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Sample records for modeling linking phenotype

  1. Emerging semantics to link phenotype and environment

    DOE PAGES

    Thessen, Anne E.; Bunker, Daniel E.; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; ...

    2015-12-14

    Understanding the interplay between environmental conditions and phenotypes is a fundamental goal of biology. Unfortunately, data that include observations on phenotype and environment are highly heterogeneous and thus difficult to find and integrate. One approach that is likely to improve the status quo involves the use of ontologies to standardize and link data about phenotypes and environments. Specifying and linking data through ontologies will allow researchers to increase the scope and flexibility of large-scale analyses aided by modern computing methods. Investments in this area would advance diverse fields such as ecology, phylogenetics, and conservation biology. While several biological ontologies aremore » well-developed, using them to link phenotypes and environments is rare because of gaps in ontological coverage and limits to interoperability among ontologies and disciplines. Lastly, in this manuscript, we present (1) use cases from diverse disciplines to illustrate questions that could be answered more efficiently using a robust linkage between phenotypes and environments, (2) two proof-of-concept analyses that show the value of linking phenotypes to environments in fishes and amphibians, and (3) two proposed example data models for linking phenotypes and environments using the extensible observation ontology (OBOE) and the Biological Collections Ontology (BCO); these provide a starting point for the development of a data model linking phenotypes and environments.« less

  2. Emerging semantics to link phenotype and environment.

    PubMed

    Thessen, Anne E; Bunker, Daniel E; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Cooper, Laurel D; Dahdul, Wasila M; Domisch, Sami; Franz, Nico M; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J; Midford, Peter E; Mungall, Christopher J; Ramírez, Martín J; Specht, Chelsea D; Vogt, Lars; Vos, Rutger Aldo; Walls, Ramona L; White, Jeffrey W; Zhang, Guanyang; Deans, Andrew R; Huala, Eva; Lewis, Suzanna E; Mabee, Paula M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between environmental conditions and phenotypes is a fundamental goal of biology. Unfortunately, data that include observations on phenotype and environment are highly heterogeneous and thus difficult to find and integrate. One approach that is likely to improve the status quo involves the use of ontologies to standardize and link data about phenotypes and environments. Specifying and linking data through ontologies will allow researchers to increase the scope and flexibility of large-scale analyses aided by modern computing methods. Investments in this area would advance diverse fields such as ecology, phylogenetics, and conservation biology. While several biological ontologies are well-developed, using them to link phenotypes and environments is rare because of gaps in ontological coverage and limits to interoperability among ontologies and disciplines. In this manuscript, we present (1) use cases from diverse disciplines to illustrate questions that could be answered more efficiently using a robust linkage between phenotypes and environments, (2) two proof-of-concept analyses that show the value of linking phenotypes to environments in fishes and amphibians, and (3) two proposed example data models for linking phenotypes and environments using the extensible observation ontology (OBOE) and the Biological Collections Ontology (BCO); these provide a starting point for the development of a data model linking phenotypes and environments.

  3. Emerging semantics to link phenotype and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thessen, Anne E.; Bunker, Daniel E.; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Cooper, Laurel D.; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Domisch, Sami; Franz, Nico M.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J.; Midford, Peter E.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Ramirez, Martin J.; Specht, Chelsea D.; Vogt, Lars; Vos, Rutger Aldo; Walls, Ramona L.; White, Jeffrey W.; Zhang, Guanyang; Deans, Andrew R.; Huala, Eva; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mabee, Paula M.

    2015-12-14

    Understanding the interplay between environmental conditions and phenotypes is a fundamental goal of biology. Unfortunately, data that include observations on phenotype and environment are highly heterogeneous and thus difficult to find and integrate. One approach that is likely to improve the status quo involves the use of ontologies to standardize and link data about phenotypes and environments. Specifying and linking data through ontologies will allow researchers to increase the scope and flexibility of large-scale analyses aided by modern computing methods. Investments in this area would advance diverse fields such as ecology, phylogenetics, and conservation biology. While several biological ontologies are well-developed, using them to link phenotypes and environments is rare because of gaps in ontological coverage and limits to interoperability among ontologies and disciplines. Lastly, in this manuscript, we present (1) use cases from diverse disciplines to illustrate questions that could be answered more efficiently using a robust linkage between phenotypes and environments, (2) two proof-of-concept analyses that show the value of linking phenotypes to environments in fishes and amphibians, and (3) two proposed example data models for linking phenotypes and environments using the extensible observation ontology (OBOE) and the Biological Collections Ontology (BCO); these provide a starting point for the development of a data model linking phenotypes and environments.

  4. Emerging semantics to link phenotype and environment

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Daniel E.; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Cooper, Laurel D.; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Domisch, Sami; Franz, Nico M.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J.; Midford, Peter E.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Ramírez, Martín J.; Specht, Chelsea D.; Vogt, Lars; Vos, Rutger Aldo; Walls, Ramona L.; White, Jeffrey W.; Zhang, Guanyang; Deans, Andrew R.; Huala, Eva; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mabee, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between environmental conditions and phenotypes is a fundamental goal of biology. Unfortunately, data that include observations on phenotype and environment are highly heterogeneous and thus difficult to find and integrate. One approach that is likely to improve the status quo involves the use of ontologies to standardize and link data about phenotypes and environments. Specifying and linking data through ontologies will allow researchers to increase the scope and flexibility of large-scale analyses aided by modern computing methods. Investments in this area would advance diverse fields such as ecology, phylogenetics, and conservation biology. While several biological ontologies are well-developed, using them to link phenotypes and environments is rare because of gaps in ontological coverage and limits to interoperability among ontologies and disciplines. In this manuscript, we present (1) use cases from diverse disciplines to illustrate questions that could be answered more efficiently using a robust linkage between phenotypes and environments, (2) two proof-of-concept analyses that show the value of linking phenotypes to environments in fishes and amphibians, and (3) two proposed example data models for linking phenotypes and environments using the extensible observation ontology (OBOE) and the Biological Collections Ontology (BCO); these provide a starting point for the development of a data model linking phenotypes and environments. PMID:26713234

  5. Defining the social phenotype in Williams syndrome: a model for linking gene, the brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Järvinen-Pasley, Anna; Bellugi, Ursula; Reilly, Judy; Mills, Debra L; Galaburda, Albert; Reiss, Allan L; Korenberg, Julie R

    2008-01-01

    Research into phenotype-genotype correlations in neurodevelopmental disorders has greatly elucidated the contribution of genetic and neurobiological factors to variations in typical and atypical development. Etiologically relatively homogeneous disorders, such as Williams syndrome (WS), provide unique opportunities for elucidating gene-brain-behavior relationships. WS is a neurogenetic disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. This results in a cascade of physical, cognitive-behavioral, affective, and neurobiological aberrations. WS is associated with a markedly uneven neurocognitive profile, and the mature state cognitive profile of WS is relatively well developed. Although anecdotally, individuals with WS have been frequently described as unusually friendly and sociable, personality remains a considerably less well studied area. This paper investigates genetic influences, cognitive-behavioral characteristics, aberrations in brain structure and function, and environmental and biological variables that influence the social outcomes of individuals with WS. We bring together a series of findings across multiple levels of scientific enquiry to examine the social phenotype in WS, reflecting the journey from gene to the brain to behavior. Understanding the complex multilevel scientific perspective in WS has implications for understanding typical social development by identifying important developmental events and markers, as well as helping to define the boundaries of psychopathology.

  6. Defining the Social Phenotype in Williams Syndrome: A Model for Linking Gene, the Brain, and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen-Pasley, Anna; Bellugi, Ursula; Reilly, Judy; Mills, Debra L.; Galaburda, Albert; Reiss, Allan L.; Korenberg, Julie R.

    2010-01-01

    Research into phenotype-genotype correlations in neurodevelopmental disorders has greatly elucidated the contribution of genetic and neurobiological factors to variations in typical and atypical development. Etiologically relatively homogeneous disorders, such as Williams syndrome (WS), provide unique opportunities for elucidating gene-brain-behavior relationships. WS is a neurogenetic disorder, caused by a hemizygous deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. This results in a cascade of physical, cognitive-behavioral, affective, and neurobiological aberrations. WS is associated with a markedly uneven neurocognitive profile, and the mature state cognitive profile of WS is relatively well developed. Although anecdotally, individuals with WS have been frequently described as unusually friendly and sociable, personality remains a considerably less well-studied area. This paper investigates genetic influences, cognitive-behavioral characteristics, aberrations in brain structure and function, and environmental and biological variables that influence the social outcomes of individuals with WS. We bring together a series of findings across multiple levels of scientific enquiry to examine the social phenotype in WS, reflecting the journey from gene to the brain to behavior. Understanding the complex multilevel scientific perspective in WS has implications for understanding typical social development by identifying important developmental events and markers, as well as helping to define the boundaries of psychopathology. PMID:18211726

  7. Simulating Brain Tumor Heterogeneity with a Multiscale Agent-Based Model: Linking Molecular Signatures, Phenotypes and Expansion Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Strouthos, Costas G.; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    We have extended our previously developed 3D multi-scale agent-based brain tumor model to simulate cancer heterogeneity and to analyze its impact across the scales of interest. While our algorithm continues to employ an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene-protein interaction network to determine the cells’ phenotype, it now adds an implicit treatment of tumor cell adhesion related to the model’s biochemical microenvironment. We simulate a simplified tumor progression pathway that leads to the emergence of five distinct glioma cell clones with different EGFR density and cell ‘search precisions’. The in silico results show that microscopic tumor heterogeneity can impact the tumor system’s multicellular growth patterns. Our findings further confirm that EGFR density results in the more aggressive clonal populations switching earlier from proliferation-dominated to a more migratory phenotype. Moreover, analyzing the dynamic molecular profile that triggers the phenotypic switch between proliferation and migration, our in silico oncogenomics data display spatial and temporal diversity in documenting the regional impact of tumorigenesis, and thus support the added value of multi-site and repeated assessments in vitro and in vivo. Potential implications from this in silico work for experimental and computational studies are discussed. PMID:20047002

  8. Alternative parameterizations of the multiple-trait random regression model for milk yield and somatic cell score via recursive links between phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jamrozik, J; Schaeffer, L R

    2011-08-01

    Multiple-trait random regression models with recursive phenotypic link from somatic cell score (SCS) to milk yield on the same test day and with different restrictions on co-variances between these traits were fitted to the first-lactation Canadian Holstein data. Bayesian methods with Gibbs sampling were used to derive inferences about parameters for all models. Bayes factor indicated that the recursive model with uncorrelated environmental effects between traits was the most plausible specification in describing the data. Goodness of fit in terms of a within-trait weighted mean square error and correlation between observed and predicted data was the same for all parameterizations. All recursive models estimated similar negative causal effects from SCS to milk yield (up to -0.4 in 46-115 days in milk in lactation). Estimates of heritabilities, genetic and environmental correlations for the first two regression coefficients (overall level of a trait and lactation persistency) within both traits were similar among models. Genetic correlations between milk and SCS were dependent on the restrictions on genetic co-variances for these traits. Recursive model with uncorrelated system genetic effects between milk and SCS gave estimates of genetic correlations of the opposite sign compared with a regular multiple-trait model. Phenotypic recursion between milk and SCS seemed, however, to be the only source of environmental correlations between these two traits. Rankings of sires for total milk yield in lactation, average daily SCS and persistency for both traits were similar among models. Multiple-trait model with recursive links between milk and SCS and uncorrelated random environmental effects could be an attractive alternative for a regular multiple-trait model in terms of model parsimony and accuracy.

  9. Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Rachel E.; Sebastian, Jose; Yee, Muh-Ching; Jiang, Hui; Lipka, Alexander E.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Dinneny, José R.; Leakey, Andrew D. B.

    2017-01-01

    Vertical growth of plants is a dynamic process that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and has a pronounced effect on overall plant architecture and biomass composition. We have performed six controlled growth trials of an interspecific Setaria italica x Setaria viridis recombinant inbred line population to assess how the genetic architecture of plant height is influenced by developmental queues, water availability and planting density. The non-destructive nature of plant height measurements has enabled us to monitor height throughout the plant life cycle in both field and controlled environments. We find that plant height is reduced under water limitation and high density planting and affected by growth environment (field vs. growth chamber). The results support a model where plant height is a heritable, polygenic trait and that the major genetic loci that influence plant height function independent of growth environment. The identity and contribution of loci that influence height changes dynamically throughout development and the reduction of growth observed in water limited environments is a consequence of delayed progression through the genetic program which establishes plant height in Setaria. In this population, alleles inherited from the weedy S. viridis parent act to increase plant height early, whereas a larger number of small effect alleles inherited from the domesticated S. italica parent collectively act to increase plant height later in development. PMID:28644860

  10. Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Max J; Paul, Rachel E; Banan, Darshi; Barrett, Jennifer F; Sebastian, Jose; Yee, Muh-Ching; Jiang, Hui; Lipka, Alexander E; Brutnell, Thomas P; Dinneny, José R; Leakey, Andrew D B; Baxter, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    Vertical growth of plants is a dynamic process that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and has a pronounced effect on overall plant architecture and biomass composition. We have performed six controlled growth trials of an interspecific Setaria italica x Setaria viridis recombinant inbred line population to assess how the genetic architecture of plant height is influenced by developmental queues, water availability and planting density. The non-destructive nature of plant height measurements has enabled us to monitor height throughout the plant life cycle in both field and controlled environments. We find that plant height is reduced under water limitation and high density planting and affected by growth environment (field vs. growth chamber). The results support a model where plant height is a heritable, polygenic trait and that the major genetic loci that influence plant height function independent of growth environment. The identity and contribution of loci that influence height changes dynamically throughout development and the reduction of growth observed in water limited environments is a consequence of delayed progression through the genetic program which establishes plant height in Setaria. In this population, alleles inherited from the weedy S. viridis parent act to increase plant height early, whereas a larger number of small effect alleles inherited from the domesticated S. italica parent collectively act to increase plant height later in development.

  11. Discordant phenotype in siblings with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bykowsky, M.J.; Veksler, K.S.; Sullivan, K.E.

    1996-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital humoral immunodeficiency caused by a defect in a B-cell-specific signaling molecule, Btk. There has been little concordance of phenotype with genotype in this disorder, and defects in Btk cause immunodeficiencies that range from mild impairment to complete inability to produce antibodies. The factors modifying the phenotype of XLA are not understood. The current study is the first description of two male siblings with identical T{sup 134}{yields}C mutations in the translation initiation ATG of Btk who have different clinical phenotypes as well as different laboratory phenotypes. The proband lacks immunoglobulins and B cells and has recurrent infections, while the elder, affected brother has normal levels of IgG and IgM and very few infections. Both have undetectable levels of Btk kinase activity in circulating mononuclear cells. Complete sequencing of Btk gene transcripts in both brothers revealed no additional mutations to account for the discordant phenotypes. This description provides unequivocal evidence that the phenotype of XLA is influenced by factors additional to the Btk gene. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. X-Linked Retinoschisis: Phenotypic Variability in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yangyan; Liu, Xiao; Tang, Luosheng; Wang, Xia; Coursy, Terry; Guo, Xiaojian; Li, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration, is characterized by a spoke-wheel pattern in the macular region of the retina and splitting of the neurosensory retina. Our study is to describe the clinical characteristics of a four generations of this family (a total of 18 members)with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and detected a novel mutations of c.3G > A (p.M1?) in the initiation codon of the RS1 gene. by direct sequencing.Identification of this mutation in this family provides evidence about potential genetic or environmental factors on its phenotypic variance, as patients presented with different phenotypes regardless of having the same mutation. Importantly, OCT has proven vital for XLRS diagnosis in children. PMID:26823236

  13. Statistical models for trisomic phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.; Feingold, E.

    1996-01-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population but more common in individuals with specific trisomies, which suggests that the genes involved in the etiology of these disorders may be located on the trisomic chromosome. As with all aneuploid syndromes, however, a considerable degree of variation exists within each phenotype so that any given trait is present only among a subset of the trisomic population. We have previously presented a simple gene-dosage model to explain this phenotypic variation and developed a strategy to map genes for such traits. The mapping strategy does not depend on the simple model but works in theory under any model that predicts that affected individuals have an increased likelihood of disomic homozygosity at the trait locus. This paper explores the robustness of our mapping method by investigating what kinds of models give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity. We describe a number of basic statistical models for trisomic phenotypes. Some of these are logical extensions of standard models for disomic phenotypes, and some are more specific to trisomy. Where possible, we discuss genetic mechanisms applicable to each model. We investigate which models and which parameter values give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity in individuals with the trait. Finally, we determine the sample sizes required to identify the increased disomic homozygosity under each model. Most of the models we explore yield detectable increases in disomic homozygosity for some reasonable range of parameter values, usually corresponding to smaller trait frequencies. It therefore appears that our mapping method should be effective for a wide variety of moderately infrequent traits, even though the exact mode of inheritance is unlikely to be known. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Fluxomics links cellular functional analyses to whole-plant phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Salon, Christophe; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Colombié, Sophie; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Gallardo, Karine; Jeudy, Christian; Ourry, Alain; Prudent, Marion; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Rolin, Dominique

    2017-04-01

    Fluxes through metabolic pathways reflect the integration of genetic and metabolic regulations. While it is attractive to measure all the mRNAs (transcriptome), all the proteins (proteome), and a large number of the metabolites (metabolome) in a given cellular system, linking and integrating this information remains difficult. Measurement of metabolome-wide fluxes (termed the fluxome) provides an integrated functional output of the cell machinery and a better tool to link functional analyses to plant phenotyping. This review presents and discusses sets of methodologies that have been developed to measure the fluxome. First, the principles of metabolic flux analysis (MFA), its 'short time interval' version Inst-MFA, and of constraints-based methods, such as flux balance analysis and kinetic analysis, are briefly described. The use of these powerful methods for flux characterization at the cellular scale up to the organ (fruits, seeds) and whole-plant level is illustrated. The added value given by fluxomics methods for unravelling how the abiotic environment affects flux, the process, and key metabolic steps are also described. Challenges associated with the development of fluxomics and its integration with 'omics' for thorough plant and organ functional phenotyping are discussed. Taken together, these will ultimately provide crucial clues for identifying appropriate target plant phenotypes for breeding. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Animal models of RLS phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard P; Donelson, Nathan C; Jones, Byron C; Li, Yuqing; Manconi, Mauro; Rye, David B; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a complex disorder that involves sensory and motor systems. The major pathophysiology of RLS is low iron concentration in the substantia nigra containing the cell bodies of dopamine neurons that project to the striatum, an area that is crucial for modulating movement. People who have RLS often present with normal iron values outside the brain; recent studies implicate several genes are involved in the syndrome. Like most complex diseases, animal models usually do not faithfully capture the full phenotypic spectrum of "disease," which is a uniquely human construct. Nonetheless, animal models have proven useful in helping to unravel the complex pathophysiology of diseases such as RLS and suggesting novel treatment paradigms. For example, hypothesis-independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genes as increasing the risk for RLS, including BTBD9. Independently, the murine homolog Btbd9 was identified as a candidate gene for iron regulation in the midbrain in mice. The relevance of the phenotype of another of the GWAS identified genes, MEIS1, has also been explored. The role of Btbd9 in iron regulation and RLS-like behaviors has been further evaluated in mice carrying a null mutation of the gene and in fruit flies when the BTBD9 protein is degraded. The BTBD9 and MEIS1 stories originate from human GWAS research, supported by work in a genetic reference population of mice (forward genetics) and further verified in mice, fish flies, and worms. Finally, the role of genetics is further supported by an inbred mouse strain that displays many of the phenotypic characteristics of RLS. The role of animal models of RLS phenotypes is also extended to include periodic limb movements.

  16. Metabolic phenotype and adipose and liver features in a high-fat Western diet-induced mouse model of obesity-linked NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuwen; Burrington, Christine M.; Graff, Emily C.; Zhang, Jian; Judd, Robert L.; Suksaranjit, Promporn; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Davenport, Samantha K.; O'Neill, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an obesity and insulin resistance associated clinical condition - ranges from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To model the human condition, a high-fat Western diet that includes liquid sugar consumption has been used in mice. Even though liver pathophysiology has been well characterized in the model, little is known about the metabolic phenotype (e.g., energy expenditure, activity, or food intake). Furthermore, whether the consumption of liquid sugar exacerbates the development of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue dysfunction in the model is currently in question. In our study, a high-fat Western diet (HFWD) with liquid sugar [fructose and sucrose (F/S)] induced acute hyperphagia above that observed in HFWD-fed mice, yet without changes in energy expenditure. Liquid sugar (F/S) exacerbated HFWD-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and impaired the storage capacity of epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). Hepatic TG, plasma alanine aminotransferase, and normalized liver weight were significantly increased only in HFWD+F/S-fed mice. HFWD+F/S also resulted in increased hepatic fibrosis and elevated collagen 1a2, collagen 3a1, and TGFβ gene expression. Furthermore, HWFD+F/S-fed mice developed more profound eWAT inflammation characterized by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration, a dramatic increase in crown-like structures, and upregulated proinflammatory gene expression. An early hypoxia response in the eWAT led to reduced vascularization and increased fibrosis gene expression in the HFWD+F/S-fed mice. Our results demonstrate that sugary water consumption induces acute hyperphagia, limits adipose tissue expansion, and exacerbates glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, which are associated with NAFLD progression. PMID:26670487

  17. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C; Mungall, Christopher J; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C M; Brown, Danielle L; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R; Eppig, Janan T; Jackson, Andrew P; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G; Kelly, Anne M; Ledbetter, David H; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Van Vooren, Steven; Wapner, Ronald J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Wright, Caroline F; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B A; Washingthon, Nicole L; Smith, Cynthia L; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online.

  18. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C. M.; Brown, Danielle L.; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A.; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Ledbetter, David H.; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L.; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Vooren, Steven Van; Wapner, Ronald J.; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.; Wright, Caroline F.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Washingthon, Nicole L.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Robinson, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  19. A link between thrifty phenotype and maternal care across two generations of intercrossed mice

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Carolina P.; Forti, Isabela; O. do Monte, Bruno Gabriel; Watanabe, Isabela M.; Cunha, Joao; Peripato, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Maternal effects are causal influences from mother to offspring beyond genetic information, and have lifelong consequences for multiple traits. Previously, we reported that mice whose mothers did not nurse properly had low birth weight followed by rapid fat accumulation and disturbed development of some organs. That pattern resembles metabolic syndromes known collectively as the thrifty phenotype, which is believed to be an adaptation to a stressful environment which prepares offspring for reduced nutrient supply. The potential link between maternal care, stress reactivity, and the thrifty phenotype, however, has been poorly explored in the human and animal literature: only a couple of studies even mention (much less, test) these concepts under a cohesive framework. Here, we explored this link using mice of the parental inbred strains SM/J and LG/J–who differ dramatically in their maternal care–and the intercrossed generations F1 and F2. We measured individual differences in 15 phenotypes and used structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. We found a remarkable relationship between thrifty phenotype and lower quality of maternal behaviors, including nest building, pup retrieval, grooming/licking, and nursing. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show, in any mammal, a clear connection between the natural variation in thrifty phenotype and maternal care. Both traits in the mother also had a substantial effect on survival rate in the F3 offspring. To our surprise, however, stress reactivity seemed to play no role in our models. Furthermore, the strain of maternal grandmother, but not of paternal grandmother, affected the variation of maternal care in F2 mice, and this effect was mediated by thrifty phenotype in F2. Since F1 animals were all genetically identical, this finding suggests that maternal effects pass down both maternal care and thrifty phenotype in these mice across generations via epigenetic transmission. PMID:28542485

  20. Preferential phenotypic association linked with cooperation in paper wasps.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, E A; Injaian, A

    2013-11-01

    Animals can influence their social environment by preferentially associating with certain conspecifics. Such preferential association has gained increasing theoretical attention, as it may influence social evolution and population dynamics. However, relatively little empirical work has examined the occurrence of preferential association and its effects on cooperative group formation. Here, we test the factors associated with cooperative group formation in Polistes dominulus nest-founding queen wasps. P. dominulus are a good system to study preferential association, as foundresses can nest alone or in groups and group membership is flexible. We found that both social and environmental factors were associated with partner choice. First, facial patterns were associated with cooperation. Wasps with more similar facial patterns were more likely to cooperate than wasps with less similar facial patterns. This preferential phenotypic association fits the theoretical criteria for the evolution of tag-based cooperation. Season was also associated with cooperation; wasps on early-season nests were more likely to cooperate than wasps on late-season nests. High levels of aggression by nest owners during initial interactions were also correlated with lower probabilities of subsequent cooperation, suggesting that nest owners have some control over group membership. Other factors including body weight, weight similarity and nest productivity were not linked with cooperation. Overall, multiple factors influence cooperation in paper wasps, including facial pattern similarity. The occurrence of preferential phenotypic association in paper wasps is quite interesting and may influence the evolution of cooperation and population divergence in this group. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: genes, mutations, and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Kemp, S; Braiterman, L T; Lu, J F; Wei, H M; Geraghty, M; Stetten, G; Bergin, J S; Pevsner, J; Watkins, P A

    1999-04-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex and perplexing neurodegenerative disorder. The metabolic abnormality, elevated levels of very long-chain fatty acids in tissues and plasma, and the biochemical defect, reduced peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity, are ubiquitous features of the disease. However, clinical manifestations are highly variable with regard to time of onset, site of initial pathology and rate of progression. In addition, the abnormal gene in X-ALD is not the gene for VLCS. Rather, it encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein with homology to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transmembrane transporter superfamily of proteins. The X-ALD protein (ALDP) is closely related to three other peroxisomal membrane ABC proteins. In this report we summarize all known X-ALD mutations and establish the lack of an X-ALD genotype/phenotype correlation. We compare the evolutionary relationships among peroxisomal ABC proteins, demonstrate that ALDP forms homodimers with itself and heterodimers with other peroxisomal ABC proteins and present cDNA complementation studies suggesting that the peroxisomal ABC proteins have overlapping functions. We also establish that there are at least two peroxisomal VLCS activities, one that is ALDP dependent and one that is ALDP independent. Finally, we discuss variable expression of the peroxisomal ABC proteins and ALDP independent VLCS in relation to the variable clinical presentations of X-ALD.

  2. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology: linking the genotype with the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Diz, Angel P; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Rolán-Alvarez, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    The study of the proteome (proteomics), which includes the dynamics of protein expression, regulation, interactions and its function, has played a less prominent role in evolutionary and ecological investigations in comparison with the study of the genome and transcriptome. There are, however, a number of arguments suggesting that this situation should change. First, the proteome is closer to the phenotype than the genome or the transcriptome, and as such may be more directly responsive to natural selection, and thus closely linked to adaptation. Second, there is evidence of a low correlation between protein and transcript expression levels across genes in many different organisms. Finally, there have been some recent important technological improvements in proteomics methods that make them feasible, practical and useful to address a wide range of evolutionary questions even in nonmodel organisms. The different proteomic methods, their limitations and problems when interpreting empirical data are described and discussed. In addition, the proteomic literature pertaining to evolutionary ecology is reviewed with examples, and potential applications of proteomics in a variety of evolutionary contexts are outlined. New proteomic research trends such as the study of posttranslational modifications and protein-protein interactions, as well as the combined use of the different -omics approaches, are discussed in relation to the development of a more functional and integrated perspective, needed for achieving a more comprehensive knowledge of evolutionary change.

  3. X-linked dystonia parkinsonism: clinical phenotype, genetics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Raymond L

    2010-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism (XDP) is typically one that involves a Filipino adult male whose ancestry is mostly traced in the Philippine island of Panay. Dystonia usually starts focally in the lower limbs or oromandibular regions, then spreads to become generalized eventually. Parkinsonism sets in later into the disease and usually in combination with dystonia. /DYT3/ and /TAF1/ are the two genes associated with XDP. An SVA retrotransposon insertion in an intron of /TAF1/ may reduce neuron-specific expression of the /TAF1/ isoform in the caudate nucleus, and subsequently interfere with the transcription of many neuronal genes. Polypharmacy with oral benzodiazepines, anticholinergic agents and muscle relaxants leaves much to be desired in terms of efficacy. The medications to date that may appear beneficial, especially in disabling dystonias, are zolpidem, muscle afferent block with lidocaine-ethanol and botulinum toxin type A. Despite the few cases undergoing deep brain stimulation, this functional surgery has shown the greatest promise in XDP. An illustrative case of XDP in a family depicts the variable course of illness, including a bout of "status dystonicus," challenges in therapy, reckoning with the social impact of the disease, and eventual patient demise. Indeed, there remains some gaps in understanding some phenomenological, genetic and treatment aspects of XDP, the areas upon which future research directions may be worthwhile.

  4. Molecular targets that link dioxin exposure to toxicity phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Wataru; Peterson, Richard E; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2011-10-01

    Many toxicology studies have elucidated health effects associated with exposure to various chemicals, but few have identified the molecular targets that cause specific endpoints of toxicity. Our understanding of the toxicity of dioxins, a group of chemicals capable of causing toxicity at environmentally relevant levels of exposure, is no exception. Dioxins are unique compared to most chemicals that we are exposed to in the environment because they activate a high affinity receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), that was identified more than three decades ago. In recent years, several lines of experimental evidence have provided clues for opening the "black box" that contains the molecular mechanisms of dioxin action. These clues have emerged by toxicologists beginning to identify the molecular targets that link AhR signaling to tissue-specific toxicity phenotypes. Endpoints of dioxin toxicity for which downstream molecular targets have begun to be elucidated are observed in developmental or tissue regeneration processes, and include impaired prostate development and hydronephrosis in mouse fetuses and pups, reduced midbrain blood flow and jaw malformation in zebrafish embryos, and impaired fin regeneration in larval and adult zebrafish. Significant progress in identifying molecular targets for dioxin-induced hepatotoxicity in adult mice also has occurred. Misregulation of AhR downstream pathways, such as conversion of arachidonic acid to prostanoids via cyclooxygenase-2, and altered Wnt/β-catenin signaling downregulating Sox9, and signaling by receptors for inflammatory cytokines have been implicated in tissue-specific endpoints of dioxin toxicity. These findings may not only begin to clarify the molecular targets of dioxin action but shed light on new molecular events associated with development and disease.

  5. Link Layer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühleisen, M.; Bültmann, D.; Klagges, K.; Schinnenburg, M.

    The Data Link Layer (DLL) is located above the PHY layer described in the previous chapter and below the network layer described in Chapter 16. All data received from these layers is digital. Today most parts of the DLL are implemented in software, either as device drivers running on general purpose Central Processing Units (CPUs) or as firmware running on dedicated network interface hardware.

  6. [Genotype/phenotype correlation in autism: genetic models and phenotypic characterization].

    PubMed

    Bonnet-Brilhault, F

    2011-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a class of conditions categorized by communication problems, ritualistic behaviors, and deficits in social behaviors. This class of disorders merges a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders regarding some phenotypic and probably physiopathological aspects. Genetic basis is well admitted, however, considering phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity, correspondences between genotype and phenotype have yet to be established. To better identify such correspondences, genetic models have to be identified and phenotypic markers have to be characterized. Recent insights show that a variety of genetic mechanisms may be involved in autism spectrum disorders, i.e. single gene disorders, copy number variations and polygenic mechanisms. These current genetic models are described. Regarding clinical aspects, several approaches can be used in genetic studies. Nosographical approach, especially with the concept of autism spectrum disorders, merges a large group of disorders with clinical heterogeneity and may fail to identify clear genotype/phenotype correlations. Dimensional approach referred in genetic studies to the notion of "Broad Autism Phenotype" related to a constellation of language, personality, and social-behavioral features present in relatives that mirror the symptom domains of autism, but are much milder in expression. Studies of this broad autism phenotype may provide a potentially important complementary approach for detecting the genes involved in these domains. However, control population used in those studies need to be well characterized too. Identification of endophenotypes seems to offer more promising results. Endophenotypes, which are supposed to be more proximal markers of gene action in the same biological pathway, linking genes and complex clinical symptoms, are thought to be less genetically complex than the broader disease phenotype, indexing a limited aspect of genetic risk for the disorder as a whole. However

  7. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6) by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals. PMID:21859467

  8. HMG Nuclear Proteins: Linking Chromatin Structure to Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    I. Summary Although the three families of mammalian HMG proteins (HMGA, HMGB and HMGN) participate in many of the same nuclear processes, each family plays its own unique role in modulating chromatin structure and regulating genomic function. This review focuses on the similarities and differences in the mechanisms by which the different HMG families impact chromatin structure and influence cellular phenotype. The biological implications of having three architectural transcription factor families with complementary, but partially overlapping, nuclear functions are discussed. PMID:19748605

  9. Assessing spatial and temporal variability of phytoplankton communities' composition in the Iroise Sea ecosystem (Brittany, France): A 3D modeling approach. Part 2: Linking summer mesoscale distribution of phenotypic diversity to hydrodynamism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadier, Mathilde; Sourisseau, Marc; Gorgues, Thomas; Edwards, Christopher A.; Memery, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    Tidal front ecosystems are especially dynamic environments usually characterized by high phytoplankton biomass and high primary production. However, the description of functional microbial diversity occurring in these regions remains only partially documented. In this article, we use a numerical model, simulating a large number of phytoplankton phenotypes to explore the three-dimensional spatial patterns of phytoplankton abundance and diversity in the Iroise Sea (western Brittany). Our results suggest that, in boreal summer, a seasonally marked tidal front shapes the phytoplankton species richness. A diversity maximum is found in the surface mixed layer located slightly west of the tidal front (i.e., not strictly co-localized with high biomass concentrations) which separates tidally mixed from stratified waters. Differences in phenotypic composition between sub-regions with distinct hydrodynamic regimes (defined by vertical mixing, nutrients gradients and light penetration) are discussed. Local growth and/or physical transport of phytoplankton phenotypes are shown to explain our simulated diversity distribution. We find that a large fraction (64%) of phenotypes present during the considered period of September are ubiquitous, found in the frontal area and on both sides of the front (i.e., over the full simulated domain). The frontal area does not exhibit significant differences between its community composition and that of either the well-mixed region or an offshore Deep Chlorophyll Maximum (DCM). Only three phenotypes (out of 77) specifically grow locally and are found at substantial concentration only in the surface diversity maximum. Thus, this diversity maximum is composed of a combination of ubiquitous phenotypes with specific picoplankton deriving from offshore, stratified waters (including specific phenotypes from both the surface and the DCM) and imported through physical transport, completed by a few local phenotypes. These results are discussed in light

  10. Smooth muscle cell phenotype modulation and contraction on native and cross-linked polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Moussallem, Maroun D; Olenych, Scott G; Scott, Shannon L; Keller, Thomas C S; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2009-11-09

    Smooth muscle cells convert between a motile, proliferative "synthetic" phenotype and a sessile, "contractile" phenotype. The ability to manipulate the phenotype of aortic smooth muscle cells with thin biocompatible polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMUs) with common surface chemical characteristics but varying stiffness was investigated. The stiffness of (PAH/PAA) PEMUs was varied by heating to form covalent amide bond cross-links between the layers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that cross-linked PEMUs were thinner than those that were not cross-linked. AFM nanoindentation demonstrated that the Young's modulus ranged from 6 MPa for hydrated native PEMUs to more than 8 GPa for maximally cross-linked PEMUs. Rat aortic A7r5 smooth muscle cells cultured on native PEMUs exhibited morphology and motility of synthetic cells and expression of the synthetic phenotype markers vimentin, tropomyosin 4, and nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIB (nmMHCIIB). In comparison, cells cultured on maximally cross-linked PEMUs exhibited the phenotype markers calponin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC), myocardin, transgelin, and smooth muscle alpha-actin (smActin) that are characteristic of the smooth muscle "contractile" phenotype. Consistent with those cells being "contractile", A7r5 cells grown on cross-linked PEMUs produced contractile force when stimulated with a Ca(2+) ionophore.

  11. Obesity and cancer phenotype: Is angiogenesis a missed link?

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Fernando; Soares, Raquel

    2015-10-15

    Obesity remains nowadays one of the main threats to human health, being a problem of worldwide proportions. It is characterized by augmented storage of fatty acids in an enlarged adipose tissue. This process is possible thanks to a rich capillary network, supported by a mechanism that has also a crucial role on cancer: angiogenesis. Given that several studies point obesity as a risk factor for cancer development, angiogenesis may be approached as the missed link between these two pathologies. Understanding the different pathways behind angiogenesis becomes essential to break this link by developing new anti-angiogenic therapies or improving the actual ones. In the first phase, this paper will focus the structural and cellular changes that adipose tissue suffers in obesity. Then, the main pro-angiogenic players will be reviewed, taking into account the pathways that explain their putative role in obesity-cancer link. Finally, the clinical implications of the presented mechanisms will also be regarded, being the main focus on the anti-angiogenic therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Linking Post-Translational Modifications and Variation of Phenotypic Traits*

    PubMed Central

    Albertin, Warren; Marullo, Philippe; Bely, Marina; Aigle, Michel; Bourgais, Aurélie; Langella, Olivier; Balliau, Thierry; Chevret, Didier; Valot, Benoît; da Silva, Telma; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes can be post-translationally modified, leading to isoforms with different properties. The phenotypic consequences of the quantitative variability of isoforms have never been studied. We used quantitative proteomics to dissect the relationships between the abundances of the enzymes and isoforms of alcoholic fermentation, metabolic traits, and growth-related traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the enzymatic pool allocated to the fermentation proteome was constant over the culture media and the strains considered, there was variation in abundance of individual enzymes and sometimes much more of their isoforms, which suggests the existence of selective constraints on total protein abundance and trade-offs between isoforms. Variations in abundance of some isoforms were significantly associated to metabolic traits and growth-related traits. In particular, cell size and maximum population size were highly correlated to the degree of N-terminal acetylation of the alcohol dehydrogenase. The fermentation proteome was found to be shaped by human selection, through the differential targeting of a few isoforms for each food-processing origin of strains. These results highlight the importance of post-translational modifications in the diversity of metabolic and life-history traits. PMID:23271801

  13. Linking Dynamic Phenotyping with Metabolite Analysis to Study Natural Variation in Drought Responses of Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Lorraine H. C.; Han, Jiwan; Corke, Fiona M. K.; Akinyemi, Aderemi; Didion, Thomas; Nielsen, Klaus K.; Doonan, John H.; Mur, Luis A. J.; Bosch, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Drought is an important environmental stress limiting the productivity of major crops worldwide. Understanding drought tolerance and possible mechanisms for improving drought resistance is therefore a prerequisite to develop drought-tolerant crops that produce significant yields with reduced amounts of water. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) is a key model species for cereals, forage grasses, and energy grasses. In this study, initial screening of a Brachypodium germplasm collection consisting of 138 different ecotypes exposed to progressive drought, highlighted the natural variation in morphology, biomass accumulation, and responses to drought stress. A core set of ten ecotypes, classified as being either tolerant, susceptible or intermediate, in response to drought stress, were exposed to mild or severe (respectively, 15 and 0% soil water content) drought stress and phenomic parameters linked to growth and color changes were assessed. When exposed to severe drought stress, phenotypic data and metabolite profiling combined with multivariate analysis revealed a remarkable consistency in separating the selected ecotypes into their different pre-defined drought tolerance groups. Increases in several metabolites, including for the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid, and TCA-cycle intermediates, were positively correlated with biomass yield and with reduced yellow pixel counts; suggestive of delayed senescence, both key target traits for crop improvement to drought stress. While metabolite analysis also separated ecotypes into the distinct tolerance groupings after exposure to mild drought stress, similar analysis of the phenotypic data failed to do so, confirming the value of metabolomics to investigate early responses to drought stress. The results highlight the potential of combining the analyses of phenotypic and metabolic responses to identify key mechanisms and markers associated with drought tolerance in both the Brachypodium model plant as

  14. Quantification of private information leakage from phenotype-genotype data: linking attacks.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, Arif; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Studies on genomic privacy have traditionally focused on identifying individuals using DNA variants. In contrast, molecular phenotype data, such as gene expression levels, are generally assumed to be free of such identifying information. Although there is no explicit genotypic information in phenotype data, adversaries can statistically link phenotypes to genotypes using publicly available genotype-phenotype correlations such as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). This linking can be accurate when high-dimensional data (i.e., many expression levels) are used, and the resulting links can then reveal sensitive information (for example, the fact that an individual has cancer). Here we develop frameworks for quantifying the leakage of characterizing information from phenotype data sets. These frameworks can be used to estimate the leakage from large data sets before release. We also present a general three-step procedure for practically instantiating linking attacks and a specific attack using outlier gene expression levels that is simple yet accurate. Finally, we describe the effectiveness of this outlier attack under different scenarios.

  15. Linking trait-based phenotypes to prefrontal cortex activation during inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Achala H.; Di Domenico, Stefano I.; Graves, Bryanna; Lam, Jaeger; Ayaz, Hasan; Bagby, R. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control is subserved in part by discrete regions of the prefrontal cortex whose functionality may be altered according to specific trait-based phenotypes. Using a unified model of normal range personality traits, we examined activation within lateral and medial aspects of the prefrontal cortex during a manual go/no-go task. Evoked hemodynamic oxygenation within the prefrontal cortex was measured in 106 adults using a 16-channel continuous-wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy system. Within lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex, greater activation was associated with higher trait levels of extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness, and lower neuroticism. Higher agreeableness was also related to more activation in the medial prefrontal cortex during inhibitory control. These results suggest that personality traits reflecting greater emotional stability, extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness may be associated with more efficient recruitment of control processes subserved by lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex. These findings highlight key links between trait-based phenotypes and neural activation patterns in the prefrontal cortex underlying inhibitory control. PMID:26163672

  16. Linking trait-based phenotypes to prefrontal cortex activation during inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Achala H; Di Domenico, Stefano I; Graves, Bryanna; Lam, Jaeger; Ayaz, Hasan; Bagby, R Michael; Ruocco, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control is subserved in part by discrete regions of the prefrontal cortex whose functionality may be altered according to specific trait-based phenotypes. Using a unified model of normal range personality traits, we examined activation within lateral and medial aspects of the prefrontal cortex during a manual go/no-go task. Evoked hemodynamic oxygenation within the prefrontal cortex was measured in 106 adults using a 16-channel continuous-wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy system. Within lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex, greater activation was associated with higher trait levels of extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness, and lower neuroticism. Higher agreeableness was also related to more activation in the medial prefrontal cortex during inhibitory control. These results suggest that personality traits reflecting greater emotional stability, extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness may be associated with more efficient recruitment of control processes subserved by lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex. These findings highlight key links between trait-based phenotypes and neural activation patterns in the prefrontal cortex underlying inhibitory control.

  17. Defining disease phenotypes using national linked electronic health records: a case study of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Morley, Katherine I; Wallace, Joshua; Denaxas, Spiros C; Hunter, Ross J; Patel, Riyaz S; Perel, Pablo; Shah, Anoop D; Timmis, Adam D; Schilling, Richard J; Hemingway, Harry

    2014-01-01

    National electronic health records (EHR) are increasingly used for research but identifying disease cases is challenging due to differences in information captured between sources (e.g. primary and secondary care). Our objective was to provide a transparent, reproducible model for integrating these data using atrial fibrillation (AF), a chronic condition diagnosed and managed in multiple ways in different healthcare settings, as a case study. Potentially relevant codes for AF screening, diagnosis, and management were identified in four coding systems: Read (primary care diagnoses and procedures), British National Formulary (BNF; primary care prescriptions), ICD-10 (secondary care diagnoses) and OPCS-4 (secondary care procedures). From these we developed a phenotype algorithm via expert review and analysis of linked EHR data from 1998 to 2010 for a cohort of 2.14 million UK patients aged ≥ 30 years. The cohort was also used to evaluate the phenotype by examining associations between incident AF and known risk factors. The phenotype algorithm incorporated 286 codes: 201 Read, 63 BNF, 18 ICD-10, and four OPCS-4. Incident AF diagnoses were recorded for 72,793 patients, but only 39.6% (N = 28,795) were recorded in primary care and secondary care. An additional 7,468 potential cases were inferred from data on treatment and pre-existing conditions. The proportion of cases identified from each source differed by diagnosis age; inferred diagnoses contributed a greater proportion of younger cases (≤ 60 years), while older patients (≥ 80 years) were mainly diagnosed in SC. Associations of risk factors (hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure) with incident AF defined using different EHR sources were comparable in magnitude to those from traditional consented cohorts. A single EHR source is not sufficient to identify all patients, nor will it provide a representative sample. Combining multiple data sources and integrating information on treatment and comorbid

  18. Phenotypic conservation in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa caused by RPGR mutations.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Sarwar; Khan, Naheed; Branham, Kari; Othman, Mohammad; Karoukis, Athanasios J; Sharma, Nisha; Moncrief, Ashley; Mahmood, Mahdi N; Sieving, Paul A; Swaroop, Anand; Heckenlively, John R; Jayasundera, Thiran

    2013-08-01

    For patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and clinicians alike, phenotypic variability can be challenging because it complicates counseling regarding patients' likely visual prognosis. To evaluate the clinical findings from patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa with 13 distinct RPGR mutations and assess for phenotypic concordance or variability. Retrospective medical record review of data collected from 1985 to 2011. Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan. A total of 42 patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa with mutations in RPGR. Age at first visit ranged from 4 to 53 years, with follow-up ranging from 1 to 11 visits (median follow-up time, 5.5 years; range, 1.4-32.7 years, for 23 patients with >1 visit). Clinical data assessed for concordance included visual acuity (VA), Goldmann visual fields (GVFs), and full-field electroretinography (ERG). Electroretinography phenotype (cone-rod vs rod-cone dysfunction) was defined by the extent of photopic vs scotopic abnormality. Qualitative GVF phenotype was determined by the GVF pattern, where central or peripheral loss suggested cone or rod dysfunction, respectively. Goldmann visual fields were also quantified and compared among patients. Each mutation was detected in 2 or more related or unrelated patients. Five mutations in 11 patients displayed strong concordance of VA, while 4 mutations in 16 patients revealed moderate concordance of VA. A definitive cone-rod or rod-cone ERG pattern consistent among patients was found in 6 of 13 mutations (46.2%); the remaining mutations were characterized by patients demonstrating both phenotypes or who had limited data or nonrecordable ERG values. Concordant GVF phenotypes (7 rod-cone pattern vs 4 cone-rod pattern) were seen in 11 of 13 mutations (84.6%). All 6 mutations displaying a constant ERG pattern within the mutation group revealed a GVF phenotype consistent with the ERG findings. While VA and ERG phenotypes are concordant in only some patients carrying

  19. "Young at heart": Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Renata S M; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (>8weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Sex-linked phenotypic divergence in the hermaphrodite fungus Neurospora tetrasperma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we present a study of the molecular phenotype linked to a large region of suppressed recombination (extending over ~ 7 Mbp and >1,500 genes) surrounding the mating-type (mat) locus of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma. While the remainder of the genome is largely homoallelic, th...

  1. Quantification of Private Information Leakage from Phenotype-Genotype Data: Linking Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Harmanci, Arif; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Studies on genomic privacy have traditionally focused on identifying individuals using DNA variants. In contrast, molecular phenotype data, such as gene expression levels, are generally assumed free of such identifying information. Although there is no explicit genotypic information in them, adversaries can statistically link phenotypes to genotypes using publicly available genotype-phenotype correlations, for instance, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). This linking can be accurate when high-dimensional data (many expression levels) are used, and the resulting links can then reveal sensitive information, for example, an individual having cancer. Here, we develop frameworks for quantifying the leakage of individual characterizing information from phenotype datasets. These can be used for estimating the leakage from large datasets before release. We also present a general three-step procedure for practically instantiating linking attacks and a specific attack using outlier gene-expression levels that is simple yet accurate. Finally, we describe the effectiveness of this outlier attack under different scenarios. PMID:26828419

  2. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of the human haptoglobin phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Nina S.; Vardi, Moshe; Blum, Shany; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Afinbinder, Yefim; Cleary, Patricia A.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Bharaj, Bhupinder; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Rewers, Marian J.; Lache, Orit; Levy, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Haptoglobin (Hp) is an abundant serum protein which binds extracorpuscular hemoglobin (Hb). Two alleles exist in humans for the Hp gene, denoted 1 and 2. Diabetic individuals with the Hp 2-2 genotype are at increased risk of developing vascular complications including heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. Recent evidence shows that treatment with vitamin E can reduce the risk of diabetic vascular complications by as much as 50% in Hp 2-2 individuals. We sought to develop a rapid and accurate test for Hp phenotype (which is 100% concordant with the three major Hp genotypes) to facilitate widespread diagnostic testing as well as prospective clinical trials. Methods A monoclonal antibody raised against human Hp was shown to distinguish between the three Hp phenotypes in an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hp phenotypes obtained in over 8000 patient samples using this ELISA method were compared with those obtained by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or the TaqMan PCR method. Results Our analysis showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA test for Hp 2-2 phenotype is 99.0% and 98.1%, respectively. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value for Hp 2-2 phenotype is 97.5% and 99.3%, respectively. Similar results were obtained for Hp 2-1 and Hp 1-1 phenotypes. In addition, the ELISA was determined to be more sensitive and specific than the TaqMan method. Conclusions The Hp ELISA represents a user-friendly, rapid and highly accurate diagnostic tool for determining Hp phenotypes. This test will greatly facilitate the typing of thousands of samples in ongoing clinical studies. PMID:23492570

  3. Sheep models of polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a fertility disorder affecting 5–7% of reproductive-aged women. Women with PCOS manifest both reproductive and metabolic defects. Several animal models have evolved, which implicate excess steroid exposure during fetal life in the development of the PCOS phenotype. This review addresses the fetal and adult reproductive and metabolic consequences of prenatal steroid excess in sheep and the translational relevance of these findings to PCOS. By comparing findings in various breeds of sheep, the review targets the role of genetic susceptibility to fetal insults. Disruptions induced by prenatal testosterone excess are evident at both the reproductive and metabolic level with each influencing the other thus creating a self-perpetuating vicious cycle. The review highlights the need for identifying a common mediator of the dysfunctions at the reproductive and metabolic levels and developing prevention and treatment interventions targeting all sites of disruption in unison for achieving optimal success. PMID:23084976

  4. Linking Plasma Cortisol Levels to Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Charlotte A.C.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Corsi-Travali, Stefani; Neumeister, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent confirmatory factor analytic studies of the dimensional structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that this disorder may be best characterized by five symptom dimensions—re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, dysphoric arousal, and anxious arousal. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation in PTSD and has been attributed to enhanced glucocorticoid responsiveness. However, little is known about how altered HPA-axis function is related to this contemporary phenotypic model of PTSD. Methods We compared morning plasma cortisol levels of drug-free civilian adults with PTSD (N=29) to trauma-exposed (TC; N=12) and non trauma-exposed healthy controls (HC; N=23). We then examined the relation between cortisol levels and a contemporary 5-factor ‘dysphoric arousal’ model of PTSD symptoms among individuals with PTSD. Results After adjustment for white race/ethnicity, education, lifetime alcohol use disorder, and current smoking status, the PTSD (Cohen’s d=1.1) and TC (Cohen’s d=1.3) groups had significantly lower cortisol levels than the HC group; cortisol levels did not differ between the TC and PTSD groups. Except for age (r=−.46), none of the other demographic, trauma-related, or clinical variables, including lifetime mood/anxiety disorder and severity of current depressive and anxiety symptoms, were associated with cortisol levels. In a stepwise linear regression analysis, age (β= −.44) and severity of emotional numbing symptoms (β= −.35) were independently associated with cortisol levels in the PTSD group; none of the other PTSD symptom clusters or depression symptoms were significant. Post-hoc analyses revealed that severity of the emotional numbing symptom of restricted range of affect (i.e., unable to have loving feelings) was independently related to cortisol levels (β= −.35). Conclusion These results suggest that trauma-exposed civilian adults with and without PTSD have significantly lower cortisol

  5. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K

    2015-11-03

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual's genetic and environmental context. Copyright © 2015 Williams et al.

  6. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual’s genetic and environmental context. PMID:26530416

  7. Open loop model for WDM links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D, Meena; Francis, Fredy; T, Sarath K.; E, Dipin; Srinivas, T.; K, Jayasree V.

    2014-10-01

    Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) techniques overfibrelinks helps to exploit the high bandwidth capacity of single mode fibres. A typical WDM link consisting of laser source, multiplexer/demultiplexer, amplifier and detectoris considered for obtaining the open loop gain model of the link. The methodology used here is to obtain individual component models using mathematical and different curve fitting techniques. These individual models are then combined to obtain the WDM link model. The objective is to deduce a single variable model for the WDM link in terms of input current to system. Thus it provides a black box solution for a link. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) associated with each of the approximated models is given for comparison. This will help the designer to select the suitable WDM link model during a complex link design.

  8. A novel test of the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis reveals independent components of fertility.

    PubMed Central

    Pizzari, Tommaso; Jensen, Per; Cornwallis, Charles K.

    2004-01-01

    The phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis predicts that male sexual ornaments signal fertilizing efficiency and that the coevolution of male ornaments and female preference for such ornaments is driven by female pursuit of fertility benefits. In addition, directional testicular asymmetry frequently observed in birds has been suggested to reflect fertilizing efficiency and to covary with ornament expression. However, the idea of a phenotypic relationship between male ornaments and fertilizing efficiency is often tested in populations where environmental effects mask the underlying genetic associations between ornaments and fertilizing efficiency implied by this idea. Here, we adopt a novel design, which increases genetic diversity through the crossing of two divergent populations while controlling for environmental effects, to test: (i) the phenotypic relationship between male ornaments and both, gonadal (testicular mass) and gametic (sperm quality) components of fertilizing efficiency; and (ii) the extent to which these components are phenotypically integrated in the fowl, Gallus gallus. We show that consistent with theory, the testosterone-dependent expression of a male ornament, the comb, predicted testicular mass. However, despite their functional inter-dependence, testicular mass and sperm quality were not phenotypically integrated. Consistent with this result, males of one parental population invested more in testicular and comb mass, whereas males of the other parental population had higher sperm quality. We found no evidence that directional testicular asymmetry covaried with ornament expression. These results shed new light on the evolutionary relationship between male fertilizing efficiency and ornaments. Although testosterone-dependent ornaments may covary with testicular mass and thus reflect sperm production rate, the lack of phenotypic integration between gonadal and gametic traits reveals that the expression of an ornament is unlikely to reflect the

  9. A multiple phenotype predator-prey model with mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernethy, Gavin M.; Mullan, Rory; Glass, David H.; McCartney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    An existing multiple phenotype predator-prey model is expanded to include mutation amongst the predator phenotypes. Two unimodal maps are used for the underlying dynamics of the prey. A predation strategy is also defined which differs for each of the predators in the model. Results show that the introduction of predator mutation enhances predator survival both in terms of the number of phenotypes and total population for a range of values of the predation rate. In general, the dominant predator phenotype is the one which is most focused on the prey phenotype with the largest population.

  10. RP2 phenotype and pathogenetic correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jayasundera, Thiran; Branham, Kari E H; Othman, Mohammad; Rhoades, William R; Karoukis, Athanasios J; Khanna, Hemant; Swaroop, Anand; Heckenlively, John R

    2010-07-01

    To assess the phenotype of patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) with RP2 mutations and to correlate the findings with their genotype. Six hundred eleven patients with RP were screened for RP2 mutations. From this screen, 18 patients with RP2 mutations were evaluated clinically with standardized electroretinography, Goldmann visual fields, and ocular examinations. In addition, 7 well-documented cases from the literature were used to augment genotype-phenotype correlations. Of 11 boys younger than 12 years, 10 (91%) had macular involvement and 9 (82%) had best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/50. Two boys from different families (aged 8 and 12 years) displayed a choroideremia-like fundus, and 9 boys (82%) were myopic (mean error, -7.97 diopters [D]). Of 10 patients with electroretinography data, 9 demonstrated severe rod-cone dysfunction. All 3 female carriers had macular atrophy in 1 or both eyes and were myopic (mean, -6.23 D). All 9 nonsense and frameshift and 5 of 7 missense mutations (71%) resulted in severe clinical presentations. Screening of the RP2 gene should be prioritized in patients younger than 16 years characterized by X-linked inheritance, decreased best-corrected visual acuity (eg, >20/40), high myopia, and early-onset macular atrophy. Patients exhibiting a choroideremia-like fundus without choroideremia gene mutations should also be screened for RP2 mutations. An identifiable phenotype for RP2-XLRP aids in clinical diagnosis and targeted genetic screening.

  11. Sexual variation in assimilation efficiency: its link to phenotype and potential role in sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Stahlschmidt, Zachary R; Davis, Jon R; Denardo, Dale F

    2011-04-01

    Sex-specific variation in morphology (sexual dimorphism) is a prevalent phenomenon among animals, and both dietary intake and resource allocation strategies influence sexually dimorphic traits (e.g., body size or composition). However, we investigated whether assimilation efficiency (AE), an intermediate step between dietary intake and allocation, can also vary between the sexes. Specifically, we tested whether sex-based differences in AE can explain variation in phenotypic traits. We measured morphometric characteristics (i.e., body length, mass, condition, and musculature) and AE of total energy, crude protein, and crude fat in post-reproductive adult Children's pythons (which exhibit a limited female-biased sexual size dimorphism) fed both low and high dietary intakes. Meal size was negatively related to AE of energy. Notably, male snakes absorbed crude protein more efficiently and increased epaxial (dorsal) musculature faster than females, which demonstrates a link between AE and phenotype. However, females grew in body length faster but did not absorb any nutrient more efficiently than males. Although our results do not provide a direct link between AE and sexual size dimorphism, they demonstrate that sexual variation in nutrient absorption exists and can contribute to other types of sex-based differences in phenotype (i.e., sexual dimorphism in growth of musculature). Hence, testing the broader applicability of AE's role in sexually dimorphic traits among other species is warranted.

  12. Coevolution is linked with phenotypic diversification but not speciation in avian brood parasites.

    PubMed

    Medina, Iliana; Langmore, Naomi E

    2015-12-22

    Coevolution is often invoked as an engine of biological diversity. Avian brood parasites and their hosts provide one of the best-known examples of coevolution. Brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of other species, selecting for host defences and reciprocal counteradaptations in parasites. In theory, this arms race should promote increased rates of speciation and phenotypic evolution. Here, we use recently developed methods to test whether the three largest avian brood parasitic lineages show changes in rates of phenotypic diversity and speciation relative to non-parasitic lineages. Our results challenge the accepted paradigm, and show that there is little consistent evidence that lineages of brood parasites have higher speciation or extinction rates than non-parasitic species. However, we provide the first evidence that the evolution of brood parasitic behaviour may affect rates of evolution in morphological traits associated with parasitism. Specifically, egg size and the colour and pattern of plumage have evolved up to nine times faster in parasitic than in non-parasitic cuckoos. Moreover, cuckoo clades of parasitic species that are sympatric (and share similar host genera) exhibit higher rates of phenotypic evolution. This supports the idea that competition for hosts may be linked to the high phenotypic diversity found in parasitic cuckoos. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Coevolution is linked with phenotypic diversification but not speciation in avian brood parasites

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Iliana; Langmore, Naomi E.

    2015-01-01

    Coevolution is often invoked as an engine of biological diversity. Avian brood parasites and their hosts provide one of the best-known examples of coevolution. Brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of other species, selecting for host defences and reciprocal counteradaptations in parasites. In theory, this arms race should promote increased rates of speciation and phenotypic evolution. Here, we use recently developed methods to test whether the three largest avian brood parasitic lineages show changes in rates of phenotypic diversity and speciation relative to non-parasitic lineages. Our results challenge the accepted paradigm, and show that there is little consistent evidence that lineages of brood parasites have higher speciation or extinction rates than non-parasitic species. However, we provide the first evidence that the evolution of brood parasitic behaviour may affect rates of evolution in morphological traits associated with parasitism. Specifically, egg size and the colour and pattern of plumage have evolved up to nine times faster in parasitic than in non-parasitic cuckoos. Moreover, cuckoo clades of parasitic species that are sympatric (and share similar host genera) exhibit higher rates of phenotypic evolution. This supports the idea that competition for hosts may be linked to the high phenotypic diversity found in parasitic cuckoos. PMID:26702044

  14. Genome-wide association and high-resolution phenotyping link Oryza sativa panicle traits to numerous trait-specific QTL clusters

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Samuel; Korniliev, Pavel; Falcão, Alexandre; Ismail, Abdelbagi; Gregorio, Glenn; Mezey, Jason; McCouch, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Rice panicle architecture is a key target of selection when breeding for yield and grain quality. However, panicle phenotypes are difficult to measure and susceptible to confounding during genetic mapping due to correlation with flowering and subpopulation structure. Here we quantify 49 panicle phenotypes in 242 tropical rice accessions with the imaging platform PANorama. Using flowering as a covariate, we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS), detect numerous subpopulation-specific associations, and dissect multi-trait peaks using panicle phenotype covariates. Ten candidate genes in pathways known to regulate plant architecture fall under GWAS peaks, half of which overlap with quantitative trait loci identified in an experimental population. This is the first study to assess inflorescence phenotypes of field-grown material using a high-resolution phenotyping platform. Herein, we establish a panicle morphocline for domesticated rice, propose a genetic model underlying complex panicle traits, and demonstrate subtle links between panicle size and yield performance. PMID:26841834

  15. A pleiotropic model of phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y

    1998-01-01

    A pleiotropic model is presented for deriving the equilibrium genetic variance by mutation and stabilizing selection and the long-term genetic responses to directional selection in the case where mutations have pleiotropic effects on fitness itself (direct deleterious effect) and on a quantitative trait (phenotypic effect). The equilibrium genetic variance is derived as a general form of the rare-alleles models, i.e., [formula: see text], where n is the number of loci, mu is the per-locus mutation rate, alpha 2 is the variance of new mutations, V(s) is the measure of stabilizing selection, and s(u) is the selection coefficient on mutations by direct deleterious effect. The genetic responses to directional selection is calculated based on the assumption that the genetic variance is kept at an equilibrium by mutation and stabilizing selection but without directional selection, and the directional selection starts to operate on the target trait. The evolutionary rate at the t-th generation after the introduction of the directional selection is [formula: see text], where i is the directional selection intensity, and s(T) is the total selection coefficient on mutations, i.e., [formula: see text]. The selection limit is [formula: see text], where V(m) is the mutational variance (2n mu alpha 2). The pleiotropic effects of genes reduce both the evolutionary rate and the selection limit.

  16. Accurate phenotyping: Reconciling approaches through Bayesian model averaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Carla Chia-Ming; Mengersen, Kerrie Lee

    2017-01-01

    Genetic research into complex diseases is frequently hindered by a lack of clear biomarkers for phenotype ascertainment. Phenotypes for such diseases are often identified on the basis of clinically defined criteria; however such criteria may not be suitable for understanding the genetic composition of the diseases. Various statistical approaches have been proposed for phenotype definition; however our previous studies have shown that differences in phenotypes estimated using different approaches have substantial impact on subsequent analyses. Instead of obtaining results based upon a single model, we propose a new method, using Bayesian model averaging to overcome problems associated with phenotype definition. Although Bayesian model averaging has been used in other fields of research, this is the first study that uses Bayesian model averaging to reconcile phenotypes obtained using multiple models. We illustrate the new method by applying it to simulated genetic and phenotypic data for Kofendred personality disorder—an imaginary disease with several sub-types. Two separate statistical methods were used to identify clusters of individuals with distinct phenotypes: latent class analysis and grade of membership. Bayesian model averaging was then used to combine the two clusterings for the purpose of subsequent linkage analyses. We found that causative genetic loci for the disease produced higher LOD scores using model averaging than under either individual model separately. We attribute this improvement to consolidation of the cores of phenotype clusters identified using each individual method. PMID:28423058

  17. Refined phenotyping identifies links between preeclampsia and related diseases in a Norwegian preeclampsia family cohort

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Liv Cecilie V.; Melton, Phillip E.; Tollaksen, Kjersti; Lyslo, Ingvill; Roten, Linda T.; Odland, Maria L.; Strand, Kristin M.; Nygård, Ottar; Sun, Chen; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Austgulen, Rigmor; Moses, Eric K.; Bjørge, Line

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preeclampsia is a complex genetic disease of pregnancy with a heterogenous presentation, unknown cause and potential severe outcomes for both mother and child. Preeclamptic women have increased risk for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. We aimed to identify heritabilities and phenotypic correlations of preeclampsia and related conditions in the Norwegian Preeclampsia Family Biobank. Methods: By applying a variance components model, a total of 493 individuals (from 138 families with increased occurrence of preeclampsia) were classified according to 30 disease-related phenotypes. Results: Of parous women, 75.7% (263/338) had experienced preeclampsia and 35.7% of women with and 22.4% without preeclampsia delivered children small for gestational age (SGA). We identified 11 phenotypes as heritable. The increased occurrence of preeclampsia was reflected by the presence [heritability (H2r) = 0.60)] and severity (H2r = 0.15) of preeclampsia and being born in a preeclamptic pregnancy (H2r = 0.25). Other heritable phenotypes identified included SGA (H2r = 0.40), chronic hypertension (H2r = 0.57), severity of atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease (H2r = 0.31), BMI (H2r = 0.60) and pulmonary disease (H2r = 0.91). The heritable phenotype preeclampsia overlapped with SGA (P = 0.03), whereas pulmonary disease was phenotypically correlated with atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease (P < 0.01), SGA (P = 0.02) and BMI (P = 0.02). Conclusion: This is the first study identifying the H2r of a range of health-related conditions in preeclamptic families. Our study demonstrates how refinement of phenotypes leads to better H2r estimation and the identification of a biological relationship between preeclampsia and related traits. PMID:26259119

  18. Conversion to the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis phenotype is associated with intermolecular linked insoluble aggregates of SOD1 in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Han-Xiang; Shi, Yong; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Zhai, Hong; Fu, Ronggen; Liu, Erdong; Gorrie, George H.; Khan, Mohammad S.; Hung, Wu-Yen; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lukas, Thomas; Dal Canto, Mauro C.; O'Halloran, Thomas V.; Siddique, Teepu

    2006-01-01

    Twenty percent of the familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by mutations in the Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) through the gain of a toxic function. The nature of this toxic function of mutant SOD1 has remained largely unknown. Here we show that WT SOD1 not only hastens onset of the ALS phenotype but can also convert an unaffected phenotype to an ALS phenotype in mutant SOD1 transgenic mouse models. Further analyses of the single- and double-transgenic mice revealed that conversion of mutant SOD1 from a soluble form to an aggregated and detergent-insoluble form was associated with development of the ALS phenotype in transgenic mice. Conversion of WT SOD1 from a soluble form to an aggregated and insoluble form also correlates with exacerbation of the disease or conversion to a disease phenotype in double-transgenic mice. This conversion, observed in the mitochondrial fraction of the spinal cord, involved formation of insoluble SOD1 dimers and multimers that are crosslinked through intermolecular disulfide bonds via oxidation of cysteine residues in SOD1. Our data thus show a molecular mechanism by which SOD1, an important protein in cellular defense against free radicals, is converted to aggregated and apparently ALS-associated toxic dimers and multimers by redox processes. These findings provide evidence of direct links among oxidation, protein aggregation, mitochondrial damage, and SOD1-mediated ALS, with possible applications to the aging process and other late-onset neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, rational therapy based on these observations can now be developed and tested. PMID:16636275

  19. Exploring Links between Genotypes, Phenotypes, and Clinical Predictors of Response to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Valsamma; Črnčec, Rudi; Walter, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is amongst the most familial of psychiatric disorders. Twin and family studies have demonstrated a monozygotic concordance rate of 70–90%, dizygotic concordance of around 10%, and more than a 20-fold increase in risk for first-degree relatives. Despite major advances in the genetics of autism, the relationship between different aspects of the behavioral and cognitive phenotype and their underlying genetic liability is still unclear. This is complicated by the heterogeneity of autism, which exists at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Given this heterogeneity, one method to find homogeneous entities and link these with specific genotypes would be to pursue endophenotypes. Evidence from neuroimaging, eye tracking, and electrophysiology studies supports the hypothesis that, building on genetic vulnerability, ASD emerges from a developmental cascade in which a deficit in attention to social stimuli leads to impaired interactions with primary caregivers. This results in abnormal development of the neurocircuitry responsible for social cognition, which in turn adversely affects later behavioral and functional domains dependent on these early processes, such as language development. Such a model begets a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, and is also supported by studies demonstrating better clinical outcomes with earlier treatment. Treatment response following intensive early behavioral intervention in ASD is also distinctly variable; however, relatively little is known about specific elements of the clinical phenotype that may predict response to current behavioral treatments. This paper overviews the literature regarding genotypes, phenotypes, and predictors of response to behavioral intervention in ASD and presents suggestions for future research to explore linkages between these that would enable better identification of, and increased treatment efficacy for, ASD. PMID:24062668

  20. X-linked MCT8 gene mutations: characterization of the pediatric neurologic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Holden, Kenton R; Zuñiga, Oscar F; May, Melanie M; Su, Humberto; Molinero, Marco R; Rogers, R Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E

    2005-10-01

    We report a family with X-linked mental retardation that has a novel mutation in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) gene associated with a characteristic neurodevelopmental phenotype with early childhood hypotonia that progresses to spasticity and global developmental delays. Affected patients experience moderate to severe psychomotor delays and congenital hypotonia, develop a myopathic facies, have diminished muscle bulk and generalized muscle weakness, develop progressive spasticity and movement disorders, and have limited speech but alert, affable personalities. Acquired microcephaly and abnormal myelination on brain magnetic resonance imaging can be present. Normal monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene functioning appears to be necessary for normal thyroid-associated metabolism in neurons. Abnormal thyroid function tests appear to be a consistent finding in the absence of typical signs of thyroid dysfunction. Although the phenotype appears to be consistent, and although the neurotoxic effects of abnormal central and peripheral neuromuscular system thyroid metabolism might be partly or wholly responsible for the neurologic phenotype reported, the exact mechanism remains unclear.

  1. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: phenotype distribution and expression of ALDP in Spanish kindreds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M; Coll, M J; Pàmpols, T; Girós, M

    1998-04-13

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an impairment in peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long straight-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Six clinical phenotypes have been delineated: childhood cerebral (CCALD), adolescent cerebral (AdolCALD), adult cerebral (ACALD), adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), Addison-only (AO), and presymptomatic (PALD). The distribution of phenotypes varies in different countries. We have diagnosed biochemically 60 X-ALD Spanish patients belonging to 48 kindreds. Their phenotypic distribution was: CCALD plus AdolCALD, 33%; ACALD, 16%; AMN, 27%; AO, 12%; and PALD, 12%. These results contrast with the distribution described in other countries, due to a higher prevalence of the ACALD form. Regarding the expression of the protein product (ALDP), we studied 17 kindreds using immunochemical techniques and found absence of ALDP in 84% of cases. We also studied 13 females from 7 negative ALDP kindreds in order to correlate ALDP expression and the carrier status established by VLCFA measurement. In one case with normal VLCFA levels in serum and fibroblasts, we observed mosaicism in ALDP expression. This fact supports the use of this technique for identifying carriers.

  2. Autosomal recessive congenital cataract, intellectual disability phenotype linked to STX3 in a consanguineous Tunisian family.

    PubMed

    Chograni, M; Alkuraya, F S; Ourteni, I; Maazoul, F; Lariani, I; Chaabouni, H B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability phenotype in a consanguineous Tunisian family. The whole genome scan of the studied family was performed with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The resulted runs of homozygosity (ROH) were analyzed through the integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery (iSyTE) in order to prioritize candidate genes associated with congenital cataract. Selected genes were amplified and sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis was conducted to predict the function of the mutant gene. We identified a new specific lens gene named syntaxin 3 linked to the studied phenotype. The direct sequencing of this gene revealed a novel missense mutation c.122A>G which results in p.E41G. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a deleterious effect of this mutation on protein structure and function. Here, we report for the first time a missense mutation of a novel lens specific gene STX3 in a phenotype associating autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability.

  3. Multiple Adhesive Phenotypes Linked to Rosetting Binding of Erythrocytes in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Victor; Treutiger, Carl Johan; Nash, Gerard B.; Wahlgren, Mats

    1998-01-01

    The cerebral form of severe malaria is associated with excessive intravascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (PRBC). Retention and accumulation of PRBC may lead to occlusion of brain microvessels and direct the triggering of acute pathologic changes. Here we report that by selection, cloning, and subcloning, we have identified rare P. falciparum parasites expressing a pan-adhesive phenotype linked to erythrocyte rosetting, a previously identified correlate of cerebral malaria. Rosetting PRBC not only bound uninfected erythrocytes but also formed autoagglutinates, adhered to endothelial cells, and bound to CD36, immunoglobulins, and the blood group A antigen. The linkage of rosetting, autoagglutination, and cytoadherence involved the coexpression on a single PRBC of ligands with multiple specificities and the binding to two or more receptors on erythrocytes and to at least two other cell adhesion molecules, including a new endothelial cell receptor for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Limited proteolysis that differentially cleaved the rosetting ligand PfEMP1 from the PRBC surface abrogated all the binding phenotypes of these parasites, implicating the variant antigen PfEMP1 as a carrier of multiple ligand specificities. The results encourage the further study of pan-adhesion as a potentially important parasite phenotype in the pathogenesis of severe P. falciparum malaria. PMID:9596774

  4. Classifying compound mechanism of action for linking whole cell phenotypes to molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Christina R.; Wakeham, Nancy; Bunce, Richard A.; Berlin, K. Darrell; Barrow, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Drug development programs have proven successful when performed at a whole cell level, thus incorporating solubility and permeability into the primary screen. However, linking those results to the target within the cell has been a major set-back. The Phenotype Microarray system, marketed and sold by Biolog, seeks to address this need by assessing the phenotype in combination with a variety of chemicals with known mechanism of action (MOA). We have evaluated this system for usefulness in deducing the MOA for three test compounds. To achieve this, we constructed a database with 21 known antimicrobials, which served as a comparison for grouping our unknown MOA compounds. Pearson correlation and Ward linkage calculations were used to generate a dendrogram that produced clustering largely by known MOA, although there were exceptions. Of the three unknown compounds, one was definitively placed as an anti-folate. The second and third compounds’ MOA were not clearly identified, likely due to unique MOA not represented within the commercial database. The availability of the database generated in this report for S. aureus ATCC 29213 will increase the accessibility of this technique to other investigators. From our analysis, the Phenotype Microarray system can group compounds with clear MOA, but distinction of unique or broadly acting MOA at this time is less clear. PMID:22434711

  5. Reversion of a fungal genetic code alteration links proteome instability with genomic and phenotypic diversification

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Ana R.; Simões, João; Lee, Wanseon; Rung, Johan; Weil, Tobias; Gut, Ivo G.; Gut, Marta; Bayés, Mónica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Cavalieri, Duccio; Giovannini, Gloria; Bozza, Silvia; Romani, Luigina; Kapushesky, Misha; Moura, Gabriela R.; Santos, Manuel A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Many fungi restructured their proteomes through incorporation of serine (Ser) at thousands of protein sites coded by the leucine (Leu) CUG codon. How these fungi survived this potentially lethal genetic code alteration and its relevance for their biology are not understood. Interestingly, the human pathogen Candida albicans maintains variable Ser and Leu incorporation levels at CUG sites, suggesting that this atypical codon assignment flexibility provided an effective mechanism to alter the genetic code. To test this hypothesis, we have engineered C. albicans strains to misincorporate increasing levels of Leu at protein CUG sites. Tolerance to the misincorporations was very high, and one strain accommodated the complete reversion of CUG identity from Ser back to Leu. Increasing levels of Leu misincorporation decreased growth rate, but production of phenotypic diversity on a phenotypic array probing various metabolic networks, drug resistance, and host immune cell responses was impressive. Genome resequencing revealed an increasing number of genotype changes at polymorphic sites compared with the control strain, and 80% of Leu misincorporation resulted in complete loss of heterozygosity in a large region of chromosome V. The data unveil unanticipated links between gene translational fidelity, proteome instability and variability, genome diversification, and adaptive phenotypic diversity. They also explain the high heterozygosity of the C. albicans genome and open the door to produce microorganisms with genetic code alterations for basic and applied research. PMID:23776239

  6. Reversion of a fungal genetic code alteration links proteome instability with genomic and phenotypic diversification.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Ana R; Simões, João; Lee, Wanseon; Rung, Johan; Weil, Tobias; Gut, Ivo G; Gut, Marta; Bayés, Mónica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Cavalieri, Duccio; Giovannini, Gloria; Bozza, Silvia; Romani, Luigina; Kapushesky, Misha; Moura, Gabriela R; Santos, Manuel A S

    2013-07-02

    Many fungi restructured their proteomes through incorporation of serine (Ser) at thousands of protein sites coded by the leucine (Leu) CUG codon. How these fungi survived this potentially lethal genetic code alteration and its relevance for their biology are not understood. Interestingly, the human pathogen Candida albicans maintains variable Ser and Leu incorporation levels at CUG sites, suggesting that this atypical codon assignment flexibility provided an effective mechanism to alter the genetic code. To test this hypothesis, we have engineered C. albicans strains to misincorporate increasing levels of Leu at protein CUG sites. Tolerance to the misincorporations was very high, and one strain accommodated the complete reversion of CUG identity from Ser back to Leu. Increasing levels of Leu misincorporation decreased growth rate, but production of phenotypic diversity on a phenotypic array probing various metabolic networks, drug resistance, and host immune cell responses was impressive. Genome resequencing revealed an increasing number of genotype changes at polymorphic sites compared with the control strain, and 80% of Leu misincorporation resulted in complete loss of heterozygosity in a large region of chromosome V. The data unveil unanticipated links between gene translational fidelity, proteome instability and variability, genome diversification, and adaptive phenotypic diversity. They also explain the high heterozygosity of the C. albicans genome and open the door to produce microorganisms with genetic code alterations for basic and applied research.

  7. Phenotypic variability in X-linked ocular albinism: Relationship to linkage genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnur, R.E. |; Wick, P.A.; Bailey, C.; Rebbeck, T.; Weleber, R.G.; Wagstaff, J.; Grix, A.W.; Pagon, R.A.; Hockey, A.; Edwards, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    One hundred nineteen individuals from 11 families with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) were studied with respect to both their clinical phenotypes and their linkage genotypes. In a four-generation Australian family, two affected males and an obligatory carrier lacked cutaneous melanin macroglobules (MMGs); ocular features were identical to those of Nettleship-Falls OA1. Four other families had more unusual phenotypic features in addition to OA1. All OA1 families were genotyped at DXS16, DXS85, DXS143, STS, and DXS452 and for a CA-repeat polymorphism at the Kallmann syndrome locus (KAL). Separate two-point linkage analyses were performed for the following: group A, six families with biopsy-proved MMGs in at least one affected male; group B, four families whose biopsy status was not known; and group C, OA-9 only (16 samples), the family without MMGs. At the set of loci closest to OA1, there is no clear evidence in our data set for locus heterogeneity between groups A and C or among the four other families with complex phenotypes. Combined multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) in the 11 families and analysis of individual recombination events confirms that the major locus for OA1 resides within the DXS85-DXS143 interval. The authors suggest that more detailed clinical evaluations of OA1 individuals and families should be performed for future correlation with specific mutations in candidate OA1 genes. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Novel variants of RPGR in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Barbaro, Vanessa; Migliorati, Angelo; Raffa, Paolo; Nespeca, Patrizia; De Nadai, Katia; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2017-03-10

    To identify novel mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) gene underlying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and assess genotype-phenotype correlations. The patient cohort, consisting of 13 individuals from 3 unrelated XLRP families, underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination. The open reading frames of RPGR and RP2 were analyzed with Sanger sequencing in each patient. The identified genetic variants were defined as mutations or polymorphisms on the basis of their pathological effect. We found 3 genetic variants: a novel mutation c.1591G>T in exon 14 and a novel polymorphism c.1105C>T in exon 10, resulting in p.Glu531* and p.Arg369Cys of RPGR gene, respectively, and one already known mutation c.413A>G in exon 2, resulting in a p.Glu138Gly of RP2 gene. Considering our XLRP probands, RPGR-related phenotypic damages were similar and less severe than those of the patient with the RP2 mutation. On the other hand, the female carriers of XLRP variants showed different RPGR-related consequences, ranging from rods hypofunctionality in c.1591G>T nonsense heterozygosity to no retinal changes in c.1105C>T polymorphic heterozygosity. These findings broaden the spectrum of RPGR mutations and phenotypic variability of the disease, which will be useful for genetic consultation and diagnosis in the future.

  9. Classifying compound mechanism of action for linking whole cell phenotypes to molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Christina R; Wakeham, Nancy; Bunce, Richard A; Nammalwar, Baskar; Berlin, K Darrell; Barrow, William W

    2012-04-01

    Drug development programs have proven successful when performed at a whole cell level, thus incorporating solubility and permeability into the primary screen. However, linking those results to the target within the cell has been a major setback. The Phenotype Microarray system, marketed and sold by Biolog, seeks to address this need by assessing the phenotype in combination with a variety of chemicals with known mechanism of action (MOA). We have evaluated this system for usefulness in deducing the MOA for three test compounds. To achieve this, we constructed a database with 21 known antimicrobials, which served as a comparison for grouping our unknown MOA compounds. Pearson correlation and Ward linkage calculations were used to generate a dendrogram that produced clustering largely by known MOA, although there were exceptions. Of the three unknown compounds, one was definitively placed as an antifolate. The second and third compounds' MOA were not clearly identified, likely because the unique MOA was not represented within the database. The availability of the database generated in this report for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 will increase the accessibility of this technique to other investigators. From our analysis, the Phenotype Microarray system can group compounds with clear MOA, but the distinction of unique or broadly acting MOA at this time is less clear. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria

    PubMed Central

    Brancaleoni, V.; Balwani, M.; Granata, F.; Graziadei, G.; Missineo, P.; Fiorentino, V.; Fustinoni, S.; Cappellini, M.D.; Naik, H.; Desnick, R.J.; Di Pierro, E.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromsomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP. PMID:25615817

  11. Reconceptualizing the Linked Courses Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Mary

    2008-01-01

    To help students meet the demands of society, the University of Houston is using the framework of learning communities and constructivism to create a cross-disciplinary approach to teaching to provide media-rich thematically linked courses to engage a diverse student population. A case study investigated three semesters of thematically linked…

  12. CASK mutations are frequent in males and cause X-linked nystagmus and variable XLMR phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Anna; Tarpey, Patrick S; Licata, Andrea; Cox, James; Whibley, Annabel; Boyle, Jackie; Rogers, Carolyn; Grigg, John; Partington, Michael; Stevenson, Roger E; Tolmie, John; Yates, John Rw; Turner, Gillian; Wilson, Meredith; Futreal, Andrew P; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Gecz, Jozef; Raymond, F Lucy; Stratton, Michael R; Schwartz, Charles E; Abidi, Fatima E

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) gene have recently been associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with microcephaly, optic atrophy and brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, as well as with an X-linked syndrome having some FG-like features. Our group has recently identified four male probands from 358 probable XLMR families with missense mutations (p.Y268H, p.P396S, p.D710G and p.W919R) in the CASK gene. Congenital nystagmus, a rare and striking feature, was present in two of these families. We screened a further 45 probands with either nystagmus or microcephaly and mental retardation (MR), and identified two further mutations, a missense mutation (p.Y728C) and a splice mutation (c.2521-2A>T) in two small families with nystagmus and MR. Detailed clinical examinations of all six families, including an ophthalmological review in four families, were undertaken to further characterise the phenotype. We report on the clinical features of 24 individuals, mostly male, from six families with CASK mutations. The phenotype was variable, ranging from non-syndromic mild MR to severe MR associated with microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. Carrier females were variably affected. Congenital nystagmus was found in members of four of the families. Our findings reinforce the CASK gene as a relatively frequent cause of XLMR in females and males. We further define the phenotypic spectrum and demonstrate that affected males with missense mutations or in-frame deletions in CASK are frequently associated with congenital nystagmus and XLMR, a striking feature not previously reported.

  13. Phenotype-Genotype Association Analysis of ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma and Its Molecular Link to Patient Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renzhi; Yang, Yakun; Sheng, Miaomiao; Bu, Dechao; Huang, Fengming; Liu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Cuiqi; Dai, Congxin; Sun, Bowen; Zhu, Jindong; Qiao, Yi; Yao, Yong; Zhu, Huijuan; Lu, Lin; Pan, Hui; Feng, Ming; Deng, Kan; Xing, Bing; Lian, Wei; Zhao, Yi; Jiang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma, also known as Cushing disease (CD), is rare and causes metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis due to hypercortisolism. However, the molecular pathogenesis of CD is still unclear because of a lack of human cell lines and animal models. Here, we study 106 clinical characteristics and gene expression changes from 118 patients, the largest cohort of CD in a single-center. RNA deep sequencing is used to examine genotypic changes in nine paired female ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas and adjacent nontumorous pituitary tissues (ANPT). We develop a novel analysis linking disease clinical characteristics and whole transcriptomic changes, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient to discover a molecular network mechanism. We report that osteoporosis is distinguished from the phenotype and genotype analysis. A cluster of genes involved in osteoporosis is identified using Pearson correlation coefficient analysis. Most of the genes are reported in the bone related literature, confirming the feasibility of phenotype-genotype association analysis, which could be used in the analysis of almost all diseases. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1), collagen type I α 1 chain (COL1A1), 5′-nucleotidase ecto (NT5E), HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) and angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1) and their signalling pathways are shown to be involved in osteoporosis in CD patients. Our discoveries provide a molecular link for osteoporosis in CD patients, and may open new potential avenues for osteoporosis intervention and treatment. PMID:27690016

  14. Optimal Linking Design for Response Model Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Michelle D.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2017-01-01

    Linking functions adjust for differences between identifiability restrictions used in different instances of the estimation of item response model parameters. These adjustments are necessary when results from those instances are to be compared. As linking functions are derived from estimated item response model parameters, parameter estimation…

  15. Multitrait mixed modeling and categorical data analyses of phenotypic variances

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative and categorical data were digitally recorded, measured or scored on whole canopies; single plants, leaves, and siliques; and on random seed samples of 224 genotypes in a phenotyping nursery of Brassica napus. They were used to (1) develop a pyramiding phenotyping model based on multitra...

  16. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A; Ambach, H; Kammerer, S; Rolinski, B; Stöckler, S; Rabl, W; Gärtner, J; Zierz, S; Roscher, A A

    1995-01-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expression of X-ALD and in their female relatives; these clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), and "Addison disease only" (ADO) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5' portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7717396

  17. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  19. Females with a disorder phenotypically identical to X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E. ); Sweinberg, S.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings in two girls with a disorder phenotypically indistinguishable from typical X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) are described. To examine the possibility that subtle defects in the X chromosome might explain the findings, detailed genetic studies were performed on one of these patients. Cytogenetic studies showed a normal 46XX karyotype. Southern blot analysis of her DNA showed that she had inherited a maternal and a paternal allele at sites flanking the locus for typical XLA at Xq22, making a microdeletion or uniparental disomy unlikely. To determine whether both of her X chromosomes could function as the active X, somatic-cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X were produced from her activated T cells. A normal random pattern of X inactivation was seen. Of 21 T-cell hybrids, 3 retained both X chromosomes, 7 had one X as the active X, and 11 had the other X as the active X. The authors have interpreted these studies as indicating that there is an autosomal recessive disorder that is phenotypically identical to XLA.

  20. Linking rhizosphere microbiome composition of wild and domesticated Phaseolus vulgaris to genotypic and root phenotypic traits.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jaramillo, Juan E; Carrión, Víctor J; Bosse, Mirte; Ferrão, Luiz F V; de Hollander, Mattias; Garcia, Antonio A F; Ramírez, Camilo A; Mendes, Rodrigo; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2017-10-01

    Plant domestication was a pivotal accomplishment in human history, but also led to a reduction in genetic diversity of crop species compared to their wild ancestors. How this reduced genetic diversity affected plant-microbe interactions belowground is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the genetic relatedness, root phenotypic traits and rhizobacterial community composition of modern and wild accessions of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) grown in agricultural soil from the highlands of Colombia, one of the centers of common bean diversification. Diversity Array Technology-based genotyping and phenotyping of local common bean accessions showed significant genetic and root architectural differences between wild and modern accessions, with a higher specific root length for the wild accessions. Canonical Correspondence Analysis indicated that the divergence in rhizobacterial community composition between wild and modern bean accessions is associated with differences in specific root length. Along the bean genotypic trajectory, going from wild to modern, we observed a gradual decrease in relative abundance of Bacteroidetes, mainly Chitinophagaceae and Cytophagaceae, and an increase in relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, in particular Nocardioidaceae and Rhizobiaceae, respectively. Collectively, these results establish a link between common bean domestication, specific root morphological traits and rhizobacterial community assembly.

  1. Genetic analysis and clinical phenotype of two Indian families with X-linked choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Murthy, Praveen; Reddy, Kavita S; Schouten, Jan SAG; Webers, Caroll A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to describe the phenotype and genotype of two Indian families affected with X-linked choroideremia (CHM). Materials and Methods: In these two families, the affected individuals and unaffected family members underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including an optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electroretinogram. Blood samples were collected from the families for genetic analysis. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was done using a panel of 184 genes, which covered previously associated genes with retinal dystrophies. Sequencing data were analyzed for the CHM, RPGR, and RP2 genes that have been implicated in CHM and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), respectively. The identified variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in available individuals and unrelated controls. Results: In two unrelated male patients, NGS analysis revealed a previously reported 3’-splice site change c.820-1G>C in the CHM gene in the first family and hemizygous mutation c.653G>C (p.Ser218X) in the second family. The asymptomatic family members were carriers for these mutations. Spectral domain-OCT showed loss of outer retina, preservation of the inner retina, and choroidal thinning in the affected males and retinal pigment epithelial changes in the asymptomatic carriers. The identified mutations were not present in 100 controls of Indian origin. There were no potential mutations found in XLRP-associated (RPGR and RP2) genes. Conclusion: This report describes the genotype and phenotype findings in patients with CHM from India. The identified genetic mutation leads to lack of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1) or affects the production of a REP-1 protein that is likely to cause retinal abnormalities in patients. PMID:28112135

  2. Modeling the Autism Spectrum Disorder Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McCray, Alexa T.; Trevvett, Philip; Frost, H. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is highly heritable, and although there has been active research in an attempt to discover the genetic factors underlying ASD, diagnosis still depends heavily on behavioral assessments. Recently, several large-scale initiatives, including those of the Autism Consortium, have contributed to the collection of extensive information from families affected by ASD. Purpose Our goal was to develop an ontology that can be used 1) to provide improved access to the data collected by those who study ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders, and 2) to assess and compare the characteristics of the instruments that are used in the assessment of ASD. Materials and Methods We analyzed two dozen instruments used to assess ASD, studying the nature of the questions asked and items assessed, the method of delivery, and the overall scope of the content. These data together with the extensive literature on ASD contributed to our iterative development of an ASD phenotype ontology. Results The final ontology comprises 283 concepts distributed across three high-level classes, ‘Personal Traits’, ‘Social Competence’, and ‘Medical History’. The ontology is fully integrated with the Autism Consortium database, allowing researchers to pose ontology-based questions. The ontology also allows researchers to assess the degree of overlap among a set of candidate instruments according to several objective criteria. Conclusions The ASD phenotype ontology has promise for use in research settings where extensive phenotypic data have been collected, allowing a concept-based approach to identifying behavioral features of importance and for correlating these with genotypic data. PMID:24163114

  3. Mixture model for sub-phenotyping in GWAS.

    PubMed

    Warde-Farley, David; Brudno, Michael; Morris, Quaid; Goldenberg, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Genome Wide Association (GWA) studies resulted in discovery of genetic variants underlying several complex diseases including Chron's disease and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Still geneticists find that in majority of studies the size of the effect even if it is significant tends to be very small. There are several factors contributing to this problem such as rare variants, complex relationships among SNPs (epistatic effect), and heterogeneity of the phenotype. In this work we focus on addressing phenotypic heterogeneity. We introduce the problem of identifying, from GWAS data, separate genotypic markers from overlapping mixtures of clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. We propose a generative model for this scenario and derive an expectation-maximization (EM) procedure to fit the model to data, as well as a novel screening procedure designed to identify skew specific to certain phenotypic regimes. We present results on several simulated datasets as well as preliminary findings in applying the model to type 2 diabetes dataset.

  4. Semantically Linking In Silico Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David; Connor, Anthony J; McKeever, Steve; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Quaiser, Tom; Shochat, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models are commonplace in cancer modeling, where individual models acting on different biological scales are combined within a single, cohesive modeling framework. However, model composition gives rise to challenges in understanding interfaces and interactions between them. Based on specific domain expertise, typically these computational models are developed by separate research groups using different methodologies, programming languages, and parameters. This paper introduces a graph-based model for semantically linking computational cancer models via domain graphs that can help us better understand and explore combinations of models spanning multiple biological scales. We take the data model encoded by TumorML, an XML-based markup language for storing cancer models in online repositories, and transpose its model description elements into a graph-based representation. By taking such an approach, we can link domain models, such as controlled vocabularies, taxonomic schemes, and ontologies, with cancer model descriptions to better understand and explore relationships between models. The union of these graphs creates a connected property graph that links cancer models by categorizations, by computational compatibility, and by semantic interoperability, yielding a framework in which opportunities for exploration and discovery of combinations of models become possible. PMID:25520553

  5. Semantically linking in silico cancer models.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Connor, Anthony J; McKeever, Steve; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Quaiser, Tom; Shochat, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models are commonplace in cancer modeling, where individual models acting on different biological scales are combined within a single, cohesive modeling framework. However, model composition gives rise to challenges in understanding interfaces and interactions between them. Based on specific domain expertise, typically these computational models are developed by separate research groups using different methodologies, programming languages, and parameters. This paper introduces a graph-based model for semantically linking computational cancer models via domain graphs that can help us better understand and explore combinations of models spanning multiple biological scales. We take the data model encoded by TumorML, an XML-based markup language for storing cancer models in online repositories, and transpose its model description elements into a graph-based representation. By taking such an approach, we can link domain models, such as controlled vocabularies, taxonomic schemes, and ontologies, with cancer model descriptions to better understand and explore relationships between models. The union of these graphs creates a connected property graph that links cancer models by categorizations, by computational compatibility, and by semantic interoperability, yielding a framework in which opportunities for exploration and discovery of combinations of models become possible.

  6. Contribution of Post-translational Phosphorylation to Sarcomere-Linked Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Margaret V.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary shifts develop in post-translational phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins in multiple animal models of inherited cardiomyopathy. These signaling alterations together with the primary mutation are predicted to contribute to the overall cardiac phenotype. As a result, identification and integration of post-translational myofilament signaling responses are identified as priorities for gaining insights into sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. However, significant questions remain about the nature and contribution of post-translational phosphorylation to structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in animal models and human patients. This perspective essay discusses specific goals for filling critical gaps about post-translational signaling in response to these inherited mutations, especially within sarcomeric proteins. The discussion focuses primarily on pre-clinical analysis of animal models and defines challenges and future directions in this field. PMID:27683560

  7. Optical Performance Models for FDDI Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A loss budget model to predict optical performance of Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) type networks in the premises distribution environment has been developed. This model tailors existing statistical loss budget models to the FDDI standard. It is expected that as FDDI becomes popular, fiber based distribution systems will become common. When designing a fiber distribution system it is important to understand the constraints placed on link performance by the cable plant. To determine these constraints, the model is examined numerically using a large range of initial conditions. The total link length is used as the dependent variable. This set of initial conditions corresponds to an ensemble of possible link configurations. These link configurations are studied in the context of the premises distribution environment. The model is extended to include the use of optical bypass switches. Laboratory measurement data is presented to verify the accuracy of the bypass switch model. The extended model, including the bypass switch, is examined numerically for a similar set of initial conditions. These constraints are applied to the use of bypass switches in wiring closets, between floors, and at the work location. Distance limitations are determined for FDDI links utilizing optical bypass switches.

  8. Transgenic mice overexpressing the ALS-linked protein Matrin 3 develop a profound muscle phenotype.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Christina; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Howard, John; Fromholt, Susan; Brown, Hilda; Collins, Matt; Cabrera, Mariela; Duffy, Colin; Siemienski, Zoe; Miller, Dave; Swanson, Maurice S; Notterpek, Lucia; Borchelt, David R; Lewis, Jada

    2016-11-18

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear matrix protein Matrin 3 have been found in familial cases of ALS, as well as autosomal dominant distal myopathy with vocal cord and pharyngeal weakness. We previously found that spinal cord and muscle, organs involved in either ALS or distal myopathy, have relatively lower levels of Matrin 3 compared to the brain and other peripheral organs in the murine system. This suggests that these organs may be vulnerable to any changes in Matrin 3. In order to determine the role of Matrin 3 in these diseases, we created a transgenic mouse model for human wild-type Matrin 3 using the mouse prion promoter (MoPrP) on a FVB background.We identified three founder transgenic lines that produced offspring in which mice developed either hindlimb paresis or paralysis with hindlimb and forelimb muscle atrophy. Muscles of affected mice showed a striking increase in nuclear Matrin 3, as well as the presence of rounded fibers, vacuoles, nuclear chains, and subsarcolemmal nuclei. Immunoblot analysis of the gastrocnemius muscle from phenotypic mice showed increased levels of Matrin 3 products migrating at approximately 120 (doublet), 90, 70, and 55 kDa. While there was no significant change in the levels of Matrin 3 in the spinal cord in the phenotypic mice, the ventral horn contained individual cells with cytoplasmic redistribution of Matrin 3, as well as gliosis. The phenotypes of these mice indicate that dysregulation of Matrin 3 levels is deleterious to neuromuscular function.

  9. Multikernel linear mixed models for complex phenotype prediction

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrod, Omer; Geiger, Dan; Rosset, Saharon

    2016-01-01

    Linear mixed models (LMMs) and their extensions have recently become the method of choice in phenotype prediction for complex traits. However, LMM use to date has typically been limited by assuming simple genetic architectures. Here, we present multikernel linear mixed model (MKLMM), a predictive modeling framework that extends the standard LMM using multiple-kernel machine learning approaches. MKLMM can model genetic interactions and is particularly suitable for modeling complex local interactions between nearby variants. We additionally present MKLMM-Adapt, which automatically infers interaction types across multiple genomic regions. In an analysis of eight case-control data sets from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium and more than a hundred mouse phenotypes, MKLMM-Adapt consistently outperforms competing methods in phenotype prediction. MKLMM is as computationally efficient as standard LMMs and does not require storage of genotypes, thus achieving state-of-the-art predictive power without compromising computational feasibility or genomic privacy. PMID:27302636

  10. Large-scale phenotyping links adult hippocampal neurogenesis to the reaction to novelty.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, R Maarten; Lazic, Stanley E; Slomianka, Lutz; Wolfer, David P; Amrein, Irmgard

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus has triggered a wide range of studies that link the new neurons to various behavioral functions. However, the role of new neurons in behavior is still equivocal. Conflicting results may be due to the difficulty in manipulating neurogenesis without off-target effects as well as the statistical approach used, which fail to account for neurogenesis-independent effects of experimental manipulations on behavior. In this study, we apply a more comprehensive statistical and conceptual approach. Instead of between-group analyses, we consider the within-group relationships between neurogenesis and behavior (ANCOVA and mediation analysis) in a large-scale experiment, in which distinct age- (3 and 5 months) and strain- (DBA and C57) related differences in basal levels of neurogenesis in mice are compared with a large number (∼1,500) of behavioral read outs. The analysis failed to detect any association between anxiety and motor impulsivity with neurogenesis. However, within-group adult hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with the reaction to novelty. Specifically, more neurogenesis is associated with a longer latency to explore and a lower frequency of exploratory actions, overall indicative of a phenotype where animals with more neurogenesis were slower to explore a novel environment. This effect is observed in 5-months-old, but not in 3-months-old mice of both strains. An association between the reaction to novelty and adult neurogenesis can have a major impact on results from previous studies using classical behavioral experiments, in which animals are tested in a--for the animal--novel experimental set-up. The neurogenesis-novelty association found here is also a necessary link in the relation that has been suggested to exist between neurogenesis and psychiatric disorders marked by a failure to cope with novelty.

  11. Phosphatase-Dead Myotubularin Ameliorates X-Linked Centronuclear Myopathy Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tronchère, Hélène; Hnia, Karim; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Rinaldi, Bruno; Cowling, Belinda S.; Ferry, Arnaud; Klaholz, Bruno; Payrastre, Bernard; Laporte, Jocelyn; Friant, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Myotubularin MTM1 is a phosphoinositide (PPIn) 3-phosphatase mutated in X-linked centronuclear myopathy (XLCNM; myotubular myopathy). We investigated the involvement of MTM1 enzymatic activity on XLCNM phenotypes. Exogenous expression of human MTM1 in yeast resulted in vacuolar enlargement, as a consequence of its phosphatase activity. Expression of mutants from patients with different clinical progression and determination of PtdIns3P and PtdIns5P cellular levels confirmed the link between vacuolar morphology and MTM1 phosphatase activity, and showed that some disease mutants retain phosphatase activity. Viral gene transfer of phosphatase-dead myotubularin mutants (MTM1C375S and MTM1S376N) significantly improved most histological signs of XLCNM displayed by a Mtm1-null mouse, at similar levels as wild-type MTM1. Moreover, the MTM1C375S mutant improved muscle performance and restored the localization of nuclei, triad alignment, and the desmin intermediate filament network, while it did not normalize PtdIns3P levels, supporting phosphatase-independent roles of MTM1 in maintaining normal muscle performance and organelle positioning in skeletal muscle. Among the different XLCNM signs investigated, we identified only triad shape and fiber size distribution as being partially dependent on MTM1 phosphatase activity. In conclusion, this work uncovers MTM1 roles in the structural organization of muscle fibers that are independent of its enzymatic activity. This underlines that removal of enzymes should be used with care to conclude on the physiological importance of their activity. PMID:23071445

  12. Infections associated with chronic granulomatous disease: linking genetics to phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Josef; Wolach, Ofir; Gavrieli, Ronit; Wolach, Baruch

    2012-08-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited primary immunodeficiency characterized by the absence or malfunction of the NADPH oxidase in phagocytic cells. As a result, there is an impaired ability to generate superoxide anions and the subsequent reactive oxygen intermediates. Consequently, CGD patients suffer from two clinical manifestations: recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammatory reactions leading to granulomatous lesions. Although the genotype of CGD was linked to the phenotypic expression of the disease, this connection is still controversial and poorly understood. Certain correlations were reported, but the clinical expression of the disease is usually unpredictable, regardless of the pattern of inheritance. CGD mainly affects the lungs, lymph nodes, skin, GI tract and liver. Patients are particularly susceptible to catalase-positive microorganisms, including Staphyloccocus aureus, Nocardia spp. and Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia marcescens, Burkholderia cepacea and Salmonella spp. Unusually, catalase-negative microorganisms were reported as well. New antibacterial and antimycotic agents considerably improved the prognosis of CGD. Therapy with IFN-γ is still controversial. Bone marrow stem cell transplantation is currently the only curative treatment and gene therapy needs further development. In this article, the authors discuss the genetic, functional and molecular aspects of CGD and their impact on the clinical expression, infectious complications and the hyperinflammatory state.

  13. Integrated phenotypic and activity-based profiling links Ces3 to obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Eduardo; Galmozzi, Andrea; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Pawlak, Joanna; Li, Weiwei; Godio, Cristina; Thomas, Jason; Partida, David; Niessen, Sherry; O'Brien, Paul E; Russell, Aaron P; Watt, Matthew J; Nomura, Daniel K; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    Phenotypic screening is making a comeback in drug discovery as the maturation of chemical proteomics methods has facilitated target identification for bioactive small molecules. A limitation of these approaches is that time-consuming genetic methods or other means are often required to determine the biologically relevant target (or targets) from among multiple protein-compound interactions that are typically detected. Here, we have combined phenotypic screening of a directed small-molecule library with competitive activity-based protein profiling to map and functionally characterize the targets of screening hits. Using this approach, we identify carboxylesterase 3 (Ces3, also known as Ces1d) as a primary molecular target of bioactive compounds that promote lipid storage in adipocytes. We further show that Ces3 activity is markedly elevated during adipocyte differentiation. Treatment of two mouse models of obesity-diabetes with a Ces3 inhibitor ameliorates multiple features of metabolic syndrome, illustrating the power of the described strategy to accelerate the identification and pharmacologic validation of new therapeutic targets.

  14. Mitochondrial genetics and hearing loss: the missing link between genotype and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fischel-Ghodsian, N

    1998-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been implicated in a great variety of diseases, including such common ones as diabetes, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's, but the pathophysiological pathway leading from a specific mutation to a specific phenotype has remained elusive. Individuals with the same mutation can fall along a clinical spectrum ranging from asymptomatic to severely affected, and can even have completely different diseases. Much of this phenotypic heterogeneity has been attributed to the heteroplasmic nature of mitochondrial mutations, with both normal and mutated mitochondrial chromosomes being present in different proportions and tissue distributions. Isolated hearing loss is one of the only mitochondrial disorders that can be caused by homoplasmic mutations (e.g., only mutated mitochondrial mutations are present in all tissues). This review will outline the relationship between mitochondrial mutations and hearing loss while showing that even in a homoplasmic model, the two basic questions of mitochondrial genetics, penetrance and tissue specificity, remain unanswered: Why does the same mutation cause severe hearing loss in some family members but not in others, and why is the ear the only organ affected?

  15. Correlation between connexin 32 gene mutations and clinical phenotype in X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.; Ionasescu, R.; Searby, C.

    1996-06-14

    We studied the relationship between the genotype and clinical phenotype in 27 families with dominant X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX1) neuropathy. Twenty-two families showed mutations in the coding region of the connexin32 (cx32) gene. The mutations include four nonsense mutations, eight missense mutations, two medium size deletions, and one insertion. Most missense mutations showed a mild clinical phenotype (five out of eight), whereas all nonsense mutations, the larger of the two deletions, and the insertion that produced frameshifts showed severe phenotypes. Five CMTX1 families with mild clinical phenotype showed no point mutations of the cx32 gene coding region. Three of these families showed positive genetic linkage with the markers of the Xq13.1 region. The genetic linkage of the remaining two families could not be evaluated because of their small size. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Mouse model phenotypes provide information about human drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Hiebert, Tanya; Hardy, Nigel W.; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Dumontier, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Methods for computational drug target identification use information from diverse information sources to predict or prioritize drug targets for known drugs. One set of resources that has been relatively neglected for drug repurposing is animal model phenotype. Results: We investigate the use of mouse model phenotypes for drug target identification. To achieve this goal, we first integrate mouse model phenotypes and drug effects, and then systematically compare the phenotypic similarity between mouse models and drug effect profiles. We find a high similarity between phenotypes resulting from loss-of-function mutations and drug effects resulting from the inhibition of a protein through a drug action, and demonstrate how this approach can be used to suggest candidate drug targets. Availability and implementation: Analysis code and supplementary data files are available on the project Web site at https://drugeffects.googlecode.com. Contact: leechuck@leechuck.de or roh25@aber.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24158600

  17. Nav 1.5 mutations linked to dilated cardiomyopathy phenotypes: Is the gating pore current the missing link?

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Moreau, Adrien; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Nav 1.5 dysfunctions are commonly linked to rhythms disturbances that include type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3), Brugada syndrome (BrS), sick sinus syndrome (SSS) and conduction defects. Recently, this channel protein has been also linked to structural heart diseases such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

  18. Artery Buckling: New Phenotypes, Models, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Chao; Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Garcia, Justin R.; Liu, Qin; Wen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Arteries are under significant mechanical loads from blood pressure, flow, tissue tethering, and body movement. It is critical that arteries remain patent and stable under these loads. This review summarizes the common forms of buckling that occur in blood vessels including cross-sectional collapse, longitudinal twist buckling, and bent buckling. The phenomena, model analyses, experimental measurements, effects on blood flow, and clinical relevance are discussed. It is concluded that mechanical buckling is an important issue for vasculature, in addition to wall stiffness and strength, and requires further studies to address the challenges. Studies of vessel buckling not only enrich vascular biomechanics but also have important clinical applications. PMID:23192265

  19. Linking genotypes database with locus-specific database and genotype-phenotype correlation in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Sarah; Underhaug, Jarl; Perez, Belen; Marsden, Brian D; Yue, Wyatt W; Martinez, Aurora; Blau, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    The wide range of metabolic phenotypes in phenylketonuria is due to a large number of variants causing variable impairment in phenylalanine hydroxylase function. A total of 834 phenylalanine hydroxylase gene variants from the locus-specific database PAHvdb and genotypes of 4181 phenylketonuria patients from the BIOPKU database were characterized using FoldX, SIFT Blink, Polyphen-2 and SNPs3D algorithms. Obtained data was correlated with residual enzyme activity, patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness. A descriptive analysis of both databases was compiled and an interactive viewer in PAHvdb database was implemented for structure visualization of missense variants. We found a quantitative relationship between phenylalanine hydroxylase protein stability and enzyme activity (r(s) = 0.479), between protein stability and allelic phenotype (r(s) = -0.458), as well as between enzyme activity and allelic phenotype (r(s) = 0.799). Enzyme stability algorithms (FoldX and SNPs3D), allelic phenotype and enzyme activity were most powerful to predict patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin response. Phenotype prediction was most accurate in deleterious genotypes (≈ 100%), followed by homozygous (92.9%), hemizygous (94.8%), and compound heterozygous genotypes (77.9%), while tetrahydrobiopterin response was correctly predicted in 71.0% of all cases. To our knowledge this is the largest study using algorithms for the prediction of patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness in phenylketonuria patients, using data from the locus-specific and genotypes database.

  20. Recombinant Osteopontin Stabilizes Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype via Integrin Receptor/Integrin-Linked Kinase/Rac-1 Pathway After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Peng; Enkhjargal, Budbazar; Manaenko, Anatol; Tang, Jiping; Pearce, William J; Hartman, Richard; Obenaus, Andre; Chen, Gang; Zhang, John H

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN) has been reported to be neuroprotective in stroke animal models. The purpose of this study is to investigate a potential role and mechanism of nasal administration of rOPN on preserving the vascular smooth muscle phenotype in early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One hundred and ninety-two male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The SAH model was induced by endovascular perforation. Integrin-linked kinase small interfering RNA was intracerebroventricularly injected 48 hours before SAH. The integrin receptor antagonist fibronectin-derived peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro (GRGDSP), focal adhesion kinase inhibitor Fib-14, and Rac-1 inhibitor NSC23766 were administered 1 hour before SAH induction. rOPN was administered via the intracerebroventricular and nasal route after SAH. SAH grade, neurological scores, brain water content, brain swelling, hematoxylin and eosin staining, India ink angiography, Western blots, and immunofluorescence were used to study the mechanisms of rOPN on the vascular smooth muscle phenotypic transformation. The marker proteins of vascular smooth muscle phenotypic transformation α-smooth muscle actin decreased and embryonic smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMemb) increased significantly at 24 and 72 hours in the cerebral arteries after SAH. rOPN prevented the changes of α-smooth muscle actin and SMemb and significantly alleviated neurobehavioral dysfunction, increased the cross-sectional area and the lumen diameter of the cerebral arteries, reduced the brain water content and brain swelling, and improved the wall thickness of cerebral arteries. These effects of rOPN were abolished by GRGDSP, integrin-linked kinase small interfering RNA, and NSC23766. Intranasal application of rOPN at 3 hours after SAH also reduced neurological deficits. rOPN prevented the vascular smooth muscle phenotypic transformation and improved the neurological outcome, which was possibly mediated by the integrin

  1. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J; Larovere, Laura E; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E; Schretlen, David J; Nyhan, William L; Puig, Juan G; O'Neill, Patrick J; Jinnah, H A

    2014-05-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype-phenotype correlations for other disorders.

  2. Genotype–phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Larovere, Laura E.; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V.; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Nyhan, William L.; Puig, Juan G.; O’Neill, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype–phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype–phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype–phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype–phenotype correlations for other disorders. PMID:23975452

  3. Optimizing complex phenotypes through model-guided multiplex genome engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Kuznetsov, Gleb; Goodman, Daniel B.; Filsinger, Gabriel T.; ...

    2017-05-25

    Here, we present a method for identifying genomic modifications that optimize a complex phenotype through multiplex genome engineering and predictive modeling. We apply our method to identify six single nucleotide mutations that recover 59% of the fitness defect exhibited by the 63-codon E. coli strain C321.ΔA. By introducing targeted combinations of changes in multiplex we generate rich genotypic and phenotypic diversity and characterize clones using whole-genome sequencing and doubling time measurements. Regularized multivariate linear regression accurately quantifies individual allelic effects and overcomes bias from hitchhiking mutations and context-dependence of genome editing efficiency that would confound other strategies.

  4. Searching For Valid Psychiatric Phenotypes: Discrete Latent Variable Models

    PubMed Central

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Zandi, Peter P.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A primary challenge in psychiatric genetics is the lack of a completely validated system of classification for mental disorders. Appropriate statistical methods are needed to empirically derive more homogenous disorder subtypes. Methods Using the framework of Robins & Guze’s (1970) five phases, latent variable models to derive and validate diagnostic groups are described. A process of iterative validation is proposed through which refined phenotypes would facilitate research on genetics, pathogenesis, and treatment, which would in turn aid further refinement of disorder definitions. Conclusions Latent variable methods are useful tools for defining and validating psychiatric phenotypes. Further methodological research should address sample size issues and application to iterative validation. PMID:20187060

  5. Phenotyping and beyond: modelling the relationships between traits.

    PubMed

    Granier, Christine; Vile, Denis

    2014-04-01

    Plant phenotyping technology has become more advanced with the capacity to measure many morphological and physiological traits on a given individual. With increasing automation, getting access to various traits on a high number of genotypes over time raises the need to develop systems for data storage and analyses, all congregating into plant phenotyping pipelines. In this review, we highlight several studies that illustrate the latest advances in plant multi-trait phenotyping and discuss future needs to ensure the best use of all these quantitative data. We assert that the next challenge is to disentangle how plant traits are embedded in networks of dependencies (and independencies) by modelling the relationships between them and how these are affected by genetics and environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural Modeling Insights into Human VKORC1 Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Czogalla, Katrin J.; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) catalyses the reduction of vitamin K and its 2,3-epoxide essential to sustain γ-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Two different phenotypes are associated with mutations in human VKORC1. The majority of mutations cause resistance to 4-hydroxycoumarin- and indandione-based vitamin K antagonists (VKA) used in the prevention and therapy of thromboembolism. Patients with these mutations require greater doses of VKA for stable anticoagulation than patients without mutations. The second phenotype, a very rare autosomal-recessive bleeding disorder caused by combined deficiency of vitamin K dependent clotting factors type 2 (VKCFD2) arises from a homozygous Arg98Trp mutation. The bleeding phenotype can be corrected by vitamin K administration. Here, we summarize published experimental data and in silico modeling results in order to rationalize the mechanisms of VKA resistance and VKCFD2. PMID:26287237

  7. Meta-analysis of global metabolomics and proteomics data to link alterations with phenotype

    DOE PAGES

    Patti, Gary J.; Tautenhahn, Ralf; Fonslow, Bryan R.; ...

    2011-01-01

    Global metabolomics has emerged as a powerful tool to interrogate cellular biochemistry at the systems level by tracking alterations in the levels of small molecules. One approach to define cellular dynamics with respect to this dysregulation of small molecules has been to consider metabolic flux as a function of time. While flux measurements have proven effective for model organisms, acquiring multiple time points at appropriate temporal intervals for many sample types (e.g., clinical specimens) is challenging. As an alternative, meta-analysis provides another strategy for delineating metabolic cause and effect perturbations. That is, the combination of untargeted metabolomic data from multiplemore » pairwise comparisons enables the association of specific changes in small molecules with unique phenotypic alterations. We recently developed metabolomic software called metaXCMS to automate these types of higher order comparisons. Here we discuss the potential of metaXCMS for analyzing proteomic datasets and highlight the biological value of combining meta-results from both metabolomic and proteomic analyses. The combined meta-analysis has the potential to facilitate efforts in functional genomics and the identification of metabolic disruptions related to disease pathogenesis.« less

  8. GABAergic Signaling Is Linked to a Hypermigratory Phenotype in Dendritic Cells Infected by Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mendu, Suresh; Jin, Zhe; Wallin, Robert P. A.; Rethi, Bence; Birnir, Bryndis; Barragan, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    During acute infection in human and animal hosts, the obligate intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of cell types, including leukocytes. Poised to respond to invading pathogens, dendritic cells (DC) may also be exploited by T. gondii for spread in the infected host. Here, we report that human and mouse myeloid DC possess functional γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors and the machinery for GABA biosynthesis and secretion. Shortly after T. gondii infection (genotypes I, II and III), DC responded with enhanced GABA secretion in vitro. We demonstrate that GABA activates GABAA receptor-mediated currents in T. gondii-infected DC, which exhibit a hypermigratory phenotype. Inhibition of GABA synthesis, transportation or GABAA receptor blockade in T. gondii-infected DC resulted in impaired transmigration capacity, motility and chemotactic response to CCL19 in vitro. Moreover, exogenous GABA or supernatant from infected DC restored the migration of infected DC in vitro. In a mouse model of toxoplasmosis, adoptive transfer of infected DC pre-treated with GABAergic inhibitors reduced parasite dissemination and parasite loads in target organs, e.g. the central nervous system. Altogether, we provide evidence that GABAergic signaling modulates the migratory properties of DC and that T. gondii likely makes use of this pathway for dissemination. The findings unveil that GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, has activation functions in the immune system that may be hijacked by intracellular pathogens. PMID:23236276

  9. Behavioral and Neuroanatomical Phenotypes in Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Ellegood, Jacob; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the consequences of the mutation on behavioral and biological phenotypes relevant to autism, mutations in many of the risk genes for autism spectrum disorder have been experimentally generated in mice. Here, we summarize behavioral outcomes and neuroanatomical abnormalities, with a focus on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of postmortem mouse brains. Results are described from multiple mouse models of autism spectrum disorder and comorbid syndromes, including the 15q11-13, 16p11.2, 22q11.2, Cntnap2, Engrailed2, Fragile X, Integrinβ3, MET, Neurexin1a, Neuroligin3, Reelin, Rett, Shank3, Slc6a4, tuberous sclerosis, and Williams syndrome models, and inbred strains with strong autism-relevant behavioral phenotypes, including BTBR and BALB. Concomitant behavioral and neuroanatomical abnormalities can strengthen the interpretation of results from a mouse model, and may elevate the usefulness of the model system for therapeutic discovery.

  10. FG syndrome, an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly syndrome: the clinical phenotype and an algorithm for diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin Dawn; Graham, John M; Friez, Michael J; Hoo, Joe J; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; McKeown, Carole; Moeschler, John B; Raymond, F Lucy; Rogers, R Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E; Battaglia, Agatino; Lyons, Michael J; Stevenson, Roger E

    2009-11-01

    FG syndrome is a rare X-linked multiple congenital anomaly-cognitive impairment disorder caused by the p.R961W mutation in the MED12 gene. We identified all known patients with this mutation to delineate their clinical phenotype and devise a clinical algorithm to facilitate molecular diagnosis. We ascertained 23 males with the p.R961W mutation in MED12 from 9 previously reported FG syndrome families and 1 new family. Six patients are reviewed in detail. These 23 patients were compared with 48 MED12 mutation-negative patients, who had the clinical diagnosis of FG syndrome. Traits that best discriminated between these two groups were chosen to develop an algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity for the p.R961W MED12 mutation. FG syndrome has a recognizable dysmorphic phenotype with a high incidence of congenital anomalies. A family history of X-linked mental retardation, deceased male infants, and/or multiple fetal losses was documented in all families. The algorithm identifies the p.R961W MED12 mutation-positive group with 100% sensitivity and 90% specificity. The clinical phenotype of FG syndrome defines a recognizable pattern of X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and cognitive impairment. This algorithm can assist the clinician in selecting the patients for testing who are most likely to have the recurrent p.R961W MED12 mutation.

  11. Psoriasis and polycystic ovary syndrome: a new link in different phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Moro, Francesca; Tropea, Anna; Scarinci, Elisa; Federico, Alex; De Simone, Clara; Caldarola, Giacomo; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Lanzone, Antonio; Apa, Rosanna

    2015-08-01

    Women affected by PCOS and psoriasis are more likely to have insulin-resistance, hyperinsulinemia, reduced HDL cholesterol levels and a more severe degree of skin disease than those with psoriasis alone. The mechanism underlying this association between PCOS and psoriasis is currently unknown. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the features of psoriasis and the psoriasis severity scores in the different PCOS phenotypes and in age and body mass index (BMI)-matched psoriatic control patients. A cross-sectional study was performed on 150 psoriatic patients: 94 PCOS and 56 age- and BMI-matched controls. PCOS patients were diagnosed and divided into four phenotypes according to Rotterdam criteria: A - patients with complete phenotype with hyperandrogenism (H) plus oligoamenorrhea (O) plus polycystic ovary (PCO) on ultrasound examination; B - patients with H plus O (without PCO); C - patients with H plus PCO (ovulatory phenotype); D - patients with O plus PCO (without H). The patient's Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) as well as the Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) were calculated. A PASI score ≥10 was correlated with common indicator of severe disease. A PGA ≥4 was considered as a condition of moderate to severe disease. Among the four phenotypes investigated, the group with complete phenotype (H plus O plus PCO) had a higher prevalence of patients with patient's PASI ≥10 compared to controls (Odds Ratio (OR) 4.71, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.59-13.95). The group with O plus PCO had a higher prevalence of patients with PGA ≥4 compared to controls (OR 26.79, 95% CI 3.40-211.02) while the ovulatory group had a lower prevalence of patients with PGA ≥4 (OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01-0.51). The ovulatory phenotype displays a milder psoriasis form than other phenotypes while the phenotypes with oligoamenorrhea presented higher severity scores of disease than other phenotypes and control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  12. Animal Models of Cystic Fibrosis Pathology: Phenotypic Parallels and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The resultant characteristic ion transport defect results in decreased mucociliary clearance, bacterial colonisation, and chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation. Much knowledge surrounding the pathophysiology of the disease has been gained through the generation of animal models, despite inherent limitations in each. The failure of certain mouse models to recapitulate the phenotypic manifestations of human disease has initiated the generation of larger animals in which to study CF, including the pig and the ferret. This review will summarise the basic phenotypes of three animal models and describe the contributions of such animal studies to our current understanding of CF. PMID:27340661

  13. Phenotype profile of a genetic mouse model for Muenke syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Eiki; Agochukwu, Nneamaka B.; Bartlett, Scott P.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Muenke syndrome mutation (FGFR3P250R), which was discovered 15 years ago, represents the single most common craniosynostosis mutation. Muenke syndrome is characterized by coronal suture synostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, subtle limb anomalies, and hearing loss. However, the spectrum of clinical presentation continues to expand. To better understand the pathophysiology of the Muenke syndrome, we present collective findings from several recent studies that have characterized a genetically equivalent mouse model for Muenke syndrome (FgfR3P244R) and compare them with human phenotypes. Conclusions FgfR3P244R mutant mice show premature fusion of facial sutures, premaxillary and/or zygomatic sutures, but rarely the coronal suture. The mice also lack the typical limb phenotype. On the other hand, the mutant mice display maxillary retrusion in association with a shortening of the anterior cranial base and a premature closure of intersphenoidal and spheno-occipital synchondroses, resembling human midface hypoplasia. In addition, sensorineural hearing loss is detected in all FgfR3P244R mutant mice as in the majority of Muenke syndrome patients. It is caused by a defect in the mechanism of cell fate determination in the organ of Corti. The mice also express phenotypes that have not been previously described in humans, such as reduced cortical bone thickness, hypoplastic trabecular bone, and defective temporomandibular joint structure. Therefore, the FgfR3P244R mouse provides an excellent opportunity to study disease mechanisms of some classical phenotypes of Muenke syndrome and to test novel therapeutic strategies. The mouse model can also be further explored to discover previously unreported yet potentially significant phenotypes of Muenke syndrome. PMID:22872265

  14. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, T. M.; Leach, P. T.; Crawley, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. PMID:26403076

  15. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  16. Animal models of the polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) remains unclear, despite its high prevalence among infertility disorders in women of reproductive age. Although there is evidence for a genetic component of the disorder, other causes, such as prenatal insults are considered among the potential factors that may contribute to the development of the syndrome. Over the past few decades, several animal models have been developed in an attempt to understand the potential contribution of exposure to excess steroids on the development of this syndrome. The current review summarizes the phenotypes of current animal models exposed to excess steroid during the prenatal and early postnatal period and how they compare with the phenotype seen in women with PCOS. PMID:23701728

  17. Naturally Occurring Animal Models with Outer Retina Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Wolfgang; Frederick, Jeanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring and laboratory generated animal models serve as powerful tools with which to investigate the etiology of human retinal degenerations, especially retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), cone dystrophies (CD) and macular degeneration (MD). Much progress has been made in elucidating gene defects underlying disease, in understanding mechanisms leading to disease, and in designing molecules for translational research and gene-based therapy to interfere with the progression of disease. Key to this progress has been study of naturally occurring murine and canine retinal degeneration mutants. This article will review the history, phenotypes and gene defects of select animal models with outer retina (photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium) degeneration phenotypes. PMID:19375447

  18. Tumor and reproductive traits are linked by RNA metabolism genes in the mouse ovary: a transcriptome-phenotype association analysis.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Ulises; Owens, Garrison A; Zhang, Gen-Mu; Cherry, James M; Sharp, John J; Munroe, David J

    2010-12-22

    The link between reproductive life history and incidence of ovarian tumors is well known. Periods of reduced ovulations may confer protection against ovarian cancer. Using phenotypic data available for mouse, a possible association between the ovarian transcriptome, reproductive records and spontaneous ovarian tumor rates was investigated in four mouse inbred strains. NIA15k-DNA microarrays were employed to obtain expression profiles of BalbC, C57BL6, FVB and SWR adult ovaries. Linear regression analysis with multiple-test control (adjusted p ≤ 0.05) resulted in ovarian tumor frequency (OTF) and number of litters (NL) as the top-correlated among five tested phenotypes. Moreover, nearly one-hundred genes were coincident between these two traits and were decomposed in 76 OTF(-) NL(+) and 20 OTF(+) NL(-) genes, where the plus/minus signs indicate the direction of correlation. Enriched functional categories were RNA-binding/mRNA-processing and protein folding in the OTF(-) NL(+) and the OTF(+) NL(-) subsets, respectively. In contrast, no associations were detected between OTF and litter size (LS), the latter a measure of ovulation events in a single estrous cycle. Literature text-mining pointed to post-transcriptional control of ovarian processes including oocyte maturation, folliculogenesis and angiogenesis as possible causal relationships of observed tumor and reproductive phenotypes. We speculate that repetitive cycling instead of repetitive ovulations represent the actual link between ovarian tumorigenesis and reproductive records.

  19. Tumor and reproductive traits are linked by RNA metabolism genes in the mouse ovary: a transcriptome-phenotype association analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The link between reproductive life history and incidence of ovarian tumors is well known. Periods of reduced ovulations may confer protection against ovarian cancer. Using phenotypic data available for mouse, a possible association between the ovarian transcriptome, reproductive records and spontaneous ovarian tumor rates was investigated in four mouse inbred strains. NIA15k-DNA microarrays were employed to obtain expression profiles of BalbC, C57BL6, FVB and SWR adult ovaries. Results Linear regression analysis with multiple-test control (adjusted p ≤ 0.05) resulted in ovarian tumor frequency (OTF) and number of litters (NL) as the top-correlated among five tested phenotypes. Moreover, nearly one-hundred genes were coincident between these two traits and were decomposed in 76 OTF(–) NL(+) and 20 OTF(+) NL(–) genes, where the plus/minus signs indicate the direction of correlation. Enriched functional categories were RNA-binding/mRNA-processing and protein folding in the OTF(–) NL(+) and the OTF(+) NL(–) subsets, respectively. In contrast, no associations were detected between OTF and litter size (LS), the latter a measure of ovulation events in a single estrous cycle. Conclusion Literature text-mining pointed to post-transcriptional control of ovarian processes including oocyte maturation, folliculogenesis and angiogenesis as possible causal relationships of observed tumor and reproductive phenotypes. We speculate that repetitive cycling instead of repetitive ovulations represent the actual link between ovarian tumorigenesis and reproductive records. PMID:21210965

  20. A prenatal nicotine exposure mouse model of methylphenidate responsive ADHD-associated cognitive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinmin; Fan, Fangfang; McCarthy, Deirdre M; Zhang, Lin; Cannon, Elisa N; Spencer, Thomas J; Biederman, Joseph; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2017-02-04

    Prenatal exposure to nicotine via cigarette smoke or other forms of tobacco use is a significant environmental risk factor for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the link between prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) and ADHD are not well understood. Animal models, especially rodent models, are beginning to bridge this gap in knowledge. Although ADHD is characterized by hyperactivity, inattention, impulsivity and working memory deficits, the majority of the animal models are based on only one or two ADHD associated phenotypes, in particular, hyperactivity or inattention. We report a PNE mouse model that displays the full range of ADHD associated behavioral phenotypes including working memory deficit, attention deficit and impulsive-like behavior. All of the ADHD-associated phenotypes respond to a single administration of a therapeutic equivalent dose of methylphenidate. In an earlier study, we showed that PNE produces hyperactivity, frontal cortical hypodopaminergic state and thinning of the cingulate cortex. Collectively, these data suggest that the PNE mouse model recapitulates key features of ADHD and may be a suitable preclinical model for ADHD research.

  1. UWB Radio Link Modeling for Multipath Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uguen, B.; Talom, F. T.; Chassay, G.

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) systems have the potential to provide very high data rates over short distances. This paper details the construction of the received signal from a pulse waveform on the transmission line at the transmitter to the received signal at the receiver allowing a fine analysis of antennas impact on UWB systems. This is used for deterministic modeling based on ray tracing (RT) and geometrical optics (GO). The paper presents the way of sizing the pulse amplitude in order to satisfy a given power spectral density (PSD) mask for a given modulation. The proposed approach is demonstrated to be coherent with classical power link budget.

  2. Phenotypically linked dichotomy in sea turtle foraging requires multiple conservation approaches.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Lucy A; Broderick, Annette C; Coyne, Michael S; Godfrey, Matthew H; Lopez-Jurado, Luis-Felipe; Lopez-Suarez, Pedro; Merino, Sonia Elsy; Varo-Cruz, Nuria; Godley, Brendan J

    2006-05-23

    Marine turtles undergo dramatic ontogenic changes in body size and behavior, with the loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta, typically switching from an initial oceanic juvenile stage to one in the neritic, where maturation is reached and breeding migrations are subsequently undertaken every 2-3 years. Using satellite tracking, we investigated the migratory movements of adult females from one of the world's largest nesting aggregations at Cape Verde, West Africa. In direct contrast with the accepted life-history model for this species, results reveal two distinct adult foraging strategies that appear to be linked to body size. The larger turtles (n = 3) foraged in coastal waters, whereas smaller individuals (n = 7) foraged oceanically. The conservation implications of these findings are profound, with the population compartmentalized into habitats that may be differentially impacted by fishery threats in what is a global fishing hotspot. Although the protection of discrete areas containing coastal individuals may be attainable, the more numerous pelagic individuals are widely dispersed with individuals roaming over more than half a million square kilometers. Therefore, mitigation of fisheries by-catch for sea turtles in the east Atlantic will likely require complex and regionally tailored actions to account for this dichotomous behavior.

  3. Behavioural and Psychiatric Phenotypes in Men and Boys with X-Linked Ichthyosis: Evidence from a Worldwide Online Survey.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sohini; Humby, Trevor; Davies, William

    2016-01-01

    X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a rare dermatological condition arising from deficiency for the enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS). Preliminary evidence in boys with XLI, and animal model studies, suggests that individuals lacking STS are at increased risk of developmental disorders and associated traits. However, the behavioural profile of children with XLI is poorly-characterised, and the behavioural profile of adults with XLI has not yet been documented at all. Using an online survey, advertised worldwide, we collected detailed self- or parent-reported information on behaviour in adult (n = 58) and younger (≤18yrs, n = 24) males with XLI for comparison to data from their non-affected brothers, and age/gender-matched previously-published normative data. The survey comprised demographic and background information (including any prior clinical diagnoses) and validated questionnaires assaying phenotypes of particular interest (Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale v1.1, Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11, adult and adolescent Autism Quotient, Kessler Psychological Distress Scales, and Disruptive Behaviour Disorder Rating Scale). Individuals with XLI generally exhibited normal sensory function. Boys with XLI were at increased risk of developmental disorder, whilst adults with the condition were at increased risk of both developmental and mood disorders. Both adult and younger XLI groups scored significantly more highly than male general population norms on measures of inattention, impulsivity, autism-related traits, psychological distress and disruptive behavioural traits. These findings indicate that both adult and younger males with XLI exhibit personality profiles that are distinct from those of males within the general population, and suggest that individuals with XLI may be at heightened risk of psychopathology. The data are consistent with the notion that STS is important in neurodevelopment and ongoing brain function, and with previous work suggesting high rates of

  4. Searching for valid psychiatric phenotypes: discrete latent variable models.

    PubMed

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Zandi, Peter P; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2010-06-01

    A primary challenge in psychiatric genetics is the lack of a completely validated system of classification for mental disorders. Appropriate statistical methods are needed to empirically derive more homogenous disorder subtypes. Using the framework of Robins and Guze's ('Establishment of diagnostic validity in psychiatric illness: its application to schizophrenia', American Journal of Psychiatry, 1970, 126(7), 983-987) five phases, latent variable models to derive and validate diagnostic groups are described. A process of iterative validation is proposed through which refined phenotypes would facilitate research on genetics, pathogenesis, and treatment, which would in turn aid further refinement of disorder definitions. Latent variable methods are useful tools for defining and validating psychiatric phenotypes. Further methodological research should address sample size issues and application to iterative validation.

  5. Striatal Network Models of Huntington's Disease Dysfunction Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Pengsheng; Kozloski, James

    2017-01-01

    We present a network model of striatum, which generates "winnerless" dynamics typical for a network of sparse, unidirectionally connected inhibitory units. We observe that these dynamics, while interesting and a good match to normal striatal electrophysiological recordings, are fragile. Specifically, we find that randomly initialized networks often show dynamics more resembling "winner-take-all," and relate this "unhealthy" model activity to dysfunctional physiological and anatomical phenotypes in the striatum of Huntington's disease animal models. We report plasticity as a potent mechanism to refine randomly initialized networks and create a healthy winnerless dynamic in our model, and we explore perturbations to a healthy network, modeled on changes observed in Huntington's disease, such as neuron cell death and increased bidirectional connectivity. We report the effect of these perturbations on the conversion risk of the network to an unhealthy state. Finally we discuss the relationship between structural and functional phenotypes observed at the level of simulated network dynamics as a promising means to model disease progression in different patient populations.

  6. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher J.; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates. PMID:27297393

  7. Phenotypic constraints and community structure: linking trade-offs within and among species.

    PubMed

    Angert, Amy L; Kimball, Sarah; Peterson, Megan; Huxman, Travis E; Venable, David L

    2014-11-01

    Trade-offs are central to many topics in biology, from the evolution of life histories to ecological mechanisms of species coexistence. Trade-offs observed among species may reflect pervasive constraints on phenotypes that are achievable given biophysical and resource limitations. If so, then among-species trade-offs should be consistent with trade-offs within species. Alternatively, trait variation among co-occurring species may reflect historical contingencies during community assembly rather than within-species constraints. Here, we test whether a key trade-off between relative growth rate (RGR) and water-use efficiency (WUE) among Sonoran Desert winter annual plants is apparent within four species representing different strategies in the system. We grew progeny of maternal families from multiple populations in a greenhouse common garden. One species, Pectocarya recurvata, displayed the expected RGR-WUE trade-off among families within populations. For other species, although RGR and WUE often varied clinally among populations, among-family variation within populations was lacking, implicating a role for past selection on these traits. Our results suggest that a combination of limited genetic variation in single traits and negative trait correlations could pose constraints on the evolution of a high-RGR and high-WUE phenotype within species, providing a microevolutionary explanation for phenotypes that influence community-level patterns of abundance and coexistence.

  8. Microglia-Based Phenotypic Screening Identifies a Novel Inhibitor of Neuroinflammation Effective in Alzheimer's Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Zhong, Guifa; Fu, Sihai; Xie, Hui; Chi, Tianyan; Li, Luyi; Rao, Xiurong; Zeng, Shaogao; Xu, Dengfeng; Wang, Hao; Sheng, Guoqing; Ji, Xing; Liu, Xiaorong; Ji, Xuefei; Wu, Donghai; Zou, Libo; Tortorella, Micky; Zhang, Kejian; Hu, Wenhui

    2016-11-16

    Currently, anti-AD drug discovery using target-based approaches is extremely challenging due to unclear etiology of AD and absence of validated therapeutic protein targets. Neuronal death, regardless of causes, plays a key role in AD progression, and it is directly linked to neuroinflammation. Meanwhile, phenotypic screening is making a resurgence in drug discovery process as an alternative to target-focused approaches. Herein, we employed microglia-based phenotypic screenings to search for small molecules that modulate the release of detrimental proinflammatory cytokines. The identified novel pharmacological inhibitor of neuroinflammation (named GIBH-130) was validated to alter phenotypes of neuroinflammation in AD brains. Notably, this molecule exhibited comparable in vivo efficacy of cognitive impairment relief to donepezil and memantine respectively in both β amyloid-induced and APP/PS1 double transgenic Alzheimer's murine models at a substantially lower dose (0.25 mg/kg). Therefore, GIBH-130 constitutes a unique chemical probe for pathogenesis research and drug development of AD, and it also suggests microglia-based phenotypic screenings that target neuroinflammation as an effective and feasible strategy to identify novel anti-AD agents.

  9. Divergent Phenotypes in Mutant TDP-43 Transgenic Mice Highlight Potential Confounds in TDP-43 Transgenic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    D’Alton, Simon; Altshuler, Marcelle; Cannon, Ashley; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Lewis, Jada

    2014-01-01

    The majority of cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are pathologically defined by the cleavage, cytoplasmic redistribution and aggregation of TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43). To examine the contribution of these potentially toxic mechanisms in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing human TDP-43 containing the familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked M337V mutation and identified two lines that developed neurological phenotypes of differing severity and progression. The first developed a rapid cortical neurodegenerative phenotype in the early postnatal period, characterized by fragmentation of TDP-43 and loss of endogenous murine Tdp-43, but entirely lacking aggregates of ubiquitin or TDP-43. A second, low expressing line was aged to 25 months without a severe neurodegenerative phenotype, despite a 30% loss of mouse Tdp-43 and accumulation of lower molecular weight TDP-43 species. Furthermore, TDP-43 fragments generated during neurodegeneration were not C-terminal, but rather were derived from a central portion of human TDP-43. Thus we find that aggregation is not required for cell loss, loss of murine Tdp-43 is not necessarily sufficient in order to develop a severe neurodegenerative phenotype and lower molecular weight TDP-43 positive species in mouse models should not be inherently assumed to be representative of human disease. Our findings are significant for the interpretation of other transgenic studies of TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:24466128

  10. A phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Craig F; Marella, Mathieu; Smerkers, Brian; Barchet, Thomas M; Gershman, Benjamin; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-07-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Such a model would show loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia, appearance of Lewy bodies, and the early stages of motor dysfunction. The model was developed by subcutaneously injecting biodegradable microspheres of rotenone, a complex I inhibitor in 8-9 month old, ovariectomized Long-Evans rats. Animals were observed for changes in body weight and motor activity. At the end of 11-12 weeks animals were euthanized and the brains examined for histopathological changes. Rotenone treated animals gain weight and appear normal and healthy as compared to controls but showed modest hypokinesia around 5-6 weeks posttreatment. Animals showed loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and the appearance of putative Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress were evidenced by the appearance of activated microglia, iron precipitates, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine a major product of DNA oxidation. The dorsal striatum, the projection site of midbrain DA neurons, showed a significant reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining, together with an increase in reactive astrocytes, an early sign of DA nerve terminal damage. Levels of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were significantly reduced in the dorsal striatum; however, there was an unexpected increase in dopamine transporter (DAT) levels. Old, ovariectomized females treated with rotenone microspheres present with normal weight gain and good health but a modest hypokinesia. Accompanying this behavioral phenotype are a constellation of neuropathologies characteristic of PD that include loss of DA neurons, microglia activation, oxidative damage to nuclear DNA, iron deposition, and appearance of putative Lewy bodies. This phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease could provide insight into early mechanisms of pathogenesis and could aid in the

  11. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Karla J F; Jones, Christopher J; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Healthy Volunteers Can Be Phenotyped Using Cutaneous Sensitization Pain Models

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, Michael C.; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human experimental pain models leading to development of secondary hyperalgesia are used to estimate efficacy of analgesics and antihyperalgesics. The ability to develop an area of secondary hyperalgesia varies substantially between subjects, but little is known about the agreement following repeated measurements. The aim of this study was to determine if the areas of secondary hyperalgesia were consistently robust to be useful for phenotyping subjects, based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat pain models. Methods We performed post-hoc analyses of 10 completed healthy volunteer studies (n = 342 [409 repeated measurements]). Three different models were used to induce secondary hyperalgesia to monofilament stimulation: the heat/capsaicin sensitization (H/C), the brief thermal sensitization (BTS), and the burn injury (BI) models. Three studies included both the H/C and BTS models. Results Within-subject compared to between-subject variability was low, and there was substantial strength of agreement between repeated induction-sessions in most studies. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) improved little with repeated testing beyond two sessions. There was good agreement in categorizing subjects into ‘small area’ (1st quartile [<25%]) and ‘large area’ (4th quartile [>75%]) responders: 56–76% of subjects consistently fell into same ‘small-area’ or ‘large-area’ category on two consecutive study days. There was moderate to substantial agreement between the areas of secondary hyperalgesia induced on the same day using the H/C (forearm) and BTS (thigh) models. Conclusion Secondary hyperalgesia induced by experimental heat pain models seem a consistent measure of sensitization in pharmacodynamic and physiological research. The analysis indicates that healthy volunteers can be phenotyped based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat [and heat plus capsaicin] pain models. PMID:23671631

  13. Common data link (CDL) interference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerasoli, Caramen; Zhao, Wiley; Santapietro, John J.; McAlinden, R. E.; Smith, B. F.; Jacyk, P. A.

    2002-07-01

    The increasing use of airwaves for military communication and surveillance and commercial applications places burdens on spectrum use. This crowding of the spectrum presents two broad problem categories. The first is "co-site interference" where numerous transmitters and receivers are physically located in a small area and share a given portion of the spectrum. Under these conditions, a receiver can be "victim" to a co-located transmitter. The second category involves numerous transmitters (typically airborne) well separated from each other but communicating to receivers placed in a relatively small area. The Common Data Link (CDL) refers to a standard protocol for military data delivery and communication. Surveillance platforms such as Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (TUAV), JSTARS, U2's, Global Hawks will stream high rate surveillance data (radar, visual and/or infrared imagery, etc.) down to ground terminals. As such, bandwidths are wide (100's MHz) and the potential exists for ground receivers to be victim to signals from airborne transmitters other than its desired source. MITRE has developed a CDL Interference Model to assess potential problems in realistic tactical surveillance scenarios. This paper documents the physical basis of the CDL Interference Model as well as the visualization software architecture that integrates the model with ModSAF/OneSAF.

  14. Environmental metabolomics links genotype to phenotype and predicts genotype abundance in wild plant populations.

    PubMed

    Field, Katie J; Lake, Janice A

    2011-08-01

    'The Holy Grail' of plant ecology is to uncover rules that associate species and traits with environmental constraints, community composition and subsequent ecosystem functioning. These aims have been crystallized in recent years within the context of global climate change and environmental pollution, increasing the urgency of the need to predict how vegetation will respond across spatial scales. We investigated whether genetic diversity is associated with the way in which phenotypic plasticity within plant populations is realized and whether this is related to genotype abundance. We used environmental metabolomics to demonstrate biochemical variation between co-occurring genotypes of Carex caryophyllea L. A novel combined metabolomic/functional trait analysis was used to test the functionality of this variation in governing plasticity to variation in edaphic conditions, with particular reference to metabolic pathways that play important roles in growth-related traits. We show that genetic diversity within a wild C. caryophyllea population relates to differences in metabolic composition and functional traits in response to soil nutrient variation, influencing genotype abundance within a community. Our findings highlight the vital role genetic diversity plays within a population in facilitating plant phenotypic plasticity and the potential usefulness of environmental metabolomics to future ecological studies.

  15. Mutations in chromatin regulators functionally link Cornelia de Lange syndrome and clinically overlapping phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Ilaria; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Pozojevic, Jelena; Ruiz Gil, Sara; Bader, Ingrid; Braunholz, Diana; Bramswig, Nuria C; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia; Pfeiffer, Lutz; Ozkinay, Ferda; Ramos, Feliciano; Reiz, Benedikt; Rittinger, Olaf; Strom, Tim M; Watrin, Erwan; Wendt, Kerstin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Pié, Juan; Deardorff, Matthew A; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kaiser, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    The coordinated tissue-specific regulation of gene expression is essential for the proper development of all organisms. Mutations in multiple transcriptional regulators cause a group of neurodevelopmental disorders termed "transcriptomopathies" that share core phenotypical features including growth retardation, developmental delay, intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) belongs to this class of disorders and is caused by mutations in different subunits or regulators of the cohesin complex. Herein, we report on the clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with features overlapping with CdLS who were found to carry mutations in chromatin regulators previously associated to other neurodevelopmental disorders that are frequently considered in the differential diagnosis of CdLS. The identified mutations affect the methyltransferase-encoding genes KMT2A and SETD5 and different subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Complementary to this, a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome was found to carry a missense substitution in NIPBL. Our findings indicate that mutations in a variety of chromatin-associated factors result in overlapping clinical phenotypes, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity that should be considered when assessing the clinical and molecular diagnosis of neurodevelopmental syndromes. It is clear that emerging molecular mechanisms of chromatin dysregulation are central to understanding the pathogenesis of these clinically overlapping genetic disorders.

  16. Linking amphibian call structure to the environment: the interplay between phenotypic flexibility and individual attributes

    PubMed Central

    Arim, Matías; Narins, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the environment surrounding signal emission produces different patterns of degradation and attenuation. The expected adjustment of calls to ensure signal transmission in an environment was formalized in the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Within this framework, most studies considered anuran calls as fixed attributes determined by local adaptations. However, variability in vocalizations as a product of phenotypic expression has also been reported. Empirical evidence supporting the association between environment and call structure has been inconsistent, particularly in anurans. Here, we identify a plausible causal structure connecting environment, individual attributes, and temporal and spectral adjustments as direct or indirect determinants of the observed variation in call attributes of the frog Hypsiboas pulchellus. For that purpose, we recorded the calls of 40 males in the field, together with vegetation density and other environmental descriptors of the calling site. Path analysis revealed a strong effect of habitat structure on the temporal parameters of the call, and an effect of site temperature conditioning the size of organisms calling at each site and thus indirectly affecting the dominant frequency of the call. Experimental habitat modification with a styrofoam enclosure yielded results consistent with field observations, highlighting the potential role of call flexibility on detected call patterns. Both, experimental and correlative results indicate the need to incorporate the so far poorly considered role of phenotypic plasticity in the complex connection between environmental structure and individual call attributes. PMID:22479134

  17. Linking amphibian call structure to the environment: the interplay between phenotypic flexibility and individual attributes.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Lucía; Arim, Matías; Narins, Peter M

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the environment surrounding signal emission produces different patterns of degradation and attenuation. The expected adjustment of calls to ensure signal transmission in an environment was formalized in the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Within this framework, most studies considered anuran calls as fixed attributes determined by local adaptations. However, variability in vocalizations as a product of phenotypic expression has also been reported. Empirical evidence supporting the association between environment and call structure has been inconsistent, particularly in anurans. Here, we identify a plausible causal structure connecting environment, individual attributes, and temporal and spectral adjustments as direct or indirect determinants of the observed variation in call attributes of the frog Hypsiboas pulchellus. For that purpose, we recorded the calls of 40 males in the field, together with vegetation density and other environmental descriptors of the calling site. Path analysis revealed a strong effect of habitat structure on the temporal parameters of the call, and an effect of site temperature conditioning the size of organisms calling at each site and thus indirectly affecting the dominant frequency of the call. Experimental habitat modification with a styrofoam enclosure yielded results consistent with field observations, highlighting the potential role of call flexibility on detected call patterns. Both, experimental and correlative results indicate the need to incorporate the so far poorly considered role of phenotypic plasticity in the complex connection between environmental structure and individual call attributes.

  18. Grocery Store Genetics: A PCR-Based Genetics Lab that Links Genotype to Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briju, Betsy J.; Wyatt, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often present Mendelian genetics and molecular biology separately. As a result, students often fail to connect the two topics in a tangible manner. We have adopted a simple experiment to help link these two important topics in a basic biology course, using red and white onions bought from a local grocery store. A lack of red coloration…

  19. Grocery Store Genetics: A PCR-Based Genetics Lab that Links Genotype to Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briju, Betsy J.; Wyatt, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often present Mendelian genetics and molecular biology separately. As a result, students often fail to connect the two topics in a tangible manner. We have adopted a simple experiment to help link these two important topics in a basic biology course, using red and white onions bought from a local grocery store. A lack of red coloration…

  20. RPGR is mutated in patients with a complex X linked phenotype combining primary ciliary dyskinesia and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A; Escudier, E; Roger, G; Tamalet, A; Pelosse, B; Marlin, S; Clément, A; Geremek, M; Delaisi, B; Bridoux, A‐M; Coste, A; Witt, M; Duriez, B; Amselem, S

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare disease classically transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait and characterised by recurrent airway infections due to abnormal ciliary structure and function. To date, only two autosomal genes, DNAI1 and DNAH5 encoding axonemal dynein chains, have been shown to cause PCD with defective outer dynein arms. Here, we investigated one non‐consanguineous family in which a woman with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) gave birth to two boys with a complex phenotype combining PCD, discovered in early childhood and characterised by partial dynein arm defects, and RP that occurred secondarily. The family history prompted us to search for an X linked gene that could account for both conditions. Results We found perfect segregation of the disease phenotype with RP3 associated markers (Xp21.1). Analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene (RPGR) located at this locus revealed a mutation (631_IVS6+9del) in the two boys and their mother. As shown by study of RPGR transcripts expressed in nasal epithelial cells, this intragenic deletion, which leads to activation of a cryptic donor splice site, predicts a severely truncated protein. Conclusion These data provide the first clear demonstration of X linked transmission of PCD. This unusual mode of inheritance of PCD in patients with particular phenotypic features (that is, partial dynein arm defects and association with RP), which should modify the current management of families affected by PCD or RP, unveils the importance of RPGR in the proper development of both respiratory ciliary structures and connecting cilia of photoreceptors. PMID:16055928

  1. Response to Drs. Shastry and Trese: Phenotype-genotype correlations in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Munnich, A.

    1996-11-11

    Shastry and Trese recently reported on a large kindred with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) characterized by a loss of central vision and preserved peripheral function. In their report, the disease had an early onset with severe myopia and a loss of central vision, while night blindness occurred later. Genetic analysis suggested that the disease was linked to the RP2 locus, and the authors raised the question of whether other cases linked to RP2 could display a similar loss of central vision. Three years ago, we reported on 4 large XLRP pedigrees with a very early onset with severe myopia and early loss of visual acuity, while in 5 other families the disease started later with night blindness. We showed that the first clinical form was linked to RP2, while the second was linked to RP3. Thus, the major difference between the two forms concerns the initial symptom, information which can be obtained from the parents and patients after careful questioning. By contrast, in adult life, no difference in either severity of disease or aspect of the fundus was observed in our series, regardless of the clinical subtype of XLRP. Some months later, Jacobson et al. reported on a pedigree with an RP2 genotype, and their data support the notion that in XLRP of RP2 type 1, cone dysfunction takes place first, and as the disease advances both rods and cones are affected. We were very happy, therefore, to read that the study of Shastry and Trese fully confirmed our previous findings. 3 refs.

  2. Mutant IDH: a targetable driver of leukemic phenotypes linking metabolism, epigenetics and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant epigenomic programming is a hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia. This is partially due to somatic mutations that perturb cytosine methylation, histone post-translational modifications and transcription factors. Remarkably, mutations in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes perturb the epigenome through all three of these mechanisms. Mutant IDH enzymes produce high levels of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate that competitively inhibits dioxygenase enzymes that modify methylcytosine to hydroxymethylcytosine and histone tail methylation. The development of IDH mutant specific inhibitors may now enable the therapeutic reprogramming of both layers of the epigenome spontaneously to revert the malignant phenotype of these leukemias and improve clinical outcome for acute myeloid leukemia patients with IDH mutations.

  3. A Neutrophil Phenotype Model for Extracorporeal Treatment of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Alexander D; Sheehan, Robert P; Mathew, Shibin; Federspiel, William J; Redl, Heinz; Clermont, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophils play a central role in eliminating bacterial pathogens, but may also contribute to end-organ damage in sepsis. Interleukin-8 (IL-8), a key modulator of neutrophil function, signals through neutrophil specific surface receptors CXCR-1 and CXCR-2. In this study a mechanistic computational model was used to evaluate and deploy an extracorporeal sepsis treatment which modulates CXCR-1/2 levels. First, a simplified mechanistic computational model of IL-8 mediated activation of CXCR-1/2 receptors was developed, containing 16 ODEs and 43 parameters. Receptor level dynamics and systemic parameters were coupled with multiple neutrophil phenotypes to generate dynamic populations of activated neutrophils which reduce pathogen load, and/or primed neutrophils which cause adverse tissue damage when misdirected. The mathematical model was calibrated using experimental data from baboons administered a two-hour infusion of E coli and followed for a maximum of 28 days. Ensembles of parameters were generated using a Bayesian parallel tempering approach to produce model fits that could recreate experimental outcomes. Stepwise logistic regression identified seven model parameters as key determinants of mortality. Sensitivity analysis showed that parameters controlling the level of killer cell neutrophils affected the overall systemic damage of individuals. To evaluate rescue strategies and provide probabilistic predictions of their impact on mortality, time of onset, duration, and capture efficacy of an extracorporeal device that modulated neutrophil phenotype were explored. Our findings suggest that interventions aiming to modulate phenotypic composition are time sensitive. When introduced between 3-6 hours of infection for a 72 hour duration, the survivor population increased from 31% to 40-80%. Treatment efficacy quickly diminishes if not introduced within 15 hours of infection. Significant harm is possible with treatment durations ranging from 5-24 hours, which may

  4. Abrupt transitions to tumor extinction: a phenotypic quasispecies model.

    PubMed

    Sardanyés, Josep; Martínez, Regina; Simó, Carles; Solé, Ricard

    2016-10-06

    The dynamics of heterogeneous tumor cell populations competing with healthy cells is an important topic in cancer research with deep implications in biomedicine. Multitude of theoretical and computational models have addressed this issue, especially focusing on the nature of the transitions governing tumor clearance as some relevant model parameters are tuned. In this contribution, we analyze a mathematical model of unstable tumor progression using the quasispecies framework. Our aim is to define a minimal model incorporating the dynamics of competition between healthy cells and a heterogeneous population of cancer cell phenotypes involving changes in replication-related genes (i.e., proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes), in genes responsible for genomic stability, and in house-keeping genes. Such mutations or loss of genes result into different phenotypes with increased proliferation rates and/or increased genomic instabilities. Despite bifurcations in the classical deterministic quasispecies model are typically given by smooth, continuous shifts (i.e., transcritical bifurcations), we here identify a novel type of bifurcation causing an abrupt transition to tumor extinction. Such a bifurcation, named as trans-heteroclinic, is characterized by the exchange of stability between two distant fixed points (that do not collide) involving tumor persistence and tumor clearance. The increase of mutation and/or the decrease of the replication rate of tumor cells involves this catastrophic shift of tumor cell populations. The transient times near bifurcation thresholds are also characterized, showing a power law dependence of exponent [Formula: see text] of the transients as mutation is changed near the bifurcation value. These results are discussed in the context of targeted cancer therapy as a possible therapeutic strategy to force a catastrophic shift by simultaneously delivering mutagenic and cytotoxic drugs inside tumor cells.

  5. Behavioural and Psychiatric Phenotypes in Men and Boys with X-Linked Ichthyosis: Evidence from a Worldwide Online Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sohini; Humby, Trevor; Davies, William

    2016-01-01

    Background X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a rare dermatological condition arising from deficiency for the enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS). Preliminary evidence in boys with XLI, and animal model studies, suggests that individuals lacking STS are at increased risk of developmental disorders and associated traits. However, the behavioural profile of children with XLI is poorly-characterised, and the behavioural profile of adults with XLI has not yet been documented at all. Materials and Methods Using an online survey, advertised worldwide, we collected detailed self- or parent-reported information on behaviour in adult (n = 58) and younger (≤18yrs, n = 24) males with XLI for comparison to data from their non-affected brothers, and age/gender-matched previously-published normative data. The survey comprised demographic and background information (including any prior clinical diagnoses) and validated questionnaires assaying phenotypes of particular interest (Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale v1.1, Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11, adult and adolescent Autism Quotient, Kessler Psychological Distress Scales, and Disruptive Behaviour Disorder Rating Scale). Results Individuals with XLI generally exhibited normal sensory function. Boys with XLI were at increased risk of developmental disorder, whilst adults with the condition were at increased risk of both developmental and mood disorders. Both adult and younger XLI groups scored significantly more highly than male general population norms on measures of inattention, impulsivity, autism-related traits, psychological distress and disruptive behavioural traits. Conclusions These findings indicate that both adult and younger males with XLI exhibit personality profiles that are distinct from those of males within the general population, and suggest that individuals with XLI may be at heightened risk of psychopathology. The data are consistent with the notion that STS is important in neurodevelopment and ongoing brain function, and

  6. A model for phenotype change in a stochastic framework.

    PubMed

    Wake, Graeme; Pleasants, Anthony; Beedle, Alan; Gluckman, Peter

    2010-07-01

    In some species, an inducible secondary phenotype will develop some time after the environmental change that evokes it. Nishimura (2006) [4] showed how an individual organism should optimize the time it takes to respond to an environmental change ("waiting time''). If the optimal waiting time is considered to act over the population, there are implications for the expected value of the mean fitness in that population. A stochastic predator-prey model is proposed in which the prey have a fixed initial energy budget. Fitness is the product of survival probability and the energy remaining for non-defensive purposes. The model is placed in the stochastic domain by assuming that the waiting time in the population is a normally distributed random variable because of biological variance inherent in mounting the response. It is found that the value of the mean waiting time that maximises fitness depends linearly on the variance of the waiting time.

  7. Behavioral phenotypes for negative symptoms in animal models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Nitta, Atsumi

    2014-01-01

    A devastating psychiatric disorder, schizophrenia is characterized by three major symptoms, positive and negative symptoms and cognitive deficit. Almost all current therapeutic drugs for schizophrenia have efficacy for positive symptoms, and weak efficacy for negative and cognitive deficit. In particular, social withdrawal, diminished motivation, and anhedonia as the depressive aspects of negative symptoms are resistant to the treatment of antipsychotic drugs. Therefore, there is a need for development of new therapeutic drugs for negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and it is necessary to have comprehensive animal models to understand the neurobiological foundations of their symptoms. In this review, we represent the behavioral phenotypes in available animal models of schizophrenia for drug discovery, focusing on the depressive aspects of negative symptoms. We mention here animal models based on the pathology and epidemiology of schizophrenia, e.g., the pharmacological, neurodevelopmental, genetic, and gene-environment combination models. The animal models of schizophrenia are developed by various approaches and are assessed, but there are few models demonstrating negative symptoms with sensitivities to available therapeutic drugs. The development of comprehensive animal model reflecting negative symptoms and of novel compounds that can remedy them provide certain insight into the neurobiological process of schizophrenia and also point the way to a new therapeutic strategy.

  8. Dissecting phenotypic traits linked to human resilience to Alzheimer’s pathology

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G.; Stein, Thor D.; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Scotton, Thomas C.; Barroeta-Espar, Isabel; Fernandez-Carballo, Leticia; de Munain, Estibaliz Lopez; Perez, Jesus; Marquie, Marta; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Mathew P.; Lowe, Val; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; López, Oscar L.; Klunk, William; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    Clinico-pathological correlation studies and positron emission tomography amyloid imaging studies have shown that some individuals can tolerate substantial amounts of Alzheimer’s pathology in their brains without experiencing dementia. Few details are known about the neuropathological phenotype of these unique cases that might prove relevant to understanding human resilience to Alzheimer’s pathology. We conducted detailed quantitative histopathological and biochemical assessments on brains from non-demented individuals before death whose brains were free of substantial Alzheimer’s pathology, non-demented individuals before death but whose post-mortem examination demonstrated significant amounts of Alzheimer’s changes (‘mismatches’), and demented Alzheimer’s cases. Quantification of amyloid-β plaque burden, stereologically-based counts of neurofibrillary tangles, neurons and reactive glia, and morphological analyses of axons were performed in the multimodal association cortex lining the superior temporal sulcus. Levels of synaptic integrity markers, and soluble monomeric and multimeric amyloid-β and tau species were measured. Our results indicate that some individuals can accumulate equivalent loads of amyloid-β plaques and tangles to those found in demented Alzheimer’s cases without experiencing dementia. Analyses revealed four main phenotypic differences among these two groups: (i) mismatches had striking preservation of neuron numbers, synaptic markers and axonal geometry compared to demented cases; (ii) demented cases had significantly higher burdens of fibrillar thioflavin-S-positive plaques and of oligomeric amyloid-β deposits reactive to conformer-specific antibody NAB61 than mismatches; (iii) strong and selective accumulation of hyperphosphorylated soluble tau multimers into the synaptic compartment was noted in demented cases compared with controls but not in mismatches; and (iv) the robust glial activation accompanying amyloid-β and

  9. Linking childhood allergic asthma phenotypes with endotype through integrated systems biology: current evidence and research needs.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunok; Song, Won-Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Asthma and other complex diseases results from a complex web of interactions involving inflammation, immunity, cell cycle, apoptosis, and metabolic perturbations across multiple organ systems. The extent to which various degrees of the age at onset, symptom severity, and the natural progression of the disease reflect multiple disease subtypes, influenced by unique process of development remains unknown. One of the most critical challenges to our understanding stems from incomplete understanding of the mechanisms. Within this review, we focus on the phenotypes of childhood allergic asthma as the basis to better understand the endotype for quantitative define subtypes of asthma. We highlight some of the known mechanistic pathways associated with the key hallmark events before the asthma onset. In particular, we examine how the recent advent of multiaxial -omics technologies and systems biology could help to clarify our current understanding of the pathway. We review how a large volume of molecular, genomic data generated by multiaxial technologies could be digested to identify cogent pathophysiologic molecular networks. We highlight some recent successes in application of these technologies within the context of other disease conditions for therapeutic interventions. We conclude by summarizing the research needs for the predictive value of preclinical biomarkers.

  10. Signaling pathways in mammalian preimplantation development: Linking cellular phenotypes to lineage decisions.

    PubMed

    Menchero, Sergio; Rayon, Teresa; Andreu, Maria Jose; Manzanares, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The first stages of mammalian development, before implantation of the embryo in the maternal uterus, result in the establishment of three cell populations in the blastocyst: trophectoderm, epiblast, and primitive endoderm. These events involve only a small number of cells, and are initiated by morphological differences among them related to cell adhesion and polarity. Much attention has been paid to the master transcription factors that are critical for establishing and maintaining early lineage choices. Nevertheless, a large body of work also reveals that additional molecular mechanisms are involved. Here, we provide an updated view of the role of different signaling pathways in the first stages of mouse development, and how their cross-talk and interplay determine the initial lineage decisions occurring in the blastocyst. We will also discuss how these pathways are critical for translating cellular phenotypes, the product of the morphogenetic events occurring at these stages, into transcriptional responses and expression of lineage-specifying transcription factors. Developmental Dynamics 246:245-261, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bicarbonate and functional CFTR channel are required for proper mucin secretion and link cystic fibrosis with its mucus phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Ermund, Anna; Ambort, Daniel; Johansson, Malin E.V.; Nilsson, Harriet E.; Thorell, Kaisa; Hebert, Hans; Sjövall, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a nonfunctional chloride and bicarbonate ion channel (CF transmembrane regulator [CFTR]), but the link to the phenomenon of stagnant mucus is not well understood. Mice lacking functional CFTR (CftrΔ508) have no lung phenotype but show similar ileal problems to humans. We show that the ileal mucosa in CF have a mucus that adhered to the epithelium, was denser, and was less penetrable than that of wild-type mice. The properties of the ileal mucus of CF mice were normalized by secretion into a high concentration sodium bicarbonate buffer (∼100 mM). In addition, bicarbonate added to already formed CF mucus almost completely restored the mucus properties. This knowledge may provide novel therapeutic options for CF. PMID:22711878

  12. X-linked creatine transporter defect: a report on two unrelated boys with a severe clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Anselm, I A; Anselm, I M; Alkuraya, F S; Salomons, G S; Jakobs, C; Fulton, A B; Mazumdar, M; Rivkin, M; Frye, R; Poussaint, T Young; Marsden, D

    2006-02-01

    We report two unrelated boys with the X-linked creatine transporter defect (CRTR) and clinical features more severe than those previously described with this disorder. These two boys presented at ages 12 and 30 months with severe mental retardation, absent speech development, hypotonia, myopathy and extra-pyramidal movement disorder. One boy has seizures and some dysmorphic features; he also has evidence of an oxidative phosphorylation defect. They both had classical absence of creatine peak on brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In one, however, this critical finding was overlooked in the initial interpretation and was discovered upon subsequent review of the MRS. Molecular studies showed large genomic deletions of a large part of the 3' end of the complete open reading frame of the SLC6A8 gene. This report emphasizes the importance of MRS in evaluating neurological symptoms, broadens the phenotypic spectrum of CRTR and adds knowledge about the pathogenesis of creatine depletion in the brain and retina.

  13. p16 overexpression and 9p21 deletion are linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kluth, Martina; Koop, Christina; Özden, Cansu; Taskin, Berivan; Hussein, Khakan; Lebeau, Annette; Witzel, Isabell; Wölber, Linn; Geist, Stefan; Paluchowski, Peter; Wilke, Christian; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Müller, Volkmar; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Terracciano, Luigi; Krech, Rainer Horst; von der Assen, Albert; Burandt, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the p16 tumor suppressor, but also deletion of its gene locus 9p21, is linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer. To better understand these contradictory observations, and to clarify the prognostic impact of p16 expression and 9p21 deletion, a tissue microarray (TMA) with 2,197 breast cancers was analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry (FISH) for 9p21 deletion and p16 expression. p16 immunostaining was weak in 25.6%, moderate in 7.1%, and strong in 12.7% of 1,684 evaluable cancers. Strong p16 staining was linked to advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0003), high-grade (p < 0.0001), high tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p < 0.0001 each), and shorter overall survival (p = 0.0038). 9p21 deletion was found in 15.3% of 1,089 analyzable breast cancers, including 1.7% homozygous and 13.6% heterozygous deletions. 9p21 deletion was linked to adverse tumor features, including high-grade (p < 0.0001) and nodal positive cancers (p = 0.0063), high cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p ≤ 0.0006), and HER2 amplification (p = 0.0078). Patient outcome was worse in 9p21 deleted than in undeleted cancers (p = 0.0720). p16 expression was absent in cancers harboring homozygous 9p21 deletions, but no difference in p16 expression was found between cancers with (59.2% p16 positive) and without heterozygous 9p21 deletion (51.3% p16 positive, p = 0.0256). In summary, p16 expression is unrelated to partial 9p21 deletion, but both alterations are linked to aggressive breast cancer phenotype. High-level p16 expression is a strong predictor of unfavorable disease course in breast cancer. PMID:27835607

  14. p16 overexpression and 9p21 deletion are linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lebok, Patrick; Roming, Magdalena; Kluth, Martina; Koop, Christina; Özden, Cansu; Taskin, Berivan; Hussein, Khakan; Lebeau, Annette; Witzel, Isabell; Wölber, Linn; Geist, Stefan; Paluchowski, Peter; Wilke, Christian; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Müller, Volkmar; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Terracciano, Luigi; Krech, Rainer Horst; von der Assen, Albert; Burandt, Eike

    2016-12-06

    Overexpression of the p16 tumor suppressor, but also deletion of its gene locus 9p21, is linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer. To better understand these contradictory observations, and to clarify the prognostic impact of p16 expression and 9p21 deletion, a tissue microarray (TMA) with 2,197 breast cancers was analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry (FISH) for 9p21 deletion and p16 expression. p16 immunostaining was weak in 25.6%, moderate in 7.1%, and strong in 12.7% of 1,684 evaluable cancers. Strong p16 staining was linked to advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0003), high-grade (p < 0.0001), high tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p < 0.0001 each), and shorter overall survival (p = 0.0038). 9p21 deletion was found in 15.3% of 1,089 analyzable breast cancers, including 1.7% homozygous and 13.6% heterozygous deletions. 9p21 deletion was linked to adverse tumor features, including high-grade (p < 0.0001) and nodal positive cancers (p = 0.0063), high cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p ≤ 0.0006), and HER2 amplification (p = 0.0078). Patient outcome was worse in 9p21 deleted than in undeleted cancers (p = 0.0720). p16 expression was absent in cancers harboring homozygous 9p21 deletions, but no difference in p16 expression was found between cancers with (59.2% p16 positive) and without heterozygous 9p21 deletion (51.3% p16 positive, p = 0.0256). In summary, p16 expression is unrelated to partial 9p21 deletion, but both alterations are linked to aggressive breast cancer phenotype. High-level p16 expression is a strong predictor of unfavorable disease course in breast cancer.

  15. Behavioral phenotyping of mouse models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tonya N.; Greene, James G.; Miller, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative movement disorder afflicting millions of people in the United States. The advent of transgenic technologies has contributed to the development of several new mouse models, many of which recapitulate some aspects of the disease; however, no model has been demonstrated to faithfully reproduce the full constellation of symptoms seen in human PD. This may be due in part to the narrow focus on the dopamine-mediated motor deficits. As current research continues to unmask PD as a multi-system disorder, animal models should similarly evolve to include the non-motor features of the disease. This requires that typically cited behavioral test batteries be expanded. The major non-motor symptoms observed in PD patients include hyposmia, sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal dysfunction, autonomic dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and cognitive decline. Mouse behavioral tests exist for all of these symptoms and while some models have begun to be reassessed for the prevalence of this broader behavioral phenotype, the majority has not. Moreover, all behavioral paradigms should be tested for their responsiveness to L-DOPA so these data can be compared to patient response and help elucidate which symptoms are likely not dopamine-mediated. Here, we suggest an extensive, yet feasible, battery of behavioral tests for mouse models of PD aimed to better assess both non-motor and motor deficits associated with the disease. PMID:20211655

  16. Medial prefrontal cortex: genes linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have altered expression in the highly social maternal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, Brian E; Driessen, Terri M; Zhao, Changjiu; Gammie, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The transition to motherhood involves CNS changes that modify sociability and affective state. However, these changes also put females at risk for post-partum depression and psychosis, which impairs parenting abilities and adversely affects children. Thus, changes in expression and interactions in a core subset of genes may be critical for emergence of a healthy maternal phenotype, but inappropriate changes of the same genes could put women at risk for post-partum disorders. This study evaluated microarray gene expression changes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region implicated in both maternal behavior and psychiatric disorders. Post-partum mice were compared to virgin controls housed with females and isolated for identical durations. Using the Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET), we found that the genetic landscape of maternal mPFC bears statistical similarity to gene databases associated with schizophrenia (5 of 5 sets) and bipolar disorder (BPD, 3 of 3 sets). In contrast to previous studies of maternal lateral septum (LS) and medial preoptic area (MPOA), enrichment of autism and depression-linked genes was not significant (2 of 9 sets, 0 of 4 sets). Among genes linked to multiple disorders were fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7), glutamate metabotropic receptor 3 (Grm3), platelet derived growth factor, beta polypeptide (Pdgfrb), and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1). RT-qPCR confirmed these gene changes as well as FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1) and proenkephalin (Penk). Systems-level methods revealed involvement of developmental gene networks in establishing the maternal phenotype and indirectly suggested a role for numerous microRNAs and transcription factors in mediating expression changes. Together, this study suggests that a subset of genes involved in shaping the healthy maternal brain may also be dysregulated in mental health disorders and put females at risk for post-partum psychosis with aspects of schizophrenia

  17. Phenotypic differences among patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome linked to three different chromosome loci

    SciTech Connect

    Carmi, R.; Elbedour, K.; Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C.

    1995-11-06

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of mental retardation, obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, and hypogenitalism. Renal and cardiac abnormalities are also frequent in this disorder. Previous clinical suggestions of heterogeneity of BBS were confirmed recently by the identification of four different chromosome loci linked to the disease. In this study we compared clinical manifestations of the syndrome in patients form 3 unrelated, extended Arab-Bedouin kindreds which were used for the linkage mapping of the BBS loci to chromosomes 3, 15, and 16. The observed differences included the limb distribution of the postaxial polydactyly and the extent and age-association of obesity. It appears that the chromosome 3 locus is associated with polydactyly of all four limbs, while polydactyly of the chromosome 15 type is mostly confined to the hands. On the other hand, the chromosome 15 type is associated with early-onset morbid obesity, while the chromosome 16 type appears to present the {open_quotes}leanest{close_quotes} form of BBS. Future cloning of the various BB genes will contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of limb development and the identification of human obesity-related genes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Phenotypic Variation in Dentinogenesis Imperfecta/Dentin Dysplasia Linked to 4q21

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, M.L.; Kim, J.-W.; Gong, S.-G.; Murdoch-Kinch, C.A.; Simmer, J.P.; Hu, J.C.-C.

    2008-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentin dysplasia (DD) are allelic disorders that primarily affect the formation of tooth dentin. Both conditions are autosomal-dominant and can be caused by mutations in the dentin sialophospho-protein gene (DSPP, 4q21.3). We recruited 23 members of a four-generation kindred, including ten persons with dentin defects, and tested the hypothesis that these defects are linked to DSPP. The primary dentition showed amber discoloration, pulp obliteration, and severe attrition. The secondary dentition showed either pulp obliteration with bulbous crowns and gray discoloration or thistle-tube pulp configurations, normal crowns, and mild gray discoloration. Haplotype analyses showed no recombination between three 4q21-q24 markers and the disease locus. Mutational analyses identified no coding or intron junction sequence variations associated with affection status in DMP1, MEPE, or the DSP portion of DSPP. The defects in the permanent dentition were typically mild and consistent with a diagnosis of DD-II, but some dental features associated with DGI-II were also present. We conclude that DD-II and DGI-II are milder and more severe forms, respectively, of the same disease. PMID:16567553

  19. Genomic and phenotypic analysis of BRCA2 mutated breast cancers reveals co-occurring changes linked to progression.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Olafur A; Jonasson, Jon G; Olafsdottir, Kristrun; Bjarnason, Hordur; Th Johannsson, Oskar; Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K; Valgeirsdottir, Sigridur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2011-09-29

    Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene greatly increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Consistent with an important role for BRCA2 in error-free DNA repair, complex genomic changes are frequently observed in tumors derived from BRCA2 mutation carriers. Here, we explore the impact of DNA copy-number changes in BRCA2 tumors with respect to phenotype and clinical staging of the disease. Breast tumors (n = 33) derived from BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers were examined in terms of copy-number changes with high-resolution aCGH (array comparative genomic hybridization) containing 385 thousand probes (about one for each 7 kbp) and expression of phenotypic markers on TMAs (tissue microarrays). The data were examined with respect to clinical parameters including TNM staging, histologic grade, S phase, and ploidy. Tumors from BRCA2 carriers of luminal and basal/triple-negative phenotypes (TNPs) differ with respect to patterns of DNA copy-number changes. The basal/TNP subtype was characterized by lack of pRb (RB1) coupled with high/intense expression of p16 (CDKN2A) gene products. We found increased proportions of Ki-67-positive cells to be significantly associated with loss of the wild-type (wt) BRCA2 allele in luminal types, whereas BRCA2wt loss was less frequent in BRCA2 tumors displaying basal/TNP phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that deletions at 13q13.1, involving the BRCA2wt allele, represents a part of a larger network of co-occurring genetic changes, including deletions at 6q22.32-q22.33, 11q14.2-q24.1, and gains at 17q24.1. Importantly, copy-number changes at these BRCA2-linked networking regions coincide with those associated with advanced progression, involving the capacity to metastasize to the nodes or more-distant sites at diagnosis. The results presented here demonstrate divergent paths of tumor evolution in BRCA2 carriers and that deletion of the wild-type BRCA2 allele, together with co-occurring changes at 6 q, 11 q, and 17 q, are important events in

  20. Genomic and phenotypic analysis of BRCA2 mutated breast cancers reveals co-occurring changes linked to progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene greatly increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Consistent with an important role for BRCA2 in error-free DNA repair, complex genomic changes are frequently observed in tumors derived from BRCA2 mutation carriers. Here, we explore the impact of DNA copy-number changes in BRCA2 tumors with respect to phenotype and clinical staging of the disease. Methods Breast tumors (n = 33) derived from BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers were examined in terms of copy-number changes with high-resolution aCGH (array comparative genomic hybridization) containing 385 thousand probes (about one for each 7 kbp) and expression of phenotypic markers on TMAs (tissue microarrays). The data were examined with respect to clinical parameters including TNM staging, histologic grade, S phase, and ploidy. Results Tumors from BRCA2 carriers of luminal and basal/triple-negative phenotypes (TNPs) differ with respect to patterns of DNA copy-number changes. The basal/TNP subtype was characterized by lack of pRb (RB1) coupled with high/intense expression of p16 (CDKN2A) gene products. We found increased proportions of Ki-67-positive cells to be significantly associated with loss of the wild-type (wt) BRCA2 allele in luminal types, whereas BRCA2wt loss was less frequent in BRCA2 tumors displaying basal/TNP phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that deletions at 13q13.1, involving the BRCA2wt allele, represents a part of a larger network of co-occurring genetic changes, including deletions at 6q22.32-q22.33, 11q14.2-q24.1, and gains at 17q24.1. Importantly, copy-number changes at these BRCA2-linked networking regions coincide with those associated with advanced progression, involving the capacity to metastasize to the nodes or more-distant sites at diagnosis. Conclusions The results presented here demonstrate divergent paths of tumor evolution in BRCA2 carriers and that deletion of the wild-type BRCA2 allele, together with co-occurring changes at 6 q, 11

  1. Comparison of Liver Cell Models Using the Basel Phenotyping Cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Benjamin; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Maseneni, Swarna; Boess, Franziska; Roth, Adrian; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Haschke, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Currently used hepatocyte cell systems for in vitro assessment of drug metabolism include hepatoma cell lines and primary human hepatocyte (PHH) cultures. We investigated the suitability of the validated in vivo Basel phenotyping cocktail (caffeine [CYP1A2], efavirenz [CYP2B6], losartan [CYP2C9], omeprazole [CYP2C19], metoprolol [CYP2D6], midazolam [CYP3A4]) in vitro and characterized four hepatocyte cell systems (HepG2 cells, HepaRG cells, and primary cryopreserved human hepatocytes in 2-dimensional [2D] culture or in 3D-spheroid co-culture) regarding basal metabolism and CYP inducibility. Under non-induced conditions, all CYP activities could be determined in 3D-PHH, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in 2D-PHH and HepaRG, and CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells. The highest non-induced CYP activities were observed in 3D-PHH and HepaRG cells. mRNA expression was at least four-fold higher for all CYPs in 3D-PHH compared to the other cell systems. After treatment with 20 μM rifampicin, mRNA increased 3- to 50-fold for all CYPs except CYP1A2 and 2D6 for HepaRG and 3D-PHH, 4-fold (CYP2B6) and 17-fold (CYP3A4) for 2D-PHH and four-fold (CYP3A4) for HepG2. In 3D-PHH at least a two-fold increase in CYP activity was observed for all inducible CYP isoforms while CYP1A2 and CYP2C9 activity did not increase in 2D-PHH and HepaRG. CYP inducibility assessed in vivo using the same phenotyping probes was also best reflected by the 3D-PHH model. Our studies show that 3D-PHH and (with some limitations) HepaRG are suitable cell systems for assessing drug metabolism and CYP induction in vitro. HepG2 cells are less suited to assess CYP induction of the 2C and 3A family. The Basel phenotyping cocktail is suitable for the assessment of CYP activity and induction also in vitro. PMID:27917125

  2. From integrative genomics to systems genetics in the rat to link genotypes to phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Moral, Aida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complementary to traditional gene mapping approaches used to identify the hereditary components of complex diseases, integrative genomics and systems genetics have emerged as powerful strategies to decipher the key genetic drivers of molecular pathways that underlie disease. Broadly speaking, integrative genomics aims to link cellular-level traits (such as mRNA expression) to the genome to identify their genetic determinants. With the characterization of several cellular-level traits within the same system, the integrative genomics approach evolved into a more comprehensive study design, called systems genetics, which aims to unravel the complex biological networks and pathways involved in disease, and in turn map their genetic control points. The first fully integrated systems genetics study was carried out in rats, and the results, which revealed conserved trans-acting genetic regulation of a pro-inflammatory network relevant to type 1 diabetes, were translated to humans. Many studies using different organisms subsequently stemmed from this example. The aim of this Review is to describe the most recent advances in the fields of integrative genomics and systems genetics applied in the rat, with a focus on studies of complex diseases ranging from inflammatory to cardiometabolic disorders. We aim to provide the genetics community with a comprehensive insight into how the systems genetics approach came to life, starting from the first integrative genomics strategies [such as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) mapping] and concluding with the most sophisticated gene network-based analyses in multiple systems and disease states. Although not limited to studies that have been directly translated to humans, we will focus particularly on the successful investigations in the rat that have led to primary discoveries of genes and pathways relevant to human disease. PMID:27736746

  3. Monogenic mouse models of autism spectrum disorders: Common mechanisms and missing links.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S W; Jiang, Y-H

    2016-05-03

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present unique challenges in the fields of genetics and neurobiology because of the clinical and molecular heterogeneity underlying these disorders. Genetic mutations found in ASD patients provide opportunities to dissect the molecular and circuit mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors using animal models. Ongoing studies of genetically modified models have offered critical insight into possible common mechanisms arising from different mutations, but links between molecular abnormalities and behavioral phenotypes remain elusive. The challenges encountered in modeling autism in mice demand a new analytic paradigm that integrates behavioral assessment with circuit-level analysis in genetically modified models with strong construct validity.

  4. Modeling psychiatric disorders: from genomic findings to cellular phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Falk, A; Heine, V M; Harwood, A J; Sullivan, P F; Peitz, M; Brüstle, O; Shen, S; Sun, Y-M; Glover, J C; Posthuma, D; Djurovic, S

    2016-01-01

    Major programs in psychiatric genetics have identified >150 risk loci for psychiatric disorders. These loci converge on a small number of functional pathways, which span conventional diagnostic criteria, suggesting a partly common biology underlying schizophrenia, autism and other psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the cellular phenotypes that capture the fundamental features of psychiatric disorders have not yet been determined. Recent advances in genetics and stem cell biology offer new prospects for cell-based modeling of psychiatric disorders. The advent of cell reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provides an opportunity to translate genetic findings into patient-specific in vitro models. iPSC technology is less than a decade old but holds great promise for bridging the gaps between patients, genetics and biology. Despite many obvious advantages, iPSC studies still present multiple challenges. In this expert review, we critically review the challenges for modeling of psychiatric disorders, potential solutions and how iPSC technology can be used to develop an analytical framework for the evaluation and therapeutic manipulation of fundamental disease processes. PMID:27240529

  5. New genetic model for predicting phenotype traits in sports.

    PubMed

    Massidda, Myosotis; Scorcu, Marco; Calò, Carla M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to construct a genetic model with a new algorithm for predicting athletic-performance variability based on genetic variations. The influence of 6 polymorphisms (ACE, ACTN-3, BDKRB2, VDR-ApaI, VDR-BsmI, and VDR-FokI) on vertical jump was studied in top-level male Italian soccer players (n = 90). First, the authors calculated the traditional total genotype score and then determined the total weighting genotype score (TWGS), which accounts for the proportion of significant phenotypic variance predicted by the polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva samples using a standard protocol. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results obtained from the new genetic model (TWGS) showed that only 3 polymorphisms entered the regression equation (ACTN-3, ACE, and BDKRB2), and these polymorphisms explained 17.68-24.24% of the vertical-jump variance. With the weighting given to each polymorphism, it may be possible to identify a polygenic profile that more accurately explains, at least in part, the individual variance of athletic-performance traits. This model may be used to create individualized training programs based on a player's genetic predispositions, as well as to identify athletes who need an adapted training routine to account for individual susceptibility to injury.

  6. The cardiovascular phenotype of a mouse model of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Izzard, Ashley S; Emerson, Michael; Prehar, Sukhpal; Neyses, Ludwig; Trainer, Peter; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Heagerty, Anthony M

    2009-10-01

    Although, it is accepted that there is an excess of cardiovascular mortality in acromegaly, it is uncertain whether this is due to the direct effects of growth hormone-induced-cardiomyopathy or is a consequence of atherosclerosis secondary to the metabolic syndrome often observed in this condition. Direct comparison of a mouse model of acromegaly to a mouse model of Laron's syndrome allowed us to carry out detailed phenotyping and better understand the role GH plays in the circulatory system. Transgenic mice that overexpress the growth hormone gene (GH) developed gigantism, including insulin resistance and higher blood pressures commensurate with increased body mass. In these giant mice, the hearts were hypertrophied but haemodynamic studies suggested contractile function was normal. Segments of small arteries mounted in a pressure myograph showed vascular wall hypertrophy but a preserved lumen diameter. Vascular contractile function was normal. Mice in which the GH receptor gene was disrupted or 'knocked out' were dwarf and had low blood pressure, small hearts and blood vessels but a normally functioning circulation. Correlations of body mass with cardiovascular parameters suggested that blood pressure and structural characteristics develop in line with body size. In this transgenic mouse model of acromegaly, there is cardiac and vascular hypertrophy commensurate with GH excess but normal function. Our findings support the contention that the excess mortality in this condition may be due to the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy rather than increased rates of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.

  7. Developmental Pesticide Models of the Parkinson Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.; Thiruchelvam, Mona; Barlow, Brian K.; Richfield, Eric K.

    2005-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that developmental insults could contribute to Parkinson disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from the loss of the dopamine neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Two models of developmental pesticide exposures in mice are presented here that yield PD phenotypes consistent with this possibility. Combined exposures to the herbicide paraquat (PQ) and the fungicide maneb (MB), both of which adversely affect dopamine systems, administered from postnatal days 5–19, produced selective losses of dopamine and metabolites and reduced numbers of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Effects were greater than those produced by adult-only exposures. Moreover, developmental PQ + MB exposures enhanced vulnerability to this pesticide regimen when administered subsequently in adulthood. In a second model, exposure to MB from gestational days 10–17 markedly increased vulnerability to PQ exposures during adulthood, with reductions in dopamine and metabolites and numbers of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Females evidenced protection in both models. Collectively, these models demonstrate that developmental exposures can produce progressive, permanent, and cumulative neurotoxicity of the nigrostriatal dopamine system and enhance vulnerability to subsequent environmental insults. Finally, effects of PQ + MB were greater than those of either pesticide alone in the postnatal model. This is consistent with a multiple-hit hypothesis predicting that multiple concurrent insults occurring at different target sites within a system (here nigrostriatal dopamine) may constrict the range and flexibility of compensatory mechanisms, thereby compromising the integrity and viability of the system. As such, this hypothesis presents a biologic strategy for identifying potentially significant neurotoxic mixtures for hazard identification in future studies. PMID:16140639

  8. Modeling Phenotypes of Tuberous Sclerosis in the Mouse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    other proteins in this pathological progression, and to evaluate relevant therapeutic interventions such as rapamycin. 15. SUBJECT TERMS MOUSE...whether rapamycin treatment corrects this dysregulation, and whether phenotypes seen in the mice are abrogated by breeding pertinent MMP knockout...induction by doxycycline (Figure 7), this approach did not yield a phenotype, at least after 6 months of doxycycline treatment . Thus, as our

  9. Genome-wide modeling of complex phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetic and molecular basis for many intermediate and end stage phenotypes in model systems such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster has long been known to involve pleiotropic effects and complex multigenic interactions. Gene sets are groups of genes that contribute to multiple biological or molecular phenomena. They have been used in the analysis of large molecular datasets such as microarray data, Next Generation sequencing, and other genomic datasets to reveal pleiotropic and multigenic contributions to phenotypic outcomes. Many model systems lack species specific organized phenotype based gene sets to enable high throughput analysis of large molecular datasets. Results and discussion Here, we describe two novel collections of gene sets in C. elegans and D. melanogaster that are based exclusively on genetically determined phenotypes and use a controlled phenotypic ontology. We use these collections to build genome-wide models of thousands of defined phenotypes in both model species. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of these gene sets in systems analysis and in analysis of gene expression-based molecular datasets and show how they are useful in analysis of genomic datasets connecting multigenic gene inputs to complex phenotypes. Conclusions Phenotypic based gene sets in both C. elegans and D. melanogaster are developed, characterized, and shown to be useful in the analysis of large scale species-specific genomic datasets. These phenotypic gene set collections will contribute to the understanding of complex phenotypic outcomes in these model systems. PMID:23984798

  10. [Families and psychiatry: models and evolving links].

    PubMed

    Frankhauser, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    The role of the families of persons with severe psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia in particular) in the care of their relatives has recently evolved: once seen as pathogenic to be kept at a distance, the family is now recognised by professionals as a partner in the care process. The links between families and psychiatric institutions remain complex and marked by ambivalence and paradoxes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting complex phenotype-genotype interactions to enable yeast engineering: Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism and a cell factory.

    PubMed

    Dikicioglu, Duygu; Pir, Pınar; Oliver, Stephen G

    2013-09-01

    There is an increasing use of systems biology approaches in both "red" and "white" biotechnology in order to enable medical, medicinal, and industrial applications. The intricate links between genotype and phenotype may be explained through the use of the tools developed in systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering. Biomedical and biotechnological research are among the fields that could benefit most from the elucidation of this complex relationship. Researchers have studied fitness extensively to explain the phenotypic impacts of genetic variations. This elaborate network of dependencies and relationships so revealed are further complicated by the influence of environmental effects that present major challenges to our achieving an understanding of the cellular mechanisms leading to healthy or diseased phenotypes or optimized production yields. An improved comprehension of complex genotype-phenotype interactions and their accurate prediction should enable us to more effectively engineer yeast as a cell factory and to use it as a living model of human or pathogen cells in intelligent screens for new drugs. This review presents different methods and approaches undertaken toward improving our understanding and prediction of the growth phenotype of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as both a model and a production organism.

  12. “Young at heart”: Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Renata S.M.; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B.; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R.; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C.; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (> 8 weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18 months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4 days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism. PMID:26827899

  13. The interplay between phenotypic and ontogenetic plasticities can be assessed using reaction-diffusion models : The case of Pseudoplatystoma fishes.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Durán, Aldo; Juárez-Valencia, Lorenzo-Héctor; Morales-Malacara, Juan-Bibiano; Santamaría-Holek, Iván

    2017-06-01

    Every morphological, behavioral, or even developmental character expression of living beings is coded in its genotype and is expressed in its phenotype. Nevertheless, the interplay between phenotypic and ontogenetic plasticities, that is, the capability to manifest trait variations, is a current field of research that needs morphometric, numerical, or even mathematical modeling investigations. In the present work, we are searching for a phenotypic index able to identify the underlying correlation among phenotypic, ontogenetic, and geographic distribution of the evolutionary development of species of the same genus. By studying the case of Pseudoplatystoma fishes, we use their skin patterns as an auxiliary trait that can be reproduced by means of a reaction diffusion (RD) model. From this model, we infer the phenotypic index in terms of one of the parameters appearing in the mathematical equations. To achieve this objective, we perform extensive numerical simulations and analysis of the model equations and link the parameter variations with different environmental and physicochemical conditions in which the individuals develop, and which may be regulated by the ontogenetic plasticity of the species. Our numerical study indicates that the patterns predicted by a set of reaction diffusion equations are not uniquely determined by the value of the parameters of the equation, but also depend on how the process is initiated and on the spatial distribution of values of these parameters. These factors are therefore significant, since they show that an individual's growth dynamics and apparent secondary transport processes, like advection, can be determinant for the alignment of motifs in a skin pattern. Our results allow us to discern the correlation between phenotypic, ontogenetic, and geographic distribution of the different species of Pseudoplatystoma fishes, thus indicating that RD models represent a useful taxonomic tool able to quantify evolutionary indexes.

  14. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. genesis 53:458–473, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26150326

  15. Phenotype and immune function of lymph node and peripheral blood CLL cells are linked to transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pasikowska, Marta; Walsby, Elisabeth; Apollonio, Benedetta; Cuthill, Kirsty; Phillips, Elizabeth; Coulter, Eve; Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Yallop, Deborah; Barber, Linda D; Patten, Piers; Fegan, Chris; Ramsay, Alan G; Pepper, Chris; Devereux, Stephen; Buggins, Andrea G S

    2016-07-28

    Several lines of evidence suggest that homing of tumor cells to lymphoid tissue contributes to disease progression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we demonstrate that lymph node (LN)-derived CLL cells possess a distinct phenotype, and exhibit enhanced capacity for T-cell activation and superior immune synapse formation when compared with paired peripheral blood (PB) samples. LN-derived CLL cells manifest a proliferative, CXCR4(dim)CD5(bright) phenotype compared with those in the PB and higher expression of T-cell activation molecules including CD80, CD86, and HLA-D-related (DR). In addition, LN-CLL cells have higher expression of α4β1 (CD49d) which, as well as being a co-stimulatory molecule, is required for CLL cells to undergo transendothelial migration (TEM) and enter the proliferation centers of the LNs. Using an in vitro system that models circulation and TEM, we showed that the small population of CLL cells that migrate are CXCR4(dim)CD5(bright) with higher CD49d, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR compared with those that remain circulating; a phenotype strikingly similar to LN-derived CLL cells. Furthermore, sorted CD49d(hi) CLL cells showed an enhanced capacity to activate T cells compared with CD49d(lo) subpopulations from the same patient. Thus, although PB-CLL cells have a reduced capacity to form immune synapses and activate CD4(+) T cells, this was not the case for LN-CLL cells or those with the propensity to undergo TEM. Taken together, our study suggests that CLL cell immunologic function is not only modulated by microenvironmental interactions but is also a feature of a subpopulation of PB-CLL cells that are primed for lymphoid tissue homing and interaction with T cells. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Cross-Link Guided Molecular Modeling with ROSETTA

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Rosenberger, George; Aebersold, Ruedi; Malmström, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Chemical cross-links identified by mass spectrometry generate distance restraints that reveal low-resolution structural information on proteins and protein complexes. The technology to reliably generate such data has become mature and robust enough to shift the focus to the question of how these distance restraints can be best integrated into molecular modeling calculations. Here, we introduce three workflows for incorporating distance restraints generated by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry into ROSETTA protocols for comparative and de novo modeling and protein-protein docking. We demonstrate that the cross-link validation and visualization software Xwalk facilitates successful cross-link data integration. Besides the protocols we introduce XLdb, a database of chemical cross-links from 14 different publications with 506 intra-protein and 62 inter-protein cross-links, where each cross-link can be mapped on an experimental structure from the Protein Data Bank. Finally, we demonstrate on a protein-protein docking reference data set the impact of virtual cross-links on protein docking calculations and show that an inter-protein cross-link can reduce on average the RMSD of a docking prediction by 5.0 Å. The methods and results presented here provide guidelines for the effective integration of chemical cross-link data in molecular modeling calculations and should advance the structural analysis of particularly large and transient protein complexes via hybrid structural biology methods. PMID:24069194

  17. New model of macrophage acquisition of the lymphatic endothelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kelly L; Volk-Draper, Lisa D; Flister, Michael J; Ran, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECPs) contribute to new lymphatic vessel formation, but the mechanisms regulating their differentiation, recruitment, and function are poorly understood. Detailed characterization of M-LECPs is limited by low frequency in vivo and lack of model systems allowing in-depth molecular analyses in vitro. Our goal was to establish a cell culture model to characterize inflammation-induced macrophage-to-LECP differentiation under controlled conditions. Time-course analysis of diaphragms from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice revealed rapid mobilization of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages to the proximity of lymphatic vessels followed by widespread (∼50%) incorporation of M-LECPs into the inflamed lymphatic vasculature. A differentiation shift toward the lymphatic phenotype was found in three LPS-induced subsets of activated macrophages that were positive for VEGFR-3 and many other lymphatic-specific markers. VEGFR-3 was strongly elevated in the early stage of macrophage transition to LECPs but undetectable in M-LECPs prior to vascular integration. Similar transient pattern of VEGFR-3 expression was found in RAW264.7 macrophages activated by LPS in vitro. Activated RAW264.7 cells co-expressed VEGF-C that induced an autocrine signaling loop as indicated by VEGFR-3 phosphorylation inhibited by a soluble receptor. LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophages also showed a 68% overlap with endogenous CD11b(+)/VEGFR-3(+) LECPs in the expression of lymphatic-specific genes. Moreover, when injected into LPS- but not saline-treated mice, GFP-tagged RAW264.7 cells massively infiltrated the inflamed diaphragm followed by integration into 18% of lymphatic vessels. We present a new model for macrophage-LECP differentiation based on LPS activation of cultured RAW264.7 cells. This system designated here as the "RAW model" mimics fundamental features of endogenous M-LECPs. Unlike native LECPs, this model is

  18. A Splice Defect in the EDA Gene in Dogs with an X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XLHED) Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Waluk, Dominik P.; Zur, Gila; Kaufmann, Ronnie; Welle, Monika M.; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Müller, Eliane J.; Leeb, Tosso; Galichet, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) caused by variants in the EDA gene represents the most common ectodermal dysplasia in humans. We investigated three male mixed-breed dogs with an ectodermal dysplasia phenotype characterized by marked hypotrichosis and multifocal complete alopecia, almost complete absence of sweat and sebaceous glands, and altered dentition with missing and abnormally shaped teeth. Analysis of SNP chip genotypes and whole genome sequence data from the three affected dogs revealed that the affected dogs shared the same haplotype on a large segment of the X-chromosome, including the EDA gene. Unexpectedly, the whole genome sequence data did not reveal any nonsynonymous EDA variant in the affected dogs. We therefore performed an RNA-seq experiment on skin biopsies to search for changes in the transcriptome. This analysis revealed that the EDA transcript in the affected dogs lacked 103 nucleotides encoded by exon 2. We speculate that this exon skipping is caused by a genetic variant located in one of the large introns flanking this exon, which was missed by whole genome sequencing with the illumina short read technology. The altered EDA transcript splicing most likely causes the observed ectodermal dysplasia in the affected dogs. These dogs thus offer an excellent opportunity to gain insights into the complex splicing processes required for expression of the EDA gene, and other genes with large introns. PMID:27449516

  19. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  20. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  1. A VGI data integration framework based on linked data model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lin; Ren, Rongrong

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims at the geographic data integration and sharing method for multiple online VGI data sets. We propose a semantic-enabled framework for online VGI sources cooperative application environment to solve a target class of geospatial problems. Based on linked data technologies - which is one of core components of semantic web, we can construct the relationship link among geographic features distributed in diverse VGI platform by using linked data modeling methods, then deploy these semantic-enabled entities on the web, and eventually form an interconnected geographic data network to support geospatial information cooperative application across multiple VGI data sources. The mapping and transformation from VGI sources to RDF linked data model is presented to guarantee the unique data represent model among different online social geographic data sources. We propose a mixed strategy which combined spatial distance similarity and feature name attribute similarity as the measure standard to compare and match different geographic features in various VGI data sets. And our work focuses on how to apply Markov logic networks to achieve interlinks of the same linked data in different VGI-based linked data sets. In our method, the automatic generating method of co-reference object identification model according to geographic linked data is discussed in more detail. It finally built a huge geographic linked data network across loosely-coupled VGI web sites. The results of the experiment built on our framework and the evaluation of our method shows the framework is reasonable and practicable.

  2. Pex gene deletions in Gy and Hyp mice provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Strom, T M; Francis, F; Lorenz, B; Böddrich, A; Econs, M J; Lehrach, H; Meitinger, T

    1997-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in humans is caused by mutations in the PEX gene which codes for a protein homologous to neutral endopeptidases. Hyp and Gy mice both have X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, although genetic data and the different phenotypic spectra observed have previously suggested that two different genes are mutated. In addition to the metabolic disorder observed in Hyp mice, male Gy mice are sterile and show circling behavior and reduced viability. We now report the cloning of the mouse homolog of PEX which is highly conserved between man and mouse. The 3' end of this gene is deleted in Hyp mice. In Gy mice, the first three exons and the promotor region are deleted. Thus, Hyp and Gy are allelic mutations and both provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  3. Design and modelling of a link monitoring mechanism for the Common Data Link (CDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John W., III

    1994-09-01

    The Common Data Link (CDL) is a full duplex, point-to-point microwave communications system used in imagery and signals intelligence collection systems. It provides a link between two remote Local Area Networks (LAN's) aboard collection and surface platforms. In a hostile environment, there is an overwhelming need to dynamically monitor the link and thus, limit the impact of jamming. This work describes steps taken to design, model, and evaluate a link monitoring system suitable for the CDL. The monitoring system is based on features and monitoring constructs of the Link Control Protocol (LCP) in the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) suite. The CDL model is based on a system of two remote Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) LAN's. In particular, the policies and mechanisms associated with monitoring are described in detail. An implementation of the required mechanisms using the OPNET network engineering tool is described. Performance data related to monitoring parameters is reported. Finally, integration of the FDDI-CDL model with the OPNET Internet model is described.

  4. In-depth metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models in obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Young; Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2014-10-01

    The world-wide prevalence of obesity and diabetes has increased sharply during the last two decades. Accordingly, the metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models is critical for evaluating the functional roles of target genes in obesity and diabetes, and for developing new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the practical meaning of metabolic phenotyping, the strategy of choosing appropriate tests, and considerations when designing and performing metabolic phenotyping in mice.

  5. Shuttle/TDRSS modelling and link simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W. R.; Mckenzie, T. M.; Biederman, L.; Lindsey, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    A Shuttle/TDRSS S-band and Ku-band link simulation package called LinCsim was developed for the evaluation of link performance for specific Shuttle signal designs. The link models were described in detail and the transmitter distortion parameters or user constraints were carefully defined. The overall link degradation (excluding hardware degradations) relative to an ideal BPSK channel were given for various sets of user constraint values. The performance sensitivity to each individual user constraint was then illustrated. The effect of excessive Spacelab clock jitter on the return link BER performance was also investigated as was the problem of subcarrier recovery for the K-band Shuttle return link signal.

  6. PhenoMeter: A Metabolome Database Search Tool Using Statistical Similarity Matching of Metabolic Phenotypes for High-Confidence Detection of Functional Links.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Adam J; Zhang, Peng; Whitehead, Lynne; Kaines, Sarah; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Badger, Murray R

    2015-01-01

    This article describes PhenoMeter (PM), a new type of metabolomics database search that accepts metabolite response patterns as queries and searches the MetaPhen database of reference patterns for responses that are statistically significantly similar or inverse for the purposes of detecting functional links. To identify a similarity measure that would detect functional links as reliably as possible, we compared the performance of four statistics in correctly top-matching metabolic phenotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana metabolism mutants affected in different steps of the photorespiration metabolic pathway to reference phenotypes of mutants affected in the same enzymes by independent mutations. The best performing statistic, the PM score, was a function of both Pearson correlation and Fisher's Exact Test of directional overlap. This statistic outperformed Pearson correlation, biweight midcorrelation and Fisher's Exact Test used alone. To demonstrate general applicability, we show that the PM reliably retrieved the most closely functionally linked response in the database when queried with responses to a wide variety of environmental and genetic perturbations. Attempts to match metabolic phenotypes between independent studies were met with varying success and possible reasons for this are discussed. Overall, our results suggest that integration of pattern-based search tools into metabolomics databases will aid functional annotation of newly recorded metabolic phenotypes analogously to the way sequence similarity search algorithms have aided the functional annotation of genes and proteins. PM is freely available at MetabolomeExpress (https://www.metabolome-express.org/phenometer.php).

  7. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher's exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (p<10-41 and p<0.001 respectively). Gly>Ala substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal failure

  8. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher’s exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (p<10−41 and p<0.001 respectively). Gly>Ala substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal

  9. Multi-Scale Modeling of Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Odegard, G. M.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking single-walled carbon nanotubes on the Young's modulus of a nanotube-reinforced composite is modeled with a multi-scale method. The Young's modulus is predicted as a function of nanotube volume fraction and cross-link density. In this method, the constitutive properties of molecular representative volume elements are determined using molecular dynamics simulation and equivalent-continuum modeling. The Young's modulus is subsequently calculated for cross-linked nanotubes in a matrix which consists of the unreacted cross-linking agent. Two different cross-linking agents are used in this study, one that is short and rigid (Molecule A), and one that is long and flexible (Molecule B). Direct comparisons between the predicted elastic constants are made for the models in which the nanotubes are either covalently bonded or not chemically bonded to the cross-linking agent. At a nanotube volume fraction of 10%, the Young's modulus of Material A is not affected by nanotube crosslinking, while the Young's modulus of Material B is reduced by 64% when the nanotubes are cross-linked relative to the non-cross-linked material with the same matrix.

  10. Multi-Scale Modeling of Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Odegard, G. M.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking single-walled carbon nanotubes on the Young's modulus of a nanotube-reinforced composite is modeled with a multi-scale method. The Young's modulus is predicted as a function of nanotube volume fraction and cross-link density. In this method, the constitutive properties of molecular representative volume elements are determined using molecular dynamics simulation and equivalent-continuum modeling. The Young's modulus is subsequently calculated for cross-linked nanotubes in a matrix which consists of the unreacted cross-linking agent. Two different cross-linking agents are used in this study, one that is short and rigid (Molecule A), and one that is long and flexible (Molecule B). Direct comparisons between the predicted elastic constants are made for the models in which the nanotubes are either covalently bonded or not chemically bonded to the cross-linking agent. At a nanotube volume fraction of 10%, the Young's modulus of Material A is not affected by nanotube crosslinking, while the Young's modulus of Material B is reduced by 64% when the nanotubes are cross-linked relative to the non-cross-linked material with the same matrix.

  11. Model Invariance across Genders of the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Neill; Wade, Jordan L.; Meyer, J. Patrick; Hull, Michael; Reeve, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    ASD is one of the most heritable neuropsychiatric disorders, though comprehensive genetic liability remains elusive. To facilitate genetic research, researchers employ the concept of the broad autism phenotype (BAP), a milder presentation of traits in undiagnosed relatives. Research suggests that the BAP Questionnaire (BAPQ) demonstrates…

  12. Model Invariance across Genders of the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Neill; Wade, Jordan L.; Meyer, J. Patrick; Hull, Michael; Reeve, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    ASD is one of the most heritable neuropsychiatric disorders, though comprehensive genetic liability remains elusive. To facilitate genetic research, researchers employ the concept of the broad autism phenotype (BAP), a milder presentation of traits in undiagnosed relatives. Research suggests that the BAP Questionnaire (BAPQ) demonstrates…

  13. Characterization of X-linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XL-HED) Hair and Sweat Gland Phenotypes Using Phototrichogram Analysis and Live Confocal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kyle B.; Goodwin, Alice F.; Landan, Maya; Seidel, Kerstin; Tran, Dong-Kha; Hogue, Jacob; Chavez, Miquella; Fete, Mary; Yu, Wenli; Hussein, Tarek; Johnson, Ramsey; Huttner, Kenneth; Jheon, Andrew H.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia (ED), which encompasses a large group of syndromes that share several phenotypic features such as missing or malformed ectodermal structures, including skin, hair, sweat glands, and teeth. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XL-HED) is associated with mutations in ectodysplasin (EDA1). Hypohidrosis due to hypoplastic sweat glands and thin, sparse hair are phenotypic features that significantly affect the daily lives of XL-HED individuals and therefore require systematic analysis. We sought to determine the quality of life of individuals with XL-HED and to quantify sweat duct and hair phenotypes using confocal imaging, pilocarpine iontophoresis, and phototrichogram analysis. Using these highly sensitive and non-invasive techniques, we demonstrated that 11/12 XL-HED individuals presented with a complete absence of sweat ducts and that none produced sweat. We determined that the thin hair phenotype observed in XL-HED was due to multiple factors, such as fewer terminal hairs with decreased thickness and slower growth rate, as well as fewer follicular units and fewer hairs per unit. The precise characterization of XL-HED phenotypes using sensitive and non-invasive techniques presented in our study will improve upon larger genotype-phenotype studies and in the assessment of future therapies in XL-HED. PMID:23687000

  14. Extended model of restricted beam for FSO links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliak, Juraj; Wilfert, Otakar

    2012-10-01

    Modern wireless optical communication systems in many aspects overcome wire or radio communications. Their advantages are license-free operation and broad bandwidth that they offer. The medium in free-space optical (FSO) links is the atmosphere. Operation of outdoor FSO links struggles with many atmospheric phenomena that deteriorate phase and amplitude of the transmitted optical beam. This beam originates in the transmitter and is affected by its individual parts, especially by the lens socket and the transmitter aperture, where attenuation and diffraction effects take place. Both of these phenomena unfavourable influence the beam and cause degradation of link availability, or its total malfunction. Therefore, both of these phenomena should be modelled and simulated, so that one can judge the link function prior to the realization of the system. Not only the link availability and reliability are concerned, but also economic aspects. In addition, the transmitted beam is not, generally speaking, circularly symmetrical, what makes the link simulation more difficult. In a comprehensive model, it is necessary to take into account the ellipticity of the beam that is restricted by circularly symmetrical aperture where then the attenuation and diffraction occur. General model is too computationally extensive; therefore simplification of the calculations by means of analytical and numerical approaches will be discussed. Presented model is not only simulated using computer, but also experimentally proven. One can then deduce the ability of the model to describe the reality and to estimate how far can one go with approximations, i.e. limitations of the model are discussed.

  15. Genotypes & sensory phenotypes in 2 new X-linked neuropathies (CMTX3 and dSMAX) and dominant CMT/HMN overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Garth; Kennerson, Marina; Brewer, Megan; Garbern, James; Shy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Classification of neuropathies into Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome (CMT, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy) or purely motor neuropathies is relatively easy in single patients but subtle sensory findings can vary in different affected individuals in a family. We examined the extent of sensory involvement in different individuals in two new X-linked neuropathy syndromes (CMTX3 and dSMAX) and in some dominantly inherited mainly motor neuropathies. CMTX3 is a mild X- linked recessive CMT phenotype linked to Xq26-28. dSMAX (distal spinal muscular atrophy linked to Xq13-21). We describe a new family linked to this locus that has some sensory findings which could also be described as a motor and sensory neuropathy i.e. a form of CMT. In our dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) family linked to chromosome 7 (dHMN1) we also found some affected individuals with sensory signs as well as reduced sensory action potentials. In reported HMN families with known mutations in GARS, SETX, HSPB1 and HSPB8 genes and in many of our HMN families with unknown gene mutations, there is sensory involvement producing a CMT phenotype in some individuals. These disorders do not easily fit into traditional hereditary neuropathy classifications and should be recognised as CMT/HMN overlap syndromes. Recognition of overlap syndromes may assist development of more accurate gene screening paradigms.

  16. Manipulators with flexible links: A simple model and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, Isao; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple dynamic model proposed for flexible links is briefly reviewed and experimental control results are presented for different flexible systems. A simple dynamic model is useful for rapid prototyping of manipulators and their control systems, for possible application to manipulator design decisions, and for real time computation as might be applied in model based or feedforward control. Such a model is proposed, with the further advantage that clear physical arguments and explanations can be associated with its simplifying features and with its resulting analytical properties. The model is mathematically equivalent to Rayleigh's method. Taking the example of planar bending, the approach originates in its choice of two amplitude variables, typically chosen as the link end rotations referenced to the chord (or the tangent) motion of the link. This particular choice is key in establishing the advantageous features of the model, and it was used to support the series of experiments reported.

  17. Cookie-Ases: Interactive Models for Teaching Genotype-Phenotype Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seipelt, Rebecca L.

    2006-01-01

    Several hands-on and wet laboratory activities have been proposed to model the genetic concepts of genotypes and phenotypes and their relationship. The exercise presented in this article is a novel, time effective, student-centered, role-playing activity in which students learn about the intricate connection between genotype and phenotype by…

  18. Cookie-Ases: Interactive Models for Teaching Genotype-Phenotype Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seipelt, Rebecca L.

    2006-01-01

    Several hands-on and wet laboratory activities have been proposed to model the genetic concepts of genotypes and phenotypes and their relationship. The exercise presented in this article is a novel, time effective, student-centered, role-playing activity in which students learn about the intricate connection between genotype and phenotype by…

  19. Feasibility of using Clinical Element Models (CEM) to standardize phenotype variables in the database of genotypes and phenotypes (dbGaP).

    PubMed

    Lin, Ko-Wei; Tharp, Melissa; Conway, Mike; Hsieh, Alexander; Ross, Mindy; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Hyeon-Eui

    2013-01-01

    The database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) contains various types of data generated from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These data can be used to facilitate novel scientific discoveries and to reduce cost and time for exploratory research. However, idiosyncrasies and inconsistencies in phenotype variable names are a major barrier to reusing these data. We addressed these challenges in standardizing phenotype variables by formalizing their descriptions using Clinical Element Models (CEM). Designed to represent clinical data, CEMs were highly expressive and thus were able to represent a majority (77.5%) of the 215 phenotype variable descriptions. However, their high expressivity also made it difficult to directly apply them to research data such as phenotype variables in dbGaP. Our study suggested that simplification of the template models makes it more straightforward to formally represent the key semantics of phenotype variables.

  20. Characterizing nanoparticle interactions: Linking models to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Zukoski, C. F.

    2000-07-15

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles involves manipulating particle interactions such that attractions are on the order of the average thermal energy in the system. If the self-assembly is to result in an ordered packing, an understanding of their phase behavior is necessary. Here we test the ability of simple pair potentials to characterize the interactions and phase behavior of silico tungstic acid (STA), a 1.2 nm particle. The strength of interaction is controlled by dispersing STA in different background salt concentrations. The experimental variables used in characterizing the interactions are the osmotic compressibility (d{pi}/d{rho}), the second virial coefficient (B{sub 2}), relative solution viscosity ({eta}/{eta}{sub c}), and the solubility ({rho}{sigma}{sup 3}){sub sat}. Various techniques are then developed to extract the parameters of square well, the adhesive hard sphere (AHS), and the Yukawa pair potentials that best describe the experimental data. The AHS model describes the solution thermodynamic behavior only where the system is weakly attractive but, as would be expected, fails when long range repulsions or nonmonotonic pair potentials become important. Model free representations are presented which offer the opportunity to extract pair potential parameters. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Precise numerical modeling of next generation multimode fiber based links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymiuk, L.; Stepniak, G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to numerically model modern multimode fiber based links we are required to take into account modal and chromatic dispersion, profile dispersion and spectral dependent coupling. In this paper we propose a complete numerical model which not only is precise but also versatile. Additionally to the detailed mathematical description of the model we provide also a bunch of numerical calculations performed with the use of the model.

  2. Metabolic parameters linked by Phenotype MicroArray to acid resistance profiles of poultry-associated Salmonella enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenotype microarrays were analyzed for 51 datasets derived from Salmonella enterica. The top 4 serovars associated with poultry products and one associated with turkey, respectively Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Infantis and Senftenberg, were represented. Datasets were clustered into two ...

  3. A Test Characteristic Curve Linking Method for the Testlet Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yanmei; Bolt, Daniel M.; Fu, Jianbin

    2005-01-01

    When tests are made up of testlets, a testlet-based item response theory (IRT) model may be used to account for local dependence among items from a common testlet. This study presents a new test characteristic curve method to link calibrations based on the Bradlow, Wainer, and Wang (1999) testlet model. Procedures for calculating the test…

  4. Link Prediction in Weighted Networks: A Weighted Mutual Information Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Boyao; Xia, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The link-prediction problem is an open issue in data mining and knowledge discovery, which attracts researchers from disparate scientific communities. A wealth of methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. Among these approaches, most are applied in unweighted networks, with only a few taking the weights of links into consideration. In this paper, we present a weighted model for undirected and weighted networks based on the mutual information of local network structures, where link weights are applied to further enhance the distinguishable extent of candidate links. Empirical experiments are conducted on four weighted networks, and results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate predictions than not only traditional unweighted indices but also typical weighted indices. Furthermore, some in-depth discussions on the effects of weak ties in link prediction as well as the potential to predict link weights are also given. This work may shed light on the design of algorithms for link prediction in weighted networks. PMID:26849659

  5. Phenotype and genotype of deaf patients with combined genomic and mitochondrial inheritance models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shasha; Wang, Guojian; Jiang, Yi; Yuan, Yongyi; Han, Dongyi; Song, Yueshuai; Dai, Pu

    2013-11-01

    In most studies, sensorineural hearing loss is reported as a single-gene disease with autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive or with X-linked or maternal inheritance. It is uncommon that the hearing impairment is caused by a combined inheritance model including genomic and mitochondrial models. Here, we report six patients with sensorineural hearing loss caused by co-existing mutations in GJB2 or SLC26A4 and the mitochondrial gene. And there was no significant difference in hearing phenotypes between the six patients and the controls. The results indicate the complicated genetic etiology of, and may impact the diagnostic strategy for, hereditary hearing impairment. All patient siblings will carry mitochondrial DNA A1555G or C1494T mutations, and 25% of siblings may carry the same homozygous or compound heterozygote mutations in GJB2 or SLC26A4. Although this combined inheritance is not common in the Chinese deaf population (0.10%), our findings will have great impact in genetic counseling and risk prediction for deafness.

  6. [FOXP2 and the molecular biology of language: new evidence. I. Phenotypic aspects and animal models].

    PubMed

    Benítez-Burraco, A

    FOXP2 is the first gene linked to a hereditary variant of specific language impairment and seems to code for a transcriptional repressor that intervenes in the regulation of development and the functioning of certain thalamic-cortical-striatal circuits. In the last three years significant progress has been made in the analysis of the structural and functional properties of the gene. The most notable advances have been made in the genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of new alterations in its sequencing in human beings; the determination in vivo of the functional properties of the mutated proteins generated from said variants; the cloning and characterisation of new orthologues of the gene; the generation of the first knockout and knockdown organisms for it; and a more precise molecular characterisation of the biological role played by the orthologues corresponding to species that are also capable of learning the articulatory patterns of the vocalisations they use to communicate. The latest clinical evidence and that obtained from analysing animal models generated to date appear to suggest the presence of a 'sensory-motor disorder' as the central deficit behind the different phenotypes associated to the different mutations of the gene in the human species, the functionality of the gene FOXP2 during development of the embryo and during the adult phase, its involvement in the development and functioning of the thalamic-cortical-striatal circuits associated to motor planning, sequential behaviour and procedural learning, and significant old age, in developmental terms, of a part of the neuroanatomical substrate that is involved in processing linguistic stimuli in our species.

  7. A Drosophila XPD model links cell cycle coordination with neuro-development and suggests links to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stettler, Karin; Li, Xiaoming; Sandrock, Björn; Braga-Lagache, Sophie; Heller, Manfred; Dümbgen, Lutz; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    XPD functions in transcription, DNA repair and in cell cycle control. Mutations in human XPD (also known as ERCC2) mainly cause three clinical phenotypes: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), and only XP patients have a high predisposition to developing cancer. Hence, we developed a fly model to obtain novel insights into the defects caused by individual hypomorphic alleles identified in human XP-D patients. This model revealed that the mutations that displayed the greatest in vivo UV sensitivity in Drosophila did not correlate with those that led to tumor formation in humans. Immunoprecipitations followed by targeted quantitative MS/MS analysis showed how different xpd mutations affected the formation or stability of different transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) subcomplexes. The XP mutants most clearly linked to high cancer risk, Xpd R683W and R601L, showed a reduced interaction with the core TFIIH and also an abnormal interaction with the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex. Interestingly, these two XP alleles additionally displayed high levels of chromatin loss and free centrosomes during the rapid nuclear division phase of the Drosophila embryo. Finally, the xpd mutations showing defects in the coordination of cell cycle timing during the Drosophila embryonic divisions correlated with those human mutations that cause the neurodevelopmental abnormalities and developmental growth defects observed in XP/CS and TTD patients. PMID:25431422

  8. Link community detection using generative model and nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities.

  9. Link Community Detection Using Generative Model and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities. PMID:24489803

  10. Linking knowledge and action through mental models of sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Matthew; Lubell, Mark; Hillis, Vicken

    2014-09-09

    Linking knowledge to action requires understanding how decision-makers conceptualize sustainability. This paper empirically analyzes farmer "mental models" of sustainability from three winegrape-growing regions of California where local extension programs have focused on sustainable agriculture. The mental models are represented as networks where sustainability concepts are nodes, and links are established when a farmer mentions two concepts in their stated definition of sustainability. The results suggest that winegrape grower mental models of sustainability are hierarchically structured, relatively similar across regions, and strongly linked to participation in extension programs and adoption of sustainable farm practices. We discuss the implications of our findings for the debate over the meaning of sustainability, and the role of local extension programs in managing knowledge systems.

  11. Linking Goal-Oriented Requirements and Model-Driven Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Oscar; Giachetti, Giovanni

    In the context of Goal-Oriented Requirement Engineering (GORE) there are interesting modeling approaches for the analysis of complex scenarios that are oriented to obtain and represent the relevant requirements for the development of software products. However, the way to use these GORE models in an automated Model-Driven Development (MDD) process is not clear, and, in general terms, the translation of these models into the final software products is still manually performed. Therefore, in this chapter, we show an approach to automatically link GORE models and MDD processes, which has been elaborated by considering the experience obtained from linking the i * framework with an industrially applied MDD approach. The linking approach proposed is formulated by means of a generic process that is based on current modeling standards and technologies in order to facilitate its application for different MDD and GORE approaches. Special attention is paid to how this process generates appropriate model transformation mechanisms to automatically obtain MDD conceptual models from GORE models, and how it can be used to specify validation mechanisms to assure the correct model transformations.

  12. A functional-structural model of rice linking quantitative genetic information with morphological development and physiological processes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lifeng; Henke, Michael; Zhu, Jun; Kurth, Winfried; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard

    2011-04-01

    Although quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of yield-related traits for rice has developed rapidly, crop models using genotype information have been proposed only relatively recently. As a first step towards a generic genotype-phenotype model, we present here a three-dimensional functional-structural plant model (FSPM) of rice, in which some model parameters are controlled by functions describing the effect of main-effect and epistatic QTLs. The model simulates the growth and development of rice based on selected ecophysiological processes, such as photosynthesis (source process) and organ formation, growth and extension (sink processes). It was devised using GroIMP, an interactive modelling platform based on the Relational Growth Grammar formalism (RGG). RGG rules describe the course of organ initiation and extension resulting in final morphology. The link between the phenotype (as represented by the simulated rice plant) and the QTL genotype was implemented via a data interface between the rice FSPM and the QTLNetwork software, which computes predictions of QTLs from map data and measured trait data. Using plant height and grain yield, it is shown how QTL information for a given trait can be used in an FSPM, computing and visualizing the phenotypes of different lines of a mapping population. Furthermore, we demonstrate how modification of a particular trait feeds back on the entire plant phenotype via the physiological processes considered. We linked a rice FSPM to a quantitative genetic model, thereby employing QTL information to refine model parameters and visualizing the dynamics of development of the entire phenotype as a result of ecophysiological processes, including the trait(s) for which genetic information is available. Possibilities for further extension of the model, for example for the purposes of ideotype breeding, are discussed.

  13. A functional–structural model of rice linking quantitative genetic information with morphological development and physiological processes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lifeng; Henke, Michael; Zhu, Jun; Kurth, Winfried; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Although quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of yield-related traits for rice has developed rapidly, crop models using genotype information have been proposed only relatively recently. As a first step towards a generic genotype–phenotype model, we present here a three-dimensional functional–structural plant model (FSPM) of rice, in which some model parameters are controlled by functions describing the effect of main-effect and epistatic QTLs. Methods The model simulates the growth and development of rice based on selected ecophysiological processes, such as photosynthesis (source process) and organ formation, growth and extension (sink processes). It was devised using GroIMP, an interactive modelling platform based on the Relational Growth Grammar formalism (RGG). RGG rules describe the course of organ initiation and extension resulting in final morphology. The link between the phenotype (as represented by the simulated rice plant) and the QTL genotype was implemented via a data interface between the rice FSPM and the QTLNetwork software, which computes predictions of QTLs from map data and measured trait data. Key Results Using plant height and grain yield, it is shown how QTL information for a given trait can be used in an FSPM, computing and visualizing the phenotypes of different lines of a mapping population. Furthermore, we demonstrate how modification of a particular trait feeds back on the entire plant phenotype via the physiological processes considered. Conclusions We linked a rice FSPM to a quantitative genetic model, thereby employing QTL information to refine model parameters and visualizing the dynamics of development of the entire phenotype as a result of ecophysiological processes, including the trait(s) for which genetic information is available. Possibilities for further extension of the model, for example for the purposes of ideotype breeding, are discussed. PMID:21247905

  14. Integrating gene set analysis and nonlinear predictive modeling of disease phenotypes using a Bayesian multitask formulation.

    PubMed

    Gönen, Mehmet

    2016-12-13

    Identifying molecular signatures of disease phenotypes is studied using two mainstream approaches: (i) Predictive modeling methods such as linear classification and regression algorithms are used to find signatures predictive of phenotypes from genomic data, which may not be robust due to limited sample size or highly correlated nature of genomic data. (ii) Gene set analysis methods are used to find gene sets on which phenotypes are linearly dependent by bringing prior biological knowledge into the analysis, which may not capture more complex nonlinear dependencies. Thus, formulating an integrated model of gene set analysis and nonlinear predictive modeling is of great practical importance. In this study, we propose a Bayesian binary classification framework to integrate gene set analysis and nonlinear predictive modeling. We then generalize this formulation to multitask learning setting to model multiple related datasets conjointly. Our main novelty is the probabilistic nonlinear formulation that enables us to robustly capture nonlinear dependencies between genomic data and phenotype even with small sample sizes. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithms using repeated random subsampling validation experiments on two cancer and two tuberculosis datasets by predicting important disease phenotypes from genome-wide gene expression data. We are able to obtain comparable or even better predictive performance than a baseline Bayesian nonlinear algorithm and to identify sparse sets of relevant genes and gene sets on all datasets. We also show that our multitask learning formulation enables us to further improve the generalization performance and to better understand biological processes behind disease phenotypes.

  15. Link performance model for filter bank based multicarrier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Dmitry; Oborina, Alexandra; Giupponi, Lorenza; Stitz, Tobias Hidalgo

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a complete link level abstraction model for link quality estimation on the system level of filter bank multicarrier (FBMC)-based networks. The application of mean mutual information per coded bit (MMIB) approach is validated for the FBMC systems. The considered quality measure of the resource element for the FBMC transmission is the received signal-to-noise-plus-distortion ratio (SNDR). Simulation results of the proposed link abstraction model show that the proposed approach is capable of estimating the block error rate (BLER) accurately, even when the signal is propagated through the channels with deep and frequent fades, as it is the case for the 3GPP Hilly Terrain (3GPP-HT) and Enhanced Typical Urban (ETU) models. The FBMC-related results of link level simulations are compared with cyclic prefix orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CP-OFDM) analogs. Simulation results are also validated through the comparison to reference publicly available results. Finally, the steps of link level abstraction algorithm for FBMC are formulated and its application for system level simulation of a professional mobile radio (PMR) network is discussed.

  16. Advances in biotechnology and informatics to link variation in the genome to phenotypes in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Appels, R; Barrero, R; Bellgard, M

    2013-03-01

    Advances in our understanding of genome structure provide consistent evidence for the existence of a core genome representing species classically defined by phenotype, as well as conditionally dispensable components of the genome that shows extensive variation between individuals of a given species. Generally, conservation of phenotypic features between species reflects conserved features of the genome; however, this is evidently not necessarily always the case as demonstrated by the analysis of the tunicate chordate Oikopleura dioica. In both plants and animals, the methylation activity of DNA and histones continues to present new variables for modifying (eventually) the phenotype of an organism and provides for structural variation that builds on the point mutations, rearrangements, indels, and amplification of retrotransposable elements traditionally considered. The translation of the advances in the structure/function analysis of the genome to industry is facilitated through the capture of research outputs in "toolboxes" that remain accessible in the public domain.

  17. Linking knowledge and action through mental models of sustainable agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew; Lubell, Mark; Hillis, Vicken

    2014-01-01

    Linking knowledge to action requires understanding how decision-makers conceptualize sustainability. This paper empirically analyzes farmer “mental models” of sustainability from three winegrape-growing regions of California where local extension programs have focused on sustainable agriculture. The mental models are represented as networks where sustainability concepts are nodes, and links are established when a farmer mentions two concepts in their stated definition of sustainability. The results suggest that winegrape grower mental models of sustainability are hierarchically structured, relatively similar across regions, and strongly linked to participation in extension programs and adoption of sustainable farm practices. We discuss the implications of our findings for the debate over the meaning of sustainability, and the role of local extension programs in managing knowledge systems. PMID:25157158

  18. CHALLENGES IN PHENOTYPE DEFINITION IN THE WHOLE-GENOME ERA: MULTIVARIATE MODELS OF MEMORY AND INTELLIGENCE

    PubMed Central

    SABB, F. W.; BURGGREN, A. C.; HIGIER, R. G.; FOX, J.; HE, J.; PARKER, D. S.; POLDRACK, R. A.; CHU, W.; CANNON, T. D.; FREIMER, N. B.; BILDER, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Refining phenotypes for the study of neuropsychiatric disorders is of paramount importance in neuroscience. Poor phenotype definition provides the greatest obstacle for making progress in disorders like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and autism. Using freely available informatics tools developed by the Consortium for Neuropsychiatric Phenomics (CNP), we provide a framework for defining and refining latent constructs used in neuroscience research and then apply this strategy to review known genetic contributions to memory and intelligence in healthy individuals. This approach can help us begin to build multi-level phenotype models that express the interactions between constructs necessary to understand complex neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:19450667

  19. Linking Academic Entitlement and Student Incivility Using Latent Means Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Jason P.; Finney, Sara J.

    2013-01-01

    Academic entitlement has been theoretically linked with uncivil student behavior; however, this relationship has not been tested. To address this gap in the literature, the authors used latent means modeling to estimate the relationship between the Academic Entitlement Questionnaire and uncivil student behavior. The authors gathered scores on the…

  20. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance. PMID:19320048

  1. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance.

  2. Beyond the Central Dogma: Model-Based Learning of How Genes Determine Phenotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinagel, Adam; Speth, Elena Bray

    2016-01-01

    In an introductory biology course, we implemented a learner-centered, model-based pedagogy that frequently engaged students in building conceptual models to explain how genes determine phenotypes. Model-building tasks were incorporated within case studies and aimed at eliciting students' understanding of 1) the origin of variation in a population…

  3. Beyond the Central Dogma: Model-Based Learning of How Genes Determine Phenotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinagel, Adam; Speth, Elena Bray

    2016-01-01

    In an introductory biology course, we implemented a learner-centered, model-based pedagogy that frequently engaged students in building conceptual models to explain how genes determine phenotypes. Model-building tasks were incorporated within case studies and aimed at eliciting students' understanding of 1) the origin of variation in a population…

  4. Model selection for athermal cross-linked fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, A; Picu, R C

    2012-07-01

    Athermal random fiber networks are usually modeled by representing each fiber as a truss, a Euler-Bernoulli or a Timoshenko beam, and, in the case of cross-linked networks, each cross-link as a pinned, rotating, or welded joint. In this work we study the effect of these various modeling options on the dependence of the overall network stiffness on system parameters. We conclude that Timoshenko beams can be used for the entire range of density and beam stiffness parameters, while the Euler-Bernoulli model can be used only at relatively low network densities. In the high density-high bending stiffness range, strain energy is stored predominantly in the axial and shear deformation modes, while in the other extreme range of parameters, the energy is stored in the bending mode. The effect of the model size on the network stiffness is also discussed.

  5. Single photon time transfer link model for GNSS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef

    2015-05-01

    The importance of optical time transfer serving as a complement to traditional microwave links, has been attested for GNSSes and for scientific missions. Single photon time transfer (SPTT) is a process, allowing to compare (subtract) time readings of two distant clocks. Such a comparison may be then used to synchronize less accurate clock to a better reference, to perform clock characterization and calibration, to calculate mean time out of ensemble of several clocks, displaced in space. The single-photon time transfer is well established in field of space geodesy, being supported by passive retro-reflectors within space segment of five known GNSSes. A truly two-way, active terminals work aboard of Jason-2 (T2L2) - multiphoton operation, GNSS Beidou (Compass) - SPTT, and are going to be launched within recent ACES project (ELT) - SPTT, and GNSS GLONASS - multiphoton operation. However, there is still missing comprehensive theoretical model of two-way (using satellite receiver and retroreflector) SPTT link incorporating all crucial parameters of receiver (both ground and space segment receivers), transmitter, atmosphere effects on uplink and downlink path, influence of retroreflector. The input to calculation of SPTT link performance will be among others: link budget (distance, power, apertures, beam divergence, attenuation, scattering), propagating medium (atmosphere scintillation, beam wander, etc.), mutual Tx/Rx velocity, wavelength. The SPTT model will be evaluated without the properties of real components. These will be added in the further development. The ground-to-space SPTT link performance of typical scenarios are modeled. This work is a part of the ESA study "Comparison of optical time-transfer links."

  6. Computational evaluation of exome sequence data using human and model organism phenotypes improves diagnostic efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bone, William P.; Washington, Nicole L.; Buske, Orion J.; Adams, David R.; Davis, Joie; Draper, David; Flynn, Elise D.; Girdea, Marta; Godfrey, Rena; Golas, Gretchen; Groden, Catherine; Jacobsen, Julius; Köhler, Sebastian; Lee, Elizabeth M. J.; Links, Amanda E.; Markello, Thomas C.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Nehrebecky, Michele; Robinson, Peter N.; Sincan, Murat; Soldatos, Ariane G.; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Toro, Camilo; Trang, Heather; Valkanas, Elise; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Wahl, Colleen; Wolfe, Lynne A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Brudno, Michael; Haendel, Melissa A.; Gahl, William A.; Smedley, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Medical diagnosis and molecular or biochemical confirmation typically rely on the knowledge of the clinician. Although this is very difficult in extremely rare diseases, we hypothesized that the recording of patient phenotypes in Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms and computationally ranking putative disease-associated sequence variants improves diagnosis, particularly for patients with atypical clinical profiles. Genet Med 18 6, 608–617. Methods: Using simulated exomes and the National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP) patient cohort and associated exome sequence, we tested our hypothesis using Exomiser. Exomiser ranks candidate variants based on patient phenotype similarity to (i) known disease–gene phenotypes, (ii) model organism phenotypes of candidate orthologs, and (iii) phenotypes of protein–protein association neighbors. Genet Med 18 6, 608–617. Results: Benchmarking showed Exomiser ranked the causal variant as the top hit in 97% of known disease–gene associations and ranked the correct seeded variant in up to 87% when detectable disease–gene associations were unavailable. Using UDP data, Exomiser ranked the causative variant(s) within the top 10 variants for 11 previously diagnosed variants and achieved a diagnosis for 4 of 23 cases undiagnosed by clinical evaluation. Genet Med 18 6, 608–617. Conclusion: Structured phenotyping of patients and computational analysis are effective adjuncts for diagnosing patients with genetic disorders. Genet Med 18 6, 608–617. PMID:26562225

  7. Classifying human audiometric phenotypes of age-related hearing loss from animal models.

    PubMed

    Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A; Lee, Fu-Shing; Matthews, Lois J; Schmiedt, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbyacusis) has a complex etiology. Results from animal models detailing the effects of specific cochlear injuries on audiometric profiles may be used to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss in older humans and predict cochlear pathologies associated with certain audiometric configurations ("audiometric phenotypes"). Patterns of hearing loss associated with cochlear pathology in animal models were used to define schematic boundaries of human audiograms. Pathologies included evidence for metabolic, sensory, and a mixed metabolic + sensory phenotype; an older normal phenotype without threshold elevation was also defined. Audiograms from a large sample of older adults were then searched by a human expert for "exemplars" (best examples) of these phenotypes, without knowledge of the human subject demographic information. Mean thresholds and slopes of higher frequency thresholds of the audiograms assigned to the four phenotypes were consistent with the predefined schematic boundaries and differed significantly from each other. Significant differences in age, gender, and noise exposure history provided external validity for the four phenotypes. Three supervised machine learning classifiers were then used to assess reliability of the exemplar training set to estimate the probability that newly obtained audiograms exhibited one of the four phenotypes. These procedures classified the exemplars with a high degree of accuracy; classifications of the remaining cases were consistent with the exemplars with respect to average thresholds and demographic information. These results suggest that animal models of age-related hearing loss can be used to predict human cochlear pathology by classifying audiograms into phenotypic classifications that reflect probable etiologies for hearing loss in older humans.

  8. A mathematical model of N-linked glycoform biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Umaña, P; Bailey, J E

    1997-09-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. Effective engineering of this pathway to maximize the fractions of beneficial glycoforms within the glycoform population of a target glycoprotein can be aided by a mathematical model of the N-linked glycosylation process. A mathematical model is presented here, whose main function is to calculate the expected qualitative trends in the N-linked oligosaccharide distribution resulting from changes in the levels of one or more enzymes involved in the network of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that accomplish N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. It consists of mass balances for 33 different oligosaccharide species N-linked to a specified protein that is being transported through the different compartments of the Golgi complex. Values of the model parameters describing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were estimated from literature information. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates was also obtained from the literature. The solution of the system for this basal set of parameters gave a glycoform distribution consisting mainly of complex-galactosylated oligosaccharides distributed in structures with different numbers of antennae in a fashion similar to that observed for various recombinant proteins produced in CHO cells. Other simulations indicate that changes in the oligosaccharide distribution could easily result from alteration in glycoprotein productivity within the range currently attainable in industry. The overexpression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III in CHO cells was simulated under different conditions to test the main function of the model. These simulations allow a comparison of different strategies, such as simultaneous overexpression of several

  9. Ensemble statistical and subspace clustering model for analysis of autism spectrum disorder phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Al-Jabery, Khalid; Obafemi-Ajayi, Tayo; Olbricht, Gayla R; Takahashi, T Nicole; Kanne, Stephen; Wunsch, Donald

    2016-08-01

    Heterogeneity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is complex including variability in behavioral phenotype as well as clinical, physiologic, and pathologic parameters. The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) now diagnoses ASD using a 2-dimensional model based social communication deficits and fixated interests and repetitive behaviors. Sorting out heterogeneity is crucial for study of etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. In this paper, we present an ensemble model for analyzing ASD phenotypes using several machine learning techniques and a k-dimensional subspace clustering algorithm. Our ensemble also incorporates statistical methods at several stages of analysis. We apply this model to a sample of 208 probands drawn from the Simon Simplex Collection Missouri Site patients. The results provide useful evidence that is helpful in elucidating the phenotype complexity within ASD. Our model can be extended to other disorders that exhibit a diverse range of heterogeneity.

  10. Exome Sequencing Reveals De Novo WDR45 Mutations Causing a Phenotypically Distinct, X-Linked Dominant Form of NBIA

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Tobias B.; Hogarth, Penelope; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Sanford, Lynn; Meyer, Esther; Kara, Eleanna; Cuno, Stephan M.; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; Hardy, John; Strom, Tim M.; Boddaert, Nathalie; Houlden, Henry H.; Kurian, Manju A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. We report that de novo mutations in WDR45, a gene located at Xp11.23 and encoding a beta-propeller scaffold protein with a putative role in autophagy, cause a distinctive NBIA phenotype. The clinical features include early-onset global developmental delay and further neurological deterioration (parkinsonism, dystonia, and dementia developing by early adulthood). Brain MRI revealed evidence of iron deposition in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Males and females are phenotypically similar, an observation that might be explained by somatic mosaicism in surviving males and germline or somatic mutations in females, as well as skewing of X chromosome inactivation. This clinically recognizable disorder is among the more common forms of NBIA, and we suggest that it be named accordingly as beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:23176820

  11. Model updating in flexible-link multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotti, R.; Caneva, G.; Palomba, I.; Richiedei, D.; Trevisani, A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic response of flexible-link multibody systems (FLMSs) can be predicted through nonlinear models based on finite elements, to describe the coupling between rigid- body and elastic behaviour. Their accuracy should be as high as possible to synthesize controllers and observers. Model updating based on experimental measurements is hence necessary. By taking advantage of the experimental modal analysis, this work proposes a model updating procedure for FLMSs and applies it experimentally to a planar robot. Indeed, several peculiarities of the model of FLMS should be carefully tackled. On the one hand, nonlinear models of a FLMS should be linearized about static equilibrium configurations. On the other, the experimental mode shapes should be corrected to be consistent with the elastic displacements represented in the model, which are defined with respect to a fictitious moving reference (the equivalent rigid link system). Then, since rotational degrees of freedom are also represented in the model, interpolation of the experimental data should be performed to match the model displacement vector. Model updating has been finally cast as an optimization problem in the presence of bounds on the feasible values, by also adopting methods to improve the numerical conditioning and to compute meaningful updated inertial and elastic parameters.

  12. Boolean network model predicts knockout mutant phenotypes of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Davidich, Maria I; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    networks of switches) are extremely simple mathematical models of biochemical signaling networks. Under certain circumstances, Boolean networks, despite their simplicity, are capable of predicting dynamical activation patterns of gene regulatory networks in living cells. For example, the temporal sequence of cell cycle activation patterns in yeasts S. pombe and S. cerevisiae are faithfully reproduced by Boolean network models. An interesting question is whether this simple model class could also predict a more complex cellular phenomenology as, for example, the cell cycle dynamics under various knockout mutants instead of the wild type dynamics, only. Here we show that a Boolean network model for the cell cycle control network of yeast S. pombe correctly predicts viability of a large number of known mutants. So far this had been left to the more detailed differential equation models of the biochemical kinetics of the yeast cell cycle network and was commonly thought to be out of reach for models as simplistic as Boolean networks. The new results support our vision that Boolean networks may complement other mathematical models in systems biology to a larger extent than expected so far, and may fill a gap where simplicity of the model and a preference for an overall dynamical blueprint of cellular regulation, instead of biochemical details, are in the focus.

  13. Boolean Network Model Predicts Knockout Mutant Phenotypes of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Davidich, Maria I.; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Boolean networks (or: networks of switches) are extremely simple mathematical models of biochemical signaling networks. Under certain circumstances, Boolean networks, despite their simplicity, are capable of predicting dynamical activation patterns of gene regulatory networks in living cells. For example, the temporal sequence of cell cycle activation patterns in yeasts S. pombe and S. cerevisiae are faithfully reproduced by Boolean network models. An interesting question is whether this simple model class could also predict a more complex cellular phenomenology as, for example, the cell cycle dynamics under various knockout mutants instead of the wild type dynamics, only. Here we show that a Boolean network model for the cell cycle control network of yeast S. pombe correctly predicts viability of a large number of known mutants. So far this had been left to the more detailed differential equation models of the biochemical kinetics of the yeast cell cycle network and was commonly thought to be out of reach for models as simplistic as Boolean networks. The new results support our vision that Boolean networks may complement other mathematical models in systems biology to a larger extent than expected so far, and may fill a gap where simplicity of the model and a preference for an overall dynamical blueprint of cellular regulation, instead of biochemical details, are in the focus. PMID:24069138

  14. Stem cell plasticity revisited: The continuum marrow model and phenotypic changes mediated by microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Aliotta, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of marrow hematopoietic stem cells is determined by cell cycle state and microvesicle entry into the stem cells. The stem cell population is continually changing based on cell cycle transit and thus can only be defined on a population basis. Purification of marrow stem cells only addresses the heterogeneity of these populations. When whole marrow is studied, the long-term repopulating stem cells are in active cell cycle. However, with some variability, when highly purified stem cells are studied, the cells appear to be dormant. Thus, the study of purified stem cells is intrinsically misleading. Tissue-derived microvesicles enhanced by injury effect the phenotype of different cell classes. We propose that previously described stem cell plasticity is due to microvesicle modulation. We further propose a stem cell population model in which the individual cell phenotypes continually changes, but the population phenotype is relatively stable. This, in turn, is modulated by microvesicle and microenvironmental influences. PMID:20382199

  15. UAS Modeling of the Communication Links Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birr, Richard B.; Girgis, Nancy; Murray, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the authority that grants access into, and operations within, the National Airspace System (NAS) for all aircraft, including Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). The safe operation of UAS in the NAS must be assured if the full potential of UAS is to be realized and supported by the public and Congress. This report analyzed the communication systems that are needed for the safe operations of UAS in the NAS. Safe operations can be defined as the availability of the required links to carry the information to control the UAS and the return links to allow controllers to know where the UAS is at any given moment as well as how it is performing. This report is the end result of work performed jointly between the FAA and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC). The work was done in support of the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) Special Committee 203 (SC-203) Control and Communications Working Group. The RTCA is a federal advisory committee to the FAA. Though the work was not under the direction of the working group, a large part of the specific values used in the simulations came from the working group. Specifically, all of the radio links were modeled based on the formulation completed by the working group. This report analyzed three scenarios from RTCA SC-203 that represent how a UAS would operate in the NAS. Each scenario was created using the Satellite Tool Kit (STK) modeling and simulation tool. The flight paths of the UAS were generated and the UAS dynamics were likewise modeled. Then each communication asset such as transmitters, receivers, and antennas were modeled and placed on the appropriate UAS, satellite, or Control Station (CS). After that, the radio links were analyzed for signal strength and antenna blockage, and the overall link performance was analyzed in detail. The goal was to obtain 99.9% availability on all of the radio communication links. In order

  16. A continuous phenotype space model of cancer evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masip, David; Korobeinikiov, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    It was suggested that the ability of cancer to avoid immune response pressure (that should be expected to be capable to annihilate cancer at its early stage) can be attributed to the ability of the cancer cells to evolve. The goal of this notice is to illustrate this possibility by the means of mathematical modelling. In this notice, we construct a simple mechanistic model of cancer evolution, which is based upon a classical model of cancer-immune response interaction. Numerical simulations confirm the hypothesis that if cancer mutates fast enough and if immune response is not sufficiently strong, then cancer is able to avoid immune response pressure by evolution.

  17. Mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shakibian, Hadi; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of meta-path based similarity indices like PathSim, HeteSim, and random walk have been proposed for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. However, these indices suffer from two major drawbacks. Firstly, they are primarily dependent on the connectivity degrees of node pairs without considering the further information provided by the given meta-path. Secondly, most of them are required to use a single and usually symmetric meta-path in advance. Hence, employing a set of different meta-paths is not straightforward. To tackle with these problems, we propose a mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. The proposed model, called as Meta-path based Mutual Information Index (MMI), introduces meta-path based link entropy to estimate the link likelihood and could be carried on a set of available meta-paths. This estimation measures the amount of information through the paths instead of measuring the amount of connectivity between the node pairs. The experimental results on a Bibliography network show that the MMI obtains high prediction accuracy compared with other popular similarity indices. PMID:28344326

  18. Phenotypic characterization of recessive gene knockout rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kuldip D; De Silva, Shehan; Sheth, Niketa P; Ramboz, Sylvie; Beck, Melissa J; Quang, Changyu; Switzer, Robert C; Ahmad, Syed O; Sunkin, Susan M; Walker, Dan; Cui, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Daniel A; McCoy, Aaron M; Gamber, Kevin; Ding, Xiaodong; Goldberg, Matthew S; Benkovic, Stanley A; Haupt, Meredith; Baptista, Marco A S; Fiske, Brian K; Sherer, Todd B; Frasier, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1(Pink1), DJ-1 (Park7) and Parkin (Park2) genes are linked to familial cases of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). As part of its strategy to provide more tools for the research community, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) funded the generation of novel rat models with targeted disruption ofPink1, DJ-1 or Parkin genes and determined if the loss of these proteins would result in a progressive PD-like phenotype. Pathological, neurochemical and behavioral outcome measures were collected at 4, 6 and 8months of age in homozygous KO rats and compared to wild-type (WT) rats. Both Pink1 and DJ-1 KO rats showed progressive nigral neurodegeneration with about 50% dopaminergic cell loss observed at 8 months of age. ThePink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats also showed a two to three fold increase in striatal dopamine and serotonin content at 8 months of age. Both Pink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats exhibited significant motor deficits starting at 4months of age. However, Parkin KO rats displayed normal behaviors with no neurochemical or pathological changes. These results demonstrate that inactivation of the Pink1 or DJ-1 genes in the rat produces progressive neurodegeneration and early behavioral deficits, suggesting that these recessive genes may be essential for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). These MJFF-generated novel rat models will assist the research community to elucidate the mechanisms by which these recessive genes produce PD pathology and potentially aid in therapeutic development.

  19. Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modeling and Phenotypic Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shibing; Xie, Min; Cao, Nan; Ding, Sheng

    2016-01-14

    In vitro cell models are invaluable tools for studying diseases and discovering drugs. Human induced pluripotent stem cells, particularly derived from patients, are an advantageous resource for generating ample supplies of cells to create unique platforms that model disease. This manuscript will review recent developments in modeling a variety of diseases (including their cellular phenotypes) with induced pluripotent stem cells derived from patients. It will also describe how researchers have exploited these models to validate drugs as potential therapeutics for these devastating diseases.

  20. Individual consistency and phenotypic plasticity in rockhopper penguins: female but not male body mass links environmental conditions to reproductive investment.

    PubMed

    Dehnhard, Nina; Eens, Marcel; Demongin, Laurent; Quillfeldt, Petra; Poisbleau, Maud

    2015-01-01

    In marine habitats, increasing ocean temperatures due to global climate change may distinctly reduce nutrient and consequently food availability for seabirds. Food availability is a known driver of body mass and reproductive investment in birds, but these traits may also depend on individual effects. Penguins show extreme intra-annual body mass variation and rely on accumulated body reserves for successful breeding. However, no study so far has tested individual consistency and phenotypic responses in body mass and reproductive investment in this taxon. Using a unique dataset on individually marked female and male southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome) across six years, we investigated 1) the individual consistency in body mass (measured at egg laying), body condition and reproductive investment across years, subsequently 2) identified the best-explanatory temperature-related environmental variables for female and male body mass, and 3) tested the effect of female and male body mass on reproductive investment. Body mass, body condition and reproductive investment were all highly repeatable. As body condition should control for the structural size of the birds, the similarly high repeatability estimates for body mass and body condition suggested that the consistent between-individual body mass differences were independent of structural size. This supported the use of body mass for the subsequent analyses. Body mass was higher under colder environmental conditions (positive Southern Annular Mode), but the overall phenotypic response appeared limited. Reproductive investment increased with female but not male body mass. While environmental effects on body mass in our study period were rather small, one can expect that ongoing global climate change will lead to a deterioration of food availability and we might therefore in the long-term expect a phenotypical decline in body mass and reproductive investment.

  1. Imaging atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis: evidence for increased prevalence, altered phenotype and a link between systemic and localised plaque inflammation.

    PubMed

    Skeoch, S; Cristinacce, P L Hubbard; Williams, H; Pemberton, P; Xu, D; Sun, J; James, J; Yuan, C; Hatsukami, T; Hockings, P D; Alexander, M Y; Waterton, J C; Bruce, I N

    2017-04-11

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), chronic inflammation is thought to drive increased cardiovascular risk through accelerated atherosclerosis. It may also lead to a more high-risk plaque phenotype. We sought to investigate carotid plaque phenotype in RA patients using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and Fludeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography(FDG-PET). In this pilot study, RA patients and age/sex-matched controls were evaluated for cardiovascular risk factors and carotid plaque on ultrasound. Subjects with plaque >2 mm thick underwent DCE-MRI, and a subgroup of patients had FDG-PET. Comparison of MRI findings between groups and correlation between clinical, serological markers and imaging findings was undertaken. 130 patients and 62 controls were recruited. Plaque was more prevalent in the RA group (53.1% vs 37.0%, p = 0.038) and was independently associated with IL6 levels (HR[95%CI]: 2.03 [1.26, 3.26] per quartile). DCE-MRI data were available in 15 patients and 5 controls. Higher prevalence of plaque calcification was noted in RA, despite similar plaque size (73.3% vs 20%, p = 0.04). FDG-PET detected plaque inflammation in 12/13 patients scanned and degree of inflammation correlated with hs-CRP (r = 0.58, p = 0.04). This study confirms increased prevalence of atherosclerosis in RA and provides data to support the hypothesis that patients have a high-risk plaque phenotype.

  2. Individual Consistency and Phenotypic Plasticity in Rockhopper Penguins: Female but Not Male Body Mass Links Environmental Conditions to Reproductive Investment

    PubMed Central

    Dehnhard, Nina; Eens, Marcel; Demongin, Laurent; Quillfeldt, Petra; Poisbleau, Maud

    2015-01-01

    In marine habitats, increasing ocean temperatures due to global climate change may distinctly reduce nutrient and consequently food availability for seabirds. Food availability is a known driver of body mass and reproductive investment in birds, but these traits may also depend on individual effects. Penguins show extreme intra-annual body mass variation and rely on accumulated body reserves for successful breeding. However, no study so far has tested individual consistency and phenotypic responses in body mass and reproductive investment in this taxon. Using a unique dataset on individually marked female and male southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome) across six years, we investigated 1) the individual consistency in body mass (measured at egg laying), body condition and reproductive investment across years, subsequently 2) identified the best-explanatory temperature-related environmental variables for female and male body mass, and 3) tested the effect of female and male body mass on reproductive investment. Body mass, body condition and reproductive investment were all highly repeatable. As body condition should control for the structural size of the birds, the similarly high repeatability estimates for body mass and body condition suggested that the consistent between-individual body mass differences were independent of structural size. This supported the use of body mass for the subsequent analyses. Body mass was higher under colder environmental conditions (positive Southern Annular Mode), but the overall phenotypic response appeared limited. Reproductive investment increased with female but not male body mass. While environmental effects on body mass in our study period were rather small, one can expect that ongoing global climate change will lead to a deterioration of food availability and we might therefore in the long-term expect a phenotypical decline in body mass and reproductive investment. PMID:26030824

  3. A Proton Leak Current through the Cardiac Sodium Channel Is Linked to Mixed Arrhythmia and the Dilated Cardiomyopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Keller, Dagmar I.; Huang, Hai; Pouliot, Valérie; Chatelier, Aurélien; Osswald, Stefan; Brink, Marijke; Chahine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac Na+ channels encoded by the SCN5A gene are essential for initiating heart beats and maintaining a regular heart rhythm. Mutations in these channels have recently been associated with atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disorders, and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We investigated a young male patient with a mixed phenotype composed of documented conduction disorder, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia associated with DCM. Further family screening revealed DCM in the patient's mother and sister and in three of the mother's sisters. Because of the complex clinical phenotypes, we screened SCN5A and identified a novel mutation, R219H, which is located on a highly conserved region on the fourth helix of the voltage sensor domain of Nav1.5. Three family members with DCM carried the R219H mutation. The wild-type (WT) and mutant Na+ channels were expressed in a heterologous expression system, and intracellular pH (pHi) was measured using a pH-sensitive electrode. The biophysical characterization of the mutant channel revealed an unexpected selective proton leak with no effect on its biophysical properties. The H+ leak through the mutated Nav1.5 channel was not related to the Na+ permeation pathway but occurred through an alternative pore, most probably a proton wire on the voltage sensor domain. We propose that acidification of cardiac myocytes and/or downstream events may cause the DCM phenotype and other electrical problems in affected family members. The identification of this clinically significant H+ leak may lead to the development of more targeted treatments. PMID:22675453

  4. De novo loss-of-function mutations in X-linked SMC1A cause severe ID and therapy-resistant epilepsy in females: expanding the phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Jansen, S; Kleefstra, T; Willemsen, M H; de Vries, P; Pfundt, R; Hehir-Kwa, J Y; Gilissen, C; Veltman, J A; de Vries, B B A; Vissers, L E L M

    2016-11-01

    De novo missense mutations and in-frame coding deletions in the X-linked gene SMC1A (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1A), encoding part of the cohesin complex, are known to cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome in both males and females. For a long time, loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in SMC1A were considered incompatible with life, as such mutations had not been reported in neither male nor female patients. However, recently, the authors and others reported LoF mutations in females with intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. Here we present the detailed phenotype of two females with de novo LoF mutations in SMC1A, including a de novo mutation of single base deletion [c.2364del, p.(Asn788Lysfs*10)], predicted to result in a frameshift, and a de novo deletion of exon 16, resulting in an out-of-frame mRNA splice product [p.(Leu808Argfs*6)]. By combining our patients with the other recently reported females carrying SMC1A LoF mutations, we ascertained a phenotypic spectrum of (severe) ID, therapy-resistant epilepsy, absence/delay of speech, hypotonia and small hands and feet. Our data show the existence of a novel phenotypic entity - distinct from CdLS - and caused by de novo SMC1A LoF mutations.

  5. Complex phenotype linked to a mutation in exon 11 of the lamin A/C gene: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Ana Rita G; Santos Gonçalves, Inês; Veiga, Fátima; Mendes Pedro, Mónica; Pinto, Fausto J; Brito, Dulce

    2017-09-01

    The lamin A/C (LMNA) gene encodes lamins A and C, which have an important role in nuclear cohesion and chromatin organization. Mutations in this gene usually lead to the so-called laminopathies, the primary cardiac manifestations of which are dilated cardiomyopathy and intracardiac conduction defects. Some mutations, associated with lipodystrophy but not cardiomyopathy, have been linked to metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and severe dyslipidemia. Herein we describe a new phenotype associated with a mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes. A 64-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene (c.1718C>T, Ser573Leu) presented with severe symptomatic ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. She underwent septal alcohol ablation, followed by Morrow myectomy. The patient was also diagnosed with severe dyslipidemia, diabetes and obesity, and fulfilled diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. No other characteristics of LMNA mutation-related phenotypes were identified. The development of type III atrioventricular block with no apparent cause, and mildly depressed systolic function, prompted referral for cardiac resynchronization therapy. In conclusion, the association between LMNA mutations and different phenotypes is complex and not fully understood, and can present with a broad spectrum of severity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The Fat/Hippo signaling pathway links within-disc morphogen patterning to whole-animal signals during phenotypically plastic growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hiroki; Hust, James A; Miura, Toru; Niimi, Teruyuki; Emlen, Douglas J; Lavine, Laura C

    2015-05-22

    Insects exhibit a diversity of environmentally sensitive phenotypes that allow them to be an extraordinarily successful group. For example, mandible size in male stag beetles is exquisitely sensitive to the larval nutritional environment and is a reliable signal of male condition. To date, studies of how such phenotypically plastic traits develop have focused on two types of mechanistic processes. Local, tissue-specific genetic mechanisms specify the shape and approximate final size of structures, whereas whole-animal hormonal signaling mechanisms modulate trait growth in response to environmental circumstance, including the body size and nutritional state of each individual. Hormones such as juvenile hormone, ecdysteroids, and/or ligands of the insulin-signaling pathway specify whether traits grow and regulate how much growth occurs across a diversity of insect groups. What remains to be shown is how the local, tissue-specific developmental genetic pathways interact with these whole animal hormonal signaling pathways during development to yield phenotypically plastic patterns of trait growth. Because the Fat/Hippo signaling pathway coordinates trait growth and development through its interactions with morphogens and hormonal pathways, we propose that Fat/Hippo signaling is a missing mechanistic link coordinating environmentally sensitive trait development in insects. Developmental Dynamics, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Placental ischemia and resultant phenotype in animal models of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    LaMarca, Babbette; Amaral, Lorena M; Harmon, Ashlyn C; Cornelius, Denise C; Faulkner, Jessica L; Cunningham, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is new onset (or worsening of preexisting) hypertension that occurs during pregnancy. It is accompanied by chronic inflammation, intrauterine growth restriction, elevated anti-angiogenic factors, and can occur with or without proteinuria. Although the exact etiology is unknown, it is thought that preeclampsia begins early in gestation with reduced uterine spiral artery remodeling leading to decreased vasculogenesis of the placenta as the pregnancy progresses. Soluble factors, stimulated by the ischemic placenta, shower the maternal vascular endothelium and are thought to cause endothelial dysfunction and to contribute to the development of hypertension during pregnancy. Due to the difficulty in studying such soluble factors in pregnant women, various animal models have been designed. Studies from these models have contributed to a better understanding of how factors released in response to placental ischemia may lead to increased blood pressure and reduced fetal weight during pregnancy. This review will highlight various animal models and the major findings indicating the importance of placental ischemia to lead to the pathophysiology observed in preeclamptic patients. PMID:27076345

  8. The lek mating system of the worm pipefish (Nerophis lumbriciformis): a molecular maternity analysis and test of the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, N M; Carneiro, D; Antunes, A; Queiroz, N; Vieira, M N; Jones, A G

    2016-11-19

    The origin and maintenance of mating preferences continues to be an important and controversial topic in sexual selection research. Leks and lek-like mating systems, where individuals gather in particular spots for the sole purpose of mate choice, are particularly puzzling, because the strong directional selection imposed by mate choice should erode genetic variation among competing individuals and negate any benefit for the choosing sex. Here, we take advantage of the lek-like mating system of the worm pipefish (Nerophis lumbriciformis) to test the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis for the maintenance of mating preferences. We use microsatellite markers to perform a parentage analysis, along with a mark-recapture study, to confirm that the worm pipefish has an unusual mating system that strongly resembles a female lek, where females display and males visit the lek to choose mates. Our results show that the most highly ornamented females occupy positions near the centre of the breeding area, and males mating with these females receive fuller broods with larger eggs compared to males mating with less-ornamented females. We also conduct a laboratory experiment to show that female ornaments are condition-dependent and honestly signal reproductive potential. Overall, these results are consistent with the predictions of a sex-independent version of the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis, as male preference for female ornaments correlates with fertility benefits.

  9. Discovering novel phenotypes with automatically inferred dynamic models: a partial melanocyte conversion in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Daniel; Lobikin, Maria; Levin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Progress in regenerative medicine requires reverse-engineering cellular control networks to infer perturbations with desired systems-level outcomes. Such dynamic models allow phenotypic predictions for novel perturbations to be rapidly assessed in silico. Here, we analyzed a Xenopus model of conversion of melanocytes to a metastatic-like phenotype only previously observed in an all-or-none manner. Prior in vivo genetic and pharmacological experiments showed that individual animals either fully convert or remain normal, at some characteristic frequency after a given perturbation. We developed a Machine Learning method which inferred a model explaining this complex, stochastic all-or-none dataset. We then used this model to ask how a new phenotype could be generated: animals in which only some of the melanocytes converted. Systematically performing in silico perturbations, the model predicted that a combination of altanserin (5HTR2 inhibitor), reserpine (VMAT inhibitor), and VP16-XlCreb1 (constitutively active CREB) would break the all-or-none concordance. Remarkably, applying the predicted combination of three reagents in vivo revealed precisely the expected novel outcome, resulting in partial conversion of melanocytes within individuals. This work demonstrates the capability of automated analysis of dynamic models of signaling networks to discover novel phenotypes and predictively identify specific manipulations that can reach them. PMID:28128301

  10. Beyond the Central Dogma: Model-Based Learning of How Genes Determine Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reinagel, Adam; Bray Speth, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In an introductory biology course, we implemented a learner-centered, model-based pedagogy that frequently engaged students in building conceptual models to explain how genes determine phenotypes. Model-building tasks were incorporated within case studies and aimed at eliciting students’ understanding of 1) the origin of variation in a population and 2) how genes/alleles determine phenotypes. Guided by theory on hierarchical development of systems-thinking skills, we scaffolded instruction and assessment so that students would first focus on articulating isolated relationships between pairs of molecular genetics structures and then integrate these relationships into an explanatory network. We analyzed models students generated on two exams to assess whether students’ learning of molecular genetics progressed along the theoretical hierarchical sequence of systems-thinking skills acquisition. With repeated practice, peer discussion, and instructor feedback over the course of the semester, students’ models became more accurate, better contextualized, and more meaningful. At the end of the semester, however, more than 25% of students still struggled to describe phenotype as an output of protein function. We therefore recommend that 1) practices like modeling, which require connecting genes to phenotypes; and 2) well-developed case studies highlighting proteins and their functions, take center stage in molecular genetics instruction. PMID:26903496

  11. Discovering novel phenotypes with automatically inferred dynamic models: a partial melanocyte conversion in Xenopus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Daniel; Lobikin, Maria; Levin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Progress in regenerative medicine requires reverse-engineering cellular control networks to infer perturbations with desired systems-level outcomes. Such dynamic models allow phenotypic predictions for novel perturbations to be rapidly assessed in silico. Here, we analyzed a Xenopus model of conversion of melanocytes to a metastatic-like phenotype only previously observed in an all-or-none manner. Prior in vivo genetic and pharmacological experiments showed that individual animals either fully convert or remain normal, at some characteristic frequency after a given perturbation. We developed a Machine Learning method which inferred a model explaining this complex, stochastic all-or-none dataset. We then used this model to ask how a new phenotype could be generated: animals in which only some of the melanocytes converted. Systematically performing in silico perturbations, the model predicted that a combination of altanserin (5HTR2 inhibitor), reserpine (VMAT inhibitor), and VP16-XlCreb1 (constitutively active CREB) would break the all-or-none concordance. Remarkably, applying the predicted combination of three reagents in vivo revealed precisely the expected novel outcome, resulting in partial conversion of melanocytes within individuals. This work demonstrates the capability of automated analysis of dynamic models of signaling networks to discover novel phenotypes and predictively identify specific manipulations that can reach them.

  12. Improving nonlinear modeling capabilities of functional link adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Scardapane, Simone; Parisi, Raffaele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The functional link adaptive filter (FLAF) represents an effective solution for online nonlinear modeling problems. In this paper, we take into account a FLAF-based architecture, which separates the adaptation of linear and nonlinear elements, and we focus on the nonlinear branch to improve the modeling performance. In particular, we propose a new model that involves an adaptive combination of filters downstream of the nonlinear expansion. Such combination leads to a cooperative behavior of the whole architecture, thus yielding a performance improvement, particularly in the presence of strong nonlinearities. An advanced architecture is also proposed involving the adaptive combination of multiple filters on the nonlinear branch. The proposed models are assessed in different nonlinear modeling problems, in which their effectiveness and capabilities are shown.

  13. Achondrogenesis type IB: agenesis of cartilage interterritorial matrix as the link between gene defect and pathological skeletal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Corsi, A; Riminucci, M; Fisher, L W; Bianco, P

    2001-10-01

    Achondrogenesis type IB is a lethal osteochondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene. How these mutations lead to the skeletal phenotype is not known. Histology of plastic-embedded skeletal fetal achondrogenesis type IB samples suggested that interterritorial epiphyseal cartilage matrix was selectively missing. Cartilage was organized in "chondrons" separated by cleft spaces; chondrocyte seriation, longitudinal septa, and, in turn, mineralized cartilaginous septa were absent. Agenesis of interterritorial matrix as the key histologic change was confirmed by immunohistology using specific markers of territorial and interterritorial matrix. Biglycan-enriched territorial matrix was preserved; decorin-enriched interterritorial areas were absent, although immunostaining was observed within chondrocytes. Thus, in achondrogenesis type IB: (1) a complex derangement in cartilage matrix assembly lies downstream of the deficient sulfate transporter activity; (2) the severely impaired decorin deposition participates in the changes in matrix organization with lack of development of normal interterritorial matrix; and (3) this change determines the lack of the necessary structural substrate for proper endochondral bone formation and explains the severe skeletal phenotype.

  14. How to consistently link extraversion and intelligence to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene: on defining and measuring psychological phenotypes in neurogenetic research.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Jan; Mueller, Erik M; Hennig, Jürgen; Stemmler, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    The evidence for associations between genetic polymorphisms and complex behavioral/psychological phenotypes (traits) has thus far been weak and inconsistent. Using the well-studied Val158Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene as an example, we demonstrate that using theoretical models to guide phenotype definition and measuring the phenotypes of interest with a high degree of specificity reveals strong gene-behavior associations that are consistent with prior work and that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. Only after statistically controlling for irrelevant portions of phenotype variance did we observe strong (Cohen's d = 0.33-0.70) and significant associations between COMT Val158Met and both cognitive and affective traits in a healthy male sample (N = 201) in Study 1: Carriers of the Met allele scored higher in fluid intelligence (reasoning) but lower in both crystallized intelligence (general knowledge) and the agency facet of extraversion. In Study 2, we conceptually replicated the association of COMT Val158Met with the agency facet of extraversion after partialing irrelevant phenotype variance in a female sample (N = 565). Finally, through reanalysis of a large published data set we showed that Met allele carriers also scored higher in indicators of fluid intelligence after partialing verbal fluency. Because the Met allele codes for a less efficient variant of the enzyme COMT, resulting in higher levels of extrasynaptic prefrontal dopamine, these observations provide further support for a role for dopamine in both intelligence and extraversion. More importantly, the present findings have important implications for the definition of psychological phenotypes in neurogenetic research.

  15. Phenotype-Specific CpG Island Methylation Events in a Murine Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Camoriano, Marta; Morey Kinney, Shannon R.; Moser, Michael T.; Foster, Barbara A.; Mohler, James L.; Trump, Donald L.; Karpf, Adam R.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation plays a significant role in nearly all human cancers and may contribute to disease progression to advanced phenotypes. Study of advanced prostate cancer phenotypes in the human disease is hampered by limited availability of tissues. We therefore took advantage of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model to study whether three different phenotypes of TRAMP tumors (PRIM, late-stage primary tumors; AIP, androgen-independent primary tumors; and MET, metastases) displayed specific patterns of CpG island hypermethylation using Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning. Each tumor phenotype displayed numerous hypermethylation events, with the most homogeneous methylation pattern in AIP and the most heterogeneous pattern in MET. Several loci displayed a phenotype-specific methylation pattern; the most striking pattern being loci methylated at high frequency in PRIM and AIP but rarely in MET. Examination of the mRNA expression of three genes, BC058385, Goosecoid, and Neurexin 2, which exhibited nonpromoter methylation, revealed increased expression associated with downstream methylation. Only methylated samples showed mRNA expression, in which tumor phenotype was a key factor determining the level of expression. The CpG island in the human orthologue of BC058385 was methylated in human AIP but not in primary androgen-stimulated prostate cancer or benign prostate. The clinical data show a proof-of-principle that the TRAMP model can be used to identify targets of aberrant CpG island methylation relevant to human disease. In conclusion, phenotype-specific hypermethylation events were associated with the overexpression of different genes and may provide new markers of prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:18519676

  16. An evaluation of the NQF Quality Data Model for representing Electronic Health Record driven phenotyping algorithms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William K; Rasmussen, Luke V; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Peissig, Peggy L; Denny, Joshua C; Kho, Abel N; Miller, Aaron; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2012-01-01

    The development of Electronic Health Record (EHR)-based phenotype selection algorithms is a non-trivial and highly iterative process involving domain experts and informaticians. To make it easier to port algorithms across institutions, it is desirable to represent them using an unambiguous formal specification language. For this purpose we evaluated the recently developed National Quality Forum (NQF) information model designed for EHR-based quality measures: the Quality Data Model (QDM). We selected 9 phenotyping algorithms that had been previously developed as part of the eMERGE consortium and translated them into QDM format. Our study concluded that the QDM contains several core elements that make it a promising format for EHR-driven phenotyping algorithms for clinical research. However, we also found areas in which the QDM could be usefully extended, such as representing information extracted from clinical text, and the ability to handle algorithms that do not consist of Boolean combinations of criteria.

  17. An Evaluation of the NQF Quality Data Model for Representing Electronic Health Record Driven Phenotyping Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, William K.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Peissig, Peggy L.; Denny, Joshua C.; Kho, Abel N.; Miller, Aaron; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2012-01-01

    The development of Electronic Health Record (EHR)-based phenotype selection algorithms is a non-trivial and highly iterative process involving domain experts and informaticians. To make it easier to port algorithms across institutions, it is desirable to represent them using an unambiguous formal specification language. For this purpose we evaluated the recently developed National Quality Forum (NQF) information model designed for EHR-based quality measures: the Quality Data Model (QDM). We selected 9 phenotyping algorithms that had been previously developed as part of the eMERGE consortium and translated them into QDM format. Our study concluded that the QDM contains several core elements that make it a promising format for EHR-driven phenotyping algorithms for clinical research. However, we also found areas in which the QDM could be usefully extended, such as representing information extracted from clinical text, and the ability to handle algorithms that do not consist of Boolean combinations of criteria. PMID:23304366

  18. Metabolic phenotyping guidelines: assessing glucose homeostasis in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Bowe, James E; Franklin, Zara J; Hauge-Evans, Astrid C; King, Aileen J; Persaud, Shanta J; Jones, Peter M

    2014-09-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetes as a disease is characterised by an inability to maintain normal glucose homeostasis. In type 1 diabetes, this is due to autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells and subsequent lack of insulin production, and in type 2 diabetes it is due to a combination of both insulin resistance and an inability of the β-cells to compensate adequately with increased insulin release. Animal models, in particular genetically modified mice, are increasingly being used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and as such the ability to study glucose homeostasis in vivo has become an essential tool. Several techniques exist for measuring different aspects of glucose tolerance and each of these methods has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Thus the appropriate methodology may vary from study to study depending on the desired end-points, the animal model, and other practical considerations. This review outlines the most commonly used techniques for assessing glucose tolerance in rodents and details the factors that should be taken into account in their use. Representative scenarios illustrating some of the practical considerations of designing in vivo experiments for the measurement of glucose homeostasis are also discussed.

  19. Differentially methylated plasticity genes in the amygdala of young primates are linked to anxious temperament, an at risk phenotype for anxiety and depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Alisch, Reid S; Chopra, Pankaj; Fox, Andrew S; Chen, Kailei; White, Andrew T J; Roseboom, Patrick H; Keles, Sunduz; Kalin, Ned H

    2014-11-19

    Children with an anxious temperament (AT) are at a substantially increased risk to develop anxiety and depression. The young rhesus monkey is ideal for studying the origin of human AT because it shares with humans the genetic, neural, and phenotypic underpinnings of complex social and emotional functioning. Heritability, functional imaging, and gene expression studies of AT in young monkeys revealed that the central nucleus of the amygdala (Ce) is a key environmentally sensitive substrate of this at risk phenotype. Because epigenetic marks (e.g., DNA methylation) can be modulated by environmental stimuli, these data led us to hypothesize a role for DNA methylation in the development of AT. To test this hypothesis, we used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing to examine the cross-sectional genome-wide methylation levels in the Ce of 23 age-matched monkeys (1.3 ± 0.2 years) phenotyped for AT. Because AT reflects a continuous trait-like variable, we used an analytical approach that is consistent with this biology to identify genes in the Ce with methylation patterns that predict AT. Expression data from the Ce of these same monkeys were then used to find differentially methylated candidates linked to altered gene regulation. Two genes particularly relevant to the AT phenotype were BCL11A and JAG1. These transcripts have well-defined roles in neurodevelopmental processes, including neurite arborization and the regulation of neurogenesis. Together, these findings represent a critical step toward understanding the effects of early environment on the neuromolecular mechanisms that underlie the risk to develop anxiety and depressive disorders. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415548-09$15.00/0.

  20. Building predictive models for mechanism-of-action classification from phenotypic assay data sets.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ellen L; Yang, Jian; Polokoff, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Compound mechanism-of-action information can be critical for drug development decisions but is often challenging for phenotypic drug discovery programs. One concern is that compounds selected by phenotypic screening will have a previously known but undesirable target mechanism. Here we describe a useful method for assigning mechanism class to compounds and bioactive agents using an 84-feature signature from a panel of primary human cell systems (BioMAP systems). For this approach, a reference data set of well-characterized compounds was used to develop predictive models for 28 mechanism classes using support vector machines. These mechanism classes encompass safety and efficacy-related mechanisms, include both target-specific and pathway-based classes, and cover the most common mechanisms identified in phenotypic screens, such as inhibitors of mitochondrial and microtubule function, histone deacetylase, and cAMP elevators. Here we describe the performance and the application of these predictive models in a decision scheme for triaging phenotypic screening hits using a previously published data set of 309 environmental chemicals tested as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast program. By providing quantified membership in specific mechanism classes, this approach is suitable for identification of off-target toxicity mechanisms as well as enabling target deconvolution of phenotypic drug discovery hits.

  1. Modeling the Transitions between Collective and Solitary Migration Phenotypes in Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Lu, Mingyang; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, Jose’ N

    2015-01-01

    Cellular plasticity during cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge. Two key cellular plasticity mechanisms —Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and Mesenchymal-to-Amoeboid Transition (MAT) – have been carefully investigated individually, yet a comprehensive understanding of their interconnections remains elusive. Previously, we have modeled the dynamics of the core regulatory circuits for both EMT (miR-200/ZEB/miR-34/SNAIL) and MAT (Rac1/RhoA). We now extend our previous work to study the coupling between these two core circuits by considering the two microRNAs (miR-200 and miR-34) as external signals to the core MAT circuit. We show that this coupled circuit enables four different stable steady states (phenotypes) that correspond to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M), mesenchymal (M), amoeboid (A) and hybrid amoeboid/mesenchymal (A/M) phenotypes. Our model recapitulates the metastasis-suppressing role of the microRNAs even in the presence of EMT-inducing signals like Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF). It also enables mapping the microRNA levels to the transitions among various cell migration phenotypes. Finally, it offers a mechanistic understanding for the observed phenotypic transitions among different cell migration phenotypes, specifically the Collective-to-Amoeboid Transition (CAT). PMID:26627083

  2. Modeling the Transitions between Collective and Solitary Migration Phenotypes in Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Lu, Mingyang; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, Jose' N.

    2015-12-01

    Cellular plasticity during cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge. Two key cellular plasticity mechanisms —Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and Mesenchymal-to-Amoeboid Transition (MAT) - have been carefully investigated individually, yet a comprehensive understanding of their interconnections remains elusive. Previously, we have modeled the dynamics of the core regulatory circuits for both EMT (miR-200/ZEB/miR-34/SNAIL) and MAT (Rac1/RhoA). We now extend our previous work to study the coupling between these two core circuits by considering the two microRNAs (miR-200 and miR-34) as external signals to the core MAT circuit. We show that this coupled circuit enables four different stable steady states (phenotypes) that correspond to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M), mesenchymal (M), amoeboid (A) and hybrid amoeboid/mesenchymal (A/M) phenotypes. Our model recapitulates the metastasis-suppressing role of the microRNAs even in the presence of EMT-inducing signals like Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF). It also enables mapping the microRNA levels to the transitions among various cell migration phenotypes. Finally, it offers a mechanistic understanding for the observed phenotypic transitions among different cell migration phenotypes, specifically the Collective-to-Amoeboid Transition (CAT).

  3. The Mouse Genome Database: Genotypes, Phenotypes, and Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD’s catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations. PMID:23175610

  4. The mouse genome database: genotypes, phenotypes, and models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD's catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations.

  5. Molecular modeling indicates distinct classes of missense variants with mild and severe XLRS phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, Yuri V; Vitale, Susan; Sieving, Paul A; Vincent, Ajoy; Robson, Anthony G; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Holder, Graham E

    2013-12-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a vitreo-retinal degeneration caused by mutations in the RS1 gene which encodes the protein retinoschisin (RS1), required for the structural and functional integrity of the retina. Data are presented from a group of 38 XLRS patients from Moorfields Eye Hospital (London, UK) who had one of 18 missense mutations in RS1. Patients were grouped based on mutation severity predicted by molecular modeling: mild (class I), moderate (intermediate) and severe (class II). Most patients had an electronegative scotopic bright flash electroretinogram (ERG) (reduced b/a-wave ratio) in keeping with predominant inner retinal dysfunction. An association between the type of structural RS1 alterations and the severity of b/a-wave reduction was found in all but the oldest group of patients, significant in patients aged 15-30 years. Severe RS1 missense changes were associated with a lower ERG b/a ratio than were mild changes, suggesting that the extent of inner retinal dysfunction is influenced by the effect of the mutations on protein structure. The majority of class I mutations showed no changes involving cysteine residues. Class II mutations caused severe perturbations due to the removal or insertion of cysteine residues or due to changes in the hydrophobic core. The ERG b/a ratio in intermediate cases was abnormal but showed significant variability, possibly related to the role of proline or arginine residues. We also conducted a second study, using a completely independent cohort, to indicate a genotype-ERG phenotype correlation.

  6. A FAULT MODEL FOR ONTOLOGY MAPPING, ALIGNMENT, AND LINKING SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, HELEN L.; COHEN, K. BRETONNEL; HUNTER, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    There has been much work devoted to the mapping, alignment, and linking of ontologies (MALO), but little has been published about how to evaluate systems that do this. A fault model for conducting fine-grained evaluations of MALO systems is proposed, and its application to the system described in Johnson et al. [15] is illustrated. Two judges categorized errors according to the model, and inter-judge agreement was calculated by error category. Overall inter-judge agreement was 98% after dispute resolution, suggesting that the model is consistently applicable. The results of applying the model to the system described in [15] reveal the reason for a puzzling set of results in that paper, and also suggest a number of avenues and techniques for improving the state of the art in MALO, including the development of biomedical domain specific language processing tools, filtering of high frequency matching results, and word sense disambiguation. PMID:17990495

  7. Groundwater Pollution Source Identification using Linked ANN-Optimization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz, Md; Srivastava, Rajesh; Jain, Ashu

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is the principal source of drinking water in several parts of the world. Contamination of groundwater has become a serious health and environmental problem today. Human activities including industrial and agricultural activities are generally responsible for this contamination. Identification of groundwater pollution source is a major step in groundwater pollution remediation. Complete knowledge of pollution source in terms of its source characteristics is essential to adopt an effective remediation strategy. Groundwater pollution source is said to be identified completely when the source characteristics - location, strength and release period - are known. Identification of unknown groundwater pollution source is an ill-posed inverse problem. It becomes more difficult for real field conditions, when the lag time between the first reading at observation well and the time at which the source becomes active is not known. We developed a linked ANN-Optimization model for complete identification of an unknown groundwater pollution source. The model comprises two parts- an optimization model and an ANN model. Decision variables of linked ANN-Optimization model contain source location and release period of pollution source. An objective function is formulated using the spatial and temporal data of observed and simulated concentrations, and then minimized to identify the pollution source parameters. In the formulation of the objective function, we require the lag time which is not known. An ANN model with one hidden layer is trained using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to find the lag time. Different combinations of source locations and release periods are used as inputs and lag time is obtained as the output. Performance of the proposed model is evaluated for two and three dimensional case with error-free and erroneous data. Erroneous data was generated by adding uniformly distributed random error (error level 0-10%) to the analytically computed concentration

  8. SLC9A6 mutations cause X-linked mental retardation, microcephaly, epilepsy, and ataxia, a phenotype mimicking Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Gregor D; Selmer, Kaja K; Roxrud, Ingrid; Smith, Raffaella; Kyllerman, Mårten; Eiklid, Kristin; Kroken, Mette; Mattingsdal, Morten; Egeland, Thore; Stenmark, Harald; Sjøholm, Hans; Server, Andres; Samuelsson, Lena; Christianson, Arnold; Tarpey, Patrick; Whibley, Annabel; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian; Raymond, F Lucy; Schwartz, Charles; Stevenson, Roger E; Undlien, Dag E; Strømme, Petter

    2008-04-01

    Linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in a family exhibiting an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome, characterized by microcephaly, epilepsy, ataxia, and absent speech and resembling Angelman syndrome, identified a deletion in the SLC9A6 gene encoding the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE6. Subsequently, other mutations were found in a male with mental retardation (MR) who had been investigated for Angelman syndrome and in two XLMR families with epilepsy and ataxia, including the family designated as having Christianson syndrome. Therefore, mutations in SLC9A6 cause X-linked mental retardation. Additionally, males with findings suggestive of unexplained Angelman syndrome should be considered as potential candidates for SLC9A6 mutations.

  9. SLC9A6 Mutations Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation, Microcephaly, Epilepsy, and Ataxia, a Phenotype Mimicking Angelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gilfillan, Gregor D.; Selmer, Kaja K.; Roxrud, Ingrid; Smith, Raffaella; Kyllerman, Mårten; Eiklid, Kristin; Kroken, Mette; Mattingsdal, Morten; Egeland, Thore; Stenmark, Harald; Sjøholm, Hans; Server, Andres; Samuelsson, Lena; Christianson, Arnold; Tarpey, Patrick; Whibley, Annabel; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian; Raymond, F. Lucy; Schwartz, Charles; Stevenson, Roger E.; Undlien, Dag E.; Strømme, Petter

    2008-01-01

    Linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in a family exhibiting an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome, characterized by microcephaly, epilepsy, ataxia, and absent speech and resembling Angelman syndrome, identified a deletion in the SLC9A6 gene encoding the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6. Subsequently, other mutations were found in a male with mental retardation (MR) who had been investigated for Angelman syndrome and in two XLMR families with epilepsy and ataxia, including the family designated as having Christianson syndrome. Therefore, mutations in SLC9A6 cause X-linked mental retardation. Additionally, males with findings suggestive of unexplained Angelman syndrome should be considered as potential candidates for SLC9A6 mutations. PMID:18342287

  10. Myocardial stiffness is attributed to alterations in cross-linked collagen rather than total collagen or phenotypes in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Norton, G R; Tsotetsi, J; Trifunovic, B; Hartford, C; Candy, G P; Woodiwiss, A J

    1997-09-16

    The relative contributions of increases in myocardial collagen, collagen cross-linking, and the ratio of type I to type III collagen to the stiff myocardium in hypertension were determined. We compared the action of hydralazine (0.07 mmol x kg(-1) x d(-1)) with that of captopril (0.22 mmol x kg(-1) x d(-1)) on the left ventricular end-diastolic (LVED) myocardial stiffness constant, k (g x cm(-2)) and LV myocardial interstitial characteristics in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) control rats. LVED k (SHR, 27.9+/-1; WKY, 19.5+/-1.2; P<.01), myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (HPRO; microg/mg dry wt) (SHR, 4.19+/-0.16; WKY, 3.17+/-0.09; P<.001), and collagen type I/III ratios (SHR, 7.1+/-0.7; WKY, 2.1+/-0.2; P<.001) were increased, whereas the percentage of myocardial collagen extracted after cyanogen bromide digestion (an index of cross-linked collagen) was decreased (SHR, 17+/-3; WKY, 41+/-4; P<.001) in SHRs compared with WKY controls. Captopril therapy reduced LVED k, myocardial HPRO, collagen type I/III, and augmented collagen solubility (43+/-4) in SHRs to values similar to those measured in WKY controls. Hydralazine therapy, despite a favorable effect on LVED k in SHRs (20.+/-1.6, P<.01 compared with untreated SHRs), failed to influence either myocardial HPRO (4.18+/-0.18) or collagen type I/III (8+/-1) but did improve collagen solubility (31+/-2). An association between alterations in LVED k and collagen solubility but not between changes in LVED k and total collagen or phenotype ratios after antihypertensive therapy in SHRs suggests that myocardial stiffness in hypertension is the consequence of an enhanced myocardial collagen cross-linking rather than of an increase in total collagen or type I phenotype concentrations.

  11. T-bet and Eomes Are Differentially Linked to the Exhausted Phenotype of CD8+ T Cells in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buggert, Marcus; Tauriainen, Johanna; Yamamoto, Takuya; Frederiksen, Juliet; Ivarsson, Martin A.; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Lund, Ole; Hejdeman, Bo; Jansson, Marianne; Sönnerborg, Anders; Koup, Richard A.; Betts, Michael R.; Karlsson, Annika C.

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cell exhaustion represents a major hallmark of chronic HIV infection. Two key transcription factors governing CD8+ T cell differentiation, T-bet and Eomesodermin (Eomes), have previously been shown in mice to differentially regulate T cell exhaustion in part through direct modulation of PD-1. Here, we examined the relationship between these transcription factors and the expression of several inhibitory receptors (PD-1, CD160, and 2B4), functional characteristics and memory differentiation of CD8+ T cells in chronic and treated HIV infection. The expression of PD-1, CD160, and 2B4 on total CD8+ T cells was elevated in chronically infected individuals and highly associated with a T-betdimEomeshi expressional profile. Interestingly, both resting and activated HIV-specific CD8+ T cells in chronic infection were almost exclusively T-betdimEomeshi cells, while CMV-specific CD8+ T cells displayed a balanced expression pattern of T-bet and Eomes. The T-betdimEomeshi virus-specific CD8+ T cells did not show features of terminal differentiation, but rather a transitional memory phenotype with poor polyfunctional (effector) characteristics. The transitional and exhausted phenotype of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells was longitudinally related to persistent Eomes expression after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Strikingly, these characteristics remained stable up to 10 years after ART initiation. This study supports the concept that poor human viral-specific CD8+ T cell functionality is due to an inverse expression balance between T-bet and Eomes, which is not reversed despite long-term viral control through ART. These results aid to explain the inability of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells to control the viral replication post-ART cessation. PMID:25032686

  12. Design Space Toolbox V2: Automated Software Enabling a Novel Phenotype-Centric Modeling Strategy for Natural and Synthetic Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Lomnitz, Jason G; Savageau, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models of biochemical systems provide a means to elucidate the link between the genotype, environment, and phenotype. A subclass of mathematical models, known as mechanistic models, quantitatively describe the complex non-linear mechanisms that capture the intricate interactions between biochemical components. However, the study of mechanistic models is challenging because most are analytically intractable and involve large numbers of system parameters. Conventional methods to analyze them rely on local analyses about a nominal parameter set and they do not reveal the vast majority of potential phenotypes possible for a given system design. We have recently developed a new modeling approach that does not require estimated values for the parameters initially and inverts the typical steps of the conventional modeling strategy. Instead, this approach relies on architectural features of the model to identify the phenotypic repertoire and then predict values for the parameters that yield specific instances of the system that realize desired phenotypic characteristics. Here, we present a collection of software tools, the Design Space Toolbox V2 based on the System Design Space method, that automates (1) enumeration of the repertoire of model phenotypes, (2) prediction of values for the parameters for any model phenotype, and (3) analysis of model phenotypes through analytical and numerical methods. The result is an enabling technology that facilitates this radically new, phenotype-centric, modeling approach. We illustrate the power of these new tools by applying them to a synthetic gene circuit that can exhibit multi-stability. We then predict values for the system parameters such that the design exhibits 2, 3, and 4 stable steady states. In one example, inspection of the basins of attraction reveals that the circuit can count between three stable states by transient stimulation through one of two input channels: a positive channel that increases the count

  13. Design Space Toolbox V2: Automated Software Enabling a Novel Phenotype-Centric Modeling Strategy for Natural and Synthetic Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lomnitz, Jason G.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models of biochemical systems provide a means to elucidate the link between the genotype, environment, and phenotype. A subclass of mathematical models, known as mechanistic models, quantitatively describe the complex non-linear mechanisms that capture the intricate interactions between biochemical components. However, the study of mechanistic models is challenging because most are analytically intractable and involve large numbers of system parameters. Conventional methods to analyze them rely on local analyses about a nominal parameter set and they do not reveal the vast majority of potential phenotypes possible for a given system design. We have recently developed a new modeling approach that does not require estimated values for the parameters initially and inverts the typical steps of the conventional modeling strategy. Instead, this approach relies on architectural features of the model to identify the phenotypic repertoire and then predict values for the parameters that yield specific instances of the system that realize desired phenotypic characteristics. Here, we present a collection of software tools, the Design Space Toolbox V2 based on the System Design Space method, that automates (1) enumeration of the repertoire of model phenotypes, (2) prediction of values for the parameters for any model phenotype, and (3) analysis of model phenotypes through analytical and numerical methods. The result is an enabling technology that facilitates this radically new, phenotype-centric, modeling approach. We illustrate the power of these new tools by applying them to a synthetic gene circuit that can exhibit multi-stability. We then predict values for the system parameters such that the design exhibits 2, 3, and 4 stable steady states. In one example, inspection of the basins of attraction reveals that the circuit can count between three stable states by transient stimulation through one of two input channels: a positive channel that increases the count

  14. Optimization model for UV-Riboflavin corneal cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, S.; Wernli, J.; Scherrer, S.; Bueehler, M.; Seiler, T.; Mrochen, M.

    2011-03-01

    Nowadays UV-cross-linking is an established method for the treatment of keraectasia. Currently a standardized protocol is used for the cross-linking treatment. We will now present a theoretical model which predicts the number of induced crosslinks in the corneal tissue, in dependence of the Riboflavin concentration, the radiation intensity, the pre-treatment time and the treatment time. The model is developed by merging the difussion equation, the equation for the light distribution in dependence on the absorbers in the tissue and a rate equation for the polymerization process. A higher concentration of Riboflavin solution as well as a higher irradiation intensity will increase the number of induced crosslinks. However, performed stress-strain experiments which support the model showed that higher Riboflavin concentrations (> 0.125%) do not result in a further increase in stability of the corneal tissue. This is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of induced crosslinks throughout the cornea due to the uneven absorption of the UV-light. The new model offers the possibility to optimize the treatment individually for every patient depending on their corneal thickness in terms of efficiency, saftey and treatment time.

  15. Towards a reference plant trait ontology for modeling knowledge of plant traits and phenotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ontology engineering and knowledge modeling for the plant sciences is expected to contribute to the understanding of the basis of plant traits that determine phenotypic expression in a given environment. Several crop- or clade-specific plant trait ontologies have been developed to describe plant tr...

  16. Modelling metabolic evolution on phenotypic fitness landscapes: a case study on C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, David

    2015-12-01

    How did the complex metabolic systems we observe today evolve through adaptive evolution? The fitness landscape is the theoretical framework to answer this question. Since experimental data on natural fitness landscapes is scarce, computational models are a valuable tool to predict landscape topologies and evolutionary trajectories. Careful assumptions about the genetic and phenotypic features of the system under study can simplify the design of such models significantly. The analysis of C4 photosynthesis evolution provides an example for accurate predictions based on the phenotypic fitness landscape of a complex metabolic trait. The C4 pathway evolved multiple times from the ancestral C3 pathway and models predict a smooth 'Mount Fuji' landscape accordingly. The modelled phenotypic landscape implies evolutionary trajectories that agree with data on modern intermediate species, indicating that evolution can be predicted based on the phenotypic fitness landscape. Future directions will have to include structural changes of metabolic fitness landscape structure with changing environments. This will not only answer important evolutionary questions about reversibility of metabolic traits, but also suggest strategies to increase crop yields by engineering the C4 pathway into C3 plants. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  17. Modeling of Long-Range Atmospheric Lasercom Links Between Static and Mobile Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T; Breitfeller, E F; Henderson, J R; Kallman, J S; Morris, J R; Ruggiero, A J

    2003-07-29

    We describe modeling and simulation of long-range terrestrial laser communications links between static and mobile platforms. Atmospheric turbulence modeling, along with pointing, tracking and acquisition models are combined to provide an overall capability to estimate communications link performance.

  18. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  19. XGAP: a uniform and extensible data model and software platform for genotype and phenotype experiments.

    PubMed

    Swertz, Morris A; Velde, K Joeri van der; Tesson, Bruno M; Scheltema, Richard A; Arends, Danny; Vera, Gonzalo; Alberts, Rudi; Dijkstra, Martijn; Schofield, Paul; Schughart, Klaus; Hancock, John M; Smedley, Damian; Wolstencroft, Katy; Goble, Carole; de Brock, Engbert O; Jones, Andrew R; Parkinson, Helen E; Jansen, Ritsert C

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensible software model for the genotype and phenotype community, XGAP. Readers can download a standard XGAP (http://www.xgap.org) or auto-generate a custom version using MOLGENIS with programming interfaces to R-software and web-services or user interfaces for biologists. XGAP has simple load formats for any type of genotype, epigenotype, transcript, protein, metabolite or other phenotype data. Current functionality includes tools ranging from eQTL analysis in mouse to genome-wide association studies in humans.

  20. XGAP: a uniform and extensible data model and software platform for genotype and phenotype experiments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensible software model for the genotype and phenotype community, XGAP. Readers can download a standard XGAP (http://www.xgap.org) or auto-generate a custom version using MOLGENIS with programming interfaces to R-software and web-services or user interfaces for biologists. XGAP has simple load formats for any type of genotype, epigenotype, transcript, protein, metabolite or other phenotype data. Current functionality includes tools ranging from eQTL analysis in mouse to genome-wide association studies in humans. PMID:20214801

  1. Linking MedDRA(®)-Coded Clinical Phenotypes to Biological Mechanisms by the Ontology of Adverse Events: A Pilot Study on Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Zhang, Shelley; Jagannathan, Desikan G; Zaman, Shadia; Burkhart, Keith K; Omenn, Gilbert S; He, Yongqun; Athey, Brian D; Abernethy, Darrell R

    2016-07-01

    A translational bioinformatics challenge exists in connecting population and individual clinical phenotypes in various formats to biological mechanisms. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA(®)) is the default dictionary for adverse event (AE) reporting in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). The ontology of adverse events (OAE) represents AEs as pathological processes occurring after drug exposures. The aim of this work was to establish a semantic framework to link biological mechanisms to phenotypes of AEs by combining OAE with MedDRA(®) in FAERS data analysis. We investigated the AEs associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tyrosine kinases. The five selected TKIs/mAbs (i.e., dasatinib, imatinib, lapatinib, cetuximab, and trastuzumab) are known to induce impaired ventricular function (non-QT) cardiotoxicity. Statistical analysis of FAERS data identified 1053 distinct MedDRA(®) terms significantly associated with TKIs/mAbs, where 884 did not have corresponding OAE terms. We manually annotated these terms, added them to OAE by the standard OAE development strategy, and mapped them to MedDRA(®). The data integration to provide insights into molecular mechanisms of drug-associated AEs was performed by including linkages in OAE for all related AE terms to MedDRA(®) and the existing ontologies, including the human phenotype ontology (HP), Uber anatomy ontology (UBERON), and gene ontology (GO). Sixteen AEs were shared by all five TKIs/mAbs, and each of 17 cardiotoxicity AEs was associated with at least one TKI/mAb. As an example, we analyzed "cardiac failure" using the relations established in OAE with other ontologies and demonstrated that one of the biological processes associated with cardiac failure maps to the genes associated with heart contraction. By expanding the existing OAE ontological design, our TKI use case demonstrated that the combination

  2. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease.

  3. Curing critical links in oscillator networks as power flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohden, Martin; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2017-01-01

    Modern societies crucially depend on the robust supply with electric energy so that blackouts of power grids can have far reaching consequences. Typically, large scale blackouts take place after a cascade of failures: the failure of a single infrastructure component, such as a critical transmission line, results in several subsequent failures that spread across large parts of the network. Improving the robustness of a network to prevent such secondary failures is thus key for assuring a reliable power supply. In this article we analyze the nonlocal rerouting of power flows after transmission line failures for a simplified AC power grid model and compare different strategies to improve network robustness. We identify critical links in the grid and compute alternative pathways to quantify the grid’s redundant capacity and to find bottlenecks along the pathways. Different strategies are developed and tested to increase transmission capacities to restore stability with respect to transmission line failures. We show that local and nonlocal strategies typically perform alike: one can equally well cure critical links by providing backup capacities locally or by extending the capacities of bottleneck links at remote locations.

  4. Linking the Weather Generator with Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, Martin; Farda, Ales; Skalak, Petr; Huth, Radan

    2013-04-01

    One of the downscaling approaches, which transform the raw outputs from the climate models (GCMs or RCMs) into data with more realistic structure, is based on linking the stochastic weather generator with the climate model output. The present contribution, in which the parametric daily surface weather generator (WG) M&Rfi is linked to the RCM output, follows two aims: (1) Validation of the new simulations of the present climate (1961-1990) made by the ALADIN-Climate Regional Climate Model at 25 km resolution. The WG parameters are derived from the RCM-simulated surface weather series and compared to those derived from weather series observed in 125 Czech meteorological stations. The set of WG parameters will include statistics of the surface temperature and precipitation series (including probability of wet day occurrence). (2) Presenting a methodology for linking the WG with RCM output. This methodology, which is based on merging information from observations and RCM, may be interpreted as a downscaling procedure, whose product is a gridded WG capable of producing realistic synthetic multivariate weather series for weather-ungauged locations. In this procedure, WG is calibrated with RCM-simulated multi-variate weather series in the first step, and the grid specific WG parameters are then de-biased by spatially interpolated correction factors based on comparison of WG parameters calibrated with gridded RCM weather series and spatially scarcer observations. The quality of the weather series produced by the resultant gridded WG will be assessed in terms of selected climatic characteristics (focusing on characteristics related to variability and extremes of surface temperature and precipitation). Acknowledgements: The present experiment is made within the frame of projects ALARO-Climate (project P209/11/2405 sponsored by the Czech Science Foundation), WG4VALUE (project LD12029 sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of CR) and VALUE (COST ES 1102

  5. Expanding phenotype of p.Ala140Val mutation in MECP2 in a 4 generation family with X-linked intellectual disability and spasticity.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sophie; Maystadt, Isabelle; Boulanger, Sébastien; Vrielynck, Pascal; Destrée, Anne; Lederer, Damien; Moortgat, Stéphanie

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in MECP2 (MIM #312750), located on Xq28 and encoding a methyl CpG binding protein, are classically associated with Rett syndrome in female patients, with a lethal effect in hemizygous males. However, MECP2 mutations have already been reported in surviving males with severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, or with X-linked intellectual disability associated with psychosis, pyramidal signs, parkinsonian features and macro-orchidism (PPM-X syndrome; MIM3 #300055). Here we report on the identification of the p.Ala140Val mutation in the MECP2 gene in 4 males and 3 females of a large Caucasian family affected with X-linked intellectual disability. Females present with mild cognitive impairment and speech difficulties. Males have moderate intellectual disability, impaired language development, friendly behavior, slowly progressive spastic paraparesis and dystonic movements of the hands. Two of them show microcephaly. The p.Ala140Val mutation is recurrent, as it was already described in 4 families with X-linked mental retardation and in three sporadic male patients with intellectual disability. We further delineate the phenotype associated with the p.Ala140Val mutation, illustrating a variable expressivity even within a given family, and we compare our patients with previous reported cases in the literature.

  6. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-Shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene

    PubMed Central

    Thyssen, Gregory N.; Fang, David D.; Zeng, Linghe; Song, Xianliang; Delhom, Christopher D.; Condon, Tracy L.; Li, Ping; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cotton seed trichomes are the most important source of natural fibers globally. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material, and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im) gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process that was previously shown to involve mitochondrial function in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum. Here, we present the fine genetic mapping of the im locus, gene expression analysis of annotated proteins near the locus, and association analysis of the linked markers. Mapping-by-sequencing identified a 22-bp deletion in a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene that is completely linked to the immature fiber phenotype in 2837 F2 plants, and is absent from all 163 cultivated varieties tested, although other closely linked marker polymorphisms are prevalent in the diversity panel. This frame-shift mutation results in a transcript with two long open reading frames: one containing the N-terminal transit peptide that targets mitochondria, the other containing only the RNA-binding PPR domains, suggesting that a functional PPR protein cannot be targeted to mitochondria in the im mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that PPR gene Gh_A03G0489 is involved in the cotton fiber wall thickening process, and is a promising candidate gene at the im locus. Our findings expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that modulate cotton fiber fineness and maturity, and may facilitate the development of cotton varieties with superior fiber attributes. PMID:27172184

  7. A QTL model to map the common genetic basis for correlative phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Lyu, Yafei; Xu, Fang; Bo, Wenhao; Zhai, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Pang, Xiaoming; Zheng, Bingsong; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    As an important mechanism for adaptation to heterogeneous environment, plastic responses of correlated traits to environmental alteration may also be genetically correlated, but less is known about the underlying genetic basis. We describe a statistical model for mapping specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control the interrelationship of phenotypic plasticity between different traits. The model is constructed by a bivariate mixture setting, implemented with the EM algorithm to estimate the genetic effects of QTLs on correlative plastic response. We provide a series of procedure that test (1) how a QTL controls the phenotypic plasticity of a single trait; and (2) how the QTL determines the correlation of environment-induced changes of different traits. The model is readily extended to test how epistatic interactions among QTLs play a part in the correlations of different plastic traits. The model was validated through computer simulation and used to analyse multi-environment data of genetic mapping in winter wheat, showing its utilization in practice.

  8. Histiocytoid cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome: phenotypes linked by truncating variants in NDUFB11

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Gillian; Homfray, Tessa; Till, Jan; Roses-Noguer, Ferran; Buchan, Rachel J.; Wilkinson, Sam; Wilk, Alicja; Walsh, Roddy; John, Shibu; McKee, Shane; Stewart, Fiona J.; Murday, Victoria; Taylor, Robert W.; Ashworth, Michael; Baksi, A. John; Daubeney, Piers; Prasad, Sanjay; Barton, Paul J.R.; Cook, Stuart A.; Ware, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Variants in NDUFB11, which encodes a structural component of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC), were recently independently reported to cause histiocytoid cardiomyopathy (histiocytoid CM) and microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS syndrome). Here we report an additional case of histiocytoid CM, which carries a de novo nonsense variant in NDUFB11 (ENST00000276062.8: c.262C > T; p.[Arg88*]) identified using whole-exome sequencing (WES) of a family trio. An identical variant has been previously reported in association with MLS syndrome. The case we describe here lacked the diagnostic features of MLS syndrome, but a detailed clinical comparison of the two cases revealed significant phenotypic overlap. Heterozygous variants in HCCS (which encodes an important mitochondrially targeted protein) and COX7B, which, like NDUFB11, encodes a protein of the MRC, have also previously been identified in MLS syndrome including a case with features of both MLS syndrome and histiocytoid CM. However, a systematic review of WES data from previously published histiocytoid CM cases, alongside four additional cases presented here for the first time, did not identify any variants in these genes. We conclude that NDUFB11 variants play a role in the pathogenesis of both histiocytoid CM and MLS and that these disorders are allelic (genetically related). PMID:28050600

  9. The impact of phosphate scarcity on pharmaceutical protein production in S. cerevisiae: linking transcriptomic insights to phenotypic responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The adaptation of unicellular organisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae to alternating nutrient availability is of great fundamental and applied interest, as understanding how eukaryotic cells respond to variations in their nutrient supply has implications spanning from physiological insights to biotechnological applications. Results The impact of a step-wise restricted supply of phosphate on the physiological state of S. cerevisiae cells producing human Insulin was studied. The focus was to determine the changes within the global gene expression of cells being cultured to an industrially relevant high cell density of 33 g/l cell dry weight and under six distinct phosphate concentrations, ranging from 33 mM (unlimited) to 2.6 mM (limited). An increased flux through the secretory pathway, being induced by the PHO circuit during low Pi supplementation, proved to enhance the secretory production of the heterologous protein. The re-distribution of the carbon flux from biomass formation towards increased glycerol production under low phosphate led to increased transcript levels of the insulin gene, which was under the regulation of the TPI1 promoter. Conclusions Our study underlines the dynamic character of adaptive responses of cells towards a change in their nutrient access. The gradual decrease of the phosphate supply resulted in a step-wise modulated phenotypic response, thereby alternating the specific productivity and the secretory flux. Our work emphasizes the importance of reduced phosphate supply for improved secretory production of heterologous proteins. PMID:22151908

  10. Par1b links lumen polarity with LGN–NuMA positioning for distinct epithelial cell division phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Cohen, David; Fernandez, Dawn; Hodgson, Louis; van IJzendoorn, Sven C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Columnar epithelia establish their luminal domains and their mitotic spindles parallel to the basal surface and undergo symmetric cell divisions in which the cleavage furrow bisects the apical domain. Hepatocyte lumina interrupt the lateral domain of neighboring cells perpendicular to two basal domains and their cleavage furrow rarely bifurcates the luminal domains. We determine that the serine/threonine kinase Par1b defines lumen position in concert with the position of the astral microtubule anchoring complex LGN–NuMA to yield the distinct epithelial division phenotypes. Par1b signaling via the extracellular matrix (ECM) in polarizing cells determined RhoA/Rho-kinase activity at cell–cell contact sites. Columnar MDCK and Par1b-depleted hepatocytic HepG2 cells featured high RhoA activity that correlated with robust LGN–NuMA recruitment to the metaphase cortex, spindle alignment with the substratum, and columnar organization. Reduced RhoA activity at the metaphase cortex in HepG2 cells and Par1b-overexpressing MDCK cells correlated with a single or no LGN–NuMA crescent, tilted spindles, and the development of lateral lumen polarity. PMID:24165937

  11. A mathematical model of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Krambeck, Frederick J; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2005-12-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. A mathematical model for the initial stages of this process, up to the first galactosylation of an oligosaccharide, was previously developed by Umana and Bailey (1997) (UB1997). Building on this work, an extended model is developed to include further galactosylation, fucosylation, extension of antennae by N-acetyllactosamine repeats, and sialylation. This allows many more structural features to be predicted. A number of simplifying assumptions are also relaxed to incorporate more variables for the control of glycoforms. The full model generates 7565 oligosaccharide structures in a network of 22,871 reactions. Methods for solving the model for the complete product distribution and adjusting the parameters to match experimental data are also developed. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates is obtained from the previous model and existing literature. Enzyme activities are adjusted to match experimental glycoform distributions for Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO). The model is then used to predict the effect of increasing expression of a target glycoprotein on the product glycoform distribution and evaluate appropriate metabolic engineering strategies to return the glycoform profile to its original distribution pattern. This model may find significant utility in the future to predict glycosylation patterns and direct glycoengineering projects to optimize glycoform distributions.

  12. Dynamic root growth and architecture responses to limiting nutrient availability: linking physiological models and experimentation.

    PubMed

    Postma, Johannes A; Schurr, Ulrich; Fiorani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the study of root phenotypic plasticity in response to sub-optimal environmental factors and the genetic control of these responses have received renewed attention. As a path to increased productivity, in particular for low fertility soils, several applied research projects worldwide target the improvement of crop root traits both in plant breeding and biotechnology contexts. To assist these tasks and address the challenge of optimizing root growth and architecture for enhanced mineral resource use, the development of realistic simulation models is of great importance. We review this research field from a modeling perspective focusing particularly on nutrient acquisition strategies for crop production on low nitrogen and low phosphorous soils. Soil heterogeneity and the dynamics of nutrient availability in the soil pose a challenging environment in which plants have to forage efficiently for nutrients in order to maintain their internal nutrient homeostasis throughout their life cycle. Mathematical models assist in understanding plant growth strategies and associated root phenes that have potential to be tested and introduced in physiological breeding programs. At the same time, we stress that it is necessary to carefully consider model assumptions and development from a whole plant-resource allocation perspective and to introduce or refine modules simulating explicitly root growth and architecture dynamics through ontogeny with reference to key factors that constrain root growth. In this view it is important to understand negative feedbacks such as plant-plant competition. We conclude by briefly touching on available and developing technologies for quantitative root phenotyping from lab to field, from quantification of partial root profiles in the field to 3D reconstruction of whole root systems. Finally, we discuss how these approaches can and should be tightly linked to modeling to explore the root phenome.

  13. Genetic and Environmental Models of Circadian Disruption Link SRC-2 Function to Hepatic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Tiffany; Stashi, Erin; Zhu, Bokai; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Kettner, Nicole M; Gorman, Blythe K; Coarfa, Cristian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the molecular clock, which is regulated by intricate positive feedforward and negative feedback loops, has expanded to include an important metabolic transcriptional coregulator, Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 (SRC-2), that regulates both the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks including the liver. We hypothesized that an environmental uncoupling of the light-dark phases, termed chronic circadian disruption (CCD), would lead to pathology similar to the genetic circadian disruption observed with loss of SRC-2 We found that CCD and ablation of SRC-2 in mice led to a common comorbidity of metabolic syndrome also found in humans with circadian disruption, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The combination of SRC-2(-/-) and CCD results in a more robust phenotype that correlates with human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene signatures. Either CCD or SRC-2 ablation produces an advanced aging phenotype leading to increased mortality consistent with other circadian mutant mouse models. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SRC-2 provides an essential link between the behavioral activities influenced by light cues and the metabolic homeostasis maintained by the liver.

  14. Modeling the human MTM1 p.R69C mutation in murine Mtm1 results in exon 4 skipping and a less severe myotubular myopathy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Christopher R.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Durban, Ashley N.; Marshall, Morgan L.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Snyder, Andrew D.; Naiyer, Nada; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Dowling, James J.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM) is a severe neuromuscular disease of infancy caused by mutations of MTM1, which encodes the phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. The Mtm1 knockout (KO) mouse has a severe phenotype and its short lifespan (8 weeks) makes it a challenge to use as a model in the testing of certain preclinical therapeutics. Many MTM patients succumb early in life, but some have a more favorable prognosis. We used human genotype–phenotype correlation data to develop a myotubularin-deficient mouse model with a less severe phenotype than is seen in Mtm1 KO mice. We modeled the human c.205C>T point mutation in Mtm1 exon 4, which is predicted to introduce the p.R69C missense change in myotubularin. Hemizygous male Mtm1 p.R69C mice develop early muscle atrophy prior to the onset of weakness at 2 months. The median survival period is 66 weeks. Histopathology shows small myofibers with centrally placed nuclei. Myotubularin protein is undetectably low because the introduced c.205C>T base change induced exon 4 skipping in most mRNAs, leading to premature termination of myotubularin translation. Some full-length Mtm1 mRNA bearing the mutation is present, which provides enough myotubularin activity to account for the relatively mild phenotype, as Mtm1 KO and Mtm1 p.R69C mice have similar muscle phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels. These data explain the basis for phenotypic variability among human patients with MTM1 p.R69C mutations and establish the Mtm1 p.R69C mouse as a valuable model for the disease, as its less severe phenotype will expand the scope of testable preclinical therapies. PMID:22068590

  15. Father-offspring phenotypic correlations suggest intralocus sexual conflict for a fitness-linked trait in a wild sexually dimorphic mammal.

    PubMed

    Mainguy, Julien; Côté, Steeve D; Festa-Bianchet, Marco; Coltman, David W

    2009-11-22

    In sexually dimorphic and polygynous mammals, sexual selection often favours large males with well-developed weaponry, as these secondary sexual characters confer advantages in intrasexual competition and are often preferred by females. Little is known, however, about the effects of sexually selected paternal traits on offspring phenotype in wild mammals, especially when considering that shared phenotypic traits and selection can also differ greatly between genders. Here, we conducted molecular parentage analyses in a long-term study population of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), an ungulate exhibiting high sexual dimorphism in mass, to first assess the determinants of yearly reproductive success (YRS) in males. We then examined the effects of paternal characteristics on offspring mass at 1 year of age. Paternity was highly skewed, with 9 per cent of 57 males siring 51 per cent of 96 offspring assigned over 12 years. Male YRS increased with age until apparent reproductive senescence at 9 years, but mass was a stronger determinant of siring success than age, horn length or social rank. Mass of sons increased with paternal mass, but the mass of daughters was negatively related to that of their father, a finding consistent with recent theory on intralocus sexual conflict. Because early differences in mass persisted to early adulthood, sex-specific effects of paternal mass can have important fitness consequences, as adult mass is positively linked with reproduction in both sexes. Divergent father-offspring phenotypic correlations may partly explain the maintenance of sexual dimorphism in mountain goats and the large variance observed for this homologous trait within each gender in polygynous mammals.

  16. Father–offspring phenotypic correlations suggest intralocus sexual conflict for a fitness-linked trait in a wild sexually dimorphic mammal

    PubMed Central

    Mainguy, Julien; Côté, Steeve D.; Festa-Bianchet, Marco; Coltman, David W.

    2009-01-01

    In sexually dimorphic and polygynous mammals, sexual selection often favours large males with well-developed weaponry, as these secondary sexual characters confer advantages in intrasexual competition and are often preferred by females. Little is known, however, about the effects of sexually selected paternal traits on offspring phenotype in wild mammals, especially when considering that shared phenotypic traits and selection can also differ greatly between genders. Here, we conducted molecular parentage analyses in a long-term study population of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), an ungulate exhibiting high sexual dimorphism in mass, to first assess the determinants of yearly reproductive success (YRS) in males. We then examined the effects of paternal characteristics on offspring mass at 1 year of age. Paternity was highly skewed, with 9 per cent of 57 males siring 51 per cent of 96 offspring assigned over 12 years. Male YRS increased with age until apparent reproductive senescence at 9 years, but mass was a stronger determinant of siring success than age, horn length or social rank. Mass of sons increased with paternal mass, but the mass of daughters was negatively related to that of their father, a finding consistent with recent theory on intralocus sexual conflict. Because early differences in mass persisted to early adulthood, sex-specific effects of paternal mass can have important fitness consequences, as adult mass is positively linked with reproduction in both sexes. Divergent father–offspring phenotypic correlations may partly explain the maintenance of sexual dimorphism in mountain goats and the large variance observed for this homologous trait within each gender in polygynous mammals. PMID:19740880

  17. Four novel connexin 32 mutations in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Phenotypic variability and central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Karadima, Georgia; Koutsis, Georgios; Raftopoulou, Maria; Floroskufi, Paraskewi; Karletidi, Karolina-Maria; Panas, Marios

    2014-06-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, the most common hereditary neuropathy, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. X-linked CMT (CMTX) is usually caused by mutations in the gap junction protein b 1 gene (GJB1) coding for connexin 32 (Cx32). The clinical manifestations of CMTX are characterized by significant variability, with some patients exhibiting central nervous system (CNS) involvement. We report four novel mutations in GJB1, c.191G>A (p.Cys64Tyr), c.508G>T (p.Val170Phe), c.778A>G (p.Lys260Glu) and c.300C>G (p.His100Gln) identified in four unrelated Greek families. These mutations were characterized by variable phenotypic expression, including a family with the Roussy-Lévy syndrome, and three of them were associated with mild clinical CNS manifestations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R.; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  19. X-linked borderline mental retardation with prominent behavioral disturbance: Phenotype, genetic localization, and evidence for disturbed monoamine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G.; Nelen, M.R.; Zandvoort, P. van; Abeling, N.G.G.M.; Gennip, A.H. van; Ropers, H.H.; Oost, B.A. van ); Wolters, E.C.; Kuiper, M.A. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors have identified a large Dutch kindred with a new form of X-linked nondysmorphic mild mental retardation. All affected males in this family show very characteristic abnormal behavior, in particular aggressive and sometimes violent behavior. Other types of impulsive behavior include arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Attempted suicide has been reported in a single case. The locus for this disorder could be assigned to the Xp11-21 interval between DXS7 and DXS77 by linkage analysis using markers spanning the X chromosome. A maximal multipoint lod score of 3.69 was obtained at the monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) monoamine metabolism. These data are compatible with a primary defect in the structural gene for MAOA and/or monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB). Normal platelet MAOB activity suggests that the unusual behavior pattern in this family may be caused by isolated MAOA deficiency. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. The Hairless Stem Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium barbadense) Is Linked to a Copia-Like Retrotransposon Insertion in a Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper Gene (HD1)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mingquan; Ye, Wuwei; Lin, Lifeng; He, Shae; Du, Xiongming; Chen, Aiqun; Cao, Yuefen; Qin, Yuan; Yang, Fen; Jiang, Yurong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xiyin; Paterson, Andrew H.; Rong, Junkang

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium) stem trichomes are mostly single cells that arise from stem epidermal cells. In this study, a homeodomain-leucine zipper gene (HD1) was found to cosegregate with the dominant trichome locus previously designated as T1 and mapped to chromosome 6. Characterization of HD1 orthologs revealed that the absence of stem trichomes in modern Gossypium barbadense varieties is linked to a large retrotransposon insertion in the ninth exon, 2565 bp downstream from the initial codon in the At subgenome HD1 gene (At-GbHD1). In both the At and Dt subgenomes, reduced transcription of GbHD1 genes is caused by this insertion. The disruption of At-HD1 further affects the expression of downstream GbMYB25 and GbHOX3 genes. Analyses of primitive cultivated accessions identified another retrotransposon insertion event in the sixth exon of At-GbHD1 that might predate the previously identified retrotransposon in modern varieties. Although both retrotransposon insertions results in similar phenotypic changes, the timing of these two retrotransposon insertion events fits well with our current understanding of the history of cotton speciation and dispersal. Taken together, the results of genetics mapping, gene expression and association analyses suggest that GbHD1 is an important component that controls stem trichome development and is a promising candidate gene for the T1 locus. The interspecific phenotypic difference in stem trichome traits also may be attributable to HD1 inactivation associated with retrotransposon insertion. PMID:26133897

  1. The Hairless Stem Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium barbadense) Is Linked to a Copia-Like Retrotransposon Insertion in a Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper Gene (HD1).

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingquan; Ye, Wuwei; Lin, Lifeng; He, Shae; Du, Xiongming; Chen, Aiqun; Cao, Yuefen; Qin, Yuan; Yang, Fen; Jiang, Yurong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xiyin; Paterson, Andrew H; Rong, Junkang

    2015-09-01

    Cotton (Gossypium) stem trichomes are mostly single cells that arise from stem epidermal cells. In this study, a homeodomain-leucine zipper gene (HD1) was found to cosegregate with the dominant trichome locus previously designated as T1 and mapped to chromosome 6. Characterization of HD1 orthologs revealed that the absence of stem trichomes in modern Gossypium barbadense varieties is linked to a large retrotransposon insertion in the ninth exon, 2565 bp downstream from the initial codon in the At subgenome HD1 gene (At-GbHD1). In both the At and Dt subgenomes, reduced transcription of GbHD1 genes is caused by this insertion. The disruption of At-HD1 further affects the expression of downstream GbMYB25 and GbHOX3 genes. Analyses of primitive cultivated accessions identified another retrotransposon insertion event in the sixth exon of At-GbHD1 that might predate the previously identified retrotransposon in modern varieties. Although both retrotransposon insertions results in similar phenotypic changes, the timing of these two retrotransposon insertion events fits well with our current understanding of the history of cotton speciation and dispersal. Taken together, the results of genetics mapping, gene expression and association analyses suggest that GbHD1 is an important component that controls stem trichome development and is a promising candidate gene for the T1 locus. The interspecific phenotypic difference in stem trichome traits also may be attributable to HD1 inactivation associated with retrotransposon insertion.

  2. miR-199a Links MeCP2 with mTOR Signaling and Its Dysregulation Leads to Rett Syndrome Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Keita; Irie, Koichiro; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Egashira, Yoshihiro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Itoh, Masayuki; Uesaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Takuya; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Takamori, Shigeo; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2015-09-22

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by MECP2 mutations. Although emerging evidence suggests that MeCP2 deficiency is associated with dysregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions as a hub for various signaling pathways, the mechanism underlying this association and the molecular pathophysiology of RTT remain elusive. We show here that MeCP2 promotes the posttranscriptional processing of particular microRNAs (miRNAs) as a component of the microprocessor Drosha complex. Among the MeCP2-regulated miRNAs, we found that miR-199a positively controls mTOR signaling by targeting inhibitors for mTOR signaling. miR-199a and its targets have opposite effects on mTOR activity, ameliorating and inducing RTT neuronal phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, genetic deletion of miR-199a-2 led to a reduction of mTOR activity in the brain and recapitulated numerous RTT phenotypes in mice. Together, these findings establish miR-199a as a critical downstream target of MeCP2 in RTT pathogenesis by linking MeCP2 with mTOR signaling.

  3. Stochastic modeling and experimental analysis of phenotypic switching and survival of cancer cells under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Kumar, Niraj; Sundaram, Bala; Celli, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Rahul

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is critical to their survival under stress. A significant contribution to heterogeneity of cancer calls derives from the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a conserved cellular program that is crucial for embryonic development. Several studies have investigated the role of EMT in growth of early stage tumors into invasive malignancies. Also, EMT has been closely associated with the acquisition of chemoresistance properties in cancer cells. Motivated by these studies, we analyze multi-phenotype stochastic models of the evolution of cancers cell populations under stress. We derive analytical results for time-dependent probability distributions that provide insights into the competing rates underlying phenotypic switching (e.g. during EMT) and the corresponding survival of cancer cells. Experimentally, we evaluate these model-based predictions by imaging human pancreatic cancer cell lines grown with and without cytotoxic agents and measure growth kinetics, survival, morphological changes and (terminal evaluation of) biomarkers with associated epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The results derived suggest approaches for distinguishing between adaptation and selection scenarios for survival in the presence of external stresses.

  4. Design optimisation for pharmacokinetic modeling of a cocktail of phenotyping drugs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bénech, Henri; Delaforge, Marcel; Lenuzza, Natacha

    2016-01-01

    Our paper proposes a methodological strategy to select optimal sampling designs for phenotyping studies including a cocktail of drugs. A cocktail approach is of high interest to determine the simultaneous activity of enzymes responsible for drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics, therefore useful in anticipating drug-drug interactions and in personalized medicine. Phenotyping indexes, which are area under the concentration-time curves, can be derived from a few samples using nonlinear mixed effect models and maximum a posteriori estimation. Because of clinical constraints in phenotyping studies, the number of samples that can be collected in individuals is limited and the sampling times must be as flexible as possible. Therefore to optimize joint design for several drugs (i.e., to determine a compromise between informative times that best characterize each drug's kinetics), we proposed to use a compound optimality criterion based on the expected population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effect models. This criterion allows weighting different models, which might be useful to take into account the importance accorded to each target in a phenotyping test. We also computed windows around the optimal times based on recursive random sampling and Monte-Carlo simulation while maintaining a reasonable level of efficiency for parameter estimation. We illustrated this strategy for two drugs often included in phenotyping cocktails, midazolam (probe for CYP3A) and digoxin (P-glycoprotein), based on the data of a previous study, and were able to find a sparse and flexible design. The obtained design was evaluated by clinical trial simulations and shown to be efficient for the estimation of population and individual parameters. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Mouse models of frontotemporal dementia: A comparison of phenotypes with clinical symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Irish, Muireann; van Eersel, Janet; Ittner, Arne; Ke, Yazi D; Volkerling, Alexander; van der Hoven, Julia; Tanaka, Kimi; Karl, Tim; Kassiou, Michael; Kril, Jillian J; Piguet, Olivier; Götz, Jürgen; Kiernan, Matthew C; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Ittner, Lars M

    2017-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common cause of young onset dementia. It is increasingly recognized that there is a clinical continuum between FTD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At a clinical, pathological and genetic level there is much heterogeneity in FTD, meaning that our understanding of this condition, pathophysiology and development of treatments has been limited. A number of mouse models focusing predominantly on recapitulating neuropathological and molecular changes of disease have been developed, with most transgenic lines expressing a single specific protein or genetic mutation. Together with the species-typical presentation of functional deficits, this makes the direct translation of results from these models to humans difficult. However, understanding the phenotypical presentations in mice and how they relate to clinical symptomology in humans is essential for advancing translation. Here we review current mouse models in FTD and compare their phenotype to the clinical presentation in patients.

  6. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database: new support for human disease models, mutation details, gene expression phenotypes and searching

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Douglas G.; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Eagle, Anne; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Kalita, Patrick; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2017-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for zebrafish (Danio rerio) genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators provide expert manual curation and integration of comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenic constructs and lines, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, TALENs, CRISPRs, antibodies, anatomical structures, models of human disease and publications. We integrate curated, directly submitted, and collaboratively generated data, making these available to zebrafish research community. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are superbly suited for rapid generation of sequence-targeted mutant lines, characterization of phenotypes including gene expression patterns, and generation of human disease models. The recent rapid adoption of zebrafish as human disease models is making management of these data particularly important to both the research and clinical communities. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN including use of the zebrafish experimental conditions ontology, ‘Fish’ records in the ZFIN database, support for gene expression phenotypes, models of human disease, mutation details at the DNA, RNA and protein levels, and updates to the ZFIN single box search. PMID:27899582

  7. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database: new support for human disease models, mutation details, gene expression phenotypes and searching.

    PubMed

    Howe, Douglas G; Bradford, Yvonne M; Eagle, Anne; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Kalita, Patrick; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2017-01-04

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for zebrafish (Danio rerio) genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators provide expert manual curation and integration of comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenic constructs and lines, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, TALENs, CRISPRs, antibodies, anatomical structures, models of human disease and publications. We integrate curated, directly submitted, and collaboratively generated data, making these available to zebrafish research community. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are superbly suited for rapid generation of sequence-targeted mutant lines, characterization of phenotypes including gene expression patterns, and generation of human disease models. The recent rapid adoption of zebrafish as human disease models is making management of these data particularly important to both the research and clinical communities. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN including use of the zebrafish experimental conditions ontology, 'Fish' records in the ZFIN database, support for gene expression phenotypes, models of human disease, mutation details at the DNA, RNA and protein levels, and updates to the ZFIN single box search.

  8. New approaches to the representation and analysis of phenotype knowledge in human diseases and their animal models.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Paul N; Sundberg, John P; Hoehndorf, Robert; Gkoutos, Georgios V

    2011-09-01

    The systematic investigation of the phenotypes associated with genotypes in model organisms holds the promise of revealing genotype-phenotype relations directly and without additional, intermediate inferences. Large-scale projects are now underway to catalog the complete phenome of a species, notably the mouse. With the increasing amount of phenotype information becoming available, a major challenge that biology faces today is the systematic analysis of this information and the translation of research results across species and into an improved understanding of human disease. The challenge is to integrate and combine phenotype descriptions within a species and to systematically relate them to phenotype descriptions in other species, in order to form a comprehensive understanding of the relations between those phenotypes and the genotypes involved in human disease. We distinguish between two major approaches for comparative phenotype analyses: the first relies on evolutionary relations to bridge the species gap, while the other approach compares phenotypes directly. In particular, the direct comparison of phenotypes relies heavily on the quality and coherence of phenotype and disease databases. We discuss major achievements and future challenges for these databases in light of their potential to contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease. In particular, we discuss how the use of ontologies and automated reasoning can significantly contribute to the analysis of phenotypes and demonstrate their potential for enabling translational research.

  9. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  10. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  11. Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, James B.; Anderson, T. Michael; Seabloom, Eric W.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Adler, Peter B.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M.; Pärtel, Meelis; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Damschen, Ellen I.; Davies, Kendi F.; Fay, Philip A.; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hector, Andy; Knops, Johannes M. H.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Smith, Melinda D.

    2016-01-01

    How ecosystem productivity and species richness are interrelated is one of the most debated subjects in the history of ecology. Decades of intensive study have yet to discern the actual mechanisms behind observed global patterns. Here, by integrating the predictions from multiple theories into a single model and using data from 1,126 grassland plots spanning five continents, we detect the clear signals of numerous underlying mechanisms linking productivity and richness. We find that an integrative model has substantially higher explanatory power than traditional bivariate analyses. In addition, the specific results unveil several surprising findings that conflict with classical models. These include the isolation of a strong and consistent enhancement of productivity by richness, an effect in striking contrast with superficial data patterns. Also revealed is a consistent importance of competition across the full range of productivity values, in direct conflict with some (but not all) proposed models. The promotion of local richness by macroecological gradients in climatic favourability, generally seen as a competing hypothesis, is also found to be important in our analysis. The results demonstrate that an integrative modelling approach leads to a major advance in our ability to discern the underlying processes operating in ecological systems.

  12. Redefining the Pediatric Phenotype of X-Linked Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 (MCT8) Deficiency: Implications for Diagnosis and Therapies.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Maria Gisele; Lehman, Rebecca K; Bonilha, Leonardo; Holden, Kenton R

    2015-10-01

    X-linked monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) deficiency results from a loss-of-function mutation in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene, located on chromosome Xq13.2 (Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome). Affected boys present early in life with neurodevelopment delays but have pleasant dispositions and commonly have elevated serum triiodothyronine. They also have marked axial hypotonia and quadriparesis but surprisingly little spasticity early in their disease course. They do, however, have subtle involuntary movements, most often dystonia. The combination of hypotonia and dystonia presents a neurorehabilitation challenge and explains why spasticity-directed therapies have commonly produced suboptimal responses. Our aim was to better define the spectrum of motor disability and to elucidate the neuroanatomic basis of the motor impairments seen in MCT8 deficiency using clinical observation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of 6 affected pediatric patients. Our findings identified potential imaging biomarkers and suggest that rehabilitation efforts targeting dystonia may be more beneficial than those targeting spasticity in the prepubertal pediatric MCT8 deficiency population.

  13. X-linked borderline mental retardation with prominent behavioral disturbance: phenotype, genetic localization, and evidence for disturbed monoamine metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, H G; Nelen, M R; van Zandvoort, P; Abeling, N G; van Gennip, A H; Wolters, E C; Kuiper, M A; Ropers, H H; van Oost, B A

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a large Dutch kindred with a new form of X-linked nondysmorphic mild mental retardation. All affected males in this family show very characteristic abnormal behavior, in particular aggressive and sometimes violent behavior. Other types of impulsive behavior include arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Attempted suicide has been reported in a single case. The locus for this disorder could be assigned to the Xp11-21 interval between DXS7 and DXS77 by linkage analysis using markers spanning the X chromosome. A maximal multipoint lod score of 3.69 was obtained at the monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) locus in Xp11.23-11.4. Results of 24-h urine analysis in three affected males indicated a marked disturbance of monoamine metabolism. These data are compatible with a primary defect in the structural gene for MAOA and/or monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB). Normal platelet MAOB activity suggests that the unusual behavior pattern in this family may be caused by isolated MAOA deficiency. PMID:8503438

  14. Delineation of the KIAA2022 mutation phenotype: two patients with X-linked intellectual disability and distinctive features.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Naruto, Takuya; Ida, Kazumi; Enomoto, Yumi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Wada, Takahito; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enabled the screening for a causative mutation in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID). We identified KIAA2022 mutations in two unrelated male patients by targeted sequencing. We selected 13 Japanese male patients with severe intellectual disability (ID), including four sibling patients and nine sporadic patients. Two of thirteen had a KIAA2022 mutation. Patient 1 was a 3-year-old boy. He had severe ID with autistic behavior and hypotonia. Patient 2 was a 5-year-old boy. He also had severe ID with autistic behavior, hypotonia, central hypothyroidism, and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome. Both patients revealed consistent distinctive features, including upswept hair, narrow forehead, downslanting eyebrows, wide palpebral fissures, long nose, hypoplastic alae nasi, open mouth, and large ears. De novo KIAA2022 mutations (p.Q705X in Patient 1, p.R322X in Patient 2) were detected by targeted sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. KIAA2022 mutations and alterations have been reported in only four families with nonsyndromic ID and epilepsy. KIAA2022 is highly expressed in the fetal and adult brain and plays a crucial role in neuronal development. These additional patients support the evidence that KIAA2022 is a causative gene for XLID. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Modeling lineage and phenotypic diversification in the New World monkey (Platyrrhini, Primates) radiation.

    PubMed

    Aristide, Leandro; Rosenberger, Alfred L; Tejedor, Marcelo F; Perez, S Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive radiations that have taken place in the distant past can now be more thoroughly studied with the availability of large molecular phylogenies and comparative data drawn from extant and fossil species. Platyrrhines are a good example of a major mammalian evolutionary radiation confined to a single continent, involving a relatively large temporal scale and documented by a relatively small but informative fossil record. Here, we present comparative evidence using data on extant and fossil species to explore alternative evolutionary models in an effort to better understand the process of platyrrhine lineage and phenotypic diversification. Specifically, we compare the likelihood of null models of lineage and phenotypic diversification versus various models of adaptive evolution. Moreover, we statistically explore the main ecological dimension behind the platyrrhine diversification. Contrary to the previous proposals, our study did not find evidence of a rapid lineage accumulation in the phylogenetic tree of extant platyrrhine species. However, the fossil-based diversity curve seems to show a slowdown in diversification rates toward present times. This also suggests an early high rate of extinction among lineages within crown Platyrrhini. Finally, our analyses support the hypothesis that the platyrrhine phenotypic diversification appears to be characterized by an early and profound differentiation in body size related to a multidimensional niche model, followed by little subsequent change (i.e., stasis). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Fank, J.

    2012-04-01

    The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the mentioned procedure with a focus on process modelling. It deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences. A soil function modelling with an adapted model parameterisation based on data of ground penetration radar (GPR) and conductivity (EM38) was realized. This study shows an approach to handle heterogeneity of soil properties with geophysical data used for biomass production modelling. The Austrian field site Wagna is characterised by highly heterogenic soil with fluvioglacial gravel sediments. The variation of thickness of topsoil above a sandy subsoil with gravels strongly influences the soil water balance. EM38, mounted on a mobile platform, enables to rapidly scan large areas whereas GPR requires a greater logistical effort. However, GPR can detect exact soil horizon depth between topsoil and subsoil, the combination of both results in a detailed large scale soil map. The combined plot-specific GPR and field site EM38 measurements extends the soil input data and improves the model performance of CANDY PLUS for plant biomass production (Krüger et al. 2011). The example demonstrates how geophysics provides a surplus of data for agroecosystem modelling which identifies and contributes alternative options for agricultural management decisions. iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission

  17. The Linked Dual Representation model of vocal perception and production

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Sean; Moreno, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The voice is one of the most important media for communication, yet there is a wide range of abilities in both the perception and production of the voice. In this article, we review this range of abilities, focusing on pitch accuracy as a particularly informative case, and look at the factors underlying these abilities. Several classes of models have been posited describing the relationship between vocal perception and production, and we review the evidence for and against each class of model. We look at how the voice is different from other musical instruments and review evidence about both the association and the dissociation between vocal perception and production abilities. Finally, we introduce the Linked Dual Representation (LDR) model, a new approach which can account for the broad patterns in prior findings, including trends in the data which might seem to be countervailing. We discuss how this model interacts with higher-order cognition and examine its predictions about several aspects of vocal perception and production. PMID:24204360

  18. Linking an ecosystem model and a landscape model to study forest species response to climate warming

    Treesearch

    Hong S. He; David J. Mladenoff; Thomas R. Crow

    1999-01-01

    No single model can address forest change from single tree to regional scales. We discuss a framework linking an ecosystem process model {LINKAGES) with a spatial landscape model (LANDIS) to examine forest species responses to climate warming for a large, heterogeneous landscape in northern Wisconsin, USA. Individual species response at the ecosystem scale was...

  19. Link of dysfunctional attitudes with the negative self-model.

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichi; Suzuki, Akihito; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Enokido, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Beck's cognitive theory postulates that dysfunctional attitudes predisposing to depression are formed by early negative experiences. Meanwhile, Bowlby's attachment theory contends that distorted working models built through insecure attachment relationships lead to various psychopathologies such as depression. The present study examined the correlations of dysfunctional attitudes about achievement, dependency, and self-control with working models of the self and other, and tried to promote understanding of those dysfunctional attitudes from an attachment perspective. The subjects were 591 Japanese healthy volunteers. Dysfunctional attitudes about achievement, dependency, and self-control were evaluated by the corresponding subscales of the 24-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, and working models of the self and other were assessed by the relationship scales questionnaire. The scores of the achievement (β = -0.26, P < 0.001), dependency (β = -0.41, P < 0.001), and self-control (β = -0.14, P < 0.01) subscales had negative correlations with the self-model score, suggesting the connections of all clusters of dysfunctional attitudes with the negative self-model. The score of the dependency subscale (β = 0.21, P < 0.001) had a positive correlation with the other-model score, suggesting the connection of this cluster of dysfunctional attitudes with the positive other-model. Meanwhile, the scores of the achievement (β = -0.17, P < 0.001) and self-control (β = -0.13, P < 0.01) subscales had negative correlations with the other-model score, suggesting the connections of these clusters of dysfunctional attitudes with the negative other-model. The present study suggests that dysfunctional attitudes as a whole are linked with the negative self-model built through negative attachment experiences, while the content specificity of each cluster is related to the differential correlations with the other-model.

  20. Full Spectrum of Postnatal Tooth Phenotypes in a Novel Irf6 Cleft Lip Model.

    PubMed

    Chu, E Y; Tamasas, B; Fong, H; Foster, B L; LaCourse, M R; Tran, A B; Martin, J F; Schutte, B C; Somerman, M J; Cox, T C

    2016-10-01

    Clefting of the lip, with or without palatal involvement (CLP), is associated with a higher incidence of developmental tooth abnormalities, including hypodontia and supernumerary teeth, aberrant crown and root morphologies, and enamel defects, although the underlying mechanistic link is poorly understood. As most CLP genes are expressed throughout the oral epithelium, the authors hypothesized that the expression of CLP genes may persist in the dental epithelium and thus, in addition to their earlier role in labiopalatine development, may play an important functional role in subsequent tooth patterning and amelogenesis. To address this, the authors generated a unique conditional knockout model involving the major CLP gene, Irf6, that overcomes the previously reported perinatal lethality to enable assessment of any posteruption dental phenotypes. A dental epithelium-specific Irf6 conditional knockout (Irf6-cKO) mouse was generated via a Pitx2-Cre driver line. Dental development was analyzed by microcomputed tomography, scanning electron microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Irf6-cKO mice displayed variable hypodontia, occasional supernumerary incisors and molars, as well as crown and root patterning anomalies, including peg-shaped first molars and taurodontic and C-shaped mandibular second molars. Enamel density was reduced in preeruption Irf6-cKO mice, and some shearing of enamel rods was noted in posteruption incisors. There was also rapid attrition of Irf6-cKO molars following eruption. Histologically, Irf6-cKO ameloblasts exhibited disturbances in adhesion and polarity, and delayed enamel formation was confirmed immunohistochemically. Altered structure of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath was also observed. These data support a role for IRF6 in tooth number, crown and root morphology and amelogenesis that is likely due to a functional role of Irf6 in organization and polarity of epithelial cell types. This data

  1. Effects of linking a soil-water-balance model with a groundwater-flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Peterson, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    A previously published regional groundwater-flow model in north-central Nebraska was sequentially linked with the recently developed soil-water-balance (SWB) model to analyze effects to groundwater-flow model parameters and calibration results. The linked models provided a more detailed spatial and temporal distribution of simulated recharge based on hydrologic processes, improvement of simulated groundwater-level changes and base flows at specific sites in agricultural areas, and a physically based assessment of the relative magnitude of recharge for grassland, nonirrigated cropland, and irrigated cropland areas. Root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the simulated and estimated or measured target values for the previously published model and linked models were relatively similar and did not improve for all types of calibration targets. However, without any adjustment to the SWB-generated recharge, the RMS difference between simulated and estimated base-flow target values for the groundwater-flow model was slightly smaller than for the previously published model, possibly indicating that the volume of recharge simulated by the SWB code was closer to actual hydrogeologic conditions than the previously published model provided. Groundwater-level and base-flow hydrographs showed that temporal patterns of simulated groundwater levels and base flows were more accurate for the linked models than for the previously published model at several sites, particularly in agricultural areas.

  2. Modelling mechanical and chemical treatment of biofilms with two phenotypic resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Szomolay, Barbara; Cogan, N G

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms are notoriously difficult to eradicate owing to a number of tolerance mechanisms including physiological, physical, genotypic and phenotypic variations. Recent focus has shifted to phenotypic tolerance which is apparently the main defence mechanism that protects biofilms against long-term disinfection. Previous mathematical models have addressed phenotypic dynamics by considering adaptive response and persister formation separately. The aim of this manuscript is to consider a combined model to understand the interplay between these two defence mechanisms. We find that each mechanism protects the biofilm differently and hence responds differently to antibiotic challenge. We focus on on-off dosing that has been shown to eradicate each subpopulation alone. Our results indicate that the combined resistance exhibits qualitatively similar behavior to persister formation for short dosing times, and similar behavior to adaptive resistance for long dosing times. To further contrast the behavior of the model under different parameter regimes, we explore two classes of combination treatment that include mechanical and chemical treatments. The examples focus on different applications - pipe clearance and dental carrie prevention - and demonstrate the underlying conclusion that adaptive and persister mechanism provide protection for different challenges and are thus not redundant systems and each may require specific treatment plans. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Pharmacological HIF2α inhibition improves VHL disease-associated phenotypes in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Metelo, Ana Martins; Noonan, Haley R; Li, Xiang; Jin, Youngnam; Baker, Rania; Kamentsky, Lee; Zhang, Yiyun; van Rooijen, Ellen; Shin, Jordan; Carpenter, Anne E; Yeh, Jing-Ruey; Peterson, Randall T; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2015-05-01

    Patients with a germline mutation in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) develop renal cell cancers and hypervascular tumors of the brain, adrenal glands, and pancreas as well as erythrocytosis. These phenotypes are driven by aberrant expression of HIF2α, which induces expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and red blood cell production. Currently, there are no effective treatments available for VHL disease. Here, using an animal model of VHL, we report a marked improvement of VHL-associated phenotypes following treatment with HIF2α inhibitors. Inactivation of vhl in zebrafish led to constitutive activation of HIF2α orthologs and modeled several aspects of the human disease, including erythrocytosis, pathologic angiogenesis in the brain and retina, and aberrant kidney and liver proliferation. Treatment of vhl(-/-) mutant embryos with HIF2α-specific inhibitors downregulated Hif target gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, improved abnormal hematopoiesis, and substantially suppressed erythrocytosis and angiogenic sprouting. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of HIF2α reversed the compromised cardiac contractility of vhl(-/-) embryos and partially rescued early lethality. This study demonstrates that small-molecule targeting of HIF2α improves VHL-related phenotypes in a vertebrate animal model and supports further exploration of this strategy for treating VHL disease.

  4. Pharmacological HIF2α inhibition improves VHL disease–associated phenotypes in zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Metelo, Ana Martins; Noonan, Haley R.; Li, Xiang; Jin, Youngnam; Baker, Rania; Kamentsky, Lee; Zhang, Yiyun; van Rooijen, Ellen; Shin, Jordan; Carpenter, Anne E.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey; Peterson, Randall T.; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a germline mutation in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) develop renal cell cancers and hypervascular tumors of the brain, adrenal glands, and pancreas as well as erythrocytosis. These phenotypes are driven by aberrant expression of HIF2α, which induces expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and red blood cell production. Currently, there are no effective treatments available for VHL disease. Here, using an animal model of VHL, we report a marked improvement of VHL-associated phenotypes following treatment with HIF2α inhibitors. Inactivation of vhl in zebrafish led to constitutive activation of HIF2α orthologs and modeled several aspects of the human disease, including erythrocytosis, pathologic angiogenesis in the brain and retina, and aberrant kidney and liver proliferation. Treatment of vhl–/– mutant embryos with HIF2α-specific inhibitors downregulated Hif target gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, improved abnormal hematopoiesis, and substantially suppressed erythrocytosis and angiogenic sprouting. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of HIF2α reversed the compromised cardiac contractility of vhl–/– embryos and partially rescued early lethality. This study demonstrates that small-molecule targeting of HIF2α improves VHL-related phenotypes in a vertebrate animal model and supports further exploration of this strategy for treating VHL disease. PMID:25866969

  5. Effect of diet on the survival and phenotype of a mouse model for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Butchbach, Matthew E R; Rose, Ferrill F; Rhoades, Sarah; Marston, John; McCrone, John T; Sinnott, Rachel; Lorson, Christian L

    2010-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading genetic cause of infant death. Patients with SMA lose alpha-motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord which leads to skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy. SMA is the result of reduction in Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) expression. Transgenic mouse models of SMA have been generated and are extremely useful in understanding the mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration in SMA and in developing new therapeutic candidates for SMA patients. Several research groups have reported varying average lifespans of SMNDelta7 SMA mice (SMN2(+/+);SMNDelta7(+/+);mSmn(-/-)), the most commonly used mouse model for preclinical therapeutic candidate testing. One environmental factor that varied between research groups was maternal diet. In this study, we compared the effects of two different commercially available rodent chows (PicoLab20 Mouse diet and Harlan-Teklad 22/5 diet) on the survival and motor phenotype of the SMNDelta7 mouse model of SMA. Specifically, the PicoLab20 diet significantly extends the average lifespan of the SMNDelta7 SMA mice by approximately 25% and improved the motor phenotype as compared to the Harlan diet. These findings indicate that maternal diet alone can have considerable impact on the SMA phenotype. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Generating Phenotypical Erroneous Human Behavior to Evaluate Human-automation Interaction Using Model Checking

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Matthew L.; Bass, Ellen J.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2012-01-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in unanticipated ways. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. Model-driven design and analysis techniques provide engineers with formal methods tools and techniques capable of evaluating how human behavior can contribute to system failures. This paper presents a novel method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both normative and erroneous human behavior from normative task models. The generated erroneous behavior is capable of replicating Hollnagel’s zero-order phenotypes of erroneous action for omissions, jumps, repetitions, and intrusions. Multiple phenotypical acts can occur in sequence, thus allowing for the generation of higher order phenotypes. The task behavior model pattern capable of generating erroneous behavior can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human-automation interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. We present benchmarks related to the size of the statespace and verification time of models to show how the erroneous human behavior generation process scales. We demonstrate the method with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. A potential problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. A design intervention is presented which prevents this problem from occurring. We discuss how our method could be used to evaluate larger applications and recommend future paths of development. PMID:23105914

  7. Linking GIS and storm water modeling for emergency risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Many emergencies involve the deposition of chemical contaminants on land either as a direct event or as a secondary byproduct. GIS can be useful in estimating the initial deposition area. Chemical product attribute data bases can be accessed to determine the degree that the contaminants might be transportable in a water medium. An important issue is to estimate the potential impact of the deposition on surface and subsurface water flows. This particularly important since millions of people rely on subsurface ground water as their main source of potable water. Thus, a modeling system is needed by planners and emergency managers to assess the potential for short and long term risks to communities due to storm water transport of deposited contaminants. GIS itself cannot provide the complete analysis. A prototype system to assist in estimating the flows of contaminants related to an emergency has been developed by linking an Arc/Info database, Digital Terrain Model, and SWMM the storm water management modeling system. This system also has important planning applications in assessing alternative land development plans for their impact on ground water recharge and management of storm water.

  8. Linking Geomechanical Models with Observations of Microseismicity during CCS Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdon, J.; Kendall, J.; White, D.

    2012-12-01

    During CO2 injection for the purposes of carbon capture and storage (CCS), injection-induced fracturing of the overburden represents a key risk to storage integrity. Fractures in a caprock provide a pathway along which buoyant CO2 can rise and escape the storage zone. Therefore the ability to link field-scale geomechanical models with field geophysical observations is of paramount importance to guarantee secure CO2 storage. Accurate location of microseismic events identifies where brittle failure has occurred on fracture planes. This is a manifestation of the deformation induced by CO2 injection. As the pore pressure is increased during injection, effective stress is decreased, leading to inflation of the reservoir and deformation of surrounding rocks, which creates microseismicity. The deformation induced by injection can be simulated using finite-element mechanical models. Such a model can be used to predict when and where microseismicity is expected to occur. However, typical elements in a field scale mechanical models have decameter scales, while the rupture size for microseismic events are typically of the order of 1 square meter. This means that mapping modeled stress changes to predictions of microseismic activity can be challenging. Where larger scale faults have been identified, they can be included explicitly in the geomechanical model. Where movement is simulated along these discrete features, it can be assumed that microseismicity will occur. However, microseismic events typically occur on fracture networks that are too small to be simulated explicitly in a field-scale model. Therefore, the likelihood of microseismicity occurring must be estimated within a finite element that does not contain explicitly modeled discontinuities. This can be done in a number of ways, including the utilization of measures such as closeness on the stress state to predetermined failure criteria, either for planes with a defined orientation (the Mohr-Coulomb criteria) for

  9. Inferring phenotypic causal structures among meat quality traits and the application of a structural equation model in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Valente, B D; Shoji, N; Honda, T; Oyama, K; Rosa, G J M

    2016-10-01

    Meat quality is one of the most important traits determining carcass price in the Japanese beef market. Optimized breeding goals and management practices for the improvement of meat quality traits requires knowledge regarding any potential functional relationships between them. In this context, the objective of this research was to infer phenotypic causal networks involving beef marbling score (BMS), beef color score (BCL), firmness of beef (FIR), texture of beef (TEX), beef fat color score (BFS), and the ratio of MUFA to SFA (MUS) from 11,855 Japanese Black cattle. The inductive causation (IC) algorithm was implemented to search for causal links among these traits and was conditionally applied to their joint distribution on genetic effects. This information was obtained from the posterior distribution of the residual (co)variance matrix of a standard Bayesian multiple trait model (MTM). Apart from BFS, the IC algorithm implemented with 95% highest posterior density (HPD) intervals detected only undirected links among the traits. However, as a result of the application of 80% HPD intervals, more links were recovered and the undirected links were changed into directed ones, except between FIR and TEX. Therefore, 2 competing causal networks resulting from the IC algorithm, with either the arrow FIR → TEX or the arrow FIR ← TEX, were fitted using a structural equation model () to infer causal structure coefficients between the selected traits. Results indicated similar genetic and residual variances as well as genetic correlation estimates from both structural equation models. The genetic variances in BMS, FIR, and TEX from the structural equation models were smaller than those obtained from the MTM. In contrast, the variances in BCL, BFS, and MUS, which were not conditioned on any of the other traits in the causal structures, had no significant differences between the structural equation model and MTM. The structural coefficient for the path from MUS (BCL) to BMS

  10. Microglial phenotypes in Parkinson's disease and animal models of the disease.

    PubMed

    Joers, Valerie; Tansey, Malú G; Mulas, Giovanna; Carta, Anna R

    2016-04-20

    Over the last decade the important concept has emerged that microglia, similar to other tissue macrophages, assume different phenotypes and serve several effector functions, generating the theory that activated microglia can be organized by their pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory and repairing functions. Importantly, microglia exist in a heterogenous population and their phenotypes are not permanently polarized into two categories; they exist along a continuum where they acquire different profiles based on their local environment. In Parkinson's disease (PD), neuroinflammation and microglia activation are considered neuropathological hallmarks, however their precise role in relation to disease progression is not clear, yet represent a critical challenge in the search of disease-modifying strategies. This review will critically address current knowledge on the activation states of microglia as well as microglial phenotypes found in PD and in animal models of PD, focusing on the expression of surface molecules as well as pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production during the disease process. While human studies have reported an elevation of both pro- or anti-inflammatory markers in the serum and CSF of PD patients, animal models have provided insights on dynamic changes of microglia phenotypes in relation to disease progression especially prior to the development of motor deficits. We also review recent evidence of malfunction at multiple steps of NFκB signaling that may have a causal interrelationship with pathological microglia activation in animal models of PD. Finally, we discuss the immune-modifying strategies that have been explored regarding mechanisms of chronic microglial activation.

  11. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - two examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.; Behrens, T.; Schmidt, K.; Fank, J.; Kroulik, M.

    2011-12-01

    iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities of the FP7 Thematic Priority Environment. The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the methodological procedure on two different examples. Example A focuses on the turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM) since many soil functions in a direct or indirect way depend on SOM and SOM depletion is amongst the worst soil threats. Example B deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The applied CANDY model (Franko et al. 1995) was developed to describe dynamics of soil organic matter and mineral nitrogen as well as soil water and temperature. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences (Krüger et al. 2011). The methodological procedure of example A illustrates a model application for a field site in the Czech Republic using generated soil maps from combined geophysical data. Modelling requires a complete set of soil parameters. Combining measured soil properties and data of geophysical measurements (electrical conductivity and gamma spectrometry) is the basis for digital soil mapping which provided data about clay, silt and sand as well as SOC content. With these data pedotransfer functions produce detailed soil input data (e.g. bulk and particle density, field capacity, wilting point, saturated conductivity) for the rooted soil profile. CANDY calculated different indicators for SOM and gave hints about

  12. Using Model Organisms in an Undergraduate Laboratory to Link Genotype, Phenotype, and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs-McDaniels, Nicole L.; Maine, Eleanor M.; Albertson, R. Craig; Wiles, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    We developed laboratory exercises using zebrafish ("Danio rerio") and nematodes ("Caenorhabditis elegans") for a sophomore-level Integrative Biology Laboratory course. Students examined live wildtype zebrafish at different stages of development and noted shifts occurring in response to "fgf8a" deficiency. Students were introduced to development in…

  13. Using Model Organisms in an Undergraduate Laboratory to Link Genotype, Phenotype, and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs-McDaniels, Nicole L.; Maine, Eleanor M.; Albertson, R. Craig; Wiles, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    We developed laboratory exercises using zebrafish ("Danio rerio") and nematodes ("Caenorhabditis elegans") for a sophomore-level Integrative Biology Laboratory course. Students examined live wildtype zebrafish at different stages of development and noted shifts occurring in response to "fgf8a" deficiency. Students were introduced to development in…

  14. Improving the phenotype predictions of a yeast genome-scale metabolic model by incorporating enzymatic constraints.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Benjamín J; Zhang, Cheng; Nilsson, Avlant; Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-08-03

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) are widely used to calculate metabolic phenotypes. They rely on defining a set of constraints, the most common of which is that the production of metabolites and/or growth are limited by the carbon source uptake rate. However, enzyme abundances and kinetics, which act as limitations on metabolic fluxes, are not taken into account. Here, we present GECKO, a method that enhances a GEM to account for enzymes as part of reactions, thereby ensuring that each metabolic flux does not exceed its maximum capacity, equal to the product of the enzyme's abundance and turnover number. We applied GECKO to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae GEM and demonstrated that the new model could correctly describe phenotypes that the previous model could not, particularly under high enzymatic pressure conditions, such as yeast growing on different carbon sources in excess, coping with stress, or overexpressing a specific pathway. GECKO also allows to directly integrate quantitative proteomics data; by doing so, we significantly reduced flux variability of the model, in over 60% of metabolic reactions. Additionally, the model gives insight into the distribution of enzyme usage between and within metabolic pathways. The developed method and model are expected to increase the use of model-based design in metabolic engineering. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. Molecular mechanism of CHRDL1-mediated X-linked megalocornea in humans and in Xenopus model.

    PubMed

    Pfirrmann, Thorsten; Emmerich, Denise; Ruokonen, Peter; Quandt, Dagmar; Buchen, Renate; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Meyer, Peter; Klopocki, Eva; Stricker, Sigmar; Lausch, Ekkehart; Seliger, Barbara; Hollemann, Thomas; Reinhard, Thomas; Auw-Haedrich, Claudia; Zabel, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Katrin; Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Chordin-Like 1 (CHRDL1) mutations cause non-syndromic X-linked megalocornea (XMC) characterized by enlarged anterior eye segments. Mosaic corneal degeneration, presenile cataract and secondary glaucoma are associated with XMC. Beside that CHRDL1 encodes Ventroptin, a secreted bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, the molecular mechanism of XMC is not well understood yet. In a family with broad phenotypic variability of XMC, we identified the novel CHRDL1 frameshift mutation c.807_808delTC [p.H270Wfs*22] presumably causing CHRDL1 loss of function. Using Xenopus laevis as model organism, we demonstrate that chrdl1 is specifically expressed in the ocular tissue at late developmental stages. The chrdl1 knockdown directly resembles the human XMC phenotype and confirms CHRDL1 deficiency to cause XMC. Interestingly, secondary to this bmp4 is down-regulated in the Xenopus eyes. Moreover, phospho-SMAD1/5 is altered and BMP receptor 1A is reduced in a XMC patient. Together, we classify these observations as negative-feedback regulation due to the deficient BMP antagonism in XMC. As CHRDL1 is preferentially expressed in the limbal stem cell niche of adult human cornea, we assume that CHRDL1 plays a key role in cornea homeostasis. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of XMC as well as into the specific role of CHRDL1 during cornea organogenesis, among others by the establishment of the first XMC in vivo model. We show that unravelling monogenic cornea disorders like XMC-with presumably disturbed cornea growth and differentiation-contribute to the identification of potential limbal stem cell niche factors that are promising targets for regenerative therapies of corneal injuries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Four novel mutations in the cystathionine beta-synthase gene: effect of a second linked mutation on the severity of the homocystinuric phenotype.

    PubMed

    de Franchis, R; Kraus, E; Kozich, V; Sebastio, G; Kraus, J P

    1999-01-01

    Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) deficiency is frequently caused by missense mutations. In this article, we report four novel missense mutations in the CBS gene: 172C-->T (R58W) linked in cis with A114V; 376A-->G (M126V); 904G-->A (E302K); and 1006C-->T (R336C). The CBS activity of the corresponding mutant enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli was greatly diminished, confirming the pathogenicity of these mutations. Western analysis showed that the R58W+A114V and M126V mutant enzymes were unstable in E. coli, while the E302K subunits were partially degraded to shorter products. Using site-directed mutagenesis we found that CBS containing either the R58W or A114V as the only mutations demonstrated 18% and 46% of normal activity, respectively. Both mutant forms of CBS were stable in E. coli. When these two mutations were expressed in cis, the resultant mutant protein exhibited activity 1.3% that of a control. All these in vitro results were in good agreement with the clinical manifestation in these patients. The Italian patient 2241, an A114V+R58W/M126V compound heterozygote, exhibited severe pyridoxine nonresponsive homocystinuria, while another Italian patient 2242, with an A114V/E302K genotype, responded to pyridoxine treatment and had a much milder phenotype. The third patient 3064, an English compound heterozygote for two severe mutations R336C and G307S, was B6 nonresponsive. This report of a ninth homocystinuric allele carrying two mutations in cis raises the possibility that double mutant alleles may be underestimated in homocystinuric patients. In this context, a search for additional mutations in cis may sometimes be necessary to establish a good genotype-phenotype relationship.

  17. Loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations cause a phenotypic spectrum of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-like features, ocular hypertelorism, large fontanelle and X-linked inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Frank J.; Ansari, Morad; Braunholz, Diana; Concepción Gil-Rodríguez, María; Decroos, Christophe; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Fincher, Christopher T.; Kaur, Maninder; Bando, Masashige; Amor, David J.; Atwal, Paldeep S.; Bahlo, Melanie; Bowman, Christine M.; Bradley, Jacquelyn J.; Brunner, Han G.; Clark, Dinah; Del Campo, Miguel; Di Donato, Nataliya; Diakumis, Peter; Dubbs, Holly; Dyment, David A.; Eckhold, Juliane; Ernst, Sarah; Ferreira, Jose C.; Francey, Lauren J.; Gehlken, Ulrike; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Hall, Bryan D.; Hennekam, Raoul; Hudgins, Louanne; Hullings, Melanie; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Yntema, Helger; Innes, A. Micheil; Kline, Antonie D.; Krumina, Zita; Lee, Hane; Leppig, Kathleen; Lynch, Sally Ann; Mallozzi, Mark B.; Mannini, Linda; Mckee, Shane; Mehta, Sarju G.; Micule, Ieva; Mohammed, Shehla; Moran, Ellen; Mortier, Geert R.; Moser, Joe-Ann S.; Noon, Sarah E.; Nozaki, Naohito; Nunes, Luis; Pappas, John G.; Penney, Lynette S.; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio; Petersen, Michael B.; Puisac, Beatriz; Revencu, Nicole; Roeder, Elizabeth; Saitta, Sulagna; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Schindeler, Karen L.; Siu, Victoria M.; Stark, Zornitza; Strom, Samuel P.; Thiese, Heidi; Vater, Inga; Willems, Patrick; Williamson, Kathleen; Wilson, Louise C.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Wierzba, Jolanta; Musio, Antonio; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Pié, Juan; Christianson, David W.; Krantz, Ian D.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Deardorff, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder with distinct facies, growth failure, intellectual disability, distal limb anomalies, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. Mutations in NIPBL, encoding a cohesin regulatory protein, account for >80% of cases with typical facies. Mutations in the core cohesin complex proteins, encoded by the SMC1A, SMC3 and RAD21 genes, together account for ∼5% of subjects, often with atypical CdLS features. Recently, we identified mutations in the X-linked gene HDAC8 as the cause of a small number of CdLS cases. Here, we report a cohort of 38 individuals with an emerging spectrum of features caused by HDAC8 mutations. For several individuals, the diagnosis of CdLS was not considered prior to genomic testing. Most mutations identified are missense and de novo. Many cases are heterozygous females, each with marked skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood DNA. We also identified eight hemizygous males who are more severely affected. The craniofacial appearance caused by HDAC8 mutations overlaps that of typical CdLS but often displays delayed anterior fontanelle closure, ocular hypertelorism, hooding of the eyelids, a broader nose and dental anomalies, which may be useful discriminating features. HDAC8 encodes the lysine deacetylase for the cohesin subunit SMC3 and analysis of the functional consequences of the missense mutations indicates that all cause a loss of enzymatic function. These data demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in HDAC8 cause a range of overlapping human developmental phenotypes, including a phenotypically distinct subgroup of CdLS. PMID:24403048

  18. Linking genes to communities and ecosystems: Daphnia as an ecogenomic model.

    PubMed

    Miner, Brooks E; De Meester, Luc; Pfrender, Michael E; Lampert, Winfried; Hairston, Nelson G

    2012-05-22

    How do genetic variation and evolutionary change in critical species affect the composition and functioning of populations, communities and ecosystems? Illuminating the links in the causal chain from genes up to ecosystems is a particularly exciting prospect now that the feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary changes are known to be bidirectional. Yet to fully explore phenomena that span multiple levels of the biological hierarchy requires model organisms and systems that feature a comprehensive triad of strong ecological interactions in nature, experimental tractability in diverse contexts and accessibility to modern genomic tools. The water flea Daphnia satisfies these criteria, and genomic approaches capitalizing on the pivotal role Daphnia plays in the functioning of pelagic freshwater food webs will enable investigations of eco-evolutionary dynamics in unprecedented detail. Because its ecology is profoundly influenced by both genetic polymorphism and phenotypic plasticity, Daphnia represents a model system with tremendous potential for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between traits at the genetic, organismal and population levels, and consequences for community and ecosystem dynamics. Here, we highlight the combination of traits and ecological interactions that make Daphnia a definitive model system, focusing on the additional power and capabilities enabled by recent molecular and genomic advances.

  19. Linking genes to communities and ecosystems: Daphnia as an ecogenomic model

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Brooks E.; De Meester, Luc; Pfrender, Michael E.; Lampert, Winfried; Hairston, Nelson G.

    2012-01-01

    How do genetic variation and evolutionary change in critical species affect the composition and functioning of populations, communities and ecosystems? Illuminating the links in the causal chain from genes up to ecosystems is a particularly exciting prospect now that the feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary changes are known to be bidirectional. Yet to fully explore phenomena that span multiple levels of the biological hierarchy requires model organisms and systems that feature a comprehensive triad of strong ecological interactions in nature, experimental tractability in diverse contexts and accessibility to modern genomic tools. The water flea Daphnia satisfies these criteria, and genomic approaches capitalizing on the pivotal role Daphnia plays in the functioning of pelagic freshwater food webs will enable investigations of eco-evolutionary dynamics in unprecedented detail. Because its ecology is profoundly influenced by both genetic polymorphism and phenotypic plasticity, Daphnia represents a model system with tremendous potential for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between traits at the genetic, organismal and population levels, and consequences for community and ecosystem dynamics. Here, we highlight the combination of traits and ecological interactions that make Daphnia a definitive model system, focusing on the additional power and capabilities enabled by recent molecular and genomic advances. PMID:22298849

  20. Age-dependent phenotypic characteristics of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-08-01

    The triple-transgenic mouse line (3 x Tg-AD) harboring PS1M146V, APPSwe, and taup301L transgenes represents the only transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to date capturing both beta-amyloid and tau neuropathology. The present study provides an extensive behavioral characterization of the 3 x Tg-AD mouse line, evaluating the emergence of noncognitive and cognitive AD-like symptoms at two ages corresponding to the early (6-7 months) and advanced (12-13 months) stages of AD-pathology. Enhanced responsiveness to aversive stimulation was detected in mutant mice at both ages: the 3 x Tg-AD genotype enhanced acoustic startle response and facilitated performance in the cued-version of the water maze. These noncognitive phenotypes were accompanied by hyperactivity and reduced locomotor habituation in the open field at the older age. Signs of cognitive aberrations were also detected at both ages, but they were limited to associative learning. The present study suggests that this popular transgenic mouse model of AD has clear phenotypes beyond the cognitive domain, and their potential relationship to the cognitive phenotypes should be further explored.

  1. The vertebrate taxonomy ontology: a framework for reasoning across model organism and species phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Midford, Peter E; Dececchi, Thomas Alex; Balhoff, James P; Dahdul, Wasila M; Ibrahim, Nizar; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G; Mabee, Paula M; Sereno, Paul C; Westerfield, Monte; Vision, Todd J; Blackburn, David C

    2013-11-22

    A hierarchical taxonomy of organisms is a prerequisite for semantic integration of biodiversity data. Ideally, there would be a single, expansive, authoritative taxonomy that includes extinct and extant taxa, information on synonyms and common names, and monophyletic supraspecific taxa that reflect our current understanding of phylogenetic relationships. As a step towards development of such a resource, and to enable large-scale integration of phenotypic data across vertebrates, we created the Vertebrate Taxonomy Ontology (VTO), a semantically defined taxonomic resource derived from the integration of existing taxonomic compilations, and freely distributed under a Creative Commons Zero (CC0) public domain waiver. The VTO includes both extant and extinct vertebrates and currently contains 106,947 taxonomic terms, 22 taxonomic ranks, 104,736 synonyms, and 162,400 cross-references to other taxonomic resources. Key challenges in constructing the VTO included (1) extracting and merging names, synonyms, and identifiers from heterogeneous sources; (2) structuring hierarchies of terms based on evolutionary relationships and the principle of monophyly; and (3) automating this process as much as possible to accommodate updates in source taxonomies. The VTO is the primary source of taxonomic information used by the Phenoscape Knowledgebase (http://phenoscape.org/), which integrates genetic and evolutionary phenotype data across both model and non-model vertebrates. The VTO is useful for inferring phenotypic changes on the vertebrate tree of life, which enables queries for candidate genes for various episodes in vertebrate evolution.

  2. Ultrasonic vocalizations: a tool for behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Crawley, Jacqueline; Ricceri, Laura

    2009-01-01

    In neonatal mice ultrasonic vocalizations have been studied both as an early communicative behavior of the pup-mother dyad and as a sign of an aversive affective state. Adult mice of both sexes produce complex ultrasonic vocalization patterns in different experimental/social contexts. All these vocalizations are becoming an increasingly valuable assay for behavioral phenotyping throughout the mouse life-span and alterations of the ultrasound patterns have been reported in several mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we also show that the modulation of vocalizations by maternal cues (maternal potentiation paradigm) – originally identified and investigated in rats - can be measured in C57Bl/6 mouse pups with appropriate modifications of the rat protocol and can likely be applied to mouse behavioral phenotyping. In addition we suggest that a detailed qualitative evaluation of neonatal calls together with analysis of adult mouse vocalization patterns in both sexes in social settings, may lead to a greater understanding of the communication value of vocalizations in mice. Importantly, both neonatal and adult USV altered patterns can be determined during the behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of human neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, starting from those in which deficits in communication are a primary symptom. PMID:18771687

  3. Individual-based models for adaptive diversification in high-dimensional phenotype spaces.

    PubMed

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Madhok, Vaibhav; Doebeli, Michael

    2016-02-07

    Most theories of evolutionary diversification are based on equilibrium assumptions: they are either based on optimality arguments involving static fitness landscapes, or they assume that populations first evolve to an equilibrium state before diversification occurs, as exemplified by the concept of evolutionary branching points in adaptive dynamics theory. Recent results indicate that adaptive dynamics may often not converge to equilibrium points and instead generate complicated trajectories if evolution takes place in high-dimensional phenotype spaces. Even though some analytical results on diversification in complex phenotype spaces are available, to study this problem in general we need to reconstruct individual-based models from the adaptive dynamics generating the non-equilibrium dynamics. Here we first provide a method to construct individual-based models such that they faithfully reproduce the given adaptive dynamics attractor without diversification. We then show that a propensity to diversify can be introduced by adding Gaussian competition terms that generate frequency dependence while still preserving the same adaptive dynamics. For sufficiently strong competition, the disruptive selection generated by frequency-dependence overcomes the directional evolution along the selection gradient and leads to diversification in phenotypic directions that are orthogonal to the selection gradient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Disease model discovery from 3,328 gene knockouts by The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Terrence F; Conte, Nathalie; West, David B; Jacobsen, Julius O; Mason, Jeremy; Warren, Jonathan; Chen, Chao-Kung; Tudose, Ilinca; Relac, Mike; Matthews, Peter; Karp, Natasha; Santos, Luis; Fiegel, Tanja; Ring, Natalie; Westerberg, Henrik; Greenaway, Simon; Sneddon, Duncan; Morgan, Hugh; Codner, Gemma F; Stewart, Michelle E; Brown, James; Horner, Neil; Haendel, Melissa; Washington, Nicole; Mungall, Christopher J; Reynolds, Corey L; Gallegos, Juan; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Sorg, Tania; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Bower, Lynette R; Moore, Mark; Morse, Iva; Gao, Xiang; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Obata, Yuichi; Cho, Soo Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Seavitt, John; Beaudet, Arthur L; Dickinson, Mary E; Herault, Yann; Wurst, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Lloyd, K C Kent; Flenniken, Ann M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Justice, Monica J; Murray, Stephen A; Svenson, Karen L; Braun, Robert E; White, Jacqueline K; Bradley, Allan; Flicek, Paul; Wells, Sara; Skarnes, William C; Adams, David J; Parkinson, Helen; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M; Smedley, Damian

    2017-08-01

    Although next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the ability to associate variants with human diseases, diagnostic rates and development of new therapies are still limited by a lack of knowledge of the functions and pathobiological mechanisms of most genes. To address this challenge, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is creating a genome- and phenome-wide catalog of gene function by characterizing new knockout-mouse strains across diverse biological systems through a broad set of standardized phenotyping tests. All mice will be readily available to the biomedical community. Analyzing the first 3,328 genes identified models for 360 diseases, including the first models, to our knowledge, for type C Bernard-Soulier, Bardet-Biedl-5 and Gordon Holmes syndromes. 90% of our phenotype annotations were novel, providing functional evidence for 1,092 genes and candidates in genetically uncharacterized diseases including arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 3. Finally, we describe our role in variant functional validation with The 100,000 Genomes Project and others.

  5. Linking symbiont community structures in a model arbuscular mycorrhizal system.

    PubMed

    Meadow, James F; Zabinski, Catherine A

    2012-05-01

    • The influence of plant communities on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities is difficult to study in situ as both symbionts are strongly influenced by some of the same soil and environmental conditions, and thus we have a poor understanding of the potential links in community composition and structure between host and fungal communities. • AMF were characterized in colonized roots of thermal soil Mimulus guttatus in both isolated plants supporting AMF for only a few months of the growing season and plants growing in mixed plant communities composed of annual and perennial hosts. Cluster and discriminant analysis were used to compare competing models based on either communities or soil conditions. • Mimulus guttatus in adjacent contrasting plant community situations harbored distinct AMF communities with few fungal taxa occurring in both community types. Isolated plants harbored communities of fewer fungal taxa with lower diversity than plants in mixed communities. Host community type was more indicative than pH of AMF community structure. • Our results support an inherent relationship between host plant and AMF community structures, although pH-based models were also statistically supported. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  7. Relationship of childhood adversity and neighborhood violence to a proinflammatory phenotype in emerging adult African American men: An epigenetic link.

    PubMed

    Janusek, Linda Witek; Tell, Dina; Gaylord-Harden, Noni; Mathews, Herbert L

    2017-02-01

    African American men (AAM) who are exposed to trauma and adversity during their early life are at greater risk for poor health over their lifespan. Exposure to adversity during critical developmental windows may embed an epigenetic signature that alters expression of genes that regulate stress response systems, including those genes that regulate the inflammatory response to stress. Such an epigenetic signature may increase risk for diseases exacerbated by inflammation, and may contribute to health disparity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which exposure to early life adversity influences the psychological, cortisol, and proinflammatory response to acute stress (Trier Social Stress Test - TSST) in emerging adult AAM, ages 18-25years (N=34). Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine the cortisol and IL-6 pattern of response to the TSST with respect to childhood adversity factors and DNA methylation of the IL-6 promoter. Findings revealed that in response to the TSST, greater levels of childhood trauma and indirect exposure to neighborhood violence were associated with a greater TSST-induced IL-6 response, and a blunted cortisol response. Reduced methylation of the IL6 promoter was related to increased exposure to childhood trauma and greater TSST-induced IL-6 levels. These results support the concept that exposure to childhood adversity amplifies the adult proinflammatory response to stress, which is related to epigenetic signature.

  8. Linking Geomagentic Data to Dynamo Models via Variational Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Egbert, G. D.; Kuang, W.; Jiang, W.; Tangborn, A.

    2011-12-01

    The increased resolution and accuracy of both the geomagnetic field models and observations in recent years has resulted in increased efforts to link theory to data via data assimilation (DA) techniques similar to those previously developed in the atmospheric and oceanic communities . If applied to the geomagnetic field, DA has potential to improve both models and observations: geodynamics models can be assessed and improved based on observational constraints to better understand the physics of the core dynamics; the improved models can then be used to (1)constrain "hidden" components of the state of the geodynamo that are not directly observable, (2)more accurately forecast the geomagnetic fields and (3) hindcast and improve past geomagnetic field models. DA methods can be broadly divided into two approaches: sequential and variational. In sequential DA, observations are combined with the current model state to produce a new state estimate, which is then used as the initial state for the next model forecast. As such, sequential DA leads to discontinuous model state, and observations can influence only the future model state. Variational DA differs from sequential DA in that the goal is a global adjustment of the model trajectory to fit simultaneously all the data. Thus in the variational approach, observations at a later time could influence the model solution at an earlier time. Both sequential and variational DA has been applied to simplified dynamic models (e.g.Sun et al. [2007], Fournier et al. [2007]), and sequential DA has been applied to full dynamo models (e.g. Liu et al. [2007], Kuang et al. [2008]). However, since the best data is from recent years, sequential schemes can't readily project this data backwards in time. We present an update to our ongoing efforts to implement modern variational DA methods (based on theory of representers, potentially allowing for weak constraint DA) for the Modular Scalable Self-consistent Three-dimensional (Mo

  9. Eco-evolutionary Model of Rapid Phenotypic Diversification in Species-Rich Communities.

    PubMed

    Villa Martín, Paula; Hidalgo, Jorge; Rubio de Casas, Rafael; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    Evolutionary and ecosystem dynamics are often treated as different processes -operating at separate timescales- even if evidence reveals that rapid evolutionary changes can feed back into ecological interactions. A recent long-term field experiment has explicitly shown that communities of competing plant species can experience very fast phenotypic diversification, and that this gives rise to enhanced complementarity in resource exploitation and to enlarged ecosystem-level productivity. Here, we build on progress made in recent years in the integration of eco-evolutionary dynamics, and present a computational approach aimed at describing these empirical findings in detail. In particular we model a community of organisms of different but similar species evolving in time through mechanisms of birth, competition, sexual reproduction, descent with modification, and death. Based on simple rules, this model provides a rationalization for the emergence of rapid phenotypic diversification in species-rich communities. Furthermore, it also leads to non-trivial predictions about long-term phenotypic change and ecological interactions. Our results illustrate that the presence of highly specialized, non-competing species leads to very stable communities and reveals that phenotypically equivalent species occupying the same niche may emerge and coexist for very long times. Thus, the framework presented here provides a simple approach -complementing existing theories, but specifically devised to account for the specificities of the recent empirical findings for plant communities- to explain the collective emergence of diversification at a community level, and paves the way to further scrutinize the intimate entanglement of ecological and evolutionary processes, especially in species-rich communities.

  10. Eco-evolutionary Model of Rapid Phenotypic Diversification in Species-Rich Communities

    PubMed Central

    Villa Martín, Paula; Rubio de Casas, Rafael; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary and ecosystem dynamics are often treated as different processes –operating at separate timescales– even if evidence reveals that rapid evolutionary changes can feed back into ecological interactions. A recent long-term field experiment has explicitly shown that communities of competing plant species can experience very fast phenotypic diversification, and that this gives rise to enhanced complementarity in resource exploitation and to enlarged ecosystem-level productivity. Here, we build on progress made in recent years in the integration of eco-evolutionary dynamics, and present a computational approach aimed at describing these empirical findings in detail. In particular we model a community of organisms of different but similar species evolving in time through mechanisms of birth, competition, sexual reproduction, descent with modification, and death. Based on simple rules, this model provides a rationalization for the emergence of rapid phenotypic diversification in species-rich communities. Furthermore, it also leads to non-trivial predictions about long-term phenotypic change and ecological interactions. Our results illustrate that the presence of highly specialized, non-competing species leads to very stable communities and reveals that phenotypically equivalent species occupying the same niche may emerge and coexist for very long times. Thus, the framework presented here provides a simple approach –complementing existing theories, but specifically devised to account for the specificities of the recent empirical findings for plant communities– to explain the collective emergence of diversification at a community level, and paves the way to further scrutinize the intimate entanglement of ecological and evolutionary processes, especially in species-rich communities. PMID:27736874

  11. A large animal model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy and correction of phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Sandra I.; Arnold, W. David; Odermatt, Philipp; Li, Xiaohui; Porensky, Paul N.; Schmelzer, Leah; Meyer, Kathrin; Kolb, Stephen J.; Schümperli, Daniel; Kaspar, Brian K.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN which results in motoneuron loss. Therapeutic strategies to increase SMN levels including drug compounds, antisense oligonucleotides or scAAV9 gene therapy have proved effective in mice. We wished to determine whether reduction of SMN in postnatal motoneurons resulted in SMA in a large animal model, whether SMA could be corrected after development of muscle weakness and the response of clinically relevant biomarkers. Methods Using intrathecal delivery of scAAV9 expressing a shRNA targeting pig SMN1, SMN was knocked down in motoneurons postnatally to SMA levels. This resulted in an SMA phenotype representing the first large animal model of SMA. Restoration of SMN was performed at different time points with scAAV9 expressing human SMN (scAAV9-SMN) and electrophysiology measures and pathology were performed. Results Knockdown of SMN in postnatal motoneurons results in overt proximal weakness, fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) indicating active denervation, and reduced compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimates (MUNE), like human SMA. Neuropathology showed loss of motoneurons and motor axons. Pre-symptomatic delivery of scAAV9-SMN prevented SMA symptoms indicating all changes are SMN dependent. Delivery of scAAV9-SMN after symptom onset had a marked impact on phenotype, electrophysiological measures and pathology. Interpretation High SMN levels are critical in postnatal motoneurons and reduction of SMN results in a SMA phenotype which is SMN dependent. Importantly, clinically relevant biomarkers including CMAP and MUNE are responsive to SMN restoration and abrogation of phenotype can be achieved even after symptom onset. PMID:25516063

  12. Vocational Education Models for Linking Agencies Serving the Handicapped. Model Development Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Lloyd W.; And Others

    Three states--Maryland, New Jersey, and Virginia--served as model states for a project on vocational education models for linking agencies serving the handicapped. Using a multi-agency team with members representing vocational education, special education, rehabilitation, guidance, and other agencies at the state level, each state developed a…

  13. A communications model for an ISAS to NASA span link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Mcguire, Robert E.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The authors propose that an initial computer-to-computer communication link use the public packet switched networks (PPSN) Venus-P in Japan and TELENET in the U.S. When the traffic warrants it, this link would then be upgraded to a dedicated leased line that directly connects into the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN). The proposed system of hardware and software will easily support migration to such a dedicated link. It therefore provides a cost effective approach to the network problem. Once a dedicated line becomes operation it is suggested that the public networks link and continue to coexist, providing a backup capability.

  14. FSO and radio link attenuation: meteorological models verified by experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazda, Vladimir; Fiser, Ondrej; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2011-09-01

    Institute of Atmospheric Physics of Czech Academy measures atmospheric attenuation on 60 m experimental FSO link on 830 and 1550 nm for more than three years. Visibility sensors and two 3D sonic anemometers on both transmitting and receiving site, rain gauge and many sensors enabling the refractivity index computation are spaced along the optical link. Meteorological visibility, wind turbulent energy, sonic temperature, structure index and rain rate are correlated with measured attenuation. FSO link attenuation dependence on the above mentioned parameters is analyzed. The paper shows also basic statistical behavior of the long-term FSO signal level and also the simulation of hybrid link techniques.

  15. A Model-Based Joint Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes and Phenotype-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minseok; Shin, Su-kyung; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Yun-Jung; Lee, Seungyeoun; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, many analytical methods and tools have been developed for microarray data. The detection of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among different treatment groups is often a primary purpose of microarray data analysis. In addition, association studies investigating the relationship between genes and a phenotype of interest such as survival time are also popular in microarray data analysis. Phenotype association analysis provides a list of phenotype-associated genes (PAGs). However, it is sometimes necessary to identify genes that are both DEGs and PAGs. We consider the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs in microarray data analyses. The first approach we used was a naïve approach that detects DEGs and PAGs separately and then identifies the genes in an intersection of the list of PAGs and DEGs. The second approach we considered was a hierarchical approach that detects DEGs first and then chooses PAGs from among the DEGs or vice versa. In this study, we propose a new model-based approach for the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs. Unlike the previous two-step approaches, the proposed method identifies genes simultaneously that are DEGs and PAGs. This method uses standard regression models but adopts different null hypothesis from ordinary regression models, which allows us to perform joint identification in one-step. The proposed model-based methods were evaluated using experimental data and simulation studies. The proposed methods were used to analyze a microarray experiment in which the main interest lies in detecting genes that are both DEGs and PAGs, where DEGs are identified between two diet groups and PAGs are associated with four phenotypes reflecting the expression of leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin. Model-based approaches provided a larger number of genes, which are both DEGs and PAGs, than other methods. Simulation studies showed that they have more power than other methods. Through analysis of

  16. Phenotypic variance predicts symbiont population densities in corals: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    van Woesik, Robert; Shiroma, Kazuyo; Koksal, Semen

    2010-02-12

    We test whether the phenotypic variance of symbionts (Symbiodinium) in corals is closely related with the capacity of corals to acclimatize to increasing seawater temperatures. Moreover, we assess whether more specialist symbionts will increase within coral hosts under ocean warming. The present study is only applicable to those corals that naturally have the capacity to support more than one type of Symbiodinium within the lifetime of a colony; for example, Montastraea annularis and Montastraea faveolata. The population dynamics of competing Symbiodinium symbiont populations were projected through time in coral hosts using a novel, discrete time optimal-resource model. Models were run for two Atlantic Ocean localities. Four symbiont populations, with different environmental optima and phenotypic variances, were modeled to grow, divide, and compete in the corals under seasonal fluctuations in solar insolation and seawater temperature. Elevated seawater temperatures were input into the model 1.5 degrees C above the seasonal summer average, and the symbiont population response was observed for each location. The models showed dynamic fluctuations in Symbiodinium populations densities within corals. Population density predictions for Lee Stocking Island, the Bahamas, where temperatures were relatively homogenous throughout the year, showed a dominance of both type 2, with high phenotypic variance, and type 1, a high-temperature and high-insolation specialist. Whereas the densities of Symbiodinium types 3 and 4, a high-temperature, low-insolation specialist, and a high-temperature, low-insolation generalist, remained consistently low. Predictions for Key Largo, Florida, where environmental conditions were more seasonally variable, showed the coexistence of generalists (types 2 and 4) and low densities of specialists (types 1 and 3). When elevated temperatures were input into the model, population densities in corals at Lee Stocking Island showed an emergence of high

  17. Phenotypic Variance Predicts Symbiont Population Densities in Corals: A Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    van Woesik, Robert; Shiroma, Kazuyo; Koksal, Semen

    2010-01-01

    Background We test whether the phenotypic variance of symbionts (Symbiodinium) in corals is closely related with the capacity of corals to acclimatize to increasing seawater temperatures. Moreover, we assess whether more specialist symbionts will increase within coral hosts under ocean warming. The present study is only applicable to those corals that naturally have the capacity to support more than one type of Symbiodinium within the lifetime of a colony; for example, Montastraea annularis and Montastraea faveolata. Methodology/Principal Findings The population dynamics of competing Symbiodinium symbiont populations were projected through time in coral hosts using a novel, discrete time optimal–resource model. Models were run for two Atlantic Ocean localities. Four symbiont populations, with different environmental optima and phenotypic variances, were modeled to grow, divide, and compete in the corals under seasonal fluctuations in solar insolation and seawater temperature. Elevated seawater temperatures were input into the model 1.5°C above the seasonal summer average, and the symbiont population response was observed for each location. The models showed dynamic fluctuations in Symbiodinium populations densities within corals. Population density predictions for Lee Stocking Island, the Bahamas, where temperatures were relatively homogenous throughout the year, showed a dominance of both type 2, with high phenotypic variance, and type 1, a high-temperature and high-insolation specialist. Whereas the densities of Symbiodinium types 3 and 4, a high-temperature, low-insolation specialist, and a high-temperature, low-insolation generalist, remained consistently low. Predictions for Key Largo, Florida, where environmental conditions were more seasonally variable, showed the coexistence of generalists (types 2 and 4) and low densities of specialists (types 1 and 3). When elevated temperatures were input into the model, population densities in corals at Lee Stocking

  18. Crustal recycling model: testing by linking petrology with isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, A. V.; Hofmann, A. W.; Bruegmann, G.; Batanova, V. G.; Sigurdsson, I. A.; Kuzmin, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of subducted oceanic crust is widely thought to explain much of the chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of Earth's present-day mantle (1). Recycled subducted ocean crust has been traced by elevated 187Os/188Os in some studies (2-4) and by high Ni and low Mn contents in others (5,6). Recently, we have linked these tracers for the first time (7). We combine data for averaged compositions of olivine phenocrysts for olivine rich lavas and bulk rock 187Os/188Os ratios from Iceland and Hawaii, and we apply the method (6,7) to obtain the proportion of pyroxenite derived melt by both Ni excess and Mn deficit in olivine. The observed strong correlation for quaternary lavas of Iceland significantly strengthens the recycling model (1,8). It allows us to estimate the Os isotopic composition of both the recycled crust and the mantle peridotite, thereby constraining the model ages of end-members. We show that Icelandic quaternary lavas require an ancient crustal component with model ages between 1.1 and 1.8 Ga and a peridotite end-member close to present-day oceanic mantle. The similar data for Hawaii suggest younger ages of recycled material: 0.5-1 Ga. References: 1. A.W. Hofmann, W. M. White, EPSL. 57, 421 (1982) 2. J. C. Lassiter, E. H. Hauri, EPSL 164, 483 (1998). 3. A.C. Skovgaard et al, EPSL 194, 259 (2001). 4. A. D. Brandon et al., GCA 71, 4570 (2007). 5. A.V. Sobolev et al., Nature 434, 590 (2005). 6. A.V. Sobolev et al., Science 316, 412 (2007). 7. A.V. Sobolev et al., Science 321, 536 (2008). 8. C. Hemond et al., JGR-Solid Earth 98, 15833 (1993).

  19. Phenotype-based cell-specific metabolic modeling reveals metabolic liabilities of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le Dévédec, Sylvia; Waldman, Yedael Y; Stein, Gideon Y; van de Water, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing molecular data to derive functional physiological models tailored for specific cancer cells can facilitate the use of individually tailored therapies. To this end we present an approach termed PRIME for generating cell-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) based on molecular and phenotypic data. We build >280 models of normal and cancer cell-lines that successfully predict metabolic phenotypes in an individual manner. We utilize this set of cell-specific models to predict drug targets that selectively inhibit cancerous but not normal cell proliferation. The top predicted target, MLYCD, is experimentally validated and the metabolic effects of MLYCD depletion investigated. Furthermore, we tested cell-specific predicted responses to the inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and successfully inferred the prognosis of cancer patients based on their PRIME-derived individual GSMMs. These results lay a computational basis and a counterpart experimental proof of concept for future personalized metabolic modeling applications, enhancing the search for novel selective anticancer therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03641.001 PMID:25415239

  20. Chronic treatment with lithium does not improve neuromuscular phenotype in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dachs, E; Piedrafita, L; Hereu, M; Esquerda, J E; Calderó, J

    2013-10-10

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by defective levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMA causes spinal motoneuron (MN) loss, and progressive muscle weakness and paralysis. Currently, there is no effective therapy to cure this disease. Although different strategies focused on increasing the expression of functional SMN protein have been assayed, numerous SMN-independent therapeutic approaches have been demonstrated to have potential effectiveness in improving the SMA phenotype in mouse models and clinical trials. Recent works have shown that compounds which inhibit GSK-3β activity are effective in promoting MN survival and ameliorating lifespan in models of MN diseases including SMA. Taking into account the reported neuroprotective actions of lithium (Li) through the inhibition of GSK-3β in different studies, we tested here its potential efficiency as a therapeutic agent in a mouse model of severe SMA (SMNΔ7 mice). We show that the chronic treatment with Li initiated before the appearance of disease symptoms, although inhibited GSK-3β, did not improve the median survival, motor behavior, and spinal MN loss linked to SMA. Li administration did not either ameliorate the microglial and astroglial reaction in the spinal cord or the depletion of glutamatergic synapses on MNs observed in SMNΔ7 animals. Moreover, Li treatment did not mitigate muscle atrophy or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) downregulation in the neuromuscular junctions linked to the disease. However, a significant reduction in apoptotic cell death found in the skeletal muscle of SMA mice was observed after Li treatment. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies (CMTX1, CMTX2, CMTX3) show different clinical phenotype and molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.V.; Searby, C.C.; Ionasescu, R.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the X-linked dominant type CMTX1 (20 families) with X-linked recessive types CMTX2 and CMTX3 (2 families). The clinical phenotype was consistent with CMT peripheral neuropathy in all cases including distal weakness, atrophy and sensory loss, pes cavus and areflexia. Additional clinicial involvement of the central nervous system was present in one family with CMTX2 (mental retardation) and one family with CMTX3 (spastic paraparesis). Tight genetic linkage to Xq13.1 was present in 20 families with CMTX1 (Z=34.07 at {theta}=0) for the marker DXS453. Fifteen of the CMTX1 families showed point mutations of the connexin 32 coding region (5 nonsense mutations, 8 missense mutations, 2 deletions). Five CMTX1 neuropathy families showed no evidence of point mutations of the CX32 coding sequence. These findings suggest that the CMTX1 neuropathy genotype in these families may be the result of promoter mutations, 3{prime}-untranslated region mutations or exon/intron splice site mutations or a mutation with a different type of connexin but which has close structural similarities to CX32. No mutations of the CX32 coding region were found in the CMTX2 or CMTX3 families. Linkage to Xq13.1 was excluded in both families. Genetic linkage to Xp22.2 was present in the CMTX2 family (Z=3.54 at {theta}=0) for the markers DXS987 and DXS999. Suggestion of linkage to Xq26 (Z=1.81 at {theta}=0) for the marker DXS86 was present in the CMTX3 family.

  2. The expanding spectrum of PRPS1-associated phenotypes: three novel mutations segregating with X-linked hearing loss and mild peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Robusto, Michela; Fang, Mingyan; Asselta, Rosanna; Castorina, Pierangela; Previtali, Stefano C; Caccia, Sonia; Benzoni, Elena; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Yu, Cong; Cesarani, Antonio; Liu, Xuanzhu; Li, Wangsheng; Primignani, Paola; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Xu, Xun; Duga, Stefano; Soldà, Giulia

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing is currently the technology of choice for gene/mutation discovery in genetically-heterogeneous disorders, such as inherited sensorineural hearing loss (HL). Whole-exome sequencing of a single Italian proband affected by non-syndromic HL identified a novel missense variant within the PRPS1 gene (NM_002764.3:c.337G>T (p.A113S)) segregating with post-lingual, bilateral, progressive deafness in the proband's family. Defects in this gene, encoding the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRS-I) enzyme, determine either X-linked syndromic conditions associated with hearing impairment (eg, Arts syndrome and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type X-5) or non-syndromic HL (DFNX1). A subsequent screening of the entire PRPS1 gene in 16 unrelated probands from X-linked deaf families led to the discovery of two additional missense variants (c.343A>G (p.M115V) and c.925G>T (p.V309F)) segregating with hearing impairment, and associated with mildly-symptomatic peripheral neuropathy. All three variants result in a marked reduction (>60%) of the PRS-I activity in the patients' erythrocytes, with c.343A>G (p.M115V) and c.925G>T (p.V309F) affecting more severely the enzyme function. Our data significantly expand the current spectrum of pathogenic variants in PRPS1, confirming that they are associated with a continuum disease spectrum, thus stressing the importance of functional studies and detailed clinical investigations for genotype-phenotype correlation.

  3. Linked space physics models for operational ionospheric forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.; Bouwer, D.; Forbes, J.; Frahm, R.; Fry, C.; Hagan, M.; Hajj, G.; Hsu, T.; Knipp, D.; Mannucci, A.; Papitashvili, V.; Pi, X.; Sharber, J.; Storz, M.; Wang, C.; Wilson, B.

    2003-12-01

    The shorter-term variable impact of the Sun's photons, solar wind particles, and interplanetary magnetic field upon the Earth's environment that can adversely affect technological systems is colloquially known as space weather. It includes, for example, the effects of solar coronal mass ejections, solar flares and irradiances, solar and galactic energetic particles, as well as the solar wind, all of which affect Earth's magnetospheric particles and fields, geomagnetic and electrodynamical conditions, radiation belts, aurorae, ionosphere, and the neutral thermosphere and mesosphere. These combined effects create risks to space and ground systems from electric field disturbances, irregularities, and scintillation, for example, where these ionospheric perturbations are a direct result of space weather. A major challenge exists to improve our understanding of ionospheric space weather processes and then translate that knowledge into operational systems. Ionospheric perturbed conditions can be recognized and specified in real-time or predicted through linkages of models and data streams. Linked systems must be based upon multi-spectral observations of the Sun, solar wind measurements by satellites between the Earth and Sun, as well as by measurements from radar and GPS/TEC networks. Models of the solar wind, solar irradiances, the neutral thermosphere, thermospheric winds, joule heating, particle precipitation, substorms, the electric field, and the ionosphere provide climatological best estimates of non-measured current and forecast parameters. We report on a team effort that is developing a prototype operational ionospheric forecast system to detect and predict the conditions leading to dynamic ionospheric changes. The system will provide global-to-local specifications of recent history, current epoch, and 72-hour forecast ionospheric and neutral density profiles, TEC, plasma drifts, neutral winds, and temperatures. Geophysical changes will be captured and

  4. A cell-based model system links chromothripsis with hyperploidy

    PubMed Central

    Mardin, Balca R; Drainas, Alexandros P; Waszak, Sebastian M; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Isokane, Mayumi; Stütz, Adrian M; Raeder, Benjamin; Efthymiopoulos, Theocharis; Buccitelli, Christopher; Segura-Wang, Maia; Northcott, Paul; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter; Ellenberg, Jan; Korbel, Jan O

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable observation emerging from recent cancer genome analyses is the identification of chromothripsis as a one-off genomic catastrophe, resulting in massive somatic DNA structural rearrangements (SRs). Largely due to lack of suitable model systems, the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis has remained elusive. We developed an integrative method termed “complex alterations after selection and transformation (CAST),” enabling efficient in vitro generation of complex DNA rearrangements including chromothripsis, using cell perturbations coupled with a strong selection barrier followed by massively parallel sequencing. We employed this methodology to characterize catastrophic SR formation processes, their temporal sequence, and their impact on gene expression and cell division. Our in vitro system uncovered a propensity of chromothripsis to occur in cells with damaged telomeres, and in particular in hyperploid cells. Analysis of primary medulloblastoma cancer genomes verified the link between hyperploidy and chromothripsis in vivo. CAST provides the foundation for mechanistic dissection of complex DNA rearrangement processes. PMID:26415501

  5. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  6. Phenotypic variability in a Tunisian family with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy caused by the p.Gln316Pro novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Kallabi, Fakhri; Ellouz, Emna; Tabebi, Mouna; Ben Salah, Ghada; Kaabechi, Naziha; Keskes, Leila; Triki, Chahnez; Kamoun, Hassen

    2016-01-30

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative recessive disorder that affects the brain white matter and associated with adrenal insufficiency. It is characterized by an abnormal function of the peroxisomes, which leads to an accumulation of the Very Long Chain Fatty Acids (VLCFA) in plasma and tissues, especially in the cortex of the adrenal glands and the white matter of the central nervous system. Mutations in the ABCD1 gene affect the function of the encoded protein ALDP, an ATP-binding cassette transporter located in the peroxisomal membrane protein. The present study reports the clinical, biochemical and molecular investigation in a Tunisian family with two affected males with childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. The ABCD1 gene sequencing indicated a novel hemizygous missense mutation c.947A>C (p.Gln316Pro) in the exon 2 of the ABCD1 gene in the patients, their mother and their sisters. This missense variation was predicted to be possibly damaging by the PolyPhen and SIFT prediction software. Although presence of the same mutation c.947A>C in both siblings, they present different clinical signs. Based on the disease's progress, the clinical signs and biochemical aspects between the two siblings, we demonstrate that there is no correlation genotype-phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The central nervous system phenotype of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a transient disorder of children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Mateen, Majeed; Craig, Alexa Kanwit; Chance, Phillip F

    2014-03-01

    We describe 2 patients with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 1 (CMTX1) disease and central nervous system manifestations and review 19 cases from the literature. Our first case had not been previously diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and the second case, although known to have Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, was suspected of having CMTX1 after presentation with central nervous system manifestations. The most common central nervous system manifestations were transient and included dysarthria, ataxia, hemiparesis, and tetraparesis resembling periodic paralysis. Of the 21 patients, 19 presented at 21 years of age or younger, implicating CMTX1 with transient central nervous system manifestations as a disorder that predominantly affects children and adolescents. CMTX1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with transient central nervous system phenomena, including stroke-like episodes, tetraparesis suggestive of periodic paralysis, dysarthria, ataxia, or combinations of these deficits. Reversible, bilateral, nonenhancing white matter lesions and restricted diffusion on magnetic resonance imaging are characteristic features of the central nervous system phenotype of CMTX1.

  8. Exosomes from adipose-derived stem cells ameliorate phenotype of Huntington's disease in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mijung; Liu, Tian; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the aggregation of mutant Huntingtin (mHtt). Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have a potential for use in the treatment of incurable disorders, including HD. ASCs secrete various neurotrophic factors and microvesicles, and modulate hostile microenvironments affected by disease through paracrine mechanisms. Exosomes are small vesicles that transport nucleic acid and protein between cells. Here, we investigated the therapeutic role of exosomes from ASCs (ASC-exo) using in vitro HD model by examining pathological phenotypes of this model. Immunocytochemistry result showed that ASC-exo significantly decreases mHtt aggregates in R6/2 mice-derived neuronal cells. Western blot result further confirmed the reduction in mHtt aggregates level by ASC-exo treatment. ASC-exo up-regulates PGC-1, phospho-CREB and ameliorates abnormal apoptotic protein level in an in vitro HD model. In addition, MitoSOX Red, JC-1 and cell viability assay showed that ASC-exo reduces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis of in vitro HD model. These findings suggest that ASC-exo has a therapeutic potential for treating HD by modulating representative cellular phenotypes of HD.

  9. Comparison of some modeling and control issues for a flexible two link manipulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Xu, W; Nair, S S

    2004-10-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a flexible two link manipulator presents a challenging modeling and control problem with its lumped actuator dynamics coupled with distributed link dynamics. Issues related to modeling uncertainty and control robustness as well as a good understanding of the experimental issues are essential for advanced modeling and control for such systems. This paper reports some of the advanced modeling, control, and experimental issues for a flexible two link manipulator, including some novel approaches developed by the authors.

  10. Linking the M&Rfi Weather Generator with Agrometeorological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, Martin; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    Realistic meteorological inputs (representing the present and/or future climates) for the agrometeorological model simulations are often produced by stochastic weather generators (WGs). This contribution presents some methodological issues and results obtained in our recent experiments. We also address selected questions raised in the synopsis of this session. The input meteorological time series for our experiments are produced by the parametric single site weather generator (WG) Marfi, which is calibrated from the available observational data (or interpolated from surrounding stations). To produce meteorological series representing the future climate, the WG parameters are modified by climate change scenarios, which are prepared by the pattern scaling method: the standardised scenarios derived from Global or Regional Climate Models are multiplied by the change in global mean temperature (ΔTG) determined by the simple climate model MAGICC. The presentation will address following questions: (i) The dependence of the quality of the synthetic weather series and impact results on the WG settings. An emphasis will be put on an effect of conditioning the daily WG on monthly WG (presently being one of our hot topics), which aims at improvement of the reproduction of the low-frequency weather variability. Comparison of results obtained with various WG settings is made in terms of climatic and agroclimatic indices (including extreme temperature and precipitation characteristics and drought indices). (ii) Our methodology accounts for the uncertainties coming from various sources. We will show how the climate change impact results are affected by 1. uncertainty in climate modelling, 2. uncertainty in ΔTG, and 3. uncertainty related to the complexity of the climate change scenario (focusing on an effect of inclusion of changes in variability into the climate change scenarios). Acknowledgements: This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific

  11. Qualitative Dynamical Modelling Can Formally Explain Mesoderm Specification and Predict Novel Developmental Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, E. Hilary; Ciglar, Lucia; Junion, Guillaume; Gonzalez, Aitor; Girardot, Charles; Perrin, Laurent; Furlong, Eileen E. M.; Thieffry, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Given the complexity of developmental networks, it is often difficult to predict the effect of genetic perturbations, even within coding genes. Regulatory factors generally have pleiotropic effects, exhibit partially redundant roles, and regulate highly interconnected pathways with ample cross-talk. Here, we delineate a logical model encompassing 48 components and 82 regulatory interactions involved in mesoderm specification during Drosophila development, thereby providing a formal integration of all available genetic information from the literature. The four main tissues derived from mesoderm correspond to alternative stable states. We demonstrate that the model can predict known mutant phenotypes and use it to systematically predict the effects of over 300 new, often non-intuitive, loss- and gain-of-function mutations, and combinations thereof. We further validated several novel predictions experimentally, thereby demonstrating the robustness of model. Logical modelling can thus contribute to formally explain and predict regulatory outcomes underlying cell fate decisions. PMID:27599298

  12. A phenotypic in vitro model for the main determinants of human whole heart function

    PubMed Central

    Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; McAleer, Christopher W.; McLamb, William; Long, Christopher J.; Oleaga, Carlota; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Hickman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This article details the construction and testing of a phenotypic assay system that models in vivo cardiac function in a parallel in vitro environment with human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. The major determinants of human whole-heart function were experimentally modeled by integrating separate 2D cellular systems with BioMicroelectromechanical Systems (BioMEMS) constructs. The model featured a serum-free defined medium to enable both acute and chronic evaluation of drugs and toxins. The integration of data from both systems produced biologically relevant predictions of cardiac function in response to varying concentrations of selected drugs. Sotalol, norepinephrine and verapamil were shown to affect the measured parameters according to their specific mechanism of action, in agreement with clinical data. This system is applicable for cardiac side effect assessment, general toxicology, efficacy studies, and evaluation of in vitro cellular disease models in body-on-a-chip systems. PMID:25978005

  13. Suppression of two major Fragile X Syndrome mouse model phenotypes by the mGluR5 antagonist MPEP.

    PubMed

    Yan, Q J; Rammal, M; Tranfaglia, M; Bauchwitz, R P

    2005-12-01

    Fragile X Syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation worldwide. A Fragile X mouse model, fmr1(tm1Cgr), with a disruption in the X-linked Fmr1 gene, has three substantial deficits observed in several strains: (1) sensitivity to audiogenic seizures (AGS), (2) tendency to spend significantly more time in the center of an open field, and (3) enlarged testes. Alterations in metabotropic glutamate receptor group I signaling were previously identified in the fmr1(tm1Cgr) mouse. In this study, we examined the effect of MPEP, an antagonist of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR5, on audiogenic seizures and open field activity of fmr1(tm1Cgr) mice. Genetic analysis revealed synergistic reactions between fmr1(tm1Cgr) and inbred AGS alleles. In addition, AGS sensitivity due to the fmr1(tm1Cgr) allele was restricted during development. Examination of phenotypes combining mGluR5 inhibition and Fmr1 mutation indicated that absence of FMRP may affect mGluR5 signaling through indirect as well as direct pathways. All strains of fmr1(tm1Cgr) mice tested (FVB/NJ, C57BL/6J, and an F1 hybrid of the two) had a more excitable AGS pathway than wild-type, and consequently required more MPEP to achieve seizure suppression. At high doses of mGluR5 antagonists, a Fragile X specific tolerance (loss of drug activity) was observed. The tolerance effect could be overcome by a further increase in drug dose. In open field tests, MPEP reduced fmr1(tm1Cgr) center field behavior to one indistinguishable from wild-type. Therefore, mGluR5 antagonists were able to rescue two of the major phenotypes of the FX mouse. Modulation of mGluR5 signaling may allow amelioration of symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome.

  14. Time series modeling of live-cell shape dynamics for image-based phenotypic profiling.

    PubMed

    Gordonov, Simon; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Wells, Alan; Gertler, Frank B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Bathe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell imaging can be used to capture spatio-temporal aspects of cellular responses that are not accessible to fixed-cell imaging. As the use of live-cell imaging continues to increase, new computational procedures are needed to characterize and classify the temporal dynamics of individual cells. For this purpose, here we present the general experimental-computational framework SAPHIRE (Stochastic Annotation of Phenotypic Individual-cell Responses) to characterize phenotypic cellular responses from time series imaging datasets. Hidden Markov modeling is used to infer and annotate morphological state and state-switching properties from image-derived cell shape measurements. Time series modeling is performed on each cell individually, making the approach broadly useful for analyzing asynchronous cell populations. Two-color fluorescent cells simultaneously expressing actin and nuclear reporters enabled us to profile temporal changes in cell shape following pharmacological inhibition of cytoskeleton-regulatory signaling pathways. Results are compared with existing approaches conventionally applied to fixed-cell imaging datasets, and indicate that time series modeling captures heterogeneous dynamic cellular responses that can improve drug classification and offer additional important insight into mechanisms of drug action. The software is available at http://saphire-hcs.org.

  15. Assessment of ataxia phenotype in a new mouse model of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wyman; Caston, Rose; Balakrishnan, Bijina; Siddiqi, Anwer; Parmar, Kamalpreet; Tang, Manshu; Feng, Merry; Lai, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Despite adequate dietary management, patients with classic galactosemia continue to have increased risks of cognitive deficits, speech dyspraxia, primary ovarian insufficiency, and abnormal motor development. A recent evaluation of a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT)-deficient mouse model revealed reduced fertility and growth restriction. These phenotypes resemble those seen in human patients. In this study, we further assess the fidelity of this new mouse model by examining the animals for the manifestation of a common neurological sequela in human patients: cerebellar ataxia. The balance, grip strength, and motor coordination of GALT-deficient and wild-type mice were tested using a modified rotarod. The results were compared to composite phenotype scoring tests, typically used to evaluate neurological and motor impairment. The data demonstrated abnormalities with varying severity in the GALT-deficient mice. Mice of different ages were used to reveal the progressive nature of motor impairment. The varying severity and age-dependent impairments seen in the animal model agree with reports on human patients. Finally, measurements of the cerebellar granular and molecular layers suggested that mutant mice experience cerebellar hypoplasia, which could have resulted from the down-regulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  16. Accelerating glioblastoma drug discovery: Convergence of patient-derived models, genome editing and phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Carragher, Neil O; Pollard, Steven M

    2017-04-01

    Patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM) continue to face a bleak prognosis. It is critical that new effective therapeutic strategies are developed. GBM stem cells have molecular hallmarks of neural stem and progenitor cells and it is possible to propagate both non-transformed normal neural stem cells and GBM stem cells, in defined, feeder-free, adherent culture. These primary stem cell lines provide an experimental model that is ideally suited to cell-based drug discovery or genetic screens in order to identify tumour-specific vulnerabilities. For many solid tumours, including GBM, the genetic disruptions that drive tumour initiation and growth have now been catalogued. CRISPR/Cas-based genome editing technologies have recently emerged, transforming our ability to functionally annotate the human genome. Genome editing opens prospects for engineering precise genetic changes in normal and GBM-derived neural stem cells, which will provide more defined and reliable genetic models, with critical matched pairs of isogenic cell lines. Generation of more complex alleles such as knock in tags or fluorescent reporters is also now possible. These new cellular models can be deployed in cell-based phenotypic drug discovery (PDD). Here we discuss the convergence of these advanced technologies (iPS cells, neural stem cell culture, genome editing and high content phenotypic screening) and how they herald a new era in human cellular genetics that should have a major impact in accelerating glioblastoma drug discovery. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. From stem cells to bone: phenotype acquisition, stabilization, and tissue engineering in animal models.

    PubMed

    Gordeladze, Jan O; Reseland, Janne E; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Apparailly, Florence; Jorgensen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The regeneration of bone tissue depends on the concerted actions of a plethora of signals that recruit mesenchymal stem cells for lineage-specific differentiation, with cellular phenotypes serving various functions throughout their life span. The signals are conveyed in hormones, growth factors, and mechanical forces, all of which ensure proper modeling and remodeling. Both processes are secured by indigenous and programmed metabolism in osteoblasts/osteocytes as well as in other stem cell (SC)-derived cell types (e.g., osteoclasts, bone lining cells) involved in the remodeling of the subject tissue. The focus of this review is the concerted action of these signals as well as the regulatory and/or stabilizing control circuits exhibited by a class of small RNAs, designated microRNAs. We discuss an in vitro approach for ensuring proper phenotype acquisition as well as the choice of scaffolds and animal models for in vivo tissue repair. This approach includes selection of SC niches to optimize bone formation in vivo, transcription factors important for osteoblastogenesis, the Wnt and Notch pathways of signaling, selection of delivery systems for gene therapy, use of appropriate matrices and scaffolds, in vivo mechanostimulation, choice of lesions to be repaired, and type of animal to use. We also discuss Wnt-related and SC-based treatment of osteoporosis. Throughout, we offer considerations for the selection of model systems and parameters to assess the entire procedure from initial SC selection to final bone repair, and conclude with a table summarizing our recommendations.

  18. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor; Cole, Wesley; Sullivan, Patrick; Brinkman, Gregory; Margolis, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validity of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.

  19. Relationship between the monosomy X phenotype and Y-linked ribosomal protein S4 (Rps4) in several species of mammals: A molecular evolutionary analysis of Rps4 homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Omoe, Katsuhiko; Endo, Akira

    1996-01-01

    Two isoforms of the human ribosomal protein S4 gene, RPS4X and RPS4Y, are located on the X and Y chromsomes. It has been postulated and haploinsufficiency of these genes may contribute to Turner syndrome. We show here that several animal species that show the Turner-like phenotype on monosomy X have no Y-linked Rps4 homolog. There may be another gene(s) that contributes to abnormal phenotypes of monosomy X. Molecular evolutionary analysis shows that the Y-linked and RPS4X-related homologs diverged prior to the radiation of placental mammals and evolved independently. Furthermore, the functional constraints against the RPS4X-related homologs are much stronger than those against the Y-linked homologs. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Estrogen Metabolism and Exposure in a Genotypic-Phenotypic Model for Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Crooke, Philip S.; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Dawling, Sheila; Roodi, Nady; Higginbotham, Kathryn S. P.; Plummer, W. Dale; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Dupont, William D.; Parl, Fritz F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current models of breast cancer risk prediction do not directly reflect mammary estrogen metabolism or genetic variability in exposure to carcinogenic estrogen metabolites. Methods We developed a model that simulates the kinetic effect of genetic variants of the enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and COMT on the production of the main carcinogenic estrogen metabolite, 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), expressed as area under the curve metric (4-OHE2-AUC). The model also incorporates phenotypic factors (age, body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptives, family history), which plausibly influence estrogen metabolism and the production of 4-OHE2. We applied the model to two independent, population-based breast cancer case-control groups, the German GENICA study (967 cases, 971 controls) and the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 465 cases, 885 controls). Results In the GENICA study, premenopausal women at the 90th percentile of 4-OHE2-AUC among control subjects had a risk of breast cancer that was 2.30 times that of women at the 10th control 4-OHE2-AUC percentile (95% CI 1.7 – 3.2, P = 2.9 × 10−7). This relative risk was 1.89 (95% CI 1.5 – 2.4, P = 2.2 × 10−8) in postmenopausal women. In the NBC, this relative risk in postmenopausal women was 1.81 (95% CI 1.3 – 2.6, P = 7.6 × 10−4), which increased to 1.83 (95% CI 1.4 – 2.3, P = 9.5 × 10−7) when a history of proliferative breast disease was included in the model. Conclusions The model combines genotypic and phenotypic factors involved in carcinogenic estrogen metabolite production and cumulative estrogen exposure to predict breast cancer risk. Impact The estrogen carcinogenesis-based model has the potential to provide personalized risk estimates. PMID:21610218

  1. Optical coherence tomography for live phenotypic analysis of embryonic ocular structures in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Saba H.; Sudheendran, Narendran; Overbeek, Paul A.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Mouse models of ocular diseases provide a powerful resource for exploration of molecular regulation of eye development and pre-clinical studies. Availability of a live high-resolution imaging method for mouse embryonic eyes would significantly enhance longitudinal analyses and high-throughput morphological screening. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used for live embryonic ocular imaging throughout gestation. At all studied stages, the whole eye is within the imaging distance of the system and there is a good optical contrast between the structures. We also performed OCT eye imaging in the embryonic retinoblastoma mouse model Pax6-SV40 T-antigen, which spontaneously forms lens and retinal lesions, and demonstrate that OCT allows us to clearly differentiate between the mutant and wild type phenotypes. These results demonstrate that OCTin utero imaging is a potentially useful tool to study embryonic ocular diseases in mouse models. PMID:23224171

  2. Optical coherence tomography for live phenotypic analysis of embryonic ocular structures in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Sudheendran, Narendran; Overbeek, Paul A.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-08-01

    Mouse models of ocular diseases provide a powerful resource for exploration of molecular regulation of eye development and pre-clinical studies. Availability of a live high-resolution imaging method for mouse embryonic eyes would significantly enhance longitudinal analyses and high-throughput morphological screening. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used for live embryonic ocular imaging throughout gestation. At all studied stages, the whole eye is within the imaging distance of the system and there is a good optical contrast between the structures. We also performed OCT eye imaging in the embryonic retinoblastoma mouse model Pax6-SV40 T-antigen, which spontaneously forms lens and retinal lesions, and demonstrate that OCT allows us to clearly differentiate between the mutant and wild type phenotypes. These results demonstrate that OCTin utero imaging is a potentially useful tool to study embryonic ocular diseases in mouse models.

  3. Linking Student Retention Model with Institutional Planning: The Benefits and Limitations of a Student Matrix Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schartman, Laura; Rhee, Byung-Shik

    This study explored the possibility of linking the Luna (1999) student flow matrix model with institutional planning at a comprehensive state institution, investigating how student flow environments were associated with student characteristics such as race, gender, citizenship, class level, entry type, and cumulative grade point average. The study…

  4. Toward a nonhuman primate model of fetal programming: phenotypic plasticity of the common marmoset fetoplacental complex.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Julienne N

    2012-11-01

    Nonhuman primates offer unique opportunities as animal models in the study of developmental programming and the role of the placenta in developmental processes. All primates share fundamental similarities in life history and reproductive biology. Thus, insights gleaned from studies of nonhuman primates have a higher degree of biological salience to human biology than do studies of rodents or agricultural animals. The common marmoset monkey is a small-bodied primate from South America that produces litters of dizygotic fetuses that share a single placental mass. This natural variation allows us to model different intrauterine conditions and associated fetoplacental phenotypes. The marmoset placenta is phenotypically plastic according to litter size. Triplet litters are characterized by low individual fetal weights and significantly more efficient placentas and attendant alterations to the microscopic architecture and endocrine function, thus modeling a nutrient restricted intrauterine environment. Consistent with this model, triplet neonates experience a higher risk of perinatal mortality and an increased likelihood of elevated adult weight. Recent evidence has shown that the intrauterine experience of females has an impact on their own pregnancy outcomes in adulthood: triplet females experience significantly greater pregnancy loss than do twin females. The marmoset monkey thus represents a potential powerful nonhuman primate model of multiple pregnancies, restrictive prenatal experiences, and differential reproductive outcomes in adulthood, which may have important implications for studying the impact of in vitro fertilization on adult reproductive health. It is still too early to determine exactly what developmental pathways lead to this disparity or what specific role the placenta plays; future work on this front will be critical to establish the marmoset as an important model of fetal programming of reproductive function in adulthood and across generations.

  5. Mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Disease phenotype of a ferret CFTR-knockout model of cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Fisher, John T.; Yan, Ziying; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Joo, Nam Soo; Zhang, Yulong; Zhou, Weihong; Yi, Yaling; Kinyon, Joann M.; Lei-Butters, Diana C.; Griffin, Michelle A.; Naumann, Paul; Luo, Meihui; Ascher, Jill; Wang, Kai; Frana, Timothy; Wine, Jeffrey J.; Meyerholz, David K.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease that affects multiple organs. It is caused by mutations in CFTR. Animal modeling of this disease has been challenging, with species- and strain-specific differences in organ biology and CFTR function influencing the emergence of disease pathology. Here, we report the phenotype of a CFTR-knockout ferret model of CF. Neonatal CFTR-knockout ferrets demonstrated many of the characteristics of human CF disease, including defective airway chloride transport and submucosal gland fluid secretion; variably penetrant meconium ileus (MI); pancreatic, liver, and vas deferens disease; and a predisposition to lung infection in the early postnatal period. Severe malabsorption by the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was the primary cause of death in CFTR-knockout kits that escaped MI. Elevated liver function tests in CFTR-knockout kits were corrected by oral administration of ursodeoxycholic acid, and the addition of an oral proton-pump inhibitor improved weight gain and survival. To overcome the limitations imposed by the severe intestinal phenotype, we cloned 4 gut-corrected transgenic CFTR-knockout kits that expressed ferret CFTR specifically in the intestine. One clone passed feces normally and demonstrated no detectable ferret CFTR expression in the lung or liver. The animals described in this study are likely to be useful tools for dissecting CF disease pathogenesis and developing treatments. PMID:20739752

  7. Predicting the functional, molecular, and phenotypic consequences of amino acid substitutions using hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Shihab, Hashem A; Gough, Julian; Cooper, David N; Stenson, Peter D; Barker, Gary L A; Edwards, Keith J; Day, Ian N M; Gaunt, Tom R

    2013-01-01

    The rate at which nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are being identified in the human genome is increasing dramatically owing to advances in whole-genome/whole-exome sequencing technologies. Automated methods capable of accurately and reliably distinguishing between pathogenic and functionally neutral nsSNPs are therefore assuming ever-increasing importance. Here, we describe the Functional Analysis Through Hidden Markov Models (FATHMM) software and server: a species-independent method with optional species-specific weightings for the prediction of the functional effects of protein missense variants. Using a model weighted for human mutations, we obtained performance accuracies that outperformed traditional prediction methods (i.e., SIFT, PolyPhen, and PANTHER) on two separate benchmarks. Furthermore, in one benchmark, we achieve performance accuracies that outperform current state-of-the-art prediction methods (i.e., SNPs&GO and MutPred). We demonstrate that FATHMM can be efficiently applied to high-throughput/large-scale human and nonhuman genome sequencing projects with the added benefit of phenotypic outcome associations. To illustrate this, we evaluated nsSNPs in wheat (Triticum spp.) to identify some of the important genetic variants responsible for the phenotypic differences introduced by intense selection during domestication. A Web-based implementation of FATHMM, including a high-throughput batch facility and a downloadable standalone package, is available at http://fathmm.biocompute.org.uk.

  8. Sex differences in mania phenotype and ethanol consumption in the lateral hypothalamic kindled rat model

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, O A; Gawad, N A; Mohamed, K; Vadnie, C; Camsari, U M; Karpyak, V; Frye, M A; Choi, D-S

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences have been observed in mania phenotypes in humans. However the mechanisms underlying this difference are poorly understood. Activating the lateral hypothalamus is implicated in manic-like behaviors in rodents. Using newly established lateral hypothalamus kindled (LHK) rat mania model, we investigated sex differences of manic-like behaviors and its correlation with voluntary ethanol intake. We stimulated the lateral hypothalamus bilaterally in the male and female Wistar rats over five consecutive days. We recorded and quantified kindling-induced behaviors for each individual animal. We also assessed ethanol consumption using a two-bottle choice ethanol drinking as well as circadian locomotor activity counts daily throughout the experiment. We found notable sex differences in several aspects of manic-like behaviors during kindling. Males exhibited a significantly increased locomotor activity during the light phase, and reduced rest interval. On the other hand, females displayed significantly higher ethanol consumption and more frequent rearing behavior. However, no sex differences were present in the duration of sexual, feeding or grooming behaviors or in dark-phase activity counts. The excessive alcohol intake in LHK female rats is reminiscent of clinically reported sex differences in bipolar patients while the other phenotypic sex differences such as rearing and locomotor activity are less clearly described in clinical studies. Overall, our results lend further evidence for the validity of the LHK rat as a useful model to study brain region-specific molecular changes during mania and its correlation with alcohol use disorders. PMID:25803497

  9. Plant Phenotyping using Probabilistic Topic Models: Uncovering the Hyperspectral Language of Plants.

    PubMed

    Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Mahlein, Anne-Katrin; Bauckhage, Christian; Steiner, Ulrike; Oerke, Erich-Christian; Kersting, Kristian

    2016-03-09

    Modern phenotyping and plant disease detection methods, based on optical sensors and information technology, provide promising approaches to plant research and precision farming. In particular, hyperspectral imaging have been found to reveal physiological and structural characteristics in plants and to allow for tracking physiological dynamics due to environmental effects. In this work, we present an approach to plant phenotyping that integrates non-invasive sensors, computer vision, as well as data mining techniques and allows for monitoring how plants respond to stress. To uncover latent hyperspectral characteristics of diseased plants reliably and in an easy-to-understand way, we "wordify" the hyperspectral images, i.e., we turn the images into a corpus of text documents. Then, we apply probabilistic topic models, a well-established natural language processing technique that identifies content and topics of documents. Based on recent regularized topic models, we demonstrate that one can track automatically the development of three foliar diseases of barley. We also present a visualization of the topics that provides plant scientists an intuitive tool for hyperspectral imaging. In short, our analysis and visualization of characteristic topics found during symptom development and disease progress reveal the hyperspectral language of plant diseases.

  10. Plant Phenotyping using Probabilistic Topic Models: Uncovering the Hyperspectral Language of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Mahlein, Anne-Katrin; Bauckhage, Christian; Steiner, Ulrike; Oerke, Erich-Christian; Kersting, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Modern phenotyping and plant disease detection methods, based on optical sensors and information technology, provide promising approaches to plant research and precision farming. In particular, hyperspectral imaging have been found to reveal physiological and structural characteristics in plants and to allow for tracking physiological dynamics due to environmental effects. In this work, we present an approach to plant phenotyping that integrates non-invasive sensors, computer vision, as well as data mining techniques and allows for monitoring how plants respond to stress. To uncover latent hyperspectral characteristics of diseased plants reliably and in an easy-to-understand way, we “wordify” the hyperspectral images, i.e., we turn the images into a corpus of text documents. Then, we apply probabilistic topic models, a well-established natural language processing technique that identifies content and topics of documents. Based on recent regularized topic models, we demonstrate that one can track automatically the development of three foliar diseases of barley. We also present a visualization of the topics that provides plant scientists an intuitive tool for hyperspectral imaging. In short, our analysis and visualization of characteristic topics found during symptom development and disease progress reveal the hyperspectral language of plant diseases. PMID:26957018

  11. UAS Modeling of the Communication Links Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birr, Richard; Murray, Jennifer; Girgis, nancy

    2011-01-01

    There were many links calculated for this and the other scenarios. The rain was analyzed for 99.9% availability with rain rated of none, 20 mm/hr and 90 mm/hr at a height of 5 km out to 25 NM. This was done for each scenario for LOS and for BLOS links for Scenario 5 and 6. Scenario 1 was a LOS-only scenario. Use of two 3 dB Antennas on both ends. The CS2 was unable to maintain a control RF Link during the flight. The largest access gap periods between object top and bottom UA antennae were caused by terrain (ridges and hills). The CS Antenna was changed to High Gain Directional Antenna, all three CS maintained lock on vehicle. There were RF dropouts between the top and bottom UA antennae caused by aircraft obstructions (fuselage, wings, wheel assembles, etc.). Note that for this study antenna locations were placed on top and bottom center of the UA body. Future study should include actual UA antenna locations on the aircraft providing manufactures are willing to provide information. The importance of CS location(s) was demonstrated for primary or backup CS. With a second backup CS placed in a suitable location the UA was able to maintain an overall RF link. The actual location of both backup CSs required the antenna location to be place 150 ft above ground in order to establish a RF link between the UA and CS.

  12. Determining the potential link between irrigation water quality and the microbiological quality of onions by phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Erika M; Duvenage, Francois; Korsten, Lise

    2015-04-01

    , respectively. Phenotypic (antimicrobial) and genotypic (virulence gene prevalence, DNA fingerprinting) analyses showed a link between river, dam, irrigation pivot point, and onion E. coli isolates.

  13. Contiguous Deletion of the X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy Gene (ABCD1) and DXS1357E: A Novel Neonatal Phenotype Similar to Peroxisomal Biogenesis Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Deyanira; Gibson, William; Johnson, Kisha; Mitchell, Grant; LePage, Guy; Cox, Gerald F.; Casey, Robin; Zeiss, Carolyn; Tyson, Heidi; Cutting, Garry R.; Raymond, Gerald V.; Smith, Kirby D.; Watkins, Paul A.; Moser, Ann B.; Moser, Hugo W.; Steinberg, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) results from mutations in ABCD1. ABCD1 resides on Xq28 and encodes an integral peroxisomal membrane protein (ALD protein [ALDP]) that is of unknown function and that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette–transporter superfamily. Individuals with ABCD1 mutations accumulate very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) (carbon length >22). Childhood cerebral X-ALD is the most devastating form of the disease. These children have the earliest onset (age 7.2 ± 1.7 years) among the clinical phenotypes for ABCD1 mutations, but onset does not occur at <3 years of age. Individuals with either peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBD) or single-enzyme deficiencies (SED) in the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathway—disorders such as acyl CoA oxidase deficiency and bifunctional protein deficiency—also accumulate VLCFA, but they present during the neonatal period. Until now, it has been possible to distinguish unequivocally between individuals with these autosomal recessively inherited syndromes and individuals with ABCD1 mutations, on the basis of the clinical presentation and measurement of other biochemical markers. We have identified three newborn boys who had clinical symptoms and initial biochemical results consistent with PBD or SED. In further study, however, we showed that they lacked ALDP, and we identified deletions that extended into the promoter region of ABCD1 and the neighboring gene, DXS1357E. Mutations in DXS1357E and the ABCD1 promoter region have not been described previously. We propose that the term “contiguous ABCD1 DXS1357E deletion syndrome” (CADDS) be used to identify this new contiguous-gene syndrome. The three patients with CADDS who are described here have important implications for genetic counseling, because individuals with CADDS may previously have been misdiagnosed as having an autosomal recessive PBD or SED PMID:11992258

  14. Contiguous deletion of the X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy gene (ABCD1) and DXS1357E: a novel neonatal phenotype similar to peroxisomal biogenesis disorders.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Deyanira; Gibson, William; Johnson, Kisha; Mitchell, Grant; LePage, Guy; Cox, Gerald F; Casey, Robin; Zeiss, Carolyn; Tyson, Heidi; Cutting, Garry R; Raymond, Gerald V; Smith, Kirby D; Watkins, Paul A; Moser, Ann B; Moser, Hugo W; Steinberg, Steven J

    2002-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) results from mutations in ABCD1. ABCD1 resides on Xq28 and encodes an integral peroxisomal membrane protein (ALD protein [ALDP]) that is of unknown function and that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette-transporter superfamily. Individuals with ABCD1 mutations accumulate very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) (carbon length >22). Childhood cerebral X-ALD is the most devastating form of the disease. These children have the earliest onset (age 7.2 +/- 1.7 years) among the clinical phenotypes for ABCD1 mutations, but onset does not occur at <3 years of age. Individuals with either peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBD) or single-enzyme deficiencies (SED) in the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway--disorders such as acyl CoA oxidase deficiency and bifunctional protein deficiency--also accumulate VLCFA, but they present during the neonatal period. Until now, it has been possible to distinguish unequivocally between individuals with these autosomal recessively inherited syndromes and individuals with ABCD1 mutations, on the basis of the clinical presentation and measurement of other biochemical markers. We have identified three newborn boys who had clinical symptoms and initial biochemical results consistent with PBD or SED. In further study, however, we showed that they lacked ALDP, and we identified deletions that extended into the promoter region of ABCD1 and the neighboring gene, DXS1357E. Mutations in DXS1357E and the ABCD1 promoter region have not been described previously. We propose that the term "contiguous ABCD1 DXS1357E deletion syndrome" (CADDS) be used to identify this new contiguous-gene syndrome. The three patients with CADDS who are described here have important implications for genetic counseling, because individuals with CADDS may previously have been misdiagnosed as having an autosomal recessive PBD or SED

  15. Modeling the population dynamics and community impacts of Ambystoma tigrinum: A case study of phenotype plasticity.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Maeve L; Wallace, Dorothy; Whiteman, Howard H; Rheingold, Evan T; Dunham, Ann M; Prosper, Olivia; Chen, Michelle; Hu-Wang, Eileen

    2017-02-24

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of an organism to change its phenotype in response to changes in the environment. General mathematical descriptions of the phenomenon rely on an abstract measure of "viability" that, in this study, is instantiated in the case of the Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum. This organism has a point in its development when, upon maturing, it may take two very different forms. One is a terrestrial salamander (metamorph)that visits ponds to reproduce and eat, while the other is an aquatic form (paedomorph) that remains in the pond to breed and which consumes a variety of prey including its own offspring. A seven dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations is developed, incorporating small (Z) and large (B) invertebrates, Ambystoma young of the year (Y), juveniles (J), terrestrial metamorphs (A) and aquatic paedomorphs (P). One parameter in the model controls the proportion of juveniles maturing into A versus P. Solutions are shown to remain non-negative. Every effort was made to justify parameters biologically through studies reported in the literature. A sensitivity analysis and equilibrium analysis of model parameters demonstrate that morphological choice is critical to the overall composition of the Ambystoma population. Various population viability measures were used to select optimal percentages of juveniles maturing into metamorphs, with optimal choices differing considerably depending on the viability measure. The model suggests that the criteria for viability for this organism vary, both from location to location and also in time. Thus, optimal responses change with spatiotemporal variation, which is consistent with other phenotypically plastic systems. Two competing hypotheses for the conditions under which metamorphosis occurs are examined in light of the model and data from an Ambystoma tigrinum population at Mexican Cut, Colorado. The model clearly supports one of these over the other for this data set

  16. Pro-adhesive phenotype of normal endothelial cells responding to metastatic breast cancer cell conditioned medium is linked to NFκB-mediated transcriptomic regulation.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Rangel, Janini; Córdova, Emilio; Orozco, Lorena; Ventura-Gallegos, José Luis; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma; Escalona-Guzmán, Alma; Vadillo, Felipe; Vázquez-Prado, José; Gariglio, Patricio; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Tumor microenvironment is an important promoter of tumorigenesis in all forms of breast cancer and has been associated with the risk of metastasis in the different breast cancer subtypes including the more frequent luminal subtypes that encompass 60% of cancer patients. Adhesive properties of endothelial cells (ECs) are strikingly affected during cancer cell dissemination and are related to functional changes of adhesion receptors. The contribution of tumor secreted factors to tumor‑EC adhesion represents a therapeutic opportunity for breast cancer metastasis. Conditioned medium (CM) of tumor cells can be used as a model to study the role of the secreted molecules to the tumor microenvironment. We explored transcriptomic changes associated to a pro‑adhesive phenotype in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with CM of the breast cancer cell line ZR75.30 or with TNF for 3 h. Selected genes were used to validate the microarray through RT‑qPCR. The bioinformatic analysis identified NFκB as the main regulator of the pro-adhesive phenotype and this was confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of NFκB pathway with BAY 11‑7085. The changes induced by ZR75.30‑CM mimic those promoted by TNF and display changes in the expression of genes related to inflammatory response, wound healing, extracellular matrix, cytokines, metabolism and cell communication. Despite the abundance of G‑CSF, IL‑8, IL‑6 and VEGF in the ZR75.30‑CM and the confirmed activation of STAT3 and VEGFR2 pathways, our results suggest dominance of NFκB as a central controller of the transcriptomic response of ECs to breast cancer cells leading to expression of cell adhesion receptors.

  17. Gut Microbiota and a Selectively Bred Taste Phenotype: A Novel Model of Microbiome-Behavior Relationships.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark; Fodor, Anthony A; Chapman, Clinton D; Martin, Gary G; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Jobin, Christian; Dess, Nancy K

    2016-06-01

    The microbiota-gut-brain axis is increasingly implicated in obesity, anxiety, stress, and other health-related processes. Researchers have proposed that gut microbiota may influence dietary habits, and pathways through the microbiota-gut-brain axis make such a relationship feasible; however, few data bear on the hypothesis. As a first step in the development of a model system, the gut microbiome was examined in rat lines selectively outbred on a taste phenotype with biobehavioral profiles that have diverged with respect to energy regulation, anxiety, and stress. Occidental low and high-saccharin-consuming rats were assessed for body mass and chow, water, and saccharin intake; littermate controls had shared cages with rats in the experimental group but were not assessed. Cecum and colon microbial communities were profiled using Illumina 16S rRNA sequencing and multivariate analysis of microbial diversity and composition. The saccharin phenotype was confirmed (low-saccharin-consuming rats, 0.7Δ% [0.9Δ%]; high-saccharin-consuming rats, 28.1Δ% [3.6Δ%]). Regardless of saccharin exposure, gut microbiota differed between lines in terms of overall community similarity and taxa at lower phylogenetic levels. Specifically, 16 genera in three phyla distinguished the lines at a 10% false discovery rate. The study demonstrates for the first time that rodent lines created through selective pressure on taste and differing on functionally related correlates host different microbial communities. Whether the microbiota are causally related to the taste phenotype or its correlates remains to be determined. These findings encourage further inquiry on the relationship of the microbiome to taste, dietary habits, emotion, and health.

  18. Verification of Geometric Model-Based Plant Phenotyping Methods for Studies of Xerophytic Plants

    PubMed Central

    Drapikowski, Paweł; Kazimierczak-Grygiel, Ewa; Korecki, Dominik; Wiland-Szymańska, Justyna

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of verification of certain non-contact measurement methods of plant scanning to estimate morphological parameters such as length, width, area, volume of leaves and/or stems on the basis of computer models. The best results in reproducing the shape of scanned objects up to 50 cm in height were obtained with the structured-light DAVID Laserscanner. The optimal triangle mesh resolution for scanned surfaces was determined with the measurement error taken into account. The research suggests that measuring morphological parameters from computer models can supplement or even replace phenotyping with classic methods. Calculating precise values of area and volume makes determination of the S/V (surface/volume) ratio for cacti and other succulents possible, whereas for classic methods the result is an approximation only. In addition, the possibility of scanning and measuring plant species which differ in morphology was investigated. PMID:27355949

  19. Verification of Geometric Model-Based Plant Phenotyping Methods for Studies of Xerophytic Plants.

    PubMed

    Drapikowski, Paweł; Kazimierczak-Grygiel, Ewa; Korecki, Dominik; Wiland-Szymańska, Justyna

    2016-06-27

    This paper presents the results of verification of certain non-contact measurement methods of plant scanning to estimate morphological parameters such as length, width, area, volume of leaves and/or stems on the basis of computer models. The best results in reproducing the shape of scanned objects up to 50 cm in height were obtained with the structured-light DAVID Laserscanner. The optimal triangle mesh resolution for scanned surfaces was determined with the measurement error taken into account. The research suggests that measuring morphological parameters from computer models can supplement or even replace phenotyping with classic methods. Calculating precise values of area and volume makes determination of the S/V (surface/volume) ratio for cacti and other succulents possible, whereas for classic methods the result is an approximation only. In addition, the possibility of scanning and measuring plant species which differ in morphology was investigated.

  20. A novel early onset phenotype in a zebrafish model of merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Gupta, Vandana A.; Dowling, James J.

    2017-01-01

    Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) is a severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in infancy that is associated with severe morbidities (particularly wheelchair dependence) and early mortality. It is caused by recessive mutations in the LAMA2 gene that encodes a subunit of the extracellular matrix protein laminin 211. At present, there are no treatments for this disabling disease. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system for the identification of novel therapies. However, drug discovery in the zebrafish is largely dependent on the identification of phenotypes suitable for chemical screening. Our goal in this study was to elucidate novel, early onset abnormalities in the candyfloss (caf) zebrafish, a model of MDC1A. We uncovered and characterize abnormalities in spontaneous coiling, the earliest motor movement in the zebrafish, as a fully penetrant change specific to caf mutants that is ideal for future drug testing. PMID:28241031

  1. MTO1-Deficient Mouse Model Mirrors the Human Phenotype Showing Complex I Defect and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Lore; Kling, Eva; Schiller, Evelyn; Zeh, Ramona; Schrewe, Anja; Hölter, Sabine M.; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Strecker, Valentina; Wittig, Ilka; Dumitru, Iulia; Wenz, Tina; Bender, Andreas; Aichler, Michaela; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Walch, Axel; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Floss, Thomas; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Wurst, Wolfgang; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Klopstock, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1) were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients. PMID:25506927

  2. Morphological Evolution of Physical Robots through Model-Free Phenotype Development

    PubMed Central

    Brodbeck, Luzius; Hauser, Simon; Iida, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Artificial evolution of physical systems is a stochastic optimization method in which physical machines are iteratively adapted to a target function. The key for a meaningful design optimization is the capability to build variations of physical machines through the course of the evolutionary process. The optimization in turn no longer relies on complex physics models that are prone to the reality gap, a mismatch between simulated and real-world behavior. We report model-free development and evaluation of phenotypes in the artificial evolution of physical systems, in which a mother robot autonomously designs and assembles locomotion agents. The locomotion agents are automatically placed in the testing environment and their locomotion behavior is analyzed in the real world. This feedback is used for the design of the next iteration. Through experiments with a total of 500 autonomously built locomotion agents, this article shows diversification of morphology and behavior of physical robots for the improvement of functionality with limited resources. PMID:26091255

  3. Modeling Rice Metabolism: From Elucidating Environmental Effects on Cellular Phenotype to Guiding Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Cheung, C. Y. Maurice; Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-01-01

    Crop productivity is severely limited by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, it is highly needed to understand the underlying mechanisms of environmental stress response and tolerance in plants, which could be addressed by systems biology approach. To this end, high-throughput omics profiling and in silico modeling can be considered to explore the environmental effects on phenotypic states and metabolic behaviors of rice crops at the systems level. Especially, the advent of constraint-based metabolic reconstruction and analysis paves a way to characterize the plant cellular physiology under various stresses by combining the mathematical network models with multi-omics data. Rice metabolic networks have been reconstructed since 2013 and currently six such networks are available, where five are at genome-scale. Since their publication, these models have been utilized to systematically elucidate the rice abiotic stress responses and identify agronomic traits for crop improvement. In this review, we summarize the current status of the existing rice metabolic networks and models with their applications. Furthermore, we also highlight future directions of rice modeling studies, particularly stressing how these models can be used to contextualize the affluent multi-omics data that are readily available in the public domain. Overall, we envisage a number of studies in the future, exploiting the available metabolic models to enhance the yield and quality of rice and other food crops. PMID:27965696

  4. Phenotypic distribution models corroborate species distribution models: A shift in the role and prevalence of a dominant prairie grass in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam B; Alsdurf, Jacob; Knapp, Mary; Baer, Sara G; Johnson, Loretta C

    2017-10-01

    Phenotypic distribution within species can vary widely across environmental gradients but forecasts of species' responses to environmental change often assume species respond homogenously across their ranges. We compared predictions from species and phenotype distribution models under future climate scenarios for Andropogon gerardii, a widely distributed, dominant grass found throughout the central United States. Phenotype data on aboveground biomass, height, leaf width, and chlorophyll content were obtained from 33 populations spanning a ~1000 km gradient that encompassed the majority of the species' environmental range. Species and phenotype distribution models were trained using current climate conditions and projected to future climate scenarios. We used permutation procedures to infer the most important variable for each model. The species-level response to climate was most sensitive to maximum temperature of the hottest month, but phenotypic variables were most sensitive to mean annual precipitation. The phenotype distribution models predict that A. gerardii could be largely functionally eliminated from where this species currently dominates, with biomass and height declining by up to ~60% and leaf width by ~20%. By the 2070s, the core area of highest suitability for A. gerardii is projected to shift up to ~700 km northeastward. Further, short-statured phenotypes found in the present-day short grass prairies on the western periphery of the species' range will become favored in the current core ~800 km eastward of their current location. Combined, species and phenotype models predict this currently dominant prairie grass will decline in prevalence and stature. Thus, sourcing plant material for grassland restoration and forage should consider changes in the phenotype that will be favored under future climate conditions. Phenotype distribution models account for the role of intraspecific variation in determining responses to anticipated climate change and

  5. Down Syndrome Cognitive Phenotypes Modeled in Mice Trisomic for All HSA 21 Homologues.

    PubMed

    Belichenko, Pavel V; Kleschevnikov, Alexander M; Becker, Ann; Wagner, Grant E; Lysenko, Larisa V; Yu, Y Eugene; Mobley, William C

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), trisomy for chromosome 21, is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. The genomic regions on human chromosome 21 (HSA21) are syntenically conserved with regions on mouse chromosomes 10, 16, and 17 (Mmu10, Mmu16, and Mmu17). Recently, we created a genetic model of DS which carries engineered duplications of all three mouse syntenic regions homologous to HSA21. This 'triple trisomic' or TTS model thus represents the most complete and accurate murine model currently available for experimental studies of genotype-phenotype relationships in DS. Here we extended our initial studies of TTS mice. Locomotor activity, stereotypic and repetitive behavior, anxiety, working memory, long-term memory, and synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus were examined in the TTS and wild-type (WT) control mice. Changes in locomotor activity were most remarkable for a significant increase in ambulatory time and a reduction in average velocity of TTS mice. No changes were detected in repetitive and stereotypic behavior and in measures of anxiety. Working memory showed no changes when tested in Y-maze, but deficiency in a more challenging T-maze test was detected. Furthermore, long-term object recognition memory was significantly reduced in the TTS mice. These changes were accompanied by deficient long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus, which was restored to the WT levels following blockade of GABAA receptors with picrotoxin (100 μM). TTS mice thus demonstrated a number of phenotypes characteristic of DS and may serve as a new standard by which to evaluate and direct findings in other less complete models of DS.

  6. Down Syndrome Cognitive Phenotypes Modeled in Mice Trisomic for All HSA 21 Homologues

    PubMed Central

    Belichenko, Pavel V.; Kleschevnikov, Alexander M.; Becker, Ann; Wagner, Grant E.; Lysenko, Larisa V.; Yu, Y. Eugene; Mobley, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), trisomy for chromosome 21, is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. The genomic regions on human chromosome 21 (HSA21) are syntenically conserved with regions on mouse chromosomes 10, 16, and 17 (Mmu10, Mmu16, and Mmu17). Recently, we created a genetic model of DS which carries engineered duplications of all three mouse syntenic regions homologous to HSA21. This ‘triple trisomic’ or TTS model thus represents the most complete and accurate murine model currently available for experimental studies of genotype-phenotype relationships in DS. Here we extended our initial studies of TTS mice. Locomotor activity, stereotypic and repetitive behavior, anxiety, working memory, long-term memory, and synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus were examined in the TTS and wild-type (WT) control mice. Changes in locomotor activity were most remarkable for a significant increase in ambulatory time and a reduction in average velocity of TTS mice. No changes were detected in repetitive and stereotypic behavior and in measures of anxiety. Working memory showed no changes when tested in Y-maze, but deficiency in a more challenging T-maze test was detected. Furthermore, long-term object recognition memory was significantly reduced in the TTS mice. These changes were accompanied by deficient long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus, which was restored to the WT levels following blockade of GABAA receptors with picrotoxin (100 μM). TTS mice thus demonstrated a number of phenotypes characteristic of DS and may serve as a new standard by which to evaluate and direct findings in other less complete models of DS. PMID:26230397

  7. Reversible pathologic and cognitive phenotypes in an inducible model of Alzheimer-amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Tatiana; Fromholt, Susan; Kim, HyunSu; Lee, Deidre; Xu, Guilian; Price, Ashleigh; Moore, Brenda D.; Golde, Todd E.; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Savonenko, Alena; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mice that express mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPsi) using tet-Off vector systems provide an alternative model for assessing short- and long-term effects of Aβ-targeting therapies on phenotypes related to the deposition of Alzheimer-type amyloid. Here we use such a model, termed APPsi:tTA, to determine what phenotypes persist in mice with high amyloid burden after new production of APP/Aβ has been suppressed. We find that 12-13 month old APPsi:tTA mice are impaired in cognitive tasks that assess short- and long-term memories. Acutely suppressing new APPsi/Aβ production produced highly significant improvements in performance short-term spatial memory tasks; which upon continued suppression translated to superior performance in more demanding tasks that assess long-term spatial memory and working memory. Deficits in episodic-like memory and cognitive flexibility, however, were more persistent. Arresting mutant APPsi production caused a rapid decline in the brain levels of soluble APP ectodomains, full-length APP, and APP C-terminal fragments. As expected, amyloid deposits persisted after new APP/Aβ production was inhibited whereas, unexpectedly, we detected persistent pools of solubilizable, relatively mobile, Aβ42. Additionally, we observed persistent levels of Aβ immunoreactive entities that were of a size consistent with SDS-resistant oligomeric assemblies. Thus, in this model with significant amyloid pathology, a rapid amelioration of cognitive deficits was observed despite persistent levels of oligomeric Aβ assemblies and low, but detectable solubilizable Aβ42 peptides. These findings implicate complex relationships between accumulating Aβ and activities of APP, soluble APP ectodomains, and/or APP CTFs in mediating cognitive deficits in this model of amyloidosis. PMID:23447589

  8. Reversible pathologic and cognitive phenotypes in an inducible model of Alzheimer-amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Tatiana; Fromholt, Susan; Kim, HyunSu; Lee, Deidre; Xu, Guilian; Price, Ashleigh; Moore, Brenda D; Golde, Todd E; Felsenstein, Kevin M; Savonenko, Alena; Borchelt, David R

    2013-02-27

    Transgenic mice that express mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPsi) using tet-Off vector systems provide an alternative model for assessing short- and long-term effects of Aβ-targeting therapies on phenotypes related to the deposition of Alzheimer-type amyloid. Here we use such a model, termed APPsi:tTA, to determine what phenotypes persist in mice with high amyloid burden after new production of APP/Aβ has been suppressed. We find that 12- to 13-month-old APPsi:tTA mice are impaired in cognitive tasks that assess short- and long-term memories. Acutely suppressing new APPsi/Aβ production produced highly significant improvements in performing short-term spatial memory tasks, which upon continued suppression translated to superior performance in more demanding tasks that assess long-term spatial memory and working memory. Deficits in episodic-like memory and cognitive flexibility, however, were more persistent. Arresting mutant APPsi production caused a rapid decline in the brain levels of soluble APP ectodomains, full-length APP, and APP C-terminal fragments. As expected, amyloid deposits persisted after new APP/Aβ production was inhibited, whereas, unexpectedly, we detected persistent pools of solubilizable, relatively mobile, Aβ42. Additionally, we observed persistent levels of Aβ-immunoreactive entities that were of a size consistent with SDS-resistant oligomeric assemblies. Thus, in this model with significant amyloid pathology, a rapid amelioration of cognitive deficits was observed despite persistent levels of oligomeric Aβ assemblies and low, but detectable solubilizable Aβ42 peptides. These findings implicate complex relationships between accumulating Aβ and activities of APP, soluble APP ectodomains, and/or APP C-terminal fragments in mediating cognitive deficits in this model of amyloidosis.

  9. Tracing the sources of human salmonellosis: a multi-model comparison of phenotyping and genotyping methods.

    PubMed

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Smid, Joost; Enserink, Remko; Franz, Eelco; Schouls, Leo; Heck, Max; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella source attribution is usually performed using frequency-matched models, such as the (modified) Dutch and Hald models, based on phenotyping data, i.e. serotyping, phage typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling. However, for practical and economic reasons, genotyping methods such as Multi-locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) are gradually replacing traditional phenotyping of salmonellas beyond the serovar level. As MLVA-based source attribution of human salmonellosis using frequency-matched models is problematic due to the high variability of the genetic targets investigated, other models need to be explored. Using a comprehensive data set from the Netherlands in 2005-2013, this study aimed at attributing sporadic and domestic cases of Salmonella Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Enteritidis to four putative food-producing animal sources (pigs, cattle, broilers, and layers/eggs) using the modified Dutch and Hald models (based on sero/phage typing data) in comparison with a widely applied population genetics model - the asymmetric island model (AIM) - supplied with MLVA data. This allowed us to compare model outcomes and to corroborate whether MLVA-based Salmonella source attribution using the AIM is able to provide sound, comparable results. All three models provided very similar results, confirming once more that most S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis cases are attributable to pigs and layers/eggs, respectively. We concluded that MLVA-based source attribution using the AIM is a feasible option, at least for S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis. Enough information seems to be contained in the MLVA profiles to trace the sources of human salmonellosis even in presence of imperfect temporal overlap between human and source isolates. Besides Salmonella, the AIM might also be applicable to other pathogens that do not always comply to clonal models. This would add further value to current surveillance

  10. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  11. Morphological and functional reversal of phenotypes in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lianne; Guy, Jacky; McKay, Leanne; Brockett, Emma; Spike, Rosemary C; Selfridge, Jim; De Sousa, Dina; Merusi, Cara; Riedel, Gernot; Bird, Adrian; Cobb, Stuart R

    2012-09-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by mutation of the X-linked MECP2 gene. Mice lacking functional Mecp2 display a spectrum of Rett syndrome-like signs, including disturbances in motor function and abnormal patterns of breathing, accompanied by structural defects in central motor areas and the brainstem. Although routinely classified as a neurodevelopmental disorder, many aspects of the mouse phenotype can be effectively reversed by activation of a quiescent Mecp2 gene in adults. This suggests that absence of Mecp2 during brain development does not irreversibly compromise brain function. It is conceivable, however, that deep-seated neurological defects persist in mice rescued by late activation of Mecp2. To test this possibility, we have quantitatively analysed structural and functional plasticity of the rescued adult male mouse brain. Activation of Mecp2 in ∼70% of neurons reversed many morphological defects in the motor cortex, including neuronal size and dendritic complexity. Restoration of Mecp2 expression was also accompanied by a significant improvement in respiratory and sensory-motor functions, including breathing pattern, grip strength, balance beam and rotarod performance. Our findings sustain the view that MeCP2 does not play a pivotal role in brain development, but may instead be required to maintain full neurological function once development is complete.

  12. Modeling disease using three dimensional cell culture: multi-lumen and inverted cyst phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Monteleon, Christine L; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture provides a unique system to investigate intrinsic mechanisms and micro environmental cues involved in the morphogenesis of epithelial glandular architectures. While this culture system allows insight into normal tissue development, it is also is readily amenable to manipulations that permit cellular modeling of various disease states. Here, we discuss a range of cellular and genetic alterations that result in two distinct cyst phenotypes, the multi-lumen cyst and the inverted cyst, both of which involve defects in cell polarity and lumen formation. Multi-lumen cyst formation results from disturbances in the mechanisms that regulate cell polarity, apical assembly, and the rate of lumen clearance. In the inverted cyst, the apical domain is oriented adjacent to the matrix, markedly affecting the morphogenic cues the matrix provides for cystogenesis. Both of these abnormal glandular phenotypes are highly reminiscent of histological patterns used to classify a number of diseases. A better understanding of the causes of multi-lumen and inverted cysts will provide insights into the origin and progression of epithelial diseases, potentially leading to the development of new therapies.

  13. Abnormal motor phenotype in the SMNΔ7 mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Butchbach, Matthew E. R.; Edwards, Jonathan D.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is recessive motor neuron disease that affects motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMA results from the reduction of SMN (survival motor neuron) protein. Even though SMN is ubiquitously expressed, motor neurons are more sensitive to the reduction in SMN than other cell types. We have previously generated mouse models of SMA with varying degrees of clinical severity. So as to more clearly understand the pathogenesis of motor neuron degeneration in SMA, we have characterized the phenotype of the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse which normally lives for 13.6 ± 0.7 days. These mice are smaller than their non-SMA littermates and begin to lose body mass at 10.4 ± 0.4 days. SMNΔ7 SMA mice exhibit impaired responses to surface righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion but not to tactile stimulation. Spontaneous motor activity and grip strength are also significantly impaired in SMNΔ7 SMA mice. In summary, we have demonstrated an impairment of neonatal motor responses in SMNΔ7 SMA mice. This phenotype characterization could be used to assess the effectiveness of potential therapies for SMA. PMID:17561409

  14. Optimizing human hepatocyte models for metabolic phenotype and function: effects of treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Green, Charlotte J; Gunn, Pippa J; Hodson, Leanne; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2016-11-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are considered to be the "gold standard" cellular model for studying hepatic fatty acid and glucose metabolism; however, they come with limitations. Although the HepG2 cell line retains many of the primary hepatocyte metabolic functions they have a malignant origin and low rates of triglyceride secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dimethyl sulfoxide supplementation in the media of HepG2 cells would enhance metabolic functionality leading to the development of an improved in vitro cell model that closely recapitulates primary human hepatocyte metabolism. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing 1% dimethyl sulfoxide for 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days. Gene expression, protein levels, intracellular triglyceride, and media concentrations of triglyceride, urea, and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured. Dimethyl sulfoxide treatment altered the expression of genes involved in lipid (FAS, ACC1, ACC2, DGAT1, DGAT2, SCD) and glucose (PEPCK, G6Pase) metabolism as well as liver functionality (albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, AFP). mRNA changes were paralleled by alterations at the protein level. DMSO treatment decreased intracellular triglyceride content and lactate production and increased triglyceride and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in the media in a time-dependent manner. We have demonstrated that the addition of 1% dimethyl sulfoxide to culture media changes the metabolic phenotype of HepG2 cells toward a more primary human hepatocyte phenotype. This will enhance the currently available in vitro model systems for the study of hepatocyte biology related to pathological processes that contribute to disease and their response to specific therapeutic interventions.

  15. Static network structure can be used to model the phenotypic effects of perturbations in regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Feiglin, Ariel; Hacohen, Adar; Sarusi, Avital; Fisher, Jasmin; Unger, Ron; Ofran, Yanay

    2012-11-01

    Biological processes are dynamic, whereas the networks that depict them are typically static. Quantitative modeling using differential equations or logic-based functions can offer quantitative predictions of the behavior of biological systems, but they require detailed experimental characterization of interaction kinetics, which is typically unavailable. To determine to what extent complex biological processes can be modeled and analyzed using only the static structure of the network (i.e. the direction and sign of the edges), we attempt to predict the phenotypic effect of perturbations in biological networks from the static network structure. We analyzed three networks from different sources: The EGFR/MAPK and PI3K/AKT network from a detailed experimental study, the TNF regulatory network from the STRING database and a large network of all NCI-curated pathways from the Protein Interaction Database. Altogether, we predicted the effect of 39 perturbations (e.g. by one or two drugs) on 433 target proteins/genes. In up to 82% of the cases, an algorithm that used only the static structure of the network correctly predicted whether any given protein/gene is upregulated or downregulated as a result of perturbations of other proteins/genes. While quantitative modeling requires detailed experimental data and heavy computations, which limit its scalability for large networks, a wiring-based approach can use available data from pathway and interaction databases and may be scalable. These results lay the foundations for a large-scale approach of predicting phenotypes based on the schematic structure of networks.

  16. Heterogeneous stock rats: a new model to study the genetics of renal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Solberg Woods, Leah C.; Stelloh, Cary; Regner, Kevin R.; Schwabe, Tiffany; Eisenhauer, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a growing medical concern, with an estimated 25.6 million people in the United States exhibiting some degree of kidney injury and/or decline in kidney function. Animal models provide great insight into the study of the genetics of complex diseases. In particular, heterogeneous stock (HS) rats represent a unique genetic resource enabling rapid fine-mapping of complex traits. However, they have not been explored as a model to study renal phenotypes. To evaluate the usefulness of HS rats in the genetics of renal traits, a time course evaluation (weeks 8–40) was performed for several renal phenotypes. As expected, a large degree of variation was seen for most renal traits. By week 24, three (of 40) rats exhibited marked proteinuria that increased gradually until week 40 and ranged from 33.7 to 80.2 mg/24 h. Detailed histological analysis confirmed renal damage in these rats. In addition, several rats consistently exhibited significant hematuria (5/41). Interestingly, these rats were not the same rats that exhibited proteinuria, indicating that susceptibility to different types of kidney injury is likely segregating within the HS population. One HS rat exhibited unilateral renal agenesis (URA), which was accompanied by a significant degree of proteinuria and glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury. The parents of this HS rat were identified and bred further. Additional offspring of this pair were observed to exhibit URA at frequency between 40% and 60%. In summary, these novel data demonstrate that HS rats exhibit variation in proteinuria and other kidney-related traits, confirming that the model harbors susceptibility alleles for kidney injury and providing the basis for further genetic studies. PMID:20219828

  17. Multilevel and Latent Variable Modeling with Composite Links and Exploded Likelihoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Composite links and exploded likelihoods are powerful yet simple tools for specifying a wide range of latent variable models. Applications considered include survival or duration models, models for rankings, small area estimation with census information, models for ordinal responses, item response models with guessing, randomized response models,…

  18. A Linked Model for Simulating Stand Development and Growth Processes of Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    V. Clark Baldwin; Phillip M. Dougherty; Harold E. Burkhart

    1998-01-01

    Linking models of different scales (e.g., process, tree-stand-ecosystem) is essential for furthering our understanding of stand, climatic, and edaphic effects on tree growth and forest productivity. Moreover, linking existing models that differ in scale and levels of resolution quickly identifies knowledge gaps in information required to scale from one level to another...

  19. Swine Influenza Virus PA and Neuraminidase Gene Reassortment into Human H1N1 Influenza Virus Is Associated with an Altered Pathogenic Phenotype Linked to Increased MIP-2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Dlugolenski, Daniel; Jones, Les; Howerth, Elizabeth; Wentworth, David; Tompkins, S Mark; Tripp, Ralph A

    2015-05-01

    Swine are susceptible to infection by both avian and human influenza viruses, and this feature is thought to contribute to novel reassortant influenza viruses. In this study, the influenza virus reassortment rate in swine and human cells was determined. Coinfection of swine cells with 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (huH1N1) and an endemic swine H1N2 (A/swine/Illinois/02860/09) virus (swH1N2) resulted in a 23% reassortment rate that was independent of α2,3- or α2,6-sialic acid distribution on the cells. The reassortants had altered pathogenic phenotypes linked to introduction of the swine virus PA and neuraminidase (NA) into huH1N1. In mice, the huH1N1 PA and NA mediated increased MIP-2 expression early postinfection, resulting in substantial pulmonary neutrophilia with enhanced lung pathology and disease. The findings support the notion that swine are a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortants independent of sialic acid distribution. These results show the potential for continued reassortment of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus with endemic swine viruses and for reassortants to have increased pathogenicity linked to the swine virus NA and PA genes which are associated with increased pulmonary neutrophil trafficking that is related to MIP-2 expression. Influenza A viruses can change rapidly via reassortment to create a novel virus, and reassortment can result in possible pandemics. Reassortments among subtypes from avian and human viruses led to the 1957 (H2N2 subtype) and 1968 (H3N2 subtype) human influenza pandemics. Recent analyses of circulating isolates have shown that multiple genes can be recombined from human, avian, and swine influenza viruses, leading to triple reassortants. Understanding the factors that can affect influenza A virus reassortment is needed for the establishment of disease intervention strategies that may reduce or preclude pandemics. The findings from this study show that swine cells provide a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortment

  20. Swine Influenza Virus PA and Neuraminidase Gene Reassortment into Human H1N1 Influenza Virus Is Associated with an Altered Pathogenic Phenotype Linked to Increased MIP-2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dlugolenski, Daniel; Jones, Les; Howerth, Elizabeth; Wentworth, David; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swine are susceptible to infection by both avian and human influenza viruses, and this feature is thought to contribute to novel reassortant influenza viruses. In this study, the influenza virus reassortment rate in swine and human cells was determined. Coinfection of swine cells with 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (huH1N1) and an endemic swine H1N2 (A/swine/Illinois/02860/09) virus (swH1N2) resulted in a 23% reassortment rate that was independent of α2,3- or α2,6-sialic acid distribution on the cells. The reassortants had altered pathogenic phenotypes linked to introduction of the swine virus PA and neuraminidase (NA) into huH1N1. In mice, the huH1N1 PA and NA mediated increased MIP-2 expression early postinfection, resulting in substantial pulmonary neutrophilia with enhanced lung pathology and disease. The findings support the notion that swine are a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortants independent of sialic acid distribution. These results show the potential for continued reassortment of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus with endemic swine viruses and for reassortants to have increased pathogenicity linked to the swine virus NA and PA genes which are associated with increased pulmonary neutrophil trafficking that is related to MIP-2 expression. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses can change rapidly via reassortment to create a novel virus, and reassortment can result in possible pandemics. Reassortments among subtypes from avian and human viruses led to the 1957 (H2N2 subtype) and 1968 (H3N2 subtype) human influenza pandemics. Recent analyses of circulating isolates have shown that multiple genes can be recombined from human, avian, and swine influenza viruses, leading to triple reassortants. Understanding the factors that can affect influenza A virus reassortment is needed for the establishment of disease intervention strategies that may reduce or preclude pandemics. The findings from this study show that swine cells provide a mixing vessel for influenza

  1. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    DOE PAGES

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu -Kang; Randles, Amanda; ...

    2014-02-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatialmore » distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.« less

  2. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu -Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege  G.; Helland, Åslaug; Rye, Inga  H.; Borresen-Dale, Anne -Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin  L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-02-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.

  3. Linking mechanistic models of tree physiology with models of forest dynamics: Problems of temporal scale

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; Emanuel, W.R.; O'Neill, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    The individual-based forest gap models are a potential resource in the study of forest growth responses to environmental stress acting on physiological processes. This approach is currently limited by the lack of physiological detail in the gap models and by the temporal scales separating tree physiology and the annual tree growth simulated by the gap models. We describe a general procedure that integrates process-based models of tree physiology with forest gap models. The procedure involves (1) a link between a physiological model and a gap model provided by the simulation of annual wood production (AWP), (2) a factorial execution of a physiological model to generate AWP, (3) a response-surface model describing the relationship between AWP and driving variables appropriate to the annual time scale of a gap model, and (4) a revised gap model that includes a rescaled physiological model. The modified gap model can be used to simulate the impact of environmental stress on forest growth and succession. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Ovarian angiogenesis. Phenotypic characterization of endothelial cells in a physiological model of blood vessel growth and regression.

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, H. G.; Braun, K.; Telemenakis, I.; Modlich, U.; Kuhn, W.

    1995-01-01

    Angiogenesis occurs during embryogenesis and is a down-regulated process in the healthy adult that is almost exclusively linked to pathological conditions such as tumor growth, wound healing, and inflammation. Physiological angiogenic processes in the adult are restricted to the female reproductive system where they occur cyclically during the ovarian and uterine cycle as well as during pregnancy. By systematically analyzing the phenotypic changes of endothelial cells during bovine corpus luteum (CL) formation and regression, we have established a physiological model of blood vessel growth and regression. Quantitation of vessel density, percentage of vessels with lumen, and ratio of Bandeiraea simplicifolia-I to von Willebrand Factor-positive endothelial cells were established as parameters of angiogenesis. Sprouting endothelial cells invade the growing CL and continue to grow throughout the first third of the ovarian cycle. Thereafter the mature CL is characterized by a dense network of vessels with gradually decreasing vessel density. During luteolysis and for several weeks thereafter (regressing and residual CL) all newly formed vessels regress, which is accompanied by gradual foreshortening and rounding of endothelial cells and subsequent detachment. Based on histochemical detection of nucleosomal fragmentation products physiological blood vessel regression in the cyclic CL does not appear to involve endothelial cell apoptosis. Lectin histochemical analysis revealed a distinct alteration of endothelial cell glycoconjugate expression during ovarian angiogenesis comparable with the distinct pattern of hyperglycosylation of cultured migrating endothelial cells (up-regulation of binding sites for Lycopersicon esculentum lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, neuraminidase-treated peanut agglutinin, and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I on sprouting ECs). Northern blot analysis of glycosyltransferases during the different stages of angiogenesis revealed an up-regulation of beta

  5. A model of band-pass phenotypic resistance in a modified Beverton-Holt framework.

    PubMed

    Nemzer, Louis R

    2014-06-01

    A new mathematical model of phenotypic bacterial resistance to a periodically applied antibiotic is presented. Using a modified Beverton-Holt framework, and without appealing to any explicit internal timescale or heritable mutations, we map the parameter-space regions corresponding to bacterial colony survival or extinction. It is demonstrated that band-pass behavior, in which colony survival occurs at intermediate - but not short or long - antibiotic application periods, is a possible regime for some initial population values if the bactericidal activity is sufficient. However, below this threshold value of antibiotic efficacy, a "fixed-point catastrophe" occurs, and colony extinction does not occur when the bacteria are challenged with long application periods. These results suggest that the dosing schedule of antibiotics within a clinical setting merits additional scrutiny, since even seemingly unimportant modifications to the frequency of administration may lead to widely diverging patient outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitamin B12 ameliorates the phenotype of a mouse model of DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lania, Gabriella; Bresciani, Alberto; Bisbocci, Monica; Francone, Alessandra; Colonna, Vincenza; Altamura, Sergio; Baldini, Antonio

    2016-08-09

    Pathological conditions caused by reduced dosage of a gene, such as gene haploinsufficiency, can potentially be reverted by enhancing the expression of the functional allele. In practice, low specificity of therapeutic agents, or their toxicity reduces their clinical applicability. Here, we have used a high throughput screening (HTS) approach to identify molecules capable of increasing the expression of the gene Tbx1, which is involved in one of the most common gene haploinsufficiency syndromes, the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Surprisingly, we found that one of the two compounds identified by the HTS is the vitamin B12. Validation in a mouse model demonstrated that vitamin B12 treatment enhances Tbx1 gene expression and partially rescues the haploinsufficiency phenotype. These results lay the basis for preclinical and clinical studies to establish the effectiveness of this drug in the human syndrome.

  7. Phenotypic and pathologic evaluation of the myd mouse. A candidate model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.D.; Rapisarda, D.; Bailey, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown pathogenesis which is characterized by weakness of the face and shoulder girdle. It is associated with a sensorineural hearing loss which may be subclinical. FSHD has been mapped to the distalmost portion of 4q35, although the gene has not yet been identified. Distal 4q has homology with a region of mouse chromosome 8 to which a mouse mutant, myodystrophy (myd), has been mapped. Muscle from homozygotes for the myd mutation appears dystrophic, showing degenerating and regenerating fibers, inflammatory infiltrates, central nuclei, and variation in fiber size. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials reveal a sensorineural hearing loss in myd homozygotes. Based on the homologous genetic map locations, and the phenotypic syndrome of dystrophic muscle with sensorineural hearing loss, we suggest that myd represents an animal model for the human disease FSHD. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Sirena; Calap-Quintana, Pablo; Llorens, José Vicente; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Martínez-Sebastián, María José; Botas, Juan; Moltó, María Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27433942

  9. Transgenic rescue of phenotypic deficits in a mouse model of alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S; Dachtler, James; Roder, John C; Clapcote, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 are the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC). Most ATP1A3 mutations in AHC lie within a cluster in or near transmembrane α-helix TM6, including I810N that is also found in the Myshkin mouse model of AHC. These mutations all substantially reduce Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 activity. Herein, we show that Myshkin mice carrying a wild-type Atp1a3 transgene that confers a 16 % increase in brain-specific total Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity show significant phenotypic improvements compared with non-transgenic Myshkin mice. Interventions to increase the activity of wild-type Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 in AHC patients should be investigated further.

  10. Identification of Multiple QTLs Linked to Neuropathology in the Engrailed-1 Heterozygous Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurowska, Zuzanna; Jewett, Michael; Brattås, Per Ludvik; Jimenez-Ferrer, Itzia; Kenéz, Xuyian; Björklund, Tomas; Nordström, Ulrika; Brundin, Patrik; Swanberg, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease are attributed to degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons (DNs). Heterozygosity for Engrailed-1 (En1), one of the key factors for programming and maintenance of DNs, results in a parkinsonian phenotype featuring progressive degeneration of DNs in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), decreased striatal dopamine levels and swellings of nigro-striatal axons in the SwissOF1-En1+/− mouse strain. In contrast, C57Bl/6-En1+/− mice do not display this neurodegenerative phenotype, suggesting that susceptibility to En1 heterozygosity is genetically regulated. Our goal was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the susceptibility to PD-like neurodegenerative changes in response to loss of one En1 allele. We intercrossed SwissOF1-En1+/− and C57Bl/6 mice to obtain F2 mice with mixed genomes and analyzed number of DNs in SNpc and striatal axonal swellings in 120 F2-En1+/− 17 week-old male mice. Linkage analyses revealed 8 QTLs linked to number of DNs (p = 2.4e-09, variance explained = 74%), 7 QTLs linked to load of axonal swellings (p = 1.7e-12, variance explained = 80%) and 8 QTLs linked to size of axonal swellings (p = 7.0e-11, variance explained = 74%). These loci should be of prime interest for studies of susceptibility to Parkinson’s disease-like damage in rodent disease models and considered in clinical association studies in PD. PMID:27550741

  11. Identification of Multiple QTLs Linked to Neuropathology in the Engrailed-1 Heterozygous Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kurowska, Zuzanna; Jewett, Michael; Brattås, Per Ludvik; Jimenez-Ferrer, Itzia; Kenéz, Xuyian; Björklund, Tomas; Nordström, Ulrika; Brundin, Patrik; Swanberg, Maria

    2016-08-23

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease are attributed to degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons (DNs). Heterozygosity for Engrailed-1 (En1), one of the key factors for programming and maintenance of DNs, results in a parkinsonian phenotype featuring progressive degeneration of DNs in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), decreased striatal dopamine levels and swellings of nigro-striatal axons in the SwissOF1-En1+/- mouse strain. In contrast, C57Bl/6-En1+/- mice do not display this neurodegenerative phenotype, suggesting that susceptibility to En1 heterozygosity is genetically regulated. Our goal was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the susceptibility to PD-like neurodegenerative changes in response to loss of one En1 allele. We intercrossed SwissOF1-En1+/- and C57Bl/6 mice to obtain F2 mice with mixed genomes and analyzed number of DNs in SNpc and striatal axonal swellings in 120 F2-En1+/- 17 week-old male mice. Linkage analyses revealed 8 QTLs linked to number of DNs (p = 2.4e-09, variance explained = 74%), 7 QTLs linked to load of axonal swellings (p = 1.7e-12, variance explained = 80%) and 8 QTLs linked to size of axonal swellings (p = 7.0e-11, variance explained = 74%). These loci should be of prime interest for studies of susceptibility to Parkinson's disease-like damage in rodent disease models and considered in clinical association studies in PD.

  12. A phenotypic in vitro model for the main determinants of human whole heart function.

    PubMed

    Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; McAleer, Christopher W; McLamb, William; Long, Christopher J; Oleaga, Carlota; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Hickman, James J

    2015-08-01

    This article details the construction and testing of a phenotypic assay system that models in vivo cardiac function in a parallel in vitro environment with human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. The major determinants of human whole-heart function were experimentally modeled by integrating separate 2D cellular systems with BioMicroelectromechanical Systems (BioMEMS) constructs. The model features a serum-free defined medium to enable both acute and chronic evaluation of drugs and toxins. The integration of data from both systems produced biologically relevant predictions of cardiac function in response to varying concentrations of selected drugs. Sotalol, norepinephrine and verapamil were shown to affect the measured parameters according to their specific mechanism of action, in agreement with clinical data. This system is applicable for cardiac side effect assessment, general toxicology, efficacy studies, and evaluation of in vitro cellular disease models in body-on-a-chip systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in resource allocation in wing-dimorphic insects.

    PubMed

    King, Elizabeth G; Roff, Derek A

    2010-06-01

    In nature, resource availability varies spatially and temporally both within and across generations, leading to variation in the amount of energy available to individuals. The optimal allocation strategy can change, depending on the amount of resources available to allocate to life-history functions. If so, selection should favor the evolution of allocation strategies that can respond to variation in environmental resource levels. We address this issue by using two quantitative genetic simulation models in a model system for studying trade-offs, wing-dimorphic insects. Wing dimorphic insects typically exhibit a trade-off in the allocation of resources between migratory ability and reproduction. In our models, we focus on allocation as a genetic trait and model the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in this trait in response to spatiotemporal variation in resource availability. We show that the evolved allocation strategy depends on the predictability of resource levels across time. Specifically, selection favors higher investment in flight under poor conditions in predictable environments and lower investment in unpredictable environments.

  14. Variable clinical phenotypes of X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome in China: Report of five cases with three novel mutations and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Wei; Tian, Zhi-Qing; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2016-08-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a rare life-threatening syndrome. Rapid recognition and definitive diagnosis are critical to improve the prognosis and survival of patients with XLP. Nowadays, little is known about patients with XLP in China. We report the characterization of five Chinese XLP patients with three novel mutations and review the literature related to this syndrome. Male patients with fulminant infectious mononucleosis (FIM), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or persistent EBV viraemia were enrolled in this study. The patients' clinical features were assessed by retrieval of data from medical records. Immunological function included analysis of lymphocyte subsets and the detection of immunoglobulins G, A, M and/or E were evaluated by flow cytometry and nephelometry. Direct sequencing was used to detect SH2D1A/XIAP gene mutations. Twenty-two male patients with FIM, EBV-associated HLH or persistent EBV viraemia were evaluated among 421 PID patients in our centre. Four patients had SH2D1A mutations, and one patient had an XIAP mutation. The onset age of the 5 patients range from 1month to 4years which was earlier than that in the western world. The diagnosis age was between 16months and 9years with a long diagnosis lag (1-97months). Two of them had positive family history. The clinical phenotypes varied in different patients among which two patients with FHLH and hypogammaglobulinaemia, one with hypogammaglobulinaemia, lymphoma and aplastic anaemia (AA) which is the first case with AA in China, one with hypogammaglobulinaemia only and the other one with FHLH. For immunological function, three exhibited reduced CD4/CD8 ratios. Arg55stop mutations as well as splice mutation in intron 1 were most frequently found and exon 2 was the hottest exon in China. Two patients died at the time of diagnosis for severe infection or hepatic coma. Three were alive and waiting for haematopoietic stem cell

  15. Global land-use allocation model linked to an integrated assessment model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Ito, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Masui, Toshihiko

    2017-02-15

    We developed a global land-use allocation model that can be linked to integrated assessment models (IAMs) with a coarser spatial resolution. Using the model, we performed a downscaling of the IAMs' regional aggregated land-use projections to obtain a spatial land-use distribution, which could subsequently be used by Earth system models for global environmental assessments of ecosystem services, food security, and climate policies. Here we describe the land-use allocation model, discuss the verification of the downscaling technique, and explain the influences of the downscaling on estimates of land-use carbon emissions. A comparison of the emissions estimated with and without downscaling suggested that the land-use downscaling would help capture the spatial distribution of carbon stock density and regional heterogeneity of carbon emissions caused by cropland and pasture land expansion. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-03-06

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  17. Lessons Learned from Dynamic Linking of a Hydrology Model with an Electricity Sector Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S. M.; Newmark, R. L.; Miara, A.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Corsi, F.; Fekete, B. M.; Macknick, J.; Vorosmarty, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Energy systems models and climate-driven hydrological models are designed and operate at different temporal and spatial scales due to the unique physical and infrastructure constraints of the systems that they represent. As the research community seeks to explicitly represent the complex interactions of the energy sector with climate conditions and hydrological resources, these scale inconsistencies present significant technical and conceptual challenges to traditional modeling approaches. To address these challenges, a multi-institution consortium of researchers has been exploring unique approaches to linking energy systems and climate-driven hydrological models to better understand how these different coupling