia and lumens.« less

  12. IV Administered Gadodiamide Enters the Lumen of the Prostatic Glands: X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy Examination of a Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Dougherty, Urszula; Zamora, Marta; Markiewicz, Erica; Binder, David C.; Antic, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-09-01

    In our objective, we descibe how dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has become a standard component of multiparametric protocols for MRI examination of the prostate, and its use is incorporated into current guidelines for prostate MRI examination. Analysis of DCE-MRI data for the prostate is usually based on the distribution of gadolinium-based agents, such as gadodiamide, into two well-mixed compartments, and it assumes that gadodiamide does not enter into the glandular lumen. However, this assumption has not been directly tested. The purpose of this study was to use x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) imaging in situ to measure the concentration of gadodiamide in the epithelia and lumens of the prostate of healthy mice after IV injection of the contrast agent. For our materials and methods, six C57Bl6 male mice (age, 28 weeks) were sacrificed 10 minutes after IV injection of gadodiamide (0.13 mmol/kg), and three mice were sacrificed after saline injection. Prostate tissue samples obtained from each mouse were harvested and frozen; 7-μm-thick slices were sectioned for XFM imaging, and adjacent 5-μm-thick slices were sectioned for H and E staining. Elemental concentrations were determined from XFM images. Our results show mean (± SD) baseline concentration of gadolinium of 0.01 ± 0.01 mM was determined from XFM measurements of prostatic tissue samples when no gadodiamide was administered, and it was used to determine the measurement error. When gadodiamide was added, the mean concentrations of gadolinium in the epithelia and lumens in 32 prostatic glands from six mice were 1.00 ± 0.13 and 0.36 ± 0.09 mM, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that IV administration of gadodiamide results in uptake of contrast agent by the glandular lumens of the mouse prostate. We were able to quantitatively determine gadodiamide distributions in mouse prostatic epithelia and lumens.

  13. Improving Performance for Gifted Students in a Cluster Grouping Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brulles, Dina; Saunders, Rachel; Cohn, Sanford J.

    2010-01-01

    Although experts in gifted education widely promote cluster grouping gifted students, little empirical evidence is available to attest to its effectiveness. This study is an example of comparative action research in the form of a quantitative case study that focused on the mandated cluster grouping practices for gifted students in an urban…

  14. A Single Model Counseling Group across All Special Needs Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papagno, Nancy I.

    A weekly group-counseling session is used with students having a range of mental and emotional disabilities in order to improve awareness and sharing of emotions, increase the repertoire of feeling words, increase listening ability, and develop empathy. Six groups composed of five to seven students each are involved, with students ranging in age…

  15. Zirconium(IV) and Hafnium(IV) Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Complexes as New Dyes for Solar Cell Devices

    PubMed Central

    Radivojevic, Ivana; Bazzan, Giorgio; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Ithisuphalap, Kemakorn; Saleh, Raihan; Durstock, Michael F.; Francesconi, Lynn C.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2012-01-01

    Metalloporphyrin and metallophthalocyanine dyes ligating Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions bind to semiconductor oxide surfaces such as TiO2 via the protruding group IV metal ions. The use of oxophylic metal ions with large ionic radii that protrude from the macrocycle is a unique mode of attaching chromophores to oxide surfaces in the design of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Our previous report on the structure and physical properties of ternary complexes wherein the Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions are ligated to both a porphyrinoid and to a defect site on a polyoxometalate (POM) represents a model for this new way of binding dyes to oxide surfaces. The Zr(IV) and Hf(IV) complexes of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) with two ligated acetates, (TPP)Hf(OAc)2 and (TPP)Zr(OAc)2, and the corresponding metallophthalocyanine (Pc) diacetate complexes, (Pc)Hf(OAc)2 and (Pc)Zr(OAc)2, were evaluated as novel dyes for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells. Similarly to the ternary complexes with the POM, the oxide surface replaces the acetates to affect binding. In DSSCs the Zr(IV) phthalocyanine dye performs better than the Zr(IV) porphyrin dye, and reaches an overall efficiency of ~ 1.0%. The Hf(IV) dyes are less efficient. The photophysical properties of these complexes in solution suggested energetically favorable injection of electrons into the conduction band of TiO2 semiconductor nanoparticles, as well as a good band gap match with I3−/I− pair in liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium iodide. The combination of blue absorbing TPP with the red absorbing Pc complexes can increase the absorbance of solar light in the device; however, the overall conversion efficiency of DSSCs using TiO2 nanoparticles treated with a mixture of both Zr(IV) complexes is comparable, but not greater than, the single (Pc)Zr. Thus, surface bound (TPP)Zr increases the absorbance in blue region of the spectra, but at the cost of diminished absorbance in the red in this DSSC architecture. PMID

  16. Zirconium((IV)) and Hafnium((IV)) Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Complexes as New Dyes for Solar Cell Devices.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Ivana; Bazzan, Giorgio; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P; Ithisuphalap, Kemakorn; Saleh, Raihan; Durstock, Michael F; Francesconi, Lynn C; Drain, Charles Michael

    2012-08-01

    Metalloporphyrin and metallophthalocyanine dyes ligating Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions bind to semiconductor oxide surfaces such as TiO(2) via the protruding group IV metal ions. The use of oxophylic metal ions with large ionic radii that protrude from the macrocycle is a unique mode of attaching chromophores to oxide surfaces in the design of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Our previous report on the structure and physical properties of ternary complexes wherein the Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions are ligated to both a porphyrinoid and to a defect site on a polyoxometalate (POM) represents a model for this new way of binding dyes to oxide surfaces. The Zr(IV) and Hf(IV) complexes of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) with two ligated acetates, (TPP)Hf(OAc)(2) and (TPP)Zr(OAc)(2), and the corresponding metallophthalocyanine (Pc) diacetate complexes, (Pc)Hf(OAc)(2) and (Pc)Zr(OAc)(2), were evaluated as novel dyes for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells. Similarly to the ternary complexes with the POM, the oxide surface replaces the acetates to affect binding. In DSSCs the Zr(IV) phthalocyanine dye performs better than the Zr(IV) porphyrin dye, and reaches an overall efficiency of ~ 1.0%. The Hf(IV) dyes are less efficient. The photophysical properties of these complexes in solution suggested energetically favorable injection of electrons into the conduction band of TiO(2) semiconductor nanoparticles, as well as a good band gap match with I(3) (-)/I(-) pair in liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium iodide. The combination of blue absorbing TPP with the red absorbing Pc complexes can increase the absorbance of solar light in the device; however, the overall conversion efficiency of DSSCs using TiO(2) nanoparticles treated with a mixture of both Zr(IV) complexes is comparable, but not greater than, the single (Pc)Zr. Thus, surface bound (TPP)Zr increases the absorbance in blue region of the spectra, but at the cost of diminished absorbance in the red in this DSSC

  17. The IWG (Interagency Working Group) model for the heterosexual spread of HIV and the demographic impact of the AIDS epidemic

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, E.A. ); Seitz, S.T. ); Way, P.O.; Johnson, P.D. ); Curry, T.F. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the State Department's Interagency Working Group (IWG) model for the spread of HIV. The model is fully operational for Pattern 2 (heterosexual blood transmission) and Pattern 3 (heterosexual, homosexual, and IV drug transmission) countries. This model was developed for various uses, including technical research, policy analysis, and support for decision making. Research uses include studying patterns of HIV spread, assessing the relative effect of different processes on the spread of HIV, examining the demographic impact of HIV infections, and comparing the potential impact of behavioral versus medical intervention strategies. The model will be used in workshops where policy makers and health officials can do hands-on scenario analyses, gain qualitative insights into the possible long-term-epidemiological and demographic impact of HIV, gauge the uncertainties in predictions for the future, and study the impact of HIV, gauge the uncertainties in predictions for the future, and study the impact that intervention strategies are likely to have. The computational model uses a deterministic system of differential equations and runs on a 286- or a 386-based IBM-compatible machine under Microsoft Windows. The program requires an input ASCII (text) file to run; all parameters used by the model are input through this file and, therefore, are user-accessible. The software is user-friendly, mouse-driven, and allows for interactive manipulation of input data and visualization and processing of model outputs. 15 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  18. General Point-Depletion and Fission Product Code System and Four-Group Fission Product Neutron Absorption Chain Data Library Generated from ENDF/B-IV for Thermal Reactors

    1981-12-01

    EPRI-CINDER calculates, for any specified initial fuel (actinide) description and flux or power history, the fuel and fission-product nuclide concentrations and associated properties. Other nuclide chains can also be computed with user-supplied libraries. The EPRI-CINDER Data Library (incorporating ENDF/B-IV fission-product processed 4-group cross sections, decay constants, absorption and decay branching fractions, and effective fission yields) is used in each constant-flux time step calculation and in time step summaries of nuclide decay rates and macroscopic absorptionmore » and barns-per-fission (b/f) absorption cross sections (by neutron group). User-supplied nuclide decay energy and multigroup-spectra data libraries may be attached to permit decay heating and decay-spectra calculations. An additional 12-chain library, explicitly including 27 major fission-product neutron absorbers and 4 fictitious nuclides, may be used to accurately calculate the aggregate macroscopic absorption buildup in fission products.« less

  19. Alternative Approaches to Group IV Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedaker, Matthew Loren

    In the pursuit of energy efficiency, there is a demand for systems capable of recovering waste heat. A temperature gradient across a thermoelectric material results in the thermal diffusion of charge carriers from the hot side to the cold side, giving rise to a voltage that can be used to convert waste heat to electricity. Silicon germanium (SiGe) alloys are the standard materials used for thermoelectric generators at high temperatures. We report an alternative method for preparing p-type Si1- xGex alloys from a boron-doped silica-germania nanocomposite. This is the first demonstration of the thermoelectric properties of SiGe-based thermoelectrics prepared at temperatures below the alloy's melting point through a magnesiothermic reduction of the (SiO 2)1-x(GeO2) x. We observe a thermoelectric power factor that is competitive with the literature record for the conventionally prepared SiGe. The large grain size in our hot pressed SiGe limits the thermoelectric figure of merit to 0.5 at 800°C for an optimally doped p-type Si80Ge 20 alloy. A phosphorus-doped oxide can yield n-type Si1- xGex; however, the current processing method introduces a background boron content that compensates ~10% of the donor impurities and limits the thermoelectric power factor. Spark plasma sintering of the nano-Si1-xGe x yields a heterogeneous alloy with thermal conductivity lower than that of the hot pressed homogeneous alloy due to a reduction in the average crystallite size. Magnesiothermic reduction in the presence of molten salts allows some control over crystallite growth and the extent of Si-Ge alloying.

  20. Group IV mid-infrared photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashanovich, G. Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Soler Penades, J.; Mitchell, C. J.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Littlejohns, C. J.; Stankovic, S.; Troia, B.; Wang, Y.; Reynolds, S.; Passaro, V. M. N.; Shen, L.; Healy, N.; Peacock, A. C.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Rowe, D. J.; Wilkinson, J. S.; Cheben, P.; Ackert, J. J.; Knights, A. P.; Thomson, D. J.; Gardes, F. Y.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we present SOI, suspended Si, and Ge-on-Si photonic platforms and devices for the mid-infrared. We demonstrate low loss strip and slot waveguides in SOI and show efficient strip-slot couplers. A Vernier configuration based on racetrack resonators in SOI has been also investigated. Mid-infrared detection using defect engineered silicon waveguides is reported at the wavelength of 2-2.5 μm. In order to extend transparency of Si waveguides, the bottom oxide cladding needs to be removed. We report a novel suspended Si design based on subwavelength structures that is more robust than previously reported suspended designs. We have fabricated record low loss Ge-on-Si waveguides, as well as several other passive devices in this platform. All optical modulation in Ge is also analyzed.

  1. Upregulation of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 and Proinflammatory Cytokines by the Major Surface Proteins of Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum, the Phylogenetic Group IV Oral Spirochetes Associated with Periodontitis and Endodontic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum belong to the group IV oral spirochetes and are associated with endodontic infections, as well as periodontitis. Recently, the genes encoding the major surface proteins (Msps) of these bacteria (MspA and MspTL, respectively) were cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequences of these proteins showed significant similarity. In this study we analyzed the functional role of these homologous proteins in human monocytic THP-1 cells and primary cultured periodontal ligament (PDL) cells using recombinant proteins. The complete genes encoding MspA and MspTL without the signal sequence were cloned into Escherichia coli by using the expression vector pQE-30. Fusion proteins tagged with N-terminal hexahistidine (recombinant MspA [rMspA] and rMspTL) were obtained, and any possible contamination of the recombinant proteins with E. coli endotoxin was removed by using polymyxin B-agarose. Flow cytometry showed that rMspA and rMspTL upregulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in both THP-1 and PDL cells. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8, was also induced significantly in both cell types by the Msps, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas IL-1β synthesis could be detected only in the THP-1 cells. The upregulation of ICAM-1, IL-6, and IL-8 was completely inhibited by pretreating the cells with an NF-κB activation inhibitor, l-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone. This suggests involvement of NF-κB activation. The increased ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression in the THP-1 cells obtained with rMsps was not inhibited in the presence of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1. Our results show that the Msps of the group IV oral spirochetes may play an important role in amplifying the local immune response by continuous inflammatory cell recruitment and retention at an

  2. Decision Development in Small Groups I: A Comparison of Two Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Marshall Scott

    1981-01-01

    Studies the sequence of phases in group decision making. Compares the unitary sequence model, which assumes that all groups follow the same sequence of phases, and the multiple sequence model, which assumes that different groups follow different sequences. Results support the latter model and suggest revisions in current decision development. (PD)

  3. A Demands-Resources Model of Work Pressure in IT Student Task Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. Vance; Sheetz, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an initial test of the group task demands-resources (GTD-R) model of group task performance among IT students. We theorize that demands and resources in group work influence formation of perceived group work pressure (GWP) and that heightened levels of GWP inhibit group task performance. A prior study identified 11 factors…

  4. Survival Models for People with AIDS in Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzel, George S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes four modes of positive survival with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and analyzes them as they appear in support groups for people with AIDS. Sees beneficent, artistic-spiritual, heroic, and rational-instrumental survival modes as compromise solutions to fears of life and death described by Rank. Calls analysis nonpejorative…

  5. Modeling the Effects of Person Group Factors on Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphry, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Discrimination has traditionally been parameterized for items but not other empirical factors. Consequently, if person factors affect discrimination they cause misfit. However, by explicitly formulating the relationship between discrimination and the unit of a metric, it is possible to parameterize discrimination for person groups. This article…

  6. Multilevel Mediation Modeling in Group-Based Intervention Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krull, Jennifer L.; MacKinnon, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Proposes and evaluates a method to test for mediation in multilevel data sets formed when an intervention administered to groups is designed to produce change in individual mediator and outcome variables. Applies the method to the ATLAS intervention designed to decrease steroid use among high school football players. (SLD)

  7. A Model for Establishing an Astronomy Education Discussion Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Grace; Hayes-Gehrke, M.; Zauderer, B. A.; Bovill, M. S.; DeCesar, M.

    2010-01-01

    In October 2005, a group of astronomy faculty and graduate students met to establish departmental support for participants in the UM Center for Teaching Excellence University Teaching and Learning Program. This program seeks to increase graduate students’ understanding of effective teaching methods, awareness of student learning, and appreciation of education as a scholarly pursuit. Our group has facilitated the submission of successful graduate student educational development grant proposals to the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE). Completion of the CTE program results in a notation on the graduate student's transcript. Our discussion group met monthly during the first two years. The Astronomy Education Review, The Physics Teacher, The Washington Post, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and National Research Council publications were used to provide background for discussion. Beginning in 2007, the group began sponsoring monthly astronomy education lunches during the academic year to which the entire department was invited. Over the past two years, speakers have included graduate students, faculty, and guests, such as Jay Labov from the National Research Council. Topics have included the Astronomy Diagnostic Test, intelligent design versus evolution, active learning techniques, introducing the use of lecture tutorials, using effective demonstrations, confronting student misconceptions, engagement through clickers (or cards), and fostering critical thinking with ranking tasks. The results of an informal evaluation will be presented.

  8. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  9. Using Fixed Thresholds with Grouped Data in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koran, Jennifer; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2010-01-01

    Valuable methods have been developed for incorporating ordinal variables into structural equation models using a latent response variable formulation. However, some model parameters, such as the means and variances of latent factors, can be quite difficult to interpret because the latent response variables have an arbitrary metric. This limitation…

  10. Zebrafish as a model for apolipoprotein biology: comprehensive expression analysis and a role for ApoA-IV in regulating food intake

    PubMed Central

    Otis, Jessica P.; Zeituni, Erin M.; Thierer, James H.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Brown, Alexandria C.; Boehm, Erica D.; Cerchione, Derek M.; Ceasrine, Alexis M.; Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Tempelhof, Hanoch; Yaniv, Karina; Farber, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Improved understanding of lipoproteins, particles that transport lipids throughout the circulation, is vital to developing new treatments for the dyslipidemias associated with metabolic syndrome. Apolipoproteins are a key component of lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are proteins that structure lipoproteins and regulate lipid metabolism through control of cellular lipid exchange. Constraints of cell culture and mouse models mean that there is a need for a complementary model that can replicate the complex in vivo milieu that regulates apolipoprotein and lipoprotein biology. Here, we further establish the utility of the genetically tractable and optically clear larval zebrafish as a model of apolipoprotein biology. Gene ancestry analyses were implemented to determine the closest human orthologs of the zebrafish apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), apoB, apoE and apoA-IV genes and therefore ensure that they have been correctly named. Their expression patterns throughout development were also analyzed, by whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization (ISH). The ISH results emphasized the importance of apolipoproteins in transporting yolk and dietary lipids: mRNA expression of all apolipoproteins was observed in the yolk syncytial layer, and intestinal and liver expression was observed from 4–6 days post-fertilization (dpf). Furthermore, real-time PCR confirmed that transcription of three of the four zebrafish apoA-IV genes was increased 4 hours after the onset of a 1-hour high-fat feed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that zebrafish ApoA-IV performs a conserved role to that in rat in the regulation of food intake by transiently overexpressing ApoA-IVb.1 in transgenic larvae and quantifying ingestion of co-fed fluorescently labeled fatty acid during a high-fat meal as an indicator of food intake. Indeed, ApoA-IVb.1 overexpression decreased food intake by approximately one-third. This study comprehensively describes the expression and function of eleven zebrafish apolipoproteins

  11. Secondary flow structures in the presence of Type-IV stent fractures through a bent tube model for curved arteries: Effect of circulation thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shadman; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    A common treatment for atherosclerosis is the opening of narrowed arteries resulting from obstructive lesions by angioplasty and stent implantation to restore unrestricted blood flow. ``Type-IV'' stent fractures involve complete transverse, linear fracture of stent struts, along with displacement of the stent fragments. Experimental data pertaining to secondary flows in the presence of stents that underwent ``Type-IV'' fractures in a bent artery model under physiological inflow conditions were obtained through a two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) PIV technique. Concomitant stent-induced flow perturbations result in secondary flow structures with complex, multi-scale morphologies and varying size-strength characteristics. Ultimately, these flow structures may have a role to play in restenosis and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. Vortex circulation thresholds were established with the goal of resolving and tracking iso-circulation secondary flow vortical structures and their morphological changes. This allowed for a parametric evaluation and quantitative representation of secondary flow structures undergoing deformation and spatial reorganization. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  12. Highly reduced organometallics of the Group IV elements: Part One. The study of (trmpe) metal tetracarbonyl complexes of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium. Part Two. The study of bis-arene titanium complexes prepared from arene radical anions

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Potassium naphthalenide reduction of solutions of the Group IV transition metal salts MCl[sub 4][center dot]THF, M = Ti, Zr, and Hf, in the presence of the tridentate phosphine ligand 1,1,1-tris(dimethylphosphinomethyl)ethane (trmpe), at -70[degrees] under Ar, followed by carbonylation at atmospheric pressure, provides the zerovalent carbonylphosphine complexes M(CO)[sub 4](trmpe). Yields range from 5% for Hf to 50% for Ti. The complexes were characterized by [sup 31]P and [sup 13]C NMR studies, and the Zr complex additionally by X-ray crystallography. The titanium complex reacts with triphenylstannide to displace one carbon monoxide ligand, forming the [(trmpe)Ti(CO)[sub 3](Sn(C[sub 6]H[sub 5])[sub 3])] anion. The reduction of TiCl[sub 4][center dot]2THF with arene radical anions provides bis-arene sandwich complexes in high yield (80-95%). For arene = naphthalene, the 18-electron [Ti(C[sub 10]H[sub 8])[sub 2

  13. A fully integrated high-throughput screening methodology for the discovery of new polyolefin catalysts: discovery of a new class of high temperature single-site group (IV) copolymerization catalysts.

    PubMed

    Boussie, Thomas R; Diamond, Gary M; Goh, Christopher; Hall, Keith A; LaPointe, Anne M; Leclerc, Margarete; Lund, Cheryl; Murphy, Vince; Shoemaker, James A W; Tracht, Ursula; Turner, Howard; Zhang, Jessica; Uno, Tetsuo; Rosen, Robert K; Stevens, James C

    2003-04-01

    For the first time, new catalysts for olefin polymerization have been discovered through the application of fully integrated high-throughput primary and secondary screening techniques supported by rapid polymer characterization methods. Microscale 1-octene primary screening polymerization experiments combining arrays of ligands with reactive metal complexes M(CH(2)Ph)(4) (M = Zr, Hf) and multiple activation conditions represent a new high-throughput technique for discovering novel group (IV) polymerization catalysts. The primary screening methods described here have been validated using a commercially relevant polyolefin catalyst, and implemented rapidly to discover the new amide-ether based hafnium catalyst [eta(2)-(N,O)[bond](2-MeO[bond]C(6)H(4))(2,4,6-Me(3)C(6)H(2))N]Hf(CH(2)Ph)(3) (1), which is capable of polymerizing 1-octene to high conversion. The molecular structure of 1 has been determined by X-ray diffraction. Larger scale secondary screening experiments performed on a focused 96-member amine-ether library demonstrated the versatile high temperature ethylene-1-octene copolymerization capabilities of this catalyst class, and led to significant performance improvements over the initial primary screening discovery. Conventional one gallon batch reactor copolymerizations performed using selected amide-ether hafnium compounds confirmed the performance features of this new catalyst class, serving to fully validate the experimental results from the high-throughput approaches described herein.

  14. A Renormalization Group Like Model for a Democratic Dictatorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galam, Serge

    2015-03-01

    We review a model of sociophysics which deals with democratic voting in bottom up hierarchical systems. The connection to the original physical model and technics are outlined underlining both the similarities and the differences. Emphasis is put on the numerous novel and counterintuitive results obtained with respect to the associated social and political framework. Using this model a real political event was successfully predicted with the victory of the French extreme right party in the 2000 first round of French presidential elections. The perspectives and the challenges to make sociophysics a predictive solid field of science are discussed.

  15. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination. PMID:20484987

  16. A model for group counseling with male pedophiles.

    PubMed

    van Zessen, G

    1990-01-01

    Group treatment programs for pedophiles are often designed for populations of convicted men in closed institutions with limited application to other populations. Treatment is usually focused on reducing the "deviant" sexual arousal and/or acquiring heterosocial skills and eventually establishing the ability to engage in adult heterosexual relationships. A six-week, highly structured program is presented to five men in a non-residential setting. In addition to individual psychotherapy, group counseling is offered. Male pedophiles are trained to talk effectively about common problems surrounding man-boy relationships. Counseling is based on the notion that the emotional, erotic and sexual attraction to boys per se does not need to be legitimized or modified. The attraction, however, can be a source of psychological and social problems that can be handled by using a social support system. Social support for pedophile problems can be obtained from and in interaction with other pedophiles.

  17. Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, George A.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

  18. Oxidovanadium(IV) complexes with chrysin and silibinin: anticancer activity and mechanisms of action in a human colon adenocarcinoma model.

    PubMed

    León, I E; Cadavid-Vargas, J F; Tiscornia, I; Porro, V; Castelli, S; Katkar, P; Desideri, A; Bollati-Fogolin, M; Etcheverry, S B

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium compounds were studied during recent years to be considered as a representative of a new class of nonplatinum metal antitumor agents in combination to its low toxicity. On the other hand, flavonoids are a wide family of polyphenolic compounds synthesized by plants that display many interesting biological effects. Since coordination of ligands to metals can improve the pharmacological properties, we report herein, for the first time, a exhaustive study of the mechanisms of action of two oxidovanadium(IV) complexes with the flavonoids: silibinin Na₂[VO(silibinin)₂2]·6H₂O (VOsil) and chrysin [VO(chrysin)₂EtOH]₂(VOchrys) on human colon adenocarcinoma derived cell line HT-29. The complexes inhibited the cell viability of colon adenocarcinoma cells in a dose dependent manner with a greater potency than that the free ligands and free metal, demonstrating the benefit of complexation. The decrease of the ratio of the amount of reduced glutathione to the amount of oxidized glutathione were involved in the deleterious effects of both complexes. Besides, VOchrys caused cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase while VOsil activated caspase 3 and triggering the cells directly to apoptosis. Moreover, VOsil diminished the NF-kB activation via increasing the sensitivity of cells to apoptosis. On the other hand, VOsil inhibited the topoisomerase IB activity concluding that this is important target involved in the anticancer vanadium effects. As a whole, the results presented herein demonstrate that VOsil has a stronger deleterious action than VOchrys on HT-29 cells, whereby suggesting that Vosil is the potentially best candidate for future use in alternative anti-tumor treatments.

  19. Temperature dependent I-V characteristics of an Au/n-GaAs Schottky diode analyzed using Tung’s model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korucu, Demet; Turut, Abdulmecit; Efeoglu, Hasan

    2013-04-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Au/n-GaAs contacts prepared with photolithography technique have been measured in the temperature range of 80-320 K. The ideality factor and barrier height (BH) values have remained almost unchanged between 1.04 and 1.10 and at a value of about 0.79 eV at temperatures above 200 K, respectively. Therefore, the ideality factor values near unity say that the experimental I-V data are almost independent of the sample temperature, that is, contacts have shown excellent Schottky diode behavior above 200 K. An abnormal decrease in the experimental BH Φb and an increase in the ideality factor with a decrease in temperature have been observed below 200 K. This behavior has been attributed to the barrier inhomogeneity by assuming a Gaussian distribution of nanometer-sized patches with low BH at the metal-semiconductor interface. The barrier inhomogeneity assumption is also confirmed by the linear relationship between the BH and the ideality factor. According to Tung’s barrier inhomogeneity model, it has been seen that the value of σT=7.41×10-5 cm2/3 V1/3from ideality factor versus (kT)-1 curve is in close agreement with σT=7.95×10-5 cm2/3 V1/3 value from the Φeff versus (2kT)-1 curve in the range of 80-200 K. The modified Richardson ln(J0/T2)-(qσT)2(Vb/η)2/3/[2(kT)2] versus (kT)-1 plot, from Tung’s Model, has given a Richardson constant value of 8.47 A cm-2 K-2which is in very close agreement with the known value of 8.16 A cm-2 K-2 for n-type GaAs; considering the effective patch area which is significantly lower than the entire geometric area of the Schottky contact, in temperature range of 80-200 K. Thus, it has been concluded that the use of Tung’s lateral inhomogeneity model is more appropriate to interpret the temperature-dependent I-V characteristics in the Schottky contacts.

  20. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  1. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  2. Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-01-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  3. Business and Organizational Models of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist Groups.

    PubMed

    Garite, Thomas J; Levine, Lisa; Olson, Rob

    2015-09-01

    The growth of obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN) hospitalists throughout the United States has led to different organizational approaches, depending on the perception of what an OB/GYN hospitalist is. There are advantages of OB/GYN hospitalist practices; however, practitioners who do this as just 1 piece of their practice are not fulfilling the promise of what this new specialty can deliver. Because those with office practices have their own business models, this article is devoted to the organizational and business models of OB/GYN hospitalists for physicians whose practice is devoted to inpatient obstetrics with or without emergency room and/or inpatient gynecology coverage.

  4. A semianalytic two-group nodal model for SIMULATE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, P.D.; Smith, K.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) cores containing highly enriched ([ge] 10% Pu) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel exhibit steep thermal flux gradients near MOX-UO[sub 2] assembly interfaces. The fourth-order polynomial representation of the internodal flux used in many polynomial nodal methods (including the QPANDA nodal model in the SIMULATE-3 core analysis code) has already been verified against low-enriched MOX fuel but cannot accurately portray the severe flux variations near highly enriched MOX interfaces. This paper describes the development of an enhanced nodal model that includes transcendental components in the thermal flux profile.

  5. Empowering women with chronic, physical disabilities:a pedagogical/experiential group model.

    PubMed

    Vail, Svetlana; Xenakis, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Past research on group work in the hospital setting has focused on traditional psycho-educational support group models. This article describes an effective group model developed in the Initiative for Women with Disabilities, a hospital-based outpatient program for women with chronic physical illnesses or conditions. The group model integrates concepts of humanistic and self-psychology with pedagogical methods and experiential learning. A Women's Writing group and Women's Assertiveness group each with 10 sessions were designed and conducted according to this model. The group leader presented as a pedagogue and self-object that created a group experience that affirms humanistic values and fosters self-growth, socialization, and interpersonal change. The results of a self-administered survey suggest that the participants responded favorably to the format, structure and content of the groups, skills learned, and the identification of past and present issues. PMID:18032157

  6. Special Interest Groups and Mass Communication as Political Participation: A Model for Interaction Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielian, Lucig H.

    A review of the literature reveals that a complete model, within a political framework, for what takes place when special interest groups and mass media interact does not exist. Since media access is more successful for groups with specific goals and resources, a model for the interaction of special interest groups and the mass media focuses on…

  7. Response Grouping in the Psychological Refractory Period (PRP) Paradigm: Models and Contamination Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Rolf; Miller, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Response grouping is a ubiquitous phenomenon in psychological refractory period (PRP) tasks, yet it hampers the analysis of dual-task performance. To account for response grouping, we developed several extended versions of the standard bottleneck model, each of which incorporates a possible grouping mechanism into this model. Computer simulations…

  8. Trinuclear terpyridine frustrated spin system with a Mn(IV)3O4 core: synthesis, physical characterization, and quantum chemical modeling of its magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Baffert, Carole; Orio, Maylis; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Duboc, Carole; Blackman, Allan G; Blondin, Geneviève; Neese, Frank; Deronzier, Alain; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle

    2009-11-01

    The trinuclear oxo bridged manganese cluster, [Mn(IV)(3)O(4)(terpy)(terpyO(2))(2)(H(2)O)](S(2)O(8))(2) (5) (terpy = 2,2':2'',6'-terpyridine and terpyO(2) = 2,2':2'',6'-terpyridine 1,1''-dioxide), was isolated in an acidic aqueous medium from the reaction of MnSO(4), terpy, and oxone as chemical oxidant. The terpyO(2) ligands were generated in situ during the synthesis by partial oxidation of terpy. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n with a = 14.251(5) A, b = 15.245(5) A, c = 24.672(5) A, alpha = 90.000(5) degrees, beta = 92.045(5) degrees, gamma = 90.000(5) degrees, and Z = 4. The triangular {Mn(IV)(3)O(4)}(4+) core observed in this complex is built up of a basal Mn(mu-O)(2)Mn unit where each Mn ion is linked to an apical Mn ion via mono(mu-O) bridges. The facial coordination of the two tridentate terpyO(2) ligands to the Mn(mu-O)(2)Mn unit allows the formation of the triangular core. 5 is also the first structurally characterized Mn complex with polypyridinyl N-oxide ligands. The variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data for this complex, in the range of 10-300 K, are consistent with an S = 1/2 ground state and were fit using the spin Hamiltonian H(eff) with S(1) = S(2) = S(3) = 3/2, J(a) = -37 (+/-0.5) and J(b) = -53 (+/-1) cm(-1), where J(a) and J(b) are exchange constants through the mono-mu-oxo and the di-mu-oxo bridges, respectively. The doublet ground spin state of 5 is confirmed by EPR spectroscopic measurements. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations based on the broken symmetry approach reproduce the magnetic properties of 5 very well (calculated values: J(a) = -39.4 and J(b) = -55.9 cm(-1)), thus confirming the capability of this quantum chemical method for predicting the magnetic behavior of clusters involving more than two metal ions. The nature of the ground spin state of the magnetic {Mn(IV)(3)O(4)}(4+) core and the role of ancillary ligands on the magnitude of J are also discussed. PMID:19795871

  9. The Purex thermodynamics of plutonium(IV) and uranium(VI) macroconcentrations coextraction into tri-n butylphosphate: new data and new models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Ed. V.; Chizhov, A. A.; Vlasov, V. S.

    1995-05-01

    The modern worldwide Purex technology (spent nuclear fuel reprocessing) is based on solvent extraction of actinides (U, Pu) in a system with aqueous nitric acid solutions and organic (n-paraffins) solutions of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP). To the creation of a universal mathematical process model contributes - first of all - the knowledge of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and nitric acid equilibrated distribution data. Further should be included the field of all the technological ("know-how") operations, in particular, so-called strong-and-weak-acid and high-and-ambient-temperature scrubs of the actinide bearing organic phase. To enrich the Purex data base with additional information the new original values of equilibrium distribution coefficients of Pu(IV) (0.06-28 g/ l), U(VI) (0.18-150 g/ l) and nitric acid (0.01-10.5 mol/ l) (in all the cases - equilibrated aqueous phase concentrations) - at reliable organic solution homogeneity (i.e. without "third" phase formation phenomena) were obtained. Those results include data at 25 and 60°C, of 20 and 30 vol% TBP (in n-dodecane). All the analyses of the metal content were performed using original gamma-spectrometric procedure of simultaneous U and Pu determination. Using both obtained data and known results (no less than 700 "systems" type of "U(VI)-Pu(IV)-water-nitric acid-TBP-n-dodecane") the simple regressive equations (two third-power polynominal series) were developed, which with an accuracy better than ± 8% permit to calculate the distribution of the three mentioned components. The developed equations of the concentration dependence of the distribution coefficients ( D) for all the components have the general form: In D n = limit∑i=03limit∑k=03limit∑m=03 ∏( ln[U]) i( ln[Pu]) k( ln[HNO 3] ) m, where i+ K+ m⩽3; n = Pu, U, HNO 3. The high performance models are recommended for development of operating programs - as a modifier of today's Purex performance.

  10. Quantitative Image Analysis and Modeling Indicate the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Type IV Secretion System Is Organized in a Periodic Pattern of Foci

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Todd A.; Roper, Marcus; Zambryski, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    The Gram negative plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens is uniquely capable of genetically transforming eukaryotic host cells during the infection process. DNA and protein substrates are transferred into plant cells via a type IV secretion system (T4SS), which forms large cell-envelope spanning complexes at multiple sites around the bacterial circumference. To gain a detailed understanding of T4SS positioning, the spatial distribution of fluorescently labeled T4SS components was quantitatively assessed to distinguish between random and structured localization processes. Through deconvolution microscopy followed by Fourier analysis and modeling, T4SS foci were found to localize in a non-random periodic pattern. These results indicate that T4SS complexes are dependent on an underlying scaffold or assembly process to obtain an organized distribution suitable for effective delivery of substrates into host cells. PMID:22860087

  11. Projection models for health effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume IV. SPAHR user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of response, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projections are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the more advanced user of the SPAHR computer package the information required to create tailor-made programs for addressing specific issues not covered by the three interactive packages. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment.

  12. Childhood Roles and the Interpersonal Circle: A Model for ACOA Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sandra A.

    1996-01-01

    Combining childhood roles and interpersonal theory produces a schematic model that includes all adult children of alcoholics, enhances understanding of the group dynamic, and suggests specific group treatment strategies. (Author)

  13. Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband reproducible noise maskers. IV. Models using interaural time, level, and envelope differences

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Junwen; Carney, Laurel H.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of out-of-phase tones to in-phase noises results in dynamic interaural level difference (ILD) and interaural time difference (ITD) cues for the dichotic tone-in-noise detection task. Several models have been used to predict listeners' detection performance based on ILD, ITD, or different combinations of the two cues. The models can be tested using detection performance from an ensemble of reproducible-noise maskers. Previous models cannot predict listeners' detection performance for reproducible-noise maskers without fitting the data. Here, two models were tested for narrowband and wideband reproducible-noise experiments. One model was a linear combination of ILD and ITD that included the generally ignored correlation between the two cues. The other model was based on a newly proposed cue, the slope of the interaural envelope difference (SIED). Predictions from both models explained a significant portion of listeners' performance for detection of a 500-Hz tone in wideband noise. Predictions based on the SIED approached the predictable variance in the wideband condition. The SIED represented a nonlinear combination of ILD and ITD, with the latter cue dominating. Listeners did not use a common strategy (cue) to detect tones in the narrowband condition and may use different single frequencies or different combinations of frequency channels. PMID:25234891

  14. A Three-groups Model for High Throughput Survival Screens

    PubMed Central

    Shaby, Benjamin A.; Skibinski, Gaia; Ando, Michael; LaDow, Eva S.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by the progressive deterioration of motor neurons in the cortex and spinal cord. Using an automated robotic microscope platform that enables the longitudinal tracking of thousands of single neurons, we examine the effects a large library of compounds on modulating the survival of primary neurons expressing a mutation known to cause ALS. The goal of our analysis is to identify the few potentially beneficial compounds among the many assayed, the vast majority of which do not extend neuronal survival. This resembles the large-scale simultaneous inference scenario familiar from microarray analysis, but transferred to the survival analysis setting due to the novel experimental setup. We apply a three component mixture model to censored survival times of thousands of individual neurons subjected to hundreds of different compounds. The shrinkage induced by our model significantly improves performance in simulations relative to performing treatment-wise survival analysis and subsequent multiple testing adjustment. Our analysis identified compounds that provide insight into potential novel therapeutic strategies for ALS. PMID:26821783

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: STAGGER-grid of 3D stellar models. IV. (Magic+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Chiavassa, A.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.

    2014-10-01

    We compute the emergent stellar spectra from the UV to far infrared for different viewing angles using realistic 3D model atmospheres for a large range in stellar parameters to predict the stellar limb darkening. We have computed full 3D LTE synthetic spectra based on 3D radiative hydrodynamic atmosphere models from the Stagger-grid in the ranges: Teff from 4000 to 7000K, logg from 1.5 to 5.0, and [Fe/H], from -4.0 to +0.5. From the resulting intensities at different wavelength, we derived coefficients for the standard limb darkening laws considering a number of often-used photometric filters. Furthermore, we calculated theoretical transit light curves, in order to quantify the differences between predictions by the widely used 1D model atmosphere and our 3D models. (1 data file).

  16. ELSMOS--an extended least squares modelling system in FORTRAN IV for mini- or micro-computer implementation.

    PubMed

    Francis, R J

    1984-01-01

    A new program ELSMOS has been developed for curve fitting of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data. The form is sufficiently general, with user-defined model in a separate FORTRAN subroutine, to permit application in many other areas. The principal features are the use of a user-defined error model for statistically rigorous automatic weighting of data, and the containment of program size to a level that enables mini- or micro-computer implementation.

  17. Coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group-Size Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2016-10-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no H-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant regime is reached in which all equilibria are determined by a single scaling profile. This universal profile exhibits power-law behavior crossing over from exponent -2/3 for small size to -3/2 for large size, with an exponential cutoff.

  18. Community wellness: a group empowerment model for rural America.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S

    1991-01-01

    Because answers to rural health problems no longer reside solely at the federal or state level, county Extension agents in Georgia are playing a pivotal role in helping communities empower themselves with the Community Wellness program. Community Wellness is a process-oriented program that encompasses community-based program planning; facilitates interventions based on an assessment of community-specific health needs; encourages empowerment of the community; and develops a community-wide support system. County Extension agents and other leaders serve as catalysts to bring together members of the community to identify health needs, develop strategies to solve problems, and implement solutions. Four case histories describe how this model has strengthened community infrastructure, developed human capital, and created rural leadership. A discussion of barriers to implementation and lessons learned follows.

  19. Networking the seceder model: Group formation in social and economic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönlund, Andreas; Holme, Petter

    2004-09-01

    The seceder model illustrates how the desire to be different from the average can lead to formation of groups in a population. We turn the original, agent based, seceder model into a model of network evolution. We find that the structural characteristics of our model closely match empirical social networks. Statistics for the dynamics of group formation are also given. Extensions of the model to networks of companies are also discussed.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Secondary Flow Structures Downstream of a Model Type IV Stent Failure in a 180° Curved Artery Test Section.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, Kartik V; Plesniak, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    The arterial network in the human vasculature comprises of ubiquitously present blood vessels with complex geometries (branches, curvatures and tortuosity). Secondary flow structures are vortical flow patterns that occur in curved arteries due to the combined action of centrifugal forces, adverse pressure gradients and inflow characteristics. Such flow morphologies are greatly affected by pulsatility and multiple harmonics of physiological inflow conditions and vary greatly in size-strength-shape characteristics compared to non-physiological (steady and oscillatory) flows (1 - 7). Secondary flow structures may ultimately influence the wall shear stress and exposure time of blood-borne particles toward progression of atherosclerosis, restenosis, sensitization of platelets and thrombosis (4 - 6, 8 - 13). Therefore, the ability to detect and characterize these structures under laboratory-controlled conditions is precursor to further clinical investigations. A common surgical treatment to atherosclerosis is stent implantation, to open up stenosed arteries for unobstructed blood flow. But the concomitant flow perturbations due to stent installations result in multi-scale secondary flow morphologies (4 - 6). Progressively higher order complexities such as asymmetry and loss in coherence can be induced by ensuing stent failures vis-à-vis those under unperturbed flows (5). These stent failures have been classified as "Types I-to-IV" based on failure considerations and clinical severity (14). This study presents a protocol for the experimental investigation of the complex secondary flow structures due to complete transverse stent fracture and linear displacement of fractured parts ("Type IV") in a curved artery model. The experimental method involves the implementation of particle image velocimetry (2C-2D PIV) techniques with an archetypal carotid artery inflow waveform, a refractive index matched blood-analog working fluid for phase-averaged measurements (15 - 18

  1. Experimental Investigation of Secondary Flow Structures Downstream of a Model Type IV Stent Failure in a 180° Curved Artery Test Section.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, Kartik V; Plesniak, Michael W

    2016-07-19

    The arterial network in the human vasculature comprises of ubiquitously present blood vessels with complex geometries (branches, curvatures and tortuosity). Secondary flow structures are vortical flow patterns that occur in curved arteries due to the combined action of centrifugal forces, adverse pressure gradients and inflow characteristics. Such flow morphologies are greatly affected by pulsatility and multiple harmonics of physiological inflow conditions and vary greatly in size-strength-shape characteristics compared to non-physiological (steady and oscillatory) flows (1 - 7). Secondary flow structures may ultimately influence the wall shear stress and exposure time of blood-borne particles toward progression of atherosclerosis, restenosis, sensitization of platelets and thrombosis (4 - 6, 8 - 13). Therefore, the ability to detect and characterize these structures under laboratory-controlled conditions is precursor to further clinical investigations. A common surgical treatment to atherosclerosis is stent implantation, to open up stenosed arteries for unobstructed blood flow. But the concomitant flow perturbations due to stent installations result in multi-scale secondary flow morphologies (4 - 6). Progressively higher order complexities such as asymmetry and loss in coherence can be induced by ensuing stent failures vis-à-vis those under unperturbed flows (5). These stent failures have been classified as "Types I-to-IV" based on failure considerations and clinical severity (14). This study presents a protocol for the experimental investigation of the complex secondary flow structures due to complete transverse stent fracture and linear displacement of fractured parts ("Type IV") in a curved artery model. The experimental method involves the implementation of particle image velocimetry (2C-2D PIV) techniques with an archetypal carotid artery inflow waveform, a refractive index matched blood-analog working fluid for phase-averaged measurements (15 - 18

  2. Project on Elite Athlete Commitment (PEAK): IV. identification of new candidate commitment sources in the sport commitment model.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Tara K; Russell, David G; Scanlan, Larry A; Klunchoo, Tatiana J; Chow, Graig M

    2013-10-01

    Following a thorough review of the current updated Sport Commitment Model, new candidate commitment sources for possible future inclusion in the model are presented. They were derived from data obtained using the Scanlan Collaborative Interview Method. Three elite New Zealand teams participated: amateur All Black rugby players, amateur Silver Fern netball players, and professional All Black rugby players. An inductive content analysis of these players' open-ended descriptions of their sources of commitment identified four unique new candidate commitment sources: Desire to Excel, Team Tradition, Elite Team Membership, and Worthy of Team Membership. A detailed definition of each candidate source is included along with example quotes from participants. Using a mixed-methods approach, these candidate sources provide a basis for future investigations to test their viability and generalizability for possible expansion of the Sport Commitment Model. PMID:24197720

  3. Project on Elite Athlete Commitment (PEAK): IV. identification of new candidate commitment sources in the sport commitment model.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Tara K; Russell, David G; Scanlan, Larry A; Klunchoo, Tatiana J; Chow, Graig M

    2013-10-01

    Following a thorough review of the current updated Sport Commitment Model, new candidate commitment sources for possible future inclusion in the model are presented. They were derived from data obtained using the Scanlan Collaborative Interview Method. Three elite New Zealand teams participated: amateur All Black rugby players, amateur Silver Fern netball players, and professional All Black rugby players. An inductive content analysis of these players' open-ended descriptions of their sources of commitment identified four unique new candidate commitment sources: Desire to Excel, Team Tradition, Elite Team Membership, and Worthy of Team Membership. A detailed definition of each candidate source is included along with example quotes from participants. Using a mixed-methods approach, these candidate sources provide a basis for future investigations to test their viability and generalizability for possible expansion of the Sport Commitment Model.

  4. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  5. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J A; Poza-Lujan, Jose-Luis; Julian, V; Posadas-Yagüe, Juan-Luis; Carrascosa, C

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5) and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE) for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts) in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system.

  6. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J A; Poza-Lujan, Jose-Luis; Julian, V; Posadas-Yagüe, Juan-Luis; Carrascosa, C

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5) and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE) for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts) in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system. PMID:26926691

  7. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  8. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5) and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE) for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts) in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system. PMID:26926691

  9. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  10. A unified gas-kinetic scheme for continuum and rarefied flows IV: Full Boltzmann and model equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Kun; Sun, Quanhua; Cai, Qingdong

    2016-06-01

    Fluid dynamic equations are valid in their respective modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. With a variation of the modeling scales, theoretically there should have a continuous spectrum of fluid dynamic equations. Even though the Boltzmann equation is claimed to be valid in all scales, many Boltzmann solvers, including direct simulation Monte Carlo method, require the cell resolution to the order of particle mean free path scale. Therefore, they are still single scale methods. In order to study multiscale flow evolution efficiently, the dynamics in the computational fluid has to be changed with the scales. A direct modeling of flow physics with a changeable scale may become an appropriate approach. The unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) is a direct modeling method in the mesh size scale, and its underlying flow physics depends on the resolution of the cell size relative to the particle mean free path. The cell size of UGKS is not limited by the particle mean free path. With the variation of the ratio between the numerical cell size and local particle mean free path, the UGKS recovers the flow dynamics from the particle transport and collision in the kinetic scale to the wave propagation in the hydrodynamic scale. The previous UGKS is mostly constructed from the evolution solution of kinetic model equations. Even though the UGKS is very accurate and effective in the low transition and continuum flow regimes with the time step being much larger than the particle mean free time, it still has space to develop more accurate flow solver in the region, where the time step is comparable with the local particle mean free time. In such a scale, there is dynamic difference from the full Boltzmann collision term and the model equations. This work is about the further development of the UGKS with the implementation of the full Boltzmann collision term in the region

  11. DA-1229, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, protects against renal injury by preventing podocyte damage in an animal model of progressive renal injury.

    PubMed

    Eun Lee, Jee; Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Song, Hye Kyoung; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kang, Young Sun; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Hyun Wook; Cha, Jin Joo; Han, Jee Young; Han, Sang Youb; Cha, Dae Ryong

    2016-05-01

    Although dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) inhibitors are known to have renoprotective effects, the mechanism underlying these effects has remained elusive. Here we investigated the effects of DA-1229, a novel DPPIV inhibitor, in two animal models of renal injury including db/db mice and the adriamycin nephropathy rodent model of chronic renal disease characterized by podocyte injury. For both models, DA-1229 was administered at 300 mg/kg/day. DPPIV activity in the kidney was significantly higher in diabetic mice compared with their nondiabetic controls. Although DA-1229 did not affect glycemic control or insulin resistance, DA-1229 did improve lipid profiles, albuminuria and renal fibrosis. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment resulted in decreased urinary excretion of nephrin, decreased circulating and kidney DPPIV activity, and decreased macrophage infiltration in the kidney. In adriamycin-treated mice, DPPIV activity in the kidney and urinary nephrin loss were both increased, whereas glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations were unchanged. Moreover, DA-1229 treatment significantly improved proteinuria, renal fibrosis and inflammation associated with decreased urinary nephrin loss, and kidney DPP4 activity. In cultured podocytes, DA-1229 restored the high glucose/angiotensin II-induced increase of DPPIV activity and preserved the nephrin levels in podocytes. These findings suggest that activation of DPPIV in the kidney has a role in the progression of renal disease, and that DA-1229 may exert its renoprotective effects by preventing podocyte injury.

  12. A Thermodynamic Model for Acetate, Lactate, and Oxalate Complexation with Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V), and U(VI) Valid to High Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bynaum, R.V.; Free, S.J.; Moore, R.C.

    1999-01-15

    The organic ligands acetate, lactate, oxalate and EDTA have been identified as components of wastes targeted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in Southeastern New Mexico. The presence of these ligands is of concern because complexation of the actinides with the ligands may increase dissolved actinide concentrations and impact chemical retardation during transport. The current work considers the complexation of Am(III), Th (IV), Np(V), and U(W) with two of the organic ligands, acetate and lactate, in NaCl media from dilute through high concentration. A thermodynamic model for actinide complexation with the organic ligands has been developed based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism and the Harvie-Moller-Weare, Felmy-Weare database for describing brine evaporite systems. The model was parameterized using first apparent stability constant data from the literature. Because of complexation of other metal ions (Fe, Mg, Ni, Pb, etc.) present in the WIPP disposal room with the organic ligands, preliminary results from model calculations indicate the organic ligands do not significantly increase dissolved actinide concentrations.

  13. Studies of removal of platinum(IV) ion microquantities from the model solutions of aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride macroquantities on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37.

    PubMed

    Hubicki, Z; Wójcik, G

    2006-08-25

    Platinum has been widely applied in catalytic industry and the recovery of noble metals from industrial wastes becomes an economic issue. The laboratory studies of platinum(IV) microquantities removal from 1M aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride solutions in 0.1M hydrochloric acid solutions on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37 of the functional secondary and tertiary amine groups were carried out. For this anion exchanger the fraction extracted values (%E, Pt(IV)) as well as the sorption isotherms were determined depending on the kind of aqueous phase and phase contact time. Moreover, the bed and weight distribution coefficients as well as working and total ion-exchange capacities were calculated from the platinum(IV) breakthrough curves. Kinetic parameters were determined. PMID:16469435

  14. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  15. Axis IV--psychosocial and environmental problems--in the DSM-IV.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, A; Ekselius, L; Ramklint, M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to further explore the properties of axis IV in the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV). In a naturalistic cross-sectional design, a group (n = 163) of young (18-25 years old) Swedish psychiatric outpatients was assessed according to DSM-IV. Psychosocial and environmental problems/axis IV were evaluated through structured interviewing by a social worker and by self-assessment on a questionnaire. Reliability between professional assessment and self-assessment of axis IV was examined. Concurrent validity of axis IV was also examined. Reliability between professional and self-assessed axis IV was fair to almost perfect, 0.31-0.83, according to prevalence and bias-adjusted kappa. Categories of psychosocial stress and environmental problems were related to the presence of axis I disorders, co-morbidity, personality disorders and decreasing Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) values. The revised axis IV according to DSM-IV seems to have concurrent validity, but is still hampered by limited reliability.

  16. Scale covariance and G-varying cosmology. IV - The log N-log S relation. [radio source models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Owen, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The traditional radio counts N(S) and radio source models are studied within the framework of the scale-covariant cosmology developed to investigate whether the relative strength of the gravitational and electromagnetic constants is a function of cosmological epoch. It is found that a gravitational constant G varying as the inverse of t, where t is the epoch in atomic units, is consistent with all the data analyzed. For a wide class of models the present cosmology allows a finer discrimination of the deceleration parameter than does standard theory. The results, when combined with those of previous papers, namely, those from radio and optical flux and angular-diameter data analysis, favor an open universe.

  17. Superiority of second over first generation chemotherapy in a randomized trial for stage III-IV intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): the 1980-1985 EORTC trial. The EORTC Lymphoma Group.

    PubMed

    Carde, P; Meerwaldt, J H; van Glabbeke, M; Somers, R; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; de Wolf-Peeters, C; de Pauw, B; Tanguy, A; Kluin-Nelemans, J C

    1991-06-01

    A first-generation CHOP-like cyclic combination chemotherapy (CT) regimen using cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 IV d1, hydroxorubicin (doxorubicin) 50 mg/m2 IV d1, VM26 60 mg/m2 IV d1, and prednisone 40 mg/m2 PO d1-5 (CHVmP) was compared to a second-generation combination wherein vincristine 1.4 mg/m2 IV and bleomycin 6 mg/m2 IM/IV were added at mid-interval (d15) to the former drugs (CHVmP + VB) in the treatment of intermediate- and high-grade malignant NHL. From April 1980 to January 1986, 141 eligible patients with stage III-IV unfavorable histologies (except T lymphoblastic NHL) entered this EORTC randomized trial. In both arms adjuvant radiotherapy (30 Gy) was given in instances of bulky or residual disease. In all patient subsets the outcome favored the second-generation regimen. The difference was even greater in patients with Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLCL). At 5 years, overall survival was 53% with CHVmP + VB versus 29% (p = 0.002). The advantage was due to a higher complete remission (CR) rate (80% versus 50%, p = 0.01). Indeed, once CR was achieved the relapse-free survival (RFS) was not significantly influenced (59% versus 49%). No significant additional toxicity could be attributed to vincristine and bleomycin. This study demonstrates a clear benefit for intermediate- and high-risk malignant NHL and particularly DLCL from intercalating non-myelotoxic drugs at mid-cycle intervals, without adverse effects. PMID:1722697

  18. Superiority of second over first generation chemotherapy in a randomized trial for stage III-IV intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): the 1980-1985 EORTC trial. The EORTC Lymphoma Group.

    PubMed

    Carde, P; Meerwaldt, J H; van Glabbeke, M; Somers, R; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; de Wolf-Peeters, C; de Pauw, B; Tanguy, A; Kluin-Nelemans, J C

    1991-06-01

    A first-generation CHOP-like cyclic combination chemotherapy (CT) regimen using cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 IV d1, hydroxorubicin (doxorubicin) 50 mg/m2 IV d1, VM26 60 mg/m2 IV d1, and prednisone 40 mg/m2 PO d1-5 (CHVmP) was compared to a second-generation combination wherein vincristine 1.4 mg/m2 IV and bleomycin 6 mg/m2 IM/IV were added at mid-interval (d15) to the former drugs (CHVmP + VB) in the treatment of intermediate- and high-grade malignant NHL. From April 1980 to January 1986, 141 eligible patients with stage III-IV unfavorable histologies (except T lymphoblastic NHL) entered this EORTC randomized trial. In both arms adjuvant radiotherapy (30 Gy) was given in instances of bulky or residual disease. In all patient subsets the outcome favored the second-generation regimen. The difference was even greater in patients with Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLCL). At 5 years, overall survival was 53% with CHVmP + VB versus 29% (p = 0.002). The advantage was due to a higher complete remission (CR) rate (80% versus 50%, p = 0.01). Indeed, once CR was achieved the relapse-free survival (RFS) was not significantly influenced (59% versus 49%). No significant additional toxicity could be attributed to vincristine and bleomycin. This study demonstrates a clear benefit for intermediate- and high-risk malignant NHL and particularly DLCL from intercalating non-myelotoxic drugs at mid-cycle intervals, without adverse effects.

  19. Empirical calibration of the near-infrared CaII triplet - IV. The stellar population synthesis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazdekis, A.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Cardiel, N.; Peletier, R. F.

    2003-04-01

    We present a new evolutionary stellar population synthesis model, which predicts spectral energy distributions for single-age single-metallicity stellar populations (SSPs) at resolution 1.5 Å (FWHM) in the spectral region of the near-infrared CaII triplet feature. The main ingredient of the model is a new extensive empirical stellar spectral library that has been recently presented by Cenarro et al., which is composed of more than 600 stars with an unprecedented coverage of the stellar atmospheric parameters. Two main products of interest for stellar population analysis are presented. The first is a spectral library for SSPs with metallicities -1.7 < [Fe/H] < +0.2, a large range of ages (0.1-18 Gyr) and initial mass function (IMF) types. They are well suited to modelling galaxy data, since the SSP spectra, with flux-calibrated response curves, can be smoothed to the resolution of the observational data, taking into account the internal velocity dispersion of the galaxy, allowing the user to analyse the observed spectrum in its own system. We also produce integrated absorption-line indices (namely CaT*, CaT and PaT) for the same SSPs in the form of equivalent widths. We find the following behaviour for the CaII triplet feature in old-aged SSPs: (i) the strength of the CaT* index does not change much with time for all metallicities for ages larger than ~3 Gyr; (ii) this index shows a strong dependence on metallicity for values below [M/H]~-0.5 and (iii) for larger metallicities this feature does not show a significant dependence either on age or on the metallicity, being more sensitive to changes in the slope of power-like IMF shapes. The SSP spectra have been calibrated with measurements for globular clusters by Armandroff & Zinn, which are well reproduced, probing the validity of using the integrated CaII triplet feature for determining the metallicities of these systems. Fitting the models to two early-type galaxies of different luminosities (NGC 4478 and 4365

  20. Our Sun IV: The Standard Model and Helioseismology: Consequences of Uncertainties in Input Physics and in Observed Solar Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothroyd, Arnold I.; Sackmann, I.-Juliana

    2001-01-01

    Helioseismic frequency observations provide an extremely accurate window into the solar interior; frequencies from the Michaelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, enable the adiabatic sound speed and adiabatic index to be inferred with an accuracy of a few parts in 10(exp 4) and the density with an accuracy of a few parts in 10(exp 3). This has become a Serious challenge to theoretical models of the Sun. Therefore, we have undertaken a self-consistent, systematic study of the sources of uncertainties in the standard solar models. We found that the largest effect on the interior structure arises from the observational uncertainties in the photospheric abundances of the elements, which affect the sound speed profile at the level of 3 parts in 10(exp 3). The estimated 4% uncertainty in the OPAL opacities could lead to effects of 1 part in 10(exp 3); the approximately 5%, uncertainty in the basic pp nuclear reaction rate would have a similar effect, as would uncertainties of approximately 15% in the diffusion constants for the gravitational settling of helium. The approximately 50% uncertainties in diffusion constants for the heavier elements would have nearly as large an effect. Different observational methods for determining the solar radius yield results differing by as much as 7 parts in 10(exp 4); we found that this leads to uncertainties of a few parts in 10(exp 3) in the sound speed int the solar convective envelope, but has negligible effect on the interior. Our reference standard solar model yielded a convective envelope position of 0.7135 solar radius, in excellent agreement with the observed value of 0.713 +/- 0.001 solar radius and was significantly affected only by Z/X, the pp rate, and the uncertainties in helium diffusion constants. Our reference model also yielded envelope helium abundance of 0.2424, in good agreement with the approximate range of 0.24 to 0.25 inferred from helioseismic observations; only

  1. The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Fostering Resiliency in Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Joy; Steen, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a group counseling intervention used to develop and foster resiliency in middle school students by implementing the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model. The authors aimed to discover what impact this group counseling intervention, which focused on resiliency characteristics, would have on students'…

  2. Examination of a Group Counseling Model of Career Decision Making with College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, P. Clay; Mobley, A. Keith; Kemer, Gulsah; Giordano, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined the effectiveness of a group career counseling model (Pyle, K. R., 2007) on college students' career decision-making abilities. They used a Solomon 4-group design and found that students who participated in the career counseling groups had significantly greater increases in career decision-making abilities than those who…

  3. A model parent group for enhancing aggressive children's social competence in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Hui

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a semi-structured psychoeducational model of group work for parents of aggressive children based on concepts of co-parenting and bidirectionality. The group was developed for enhancing five Taiwanese aggressive children's social competence by promoting positive interactions within family. Topics covered in the group included identifying parenting styles, forming parental alliances, fostering parent-child mutual initiations/mutual compliances, establishing parent-child co-regulation, and responding to aggressive children's negative emotions. Pre- and post-group comparisons suggested the effectiveness of the group model.

  4. Risk adjustment models for interhospital comparison of CS rates using Robson’s ten group classification system and other socio-demographic and clinical variables

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Caesarean section (CS) rate is a quality of health care indicator frequently used at national and international level. The aim of this study was to assess whether adjustment for Robson’s Ten Group Classification System (TGCS), and clinical and socio-demographic variables of the mother and the fetus is necessary for inter-hospital comparisons of CS rates. Methods The study population includes 64,423 deliveries in Emilia-Romagna between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2004, classified according to theTGCS. Poisson regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted hospital relative risks of CS compared to a reference category. Analyses were carried out in the overall population and separately according to the Robson groups (groups I, II, III, IV and V–X combined). Adjusted relative risks (RR) of CS were estimated using two risk-adjustment models; the first (M1) including the TGCS group as the only adjustment factor; the second (M2) including in addition demographic and clinical confounders identified using a stepwise selection procedure. Percentage variations between crude and adjusted RRs by hospital were calculated to evaluate the confounding effect of covariates. Results The percentage variations from crude to adjusted RR proved to be similar in M1 and M2 model. However, stratified analyses by Robson’s classification groups showed that residual confounding for clinical and demographic variables was present in groups I (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and III (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and to a minor extent in groups II (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour). Conclusions The TGCS classification is useful for

  5. Homozygous DNA ligase IV R278H mutation in mice leads to leaky SCID and represents a model for human LIG4 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Francesca; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Fazeli, Alex; Patrizi, Laura; Hickernell, Thomas; Paganini, Tiziana; Coakley, Kristen M.; Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Walter, Jolan E.; Feldman, Lauren; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Wang, Jing H.; Balter, Barbara B.; Recher, Mike; Andersson, Emma-Maria; Zha, Shan; Giliani, Silvia; Terhorst, Cox; Alt, Frederick W.; Yan, Catherine T.

    2010-01-01

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) is an essential component of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway and plays a key role in V(D)J recombination. Hypomorphic LIG4 mutations in humans are associated with increased cellular radiosensitivity, microcephaly, facial dysmorphisms, growth retardation, developmental delay, and a variable degree of immunodeficiency. We have generated a knock-in mouse model with a homozygous Lig4 R278H mutation that corresponds to the first LIG4 mutation reported in humans. The phenotype of homozygous mutant mice Lig4R278H/R278H (Lig4R/R) includes growth retardation, a decreased life span, a severe cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation, and a very severe, but incomplete block in T and B cell development. Peripheral T lymphocytes show an activated and anergic phenotype, reduced viability, and a restricted repertoire, reminiscent of human leaky SCID. Genomic instability is associated with a high rate of thymic tumor development. Finally, Lig4R/R mice spontaneously produce low-affinity antibodies that include autoreactive specificities, but are unable to mount high-affinity antibody responses. These findings highlight the importance of LIG4 in lymphocyte development and function, and in genomic stability maintenance, and provide a model for the complex phenotype of LIG4 syndrome in humans. PMID:20133615

  6. Effect of external magnetic field on IV 99mTc-labeled aminosilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles: demonstration in a rat model: special report.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Mauro; Barteri, Mario; Megna, Valentina; D'Elia, Piera; Rebonato, Stefania; Latini, Augusto; De Angelis, Francesca; Scaramuzzo, Francesca Anna; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Guadagno, Noemi Antonella; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rubello, Domenico; Pala, Alessandro; Colletti, Patrick M

    2015-02-01

    Among the most interesting applications of ferromagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine is the potential for localizing pharmacologically or radioactively tagged agents directly to selected tissues selected by an adjustable external magnetic field. This concept is demonstrated by the application external magnetic field on IV Tc-labeled aminosilane-coated iron oxide NPs in a rat model. In a model comparing a rat with a 0.3-T magnet over a hind paw versus a rat without a magnet, a static acquisition at 45 minutes showed that 27% of the administered radioactivity was in the area subtended by the magnet, whereas the liver displays a percentage of binding of 14% in the presence of the magnet and of 16% in the absence of an external magnetic field. These preliminary results suggest that the application of an external magnetic field may be a viable route for the development of methods for the confinement of magnetic NPs labeled with radioactive isotopes targeted for predetermined sites of the body.

  7. Social role negotiation skills for substance-abusing adolescents: a group model.

    PubMed

    Blume, T W; Green, S; Joanning, H; Quinn, W S

    1994-01-01

    A group model for therapeutic early intervention (secondary prevention) with nonaddicted adolescent substance abusers is proposed, based on a Social Role Negotiation model of substance abuse integrating concepts form role theory and cognitive developmental theory. The description of the group model, a structured short-term approach, includes a variety of exercises which promote developmental improvement in the essential skills of role-taking, role-making, and definition of the situation. An individualized intervention strategy is proposed for each group member, based on a theory-based taxonomy of substance-related problems. Strategies for using family involvement to support an adolescent group are described.

  8. The "New Family" Model: The Evolution of Group Treatment for Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriedler, Maryhelen C.; Fluharty, Leslie Barnes

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of a group therapy protocol for adult survivors of incest and the theoretical model on which it is based, the learned helplessness model of depression. Learned helplessness theory supports the assumption that victims internalize trauma. Group activities were aimed at changing negative self-beliefs and at providing…

  9. The Family FIRO Model: The Integration of Group Theory and Family Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Nicholas; Doherty, William J.

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Family Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (Family FIRO) Model, an integration of small-group theory and family therapy. The model is offered as a framework for organizing family issues. Discusses three fundamental issues of human relatedness and their applicability to group dynamics. (Author/NB)

  10. The Dimensions of Social Justice Model: Transforming Traditional Group Work into a Socially Just Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratts, Manivong J.; Anthony, Loni; Santos, KristiAnna Nicole T.

    2010-01-01

    Social justice is a complex and abstract concept that can be difficult to discuss and integrate within group work. To address this concern, this article introduces readers to the Dimensions of Social Justice Model. The model provides group leaders with a conceptual framework for understanding the degree to which social justice is integrated within…

  11. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  12. The Ionized Gas and Nuclear Environment in NGC 3783. IV; Variability and Modeling of the 900 ks CHANDRA Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Brandt, W. N.; Chelouche, Doron; George, Ian M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Gabel, Jack R.; Hamann, Frederick W.; George, Steven B.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the 900 ks spectrum of NGC3783 obtained by Chandra in 2000-2001 (Kaspi et al. 2002). We split the data in various ways to look for time dependent and luminosity dependent spectral variations. This analysis, the measured equivalent widths of a large number of X-ray lines, and our photoionization calculations, lead us to the following conclusions: 1) NGC 3783 fluctuated in luminosity, by a factor N 1.5, during individual 170 ks observations. The fluctuations were not associated with significant spectral variations. 2) On a longer time scale, of 20-120 days, we discovered two very different spectral shapes that are noted the high state and the low state spectra. The observed changes between the two can be described as the appearance and disappearance of a soft continuum component. The spectral variations are not related, in a simple way, to the brightening or the fading of the short wavelength continuum, as observed in other objects. NGC3783 seems to be the first AGN to show this unusual behavior. 3) The appearance of the soft continuum component is consistent with beeing the only spectral variation and there is no need to invoke changes in the absorber s opacity. In particular, all absorption lines with reliable measurements show the same equivalent width, within the observational uncertainties, during high and low states. 4) Photoionization model calculations show that a combination of three ionization components, each split into two kinematic components, explain very well the intensity of almost all absorption lines and the bound-free absorption. The components span a large range of ionization and a total column of about 3 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter Moreover, all components are thermally stable and are situated on the vertical branch of the stability curve.. This means that they are in pressure equilibrium and perhaps occupy the same volume of space. This is the first detection of such a multi-component equilibrium gas in

  13. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  14. Noncontact dipole effects on channel permeation. IV. Kinetic model of 5F-Trp(13) gramicidin A currents.

    PubMed

    Thompson, N; Thompson, G; Cole, C D; Cotten, M; Cross, T A; Busath, D D

    2001-09-01

    Nonlinear least squares fitting was used to assign rate constants for the three-barrier, two-site, double-occupancy, single-filing kinetic model for previously reported current-voltage relations of (5F-Indole)Trp(13) gramicidin A and gramicidin A channels (, 75:2830-2844). By judicious coupling of parameters, it was possible to reduce the parameter space from 64 parameters to 24, and a reasonable fit consistent with other experimental data was obtained. The main features of the fit were that fluorination increased the rate constant for translocation by a factor of 2.33, consistent with a free energy change in the translocation barrier of -0.50 kcal/mol, and increased first-ion binding affinity by a factor of 1.13, primarily by decreasing the first-ion exit rate constant. The translocation rate constant was 5.62 times slower in diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) bilayers than in monoolein (GMO) bilayers (coupled for the four combinations of peptide and salt), suggesting a 44.2-mV difference in the projection of the interfacial dipole into the channel. Thus fluorination caused increased currents in DPhPC bilayers, where a high interfacial dipole potential makes translocation more rate limiting because the translocation barrier was reduced, and decreased currents in GMO bilayers, where ion exit or entry is rate limiting because these barriers were increased.

  15. A simple model of group selection that cannot be analyzed with inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    van Veelen, Matthijs; Luo, Shishi; Simon, Burton

    2014-11-01

    A widespread claim in evolutionary theory is that every group selection model can be recast in terms of inclusive fitness. Although there are interesting classes of group selection models for which this is possible, we show that it is not true in general. With a simple set of group selection models, we show two distinct limitations that prevent recasting in terms of inclusive fitness. The first is a limitation across models. We show that if inclusive fitness is to always give the correct prediction, the definition of relatedness needs to change, continuously, along with changes in the parameters of the model. This results in infinitely many different definitions of relatedness - one for every parameter value - which strips relatedness of its meaning. The second limitation is across time. We show that one can find the trajectory for the group selection model by solving a partial differential equation, and that it is mathematically impossible to do this using inclusive fitness.

  16. A simple model of group selection that cannot be analyzed with inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    van Veelen, Matthijs; Luo, Shishi; Simon, Burton

    2014-11-01

    A widespread claim in evolutionary theory is that every group selection model can be recast in terms of inclusive fitness. Although there are interesting classes of group selection models for which this is possible, we show that it is not true in general. With a simple set of group selection models, we show two distinct limitations that prevent recasting in terms of inclusive fitness. The first is a limitation across models. We show that if inclusive fitness is to always give the correct prediction, the definition of relatedness needs to change, continuously, along with changes in the parameters of the model. This results in infinitely many different definitions of relatedness - one for every parameter value - which strips relatedness of its meaning. The second limitation is across time. We show that one can find the trajectory for the group selection model by solving a partial differential equation, and that it is mathematically impossible to do this using inclusive fitness. PMID:25034338

  17. Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

    2008-01-01

    The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

  18. Multi-scale approach to the modeling of fission gas discharge during hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in gen-IV sodium fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Behafarid, F.; Shaver, D. R.; Bolotnov, I. A.; Jansen, K. E.; Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z.

    2012-07-01

    The required technological and safety standards for future Gen IV Reactors can only be achieved if advanced simulation capabilities become available, which combine high performance computing with the necessary level of modeling detail and high accuracy of predictions. The purpose of this paper is to present new results of multi-scale three-dimensional (3D) simulations of the inter-related phenomena, which occur as a result of fuel element heat-up and cladding failure, including the injection of a jet of gaseous fission products into a partially blocked Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) coolant channel, and gas/molten sodium transport along the coolant channels. The computational approach to the analysis of the overall accident scenario is based on using two different inter-communicating computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) codes: a CFD code, PHASTA, and a RANS code, NPHASE-CMFD. Using the geometry and time history of cladding failure and the gas injection rate, direct numerical simulations (DNS), combined with the Level Set method, of two-phase turbulent flow have been performed by the PHASTA code. The model allows one to track the evolution of gas/liquid interfaces at a centimeter scale. The simulated phenomena include the formation and breakup of the jet of fission products injected into the liquid sodium coolant. The PHASTA outflow has been averaged over time to obtain mean phasic velocities and volumetric concentrations, as well as the liquid turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate, all of which have served as the input to the core-scale simulations using the NPHASE-CMFD code. A sliding window time averaging has been used to capture mean flow parameters for transient cases. The results presented in the paper include testing and validation of the proposed models, as well the predictions of fission-gas/liquid-sodium transport along a multi-rod fuel assembly of SFR during a partial loss-of-flow accident. (authors)

  19. Applications of multivariate modeling to neuroimaging group analysis: a comprehensive alternative to univariate general linear model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Adleman, Nancy E; Saad, Ziad S; Leibenluft, Ellen; Cox, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    All neuroimaging packages can handle group analysis with t-tests or general linear modeling (GLM). However, they are quite hamstrung when there are multiple within-subject factors or when quantitative covariates are involved in the presence of a within-subject factor. In addition, sphericity is typically assumed for the variance-covariance structure when there are more than two levels in a within-subject factor. To overcome such limitations in the traditional AN(C)OVA and GLM, we adopt a multivariate modeling (MVM) approach to analyzing neuroimaging data at the group level with the following advantages: a) there is no limit on the number of factors as long as sample sizes are deemed appropriate; b) quantitative covariates can be analyzed together with within-subject factors; c) when a within-subject factor is involved, three testing methodologies are provided: traditional univariate testing (UVT) with sphericity assumption (UVT-UC) and with correction when the assumption is violated (UVT-SC), and within-subject multivariate testing (MVT-WS); d) to correct for sphericity violation at the voxel level, we propose a hybrid testing (HT) approach that achieves equal or higher power via combining traditional sphericity correction methods (Greenhouse-Geisser and Huynh-Feldt) with MVT-WS. To validate the MVM methodology, we performed simulations to assess the controllability for false positives and power achievement. A real FMRI dataset was analyzed to demonstrate the capability of the MVM approach. The methodology has been implemented into an open source program 3dMVM in AFNI, and all the statistical tests can be performed through symbolic coding with variable names instead of the tedious process of dummy coding. Our data indicates that the severity of sphericity violation varies substantially across brain regions. The differences among various modeling methodologies were addressed through direct comparisons between the MVM approach and some of the GLM implementations in

  20. To Eat and Not Be Eaten: Modelling Resources and Safety in Multi-Species Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Umesh; Quader, Suhel

    2012-01-01

    Using mixed-species bird flocks as an example, we model the payoffs for two types of species from participating in multi-species animal groups. Salliers feed on mobile prey, are good sentinels and do not affect prey capture rates of gleaners; gleaners feed on prey on substrates and can enhance the prey capture rate of salliers by flushing prey, but are poor sentinels. These functional types are known from various animal taxa that form multi-species associations. We model costs and benefits of joining groups for a wide range of group compositions under varying abundances of two types of prey–prey on substrates and mobile prey. Our model predicts that gleaners and salliers show a conflict of interest in multi-species groups, because gleaners benefit from increasing numbers of salliers in the group, whereas salliers benefit from increasing gleaner numbers. The model also predicts that the limits to size and variability in composition of multi-species groups are driven by the relative abundance of different types of prey, independent of predation pressure. Our model emphasises resources as a primary driver of temporal and spatial group dynamics, rather than reproductive activity or predation per se, which have hitherto been thought to explain patterns of multi-species group formation and cohesion. The qualitative predictions of the model are supported by empirical patterns from both terrestrial and marine multi-species groups, suggesting that similar mechanisms might underlie group dynamics in a range of taxa. The model also makes novel predictions about group dynamics that can be tested using variation across space and time. PMID:22848706

  1. Geometries of functional group interactions in enzyme-ligand complexes: guides for receptor modelling.

    PubMed

    Tintelnot, M; Andrews, P

    1989-03-01

    An approach is described which makes use of X-ray structural data from enzyme-ligand complexes in order to obtain information for application in receptor modelling. The atomic surroundings of five different ligand functional groups were determined for all complex structures recorded in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. These atomic surroundings were then superimposed with respect to the atoms of the functional groups of the ligands in order to obtain clouds of neighbouring atoms. General principles were sought to describe the orientation or favoured position of groups or atoms around those functional groups when bound to a macromolecule. Some simple conclusions and leads for further modelling were thus derived.

  2. Group Sparsity Regularization for Calibration of SubsurfaceFlow Models under Geologic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammadi, A.; Jafarpour, B.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface flow model calibration inverse problems typically involve inference of high-dimensional aquifer properties from limited monitoring and performance data. To find plausible solutions, the dynamic flow and pressure data are augmented with prior geological information about the unknown properties. Specifically, geologic continuity that exhibits itself as strong spatial correlation in heterogeneous rock properties has motivated various regularization and parameterization techniques for solving ill-posed model calibration inverse problems. However, complex geologic formations, such as fluvial facies distribution, are not amenable to generic regularization techniques; hence, more specific prior models about the shape and connectivity of the underlying geologic patterns are necessary for constraining the solution properly. Inspired by recent advances in signal processing, sparsity regularization uses effective basis functions to compactly represent complex geologic patterns for efficient model calibration. Here, we present a novel group-sparsity regularization that can discriminate between alternative plausible prior models based on the dynamic response data. This regularization property is used to select prior models that better reconstruct the complex geo-spatial connectivity during calibration. With group sparsity, the dominant spatial connectivity patterns are encoded into several parameter groups where each group is tuned to represent certain types of geologic patterns. In the model calibration process, dynamic flow and pressure data are used to select a small subset of groups to estimate aquifer properties. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the group sparsity regularization for solving ill-posed model calibration inverse problems.

  3. Using Explanatory Item Response Models to Analyze Group Differences in Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates the use of an explanatory item response modeling (EIRM) approach in the context of measuring group differences in science achievement. The distinction between item response models and EIRMs, recently elaborated by De Boeck and Wilson (2004), is presented within the statistical framework of generalized linear mixed models.…

  4. Evidence of empowerment in resident council groups: an examination of two leadership models in assisted living.

    PubMed

    Bonifas, Robin P; Hedgpeth, Jay; Kramer, Christie

    2013-01-01

    Individuals living in long-term care facilities and the professionals working with them are seeking methods to enhance resident choice and self-direction in personal care and internal community planning. This article presents findings from a study examining the incidence of empowerment opportunities in two resident council groups in assisted living facilities; one group used a resident leadership model and the other used an administrative leadership model by residents' choice. Results indicate that even with health and mental health challenges, residents were able to exercise choice in complicated situations under both leadership models, suggesting that resident council groups are a beneficial empowerment strategy.

  5. Oxovanadium(IV) complexes of bioinorganic and medicinal relevance: Synthesis, characterization and 3D molecular modeling and analysis of some oxovanadium(IV) complexes involving the O, N-donor environment of pyrazolone-based sulfa drug Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, R. C.; Rajput, S.

    2006-08-01

    Four new oxovanadium(IV) complexes, formed by the interaction of vanadyl sulfate pentahydrate and the Schiff bases derived from 3-methyl-1-phenyl-4-valeryl-2-pyrazolin-5-one and the sulfa drugs, N-(3'-methyl-1'-phenyl-4'-valerylidene-2'-pyrazolin-5'-one)sulfadiazine (L 1H), N-(3'-methyl-1'-phenyl-4'-valerylidene-2'-pyrazolin-5'-)sulfaguanidine (L 2H), N-(3'-methyl-1'-phenyl-4'-valerylidene-2'-pyrazolin-5'-one)sulphanilamide (L 3H) and N'(-3'-methyl-1'-phenyl-4'-valerylidene-2'-pyrazolin-5'-one)sulphamethoxazole (L 4H) in aqueous ethanol are described. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductances, magnetic and decomposition temperature measurements, cyclic voltammetry, electron spin resonance, infrared and electronic spectral studies. They have the composition [VO(L) 2]·H 2O, where LH=Schiff base L 1H, L 2H, L 3H or L 4H mentioned above. A square-pyramidal structure having a slight ⋯V dbnd6 O⋯V dbnd6 O⋯ type interaction has been proposed for these complexes.

  6. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  7. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  8. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  9. Bayesian Hierarchical Semiparametric Modelling of Longitudinal Post-treatment Outcomes from Open Enrolment Therapy Groups.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Susan M; Savitsky, Terrance D

    2013-06-01

    There are several challenges to testing the effectiveness of group therapy-based interventions in alcohol and other drug use (AOD) treatment settings. Enrollment into AOD therapy groups typically occurs on an open (rolling) basis. Changes in therapy group membership induce a complex correlation structure among client outcomes, with relatively small numbers of clients attending each therapy group session. Primary outcomes are measured post-treatment, so each datum reflects the effect of all sessions attended by a client. The number of post-treatment outcomes assessments is typically very limited. The first feature of our modeling approach relaxes the assumption of independent random effects in the standard multiple membership model by employing conditional autoregression (CAR) to model correlation in random therapy group session effects associated with clients' attendance of common group therapy sessions. A second feature specifies a longitudinal growth model under which the posterior distribution of client-specific random effects, or growth parameters, is modeled non-parametrically. The Dirichlet process prior helps to overcome limitations of standard parametric growth models given limited numbers of longitudinal assessments. We motivate and illustrate our approach with a data set from a study of group cognitive behavioral therapy to reduce depressive symptoms among residential AOD treatment clients. PMID:24353375

  10. Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling of Resting-state fMRI: applicability of group models to individual subjects

    PubMed Central

    James, G. Andrew; Kelley, Mary E.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Dunlop, Boadie; Nemeroff, Charles; Mayberg, Helen S.; Hu, Xiaoping P.

    2009-01-01

    The extension of group-level connectivity methods to individual subjects remains a hurdle for statistical analyses of neuroimaging data. Previous group analyses of positron emission tomography data in clinically depressed patients, for example, have shown that resting-state connectivity prior to therapy predicts how patients eventually respond to pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Such applications would be considerably more informative for clinical decision making if these connectivity methods could be extended into the individual subject domain. To test such an extension, 46 treatment-naïve depressed patients were enrolled in an fMRI study to model baseline resting-state functional connectivity. Resting-state fMRI scans were acquired and submitted to exploratory structural equation modeling (SEM) to derive the optimal group connectivity model. Jackknife and split sample tests confirm that group model was highly reproducible, and path weights were consistent across the best five group models. When this model was applied to data from individual subjects, 85% of patients fit the group model. Histogram analysis of individual subjects’ paths indicate that some paths are better representative of group membership. These results suggest that exploratory SEM is a viable technique for neuroimaging connectivity analyses of individual subjects’ resting-state fMRI data. PMID:19162206

  11. LDA-Based Unified Topic Modeling for Similar TV User Grouping and TV Program Recommendation.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Shinjee; Kim, Eunhui; Kim, Munchurl

    2015-08-01

    Social TV is a social media service via TV and social networks through which TV users exchange their experiences about TV programs that they are viewing. For social TV service, two technical aspects are envisioned: grouping of similar TV users to create social TV communities and recommending TV programs based on group and personal interests for personalizing TV. In this paper, we propose a unified topic model based on grouping of similar TV users and recommending TV programs as a social TV service. The proposed unified topic model employs two latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models. One is a topic model of TV users, and the other is a topic model of the description words for viewed TV programs. The two LDA models are then integrated via a topic proportion parameter for TV programs, which enforces the grouping of similar TV users and associated description words for watched TV programs at the same time in a unified topic modeling framework. The unified model identifies the semantic relation between TV user groups and TV program description word groups so that more meaningful TV program recommendations can be made. The unified topic model also overcomes an item ramp-up problem such that new TV programs can be reliably recommended to TV users. Furthermore, from the topic model of TV users, TV users with similar tastes can be grouped as topics, which can then be recommended as social TV communities. To verify our proposed method of unified topic-modeling-based TV user grouping and TV program recommendation for social TV services, in our experiments, we used real TV viewing history data and electronic program guide data from a seven-month period collected by a TV poll agency. The experimental results show that the proposed unified topic model yields an average 81.4% precision for 50 topics in TV program recommendation and its performance is an average of 6.5% higher than that of the topic model of TV users only. For TV user prediction with new TV programs, the average

  12. LDA-Based Unified Topic Modeling for Similar TV User Grouping and TV Program Recommendation.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Shinjee; Kim, Eunhui; Kim, Munchurl

    2015-08-01

    Social TV is a social media service via TV and social networks through which TV users exchange their experiences about TV programs that they are viewing. For social TV service, two technical aspects are envisioned: grouping of similar TV users to create social TV communities and recommending TV programs based on group and personal interests for personalizing TV. In this paper, we propose a unified topic model based on grouping of similar TV users and recommending TV programs as a social TV service. The proposed unified topic model employs two latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models. One is a topic model of TV users, and the other is a topic model of the description words for viewed TV programs. The two LDA models are then integrated via a topic proportion parameter for TV programs, which enforces the grouping of similar TV users and associated description words for watched TV programs at the same time in a unified topic modeling framework. The unified model identifies the semantic relation between TV user groups and TV program description word groups so that more meaningful TV program recommendations can be made. The unified topic model also overcomes an item ramp-up problem such that new TV programs can be reliably recommended to TV users. Furthermore, from the topic model of TV users, TV users with similar tastes can be grouped as topics, which can then be recommended as social TV communities. To verify our proposed method of unified topic-modeling-based TV user grouping and TV program recommendation for social TV services, in our experiments, we used real TV viewing history data and electronic program guide data from a seven-month period collected by a TV poll agency. The experimental results show that the proposed unified topic model yields an average 81.4% precision for 50 topics in TV program recommendation and its performance is an average of 6.5% higher than that of the topic model of TV users only. For TV user prediction with new TV programs, the average

  13. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  14. A model for the origin of group reproduction during the evolutionary transition to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Maliet, Odile; Shelton, Deborah E; Michod, Richard E

    2015-06-01

    During the evolution of multicellular organisms, the unit of selection and adaptation, the individual, changes from the single cell to the multicellular group. To become individuals, groups must evolve a group life cycle in which groups reproduce other groups. Investigations into the origin of group reproduction have faced a chicken-and-egg problem: traits related to reproduction at the group level often appear both to be a result of and a prerequisite for natural selection at the group level. With a focus on volvocine algae, we model the basic elements of the cell cycle and show how group reproduction can emerge through the coevolution of a life-history trait with a trait underpinning cell cycle change. Our model explains how events in the cell cycle become reordered to create a group life cycle through continuous change in the cell cycle trait, but only if the cell cycle trait can coevolve with the life-history trait. Explaining the origin of group reproduction helps us understand one of life's most familiar, yet fundamental, aspects-its hierarchical structure.

  15. Toward a unifying model of identification with groups: integrating theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roccas, Sonia; Sagiv, Lilach; Schwartz, Shalom; Halevy, Nir; Eidelson, Roy

    2008-08-01

    Building on the contributions of diverse theoretical approaches, the authors present a multidimensional model of group identification. Integrating conceptions from the social identity perspective with those from research on individualism-collectivism, nationalism- patriotism, and identification with organizations, we propose four conceptually distinct modes of identification: importance (how much I view the group as part of who I am), commitment (how much I want to benefit the group), superiority (how much I view my group as superior to other groups), and deference (how much I honor, revere, and submit to the group's norms, symbols, and leaders). We present an instrument for assessing the four modes of identification and review initial empirical findings that validate the proposed model and show its utility in understanding antecedents and consequences of identification. PMID:18641386

  16. Toward a unifying model of identification with groups: integrating theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roccas, Sonia; Sagiv, Lilach; Schwartz, Shalom; Halevy, Nir; Eidelson, Roy

    2008-08-01

    Building on the contributions of diverse theoretical approaches, the authors present a multidimensional model of group identification. Integrating conceptions from the social identity perspective with those from research on individualism-collectivism, nationalism- patriotism, and identification with organizations, we propose four conceptually distinct modes of identification: importance (how much I view the group as part of who I am), commitment (how much I want to benefit the group), superiority (how much I view my group as superior to other groups), and deference (how much I honor, revere, and submit to the group's norms, symbols, and leaders). We present an instrument for assessing the four modes of identification and review initial empirical findings that validate the proposed model and show its utility in understanding antecedents and consequences of identification.

  17. Suicide prevention by online support groups: an action theory-based model of emotional first aid.

    PubMed

    Gilat, Itzhak; Shahar, Golan

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, online support groups have become a valuable source of help for individuals in suicidal crisis. Their attractiveness is attributed to features that enhance help-seeking and self-disclosure such as availability, anonymity, and use of written communication. However, online support groups also suffer from limitations and potential risks as agents of suicide prevention. The Israeli Association for Emotional First Aid (ERAN) has developed a practical model that seeks to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of online suicide prevention. The model applies the Action Theory concepts whereby individuals shape their own environment. The present paper presents the model, which is based on an online support group combined with personal chat and a telephonic help line. The online support group is moderated by paraprofessionals who function as both process regulators and support providers. The principles and practice of the model are described, the theoretical rationale is presented, and directions for future research are suggested.

  18. Likelihood Methods for Testing Group Problem Solving Models with Censored Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regal, Ronald R.; Larntz, Kinley

    1978-01-01

    Models relating individual and group problem solving solution times under the condition of limited time (time limit censoring) are presented. Maximum likelihood estimation of parameters and a goodness of fit test are presented. (Author/JKS)

  19. Simultaneous geologic scenario identification and flow model calibration with group-sparsity formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammadi, Azarang; Jafarpour, Behnam

    2016-06-01

    Adopting representative geologic connectivity scenarios is critical for reliable modeling and prediction of flow and transport processes in subsurface environments. Geologic scenarios are often developed by integrating several sources of information, including knowledge of the depositional environment, qualitative and quantitative data such as outcrop and well logs, and process-based geologic modeling. In general, flow and transport response data are usually not included in constructing geologic scenarios for a basin. Instead, these data are typically matched using a given prior geologic scenario as constraint. Since data limitations, modeling assumptions and subjective interpretations can lead to significant uncertainty in the adopted geologic scenarios, flow and transport data may also be useful for constraining the uncertainty in proposed geologic scenarios. Constraining geologic scenarios with flow-related data opens an interesting and challenging research area, which goes beyond the traditional model calibration formulations where the geologic scenario is assumed given. In this paper, a novel concept, known as group-sparsity regularization, is proposed as an effective formulation to constrain the uncertainty in the prior geologic scenario during subsurface flow model calibration. Given a collection of model realizations from several plausible geologic scenarios, the proposed method first applies the truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) to compactly represent the models from each geologic scenario. The TSVD basis for representing each scenario forms a distinct group. The proposed approach searches over these groups (i.e., geologic scenarios) to eliminate inconsistent groups that are not supported by the observed flow/pressure data. The group-sparsity regularization minimizes a l1/l2mixed norm, where the l2-norm quantifies the contribution of each group and operates on the coefficients within the groups while the l1-norm, having a selection property, is

  20. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision. PMID:23009276

  1. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  2. Using the Solving Problems Together Psychoeducational Group Counseling Model as an Intervention for Negative Peer Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri Lynn; Khurshid, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), that focuses on working with students who struggle with negative peer pressure. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  3. Teaching Engineering Statistics with Technology, Group Learning, Contextual Projects, Simulation Models and Student Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeu, Jorge Luis

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses our teaching approach in graduate level Engineering Statistics. It is based on the use of modern technology, learning groups, contextual projects, simulation models, and statistical and simulation software to entice student motivation. The use of technology to facilitate group projects and presentations, and to generate,…

  4. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision.

  5. Context and Models for the Analysis of Individual and Group Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; McIlveen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the papers presented in the discussion group focused on the theme "Models for the Analysis of Individual and Group Needs" at the joint symposium of the International Association for Educational and Vocational Guidance, Society for Vocational Psychology, and National Career Development Association held in Padua, Italy, in…

  6. Group-oriented coordination models for distributed client-server computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Hughes, Craig S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes group-oriented control models for distributed client-server interactions. These models transparently coordinate requests for services that involve multiple servers, such as queries across distributed databases. Specific capabilities include: decomposing and replicating client requests; dispatching request subtasks or copies to independent, networked servers; and combining server results into a single response for the client. The control models were implemented by combining request broker and process group technologies with an object-oriented communication middleware tool. The models are illustrated in the context of a distributed operations support application for space-based systems.

  7. Incorporating social groups' responses in a descriptive model for second- and higher-order impact identification

    SciTech Connect

    Sutheerawatthana, Pitch; Minato, Takayuki

    2010-02-15

    The response of a social group is a missing element in the formal impact assessment model. Previous discussion of the involvement of social groups in an intervention has mainly focused on the formation of the intervention. This article discusses the involvement of social groups in a different way. A descriptive model is proposed by incorporating a social group's response into the concept of second- and higher-order effects. The model is developed based on a cause-effect relationship through the observation of phenomena in case studies. The model clarifies the process by which social groups interact with a lower-order effect and then generate a higher-order effect in an iterative manner. This study classifies social groups' responses into three forms-opposing, modifying, and advantage-taking action-and places them in six pathways. The model is expected to be used as an analytical tool for investigating and identifying impacts in the planning stage and as a framework for monitoring social groups' responses during the implementation stage of a policy, plan, program, or project (PPPPs).

  8. Group Sequential Design for Randomized Phase III Trials under the Weibull Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianrong; Xiong, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a parametric sequential test is proposed under the Weibull model. The proposed test is asymptotically normal with an independent increments structure. The sample size for fixed sample test is derived for the purpose of group sequential trial design. In addition, a multi-stage group sequential procedure is given under the Weibull model by applying the Brownian motion property of the test statistic and sequential conditional probability ratio test methodology. PMID:25322440

  9. Client satisfaction with a new group-based model of case management for supported housing services.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Reddy, Navin; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Supportive housing typically offers rental subsidies and individual intensive community-based case management and has become a predominant service model for homeless adults. Alternative case management models have not been adequately explored. This study evaluates satisfaction with a novel group-intensive peer support (GIPS) model of case management for the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program. A total of 95 HUD-VASH clients rated their satisfaction with services and responded to open-ended questions about what they liked best and least about the program. Quantitative and qualitative analyses compared clients who attended groups as part of the GIPS model and those who did not. No significant difference in satisfaction between group and non-group attenders were found. Clients reported what they liked best about the program was the staff; those who attended groups reported what they liked best was the social interaction and peer support. These findings suggest clients who attend groups for their primary source of case management may be as satisfied as those who receive only individual case management. GIPS offers a feasible and acceptable service model and should be further explored along with other alternative models of care in supportive housing services. PMID:24413143

  10. Group-wise herding behavior in financial markets: an agent-based modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsung; Kim, Minki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we shed light on the dynamic characteristics of rational group behaviors and the relationship between monetary policy and economic units in the financial market by using an agent-based model (ABM), the Hurst exponent, and the Shannon entropy. First, an agent-based model is used to analyze the characteristics of the group behaviors at different levels of irrationality. Second, the Hurst exponent is applied to analyze the characteristics of the trend-following irrationality group. Third, the Shannon entropy is used to analyze the randomness and unpredictability of group behavior. We show that in a system that focuses on macro-monetary policy, steep fluctuations occur, meaning that the medium-level irrationality group has the highest Hurst exponent and Shannon entropy among all of the groups. However, in a system that focuses on micro-monetary policy, all group behaviors follow a stable trend, and the medium irrationality group thus remains stable, too. Likewise, in a system that focuses on both micro- and macro-monetary policies, all groups tend to be stable. Consequently, we find that group behavior varies across economic units at each irrationality level for micro- and macro-monetary policy in the financial market. Together, these findings offer key insights into monetary policy.

  11. Group-wise herding behavior in financial markets: an agent-based modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsung; Kim, Minki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we shed light on the dynamic characteristics of rational group behaviors and the relationship between monetary policy and economic units in the financial market by using an agent-based model (ABM), the Hurst exponent, and the Shannon entropy. First, an agent-based model is used to analyze the characteristics of the group behaviors at different levels of irrationality. Second, the Hurst exponent is applied to analyze the characteristics of the trend-following irrationality group. Third, the Shannon entropy is used to analyze the randomness and unpredictability of group behavior. We show that in a system that focuses on macro-monetary policy, steep fluctuations occur, meaning that the medium-level irrationality group has the highest Hurst exponent and Shannon entropy among all of the groups. However, in a system that focuses on micro-monetary policy, all group behaviors follow a stable trend, and the medium irrationality group thus remains stable, too. Likewise, in a system that focuses on both micro- and macro-monetary policies, all groups tend to be stable. Consequently, we find that group behavior varies across economic units at each irrationality level for micro- and macro-monetary policy in the financial market. Together, these findings offer key insights into monetary policy. PMID:24714635

  12. Group-Wise Herding Behavior in Financial Markets: An Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsung; Kim, Minki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we shed light on the dynamic characteristics of rational group behaviors and the relationship between monetary policy and economic units in the financial market by using an agent-based model (ABM), the Hurst exponent, and the Shannon entropy. First, an agent-based model is used to analyze the characteristics of the group behaviors at different levels of irrationality. Second, the Hurst exponent is applied to analyze the characteristics of the trend-following irrationality group. Third, the Shannon entropy is used to analyze the randomness and unpredictability of group behavior. We show that in a system that focuses on macro-monetary policy, steep fluctuations occur, meaning that the medium-level irrationality group has the highest Hurst exponent and Shannon entropy among all of the groups. However, in a system that focuses on micro-monetary policy, all group behaviors follow a stable trend, and the medium irrationality group thus remains stable, too. Likewise, in a system that focuses on both micro- and macro-monetary policies, all groups tend to be stable. Consequently, we find that group behavior varies across economic units at each irrationality level for micro- and macro-monetary policy in the financial market. Together, these findings offer key insights into monetary policy. PMID:24714635

  13. Beyond the "Classic" Nurture Group Model: An Evaluation of Part-Time and Cross-Age Nurture Groups in a Scottish Local Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Karen; Lee, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This study begins to explore ways in which the principles underpinning the traditional "nurture group" model could be altered and age ranges extended while continuing to deliver the proven success of nurture groups in promoting children's social and emotional development. Part-time nurture groups were established in four different primary schools…

  14. Electronic structure description of a [Co(III)3Co(IV)O4] cluster: a model for the paramagnetic intermediate in cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation.

    PubMed

    McAlpin, J Gregory; Stich, Troy A; Ohlin, C André; Surendranath, Yogesh; Nocera, Daniel G; Casey, William H; Britt, R David

    2011-10-01

    Multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonace (EPR) spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations were performed on [Co(4)O(4)(C(5)H(5)N)(4)(CH(3)CO(2))(4)](+) (1(+)), a cobalt tetramer with total electron spin S = 1/2 and formal cobalt oxidation states III, III, III, and IV. The cuboidal arrangement of its cobalt and oxygen atoms is similar to that of proposed structures for the molecular cobaltate clusters of the cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) water-oxidizing catalyst. The Davies electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectrum is well-modeled using a single class of hyperfine-coupled (59)Co nuclei with a modestly strong interaction (principal elements of the hyperfine tensor are equal to [-20(±2), 77(±1), -5(±15)] MHz). Mims (1)H ENDOR spectra of 1(+) with selectively deuterated pyridine ligands confirm that the amount of unpaired spin on the cobalt-bonding partner is significantly reduced from unity. Multifrequency (14)N ESEEM spectra (acquired at 9.5 and 34.0 GHz) indicate that four nearly equivalent nitrogen nuclei are coupled to the electron spin. Cumulatively, our EPR spectroscopic findings indicate that the unpaired spin is delocalized almost equally across the eight core atoms, a finding corroborated by results from DFT calculations. Each octahedrally coordinated cobalt ion is forced into a low-spin electron configuration by the anionic oxo and carboxylato ligands, and a fractional electron hole is localized on each metal center in a Co 3d(xz,yz)-based molecular orbital for this essentially [Co(+3.125)(4)O(4)] system. Comparing the EPR spectrum of 1(+) with that of the catalyst film allows us to draw conclusions about the electronic structure of this water-oxidation catalyst.

  15. Understanding Group/Party Affiliation Using Social Networks and Agent-Based Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kenyth

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of group affiliation and group dispersion is a concept that is most often studied in order for political candidates to better understand the most efficient way to conduct their campaigns. While political campaigning in the United States is a very hot topic that most politicians analyze and study, the concept of group/party affiliation presents its own area of study that producers very interesting results. One tool for examining party affiliation on a large scale is agent-based modeling (ABM), a paradigm in the modeling and simulation (M&S) field perfectly suited for aggregating individual behaviors to observe large swaths of a population. For this study agent based modeling was used in order to look at a community of agents and determine what factors can affect the group/party affiliation patterns that are present. In the agent-based model that was used for this experiment many factors were present but two main factors were used to determine the results. The results of this study show that it is possible to use agent-based modeling to explore group/party affiliation and construct a model that can mimic real world events. More importantly, the model in the study allows for the results found in a smaller community to be translated into larger experiments to determine if the results will remain present on a much larger scale.

  16. A hierarchical (multicomponent) model of in-group identification: examining in Russian samples.

    PubMed

    Lovakov, Andrey V; Agadullina, Elena R; Osin, Evgeny N

    2015-06-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of Leach et al.'s (2008) model of in-group identification in two studies using Russian samples (overall N = 621). In Study 1, a series of multi-group confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the hierarchical model of in-group identification, which included two second-order factors, self-definition (individual self-stereotyping, and in-group homogeneity) and self-investment (satisfaction, solidarity, and centrality), fitted the data well for all four group identities (ethnic, religious, university, and gender) (CFI > .93, TLI > .92, RMSEA < .06, SRMR < .06) and demonstrated a better fit, compared to the alternative models. In Study 2, the construct validity and reliability of the Russian version of the in-group identification measure was examined. Results show that these measures have adequate psychometric properties. In short, our results show that Leach et al.'s model is reproduced in Russian culture. The Russian version of this measure can be recommended for use in future in-group research in Russian-speaking samples.

  17. Testing the cognitive-behavioural maintenance models across DSM-5 bulimic-type eating disorder diagnostic groups: a multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Carrà, Giuseppe; Calogero, Rachel; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Gaudio, Santino; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    The original cognitive-behavioural (CB) model of bulimia nervosa, which provided the basis for the widely used CB therapy, proposed that specific dysfunctional cognitions and behaviours maintain the disorder. However, amongst treatment completers, only 40-50 % have a full and lasting response. The enhanced CB model (CB-E), upon which the enhanced version of the CB treatment was based, extended the original approach by including four additional maintenance factors. This study evaluated and compared both CB models in a large clinical treatment seeking sample (N = 679), applying both DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for bulimic-type eating disorders. Application of the DSM-5 criteria reduced the number of cases of DSM-IV bulimic-type eating disorders not otherwise specified to 29.6 %. Structural equation modelling analysis indicated that (a) although both models provided a good fit to the data, the CB-E model accounted for a greater proportion of variance in eating-disordered behaviours than the original one, (b) interpersonal problems, clinical perfectionism and low self-esteem were indirectly associated with dietary restraint through over-evaluation of shape and weight, (c) interpersonal problems and mood intolerance were directly linked to binge eating, whereas restraint only indirectly affected binge eating through mood intolerance, suggesting that factors other than restraint may play a more critical role in the maintenance of binge eating. In terms of strength of the associations, differences across DSM-5 bulimic-type eating disorder diagnostic groups were not observed. The results are discussed with reference to theory and research, including neurobiological findings and recent hypotheses.

  18. Bio-inspired group modeling and analysis for intruder detection in mobile sensor/robotic networks.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Xiao, Yang; Liang, Xiannuan; Philip Chen, C L

    2015-01-01

    Although previous bio-inspired models have concentrated on invertebrates (such as ants), mammals such as primates with higher cognitive function are valuable for modeling the increasingly complex problems in engineering. Understanding primates' social and communication systems, and applying what is learned from them to engineering domains is likely to inspire solutions to a number of problems. This paper presents a novel bio-inspired approach to determine group size by researching and simulating primate society. Group size does matter for both primate society and digital entities. It is difficult to determine how to group mobile sensors/robots that patrol in a large area when many factors are considered such as patrol efficiency, wireless interference, coverage, inter/intragroup communications, etc. This paper presents a simulation-based theoretical study on patrolling strategies for robot groups with the comparison of large and small groups through simulations and theoretical results. PMID:24846688

  19. Loyal deviance: testing the normative conflict model of dissent in social groups.

    PubMed

    Packer, Dominic J; Chasteen, Alison L

    2010-01-01

    The normative conflict model predicts that expressions of dissent within groups can be motivated by the collective interest and that strongly identified members may dissent from group norms if and when they are perceived to be harmful to the collective. We present convergent evidence from four studies in support of the model. Study 1 investigated retrospective reports of disagreements and found that strongly identified members reported collectively oriented motives for expressing disagreement within their groups. Studies 2a and 2b provided experimental tests of the prediction that strongly identified group members are willing to dissent when they reflect on how a norm could harm their group but not when they reflect on negative individualistic consequences of the same norm. Finally, Study 3 replicated these effects using a correlational design that measured actual opinion expression in an ostensible online chat room.

  20. Bio-inspired group modeling and analysis for intruder detection in mobile sensor/robotic networks.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Xiao, Yang; Liang, Xiannuan; Philip Chen, C L

    2015-01-01

    Although previous bio-inspired models have concentrated on invertebrates (such as ants), mammals such as primates with higher cognitive function are valuable for modeling the increasingly complex problems in engineering. Understanding primates' social and communication systems, and applying what is learned from them to engineering domains is likely to inspire solutions to a number of problems. This paper presents a novel bio-inspired approach to determine group size by researching and simulating primate society. Group size does matter for both primate society and digital entities. It is difficult to determine how to group mobile sensors/robots that patrol in a large area when many factors are considered such as patrol efficiency, wireless interference, coverage, inter/intragroup communications, etc. This paper presents a simulation-based theoretical study on patrolling strategies for robot groups with the comparison of large and small groups through simulations and theoretical results.

  1. A finite mixture survival model to characterize risk groups of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Sally; Albert, Paul S; London, Wendy B

    2009-04-15

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer with patients experiencing heterogeneous survival outcomes despite aggressive treatment. Disease outcomes range from early death to spontaneous regression of the tumor followed by cure. Owing to this heterogeneity, it is of interest to identify patients with similar types of neuroblastoma so that specific types of treatment can be developed. Oncologists are especially interested in identifying patients who will be cured so that the minimum amount of a potentially toxic treatment can be given to this group of patients. We analyze a large cohort of neuroblastoma patients and develop a finite mixture model that uses covariates to predict the probability of being in a cure group or other (one or more) risk groups. A prediction method is developed that uses the estimated probabilities to assign a patient to different risk groups. The robustness of the model and the prediction method is examined via simulation by looking at misclassification rates under misspecified models.

  2. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  3. Models of Continuous Growth and Their Implications for the Analysis of Nonequivalent Control Group Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Carol Joyce; Porter, Andrew C.

    Analysis strategies are discussed for the nonequivalent control group design when three models of continuous natural growth are known. For Model I type natural growth it was shown that the fan spread hypothesis always holds, and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) of Residualized Gain Scores, and ANOVA of Standardized…

  4. Interpersonal Congruence, Transactive Memory, and Feedback Processes: An Integrative Model of Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Manuel; Polzer, Jeffrey T.; Omoregie, Heather

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a multilevel model of group learning that focuses on antecedents and consequences of interpersonal congruence, transactive memory, and feedback processes. The model holds that members' self-verification motives and situational conditions (e.g., member diversity and task demands) give rise to identity negotiation behaviors…

  5. A Model for Measuring Children's Interactions in Small Groups Using Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Martyn; Braid, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Examines a model for measuring children's verbal interactions in small heterogeneous or homogeneous cooperative groups using computers. Considers research design, type of task, and data collection and analysis. Concludes that a model incorporating cognitively oriented and socially oriented talk will expand understanding of the nature of children's…

  6. The Cyclical Tradition: A Study of Phases and Cycles in Four Models of Group Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John

    A study analyzed and compared four selected models in the cyclical tradition of group development as a basis for identifying possible issues and implications for future theory building. The theorists whose models were examined were Leland Bradford, Jack Gibb, William Schutz, and Theodore Mills. Both historical and conceptual perspectives of the…

  7. Behaviour Modelling, Instruction and Exploration Training Approaches in Group and Individual Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truman, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Behaviour modelling has been associated with higher learning outcomes compared to other training approaches. These cumulative research findings create imperative to examine underlying causal mechanisms or contingency factors that may promote behaviour modelling's advantages even further. We propose group-based learning as one contingency factor…

  8. Predicting mortality from burns: the need for age-group specific models.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandra L; Lawless, MaryBeth; Curri, Terese; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2014-09-01

    Traditional burn mortality models are derived using all age groups. We hypothesized that age variably impacts mortality after burn and that age-specific models for children, adults, and seniors will more accurately predict mortality than an all-ages model. We audited data from the American Burn Association (ABA) National Burn Repository (NBR) from 2000 to 2009 and used mixed effect logistic regression models to assess the influence of age, total body surface area (TBSA) burn, and inhalation injury on mortality. Mortality models were constructed for all ages and age-specific models: children (<18 years), adults (18-60 years), and seniors (>60 years). Model performance was assessed by area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Main effect and two-way interactions were used to construct age-group specific mortality models. Each age-specific model was compared to the All Ages model. Of 286,293 records 100,051 had complete data. Overall mortality was 4% but varied by age (17% seniors, <1% children). Age, TBSA, and inhalation injury were significant mortality predictors for all models (p<0.05). Differences in predicted mortality between the All Ages model and the age-specific models occurred in children and seniors. In the age-specific pediatric model, predicted mortality decreased with age; inhalation injury had greater effect on mortality than in the All Ages model. In the senior model mortality increased with age. Seniors had greater increase in mortality per 1% increment in burn size and 1 year increase in age than other ages. The predicted mortality in seniors using the senior-specific model was higher than in the All Ages model. "One size fits all" models for predicting burn outcomes do not accurately reflect the outcomes for seniors and children. Age-specific models for children and seniors may be advisable. PMID:24846014

  9. Predicting Mortality from Burn Injuries: The need for age-group specific models

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sandra L.; Lawless, MaryBeth; Curri, Terese; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G.; Palmieri, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional burn mortality models are derived using all age groups. We hypothesized that age variably impacts mortality after burn and that age-specific models for children, adults, and seniors will more accurately predict mortality than an all-ages model. We audited data from the American Burn Association (ABA) National Burn Repository (NBR) from 2000-2009 and used mixed effect logistic regression models to assess the influence of age, total body surface area (TBSA) burn, and inhalation injury on mortality. Mortality models were constructed for all ages and age-specific models: children (<18 years), adults (18-60 years), and seniors (>60 years). Model performance was assessed by area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Main effect and two-way interactions were used to construct age-group specific mortality models. Each age-specific model was compared to the All Ages model. Of 286,293 records 100,051 had complete data. Overall mortality was 4% but varied by age (17% seniors, <1% children). Age, TBSA, and inhalation injury were significant mortality predictors for all models (p<0.05). Differences in predicted mortality between the All Ages model and the age-specific models occurred in children and seniors. In the age-specific pediatric model, predicted mortality decreased with age; inhalation injury had greater effect on mortality than in the All Ages model. In the senior model mortality increased with age. Seniors had greater increase in mortality per 1% increment in burn size and 1 year increase in age than other ages. The predicted mortality in seniors using the senior-specific model was higher than in the All Ages model. “One size fits all” models for predicting burn outcomes do not accurately reflect the outcomes for seniors and children. Age-specific models for children and seniors may be advisable. PMID:24846014

  10. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  11. On the use of speciation techniques and ab initio modelling to understand tetravalent actinide behavior in a biological medium: An(IV)DTPA case.

    PubMed

    Aupiais, J; Bonin, L; Den Auwer, C; Moisy, P; Siberchicot, B; Topin, S

    2016-03-01

    In the case of an accidental nuclear event, contamination of human bodies by actinide elements may occur. Such elements have the particularity to exhibit both radiological and chemical toxicities that may induce severe damages at several levels, depending on the biokinetics of the element. In order to eliminate the actinide elements before they are stored in target organs (liver, kidneys, or bone, depending on the element), sequestering agents must be quickly injected. However, to date, there is still no ideal sequestering agent, despite the recent interest in this topic due to contamination concerns. DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) is currently generating interest for the development of oral or alternative self-administrable forms. Although biokinetics data are mostly available, molecular scale characterization of actinide-DTPA complexes is still scarce. Nevertheless, strong interest is growing in the characterization of An(IV)DTPA(-) complexes at the molecular level because this opens the way for predicting the stability constants of unknown systems or even for developing new analytical strategies aimed at better and more selective decorporation. For this purpose, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (AIMD) investigations were undertaken and compared with capillary electrophoresis (CE) used in a very unusual way. Indeed, it is commonly believed that CE is incapable of extracting structural information. In capillary electrophoresis, the electrophoretic mobility of an ion is a function of its charge and size. Despite very similar ratios, partial separations between An(IV)DTPA(-) species (An(IV) = Th, U, Np, Pu) were obtained. A linear relationship between the electrophoretic mobility and the actinide--oxygen distance calculated by AIMD was evidenced. As an example, the interpolated U-O distances in U(IV)DTPA(-) from CE-ICPMS experiments, EXAFS, AIMD, and the relationship between the stability constants and

  12. Grouping Influences Output Interference in Short-term Memory: A Mixture Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Suk; Oh, Byung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Output interference is a source of forgetting induced by recalling. We investigated how grouping influences output interference in short-term memory. In Experiment 1, the participants were asked to remember four colored items. Those items were grouped by temporal coincidence as well as spatial alignment: two items were presented in the first memory array and two were presented in the second, and the items in both arrays were either vertically or horizontally aligned as well. The participants then performed two recall tasks in sequence by selecting a color presented at a cued location from a color wheel. In the same-group condition, the participants reported both items from the same memory array; however, in the different-group condition, the participants reported one item from each memory array. We analyzed participant responses with a mixture model, which yielded two measures: guess rate and precision of recalled memories. The guess rate in the second recall was higher for the different-group condition than for the same-group condition; however, the memory precisions obtained for both conditions were similarly degraded in the second recall. In Experiment 2, we varied the probability of the same- and different-group conditions with a ratio of 3 to 7. We expected output interference to be higher in the same-group condition than in the different-group condition. This is because items of the other group are more likely to be probed in the second recall phase and, thus, protecting those items during the first recall phase leads to a better performance. Nevertheless, the same pattern of results was robustly reproduced, suggesting grouping shields the grouped items from output interference because of the secured accessibility. We discussed how grouping influences output interference. PMID:27199820

  13. Grouping Influences Output Interference in Short-term Memory: A Mixture Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Suk; Oh, Byung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Output interference is a source of forgetting induced by recalling. We investigated how grouping influences output interference in short-term memory. In Experiment 1, the participants were asked to remember four colored items. Those items were grouped by temporal coincidence as well as spatial alignment: two items were presented in the first memory array and two were presented in the second, and the items in both arrays were either vertically or horizontally aligned as well. The participants then performed two recall tasks in sequence by selecting a color presented at a cued location from a color wheel. In the same-group condition, the participants reported both items from the same memory array; however, in the different-group condition, the participants reported one item from each memory array. We analyzed participant responses with a mixture model, which yielded two measures: guess rate and precision of recalled memories. The guess rate in the second recall was higher for the different-group condition than for the same-group condition; however, the memory precisions obtained for both conditions were similarly degraded in the second recall. In Experiment 2, we varied the probability of the same- and different-group conditions with a ratio of 3 to 7. We expected output interference to be higher in the same-group condition than in the different-group condition. This is because items of the other group are more likely to be probed in the second recall phase and, thus, protecting those items during the first recall phase leads to a better performance. Nevertheless, the same pattern of results was robustly reproduced, suggesting grouping shields the grouped items from output interference because of the secured accessibility. We discussed how grouping influences output interference. PMID:27199820

  14. Modeling and predicting abstract concept or idea introduction and propagation through geopolitical groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Hicklen, Michael L.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a novel capability for modeling known idea propagation transformations and predicting responses to new ideas from geopolitical groups. Ideas are captured using semantic words that are text based and bear cognitive definitions. We demonstrate a unique algorithm for converting these into analytical predictive equations. Using the illustrative idea of "proposing a gasoline price increase of 1 per gallon from 2" and its changing perceived impact throughout 5 demographic groups, we identify 13 cost of living Diplomatic, Information, Military, and Economic (DIME) features common across all 5 demographic groups. This enables the modeling and monitoring of Political, Military, Economic, Social, Information, and Infrastructure (PMESII) effects of each group to this idea and how their "perception" of this proposal changes. Our algorithm and results are summarized in this paper.

  15. From Mindless Masses to Small Groups: Conceptualizing Collective Behavior in Crowd Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations are increasingly used to monitor and predict behavior at large crowd events, such as mass gatherings, festivals and evacuations. We critically examine the crowd modeling literature and call for future simulations of crowd behavior to be based more closely on findings from current social psychological research. A systematic review was conducted on the crowd modeling literature (N = 140 articles) to identify the assumptions about crowd behavior that modelers use in their simulations. Articles were coded according to the way in which crowd structure was modeled. It was found that 2 broad types are used: mass approaches and small group approaches. However, neither the mass nor the small group approaches can accurately simulate the large collective behavior that has been found in extensive empirical research on crowd events. We argue that to model crowd behavior realistically, simulations must use methods which allow crowd members to identify with each other, as suggested by self-categorization theory. PMID:26388685

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  17. Robust group-wise rigid registration of point sets using t-mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Nishant; Gooya, Ali; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Taylor, Zeike A.

    2016-03-01

    A probabilistic framework for robust, group-wise rigid alignment of point-sets using a mixture of Students t-distribution especially when the point sets are of varying lengths, are corrupted by an unknown degree of outliers or in the presence of missing data. Medical images (in particular magnetic resonance (MR) images), their segmentations and consequently point-sets generated from these are highly susceptible to corruption by outliers. This poses a problem for robust correspondence estimation and accurate alignment of shapes, necessary for training statistical shape models (SSMs). To address these issues, this study proposes to use a t-mixture model (TMM), to approximate the underlying joint probability density of a group of similar shapes and align them to a common reference frame. The heavy-tailed nature of t-distributions provides a more robust registration framework in comparison to state of the art algorithms. Significant reduction in alignment errors is achieved in the presence of outliers, using the proposed TMM-based group-wise rigid registration method, in comparison to its Gaussian mixture model (GMM) counterparts. The proposed TMM-framework is compared with a group-wise variant of the well-known Coherent Point Drift (CPD) algorithm and two other group-wise methods using GMMs, using both synthetic and real data sets. Rigid alignment errors for groups of shapes are quantified using the Hausdorff distance (HD) and quadratic surface distance (QSD) metrics.

  18. Actinide(IV) Deposits on Bone: Potential Role of the Osteopontin-Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Creff, Gaëlle; Safi, Samir; Roques, Jérôme; Michel, Hervé; Jeanson, Aurélie; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Basset, Christian; Simoni, Eric; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In case of a nuclear event, contamination (broad or limited) of the population or of specific workers might occur. In such a senario, the fate of actinide contaminants may be of first concern, in particular with regard to human target organs like the skeleton. To improve our understanding of the toxicological processes that might take place, a mechanistic approach is necessary. For instance, ∼50% of Pu(IV) is known from biokinetic data to accumulate in bone, but the underlining mechanisms are almost unknown. In this context, and to obtain a better description of the toxicological mechanisms associated with actinides(IV), we have undertaken the investigation, on a molecular scale, of the interaction of thorium(IV) with osteopontin (OPN) a hyperphosphorylated protein involved in bone turnover. Thorium is taken here as a simple model for actinide(IV) chemistry. In addition, we have selected a phosphorylated hexapeptide (His-pSer-Asp-Glu-pSer-Asp-Glu-Val) that is representative of the peptidic sequence involved in the bone interaction. For both the protein and the biomimetic peptide, we have determined the local environment of Th(IV) within the bioactinidic complex, combining isothermal titration calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, theoretical calculations with density functional theory, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Th LIII edge. The results demonstrate a predominance of interaction of metal with the phosphate groups and confirmed the previous physiological studies that have highlighted a high affinity of Th(IV) for the bone matrix. Data are further compared with those of the uranyl case, representing the actinyl(V) and actinyl(VI) species. Last, our approach shows the importance of developing simplified systems [Th(IV)-peptide] that can serve as models for more biologically relevant systems. PMID:26684435

  19. Actinide(IV) Deposits on Bone: Potential Role of the Osteopontin-Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Creff, Gaëlle; Safi, Samir; Roques, Jérôme; Michel, Hervé; Jeanson, Aurélie; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Basset, Christian; Simoni, Eric; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In case of a nuclear event, contamination (broad or limited) of the population or of specific workers might occur. In such a senario, the fate of actinide contaminants may be of first concern, in particular with regard to human target organs like the skeleton. To improve our understanding of the toxicological processes that might take place, a mechanistic approach is necessary. For instance, ∼50% of Pu(IV) is known from biokinetic data to accumulate in bone, but the underlining mechanisms are almost unknown. In this context, and to obtain a better description of the toxicological mechanisms associated with actinides(IV), we have undertaken the investigation, on a molecular scale, of the interaction of thorium(IV) with osteopontin (OPN) a hyperphosphorylated protein involved in bone turnover. Thorium is taken here as a simple model for actinide(IV) chemistry. In addition, we have selected a phosphorylated hexapeptide (His-pSer-Asp-Glu-pSer-Asp-Glu-Val) that is representative of the peptidic sequence involved in the bone interaction. For both the protein and the biomimetic peptide, we have determined the local environment of Th(IV) within the bioactinidic complex, combining isothermal titration calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, theoretical calculations with density functional theory, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Th LIII edge. The results demonstrate a predominance of interaction of metal with the phosphate groups and confirmed the previous physiological studies that have highlighted a high affinity of Th(IV) for the bone matrix. Data are further compared with those of the uranyl case, representing the actinyl(V) and actinyl(VI) species. Last, our approach shows the importance of developing simplified systems [Th(IV)-peptide] that can serve as models for more biologically relevant systems.

  20. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  1. Factors from the transtheoretical model differentiating between solar water disinfection (SODIS) user groups.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Silvie M; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a sustainable household water treatment technique that could prevent millions of deaths caused by diarrhoea. The behaviour change process necessary to move from drinking raw water to drinking SODIS is analysed with the Transtheoretical Model of Change (TTM). User groups and psychological factors that differentiate between types of users are identified. Results of a 1.5 year longitudinal study in Zimbabwe reveal distinguishing factors between groups, from which it can be deduced that they drive the development of user groups. Implications are drawn for campaigns with the aim of bringing all user types to a regular use.

  2. Detection of social group instability among captive rhesus macaques using joint network modeling

    PubMed Central

    Beisner, Brianne A.; Jin, Jian; Fushing, Hsieh; Mccowan, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Social stability in group-living animals is an emergent property which arises from the interaction amongst multiple behavioral networks. However, pinpointing when a social group is at risk of collapse is difficult. We used a joint network modeling approach to examine the interdependencies between two behavioral networks, aggression and status signaling, from four stable and three unstable groups of rhesus macaques in order to identify characteristic patterns of network interdependence in stable groups that are readily distinguishable from unstable groups. Our results showed that the most prominent source of aggression-status network interdependence in stable social groups came from more frequent dyads than expected with opposite direction status-aggression (i.e. A threatens B and B signals acceptance of subordinate status). In contrast, unstable groups showed a decrease in opposite direction aggression-status dyads (but remained higher than expected) as well as more frequent than expected dyads with bidirectional aggression. These results demonstrate that not only was the stable joint relationship between aggression and status networks readily distinguishable from unstable time points, social instability manifested in at least two different ways. In sum, our joint modeling approach may prove useful in quantifying and monitoring the complex social dynamics of any wild or captive social system, as all social systems are composed of multiple interconnected networks PMID:26052339

  3. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  4. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups.

    PubMed

    Capitán, José A; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  5. Modeling the Role of Networks and Individual Differences in Inter-Group Violence.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Alexander; Holcomb, Amelia; Glowacki, Luke; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    There is significant heterogeneity within and between populations in their propensity to engage in conflict. Most research has neglected the role of within-group effects in social networks in contributing to between-group violence and focused instead on the precursors and consequences of violence, or on the role of between-group ties. Here, we explore the role of individual variation and of network structure within a population in promoting and inhibiting group violence towards other populations. Motivated by ethnographic observations of collective behavior in a small-scale society, we describe a model with differentiated roles for individuals embedded within friendship networks. Using a simple model based on voting-like dynamics, we explore several strategies for influencing group-level behavior. When we consider changing population level attitude changes and introducing control nodes separately, we find that a particularly effective control strategy relies on exploiting network degree. We also suggest refinements to our model such as tracking fine-grained information spread dynamics that can lead to further enrichment in using evolutionary game theory models for sociological phenomena. PMID:26828362

  6. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups.

    PubMed

    Capitán, José A; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space. PMID:26764748

  7. Modeling the Role of Networks and Individual Differences in Inter-Group Violence

    PubMed Central

    Glowacki, Luke; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    There is significant heterogeneity within and between populations in their propensity to engage in conflict. Most research has neglected the role of within-group effects in social networks in contributing to between-group violence and focused instead on the precursors and consequences of violence, or on the role of between-group ties. Here, we explore the role of individual variation and of network structure within a population in promoting and inhibiting group violence towards other populations. Motivated by ethnographic observations of collective behavior in a small-scale society, we describe a model with differentiated roles for individuals embedded within friendship networks. Using a simple model based on voting-like dynamics, we explore several strategies for influencing group-level behavior. When we consider changing population level attitude changes and introducing control nodes separately, we find that a particularly effective control strategy relies on exploiting network degree. We also suggest refinements to our model such as tracking fine-grained information spread dynamics that can lead to further enrichment in using evolutionary game theory models for sociological phenomena. PMID:26828362

  8. The collaborative model of fieldwork education: a blueprint for group supervision of students.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Debra J; DeIuliis, Elizabeth D

    2015-04-01

    Historically, occupational therapists have used a traditional one-to-one approach to supervision on fieldwork. Due to the impact of managed care on health-care delivery systems, a dramatic increase in the number of students needing fieldwork placement, and the advantages of group learning, the collaborative supervision model has evolved as a strong alternative to an apprenticeship supervision approach. This article builds on the available research to address barriers to model use, applying theoretical foundations of collaborative supervision to practical considerations for academic fieldwork coordinators and fieldwork educators as they prepare for participation in group supervision of occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant students on level II fieldwork.

  9. Particle Swarm Social Model for Group Social Learning in Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N; Patton, Robert M; Pullum, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a study of integrating particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the social learning of self-organized groups and their collective searching behavior in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social learning for a dynamic environment. The research provides a platform for understanding and insights into knowledge discovery and strategic search in human self-organized social groups, such as insurgents or online communities.

  10. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C.; Briant, J.K. ); Stahlhofen, W.; Rudolf, G. . Abt. fuer Biophysikalische Strahlenforschung); Egan, M.J.; Nixon, W. ); Gehr, P. . Anatomisches Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 {mu}m. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. A method for assigning species into groups based on generalized Mahalanobis distance between habitat model coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, C.J.; Heglund, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Habitat association models are commonly developed for individual animal species using generalized linear modeling methods such as logistic regression. We considered the issue of grouping species based on their habitat use so that management decisions can be based on sets of species rather than individual species. This research was motivated by a study of western landbirds in northern Idaho forests. The method we examined was to separately fit models to each species and to use a generalized Mahalanobis distance between coefficient vectors to create a distance matrix among species. Clustering methods were used to group species from the distance matrix, and multidimensional scaling methods were used to visualize the relations among species groups. Methods were also discussed for evaluating the sensitivity of the conclusions because of outliers or influential data points. We illustrate these methods with data from the landbird study conducted in northern Idaho. Simulation results are presented to compare the success of this method to alternative methods using Euclidean distance between coefficient vectors and to methods that do not use habitat association models. These simulations demonstrate that our Mahalanobis-distance- based method was nearly always better than Euclidean-distance-based methods or methods not based on habitat association models. The methods used to develop candidate species groups are easily explained to other scientists and resource managers since they mainly rely on classical multivariate statistical methods. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  12. Modeling the cis-oxo-labile binding site motif of non-heme iron oxygenases: water exchange and oxidation reactivity of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo compound bearing a tripodal tetradentate ligand.

    PubMed

    Company, Anna; Prat, Irene; Frisch, Jonathan R; Mas-Ballesté, Ruben; Güell, Mireia; Juhász, Gergely; Ribas, Xavi; Münck, Eckard; Luis, Josep M; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miquel

    2011-02-01

    The spectroscopic and chemical characterization of a new synthetic non-heme iron(IV)-oxo species [Fe(IV)(O)((Me,H) Pytacn)(S)](2+) (2, (Me,H)Pytacn=1-(2'-pyridylmethyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, S=CH(3)CN or H(2)O) is described. Complex 2 was prepared by reaction of [Fe(II)(CF(3)SO(3))(2)((Me,H) Pytacn)] (1) with peracetic acid. Complex 2 bears a tetradentate N(4) ligand that leaves two cis sites available for binding an oxo group and a second external ligand but, unlike the related iron(IV)-oxo species with tetradentate ligands, it is remarkably stable at room temperature (t(1/2)>2 h at 288 K). Its ability to exchange the oxygen atom of the oxo ligand with water has been analyzed in detail by means of kinetic studies, and a mechanism is proposed on the basis of DFT calculations. Hydrogen-atom abstraction from C-H bonds and oxygen-atom transfer to sulfides by 2 have also been studied. Despite its thermal stability, 2 proves to be a very powerful oxidant that is capable of breaking the strong C-H bond of cyclohexane (bond dissociation energy=99.3 kcal mol(-1)).

  13. The development of a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for BSN graduates.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chun-Yi; Chung, Ue-Lin

    2008-12-01

    Under the current nursing education system in Taiwan, a fair and objective evaluation of group health teaching competency has been lacking for a long time. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for baccalaureate graduates. Action research was the main research methodology used in this study. The research consisted of two phases. In the first phase, a development committee was established. Based on routine discussions, literature reviews and realistic cases, a draft examination model with quasi-clinical situation model content and procedure was developed. Examination Facility Preparations, Simulated Scenarios and Client Recruitments, Examination Result Evaluation (evaluated by teachers) and Learning Guidelines were also prepared. This draft was reviewed twice for expert opinion, a pilot test was done and both the draft and pilot testing were reviewed again before the draft was finalized. The second phase involved refining the examination model by actually practicing the completed draft examination model in a simulated group-teaching setting in order to examine the model's reliability and validity. Fifteen people were involved in this experiment: three nursing personnel each having at least two years' clinical and teaching experience; three nursing students who did not have actual clinical experience and had not taken the course of teaching principles; three senior teachers; and six virtual patients. The responses from the nursing personnel, nursing students, teachers, and virtual patients who participated in the testing were gathered and integrated to refine the model. The model has content, expert and discriminative validity. The reliability of the model was proven by the high consistency in administration and scoring of the model by clinical examiners. This examination model is not only applicable for the proof of students' credit point exemption, but also as an alternative

  14. The development of a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for BSN graduates.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chun-Yi; Chung, Ue-Lin

    2008-12-01

    Under the current nursing education system in Taiwan, a fair and objective evaluation of group health teaching competency has been lacking for a long time. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for baccalaureate graduates. Action research was the main research methodology used in this study. The research consisted of two phases. In the first phase, a development committee was established. Based on routine discussions, literature reviews and realistic cases, a draft examination model with quasi-clinical situation model content and procedure was developed. Examination Facility Preparations, Simulated Scenarios and Client Recruitments, Examination Result Evaluation (evaluated by teachers) and Learning Guidelines were also prepared. This draft was reviewed twice for expert opinion, a pilot test was done and both the draft and pilot testing were reviewed again before the draft was finalized. The second phase involved refining the examination model by actually practicing the completed draft examination model in a simulated group-teaching setting in order to examine the model's reliability and validity. Fifteen people were involved in this experiment: three nursing personnel each having at least two years' clinical and teaching experience; three nursing students who did not have actual clinical experience and had not taken the course of teaching principles; three senior teachers; and six virtual patients. The responses from the nursing personnel, nursing students, teachers, and virtual patients who participated in the testing were gathered and integrated to refine the model. The model has content, expert and discriminative validity. The reliability of the model was proven by the high consistency in administration and scoring of the model by clinical examiners. This examination model is not only applicable for the proof of students' credit point exemption, but also as an alternative

  15. Guidelines for a priori grouping of species in hierarchical community models.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Krishna; Zipkin, Elise F; Collazo, Jaime A; Irizarry, Julissa I; Dewan, Amielle

    2014-04-01

    Recent methodological advances permit the estimation of species richness and occurrences for rare species by linking species-level occurrence models at the community level. The value of such methods is underscored by the ability to examine the influence of landscape heterogeneity on species assemblages at large spatial scales. A salient advantage of community-level approaches is that parameter estimates for data-poor species are more precise as the estimation process "borrows" from data-rich species. However, this analytical benefit raises a question about the degree to which inferences are dependent on the implicit assumption of relatedness among species. Here, we assess the sensitivity of community/group-level metrics, and individual-level species inferences given various classification schemes for grouping species assemblages using multispecies occurrence models. We explore the implications of these groupings on parameter estimates for avian communities in two ecosystems: tropical forests in Puerto Rico and temperate forests in northeastern United States. We report on the classification performance and extent of variability in occurrence probabilities and species richness estimates that can be observed depending on the classification scheme used. We found estimates of species richness to be most precise and to have the best predictive performance when all of the data were grouped at a single community level. Community/group-level parameters appear to be heavily influenced by the grouping criteria, but were not driven strictly by total number of detections for species. We found different grouping schemes can provide an opportunity to identify unique assemblage responses that would not have been found if all of the species were analyzed together. We suggest three guidelines: (1) classification schemes should be determined based on study objectives; (2) model selection should be used to quantitatively compare different classification approaches; and (3) sensitivity

  16. Guidelines for a priori grouping of species in hierarchical community models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pacifici, Krishna; Zipkin, Elise; Collazo, Jaime; Irizarry, Julissa I.; DeWan, Amielle A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent methodological advances permit the estimation of species richness and occurrences for rare species by linking species-level occurrence models at the community level. The value of such methods is underscored by the ability to examine the influence of landscape heterogeneity on species assemblages at large spatial scales. A salient advantage of community-level approaches is that parameter estimates for data-poor species are more precise as the estimation process borrows from data-rich species. However, this analytical benefit raises a question about the degree to which inferences are dependent on the implicit assumption of relatedness among species. Here, we assess the sensitivity of community/group-level metrics, and individual-level species inferences given various classification schemes for grouping species assemblages using multispecies occurrence models. We explore the implications of these groupings on parameter estimates for avian communities in two ecosystems: tropical forests in Puerto Rico and temperate forests in northeastern United States. We report on the classification performance and extent of variability in occurrence probabilities and species richness estimates that can be observed depending on the classification scheme used. We found estimates of species richness to be most precise and to have the best predictive performance when all of the data were grouped at a single community level. Community/group-level parameters appear to be heavily influenced by the grouping criteria, but were not driven strictly by total number of detections for species. We found different grouping schemes can provide an opportunity to identify unique assemblage responses that would not have been found if all of the species were analyzed together. We suggest three guidelines: (1) classification schemes should be determined based on study objectives; (2) model selection should be used to quantitatively compare different classification approaches; and (3) sensitivity

  17. Guidelines for a priori grouping of species in hierarchical community models

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Krishna; Zipkin, Elise F; Collazo, Jaime A; Irizarry, Julissa I; DeWan, Amielle

    2014-01-01

    Recent methodological advances permit the estimation of species richness and occurrences for rare species by linking species-level occurrence models at the community level. The value of such methods is underscored by the ability to examine the influence of landscape heterogeneity on species assemblages at large spatial scales. A salient advantage of community-level approaches is that parameter estimates for data-poor species are more precise as the estimation process “borrows” from data-rich species. However, this analytical benefit raises a question about the degree to which inferences are dependent on the implicit assumption of relatedness among species. Here, we assess the sensitivity of community/group-level metrics, and individual-level species inferences given various classification schemes for grouping species assemblages using multispecies occurrence models. We explore the implications of these groupings on parameter estimates for avian communities in two ecosystems: tropical forests in Puerto Rico and temperate forests in northeastern United States. We report on the classification performance and extent of variability in occurrence probabilities and species richness estimates that can be observed depending on the classification scheme used. We found estimates of species richness to be most precise and to have the best predictive performance when all of the data were grouped at a single community level. Community/group-level parameters appear to be heavily influenced by the grouping criteria, but were not driven strictly by total number of detections for species. We found different grouping schemes can provide an opportunity to identify unique assemblage responses that would not have been found if all of the species were analyzed together. We suggest three guidelines: (1) classification schemes should be determined based on study objectives; (2) model selection should be used to quantitatively compare different classification approaches; and (3

  18. Surgical research IV.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2010-08-01

    Harvey W. Cushing (1869-1939) is the only surgeon represented in Surgical Research IV and one of the most accomplished American contributors to surgical research in general and to neurological and endocrine surgery research in particular. Other surgical research leaders of the 19th and 20th centuries who preceded Harvey Cushing have been introduced before. First, we highlighted the "importance of medical and surgical research" as the basic elements in the advancement of medicine and surgery could be considered as Surgical Research I. Second, in Surgical Research II, we presented William Beaumont, Samuel Gross, and William Halsted as the most important participants of the first wave of American surgical researchers. Next, in Surgical Research III, we considered surgeon researchers who moved ahead in the field of surgery with their research initiatives at the time, including John B. Murphy, the Mayo Brothers William J. and Charles H. Mayo, and George W. Crile. With Harvey Cushing, we enter an era of surgical research associated with neurosurgery and endocrine surgery as part of Surgical Research IV. PMID:20690841

  19. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  20. Reducing Societal Obesity: Establishing a Separate Exercise Model through Studies of Group Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Puterbaugh, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The past 50 years has brought attention to high and increasing levels of human obesity in most of the industrialized world. The medical profession has noticed, has evaluated, and has developed models for studying, preventing, and reversing obesity. The current model prescribes activity in specific quantities such as days, minutes, heart rates, and footfalls. Although decreased levels of activity have come from changes revolving around built environments and social networks, the existing medical model to lower body weights by increasing activity remains individually prescriptive. It is not working. The study of societal obesity precludes the individual and must involve group behavioral studies. Such studies necessitate acquiring separate tools and, therefore, require a significant change in the evaluation and treatment of obesity. Finding groups with common activities and lower levels of obesity would allow the development of new models of land use and encourage active lifestyles through shared interests. PMID:27429800