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Sample records for modeling orifice pulse

  1. Modeling Orifice Pulse Tube Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Kittel P.; Roach, P. R.; Lee, J. M.; Kashani, A.; McCreight, Craig R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a calculational model that treats all the components of an orifice pulse tube cooler. We base our analysis on 1-dimensional thermodynamic equations for the regenerator and we assume that all mass flows, pressure oscillations and temperature oscillations are small and sinusoidal. Non-linear pressure drop effects are included in the regenerator to account for finite pressure amplitude effects. The resulting mass flows and pressures are matched at the boundaries with the other components of the cooler: compressor, aftercooler, cold heat exchanger, pulse tube, hot heat exchanger, orifice and reservoir. The results of the calculation are oscillating pressures, mass flows and enthalpy flows in the main components of the cooler. By comparing with the calculations of other available models, we show that our model is very similar to REGEN 3 from NIST and DeltaE from Los Alamos National Lab. Our model is much easier to use than other available models because of its simple graphical interface and the fact that no guesses are required for the operating pressures or mass flows. In addition, the model only requires a few minutes of running time allowing many parameters to be optimized in a reasonable time. A version of the model is available for use over the World Wide Web at http://irtek.arc.nasa.gov. Future enhancements include adding a bypass orifice and including second order terms in steady mass streaming and steady heat transfer. A two-dimensional anelastic approximation of the fluid equations will be used as the basis for the latter analysis. Preliminary results are given in dimensionless numbers appropriate for oscillating compressible flows. The model shows how transverse heat transfer reduces enthalpy flow, particularly for small pulse tubes. The model also clearly shows mass recirculation in the open tube on the order of the tube length. They result from the higher order Reynolds stresses. An interesting result of the linearized approach is that the

  2. Development and experimental test of an analytical model of the orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, Peter J.; Radebaugh, Ray

    1988-01-01

    An analytical model for the orifice pulse tube is developed, in which the system is described in terms of average enthalpy flow with such simplifying assumptions as an ideal gas and sinusoidal pressure variation. Phasor analysis is used to represent temperature, pressure, and mass-flow rate waves in vector form. The model predictions, namely, that the refrigeration power of a pulse-tube refrigerator is proportional to the average pressure, the pulse frequency, the mass-flow ratio, and the square of the dynamic pressure ratio, were verified by experimental measurements. It was found that, as a result of the simplifying assumptions, the magnitudes of the refrigeration power predicted by the model were between three and five times greater than experimental values.

  3. Ideal orifice pulse tube refrigerator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of orifice pulse tube refrigerators has raised questions as to what limits their ultimate performance. Using an analogy to the Stirling cycle refrigerator, the efficiency (cooling power per unit input power) of an ideal orifice pulse tube refrigerator is shown to be T1/T0, the ratio of the cold temperature to the hot temperature.

  4. Theory of ideal orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Maréchal, J.-C.; Simon, Y.; Guilpin, C.

    The main purpose of this paper is to explain the operation of the orifice pulse tube refrigerator (OPTR). An analytical model of the ideal OPT has been developed. The mechanism of heat flow at the tube ends is clearly explained as the result of the hysteretic process of the elements of gas entering and leaving the tube. The motion of the buffer gas is deduced by numerical integration and the expected balance equation for the heat flows at the hot and cold exchangers is established. A numerical calculation of the velocity profile along the pulse tube is in good agreement with hot-wire anemometry data. In working conditions, we found, for the gross refrigeration power, < q˙>, theory/experiment ratios as low as 1.2, whereas those previously reported by Storch and Radebaugh were about 3 - 5. The differences between the theory of Radebaugh et al. and our model are following: (1) Radebaugh and co-workers assume small sinusoidal oscillations of the gas pressure in the tube ( ΔP/ P¯ « 1 ) whereas we describe the gas flow in the tube for any time-dependence of the pressure oscillation P( t); (2) In our model, < q˙>, is expressed with a minimum number of independent and controlled parameters relative to the OPT. In a double inlet pulse tube configuration, our test apparatus was able to achieve a 32 K temperature limit.

  5. A small, single stage orifice pulse tube cryocooler demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, John B.

    1990-01-01

    This final report summarizes and presents the analytical and experimental progress in the present effort. The principal objective of this effort was the demonstration of a 0.25 Watt, 80 Kelvin orifice pulse tube refrigerator. The experimental apparatus is described. The design of a partially optimized pulse tube refrigerator is included. The refrigerator demonstrates an ultimate temperature of 77 K, has a projected cooling power of 0.18 Watts at 80 K, and has a measured cooling power of 1 Watt at 97 K, with an electrical efficiency of 250 Watts/Watt, much better than previous pulse tube refrigerators. A model of the pulse tube refrigerator that provides estimates of pressure ratio and mass flow within the pulse tube refrigerator, based on component physical characteristics is included. A model of a pulse tube operation based on generalized analysis which is adequate to support local optimization of existing designs is included. A model of regenerator performance based on an analogy to counterflow heat exchangers is included.

  6. A pulse-tube refrigerator using variable-resistance orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B. J.; Sun, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, we propose a new design of orifice pulse-tube refrigerator (VROPT) using a variable-resistance valve to replace the conventional orifice. The variable-resistance orifice (VRO) is basically a high-speed solenoidal valve similar to the fuel jet device widely used in automobile engines. By changing the frequency and periods of ON and OFF of the valve through an electronic device, we can change the flow resistance of the VRO. This thus provides a possibility for an OPT to be controlled on-line during operation. From the results obtained in the present study, we have shown that VROPT is able to achieve on-line control by regulating the duty cycle d or frequency fv of the VRO. We also show that VROPT will not loss its thermal performance as compared to conventional OPT.

  7. Formation of Single Bubbles from a Submerged Orifice Using Pulsed Ultrasound Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Imamura, Tomohiro; Kameda, Masaharu

    A new experimental method is presented in which single small gas bubbles are generated in a liquid from a submerged orifice using pulsed ultrasound waves. Pulsed ultrasound waves having a frequency of 15 kHz and a maximum pressure amplitude of approximately 10 kPa are irradiated to a bubble growing from an orifice. Single air bubbles ranging from approximately 0.05 to 0.2 mm in radius are obtained in silicone oil (kinematic viscosity: 1 mm2/s) by using two orifices (0.02 and 0.04 mm in diameter) and by shifting the onset of the detachment-assistance pressure wave. The bubble deformation and detaching processes were visualized and analyzed using high-speed video imaging and direct numerical simulation. Consequently, it is revealed that the bubbles are forced to elongate upward due to the fast oscillatory flow of gas through the orifice, and the elongation causes the bubbles to detach from the orifice. The size of the bubbles at detachment is well estimated by employing a common spherical bubble formation model.

  8. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  9. Method and apparatus for fine tuning an orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Wollan, John J.

    2003-12-23

    An orifice pulse tube refrigerator uses flow resistance, compliance, and inertance components connected to a pulse tube for establishing a phase relationship between oscillating pressure and oscillating velocity in the pulse tube. A temperature regulating system heats or cools a working gas in at least one of the flow resistance and inertance components. A temperature control system is connected to the temperature regulating system for controlling the temperature of the working gas in the at least one of the flow resistance and inertance components and maintains a control temperature that is indicative of a desired temporal phase relationship.

  10. The influence of gas velocity on surface heat pumping for the orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. M.; Dill, H. R.

    The basic pulse tube refrigerator produces cooling by a mechanism known as surface heat pumping. Cyclical compression and expansion of a gas within an enclosed tube produces large temperature gradients. The purpose of the tube is to act as 'nodal regenerator'. Heat is stored at node positions along the tube wall and is transported between nodes by moving gas parcels. This process gives rise to refrigeration, with hot temperatures at the closed end and cold temperatures at the open end. Unfortunately, much of the available refrigeration is not realized because the closed end of the basic pulse tube restricts gas movement - gas at the extreme temperatures does not come in contact with the heat exchangers. The orifice pulse tube overcomes this limitation by using a valve and surge volume assembly at the warm, closed end. This allows for a residual gas velocity to remain present during the heat transfer process, thereby permitting more gas to exchange heat at the heat exchangers. This paper describes the pulse tube as a nodal regenerator and the effect residual gas velocity has on the heat transfer mechanism of the orifice pulse tube.

  11. The influence of gas velocity on surface heat pumping for the orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Dill, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The basic pulse tube refrigerator produces cooling by a mechanism known as surface heat pumping. Cyclical compression and expansion of a gas within an enclosed tube produces large temperature gradients. The purpose of the tube is to act as 'nodal regenerator'. Heat is stored at node positions along the tube wall and is transported between nodes by moving gas parcels. This process gives rise to refrigeration, with hot temperatures at the closed end and cold temperatures at the open end. Unfortunately, much of the available refrigeration is not realized because the closed end of the basic pulse tube restricts gas movement - gas at the extreme temperatures does not come in contact with the heat exchangers. The orifice pulse tube overcomes this limitation by using a valve and surge volume assembly at the warm, closed end. This allows for a residual gas velocity to remain present during the heat transfer process, thereby permitting more gas to exchange heat at the heat exchangers. This paper describes the pulse tube as a nodal regenerator and the effect residual gas velocity has on the heat transfer mechanism of the orifice pulse tube.

  12. Characterization of 350 HZ thermoacoustic driven orifice pulse tube refrigerator with measurements of the phase of the mass flow and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Godshalk, K.M.; Jin, C.; Kwong, Y.K.

    1996-12-31

    The world`s first 350 Hz thermoacoustic driven orifice pulse tube refrigerator (TADOPTR) has been designed and built by Tektronix, Inc., in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This highly instrumented system includes hot wire anemometers and pressure sensors for measuring the phase of the mass flow and pressure at all key locations in the TADOPTR, permitting for the first time detailed comparison to analytical models developed by LANL and NIST. Characterization results for velocity and pressure phase, pressure amplitude, and enthalpy flow show good agreement with the simulations. The authors have also demonstrated a new design method that uses the inertance of the pulse tube at 350 Hz to achieve the desired phase between the mass flow and pressure, rather than the usual double inlet design. The authors have designed and characterized single stage and two stage 350 Hz TADOPTRs.

  13. Assessment of the orifice diameter by a multigated pulsed Doppler system in children with congenital semilunar valve stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    de Knecht, S; Hopman, J C; Daniëls, O; Stoelinga, G B; Reneman, R S; Hoeks, A P

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated whether the jet diameter measured by a multigated pulsed Doppler system could be used to assess the severity of valve disease in children with pulmonary (n = 11) or aortic (n = 4) valve stenosis. The results obtained were compared with those obtained at cineangiography and at operation. Multigated pulsed Doppler examination of a stenosed valve showed a region of relatively high velocities in the velocity profile (jet flow). There was good agreement between the diameter of the disturbed region on the Doppler echocardiogram and the diameter of the jet on the lateral angiocardiogram. In severe valve stenosis the agreement between the valve diameters measured by multigated pulsed Doppler and at operation was also good. In less severe valve stenosis Doppler measurements systematically underestimated the valve diameter at operation. It is likely that the functional opening of a semilunar valve is a more relevant estimate of the degree of stenosis than the anatomical measurement of the orifice. The findings of this study indicate that multigated pulsed Doppler systems are useful in the noninvasive diagnosis of stenotic valve disease. Images Fig 1 PMID:2757874

  14. Determination of left ventricular inflow by pulsed Doppler echocardiography: influence of mitral orifice area and blood velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Tribouilloy, C; Slama, M; Shen, W F; Choquet, D; Delonca, J; Mertl, C; Dufosse, H; Lesbre, J P

    1991-01-01

    Pulsed Doppler echocardiography was performed in 30 patients to assess the influence of mitral orifice area and velocity on the determination of mitral stroke volume and inflow. Aortic forward stroke volume and outflow were measured at the centre of the aortic annulus, and compared with mitral flow measurements calculated by three methods. Both mitral stroke volume and inflow derived from an instantaneous velocity-area method showed an excellent correlation with aortic flow measurements. The other two methods, which determined mitral stroke volume and inflow based on a mean mitral valve area and diastolic velocity integral, significantly underestimated mitral flow measurements. This study indicates that the instantaneous velocity-area method offers a reliable means for quantitating left ventricular inflow.

  15. A junction-orifice-fiber entrance layer model for capillary permeability: application to frog mesenteric capillaries.

    PubMed

    Fu, B M; Weinbaum, S; Tsay, R Y; Curry, F E

    1994-11-01

    The recent serial section electron microscopic studies by Adamson and Michel (1993) on microves gels of frog mesentery have revealed that the large pores in the junction strand of the interendothelial cleft are widely separated 150 nm wide orifice-like breaks whose gap height 20 nm is the same as the wide part of the cleft. In this paper a modified version of the model in Weinbaum et al. (1992) is first developed in which this orifice structure is explored in combination with a random or ordered fiber matrix layer that is at the luminal surface and/or occupies a fraction of the wide part of the cleft. This basic orifice model predicts that for the measured Lp to be achieved the fiber layer must be confined to a relatively narrow region at the entrance to the cleft where it serves as the primary molecular filter. The model provides a much better fit of the permeability P for intermediate size solutes between 1 and 2 nm radius than the previous model in Weinbaum et al., where the junction strand breaks were treated as finite depth circular or rectangular pores, but like the previous model significantly underestimates P for small ions. However, it is shown that if a small frequent pore of 1.5 nm radius with characteristic spacing comparable to the diameter of the junction proteins or a continuous narrow slit of approximately 1.5 to 2.3 nm gap height is also present in the continuous part of the junction strand, small ion permeability can also be satisfied. The 1.5 nm radius pore does not significantly change Lp, whereas the continuous narrow slit provides a contribution to Lp that is comparable to, or in the case of the 2.3 nm slit greater than, the widely spaced 150 nm orifices. Thus, for the narrow slit the contribution to Lp from the orifices can be as low as 1.0 x 10(-7) cm/s/cm H2O and it is also possible to satisfy the 2.5 fold increase in permeability that occurs when the matrix is enzymatically removed from the luminal side of the cleft, Adamson (1990). The

  16. Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery Inguinal Hernia Repair: A Survival Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amar; Eckstein, Jeremy G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction With over 20 million repairs performed worldwide annually, inguinal hernias represent a significant source of disability and loss of productivity. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES™), as a potentially less invasive form of surgery may reduce postoperative disability and accelerate return to work. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and short-term effectiveness of transgastric inguinal herniorrhaphy using a biologic mesh in a survival canine model. Materials and Methods Under general anesthesia with the animal in trendelenburg position, a gastrostomy was created. A 4 × 6 cm acellular dermal implant was deployed endoscopically across the myopectineal orifice, draped over the cord structures, and secured with Bioglue. Following completion of bilateral repairs the animals were survived for 14 days. At the end of the study period, the animals were euthanized and a necropsy performed. Cultures of a random site within the peritoneal cavity and at the site of implant deployment were obtained. In addition, a visual inspection of the peritoneal cavity was performed. Results All animals thrived postoperatively and did not manifest signs of peritonitis or sepsis at any point. At necropsy accurate placement and adequate myopectineal coverage was confirmed in all subjects. Cultures of a random site within the peritoneal cavity and at the site of implant deployment had no growth. Discussion This study confirms that NOTES-inguinal herniorrhaphy using a biologic implant can be performed safely. In addition, the transgastric technique provided good short-term myopectineal coverage without infectious sequelae. PMID:21457111

  17. Reduction of Orifice-Induced Pressure Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, Elizabeth B.; Gloss, Blair B.; Eves, John W.; Stack, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Use of porous-plug orifice reduces or eliminates errors, induced by orifice itself, in measuring static pressure on airfoil surface in wind-tunnel experiments. Piece of sintered metal press-fitted into static-pressure orifice so it matches surface contour of model. Porous material reduces orifice-induced pressure error associated with conventional orifice of same or smaller diameter. Also reduces or eliminates additional errors in pressure measurement caused by orifice imperfections. Provides more accurate measurements in regions with very thin boundary layers.

  18. Feasibility and Technique for Transvaginal Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery Liver Resection: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Toshio; Horgan, Santiago; Sandler, Bryan J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.; Coker, Alisa M.; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Maeda, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a challenging minimally invasive procedure. Although laparoscopic techniques for liver resection are gaining acceptance worldwide, few studies have investigated NOTES liver resection. We used a porcine model to assess the feasibility and safety of transvaginal NOTES liver resection (TV NOTES LR). Materials and Methods: Nine female pigs underwent TV NOTES LR. A nonsurvival acute porcine model with general anesthesia was used in all cases. Using hybrid NOTES technique, we placed only 1 umbilical 12-mm umbilical trocar in the abdominal wall, which was used to create pneumoperitoneum. A laparoscope was then advanced to obtain intra-abdominal visualization. A 15-mm vaginal trocar was inserted under direct laparoscopic vision, and a flexible endoscope was introduced through the vaginal trocar. A long, flexible grasper and endocavity retractor were used to stably retract the liver. The liver edge was partially transected using energy devices inserted through the umbilical trocar. To transect the left lateral lobe, a flexible linear stapler was inserted alongside the vaginal trocar. A specimen extraction bag was deployed and extracted transvaginally. Blood loss, bile leakage, operative time, and specimen size were evaluated. Necropsy studies were performed after the procedures. Results: Eighteen transvaginal NOTES partial liver resections and 4 transvaginal NOTES left lateral lobectomies were successfully performed on 9 pigs. Mean operative time was 165.8 minutes, and mean estimated blood loss was 76.6 mL. All TV NOTES LRs were performed without complications or deaths. Necropsy showed no bile leakage from remnant liver. Conclusions: Our porcine model suggests that TV NOTES LR is technically feasible and safe and has the potential for clinical use as a minimally invasive alternative to conventional laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:28030435

  19. Flow Characteristics and Status of CFD Hydrodynamic Model Development in Sudden Contraction Manifold/Orifice Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    the entrance characteristics are asymmetric. In the in-line (A) and the dead head 90o (C) configurations, the manifold flow accelerates axially...flow to experience reverse flow in the downstream manifold, redirecting that portion of the flow to accelerate as it enters on the downstream side of...Reynolds number; and typically for high Re number (> 1x104) Cd is ~ constant for a given L/D. Depending on the orifice L/D and Reynolds number, the

  20. Determination of prestenotic flow volume using an automated method based on colour Doppler imaging for evaluating orifice area by the continuity equation: validation in a pulsatile flow model

    PubMed Central

    Dennig, K; Nesser, H; Hall, D; Haase, H; Schomig, A

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To evaluate, in a pulsatile flow model simulating flow conditions in valvar stenoses, whether accurate determination of orifice area can be achieved by the continuity equation using automated determination of flow volumes based on spatiotemporal integration of digital colour Doppler flow velocities.
Methods—A method for automated determination of flow volumes which takes into account the velocity distribution across a region of interest was examined using flow through a tube and various restrictive outlet orifices with areas ranging between 0.2 and 3.1 cm2. The sampling rectangle of the Doppler method was positioned proximal to the obstructions within the flow convergence zone for evaluating prestenotic flow volume. Stenotic jet velocities were recorded by continuous wave Doppler to obtain the integral under the velocity curve. Prestenotic flow volume was then divided by the velocity integral to calculate functional orifice area according to the continuity equation.
Results—The presence of parabolically shaped velocity profiles across the prestenotic region was demonstrated by the Doppler method. Excellent agreement was found between prestenotic flow volumes measured by the Doppler technique and actual values (r = 0.99, SEE = 1.35 ml, y = 0.99x−0.24). Use of the continuity equation led to a close correlation, with a systematic underestimation of geometric orifice sizes. Correction of Doppler data for flow contraction yielded an excellent agreement with actual orifice areas.
Conclusions—The study validated the accuracy of a Doppler method for automated determination of flow volumes for quantifying orifice area by the continuity equation. Prestenotic flow volume and functional orifice area could be evaluated reliably in the presence of non-flat velocity profiles. Thus the method contributes to the non-invasive assessment of valvar stenoses.

 Keywords: Doppler echocardiography;  automated flow volume determination;  valvar

  1. A cone-beam computed tomographic study of root canal systems in mandibular premolars in a Turkish population: Theoretical model for determining orifice shape

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Capar, Ismail Davut; Ertas, Elif Tarim; Ertas, Huseyin; Akcay, Merve

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this retrospective study were to represent a newly designed theoretical model for determining orifice shape and morphologic properties of mandibular premolars and to correlate these findings with each other. Materials and Methods: A total of 287 mandibular premolar images obtained from 88 patients by cone-beam computed tomography were included in this study. The measurements were performed below the cementoenamel junction, and different orifice configurations were defined in accordance with various ratios. The age and gender of the patient, the tooth type and position, the number of roots, orifice configuration, root canal configuration, presence of C-shaped canal, and the presence of radicular groove were recorded. It was also recorded whether the root canal becomes round or not and if any, length of the root canal from the orifice to the section in which it becomes round. Furthermore, the theoretical model for determining orifice shape was defined after measurements. The orifice shape was determined as round, oval, flat, keyhole-shaped, and T-shaped, and orifices with short, normal length, and long isthmus. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square and Spearman's rank correlation tests (P = 0.05). Results: Orifice configurations were, usually, flat (37%), or keyhole-shaped (23%). The prevalence of T-shaped was found to be 3.8%. The prevalence of C-shaped canals was found to be 2.1%. The percentage of root canals that became round in the middle or apical thirds was 95.1%. Radicular grooves were detected in 37 (24%) of first premolars and six (4.5%) of second premolars. Statistical analysis revealed that the mean length of distance until the canal reached a round shape varied according to age group (r = −0.270; P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference between radicular groove and tooth type (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The mean length of distance until the canal reached a round shape correlated with the

  2. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  3. Variable orifice flow regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow regulator for high-pressure fluids at elevated temperatures includes a body having a flow passage extending between inlet and outlet openings. First and second orifice members are arranged in the flow passage so at least one of the orifice members can be moved transversely in relation to the flow passage between one operating position where the two orifice openings are aligned for establishing a maximum flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage and at least one other operating position in which the two openings are moderately misaligned with one another for establishing a predetermined reduced flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage.

  4. Systemic Inflammatory Response After Natural Orifice Translumenal Surgery: Transvaginal Cholecystectomy in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Joe K. M.; Tong, Daniel K. H.; HO, David W. Y.; Luk, John; Law, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We analyzed circulating TNF-α and IL-6 to determine systemic inflammatory responses associated with transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model. Methods: Six female pigs were used for a survival study after transvaginal cholecystectomy (NOTES group) using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instruments and a single-channel endoscope. Blood was drawn preoperatively and 24 hours and 48 hours postoperatively. Four pigs were used as controls. In addition, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 2 pigs for laparoscopic control. Results: In all 6 pigs in the NOTES group, no major intraoperative complications occurred. No significant differences were found between control, laparoscopic, and NOTES groups in terms of preoperative IL-6 level (P=0.897) and at 24 hours (P=0.790), and 48 hours postoperatively (P=0.945). Similarly, there was no significant difference in mean preoperative (P=0.349) and mean day 2 postoperative TNF-α levels (P=0.11). But a significant increase in day 1 postoperative TNF-α levels in the laparoscopic group compared with that in the control and NOTES groups was observed (P=0.049). One limitation of our study is that the sample size was relatively small. Conclusion: NOTES is safe in animal models in terms of anatomical and cellular level changes with minimal systemic inflammatory host responses elicited. Further study needs to be carried out in humans before NOTES can be recommended for routine use. PMID:19366533

  5. Systemic inflammatory response after natural orifice translumenal surgery: transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Joe K M; Tong, Daniel K H; Ho, David W Y; Luk, John; Law, Wai Lun; Law, Simon

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed circulating TNF-alpha and IL-6 to determine systemic inflammatory responses associated with transvaginal cholecystectomy in a porcine model. Six female pigs were used for a survival study after transvaginal cholecystectomy (NOTES group) using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instruments and a single-channel endoscope. Blood was drawn preoperatively and 24 hours and 48 hours postoperatively. Four pigs were used as controls. In addition, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 2 pigs for laparoscopic control. In all 6 pigs in the NOTES group, no major intraoperative complications occurred. No significant differences were found between control, laparoscopic, and NOTES groups in terms of preoperative IL-6 level (P=0.897) and at 24 hours (P=0.790), and 48 hours postoperatively (P=0.945). Similarly, there was no significant difference in mean preoperative (P=0.349) and mean day 2 postoperative TNF-alpha levels (P=0.11). But a significant increase in day 1 postoperative TNF-alpha levels in the laparoscopic group compared with that in the control and NOTES groups was observed (P=0.049). One limitation of our study is that the sample size was relatively small. NOTES is safe in animal models in terms of anatomical and cellular level changes with minimal systemic inflammatory host responses elicited. Further study needs to be carried out in humans before NOTES can be recommended for routine use.

  6. Modeling of pulsed propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patag, A. E.; Hochstein, J. I.; Chato, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Optimization of the propellant reorientation process can provide increased payload capability and extend the service life of spacecraft. The use of pulsed propellant reorientation to optimize the reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code was validated for modeling the reorientation process and is used to study pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions for reorientation performance.

  7. Drilling Precise Orifices and Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, C. W.; Seidler, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction control thrustor injector requires precisely machined orifices and slots. Tooling setup consists of rotary table, numerical control system and torque sensitive drill press. Components used to drill oxidizer orifices. Electric discharge machine drills fuel-feed orifices. Device automates production of identical parts so several are completed in less time than previously.

  8. Numerical analysis of eccentric orifice plate using ANSYS Fluent software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahariea, D.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper the eccentric orifice plate is qualitative analysed as compared with the classical concentric orifice plate from the point of view of sedimentation tendency of solid particles in the fluid whose flow rate is measured. For this purpose, the numerical streamlines pattern will be compared for both orifice plates. The numerical analysis has been performed using ANSYS Fluent software. The methodology of CFD analysis is presented: creating the 3D solid model, fluid domain extraction, meshing, boundary condition, turbulence model, solving algorithm, convergence criterion, results and validation. Analysing the numerical streamlines, for the concentric orifice plate can be clearly observed two circumferential regions of separated flows, upstream and downstream of the orifice plate. The bottom part of these regions are the place where the solid particles could sediment. On the other hand, for the eccentric orifice plate, the streamlines pattern suggest that no sedimentation will occur because at the bottom area of the pipe there are no separated flows.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulations of Sound-Orifice-Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Bodony, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    We report on a series of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the interaction of a monochromatic incident acoustic field with a cavity-backed circular orifice in the presence of laminar and turbulent boundary layers of freestream Mach number 0.5 and momentum thickness Reynolds number 2,300, with application to acoustic liners. The simulations show that the addition of the orifice increases the drag and can induce laminar-to-turbulent transition at sufficiently high acoustic levels. Furthermore, the sound-orifice-boundary layer system support three distinct timescales whose spatial distributions change with the phase of the incident sound. Details of the near-orifice interaction are studied to create a model of the orifice discharge coefficient that is part of a time-domain, nonlinear reduced-order model (ROM) for the liner impedance. Comparisons between the ROM-predicted and DNS-measured near-orifice flow and acoustic impedance are given.

  10. Pulse Detonation Engine Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse Detonation Engine Technology is currently being investigated at Glenn for both airbreathing and rocket propulsion applications. The potential for both mechanical simplicity and high efficiency due to the inherent near-constant-volume combustion process, may make Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE's) well suited for a number of mission profiles. Assessment of PDE cycles requires a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It should capture the essential physics of the system, yet run at speeds that allow parametric analysis. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational-fluid-dynamics-based simulation has been developed that may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used along with a single reactive species transport equation, and submodels to account for dominant loss mechanisms (e.g., viscous losses, heat transfer, and valving) to successfully simulate PDE cycles. A high-resolution numerical integration scheme was chosen to capture the discontinuities associated with detonation, and robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during a given cycle. The accompanying graphs compare experimentally measured and computed performance over a range of operating conditions for a particular PDE. Experimental data were supplied by Fred Schauer and Jeff Stutrud from the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB and by Royce Bradley from Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc. The left graph shows thrust and specific impulse, Isp, as functions of equivalence ratio for a PDE cycle in which the tube is completely filled with a detonable hydrogen/air mixture. The right graph shows thrust and specific impulse as functions of the fraction of the tube that is filled with a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and air. For both figures, the operating frequency was 16 Hz. The agreement between measured and computed values is quite good, both in terms of trend and

  11. Oscillatory flow around discs and through orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debernardinis, B.; Graham, J. M. R.; Parker, K. H.

    1980-11-01

    Examples of unsteady, axisymmetric, separated flows are modeled, including unbounded oscillatory flow around a disk and bounded oscillatory flow through a sharp-edged orifice. Calculations are made, assuming that the flow is inviscid and that the shed vortex sheets can be represented by sequences of discrete vortex rings. The solid bodies, i.e., the disk or the orifice and bounding tube, are also represented by a distribution of bound discrete vortex rings whose strenghts are chosen to satisfy the Neumann or zero normal velocity boundary condition. The results of flow visualization experiments and, for the orifice, pressure drop measurements are reported. In general, the gross properties of the flows are predicted accurately.

  12. Effect of grazing flow on steady-state resistance of isolated square-edged orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    Steady state diagnostic testing of an isolated orifice has shown the nature of the interaction between grazing and orifice flow causing the large increase in orifice resistance for both inflow and outflow. A simple inviscid interaction model is developed which uses thin aerofoil theory to account for pressure forces exerted at the interface between the orifice and grazing flow together with a one-dimensional discharge coefficient concept. The effect of grazing flow boundary layer thickness is also included in the model. Resistance measurements for each orifice tested, over a wide range of grazing flow speeds and flow rates, collapse into a single curve when plotted in terms of effective discharge coefficient against orifice to grazing velocity ratio. The correlation curves for inflow and outflow are different. Data for clustered orifices collapse in the same way as those for the single orifice. The effect of boundary layer thickness is compared with model predictions.

  13. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David

    1999-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles greatly increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with its transverse velocity as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifices located near the center. The energy transmitted to the surface from the impact force of the water stream from an outer orifice is therefore spread over a larger area than energy from an inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the total energy transmitted from the outer orifice to compensate for the wider distribution of energy. The total flow rate from the combination of all orifices must be monitored and should be kept below the pump capacity while choosing orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all the orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section. All orifices contribute to the stripping in the center of the path while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping at the edge of the nozzle. Additional orifices contribute to the stripping from the outer edge toward the center section. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation graphically indicates the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The result from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  14. Active Control of Liner Impedance by Varying Perforate Orifice Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuji, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The present work explored the feasibility of controlling the acoustic impedance of a resonant type acoustic liner. This was accomplished by translating one perforate over another of the same porosity creating a totally new perforate that had an intermediate porosity. This type of adjustable perforate created a variable orifice perforate whose orifices were non-circular. The key objective of the present study was to quantify, the degree of attenuation control that can be achieved by applying such a concept to the buried septum in a two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) acoustic liner. An additional objective was to examine the adequacy of the existing impedance models to explain the behavior of the unique orifice shapes that result from the proposed silding perforate concept. Different orifice shapes with equivalent area were also examined to determine if highly non-circular orifices had a significant impact on the impedance.

  15. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  16. Balanced Orifice Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An orifice plate for use in a conduit through which fluid flows is defined by a central circular region having a radius R, and a ring-shaped region surrounding the central circular region. The ring-shaped region has holes formed therethrough with those holes centered at each radius R thereof satisfying a relationship A(sub R)=al(X(sub R)V(sub R)(sup b)) where A(sub R) is a sum of areas of those holes having centers at radius R, X(sub R) is a flow coefficient at radius R, V(sub R) is a velocity of the fluid that is to flow through the conduit at radius R, b is a constant selected to make at least one process variable (associated with the fluid that is to flow through the conduit) approximately equal at each radius R, and a is a constant that is equal to (X(sub R)A(sub R)V(sub R)(sup b)) at each radius R.

  17. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles not only increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with the transverse velocity of the nozzle as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Since orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifice located near the center, the energy impact force of the water stream from the outer orifice is spread over a larger area than the water streams from the inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the energy impact to compensate for its wider force distribution. The total flow rate from the combination of orifices must be monitored and kept below the pump capacity while choosing an orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section, contributing to the stripping in this area while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping in the shell area at the extreme outside edge of the nozzle. From t he outer most shell to the center section, more orifices contribute to the stripping in each progressively reduced diameter shell. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation responds by graphically indicating the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The results from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  18. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles not only increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with the transverse velocity of the nozzle as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Since orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifice located near the center, the energy impact force of the water stream from the outer orifice is spread over a larger area than the water streams from the inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the energy impact to compensate for its wider force distribution. The total flow rate from the combination of orifices must be monitored and kept below the pump capacity while choosing an orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section, contributing to the stripping in this area while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping in the shell area at the extreme outside edge of the nozzle. From t he outer most shell to the center section, more orifices contribute to the stripping in each progressively reduced diameter shell. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation responds by graphically indicating the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The results from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  19. Program sizes flange-tap orifice plate

    SciTech Connect

    Hogsett, J.E.

    1981-03-23

    A program developed for the TI-59 programmable calculator computes the differential pressure across an orifice, the gas flow through an orifice, or the orifice-plate bore for orifice plates with flange taps. Based on equations and data from L.K. Spinks, the program saves time in extracting from charts, tables, and graphs the values required to perform the calculations.

  20. Numerical simulation of particle dynamics in an orifice-electrode system. Application to counting and sizing by impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Isèbe, Damien; Nérin, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes how to numerically tackle the problem of counting and sizing particles by impedance measurement in an orifice-electrode system. The model allows to simulate the particle dynamics submitted to strong hydrodynamic stresses through a microorifice and to compute the voltage pulses generated by the modification of the inner dielectric medium. This approach gives important information about particles size distribution and allows to quantify the role of trajectory and orientation of particles on the size measurement.

  1. Improving the accuracy of effective orifice area assessment after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: validation of left ventricular outflow tract diameter and pulsed-wave Doppler location and impact of three-dimensional measurements.

    PubMed

    Khalique, Omar K; Hamid, Nadira B; Kodali, Susheel K; Nazif, Tamim M; Marcoff, Leo; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Williams, Mathew R; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; Hahn, Rebecca T

    2015-11-01

    Echocardiographic calculation of effective orifice area (EOA) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is integral to the assessment of transcatheter heart valve (THV) function. The aim of this study was to determine the most accurate method for calculating the EOA of the Edwards SAPIEN and SAPIEN XT THVs. One hundred intraprocedural transesophageal echocardiograms were analyzed. To calculate the post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) stroke volume (SV), four diameters were measured using two-dimensional echocardiography: (1) baseline LVOT diameter (LVOTd_PRE), (2) postimplantation LVOT diameter, (3) native aortic annular diameter, and (4) THV in-stent diameter. Four corresponding areas were planimetered by three-dimensional echocardiography. Two LVOT velocity-time integrals (VTI) were measured with the pulsed-wave Doppler sample volume at (1) the proximal (apical) edge of the valve stent or (2) within the valve stent at the level of the THV cusps. LVOT velocity-time integral with the sample volume at the proximal edge of the valve stent was used with the LVOT and aortic annular measurements above, whereas in-stent VTI was paired with the in-stent THV diameter to yield eight different SVs. Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) SV was calculated using RVOT diameter and RVOT VTI and was used as the primary comparator. Transaortic VTI was obtained by continuous-wave Doppler, and EOA calculations using each SV measurement were compared with (1) EOA calculated using RVOTSV and (2) planimetered aortic valve area using three-dimensional echocardiography (AVAplanimetry3D). Post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement EOA calculated using LVOTd_PRE was not significantly different from EOA calculated using RVOTSV (1.88 ± 0.33 vs 1.86 ± 0.39 cm(2), P = .36) or from AVAplanimetry3D (1.85 ± 0.28, P = .38, n = 34). All other two-dimensional EOA calculations were statistically larger than EOA calculated using RVOTSV

  2. The effect of grazing flow on the steady state resistance of square-edged orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, T.; Hersh, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    A simple inviscid interaction model has been developed which uses thin airfoil theory to account for pressure forces exerted at the interface between the orifice and grazing flow together with a one-dimensional discharge coefficient concept. The effect of grazing flow boundary layer thickness was also included in the model. Resistance measurements for a wide range of grazing flow speeds and orifice flow rates collapse into a single curve when plotted in terms of effective discharge coefficient versus orifice-to-grazing velocity ratio. The correlation curves for inflow and outflow are different. Data for clustered orifices collapse in the same way as the single orifice. The effect of boundary layer thickness is compared with model predictions. The effect of orifice length-diameter ratio is shown to be significant for inflow but negligible for outflow.

  3. Mini-laparoscopy, laparoendoscopic single-site surgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery-assisted laparoscopy: novice surgeons' performance and perception in a porcine nephrectomy model.

    PubMed

    Autorino, Riccardo; Kim, Fernando J; Rassweiler, Jens; De Sio, Marco; Ribal, Maria J; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Damiano, Rocco; Cindolo, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Schips, Luigi; Rané, Abhay; Quattrone, Carmelo; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Lima, Estevão

    2012-12-01

    Study Type--Therapy (case series) Level of Evidence 4. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Over the last few years, minimally invasive urological surgery has evolved towards less invasive, 'scarless' procedures. New surgical concepts, such as those of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) have been introduced. Mini-laparoscopy has been rediscovered in an attempt to reduce the invasiveness of standard laparoscopy. This study is the first to compare the perception of surgeons when first facing three different scarless options for performing a porcine nephrectomy and when dealing with the constraints of each technique. The study findings suggest that: (i) when first approaching these techniques, surgeons tend to perform equally well under expert guidance in the porcine model; (ii) mini-laparoscopy is perceived as less difficult to perform; (iii) for all the techniques, surgeon's impressions are in line with their expectations. • To evaluate the perception and performance of urological surgeons when first applying scarless surgical techniques. • The study was conducted during the 2(nd) Minimally Invasive Urological Surgical Week annual course in Braga, Portugal. • Fourteen attendees performed three porcine nephrectomies by using each of the following techniques: mini-laparoscopy, laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES)-assisted laparoscopy. • Peri-operative data were recorded, and operating performance was scored by one experienced surgeon for each working station, using a global rating scale. • The surgeons' subjective perceptions of degree of difficulty were graded and their expectations before the procedures were recorded. • Forty-two porcine nephrectomies were performed. • There were no differences in overall operating time, or time to dissect and manage the renal vascular hilum, whereas time to gain

  4. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic wedge hepatic resection with a water-jet hybrid knife in a non-survival porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Fu, Deng-Ke; Xin, Pei; Wang, Yong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of a water-jet hybrid knife to facilitate wedge hepatic resection using a natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach in a non-survival porcine model. METHODS: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system allows a needleless, tissue-selective hydro-dissection with a pre-selected pressure. Using this system, wedge hepatic resection was performed through three natural routes (trans-anal, trans-vaginal and trans-umbilical) in three female pigs weighing 35 kg under general anesthesia. Entry into the peritoneal cavity was via a 15-mm incision using a hook knife. The targeted liver segment was marked by an APC probe, followed by wedge hepatic resection performed using a water-jet hybrid knife with the aid of a 4-mm transparent distance soft cap mounted onto the tip of the endoscope for holding up the desired plane. The exposed vascular and ductal structures were clipped with Endoclips. Hemostasis was applied to the bleeding cut edges of the liver parenchyma by electrocautery. After the procedure, the incision site was left open, and the animal was euthanized followed by necropsy. RESULTS: Using the Erbe Jet2 water-jet system, trans-anal and trans-vaginal wedge hepatic resection was successfully performed in two pigs without laparoscopic assistance. Trans-umbilical attempt failed due to an unstable operating platform. The incision for peritoneal entry took 1 min, and about 2 h was spent on excision of the liver tissue. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 100 to 250 mL. Microscopically, the hydro-dissections were relatively precise and gentle, preserving most vessels. CONCLUSION: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system can safely accomplish non-anatomic wedge hepatic resection in NOTES, which deserves further studies to shorten the dissection time. PMID:21412502

  5. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic wedge hepatic resection with a water-jet hybrid knife in a non-survival porcine model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Fu, Deng-Ke; Xin, Pei; Wang, Yong-Guang

    2011-02-21

    To explore the feasibility of a water-jet hybrid knife to facilitate wedge hepatic resection using a natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach in a non-survival porcine model. The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system allows a needleless, tissue-selective hydro-dissection with a pre-selected pressure. Using this system, wedge hepatic resection was performed through three natural routes (trans-anal, trans-vaginal and trans-umbilical) in three female pigs weighing 35 kg under general anesthesia. Entry into the peritoneal cavity was via a 15-mm incision using a hook knife. The targeted liver segment was marked by an APC probe, followed by wedge hepatic resection performed using a water-jet hybrid knife with the aid of a 4-mm transparent distance soft cap mounted onto the tip of the endoscope for holding up the desired plane. The exposed vascular and ductal structures were clipped with Endoclips. Hemostasis was applied to the bleeding cut edges of the liver parenchyma by electrocautery. After the procedure, the incision site was left open, and the animal was euthanized followed by necropsy. Using the Erbe Jet2 water-jet system, trans-anal and trans-vaginal wedge hepatic resection was successfully performed in two pigs without laparoscopic assistance. Trans-umbilical attempt failed due to an unstable operating platform. The incision for peritoneal entry took 1 min, and about 2 h was spent on excision of the liver tissue. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 100 to 250 mL. Microscopically, the hydro-dissections were relatively precise and gentle, preserving most vessels. The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system can safely accomplish non-anatomic wedge hepatic resection in NOTES, which deserves further studies to shorten the dissection time.

  6. Influence of Geometry and Flow Variation on Jet Mixing and NO Formation in a Model Staged Combustor Mixer with Eight Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Hatch, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of non-reacting parametric experiments was conducted to investigate the effect of geometric and flow variations on mixing of cold jets in an axis-symmetric, heated cross flow. The confined, cylindrical geometries tested represent the quick mix region of a Rich-Burn/Quick-Mix/Lean-Burn (RQL) combustor. The experiments show that orifice geometry and jet to mainstream momentum-flux ratio significantly impact the mixing characteristic of jets in a cylindrical cross stream. A computational code was used to extrapolate the results of the non-reacting experiments to reacting conditions in order to examine the nitric oxide (NO) formation potential of the configurations examined. The results show that the rate of NO formation is highest immediately downstream of the injection plane. For a given momentum-flux ratio, the orifice geometry that mixes effectively in both the immediate vicinity of the injection plane, and in the wall regions at downstream locations, has the potential to produce the lowest NO emissions. The results suggest that further study may not necessarily lead to a universal guideline for designing a low NO mixer. Instead, an assessment of each application may be required to determine the optimum combination of momentum-flux ratio and orifice geometry to minimize NO formation. Experiments at reacting conditions are needed to verify the present results.

  7. Modeling of ultrafast laser pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesik, Miroslav; Brown, Jeffrey; Bahl, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Computer simulations of ultrafast optical pulses face multiple challenges. This requires one to construct a propagation model to reduce the Maxwell system so that it can be efficiently simulated at the temporal and spatial scales relevant to experiments. The second problem concerns the light-matter interactions, demanding novel approaches for gaseous and condensed media alike. As the nonlinear optics pushes into new regimes, the need to honor the first principles is ever greater, and requires striking a balance between computational complexity and physical fidelity of the model. With the emphasis on the dynamics in intense optical pulses, this paper discusses some recent developments and promising directions in the field of ultrashort pulse modeling.

  8. The role of a computed tomography-based image registered navigation system for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: a comparative study in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Esparrach, G.; San José Estépar, R.; Guarner-Argente, C.; Martínez-Pallí, G.; Navarro, R.; Rodríguez de Miguel, C.; Córdova, H.; Thompson, C. C.; Lacy, A. M.; Donoso, L.; Ayuso-Colella, J. R.; Ginès, A.; Pellisé, M.; Llach, J.; Vosburgh, K. G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and study aims Most natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures have been performed in animal models through the anterior stomach wall, but this approach does not provide efficient access to all anatomic areas of interest. Moreover, injury of the adjacent structures has been reported when using a blind access. The aim of the current study was to assess the utility of a CT-based (CT: computed tomography) image registered navigation system in identifying safe gastrointestinal access sites for NOTES and identifying intraperitoneal structures. Methods A total of 30 access procedures were performed in 30 pigs: anterior gastric wall (n = 10), posterior gastric wall (n = 10), and anterior rectal wall (n = 10). Of these, 15 procedures used image registered guidance (IR-NOTES) and 15 procedures used a blind access (NOTES only). Timed abdominal exploration was performed with identification of 11 organs. The location of the endoscopic tip was tracked using an electromagnetic tracking system and was recorded for each case. Necropsy was performed immediately after the procedure. The primary outcome was the rate of complications; secondary outcome variables were number of organs identified and kinematic measurements. Results A total of 30 animals weighting a mean (± SD) of 30.2 ± 6.8 kg were included in the study. The incision point was correctly placed in 11 out of 15 animals in each group (73.3 %). The mean peritoneoscopy time and the number of properly identified organs were equivalent in the two groups. There were eight minor complications (26.7 %), two (13.3 %) in the IR-NOTES group and six (40.0 %) in the NOTES only group (P = n. s.). Characteristics of the endoscope tip path showed a statistically significant improvement in trajectory smoothness of motion for all organs in the IR-NOTES group. Conclusion The image registered system appears to be feasible in NOTES procedures and results from this study suggest that image registered

  9. Generic Sensor Modeling Using Pulse Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helder, Dennis L.; Choi, Taeyoung

    2005-01-01

    Recent development of high spatial resolution satellites such as IKONOS, Quickbird and Orbview enable observation of the Earth's surface with sub-meter resolution. Compared to the 30 meter resolution of Landsat 5 TM, the amount of information in the output image was dramatically increased. In this era of high spatial resolution, the estimation of spatial quality of images is gaining attention. Historically, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) concept has been used to estimate an imaging system's spatial quality. Sometimes classified by target shapes, various methods were developed in laboratory environment utilizing sinusoidal inputs, periodic bar patterns and narrow slits. On-orbit sensor MTF estimation was performed on 30-meter GSD Landsat4 Thematic Mapper (TM) data from the bridge pulse target as a pulse input . Because of a high resolution sensor s small Ground Sampling Distance (GSD), reasonably sized man-made edge, pulse, and impulse targets can be deployed on a uniform grassy area with accurate control of ground targets using tarps and convex mirrors. All the previous work cited calculated MTF without testing the MTF estimator's performance. In previous report, a numerical generic sensor model had been developed to simulate and improve the performance of on-orbit MTF estimating techniques. Results from the previous sensor modeling report that have been incorporated into standard MTF estimation work include Fermi edge detection and the newly developed 4th order modified Savitzky-Golay (MSG) interpolation technique. Noise sensitivity had been studied by performing simulations on known noise sources and a sensor model. Extensive investigation was done to characterize multi-resolution ground noise. Finally, angle simulation was tested by using synthetic pulse targets with angles from 2 to 15 degrees, several brightness levels, and different noise levels from both ground targets and imaging system. As a continuing research activity using the developed sensor

  10. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  11. Modelling the pulse transformer in SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewska, Malgorzata; Górecki, Krzysztof; Górski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to modelling pulse transformers in SPICE. It shows the character of the selected models of this element, points out their advantages and disadvantages, and presents the results of experimental verification of the considered models. These models are characterized by varying degrees of complexity - from linearly coupled linear coils to nonlinear electrothermal models. The study was conducted for transformer with ring cores made of a variety of ferromagnetic materials, while exciting the sinusoidal signal of a frequency 100 kHz and different values of load resistance. The transformers operating conditions under which the considered models ensure the acceptable accuracy of calculations are indicated.

  12. Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

    A model of pulsed laser melting of embedded nanoparticles is introduced. Pulsed laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in nanoparticles; this model enables a better understanding of the influence of PLM on the size distribution of nanoparticles, which is crucial for studying or using their size-dependent properties. The model includes laser absorption according to the Mie theory, a full heat transport model, and rate equations for nucleation, growth, coarsening, and melting and freezing of nanoparticles embedded in a transparent matrix. The effects of varying the laser parameters and sample properties are studied, as well as combining PLM and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) processing steps on the same sample. A general theory for achieving narrow size distributions of nanoparticles is presented, and widths as narrow as 12% are achieved using PLM and RTA.

  13. Unlimited-Length Proctocolectomy Utilizing Sequential Intussusception and Pull-Through: Novel Clean Endolumenal NOTE-Assisted Technique With Transanal Natural Orifice Specimen Extraction Without Rectal Stump Opening in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Kvasha, Anton; Khalifa, Muhammad; Biswas, Seema; Hamoud, Mohamad; Nordkin, Dmitri; Bramnik, Zakhar; Willenz, Udi; Farraj, Moaad; Waksman, Igor

    2016-10-01

    Transanal, hybrid natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and NOTES-assisted natural orifice specimen extraction techniques hold promise as leaders in the field of natural orifice surgery. We report the feasibility of a novel NOTES assisted technique for unlimited length, clean, endolumenal proctocolectomy in a porcine model. This technique is a modification of a transanal intussusception and pull-through procedure recently published by our group. Rectal mobilization was achieved laparoscopically; this was followed by a transanal recto-rectal intussusception and pull-through (IPT). IPT was established in a stepwise fashion. First, the proximal margin of resection was attached laparoscopically to the shaft of the anvil of an end-to-end circular stapler with a ligature around the rectum. Second, this complex was pulled transanally to produce IPT. To achieve an unlimited-length proctocolectomy, the IPT step was repeated several times prior to bowel resection. This was facilitated by removing the ligature applied in the first step of this procedure. Once sequential IPT established the desired length of bowel to be resected, a second ligature was placed around the rectum approximating the proximal and distal resection margins. The specimen was resected and extracted by making a full-thickness incision through the 2 bowel walls. The anastomosis was achieved by deploying the stapler. The technique was found to be feasible. Peritoneal samples, collected after transanal specimen extraction, did not demonstrate bacterial growth. The minimally invasive nature of this evolving technique as well as its aseptic bowel manipulation has the potential to limit the complications associated with abdominal wall incision and surgical site infection.

  14. Effect of mitral orifice shape on intra-ventricular filling fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Angirish, Yagna; Yoganathan, Ajit; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2013-11-01

    The natural geometry of the mitral orifice is D-shaped. However, most current designs of prosthetic valves employ O-shaped orifice geometry. The goal of this study was to compare the effect of geometrical modification between the D and O orifice on the intra-ventricular fluid dynamics during diastolic filling. The different mitral orifice geometries were incorporated into an in vitro left heart simulator consisting of a flexible-walled anatomical left ventricle (LV) physical model enclosed in an acrylic housing. Physiological flow rates and pressures were obtained via tuning systemic resistance and compliance elements in the flow loop. A programmable piston pump was used to generate the LV model wall motion. 2D Particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted along multiple longitudinal planes perpendicular to the annulus plane. During peak diastole, the incoming jet width at the LV central plane was smaller for the D-orifice than that of the O-orifice. Further, the core of the vortex ring in the D-orifice was reduced in size compared to that of the O-orifice. The spatiotemporal spreading of the inflow jet as well as the propagation of the vortex ring will be discussed. This study was funded by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (RO1HL70262).

  15. Anatomical Variation of Human Collector Channel Orifices

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Michael D.; Hann, Cheryl R.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the anatomical variation of normal human collector channel orifices and their relationship with Schlemm's canal. Methods Ten human anterior segments fixed by immersion or perfusion were dissected radially and further divided by fine dissection into corresponding inner and outer wall segments. The tissues were dehydrated, critical-point dried, sputter coated, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Images were obtained at magnifications from ×200 to ×10,000. Selected radial collector channel regions were processed for plastic embedding. Results Two classes of collector channel orifices were identified. Simple oval orifices (54.7 ± 4.6–μm diameter) were lined with endothelial cells and most often occurred on a planar region of Schlemm's canal outer wall. Complex orifices (62.7 ± 3.4–μm diameter) were often found associated with septal columns and bridges, and typically covered with flap-like structures (10–40 μm) that extended between the inner and outer wall and over the collector channel orifices. Both simple and complex orifices had complete or partial lip-like rims. In orifices with partial rims, a trough-like groove was often visible on the outer wall surface opposite the lip. Transected septa and inner and outer wall adhesion sites were often found in association with complex collector channel orifices. Conclusions Collector channel orifice structure varied from simple ovals to complex tethered flaps and bridges. Collector channel orifices with complex flaps connect the inner and outer walls of Schlemm's canal, and may serve to enhance and regulate aqueous outflow in these regions. PMID:26975026

  16. Modeling of Ultra-Short-Pulse Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce I.

    1998-11-01

    Pulsed reflectometry offers the prospect of making space and time-resolved measurements of the radial profiles of both the electron density and the vector magnetic field in the midplane of a device, from which the current profile can be inferred if the device is toroidally symmetric and has a weak up-down asymmetry at the midplane. Detailed modeling of the use of ultra-short-pulse reflectometry to diagnose radial electron density and magnetic field strength profiles has been undertaken with a suite of one and two-dimensional, wave-equation-solving simulation codes and analytical calculations.(B. I. Cohen, L. L. LoDestro, E. B. Hooper, and T. A. Casper, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 40), 75 (1998). The reflectometry simulations are coupled to the CORSICA equilibrium and transport code to allow realistic plasma density and magnetic profiles to be used. The simulations show that pulsed reflectometry is a relatively robust technique for inferring density and magnetic profiles. A new innovation is the demonstration that the linear mode conversion of extraordinary modes to ordinary modes induced by magnetic shear can be diagnosed with reflectometry from which the magnetic pitch angle can be inferred.(B. I. Cohen, E. B. Hooper, M. C. Spang, and C. W. Domier, "Theoretical Aspects of the Use of Pulsed Reflectometry in a Spheromak Plasma," (June, 1998), submitted to Rev. Sci. Instrum.) Some of the characteristics of fluctuations are also revealed by reflectometry. Simulation examples of applications of ultra-short-pulsed reflectometry to the SSPX spheromak experiment at Livermore are presented.

  17. Preparation of spherical particles by vibrating orifice technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Shuichi; Tomizawa, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Hidemi; Yano, Tetsuji; Yamane, Masayuki

    2000-05-01

    Preparation of micrometer-sized spherical particles containing Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been investigated for the spherical cavity micro-laser. Using phenyl triethoxy silane (PTES) as a starting material, R6G-doped monodisperse spherical particles were prepared by the vibrating orifice technique. Processing consists of two major processes: (1) Hydrolysis and polymerization of PTES and (2) Droplet formation from PTES oligomers by vibrating orifice technique. A cylindrical liquid jet passing through the orifice of 10 and 20 micrometers in diameter breaks up into equal- sized droplets by mechanical vibration. Alcohol solvent of these droplets was evaporated during flying with carrier gas and subsequently solidified in ammonium water trap. For making smooth surface and god shaped particles, control of molecular weight of PTES oligomer was essential. R6G-doped hybrid spherical particles of 4 to 10 micrometers size of cavity structure were successfully obtained. The spherical particles were pumped by a second harmonic pulse of Q- switched Nd:YAG laser and laser emission peaks were observed at wavelengths which correspond to the resonance modes.

  18. Gas Generator Feedline Orifice Sizing Methodology: Effects of Unsteadiness and Non-Axisymmetric Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; West, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Engine LH2 and LO2 gas generator feed assemblies were modeled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods at 100% rated power level, using on-center square- and round-edge orifices. The purpose of the orifices is to regulate the flow of fuel and oxidizer to the gas generator, enabling optimal power supply to the turbine and pump assemblies. The unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved on unstructured grids at second-order spatial and temporal accuracy. The LO2 model was validated against published experimental data and semi-empirical relationships for thin-plate orifices over a range of Reynolds numbers. Predictions for the LO2 square- and round-edge orifices precisely match experiment and semi-empirical formulas, despite complex feedline geometry whereby a portion of the flow from the engine main feedlines travels at a right-angle through a smaller-diameter pipe containing the orifice. Predictions for LH2 square- and round-edge orifice designs match experiment and semi-empirical formulas to varying degrees depending on the semi-empirical formula being evaluated. LO2 mass flow rate through the square-edge orifice is predicted to be 25 percent less than the flow rate budgeted in the original engine balance, which was subsequently modified. LH2 mass flow rate through the square-edge orifice is predicted to be 5 percent greater than the flow rate budgeted in the engine balance. Since CFD predictions for LO2 and LH2 square-edge orifice pressure loss coefficients, K, both agree with published data, the equation for K has been used to define a procedure for orifice sizing.

  19. [Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: current situation].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Salvadora; Ibarzábal, Ainitze; Fernández-Esparrach, Glòria

    2008-10-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is the paradigm of the evolution of minimally invasive surgery. The laparoscopic has introduced new ideas in general surgery, one of them being that modern surgery is the work of multidisciplinary teams. A clear example of this is provided by NOTES. The aim of this type of surgery is to perform conventional laparoscopic procedures without incision, using flexible endoscopic technology usually employed in the diagnosis and treatment of intraluminal lesions and reaching the inside of the abdominal cavity through natural orifices (mouth, anus, vagina and even urethra). This type of access opens a highly interesting field for certain types of patients, such as those with high surgical risk, the morbidly obese, and those with multiple prior abdominal interventions or surgical wound infections. Animal models have shown that a wide variety of interventions (cholecystectomy, appendicectomy, splenectomy, hysterectomy, tubal ligations, gastroenteroanastomosis, peritoneoscopy, liver biopsy and herniorrhaphy, among others) can be performed. However, before use in humans, this new technique must be shown to be safe and to provide real advantages for patients. To do this, a series of issues, including safe methods for closure of the gastric incision and the avoidance of infections, among others, must be solved. Another critical element for the development of this new type of surgery is the creation of appropriate instrumentation, requiring input not only from medical professionals but also from engineers and industry. The present article describes the major advances made in NOTES since this technique was first described and analyzes the risks and potential benefits associated with this novel procedure.

  20. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  1. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  2. Program computes orifice-meter flow rate

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1981-10-12

    Useful for designing new metering stations or figuring flow rates through existing ones, the program developed for the Tl-59 programmable calculator computes the gas flow rate through an orifice-meter run. The user inputs are the orifice diameter, meter run ID, flowing gas temperature, density, flowing gas pressure, and differential pressure. The program's results are more accurate than those of flow charts or slide-rule-type calculators.

  3. Aerodynamic estimates of induced anterior orifice openings in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Guyette, T W; Smith, B E; Reisberg, D J

    1994-05-01

    This study first examined the accuracy of pressure-flow area estimates of experimental openings in anterior palatal obturators of three adult subjects. Second, we evaluated pressure-flow measures of the same experimental openings using a model. Results indicated that percent error in orifice estimates was slightly higher for induced openings in human subjects (13%) versus those in the model (11%). Results for our human subjects were similar to those reported by previous investigators.

  4. Transanal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery total mesorectal excision in animal models: endoscopic inferior mesenteric artery dissection made easier by a retroperitoneal approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Jin; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Chang, Tae Young; Jung, Yunho; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Young Ill; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2014-07-01

    We report the performance of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) low anterior resection in animals using transanal total mesorectal excision (TME) with laparoscopic assistance and endoscopic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) dissection. Four pigs weighing 45 kg each, and one dog weighing 25 kg, underwent surgery via a transanal approach. The rectum was occluded transanally using a purse-string suture, approximately 3-4 cm from the anal verge. The rectal mucosa was incised circumferentially just distal to the purse-string. A SILS or GelPOINT port was inserted transanally. Transanal TME was assisted by laparoscopy and proceeded up to the peritoneal reflection. More proximal dissection, including IMA dissection, was performed along the retroperitoneal avascular plane by endoscopy alone and facilitated by CO2 insufflation. The IMA was clipped and divided endoscopically. The mobilized rectosigmoid were exteriorized transanally and transected. A colorectal anastomosis was performed using a circular stapler with a single stapling technique. Endoscopic dissection of the IMA was successful in all five animals. The mean operation time was 125 minutes (range, 90-170 minutes). There were no intraoperative complications or hemodynamic instability. The mean length of the resected specimen was 14.4 cm (range, 12-16 cm). A NOTES retroperitoneal approach to the IMA with CO2 insufflation and intact peritoneal covering overcame the difficulties of retraction and exposure of endoscopic dissection in animals.

  5. Modeling of ablation threshold dependence on pulse duration for dielectrics with ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingying; Zhu, Jianqiang; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-01-01

    We present a numerical model of plasma formation in ultrafast laser ablation on the dielectrics surface. Ablation threshold dependence on pulse duration is predicted with the model and the numerical results for water agrees well with the experimental data for pulse duration from 140 fs to 10 ps. Influences of parameters and approximations of photo- and avalanche-ionization on the ablation threshold prediction are analyzed in detail for various pulse lengths. The calculated ablation threshold is strongly dependent on electron collision time for all the pulse durations. The complete photoionization model is preferred for pulses shorter than 1 ps rather than the multiphoton ionization approximations. The transition time of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption needs to be considered when pulses are shorter than 5 ps and it can also ensure the avalanche ionization (AI) coefficient consistent with that in multiple rate equations (MREs) for pulses shorter than 300 fs. The threshold electron density for AI is only crucial for longer pulses. It is reasonable to ignore the recombination loss for pulses shorter than 100 fs. In addition to thermal transport and hydrodynamics, neglecting the threshold density for AI and recombination could also contribute to the disagreements between the numerical and the experimental results for longer pulses.

  6. TWO-PHASE FLOW OF TWO HFC REFRIGERANT MIXTURES THROUGH SHORT-TUBE ORIFICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental investigation to develop an acceptable flow model for short tube orifice expansion devices used in heat pumps. The refrigerants investigated were two hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) mixtures considered hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)-22 replacem...

  7. Subsonic tests of an all-flush-pressure-orifice air data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1981-01-01

    The use of an all-flush-pressure-orifice array as a subsonic air data system was evaluated in flight and wind tunnel tests. Two orifice configurations were investigated. Both used orifices arranged in a cruciform pattern on the airplane nose. One configuration also used orifices on the sides of the fuselage for a source of static pressure. The all-nose-orifice configuration was similar to the shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). The flight data were obtained with a KC-135A airplane. The wind tunnel data were acquired with a 0.035-scale model of the KC-135A airplane. With proper calibration, several orifices on the vertical centerline of the vehicle's nose were found to be satisfactory for the determination of total pressure and angle of attack. Angle of sideslip could be accurately determined from pressure measurements made on the horizontal centerline of the aircraft. Orifice pairs were also found that provided pressure ratio relationships suitable for the determination of Mach number. The accuracy that can be expected for the air data determined with SEADS during subsonic orbiter flight is indicated.

  8. A power law approach to orifice flow rate calibration.

    PubMed

    Rhinehart, R Russell; Gebreyohannes, Solomon; Sridhar, Upasana Manimegalai; Patrachari, Anirudh; Rahaman, M S

    2011-04-01

    Although standards for orifice flow meter design, installation, and calibration are supported herein, noncompliant devices exist in many pilot-, lab-scale, and on-board applications. For these, a common calibration practice is to preserve the ideal square root relation and determine a device specific discharge coefficient value. This work provides theoretical and empirical analyses to support relaxing the square root relation between orifice pressure drop and flow rate for noncompliant devices. The resulting power law relation is shown to improve accuracy, precision, and rangeability. Whether a device specific square root or power law model is used, it requires off-line or in-line calibration data. As such, a power law calibration model may only be useful for on-board and small-scale applications.

  9. Model test plan for HV pulse testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, W. G.; Schweickart, D. L.

    This pulse test plan will contain the configuration, operation and maintenance test requirements, equipment requirements, and procedures for high-voltage pulse testing of aerospace high power experimental and operational parts and equipment. The plan details peak voltage and test pulse rise time and fall time as they are applied to evaluate electrical insulation within electrical and electronic system components.

  10. Comparison of turbulent flow through hexagram and hexagon orifices in circular pipes using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Nicolleau, Franck C. G. A.; Qin, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Characteristics of turbulent flow through a circular, a hexagon and a hexagram orifice with the same flow area in circular pipes are investigated using wall-modelled large-eddy simulation. Good agreements to available experimental data were obtained in both the mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. The hexagram orifice with alternating convex and concave corners introduces outwards radial velocity around the concave corners downstream of the orifice plate stronger than the hexagon orifice. The stronger outwards radial velocity transfers high momentum from the pipe centre towards the pipe wall to energize the orifice-forced vortex sheet rolling-up and leads to a delayed vortex break-down. Correspondingly, the hexagram has a more gradual flow recovery to a pipe flow and a reduced pressure drop than the hexagon orifice. Both the hexagon and hexagram orifices show an axis-switching phenomenon, which is observed from both the streamwise velocity and turbulent kinetic energy contours. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first comparison of orifice-forced turbulence development, mixing and flow dynamics between a regular and a fractal-based polygonal orifice.

  11. Future Modeling Needs in Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Brian; Talley, Doug; Mueller, Donn; Tew, Dave; Guidos, Mike; Seymour, Dave

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a performance model rocket engine design that takes advantage of pulse detonation to generate thrust. The contents include: 1) Introduction to the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE); 2) PDRE modeling issues and options; 3) Discussion of the PDRE Performance Workshop held at Marshall Space Flight Center; and 4) Identify needs involving an open performance model for Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  12. Modeling of high power pulse generator based on the non-linear elements of pulsed facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Dmitrieva, V. V.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article considered the software implementation mathematical model of the voltage pulse generator with a hard switch. The interactive object-oriented software interface provides the choice of generator parameters and the type of its load, as well as pulses parameters analysis on the load at the generator switching.

  13. Effects of Gravity on Bubble Formation at a Plate Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce W.; Buyevich, Yu A.

    1995-01-01

    A model of the dynamic regime of gas injection through a submerged plate orifice into an ideally wetting liquid is developed in the circumstance when successively detached bubbles may be regarded as independent objects. Two major factors favor bubble detachment: the buoyancy force and a force due to the momentum inflow into the bubble with injected gas. In normal and moderately reduced gravity, the first factor dominates. At relatively low flow rates, a growing bubble is modeled as a spherical segment touching the orifice perimeter during the whole period of its evolution till detachment. If the flow rate exceeds a critical value, another stage of bubble evolution occurs in which an almost spherical gas envelope is connected with the orifice by a nearly cylindrical gaseous stem that lengthens as the bubble rises above the plate. The bubble continues to grow until the gas supply through the stem is completely cut off, after which back flow of gas into the stem from the bubble becomes possible. In microgravity, the second factor prevails, and the latter stage is always present irrespective of the flow rate. However, the gas envelope rises and the stem lengthens very slowly. This difference in the underlying physical mechanisms provides for key properties of bubble growth and detachment being drastically different in appreciable and sufficiently reduced gravity. The frequency of bubble formation slightly decreases with and the detachment volume is almost proportional to the gas flow rate in the first case, in accordance with familiar relations. In the second case, the first variable is proportional to the flow rate whereas the second one is independent of it. Effects of other parameters, such as the orifice radius, gas and liquid densities, and surface tension are discussed.

  14. Pulse Control Assisted Dynamical Decoupling in a Central Spin Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao-Yan; Wei, Yong-Bo; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Gu, Yong-Jian; Li, Wen-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Ping

    2017-02-01

    We study pulse control assisted dynamical decoupling through a central spin model in a total Hilbert space. We find that the effective decoupling can be realized by applying a sequence of external pulses. Compared with the bang-bang control which needs infinite strength and infinitesimal short pulses, we show that there is a large parameter space that allows an effective nonperturbative dynamical control. Furthermore, our numerical calculation shows that the reliability can be held for random pulses, such as random pulse time interval or random strength.

  15. Modelling of noise-like pulses generated in fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The present paper for the first time proposes and studies a relatively simple model of noise-like pulses that matches the experimental data well and suggests that there is a correlation between phases of adjacent spectral components of noiselike pulses. Comparison of a relatively basic model of `random' pulses with the results of noise-like pulse modelling in mode-locked fibre lasers based on coupled non-linear Schrödinger equations demonstrates that it adequately reproduces temporal and spectral properties of noise-like pulses as well as correlation between adjacent modes so that it's possible to use the proposed model for highly efficient simulations of promising applications of noise-like pulses, such as material processing, non-linear frequency conversion, microscopy, and others.

  16. Doppler echocardiographic measurement of cardiac output using the mitral orifice method.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nitter-Hauge, S; Ihlen, H; Myhre, E

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac output was determined in 20 patients with various cardiac conditions by measuring the cross sectional area of the mitral orifice by echocardiography and the transmitral flow by the Doppler technique. Cardiac output was calculated by multiplying the corrected mitral orifice area by the maximum diastolic velocity integral recorded by the pulsed mode. The results were compared with that obtained by the Fick method. The correlation for cardiac output by the two techniques was high in the whole group, particularly in patients without mitral regurgitation. There was also a good correlation for stroke volume determined by the two methods. Cardiac output was significantly overestimated by the continuous mode and in patients with mitral regurgitation. These results show that the mitral orifice method provides a new and reliable approach to the non-invasive measurement of cardiac output. Images PMID:3966956

  17. Double mitral valve orifice. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Solorio, S; Badui, E; Yáñez, M; Enciso, R; Rodríguez, L; Quintero, L R

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography for diagnosing double mitral valve orifices (DMVO) in addition to identifying associated pathologies. We report five cases, three male and two female with an age ranging from 4 to 44 years old (mean age: 17 years), with the diagnosis of DMVO according to the following characteristics: using two-dimensional echocardiography on the short parasternal axis, both orifices were observed; apical in which the "seagull sign" was identified in both chambers, in addition to identifying the flows of each orifice by pulsed and codified color Doppler obtaining the corresponding gradients. With respect to the associated pathologies, all patients presented some type of malformation, such as subaortic ring, patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, bicuspid aorta and pulmonary stenosis. Using the color Doppler echocardiography allows an adequate anatomical and functional definition of DMVO.

  18. Bubble Formation at a Submerged Orifice in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic regime of gas injection through a circular plate orifice into an ideally wetting liquid is considered, when successively detached bubbles may be regarded as separate identities. In normal gravity and at relatively low gas flow rates, a growing bubble is modeled as a spherical segment touching the orifice perimeter during the whole time of its evolution. If the flow rate exceeds a certain threshold value, another stage of the detachment process takes place in which an almost spherical gas envelope is connected with the orifice by a nearly cylindrical stem that lengthens as the bubble rises above the plate. The bubble shape resembles then that of a mushroom and the upper envelope continues to grow until the gas supply through the stem is completely cut off. Such a stage is always present under conditions of sufficiently low gravity, irrespective of the flow rate. Two major reasons make for bubble detachment: the buoyancy force and the force due to the momentum inflow into the bubble with the injected gas. The former force dominates the process at normal gravity whereas the second one plays a key role under negligible gravity conditions. It is precisely this fundamental factor that conditions the drastic influence on bubble growth and detachment that changes in gravity are able to cause. The frequency of bubble formation is proportional to and the volume of detached bubbles is independent of the gas flow rate in sufficiently low gravity, while at normal and moderately reduced gravity conditions the first variable slightly decreases and the second one almost linearly increases as the flow rate grows. Effects of other parameters, such as the orifice radius, gas and liquid densities, and surface tension are discussed.

  19. On the attached length of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komkin, A. I.; Mironov, M. A.; Yudin, S. I.

    2012-11-01

    The attached length of orifices in reactive mufflers has been estimated based on numerical calculations by the finite-element method. The numerical results for a diaphragm in a duct are compared with the theoretical data obtained by Rayleigh, Fock, Karal, and Ingard. The dependence of the attached length on the diaphragm thickness is given. The results obtained are generalized for the case in which the orifice is a Helmholtz resonator neck. The effect of the resonator length on the attached length of the neck is analyzed.

  20. The asymmetrically stepped, orifice compensated hydrostatic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharrer, J. K.; Hibbs, R. I.; San Andres, L.

    1992-07-01

    An improved hydrostatic bedaring configuration consisting of a conventional orifice compensated, continuous, hydrostatic bearing augmented on one side by a ring with a smaller radial clearance is presented. Results for the leakage and rotordynamic coeffcients of this asymmetrically stepped hydrostatic bearing are calculated using a numerical solution of the film-average Navier-Stokes equations. Results of a parametric study on the effects of ring geometry and recess position on hydrostatic bearing performance are presented. The results show that the presence of the asymmetric step enhances the rotordynamic performance of an orifice compensated hydrostatic bearing.

  1. Head loss coefficient through sharp-edged orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Nicolas J.; De Cesare, Giovanni; Schleiss, Anton J.; Richard, Sylvain; Muench-Alligné, Cécile

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, high-head power plants could increase their installed power capacity for many reasons, e.g. dam heightening, increase of their peak power capacity or refurbishment with new turbines. Frequently, due to several considerations, e.g. topographical or economical limitations, the existing surge tank cannot be extended to keep previous safety levels and efficiency. A valuable way to adapt these surge tanks is to place a throttle at their entrance like, for example, an orifice. The main effect of this adaptation is the introduction of head losses that reduce the extreme levels in the surge tank due to the mass oscillations resulting from a closure or opening of downstream discharge control. This research studies the influence of the edge angle of a ASME-standard orifice on the head losses. This angle introduces an asymmetrical behavior and influences head losses. Different angles are tested from 0° to the 67° (biggest angle possible for this configuration). The first step of this study is to determine experimentally the steady losses produced by orifice for several discharges. In the second step, a numerical model on ANSYS CFX is performed. Combining the two approaches, it is possible to understand and quantify the effect of the edge angle.

  2. Effects of Ultrasmall Orifices on the Electro-generation of Femtoliter-Volume Aqueous Droplets

    PubMed Central

    He, Mingyan; Kuo, Jason S.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to generate individual picoliter- and femtoliter-volume aqueous droplets on-demand is useful for encapsulating and chemically manipulating discrete chemical and biological samples. This paper characterizes the effects of orifice dimensions and material choices on generating such droplets in an immiscible oil phase using single high-voltage pulses with various amplitudes and durations. We have examined microfluidic orifices as small as 1.7 μm in equivalent radii, and found that the electrohydrodynamic jet lengths and the subsequent formation of droplets are affected by the axial aspect ratios of the orifices (length of an orifice divided by its equivalent radius). As higher voltages were used to compensate for the increased capillary pressure and hydrodynamic resistance in ultrasmall orifices, we observed secondary jet protrusions and droplet formations that were not of classical electrohydrodynamic origin. The droplets generated from secondary jets traveled at relatively lower velocities as compared to those of electrohydrodynamic origin, and these slow individual droplets are potentially more useful for applications in microscale chemical reactions. PMID:16800707

  3. The underground electromagnetic pulse: Four representative models

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, L.F.

    1989-06-01

    I describe four phenomenological models by which an underground nuclear explosion may generate electromagnetic pulses: Compton current asymmetry (or ''Compton dipole''); Uphole conductor currents (or ''casing currents''); Diamagnetic cavity plasma (or ''magnetic bubble''); and Large-scale ground motion (or ''magneto-acoustic wave''). I outline the corresponding analytic exercises and summarize the principal results of the computations. I used a 10-kt contained explosion as the fiducial case. Each analytic sequence developed an equivalent source dipole and calculated signal waveforms at representative ground-surface locations. As a comparative summary, the Compton dipole generates a peak source current moment of about 12,000 A/center dot/m in the submicrosecond time domain. The casing-current source model obtains an equivalent peak moment of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 5/ A/center dot/m in the 10- to 30-/mu/s domain. The magnetic bubble produces a magnetic dipole moment of about 7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ A/center dot/m/sup 2/, characterized by a 30-ms time structure. Finally, the magneto-acoustic wave corresponds to a magnetic dipole moment of about 600 A/center dot/m/sup 2/, with a waveform showing 0.5-s periodicities. 8 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Investigation of the sound generation mechanisms for in-duct orifice plates.

    PubMed

    Tao, Fuyang; Joseph, Phillip; Zhang, Xin; Stalnov, Oksana; Siercke, Matthias; Scheel, Henning

    2017-08-01

    Sound generation due to an orifice plate in a hard-walled flow duct which is commonly used in air distribution systems (ADS) and flow meters is investigated. The aim is to provide an understanding of this noise generation mechanism based on measurements of the source pressure distribution over the orifice plate. A simple model based on Curle's acoustic analogy is described that relates the broadband in-duct sound field to the surface pressure cross spectrum on both sides of the orifice plate. This work describes careful measurements of the surface pressure cross spectrum over the orifice plate from which the surface pressure distribution and correlation length is deduced. This information is then used to predict the radiated in-duct sound field. Agreement within 3 dB between the predicted and directly measured sound fields is obtained, providing direct confirmation that the surface pressure fluctuations acting over the orifice plates are the main noise sources. Based on the developed model, the contributions to the sound field from different radial locations of the orifice plate are calculated. The surface pressure is shown to follow a U(3.9) velocity scaling law and the area over which the surface sources are correlated follows a U(1.8) velocity scaling law.

  5. Update on Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bingener, Juliane; Gostout, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has moved from the realm of laboratory experiments to the realm of human clinical trials. This paper reviews the spectrum of NOTES procedures currently available in the United States and worldwide. It also discusses the limitations and avenues for further development of these procedures, particularly those involving the transgastric approach. PMID:22933874

  6. Contoured Orifice for Silicon-Ribbon Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    Die configuration encourages purity and stable growth. Contour of die orifice changes near ribbon edges. As result, silicon ribbon has nearly constant width and little carbon contamination. Die part of furnace being developed to produce high-quality, low-cost material for solar cells.

  7. Variable orifice using an iris shutter

    DOEpatents

    Beeman, Raymond; Brajkovich, Steven J.

    1978-01-01

    A variable orifice forming mechanism utilizing an iris shutter arrangement adapted to control gas flow, conductance in vacuum systems, as a heat shield for furnace windows, as a beam shutter in sputtering operations, and in any other application requiring periodic or continuously-variable control of material, gas, or fluid flow.

  8. Contoured Orifice for Silicon-Ribbon Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackintosh, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    Die configuration encourages purity and stable growth. Contour of die orifice changes near ribbon edges. As result, silicon ribbon has nearly constant width and little carbon contamination. Die part of furnace being developed to produce high-quality, low-cost material for solar cells.

  9. Measurements and computational fluid dynamics predictions of the acoustic impedance of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Rupp, J.; Garmory, A.; Carrotte, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    The response of orifices to incident acoustic waves, which is important for many engineering applications, is investigated with an approach combining both experimental measurements and numerical simulations. This paper presents experimental data on acoustic impedance of orifices, which is subsequently used for validation of a numerical technique developed for the purpose of predicting the acoustic response of a range of geometries with moderate computational cost. Measurements are conducted for orifices with length to diameter ratios, L/D, of 0.5, 5 and 10. The experimental data is obtained for a range of frequencies using a configuration in which a mean (or bias) flow passes from a duct through the test orifices before issuing into a plenum. Acoustic waves are provided by a sound generator on the upstream side of the orifices. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of the same configuration have also been performed. These have been undertaken using an unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach with a pressure based compressible formulation with appropriate characteristic based boundary conditions to simulate the correct acoustic behaviour at the boundaries. The CFD predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the correct trend with both frequency and orifice L/D in a way not seen with analytical models. The CFD was also able to successfully predict a negative resistance, and hence a reflection coefficient greater than unity for the L / D = 0.5 case.

  10. Overcome side identification in PPOP by making orifices on both layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-hong; Li, Wei; Nie, Shu-fang; Tang, Xin; Peng, Bo; Tian, Lei; Pan, Wei-san

    2009-04-17

    The original purpose of this research was to build a database for an expert system. Unexpectedly, it was found that the color-identifying device in push-pull osmotic pump (PPOP) manufacturing process could be unnecessary. Water-insoluble drug indapamide, gliclazide and dipyridamole were employed as model drugs. Bunches of conventional formulations were designed; and traditional preparation procedures were used. In vitro drug release was studied; and the similarity between the conditions of orifice only on the side of the drug layer and orifices of the same diameter on both sides was evaluated. It was found that the drug release from PPOP could be influenced by formulation and core hardness while it could hardly be influenced by orifice size. No significant difference was observed between the dissolution profiles of orifice only on the side of the drug layer and orifices of the same diameter on both sides. Mechanism of drug release was discussed. The conclusion was that the disadvantage of side identification in PPOP manufacturing process could be overcome by drilling orifices on both sides.

  11. Modeling propagation of coherent optical pulses through molecular vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Eberly, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of modeling the mutual coupling of coherent molecular response and coherent optical pulses during propagation are described. The propagation is treated numerically, with particular emphasis on both continuum and discrete behavior associated with the quasicontinuum model.

  12. Modeling of space-time focusing of localized nondiffracting pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Besieris, Ioannis M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we develop a method capable of modeling the space-time focusing of nondiffracting pulses. These pulses can possess arbitrary peak velocities and, in addition to being resistant to diffraction, can have their peak intensities and focusing positions chosen a priori. More specifically, we can choose multiple locations (spatial ranges) of space and time focalization; also, the pulse intensities can be chosen in advance. The pulsed wave solutions presented here can have very interesting applications in many different fields, such as free-space optical communications, remote sensing, medical apparatus, etc.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the optimum pulse structure for safe and effective photo epilation using broadband pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Ash, Caerwyn; Donne, Kelvin; Daniel, Gwenaelle; Town, Godfrey; Clement, Marc; Valentine, Ronan

    2012-09-06

    The objective of this work is the investigation of intense pulsed light (IPL) photoepilation using Monte Carlo simulation to model the effect of the output dosimetry with millisecond exposure used by typical commercial IPL systems. The temporal pulse shape is an important parameter, which may affect the biological tissue response in terms of efficacy and adverse reactions. This study investigates the effect that IPL pulse structures, namely free discharge, square pulse, close, and spaced pulse stacking, has on hair removal. The relationship between radiant exposure distribution during the IPL pulse and chromophore heating is explored and modeled for hair follicles and the epidermis using a custom Monte Carlo computer simulation. Consistent square pulse and close pulse stacking delivery of radiant exposure across the IPL pulse is shown to generate the most efficient specific heating of the target chromophore, whilst sparing the epidermis, compared to free discharge and pulse stacking pulse delivery. Free discharge systems produced the highest epidermal temperature in the model. This study presents modeled thermal data of a hair follicle in situ, indicating that square pulse IPL technology may be the most efficient and the safest method for photoepilation. The investigation also suggests that the square pulse system design is the most efficient, as energy is not wasted during pulse exposure or lost through interpulse delay times of stacked pulses.

  14. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  15. Pulsed thrust propellant reorientation - Concept and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Korakianitis, T. P.; Chato, David J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of pulsed thrust to optimize the propellant reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code is used to study the performance of pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions of reorientation performance. Based on the results obtained from this study, it is concluded that pulsed thrust reorientation seems to be a feasible technique for optimizing the propellant reorientation process across a wide range of spacecraft, for a variety of missions, for the entire duration of a mission, and with a minimum of hardware design and qualification.

  16. Electro-optic time lens model for femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Francisco J.; Bernardo, Luís M.

    2008-04-01

    We propose an electro-optic time-lens (EOTL) model based on the coupled-mode theory. The model describes the propagation of a femtosecond pulse in an electro-optical crystal with parabolic refractive index modulation by a microwave. The proposed model integrates the second order dispersion approximation (β II ≠ 0) and takes into consideration the possible mismatch between the microwave phase velocity and the pulse group velocity. The coupled-mode theory uses the Hermite-Gaussian functions which are the modes of an ideal electro-optic time-lens. The model characterizes completely the performances of EOTL, including the aberrations, and it establishes the maximum velocity mismatch for which the pulse profile propagates through the crystal without significant distortion. The theoretical model is numerically implement considering the propagation of a short pulse in a Litium Niobate time-lens.

  17. Cosine-Gaussian correlated Schell-model pulsed beams.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chaoliang; Korotkova, Olga; Zhang, Yongtao; Pan, Liuzhan

    2014-01-13

    A new class of partially coherent pulses of Schell type with cosine-Gaussian temporal degree of coherence is introduced. Such waves are termed the Cosine-Gaussian Schell-model (CGSM) pulses. The analytic expression for the temporal mutual coherence function of the CGSM pulse in dispersive media is derived and used to study the evolution of its intensity distribution and its temporal degree of coherence. Further, the numerical calculations are performed in order to show the dependence of the intensity profile and the temporal degree of coherence of the CGSM pulse on the incident pulse duration, the initial temporal coherence length, the order-parameter n and the dispersion of the medium. The most important feature of the novel pulsed wave is its ability to split into two pulses on passage in a dispersive medium at some critical propagation distance. Such critical distance and the subsequent evolution of the split pulses are shown to depend on the source parameters and on the properties of the medium in which the pulse travels.

  18. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the engine cycle of a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE), models for optimizing the performance of a PDRE, and the performance of PDREs in comparison to Solid State Rocket Engines (SSREs).

  19. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Modeling the Exhaust of the Pulsed Plasma Thruster.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    8217 AFRPL TR-85-005AD ~h Final Report Il for the period Modeling the Exhaust of iC) 1Junel1980Oto the Pulsed Plasma Thruster 1’ l5August 1980 February 1985...Pulsed Plasma Thruster , was -. prepared by Daniel W. Yannitell, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Louisiana State University, while on...NO. NO. NO 20332 11 tITLE Inctmde Security Clasification) MODELING THE EXHAUST OF THE PULSED PLASMA THRUSTER (U) 62302F WAR 12 TB 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR

  1. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of an Orifice With a Mean Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; DAgostino, M.; Jones, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire acoustic and flow data for numerical validation of impedance models that simulate bias flow through perforates. The impedance model is being developed by researchers at High Technology Corporation. This report documents normal incidence impedance measurements a singular circular orifice with mean flow passing through it. All measurements are made within a 1.12 inch (28.5 mm) diameter impedance tube. The mean flow is introduced upstream of the orifice (with the flow and incident sound wave travelling in the same direction) with an anechoic termination downstream of the orifice. Velocity profiles are obtained upstream of the orifice to characterize the inflow boundary conditions. Velocity in the center of the orifice is also obtained. All velocity measurements are made with a hot wire anemometer and subsequent checked with mass flow measurements made concurrently. All impedance measurements are made using the Two-Microphone Method. Although we have left the analysis of the data to the developers of the impedance models that simulate bias flow through perforate, our initial examination indicates that our results follow the trends consistent with published theory on impedance of perforates with a steady bias flow.

  2. Electromagnetic sinc Schell-model pulses in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Daomu; Zhu, Yingbin; Ang, Lay-Kee

    2016-02-01

    A class of random electromagnetic pulsed sources with sinc Schell-model correlations is introduced. Analytical formulas for the electromagnetic pulses generated by such pulsed sources propagating in dispersive media are derived. It is shown that the temporal intensity distribution of this new type of pulse exhibits unique propagation features, such as reshaping its average intensity from the initial Gaussian profile to a double-layer flat-top distribution at far field. The effects, arising from the source temporal coherent length and the dispersion coefficient, on the profiles of the temporal intensity distribution and the temporal degree of polarization are analyzed in detail. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of coherence modulation for pulse shaping applications.

  3. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cold reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, K. H.; Qiu, L. M.; Gan, Z. H.; Shen, X.; Xiang, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    Phase difference between pressure wave and mass flow is decisive to the cooling capacity of regenerative cryocoolers. Unlike the direct phase shifting using a piston or displacer in conventional Stirling or GM cryocoolers, the pulse tube cyocooler (PTC) indirectly adjusts the cold phase due to the absence of moving parts at the cold end. The present paper proposed and validated theoretically and experimentally a novel configuration of PTC, termed cold reservoir PTC, in which a reservoir together with an adjustable orifice is connected to the cold end of the pulse tube. The impedance from the additional orifice to the cold end helps to increase the mass flow in phase with the pressure wave at the cold end. Theoretical analyses with the linear model for the orifice and double-inlet PTCs indicate that the cooling performance can be improved by introducing the cold reservoir. The preliminary experiments with a home-made single-stage GM PTC further validated the results on the premise of minor opening of the cold-end orifice.

  4. Evaluation of descending aortic flow volumes and effective orifice area through aortic coarctation by spatiotemporal integration of color Doppler data: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wanitkun, S; Gharib, M; Zarandi, M; Shiota, T; Sahn, D J

    1999-06-01

    Flow volumes in an in vitro model of the aorta with 3 different degrees of stiffness (stiff, moderately stiff, and compliant) proximal to a coarctation were calculated by using a digital color Doppler echocardiography flow calculation method that semiautomatically integrates spatial and temporal color flow velocity data. These flow volumes were compared with those obtained by the conventional pulsed Doppler method with reference to ultrasonic flowmeter. Flow volumes determined by the automated method agreed well with those obtained by ultrasonic flowmeter, even in this compliant aorta model with vessel size changing with pulsation, whereas the pulsed Doppler method overestimated the reference data, especially for more compliant descending aortic segments. The combination of flow data with continuous wave Doppler allows definition of effective orifice area for coarctation.

  5. Experiments in dilution jet mixing effects of multiple rows and non-circular orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E. B.; Meyers, G. D.; White, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and empirical model results are presented that extend previous studies of the mixing of single-sided and opposed rows of jets in a confined duct flow to include effects of non-circular orifices and double rows of jets. Analysis of the mean temperature data obtained in this investigation showed that the effects of orifice shape and double rows are significant only in the region close to the injection plane, provided that the orifices are symmetric with respect to the main flow direction. The penetration and mixing of jets from 45-degree slanted slots is slightly less than that from equivalent-area symmetric orifices. The penetration from 2-dimensional slots is similar to that from equivalent-area closely-spaced rows of holes, but the mixing is slower for the 2-D slots. Calculated mean temperature profiles downstream of jets from non-circular and double rows of orifices, made using an extension developed for a previous empirical model, are shown to be in good agreement with the measured distributions.

  6. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  7. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in cph do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in cph cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), Rtot, Ctot, and cph to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, cph was theoretically maintained constant, while Ctot, Rtot, and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, Ctot, Rtot, and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and cph was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in cph have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in Ctot. PMID:22561301

  8. Surgery via natural orifices in human beings: yesterday, today, tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios N; Bramis, Konstantinos J; Mantonakis, Eleftherios I; Papalampros, Efstathios L; Petrou, Athanasios S; Papalampros, Alexandros E

    2012-07-01

    We performed an evaluation of models, techniques, and applicability to the clinical setting of natural orifice surgery (mainly natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery [NOTES]) primarily in general surgery procedures. NOTES has attracted much attention recently for its potential to establish a completely alternative approach to the traditional surgical procedures performed entirely through a natural orifice. Beyond the potentially scar-free surgery and abolishment of dermal incision-related complications, the safety and efficacy of this new surgical technology must be evaluated. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Entrez PubMed from 2007 to February 2011. Most of the references were identified from 2009 to 2010. There were limitations as far as the population that was evaluated (only human beings, no cadavers or animals) was concerned, but there were no limitations concerning the level of evidence of the studies that were evaluated. The studies that were deemed applicable for our review were published mainly from 2007 to 2010 (see Methods section). All the evaluated studies were conducted only in human beings. We studied the most common referred in the literature orifices such as vaginal, oral, gastric, esophageal, anal, or urethral. The optimal access route and method could not be established because of the different nature of each procedure. We mainly studied procedures in the field of general surgery such as cholecystectomy, intestinal cancers, renal cancers, appendectomy, mediastinoscopy, and peritoneoscopy. All procedures were feasible and most of them had an uneventful postoperative course. A number of technical problems were encountered, especially as far as pure NOTES procedures are concerned, which makes the need of developing new endoscopic instruments, to facilitate each approach, undeniable. NOTES is still in the early stages of development and more robust technologies will be needed to achieve reliable

  9. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersch, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is derived for the acoustic behavior of thin-walled single orifice Helmholtz resonators in a grazing flow environment. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient whose values are determined experimentally using the two-microphone method. Measurements show that at high grazing flow speeds, acoustical resistance is almost linearly proportional to the grazing flow speed and almost independent of incident sound pressure. The corresponding values of reactance are much smaller and tend towards zero. For thicker-walled orifice plates, resistance and reactance were observed to be less sensitive to grazing flow as the ratio of plate thickness to orifice diameter increased. Loud tones were observed to radiate from a single orifice Helmholtz resonator due to interaction between the grazing flow shear layer and the resonator cavity. Measurements showed that the tones radiated at a Strouhal number equal to 0.26. The effects of grazing flow on the impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of clusters of orifices was also studied. In general, both resistance and reaction were found to be virtually independent of orifice relative spacing and number. These findings are valid with and without grazing flow.

  10. Discharge flow of granular media from silos with a lateral orifice and injection of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussillous, Pascale; Zhou, Yixian; Ruyer, Pierre; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Few studies concern the prediction of the mass flow rate of a granular media discharged from a silo with a lateral orifice. However, this situation can have pratical interest considering a tank of granular material with a leak on its side. We studied experimentally the discharge of a vertical silo filled by spherical glass beads. We consider rectangular silos with a rectangular orifice. The impact of size, aspect ratio and position of the orifice and the effect of an additional air flow were studied. The measured parameters are the mass flow rate and the pressure along the silo, whereas the controlled parameters are the size of particles, and the flow rate of air. We identified two regimes of discharge according to the aspect ratio (of width to height) of the rectangular orifice. Increasing the air flow rate induces an increase of the granular media flow rate. Using a simple physical model to describe the grains and gas flow, we put in evidence the role played by the air pressure gradient at the outlet. Then we compared the experimental results with continuum Navier-Stokes simulations with the granular μ(I)-rheology. We showed that the continuum μ(I)-rheology describes well our discharge flow of granular media from silos, taking into account the effect of the position of the orifice as well as the coupling with the gas flow.

  11. A Simple Model of Pulsed Ejector Thrust Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Deloof, Richard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A simple model of thrust augmentation from a pulsed source is described. In the model it is assumed that the flow into the ejector is quasi-steady, and can be calculated using potential flow techniques. The velocity of the flow is related to the speed of the starting vortex ring formed by the jet. The vortex ring properties are obtained from the slug model, knowing the jet diameter, speed and slug length. The model, when combined with experimental results, predicts an optimum ejector radius for thrust augmentation. Data on pulsed ejector performance for comparison with the model was obtained using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as the pulsed jet source. A statistical experiment, in which ejector length, diameter, and nose radius were independent parameters, was performed at four different frequencies. These frequencies corresponded to four different slug length to diameter ratios, two below cut-off, and two above. Comparison of the model with the experimental data showed reasonable agreement. Maximum pulsed thrust augmentation is shown to occur for a pulsed source with slug length to diameter ratio equal to the cut-off value.

  12. Computer Modeling of Pulsed Chemical Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-31

    laser pulse was by photolysis of molecular fluorine using flashlamps. The initiation reaction pro- ceeded as: F2 + hvP = 2F (1.4) with Vp being an... MEN a~ji -U-O--- C C, ca. 04 ( i’ c4 CL viM m0 LA 04 016 166 Elm1 E FI ozF LA- 10 --- - -6’~ 167 =VE 0.ik 0ww 1 68 -wl MAIN t...# r Al w YVfaia we. a...0m NoJ IS-90I IRA -. OEM 179 180 MIN im, IUAINNE Ililm MINE 17i mmm mums NOW1911mmoImm, man .AKE-# 0 ON1 INA 0 Suffillan Ellmmm MEN IFIRM 0 W-mv- um I

  13. Study of orifice fabrication technologies for the liquid droplet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, David B.; Hayes, Donald J.; Bush, J. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Eleven orifice fabrication technologies potentially applicable for a liquid droplet radiator are discussed. The evaluation is focused on technologies capable of yielding 25-150 microns diameter orifices with trajectory accuracies below 5 milliradians, ultimately in arrays of up to 4000 orifices. An initial analytical screening considering factors such as trajectory accuracy, manufacturability, and hydrodynamics of orifice flow is presented. Based on this screening, four technologies were selected for experimental evaluation. A jet straightness system used to test 50-orifice arrays made by electro-discharge machining (EDM), Fotoceram, and mechanical drilling is discussed. Measurements on orifice diameter control and jet trajectory accuracy are presented and discussed. Trajectory standard deviations are in the 4.6-10.0 milliradian range. Electroforming and EDM appear to have the greatest potential for Liquid Droplet Radiator applications. The direction of a future development effort is discussed.

  14. Modelling X-ray Pulse Profiles of Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S.; Tian, W.

    2013-03-01

    The modelling of X-ray pulse profiles from accreting millisecond pulsars is a way to infer masses and radii of neutron stars. We briefly describe how a pulse shape encodes information on the mass and radius, but also depends on other parameters such as hot spot location and observer viewing angle. A numerical model that we have developed is then described. The model includes light bending, time-delay effects, and Doppler effects for photons. The model accounts for oblateness of the neutron star, caused by the rapid rotation, and for scattered light from the surface of the accretion disk. The millisecond pulsar SAX J1808-3658 has multiple observations taken during different outbursts. The observed pulse shapes vary greatly, and it is a challenging test to fit the different observations. Some of the latest results are given.

  15. Transverse Injection into Subsonic Crossflow with Various Injector Orifice Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lancert E.; Zaman, Khairul B.

    2010-01-01

    Computational and experimental results are presented for a case study of single injectors employed in 90 deg transverse injection into a non-reacting subsonic flow. Different injector orifice shapes are used (including circular, square, diamond-shaped, and wide rectangular slot), all with constant cross-sectional area, to observe the effects of this variation on injector penetration and mixing. Whereas the circle, square, and diamond injector produce similar jet plumes, the wide rectangular slot produces a plume with less vertical penetration than the others. There is also some evidence that the diamond injector produces slightly faster penetration with less mixing of the injected fluid. In addition, a variety of rectangular injectors were analyzed, with varying length/width ratios. Both experimental and computational data show improved plume penetration with increased streamwise orifice length. 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) results are obtained for the various injector geometries using NCC (National Combustion Code) with the kappa-epsilon turbulence model in multi-species modes on an unstructured grid. Grid sensitivity results are also presented which indicate consistent qualitative trends in the injector performance comparisons with increasing grid refinement.

  16. A novel, new robotic platform for natural orifice distal pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shyam; Awad, Michael; Gurram, Krishna C; Tully, Steven; Wright, Cornell; Sanan, Siddharth; Choset, Howie

    2015-06-01

    Laparoendoscopic technology has revolutionized the practice of surgery; however, surgeons have not widely accepted laparoscopic techniques for pancreatic surgeries due to the complexity of the operation. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) offers a great new potential for pancreatic procedures, with early data showing benefits of reduced visible scarring and the potential for decreased wound infections, hernias, pain, and postoperative complications. However, there are significant limitations to the currently used flexible endoscopy tools, including a diminished visual field, spatial orientation and tissue manipulation issues, and 2-dimensional visual feedback. We have adopted a novel snake-like robot, the minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) robot, which addresses these issues. In the current pilot study, the MICS robot was evaluated for transrectal distal pancreas exploration and resection in 2 nonsurvival porcine models. Abdominal navigation and accessing the pancreas was investigated in the first pig, and based on its success, pancreas resection was studied in pig 2. The MICS robot was successful in accessing and visualizing the right upper, left upper, and left lower quadrants of the abdomen in pig 1 and was able to perform a successful complex NOTES procedure with distal pancreas resection in pig 2, with only minimal laparoscopic retraction assistance. In conclusion, preliminary results showing the MICS robot in natural orifice distal pancreatectomy are positive. Enhancements to optics and instrumentation will help further increase the usability in pancreatic interventions. Future indications may include transgastric NOTES approaches, endoluminal procedures, and single-port applications.

  17. Numerical investigation of the geometrical effects on UHMWPE flow characteristics in small aperture spinneret orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengxue; Zhang, Zhanhuan; Xu, Xingming; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Due to high viscosity of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), it is difficult for the melt UHMWPE to flow through the small aperture spinneret orifice in the melt spinning forming process. The geometrical parameters of the spinneret orifice become critical to the melt spinning process. Based on the theory of polymer rheology, the finite element model of UHMWPE melt spinning had been developed by using POLYFLOW, and the length-to-diameter ratio and taper angle of the spinneret orifice effects on the UHMWPE melt flow characters were discussed. The results show that suitable length-to-diameter ratio and taper angle are helpful for the compactness and flow stability of the melt.

  18. Mixing, ignition and combustion studies using discrete orifice injection at hypervelocity flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakos, R.; Tamagno, J.; Trucco, R.; Rizkalla, O.; Chinitz, W.

    1991-01-01

    Testing at hypervelocity test conditions continues in the Hypulse expansion tube. A newly-calibrated Mach 13 operating point has been achieved, and hydrogen injection studies were performed at this test condition. The experiments were conducted in a 2-in x 1-in combustor model employing three injector configurations: a single flush-wall circular orifice; two such orifices on opposite walls (the 'dual' injector configuration); and two orifices on the upper and the lower walls (the 'quad' injector configuration). The quad injectors were distinctly superior to the other two configurations in promoting mixing, ignition, and combustion. The single injector, however, proved to be superior to the dual injectors, supporting the concept that the aspect ratio of the 'injection cell' plays a large role in promoting the processes required to achieve high combustion efficiency.

  19. Effect of orifice-area reduction on flow characteristics during injection through spinal needles.

    PubMed

    Myers, M R; Malinauskas, R A

    1998-02-01

    A reduction in hole size for certain side-port spinal needles has been advocated in recent reports. While the influence of orifice-area reduction on the aspiration capability of the needle has been studied, the influence on the anaesthetic delivery properties is relatively unknown. As a first step in understanding the effects of hole-size reduction on anaesthetic distribution within the subarachnoid space, we studied flows emanating from isolated needles using computer simulations. Following validation of the numerical model using experimental particle visualisation, trajectories of anaesthetic particles injected through 25 G Whitacre needles of various orifice areas were computed and used to determine the orientation and rate of spread of the anaesthetic jet exiting the needle. Two factors impacting the concentration distribution were observed: the rate of spread of the anaesthetic jet increases markedly with decreasing orifice area and the jet alignment shifts toward perpendicular to the needle axis.

  20. Drinking spout orifice size affects licking behavior in inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Dotson, Cedrick D; Spector, Alan C

    2005-08-07

    Using a lickometer, we assessed the effect of drinking spout orifice size on the licking behavior of inbred mice [C57BL/6J, SWR/J, 129P3/J and DBA/2J]. Animals licked from drinking spout sipper tubes that had what were defined as either a large (2.7 mm) or a small (1.5 mm) orifice. Mice took approximately twice as many licks from a stationary single small orifice drinking spout than when licking from a spout with a large orifice during separate 30-min sessions. However, their total intake volume was approximately the same. We calculated that mice received a mean of 0.55 muL per lick from the drinking tubes with a small orifice and a mean of 1.15 muL per lick from the drinking tubes with a large orifice. Thus, the animals appear to have regulated their fluid intake by proportionally adjusting their licking as a function of the lick volume. On average, this regulation occurred through modulation of the size of licking bursts and not their frequency. However, strain differences in compensation strategy were observed. When licking was restricted to a series of 5-s trials in a 30-min brief access test session, the smaller orifice size increased the range of responsiveness that was expressed. Mice increased their average licks per trial by 20% and took 60% more trials when licking from a spout with a small orifice. Interestingly, when the orifice size was quasi-randomly varied within a brief access session, licking was greater from large orifice drinking spouts, suggesting that water delivered from the two orifice sizes differs in its reinforcement efficacy. These findings demonstrate that drinking spout orifice size can significantly influence experimental outcomes in licking tests involving mice and care should be taken in controlling this variable in testing the effects of taste or other factors on ingestive behavior.

  1. A mandibular second premolar with three canals and atypical orifices.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Zand, Vahid; Fatemi, Ali; Shyezadeh, Vahab; Ranjkesh, Bahram

    2008-09-01

    Mandibular second premolars with three canals (Type V, Vertucci) and separate foramina are very rare. The anatomy of the pulp chamber floor in these premolars usually reveals one lingual and two buccal orifices at the same level. This case report describes a second premolar with three canals and an unusual pulpal floor anatomy with one distobuccal and one distolingual orifice at the same level and an orifice on the mesiolingual wall. Very careful examination of the pulpal space, preferably with an optical device, is recommended to locate any unusual orifices.

  2. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  3. Minilaparoscopy-Assisted Natural Orifice Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Colombero, Liliana T.; Lambeck, Johann; Manolas, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objectives: New technology has allowed us to perform major abdominal and pelvic surgeries with increasingly smaller instruments. The ultimate goal is surgery with no visible scars. Until current technical limitations are overcome, minilaparoscopy-assisted natural orifice surgery (MANOS) provides a solution. The aim of this study was to examine our clinical and experimental experience with MANOS. Method: Minilaparoscopic abdominal instruments were used together with a large vaginal port, which was used for insufflation, visual purposes, introduction of operative instruments, and specimen extraction. Minilaparoscopy-assisted intraperitoneal transgastric appendectomy was done in simulators (Lap trainer with SimuVision, Simulab Corp., Seattle, WA). Results: Since 1998, we have used this technique in 100 cases including ovarian cystectomies, oophorectomies, salpingo-oophorectomies, myomectomies, appendectomies, and cholecystectomies. Some oophorectomies were performed after vaginal hysterectomy in cases where vaginal extraction was not possible. In this case series, we had only one complication, a case of postoperative fever after an ovarian cystectomy, which was diagnosed as drug-related fever. Our limited simulator experience showed that MANOS is a feasible technique for performing trans-gastric appendectomies. Conclusion: It may take several years for natural orifice surgery to become standard care. Meanwhile, MANOS could encourage and expedite this process. PMID:17651552

  4. Natural orifice surgery: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Santiago; Cullen, John P; Talamini, Mark A; Mintz, Yoav; Ferreres, Alberto; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan; Bosia, Julie; Savides, Thomas; Easter, David W; Savu, Michelle K; Ramamoorthy, Sonia L; Whitcomb, Emily; Agarwal, Sanjay; Lukacz, Emily; Dominguez, Guillermo; Ferraina, Pedro

    2009-07-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has moved quickly from preclinical investigation to clinical implementation. However, several major technical problems limit clinical NOTES including safe access, retraction and dissection of the gallbladder, and clipping of key structures. This study aimed to identify challenges and develop solutions for NOTES during the initial clinical experience. Under an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol, patients consented to a natural orifice operation for removal of either the gallbladder or the appendix via either the vagina or the stomach using a single umbilical trocar for safety and assistance. Nine transvaginal cholecystectomies, one transgastric appendectomy, and one transvaginal appendectomy have been completed to date. All but one patient were discharged on postoperative day 1 as per protocol. No complications occurred. The limited initial evidence from this study demonstrates that NOTES is feasible and safe. The addition of an umbilical trocar is a bridge allowing safe performance of NOTES procedures until better instruments become available. The addition of a flexible long grasper through the vagina and a flexible operating platform through the stomach has enabled the performance of NOTES in a safe and easily reproducible manner. The use of a uterine manipulator has facilitated visualization of the cul de sac in women with a uterus to allow for safe transvaginal access.

  5. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  6. Physical Attributes of Pulse Jet Mixer Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2013-07-07

    Vessels mixed using pulse jet mixers that produce a periodic, rather than steady, flow present challenges with respect to modeling slurry mixing. A PJM is a cylindrical tank within the mixed tank that has a conical bottom with an orifice through which process fluid cyclically enters and is expelled forcefully by pressurizing the air space above the liquid in the PJM. Between pulses, some of the solids settle from the slurry, which nominally is a failure in mixing, but during the pulses (if operated to attain bottom clearing conditions), all of the solids are resuspended and made available for processing or transfer. Overall, mixing is successful if the solids are processed and removed from the vessel as needed when averaged over repeated PJM cycles. This paper describes the physics of pulse jet mixing process based on physical observation during experiments and analysis of experimental concentration profile data obtained during the mixing cycle.

  7. Thor: Modeling of a Megabar Class Pulsed Power Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, T. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Stygar, W. A.; Brown, J. L.; Davis, J.-P.; Waisman, E. M.

    2015-06-01

    Thor is a compact, economical machine to drive megabar-class shockless compression material physics experiments and multi-mega-ampere HEDP experiments for the physics community. It is capable of driving peak currents up to 7 MA with rise times of 200-500 ns, resulting in material pressures between 1 to 5 Mbar depending upon the load design, and incorporates a pulse tailoring capability required to maintain shockless loading of many materials. Thor is modular in nature with 200 capacitive bricks triggered in groups by independent, de-coupled switches. The current pulse at the load is a simple linear combination of the 200 time-shifted basis pulses. This enables a variety of experiments including shockless compression experiments using smooth ramped pulses, shock-ramp compression experiments using tailored pulses, and strength measurement experiments using flat top pulses. This paper overviews the Thor design and describes an equivalent circuit model of the machine that drives MHD simulations of the load region. 3D ALEGRA MHD simulations explore topics such as the uniformity of the magnetic field along the stripline load and the design modifications to improve uniformity. Optimized current drives and simulations of the aforementioned applications are also presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Dielectrophoresis-assisted massively parallel cell pairing and fusion based on field constriction created by a micro-orifice array sheet.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuji; Gel, Murat; Techaumnat, Boonchai; Oana, Hidehiro; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Washizu, Masao

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present a novel electrofusion device that enables massive parallelism, using an electrically insulating sheet having a two-dimensional micro-orifice array. The sheet is sandwiched by a pair of micro-chambers with immersed electrodes, and each chamber is filled with the suspensions of the two types of cells to be fused. Dielectrophoresis, assisted by sedimentation, is used to position the cells in the upper chamber down onto the orifices, then the device is flipped over to position the cells on the other side, so that cell pairs making contact in the orifice are formed. When a pulse voltage is applied to the electrodes, most voltage drop occurs around the orifice and impressed on the cell membrane in the orifice. This makes possible the application of size-independent voltage to fuse two cells in contact at all orifices exclusively in 1:1 manner. In the experiment, cytoplasm of one of the cells is stained with a fluorescence dye, and the transfer of the fluorescence to the other cell is used as the indication of fusion events. The two-dimensional orifice arrangement at the pitch of 50 μm realizes simultaneous fusion of 6 × 10³ cells on a 4 mm diameter chip, and the fusion yield of 78-90% is achieved for various sizes and types of cells.

  9. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  10. Measurement and modeling of pulsed microchannel plate operation (invited).

    PubMed

    Rochau, G A; Wu, M; Kruschwitz, C; Joseph, N; Moy, K; Bailey, J; Krane, M; Thomas, R; Nielsen, D; Tibbitts, A

    2008-10-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are a standard detector for fast-framing x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas. The MCP is coated with conductive striplines that carry short duration voltage pulses to control the timing and amplitude of the signal gain. This gain depends on the voltage to a large exponent so that small reflections or impedance losses along the striplines can have a significant impact on the position-dependent amplitude and pulse width of the gain. Understanding the pulsed gain response therefore requires careful measurements of the position- and time-dependent surface voltage coupled with detailed modeling of the resulting electron cascade. We present measurements and modeling of the time- and space-dependent gain response of MCP detectors designed for use at Sandia National Laboratories' Z facility. The pulsed gain response is understood through measurements using a high impedence probe to determine the voltage pulse propagating along the stripline surface. Coupling the surface voltage measurements with Monte Carlo calculations of the electron cascade in the MCP provides a prediction of the time- and position-dependent gain that agrees with measurements made on a subpicosecond UV laser source to within the 25% uncertainty in the simulations.

  11. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  12. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi 1-D, finite-rate chemistry CFD model for a PDRE & described and implemented. A parametric study of the effect of blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of an optimized, fixed PDRE nozzle configuration is reported. The results are compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

  13. Wind tunnel investigation of an all flush orifice air data system for a large subsonic aircraft. [conducted in a Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Flechner, S. G.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel investigation on an all flush orifice air data system for use on a KC-135A aircraft are presented. The investigation was performed to determine the applicability of fixed all flush orifice air data systems that use only aircraft surfaces for orifices on the nose of the model (in a configuration similar to that of the shuttle entry air data system) provided the measurements required for the determination of stagnation pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. For the measurement of static pressure, additional flush orifices in positions on the sides of the fuselage corresponding to those in a standard pitot-static system were required. An acceptable but less accurate system, consisting of orifices only on the nose of the model, is defined and discussed.

  14. Multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic air streams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Review of oblique water and fluorocarbon injection test results obtained in experimental studies of the effects of multiple-orifice liquid injection into hypersonic air streams. The results include the finding that maximum lateral penetration from such injections increases linearly with the square root of the jet-to-freestream dynamic-pressure ratio and is proportional to an equivalent orifice diameter.

  15. Modeling of the bipolar transistor under different pulse ionizing radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. M.; Skorobogatov, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a 2D model of the bipolar transistor 2T312 under gamma, X-ray and laser pulse ionizing radiations. Both the Finite Element Discretization and Semiconductor module of Comsol 5.1 are used. There is an analysis of energy deposition in this device under different radiations and the results of transient ionizing current response for some different conditions.

  16. Reconciling diversification: random pulse models of speciation and extinction.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Inferring the underlying speciation-extinction dynamics of a clade from the phylogenetic relationships of contemporary species has proven difficult, primarily because the record of extinction is absent. Moreover, models of diversification tend to emphasize either time homogeneity or gradual trends in speciation and extinction rates. In contrast, the fossil records of many groups exhibit repeated increase and decrease of species richness within clades. Modeling this dynamic in the structure of phylogenetic trees has had limited application. Here, I consider the idea that pulses of diversification followed by declines in clade size-such pulses having short life spans in evolutionary time-occur frequently and more or less randomly among lineages. I suggest that this model might characterize diversification quite generally. Analyses of a recent phylogeny of the ovenbirds and treecreepers (Aves: Furnariidae) supports the random pulse model in that ancestral lineages at 15, 10, and 5 Ma exhibit diversification rate heterogeneity, but the sizes of ancestral and descendant lineages are uncorrelated. Simulations of such a process and its manifestations in reconstructed phylogenies would help to characterize diversification pulses in an abstract sense and draw attention to the underlying biological processes that produce them.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDB) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional gas turbines and rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional engines. However, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to all pulse detonation devices has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance of PDES problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models.

  18. Porous plug for reducing orifice induced pressure error in airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, Elizabeth B. (Inventor); Gloss, Blair B. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Stack, John P. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A porous plug is provided for the reduction or elimination of positive error caused by the orifice during static pressure measurements of airfoils. The porous plug is press fitted into the orifice, thereby preventing the error caused either by fluid flow turning into the exposed orifice or by the fluid flow stagnating at the downstream edge of the orifice. In addition, the porous plug is made flush with the outer surface of the airfoil, by filing and polishing, to provide a smooth surface which alleviates the error caused by imperfections in the orifice. The porous plug is preferably made of sintered metal, which allows air to pass through the pores, so that the static pressure measurements can be made by remote transducers.

  19. Porous plug for reducing orifice induced pressure error in airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, Elizabeth B. (Inventor); Gloss, Blair B. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Stack, John P. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A porous plug is provided for the reduction or elimination of positive error caused by the orifice during static pressure measurements of airfoils. The porous plug is press fitted into the orifice, thereby preventing the error caused either by fluid flow turning into the exposed orifice or by the fluid flow stagnating at the downstream edge of the orifice. In addition, the porous plug is made flush with the outer surface of the airfoil, by filing and polishing, to provide a smooth surface which alleviates the error caused by imperfections in the orifice. The porous plug is preferably made of sintered metal, which allows air to pass through the pores, so that the static pressure measurements can be made by remote transducers.

  20. Effect of nonsymmetrical flow resistance upon orifice impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey, J. W.; Compton, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    Previous laboratory work has indicated that an orifice in a thin sheet behaves in a quasisteady manner under acoustical excitation. Also, it has been found that the steady flow resistance of an orifice may be dependent upon the direction of flow, especially in the presence of a crossflow on one side of the hole. An analytical study is presented which assumes a nonreactive orifice in an infinite baffle. The pressure difference across the orifice varies sinusoidally with amplitude 1.0 and average value -P. The orifice resistance is discontinuous at zero velocity and exhibits the constant values when the velocity is nonzero. The resultant velocity has power in all harmonics of the excitation frequency, providing an explanation of the even harmonic excitation observed by other investigators, but not predicted by symmetric nonlinearity. A quasilinear resistance is defined and found to be relatively insensitive to the presence or absence of a resonant backing cavity.

  1. Quantum model for mode locking in pulsed semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beugeling, W.; Uhrig, Götz S.; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots in GaAs/InGaAs structures have been proposed as a candidate system for realizing quantum computing. The short coherence time of the electronic quantum state that arises from coupling to the nuclei of the substrate is dramatically increased if the system is subjected to a magnetic field and to repeated optical pulsing. This enhancement is due to mode locking: oscillation frequencies resonant with the pulsing frequencies are enhanced, while off-resonant oscillations eventually die out. Because the resonant frequencies are determined by the pulsing frequency only, the system becomes immune to frequency shifts caused by the nuclear coupling and by slight variations between individual quantum dots. The effects remain even after the optical pulsing is terminated. In this work, we explore the phenomenon of mode locking from a quantum mechanical perspective. We treat the dynamics using the central-spin model, which includes coupling to 10-20 nuclei and incoherent decay of the excited electronic state, in a perturbative framework. Using scaling arguments, we extrapolate our results to realistic system parameters. We estimate that the synchronization to the pulsing frequency needs time scales in the order of 1 s .

  2. Air suspension characterisation and effectiveness of a variable area orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A.; Giménez, J. G.; Nieto, J.; Vinolas, J.

    2010-12-01

    The air spring is one of the components that most affects vehicle comfort. This element usually makes up the main part of the secondary suspension, which introduces both stiffness and damping between the bogie and the car body. Therefore, a deep understanding of this element is necessary in order to study the comfort of a vehicle, the influence of different parameters and the ways to improve it. In this work, the effect of the air spring system on comfort is studied. To accomplish this, a typical pneumatic suspension composition is briefly studied as a first step. Then, the test bench developed to characterise air springs is described, presenting experimental results. Correlation of the results with some theoretical models is also addressed. Afterwards, the effect of the air spring system on comfort is analysed, and finally, improvements from introducing a variable area orifice in the pipe that joints the air spring and the surge reservoir are discussed.

  3. Use of nose cap and fuselage pressure orifices for determination of air data for space shuttle orbiter below supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel pressure measurements were acquired from orifices on a 0.1 scale forebody model of the space shuttle orbiter that were arranged in a preliminary configuration of the shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). Pressures from those and auxiliary orifices were evaluated for their ability to provide air data at subsonic and transonic speeds. The orifices were on the vehicle's nose cap and on the sides of the forebody forward of the cabin. The investigation covered a Mach number range of 0.25 to 1.40 and an angle of attack range from 4 deg. to 18 deg. An air data system consisting of nose cap and forebody fuselage orifices constitutes a complete and accurate air data system at subsonic and transonic speeds. For Mach numbers less than 0.80 orifices confined to the nose cap can be used as a complete and accurate air data system. Air data systems that use only flush pressure orifices can be used to determine basic air data on other aircraft at subsonic and transonic speeds.

  4. Experimental Validation of a Pulse Tube Cfd Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. P.; Nellis, G. F.; Klein, S. A.; Radebaugh, R.; Lewis, M.; Bradley, P.

    2010-04-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis has been applied by various authors to study the processes occurring in the pulse tube cryocooler and carry out parametric design and optimization. However, a thorough and quantitative validation of the CFD model predications against experimental data has not been accomplished. This is in part due to the difficulty associated with measuring the specific quantities of interest (e.g., internal enthalpy flows and acoustic power) rather than generic system performance (e.g., cooling power). This paper presents the experimental validation of a previously published two-dimensional, axisymmetric CFD model of the pulse tube and its associated flow transitions. The test facility designed for this purpose is unique in that it allows the precise measurement of the cold end acoustic power, regenerator loss, and cooling power. Therefore, it allows the separate and precise measurement of both the pulse tube loss and the regenerator loss. The experimental results are presented for various pulse tube and flow transition configurations operating at a cold end temperature of 80 K over a range of pressure ratios. The comparison of the model prediction to the experimental data is presented with discussion.

  5. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  6. Modeling the pressure pulse shape of piezoelectric lithotripters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Thomas; Riedlinger, Rainer

    2002-11-01

    Piezoelectric focusing transducers are widely used in extracorporeal lithotripsy. To optimize the therapeutically relevant focal pressure pulse it is necessary to affect the generated pulse shape at the transducer surface. Therefore a modeling approach is required containing the acousto-mechanical properties of the transducer structure as well as the influence of the electrical drive. The procedure presented here uses three dimensional transient finite element simulations to calculate an electro-acoustical impulse response of the transducer structure and linear systems theory to model the influence of the driving circuit on the emitted acoustical signal. Applying a short electrical pulse an acoustical impulse response can be simulated under plane wave conditions, which is valid at sufficiently large distances from the transducer. Focal pressures are estimated rapidly by linear calculations or accurately by a nonlinear propagation model. The influence of electrical drive conditions on the emitted acoustical signal is investigated very efficiently by a convolution with the desired electrical input, avoiding FEM simulations for each case. Reverting this process the required driving voltage course for a given pressure signal is determined. Alterations of the pressure signal in terms of pulse width and tensile components are demonstrated theoretically, varying the design parameters of the transducer.

  7. Stalled Pulsing Inertial Oscillation Model for a Tornadic Cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    A supercell storm is a tall, rotating thunderstorm that can generate hail and tornadoes. Two models exist for the development of the storm's rotation or mesocyclone - the conventional splitting-storm model, and the more recent pulsing inertial oscillation (PIO) model, in which a nonlinear pulse represents the supercell. Although data support both models and both could operate in the same supercell, neither model has satisfactorily explained the tornadic cyclone. A tornadic cyclone is an elevated vorticity concentration of Rossby number approximately 1000 that develops within the contracting mesocyclone shortly before a major tornado appears at the surface. We now show that if the internal temperature excess due to latent energy release is limited to the realistic range of -12 K to +12 K, the PIO model can stall part way through the pulse in a state of contraction and spin-up. Should this happen, the stalled-PIO model can evolve into a tornadic cyclone with a central pressure deficit that exceeds 40 mb, which is greater than the largest measured value. This simulation uses data from a major tornadic supercell that occurred over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, on May 3, 1999. The stalled-PIO mechanism also provides a strategy for human intervention to retard or reverse the development of a tornadic cyclone and its pendant tornado.

  8. Use of groundwater levels with the PULSE analytical model.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Albert T

    2014-01-01

    The PULSE analytical model, which calculates daily groundwater discharge on the basis of user-specified recharge, was originally developed for calibration using streamflow data. This article describes a model application in which groundwater level data constitute the primary control on model input. As a test case, data were analyzed from a small basin in central Pennsylvania in which extensive groundwater level data are available. The timing and intensity of daily water-level rises are used to ascertain temporal distribution of recharge, and the simulated groundwater discharge hydrograph has shape features that are similar to the streamflow hydrograph. This article does not include details about calibration, but some steps are illustrated and general procedures are described for calibration in specific hydrologic studies. The PULSE model can be used to assess results of fully automated base flow methods and can be used to define groundwater recharge and discharge at a relatively small time scale.

  9. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  10. Modeling short pulse duration shock initiation of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Hallquist, J.O.; Erickson, L.M.

    1985-06-27

    The chemical reaction rate law in the ignition and growth model of shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is modified so that the model can accurately simulate short pulse duration shock initiation. The reaction rate law contains three terms to model the ignition of hot spots by shock compression, the slow growth of reaction from these isolated hot spots, and the rapid completion of reaction as the hot spots coalesce. Comparisons for PBX 9404 between calculated and experimental records are presented for the electric gun mylar flyer plate system, the minimum priming charge test, embedded manganin pressure and particle velocity gauges, and VISAR particle velocity measurements for a wide variety of input pressures, rise times and pulse durations. The ignition and growth model is now a fully developed phenomenological tool that can be applied with confidence to almost any hazard, vulnerability or explosive performance problem. 27 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Modelling Multi-Pulse Population Dynamics from Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Lincoln, Craig N.; van Thor, Jasper J.

    2011-01-01

    Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio-) physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function) for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox) that describes the finite bleach (orientation) effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective) excitation (photoselection) and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical modelling is

  12. Modelling multi-pulse population dynamics from ultrafast spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Lincoln, Craig N; van Thor, Jasper J

    2011-03-21

    Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio-) physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function) for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox) that describes the finite bleach (orientation) effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective) excitation (photoselection) and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical modelling is

  13. Advanced modeling techniques in application to plasma pulse treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, A. F.; Pashchenko, F. F.

    2016-06-01

    Different approaches considered for simulation of plasma pulse treatment process. The assumption of a significant non-linearity of processes in the treatment of oil wells has been confirmed. Method of functional transformations and fuzzy logic methods suggested for construction of a mathematical model. It is shown, that models, based on fuzzy logic are able to provide a satisfactory accuracy of simulation and prediction of non-linear processes observed.

  14. Numerical analysis of stirling type pulse tube cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroujerdi, A. A.; Ashrafizadeh, A.; Mousavi Naeenian, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    A one-dimensional finite volume discretization method is proposed and is implemented as a computer program for the modeling of a family of stirling type Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTC). The set of unsteady, one-dimensional, viscous compressible flow equations are written in a general form such that all, porous and non-porous, sections of the PTC can be modeled with these governing equations. In present work, temperature dependency of thermo-physical properties are taken into account as well as the heat transfer between the working fluid and the solid parts, and heat conductions of the gas and solid. The simulation tool can be used to model both the inertance tube type and the orifice type cryocoolers equipped with regenerators made up of different matrix constructions. The PTC might have an arbitrary orientation with respect to the gravitational field. By using the computer program, an orifice type and an inertance tube type pulse tube cryocooler are simulated. Diameter of the orifice and length of the inertance tube are optimized in order to maximize the coefficient of performance. Furthermore, the cooling power of the two types is obtained as a function of the cooling temperature. The behavior of thermodynamic parameters of the inertance tube PTC is investigated. Mean cyclic values of the parameters are presented.

  15. Numerical modeling of pulse propagation in viscoelastic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitsky, S.; Bergman, R.

    2017-07-01

    Pressure pulse propagation in a viscoelastic cylindrical tube filled with polymeric liquid, is investigated. The tube is considered as a thin circular cylindrical shell, made of material following Kelvin-Voight rheological model. The liquid rheology is described by Oldroyd equation. Dynamic interaction of liquid with the tube wall in the wave is described within quasi-one-dimensional approach. The initial-boundary value problem, modeling pressure pulse propagation in the waveguide, is solved by operational method. The solution is presented in explicit form in the s-domain. Plots of pressure distribution along the pipe at different moments of time are calculated by numerical inversion of Laplace transform for initial finite pulse, generated at the tube end. Results of simulations illustrate the tube and liquid rheology effect on the wave propagation; they indicate that attenuation of the wave in a viscoelastic tube can exceed essentially that one for a corresponding pure elastic tube. Liquid viscoelasticity has an opposite effect on the pulse propagation.

  16. Pulsed pumping process optimization using a potential flow model.

    PubMed

    Tenney, C M; Lastoskie, C M

    2007-08-15

    A computational model is applied to the optimization of pulsed pumping systems for efficient in situ remediation of groundwater contaminants. In the pulsed pumping mode of operation, periodic rather than continuous pumping is used. During the pump-off or trapping phase, natural gradient flow transports contaminated groundwater into a treatment zone surrounding a line of injection and extraction wells that transect the contaminant plume. Prior to breakthrough of the contaminated water from the treatment zone, the wells are activated and the pump-on or treatment phase ensues, wherein extracted water is augmented to stimulate pollutant degradation and recirculated for a sufficient period of time to achieve mandated levels of contaminant removal. An important design consideration in pulsed pumping groundwater remediation systems is the pumping schedule adopted to best minimize operational costs for the well grid while still satisfying treatment requirements. Using an analytic two-dimensional potential flow model, optimal pumping frequencies and pumping event durations have been investigated for a set of model aquifer-well systems with different well spacings and well-line lengths, and varying aquifer physical properties. The results for homogeneous systems with greater than five wells and moderate to high pumping rates are reduced to a single, dimensionless correlation. Results for heterogeneous systems are presented graphically in terms of dimensionless parameters to serve as an efficient tool for initial design and selection of the pumping regimen best suited for pulsed pumping operation for a particular well configuration and extraction rate. In the absence of significant retardation or degradation during the pump-off phase, average pumping rates for pulsed operation were found to be greater than the continuous pumping rate required to prevent contaminant breakthrough.

  17. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this effort is to develop code to enable the accurate prediction of the performance of pulsed transversely excited (TE) CO2 lasers prior to their construction. This is of particular benefit to the NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) project. A benefit of the completed code is that although developed specifically for the pulsed CO2 laser much of the code can be modified to model other laser systems of interest to the lidar community. A Boltzmann equation solver has been developed which enables the electron excitation rates for the vibrational levels of CO2 and N2, together with the electron ionization and attachment coefficients to be determined for any CO2 laser gas mixture consisting of a combination of CO2, N2, CO, He and CO. The validity of the model has been verified by comparison with published material. The results from the Boltzmann equation solver have been used as input to the laser kinetics code which is currently under development. A numerical code to model the laser induced medium perturbation (LIMP) arising from the relaxation of the lower laser level has been developed and used to determine the effect of LIMP on the frequency spectrum of the LAWS laser output pulse. The enclosed figures show representative results for a laser operating at 0.5 atm. with a discharge cross-section of 4.5 cm to produce a 20 J pulse with aFWHM of 3.1 microns. The first four plots show the temporal evolution of the laser pulse power, energy evolution, LIMP frequency chirp and electric field magnitude. The electric field magnitude is taken by beating the calculated complex electric field and beating it with a local oscillator signal. The remaining two figures show the power spectrum and energy distribution in the pulse as a function of the varying pulse frequency. The LIMP theory has been compared with experimental data from the NOAA Windvan Lidar and has been found to be in good agreement.

  18. Orifice-induced pressure error studies in Langley 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, E. B.; Gloss, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    For some time it has been known that the presence of a static pressure measuring hole will disturb the local flow field in such a way that the sensed static pressure will be in error. The results of previous studies aimed at studying the error induced by the pressure orifice were for relatively low Reynolds number flows. Because of the advent of high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnels, a study was undertaken to assess the magnitude of this error at high Reynolds numbers than previously published and to study a possible method of eliminating this pressure error. This study was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel on a flat plate. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.72 and at Reynolds numbers from 7.7 x 1,000,000 to 11 x 1,000,000 per meter (2.3 x 1,000,000 to 3.4 x 1,000,000 per foot), respectively. The results indicated that as orifice size increased, the pressure error also increased but that a porous metal (sintered metal) plug inserted in an orifice could greatly reduce the pressure error induced by the orifice.

  19. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Smithers, Martin E.; Murty, Rom

    1991-01-01

    The experimental results will enable a comparison of the numerical code output with experimental data. This will ensure verification of the validity of the code. The measurements were made on a modified commercial CO2 laser. Results are listed as following. (1) The pulse shape and energy dependence on gas pressure were measured. (2) The intrapulse frequency chirp due to plasma and laser induced medium perturbation effects were determined. A simple numerical model showed quantitative agreement with these measurements. The pulse to pulse frequency stability was also determined. (3) The dependence was measured of the laser transverse mode stability on cavity length. A simple analysis of this dependence in terms of changes to the equivalent fresnel number and the cavity magnification was performed. (4) An analysis was made of the discharge pulse shape which enabled the low efficiency of the laser to be explained in terms of poor coupling of the electrical energy into the vibrational levels. And (5) the existing laser resonator code was changed to allow it to run on the Cray XMP under the new operating system.

  20. Double-orifice mitral valve treated by percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Thomas George; Revankar, Vinod Raghunath; Papanna, Monica; Srinivasan, Harshini

    2016-07-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve is an rare anomaly characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus and 2 orifices that open into the left ventricle. It is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly atrioventricular canal defects, and rarely associated with a stenotic or regurgitant mitral valve. A patient who was diagnosed with congenital double-orifice mitral valve with severe mitral stenosis was treated successfully by percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy rather than the conventional open surgical approach, demonstrating the utility of percutaneous correction of this anomaly.

  1. Pressure atomizer having multiple orifices and turbulent generation feature

    DOEpatents

    VanBrocklin, Paul G.; Geiger, Gail E.; Moran, Donald James; Fournier, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    A pressure atomizer includes a silicon plate having a top surface and a bottom surface. A portion of the top surface defines a turbulent chamber. The turbulent chamber is peripherally bounded by the top surface of the plate. The turbulent chamber is recessed a predetermined depth relative to the top surface. The silicon plate further defines at least one flow orifice. Each flow orifice extends from the bottom surface of the silicon plate to intersect with and open into the turbulent chamber. Each flow orifice is in fluid communication with the turbulent chamber.

  2. Modeling of Multi-Tube Pulse Detonation Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper explores some preliminary issues concerning the operational characteristics of multiple-tube pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The study is based on a two-dimensional analysis of the first-pulse operation of two detonation tubes exhausting through a common nozzle. Computations are first performed to assess isolated tube behavior followed by results for multi-tube flow phenomena. The computations are based on an eight-species, finite-rate transient flow-field model. The results serve as an important precursor to understanding appropriate propellant fill procedures and shock wave propagation in multi-tube, multi-dimensional simulations. Differences in behavior between single and multi-tube PDE models are discussed, The influence of multi-tube geometry and the preferred times for injecting the fresh propellant mixture during multi-tube PDE operation are studied.

  3. Heating model for metals irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Hallo, L.

    2007-05-15

    We propose a model describing the heating and ablation of a metallic target irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. It takes into account the temperature equilibration between the electrons and ions and the density variation of the target material during the heating process. A simple analytical equation of state is developed, which allows one to calculate the total pressure in the heated layer for different electron and ion temperatures. The thermodynamic behavior of a nonequilibrium system is discussed, and nonequilibrium spinodals and cohesion limits are introduced. The model is applied for a description of the thermal ablation process driven by a sub-ps laser pulse. Aluminum and copper targets are considered, and it is shown that the dominant ablation process is due to breaking the nonequilibrium cohesion limit. The numerical results are in good agreement with recent experimental data.

  4. A model for abrupt changes in pulsar pulse profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, R.; Melrose, D. B.

    2017-08-01

    We propose and explore a purely magnetospheric model for observed abrupt changes in pulsar radio profile. The flow rate of the magnetospheric plasma is dependent on the magnetospheric state described by the parameter y. We include the effect of the motion of the visible point along its trajectory, whose omission from a 'standard' version of viewing geometry is strictly valid only for align rotation and approximately valid for oblique rotation only in a narrow range of pulsar phase, which decreases as the obliquity increases. Emission is assumed from spots, distributed uniformly around the magnetic axis, so that observable features, such as subpulses, appear to rotate at a rate, ωR, relative to the visible point. We find that the apparent motion of an individual spot is not constant, and the apparent distribution of emission spots around the trajectory of the visible point is uneven being highest around the centre of the pulse window, where their apparent motion is slowest, allowing more spots to be present simultaneously in the pulse window than in the 'standard' version. An abrupt (or more gradual) change in y implies a change in ωR, which affects the pulse structure and profile. As a case study, we apply the model to 'swooshing' in PSR B0919+06. We discuss correlated slowing down rate in the model and related time-dependent phenomena in radio pulsars.

  5. Modeling of Pulses in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere that are associated with lightning activities. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to the mechanism of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. On the other hand, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] have shown theoretically that the large flux of thermal runaway electrons generated by streamers during the negative corona flash stage of stepping lightning leaders in intracloud lightning flashes could be responsible for TGFs. Recently, based on analysis of the temporal profiles of 278 TGF events observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, Foley et al. [JGR, 119, 5931, 2014] have suggested that 67% of TGF pulses detected are asymmetric and these asymmetric pulses are consistent with the production mechanism of TGFs by relativistic feedback discharges. In the present work, we employ a Monte Carlo model to study the temporal distribution of photons at low-orbit satellite altitudes during TGF events. Using the pulse fitting method described in [Foley et al., 2014], we further investigate the characteristics of TGF pulses. We mainly focus on the effects of Compton scattering on the symmetry properties and the rise and fall times of TGF pulses.

  6. Assessment of simulation-based calibration of rectangular pulse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhaute, Willem Jan; Vandenberghe, Sander; Willems, Patrick; Verhoest, Niko E. C.

    2013-04-01

    The use of stochastic rainfall models has become widespread in many hydrologic applications, especially when historical rainfall records lack in length or quality to be used for practical purposes. Among a variety of models, rectangular pulse models such as the Neyman-scott and Bartlett-Lewis type models are known for their parsimonious nature and relative ease in simulating long rainfall time series. The aforementioned models are often calibrated using the generalized method of moments which fits modeled to observed moments. To ease the computational burden, the expected values of the modeled moments are usually expressed in function of the model parameters through analytical expressions. The derivation of such analytical expressions is considered to be an important bottleneck in the development of these rectangular pulse models. Any adjustment to the model structure must be accompanied by an adjustment of the analytical moments in order to be able to calibrate the adjusted model. To avoid the use of analytical moments during calibration, a simulation-based calibration is needed. The latter would enable the modeler to make and validate adjustments in a more organic matter. However, such simulation-based calibration must be able to account for the randomness of the simulation. As such, ensemble runs must be made for every objective function evaluation, resulting in considerable computational requirements. The presented research investigates how to exploit today's available computational resources in order to enable simulation-based calibration. Once such type of calibration is feasible, it will open doors to implementing adjustments to the model structure (such as the introduction of dependencies between model variables by using copulas) without the need to rely on analytical expressions of the different moments.

  7. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.71 Orifice testing of compressors. (a) Frequency of...

  8. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.71 Orifice testing of compressors. (a) Frequency of...

  9. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.71 Orifice testing of compressors. (a) Frequency of...

  10. Program sizes flange or pipe-tap orifice plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hogsett, J.E.

    1984-03-12

    A program has been developed for the HP-41CV programmable calculator that is designed to compute differential pressure across an orifice, gas flow through an orifice, or the orifice-plate bore for orifice plates with flange or pipe taps. It is designed to save time in extracting values from charts, tables, and graphs which are required to perform the calculations. It is based on equations and data from Spink. The program is run by inputing appropriate data via execution of a program entitled ''DATA IN,'' calculating differential pressure via program ''dH20,'' gas flow via program ''FLOW,'' and via program ''BORE.'' Flange-tap calculations are performed with FLAG 01 not set, while pipe-tap calculations are selected by setting FLAG 01.

  11. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.71 Orifice testing of compressors. (a) Frequency of...

  12. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.71 Orifice testing of compressors. (a) Frequency of...

  13. Fabrication of small-orifice fuel injectors for diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodford, J. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2005-04-08

    Diesel fuel injector nozzles with spray hole diameters of 50-75 {micro}m have been fabricated via electroless nickel plating of conventionally made nozzles. Thick layers of nickel are deposited onto the orifice interior surfaces, reducing the diameter from {approx}200 {micro}m to the target diameter. The nickel plate is hard, smooth, and adherent, and covers the orifice interior surfaces uniformly.

  14. Modeling of High-Energy Pulsed Laser Interactions with Coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-02-06

    We describe a computational model of laser-materials interactions in the regime accessed by the solid state heat capacity lasers (SSHCLs) built at LLNL. We show that its predictions compare quite favorably with coupon experiments by the 10 kW SSHCL at LLNL. The body of this paper describes the following topics, listed by section number: (2) model in quiescent air, (3) comparison with experiments in quiescent air, (4) effects of air flow, (5) comparison with experiments involving air flow, (6) importance of material properties, (7) advantage of pulsed lasers over CW lasers, and (8) conclusions and recommendations.

  15. Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1995-02-21

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

  16. Traveling Pulses for a Two-Species Chemotaxis Model

    PubMed Central

    Emako, Casimir; Gayrard, Charlène; Buguin, Axel; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Vauchelet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used to describe the collective movement of bacteria by chemotaxis. In particular, bacterial concentration waves traveling in a narrow channel have been experimentally observed and can be precisely described thanks to a mathematical model at the macroscopic scale. Such model was derived in [1] using a kinetic model based on an accurate description of the mesoscopic run-and-tumble process. We extend this approach to study the behavior of the interaction between two populations of E. Coli. Separately, each population travels with its own speed in the channel. When put together, a synchronization of the speed of the traveling pulses can be observed. We show that this synchronization depends on the fraction of the fast population. Our approach is based on mathematical analysis of a macroscopic model of partial differential equations. Numerical simulations in comparison with experimental observations show qualitative agreement. PMID:27071058

  17. Numerically Modeling Pulsed-Current, Kinked Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbey, Gordon; Kingman, Pat

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has embarked on a program to provide far-term land fighting vehicles with electromagnetic armor protection. Part of this work seeks to establish robust simulations of magneto-solid-mechanics phenomena. Whether describing violent rupture of a fuse link resulting from a large current pulse or the complete disruption of a copper shaped-charge jet subjected to high current densities, the simulations must include effects of intense Lorentz body forces and rapid Ohmic heating. Material models are required that describe plasticity, flow and fracture, conductivity, and equation of state (EOS) parameters for media in solid, liquid, and vapor phases. An extended version of the Eulerian wave code CTH has been used to predict the apex motion of a V-shaped (``kinked'') copper wire 3mm in diameter during a 400 kilo-amp pulse. These predictions, utilizing available material, EOS, and conductivity data for copper and the known characteristics of an existing capacitor-bank pulsed power supply, were then used to configure an experiment. The experiments were in excellent agreement with the prior simulations. Both computational and experimental results (including electrical data and flash X-rays) will be presented.

  18. A neuron model of stochastic resonance using rectangular pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M

    2015-02-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is the enhanced representation of a weak input signal by the addition of an optimal level of broadband noise to a nonlinear (threshold) system. Since its discovery in the 1980s the domain of input signals shown to be applicable to SR has greatly expanded, from strictly periodic inputs to now nearly any aperiodic forcing function. The perturbations (noise) used to generate SR have also expanded, from white noise to now colored noise or vibrational forcing. This study demonstrates that a new class of perturbations can achieve SR, namely, series of stochastically generated biphasic pulse trains. Using these pulse trains as 'noise' we show that a Hodgkin Huxley model neuron exhibits SR behavior when detecting weak input signals. This result is of particular interest to neuroscience because nearly all artificial neural stimulation is implemented with square current or voltage pulses rather than broadband noise, and this new method may facilitate the translation of the performance gains achievable through SR to neural prosthetics.

  19. Phenomenological Model of Current Sheet Canting in Pulsed Electromagnetic Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of current sheet canting in pulsed electromagnetic accelerators is the departure of the plasma sheet (that carries the current) from a plane that is perpendicular to the electrodes to one that is skewed, or tipped. Review of pulsed electromagnetic accelerator literature reveals that current sheet canting is a ubiquitous phenomenon - occurring in all of the standard accelerator geometries. Developing an understanding of current sheet canting is important because it can detract from the propellant sweeping capabilities of current sheets and, hence, negatively impact the overall efficiency of pulsed electromagnetic accelerators. In the present study, it is postulated that depletion of plasma near the anode, which results from axial density gradient induced diamagnetic drift, occurs during the early stages of the discharge, creating a density gradient normal to the anode, with a characteristic length on the order of the ion skin depth. Rapid penetration of the magnetic field through this region ensues, due to the Hall effect, leading to a canted current front ahead of the initial current conduction channel. In this model, once the current sheet reaches appreciable speeds, entrainment of stationary propellant replenishes plasma in the anode region, inhibiting further Hall-convective transport of the magnetic field; however, the previously established tilted current sheet remains at a fairly constant canting angle for the remainder of the discharge cycle, exerting a transverse J x B force which drives plasma toward the cathode and accumulates it there. This proposed sequence of events has been incorporated into a phenomenological model. The model predicts that canting can be reduced by using low atomic mass propellants with high propellant loading number density; the model results are shown to give qualitative agreement with experimentally measured canting angle mass dependence trends.

  20. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  1. Orifice plate for controlling solids flow, methods of use thereof and articles comprising the same

    DOEpatents

    Jukkola, Glen D.; Teigen, Bard C.

    2017-01-31

    Disclosed herein is an orifice plate comprising one or more plates having orifices disposed therein; the orifices being operative to permit the flow of solids from a moving bed heat exchanger to a solids flow control system; where the orifice plate is downstream of a tube bundle of the moving bed heat exchanger and upstream of the solids flow control system and wherein the orifice plate is operative to evenly distribute the flow of solids in the solids flow control system.

  2. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery in pancreatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jörg; Kranzfelder, Michael; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Friess, Helmut; Feussner, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a surgical technique that has received considerable interest in recent years. Although minimal access surgery has increasingly replaced traditional open abdominal surgical approaches for a wide spectrum of indications, in pancreatic diseases its widespread use is limited to few indications because of the challenging and demanding nature of major pancreatic operations. Nonetheless, there have been attempts in animal models as well as in the clinical setting to perform diagnostic and resectional NOTES for pancreatic diseases. Here, we review and comment upon the available data regarding currently analyzed and performed pancreatic NOTES procedures. Potential indications for NOTES include peritoneoscopy, cyst drainage, and necrosectomy, palliative procedures such as gastroenterostomy, as well as resections such as distal pancreatectomy or enucleation. These procedures have already been shown to be technically feasible in several studies in animal models and a few clinical trials. In conclusion, NOTES is a rapidly developing concept/technique that could potentially become an integral part of the armamentarium dealing with surgical approaches to pancreatic diseases. PMID:20712045

  3. Modeling of a microchannel plate working in pulsed mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secroun, Aurelia; Mens, Alain; Segre, Jacques; Assous, Franck; Piault, Emmanuel; Rebuffie, Jean-Claude

    1997-05-01

    MicroChannel Plates (MCPs) are used in high speed cinematography systems such as MCP framing cameras and streak camera readouts. In order to know the dynamic range or the signal to noise ratio that are available in these devices, a good knowledge of the performances of the MCP is essential. The point of interest of our simulation is the working mode of the microchannel plate--that is light pulsed mode--, in which the signal level is relatively high and its duration can be shorter than the time needed to replenish the wall of the channel, when other papers mainly studied night vision applications with weak continuous and nearly single electron input signal. Also our method allows the simulation of saturation phenomena due to the large number of electrons involved, whereas the discrete models previously used for simulating pulsed mode might not be properly adapted. Here are presented the choices made in modeling the microchannel, more specifically as for the physics laws, the secondary emission parameters and the 3D- geometry. In a last part first results are shown.

  4. System characterization of a novel haptic interface for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery simulation.

    PubMed

    Dargar, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; De, Suvranu

    2014-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a minimally invasive procedure, which utilizes the body's natural orifices to gain access to the peritoneal cavity. The VTEST(©) is a virtual reality NOTES simulator developed at the CeMSIM at RPI to train surgeons in NOTES. A novel 2 DOF decoupled haptic device was designed and built for this simulator. The haptic device can render 5.62 N and 190.05 N-mm of continuous force and torque respectively. In this work we have evaluated the haptic interface and developed a model to accurately describe the system behavior, to further incorporate into an impedance type controller for realistic haptic rendering in the VTEST(©).

  5. Wet gas measure by tapered tube variable area ring orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guomin; Shen, Yi

    2008-10-01

    Great difficulties exist in wet gas flow measuring by means of standard orifice plate since the rangeability can only reach 3:1, with serious pressure loss plus liquid aggregation near the upstream orifice plate. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the structure of the standard orifice plate. This paper presents a sort of tapered tube variable area ring orifice device for wet gas measure, which is designed structurally by combination of a tapered tube, an inner circle-shaped movable baffle, a precision spring and a displacement sensor. Accordingly, a wet gas flow equation is shown that features the substitution of displacement for pressure difference. The rangeability can be as large as 15:1 in the case that the area ratio of the variable flow path is designed to be 5:1. The hydromechanical numerical simulation results indicate that both rate field and pressure field inside the device are stable and the pressure loss is one-third of the standard orifice plate. Further, the problems of liquid aggregation and pressure ducts block are avoided.H

  6. Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1991-10-29

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

  7. Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, Paul L.; Giammarise, Anthony W.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

  8. Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, Paul L.; Giammarise, Anthony W.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

  9. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2005-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  10. Gastrointestinal tract access for urological natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Miakicheva, Olga; Hamilton, Zachary; Beksac, Alp T; Berquist, Sean W; Hassan, Abd-elrahman; Holden, Marc; Derweesh, Ithaar H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), focusing on urologic procedures with gastrointestinal tract access, to update on the development of this novel surgical approach. As part of the methods, a comprehensive electronic literature search for NOTES was conducted using PubMed and Cochrane Library from March 2002 to February 2016 for papers reporting urologic procedures performed utilizing gastrointestinal tract access. A total of 11 peer-reviewed studies examining utility of gastrointestinal access for NOTES urologic procedures were noted, with the first report in 2007. The procedures reported in the studies were total/radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, adrenalectomy, and prostatectomy. The transgastric approach was identified in five studies examining total/radical nephrectomy (n = 2), partial nephrectomy (n = 1), partial cystectomy (n = 1), and adrenalectomy (n = 1). Six studies evaluated transrectal approach for NOTES, describing total/radical nephrectomy (n = 3), partial nephrectomy (n = 1), robotic nephrectomy with adrenalectomy (n = 1) and prostatectomy (n = 1). Feasibility was reported in all studies. Most studies were preclinical and acute, and limited by concerns regarding restricted instrumentation and infection risk. We concluded that gastrointestinal access for urologic NOTES demonstrates promise as described by outlined feasibility studies in preclinical models. Nonetheless, clinical application awaits further advancements in surgical technology and concerns regarding infectious potential. PMID:27909547

  11. Numerical study of liquid-hydrogen droplet generation from a vibrating orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Celik, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2005-08-01

    Atomic hydrogen propellant feed systems for far-future spacecraft may utilize solid-hydrogen particle carriers for atomic species that undergo recombination to create hot rocket exhaust. Such technology will require the development of particle generation techniques. One such technique could involve the production of hydrogen droplets from a vibrating orifice that would then freeze in cryogenic helium vapor. Among other quantities, the shape and size of the droplet are of particular interest. The present paper addresses this problem within the framework of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows, in order to unravel the basic mechanisms of droplet formation with a view to control them. Surface tension, one of the most important mechanisms to determine droplet shape, is modeled as the source term in the momentum equation. Droplet shape is tracked using a volume-of-fluid approach. A dynamic meshing technique is employed to accommodate the vibration of the generator orifice. Numerically predicted droplet shapes show satisfactory agreement with photographs of droplets generated in experiments. A parametric study is carried out to understand the influence of injection velocity, nozzle vibrational frequency, and amplitude on the droplet shape and size. The computational model provides a definitive qualitative picture of the evolution of droplet shape as a function of the operating parameters. It is observed that, primarily, the orifice vibrational frequency affects the shape, the vibrational amplitude affects the time until droplet detachment from the orifice, and the injection velocity affects the size. However, it does not mean that, for example, there is no secondary effect of amplitude on shape or size.

  12. Modelling of pulsed and steady-state DEMO scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Fable, E.; Garzotti, L.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Kemp, R.; King, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stankiewicz, R.; Stępniewski, W.; Vincenzi, P.; Ward, D.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    Scenario modelling for the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) has been carried out using a variety of simulation codes. Two DEMO concepts have been analysed: a pulsed tokamak, characterized by rather conventional physics and technology assumptions (DEMO1) and a steady-state tokamak, with moderately advanced physics and technology assumptions (DEMO2). Sensitivity to impurity concentrations, radiation, and heat transport models has been investigated. For DEMO2, the impact of current driven non-inductively by neutral beams has been studied by full Monte Carlo simulations of the fast ion distribution. The results obtained are a part of a more extensive research and development (R&D) effort carried out in the EU in order to develop a viable option for a DEMO reactor, to be adopted after ITER for fusion energy research.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the numerical modeling of pulse detonation rocket engines (PDRE), with an emphasis on the Gasdynamics and performance analysis of these engines. The topics include: 1) Performance Analysis of PDREs; 2) Simplified PDRE Cycle; 3) Comparison of PDRE and Steady-State Rocket Engines (SSRE) Performance; 4) Numerical Modeling of Quasi 1-D Rocket Flows; 5) Specific PDRE Geometries Studied; 6) Time-Accurate Thrust Calculations; 7) PDRE Performance (Geometries A B C and D); 8) PDRE Blowdown Gasdynamics (Geom. A B C and D); 9) PDRE Geometry Performance Comparison; 10) PDRE Blowdown Time (Geom. A B C and D); 11) Specific SSRE Geometry Studied; 12) Effect of F-R Chemistry on SSRE Performance; 13) PDRE/SSRE Performance Comparison; 14) PDRE Performance Study; 15) Grid Resolution Study; and 16) Effect of F-R Chemistry on SSRE Exit Species Mole Fractions.

  14. Modeling of pulsed Cs vapor lasers in transversely pumped configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi, Fei; Zhang, Xian; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Kaikai; Lu, Xuanhui

    2017-06-01

    By means of combining the transverse differential equation of pump intensity and the longitudinal differential equation of laser power, an optical model for transversely pumped diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) is established. The spatial distributions of both radius and intensities are considered in the model for pump and laser beams. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment ones as compared to the reported pulsed transversely pumped Cs DPALs. Influences of pump power, temperature, cell length, and beam waist on output performance are investigated, which suggests a set of parameters for efficient DPAL operation. In particular, the optimal ratio of the beam waist between the laser and pump beam is demonstrated to be 0.81, which can increase the laser power by 85% larger than the current experimental result.

  15. ARTICLES: Thermohydrodynamic models of the interaction of pulse-periodic radiation with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Pis'mennyĭ, V. D.

    1987-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were made of the processes of drilling and deep melting of metals by pulsed and pulse-periodic laser radiation. Direct photography of the surface revealed molten metal splashing due to interaction with single CO2 laser pulses. A proposed thermohydrodynamic model was used to account for the experimental results and to calculate the optimal parameters of pulse-periodic radiation needed for deep melting. The melt splashing processes were simulated numerically.

  16. A new method for quantification of regurgitant flow rate using color Doppler flow imaging of the flow convergence region proximal to a discrete orifice. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Recusani, F; Bargiggia, G S; Yoganathan, A P; Raisaro, A; Valdes-Cruz, L M; Sung, H W; Bertucci, C; Gallati, M; Moises, V A; Simpson, I A

    1991-02-01

    While color Doppler flow mapping has yielded a quick and relatively sensitive method for visualizing the turbulent jets generated in valvular insufficiency, quantification of the degree of valvular insufficiency has been limited by the dependence of visualization of turbulent jets on hemodynamic as well as instrument-related factors. Color Doppler flow imaging, however, does have the capability of reliably showing the spatial relations of laminar flows. An area where flow accelerates proximal to a regurgitant orifice is commonly visualized on the left ventricular side of a mitral regurgitant orifice, especially when imaging is performed with high gain and a low pulse repetition frequency. This area of flow convergence, where the flow stream narrows symmetrically, can be quantified because velocity and the flow cross-sectional area change in inverse proportion along streamlines centered at the orifice. In this study, a gravity-driven constant-flow system with five sharp-edged diaphragm orifices (ranging from 2.9 to 12 mm in diameter) was imaged both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of flow through the orifice. Color Doppler flow images were produced by zero shifting so that the abrupt change in display color occurred at different velocities. This "aliasing boundary" with a known velocity and a measurable radial distance from the center of the orifice was used to determine an isovelocity hemisphere such that flow rate through the orifice was calculated as 2 pi r2 x Vr, where r is the radial distance from the center of the orifice to the color change and Vr is the velocity at which the color change was noted. Using Vr values from 54 to 14 cm/sec obtained with a 3.75-MHz transducer and from 75 to 18 cm/sec obtained with a 2.5-MHz transducer, we calculated flow rates and found them to correlate with measured flow rates (r = 0.94-0.99). The slope of the regression line was closest to unity when the lowest Vr and the correspondingly largest r were used in the

  17. Effect of nonsymmetrical flow resistance upon orifice impedance resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey, J. W.; Compton, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    A nonreactive orifice in an infinite baffle is analyzed. The pressure difference delta across the orifice varies sinusoidally with amplitude 1.0 and average value -P. The orifice resistance, delta p is discontinuous at zero velocity and exhibits the constant values R sub + and R sub - for u 0 and u 0, respectively. The resultant velocity has power in all harmonics of the excitation frequency. A quasi-linear resistance is defined and found to be relatively insensitive to the presence or absence of a resonant backing cavity; however, it does vary from 1.33 R sub + to 0.67 R sub + for a resistance ratio R sub +/R sub - between 0.5 and 2.0.

  18. Wave-packet model for excitation by ultrashort pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, Kalle-Antti; Garraway, Barry M.; Stenholm, Stig

    1992-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the excitation of a localized molecular ground-state wave function by a short laser pulse. With a one-dimensional approach we show when it is possible to excite a considerable fraction of the ground state without too much distortion of the shape of the wave packet. This is of interest in time-resolved molecular experiments where an excited wave packet is often taken as the initial state. We solve the two coupled wave equations numerically and compare results to an analytical approximation based on the Rosen-Zener model. The validity of the approximation and its breakdown is considered in detail. Special attention is paid to the effect of lengthening the pulse duration and the consequences of the accompanying number of Rabi flops occurring in the area theorem. When the approximation breaks down, the wave packet becomes distorted and spread out, but there are still interesting coherence effects due to the interplay between the Rabi flopping and the molecular dynamics; these are displayed and discussed. Finally, the relationship to other works and possible generalizations are presented.

  19. Update on PHELIX Pulsed-Power Hydrodynamics Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, Christopher; Reass, William; Oro, David; Griego, Jeffery; Turchi, Peter; Reinovsky, Robert; Devolder, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    The PHELIX pulsed-power driver is a 300 kJ, portable, transformer-coupled, capacitor bank capable of delivering 3-5 MA, 10 μs pulse into a low inductance load. Here we describe further testing and hydrodynamics experiments. First, a 4 nH static inductive load has been constructed. This allows for repetitive high-voltage, high-current testing of the system. Results are used in the calibration of simple circuit models and numerical simulations across a range of bank charges (+/-20 < V0 < +/-40 kV). Furthermore, a dynamic liner-on-target load experiment has been conducted to explore the shock-launched transport of particulates (diam. ~ 1 μm) from a surface. The trajectories of the particulates are diagnosed with radiography. Results are compared to 2D hydro-code simulations. Finally, initial studies are underway to assess the feasibility of using the PHELIX driver as an electromagnetic launcher for planer shock-physics experiments. Work supported by United States-DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Effect of nozzle orifice geometry on spray, combustion, and emission characteristics under diesel engine conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Longman, D. E; Ramirez, A. I.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    Diesel engine performance and emissions are strongly coupled with fuel atomization and spray processes, which in turn are strongly influenced by injector flow dynamics. Modern engines employ micro-orifices with different orifice designs. It is critical to characterize the effects of various designs on engine performance and emissions. In this study, a recently developed primary breakup model (KH-ACT), which accounts for the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector nozzle is incorporated into a CFD software CONVERGE for comprehensive engine simulations. The effects of orifice geometry on inner nozzle flow, spray, and combustion processes are examined by coupling the injector flow and spray simulations. Results indicate that conicity and hydrogrinding reduce cavitation and turbulence inside the nozzle orifice, which slows down primary breakup, increasing spray penetration, and reducing dispersion. Consequently, with conical and hydroground nozzles, the vaporization rate and fuel air mixing are reduced, and ignition occurs further downstream. The flame lift-off lengths are the highest and lowest for the hydroground and conical nozzles, respectively. This can be related to the rate of fuel injection, which is higher for the hydroground nozzle, leading to richer mixtures and lower flame base speeds. A modified flame index is employed to resolve the flame structure, which indicates a dual combustion mode. For the conical nozzle, the relative role of rich premixed combustion is enhanced and that of diffusion combustion reduced compared to the other two nozzles. In contrast, for the hydroground nozzle, the role of rich premixed combustion is reduced and that of non-premixed combustion is enhanced. Consequently, the amount of soot produced is the highest for the conical nozzle, while the amount of NOx produced is the highest for the hydroground nozzle, indicating the classical tradeoff between them.

  1. Two-phase flow of HFC-134a and CFC-12 through short-tube orifices

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; O`Neal, D.L.; Yuan, X.

    1994-12-31

    Short-tube orifices have been widely used as an expansion device on automotive and residential-sized air conditioners in the United States. The design for optimum performance of these systems requires predicting correct flow characteristics through short tubes for a given set of operating conditions. Insufficient data are available on how any of the new replacement refrigerants will perform in short-tube orifices relative to conventional refrigerants. This paper compares experimental mass flow results with HFC-134a and CFC-12 for a variety of inlet conditions and short-tube geometries. Five sharp-edged short-tube orifices with 7 < LID < 20 and 1.10 mm (0.0435 in.) < D < 1.72 mm (0.0676 in.) were tested with HFC-134a and CFC-12. Both two-phase and subcooled liquid flow conditions entering the short tube were examined for condensing temperatures ranging from 35.4 C (96 F) to 53.8 C (129 F), for subcooling as high as 13.9 C (25 F), and for qualities as high as 10% at the inlet of the short tube. The effects of downstream pressure were also investigated by lowering the downstream pressure from the upstream saturation pressure down to 310 kPa (45 psia). For HFC-134a, two types of measurements were made during this study-mass flow tests and pressure distribution inside the orifice. For CFC-12, only mass flow tests were performed The results with CFC-12 were compared with those of HFC-134a with the same upstream temperature conditions. A comparison of these two refrigerants was made as a function of the main operating variables (upstream pressure, subcooling, and downstream pressure) and short-tube geometry. Semi-empirical models for both HFC-134a and CFC-12 were developed for the prediction of mass flow rate through short tubes.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Steam Traps and Orifice Plates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    ADlAO9dl 229 JOHNS - MANVILLE SALES CORP DENVER CO RESEARCH AND DEV-’ETC F/S 13/1 PERFOR1ANCE EVALUATION OF STEAM TRAPS AND ORIFICE PLATES.(U)/ OCT 80...AGENCY t REPORT FESA-TS-2085 41! PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF STEAM TRAPS AND ORIFICE PLATES P. B. SHEPHERD JOHNS - MANVILLE SALES CORPORATION w RESEARCH...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME ANED ADDPESS!_ i lFioC’iA.TCr ’.ETPlJ A~ Johns - Manville Sales Corporation &00* 0 - Research & Development Center qOll Ken

  3. Acoustic response of a rectangular levitator with orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, Michael; Wagner, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The acoustic response of a rectangular cavity to speaker-generated excitation through waveguides terminating at orifices in the cavity walls is analyzed. To find the effects of orifices, acoustic pressure is expressed by eigenfunctions satisfying Neumann boundary conditions as well as by those satisfying Dirichlet ones. Some of the excess unknowns can be eliminated by point constraints set over the boundary, by appeal to Lagrange undetermined multipliers. The resulting transfer matrix must be further reduced by partial condensation to the order of a matrix describing unmixed boundary conditions. If the cavity is subjected to an axial temperature dependence, the transfer matrix is determined numerically.

  4. Modeling pulsed-laser melting of embedded semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. A.; Guzman, J.; Boswell-Koller, C. N.; Sherburne, M. P.; Mastandrea, J. P.; Bustillo, K. C.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2011-11-01

    Pulsed-laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in both thin films and nanoparticles. A model for the size evolution during PLM of nanoparticles confined in a transparent matrix, such as those created by ion-beam synthesis, is presented. A self-consistent mean-field rate equations approach that has been used successfully to model ion beam synthesis of germanium nanoparticles in silica is extended to include the PLM process. The PLM model includes classical optical absorption, multiscale heat transport by both analytical and finite difference methods, and melting kinetics for confined nanoparticles. The treatment of nucleation and coarsening behavior developed for the ion beam synthesis model is modified to allow for a nonuniform temperature gradient and for interacting liquid and solid particles with different properties. The model allows prediction of the particle size distribution after PLM under various laser fluences, starting from any particle size distribution including as-implanted or annealed simulated samples. A route for narrowing the size distribution of embedded nanoparticles is suggested, with simulated distribution widths as low as 15% of the average size.

  5. Modeling pulsed-laser melting of embedded semiconductor nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, C.A.; Guzman, J.; Boswell-Koller, C.N.; Sherburne, M.P.; Mastandrea, J.P.; Bustillo, K.C.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2011-05-18

    Pulsed-laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in both thin films and nanoparticles. A model for the size evolution during PLM of nanoparticles confined in a transparent matrix, such as those created by ion-beam synthesis, is presented. A self-consistent mean-field rate equations approach that has been used successfully to model ion beam synthesis of germanium nanoparticles in silica is extended to include the PLM process. The PLM model includes classical optical absorption, multiscale heat transport by both analytical and finite difference methods, and melting kinetics for confined nanoparticles. The treatment of nucleation and coarsening behavior developed for the ion beam synthesis model is modified to allow for a non-uniform temperature gradient and for interacting liquid and solid particles with different properties. The model allows prediction of the particle size distribution after PLM under various laser fluences, starting from any particle size distribution including as-implanted or annealed simulated samples. A route for narrowing the size distribution of embedded nanoparticles is suggested, with simulated distribution widths as low as 15% of the average size.

  6. Modeling boron profiles in silicon after pulsed excimer laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hackenberg, M.; Huet, K.; Negru, R.; Venturini, J.; Fisicaro, G.; La Magna, A.; Pichler, P.

    2012-11-06

    In this work, we investigated four possible mechanisms which were candidates to explain the shape of boron profiles after ion implantation and melting excimer laser annealing in silicon. A laser with a wavelength of 308 nm and a pulse duration of {approx}180 ns was used. To simulate this process, an existing model for the temperature and phase evolution was complemented with equations for the migration of dopants. Outdiffusion, thermodiffusion, segregation, and adsorption were investigated as possible mechanisms. As a result, we found that outdiffusion and segregation can be excluded as major mechanisms. Thermodiffusion as well as adsorption could both reproduce the build-up at low melt depths, but only adsorption the one at deeper melt depths. In both cases, ion beam mixing during SIMS measurement had to be taken into account to reproduce the measured profiles.

  7. Evidence of thermal additivity during short laser pulses in an in vitro retinal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Michael L.; Tijerina, Amanda J.; Dyer, Phillip N.; Oian, Chad A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rickman, John M.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Clark, Clifton D.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2015-03-01

    Laser damage thresholds were determined for exposure to 2.5-ms 532-nm pulses in an established in vitro retinal model. Single and multiple pulses (10, 100, 1000) were delivered to the cultured cells at three different pulse repetition frequency (PRF) values, and overt damage (membrane breach) was scored 1 hr post laser exposure. Trends in the damage data within and across the PRF range identified significant thermal additivity as PRF was increased, as evidenced by drastically reduced threshold values (< 40% of single-pulse value). Microthermography data that were collected in real time during each exposure also provided evidence of thermal additivity between successive laser pulses. Using thermal profiles simulated at high temporal resolution, damage threshold values were predicted by an in-house computational model. Our simulated ED50 value for a single 2.5-ms pulse was in very good agreement with experimental results, but ED50 predictions for multiple-pulse trains will require more refinement.

  8. Conductivity depth imaging of Airborne Electromagnetic data with double pulse transmitting current based on model fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Dou, Mei; Lu, Yiming; Peng, Cong; Yu, Zining; Zhu, Kaiguang

    2017-01-01

    The airborne electromagnetic (AEM) systems have been used traditionally in mineral exploration. Typically the system transmits a single pulse waveform to detect conductive anomaly. Conductivity-depth imaging (CDI) of data is generally applied in identifying conductive targets. A CDI algorithm with double-pulse transmitting current based on model fusion is developed. The double-pulse is made up of a half-sine pulse of high power and a trapezoid pulse of low power. This CDI algorithm presents more shallow information than traditional CDI with a single pulse. The electromagnetic response with double-pulse transmitting current is calculated by linear convolution based on forward modeling. The CDI results with half-sine and trapezoid pulse are obtained by look-up table method, and the two results are fused to form a double-pulse conductivity-depth imaging result. This makes it possible to obtain accurate conductivity and depth. Tests on synthetic data demonstrate that CDI algorithm with double-pulse transmitting current based on model fusion maps a wider range of conductivities and does a better job compared with CDI with a single pulse transmitting current in reflecting the whole geological conductivity changes.

  9. [A mathematical model of hemodynamic processes for distal pulse wave formation].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, A A

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of the formation of distal arterial pulse wave signal in the blood vessels of the upper limbs was considered. The formation of distal arterial pulse wave is represented as a composition of forward and reverse pulse waves propagating along the human arterial system. The system of formal analogy between pulse waves propagation along the human arterial system and the propagation of electrical oscillations in electrical transmission lines with distributed parameters was proposed. Dependencies of pulse wave propagation along the human arterial system were obtained by solving the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for a few special cases.

  10. Modeling digital pulse waveforms by solving one-dimensional Navier-stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Aleksandr A; Akulova, Anna S; Akulov, Sergey A

    2016-08-01

    Mathematical modeling for composition distal arterial pulse wave in the blood vessels of the upper limbs was considered. Formation of distal arterial pulse wave is represented as a composition of forward and reflected pulse waves propagating along the arterial vessels. The formal analogy between pulse waves propagation along the human arterial system and the propagation of electrical oscillations in electrical transmission lines with distributed parameters was proposed. Dependencies of pulse wave propagation along the human arterial system were obtained by solving the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for a few special cases.

  11. PATCHING AND SECTION OF THE PULMONARY ORIFICE OF THE HEART

    PubMed Central

    Tuffier, Theodore; Carrel, Alexis

    1914-01-01

    These experiments show that it is possible to perform an operation, the object of which is to increase the circumference of the pulmonary orifice without involving much danger to the life of the animal. It is probable that operations of this type may come to be employed in the treatment of stenosis of the pulmonary artery in man. PMID:19867800

  12. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics And Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi-1-D, finite-rate chemistry computational fluid dynamics model for PDREs is described and implemented. Four different PDRE geometries are evaluated in this work: a baseline detonation tube, a detonation tube with a straight extension, and a detonation tube with two types of converging-diverging (C-D) nozzles. The effect of extension length and C-D nozzle area ratio on the single-shot gasdynamics and performance of a PDRE is studied over a wide range of blowdown pressure ratios (1-1000). The results indicate that a C-D nozzle is generally more effective than a straight extension in improving PDRE performance, particularly at higher pressure ratios. Additionally, the results show that the blowdown process of the C-D nozzle systems could be beneficially cut off well before the pressure at the end-wall reaches the ambient value. The performance results are also compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

  14. High energy pulsed inductive thruster modeling operating with ammonia propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Pavlos G.; Villarreal, James K.

    2007-11-15

    Numerical modeling of the pulsed inductive thruster operating with ammonia propellant at high energy levels, utilized a time-dependent, two-dimensional, and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics code to provide bilateral validation of experiment and theory and offer performance insights for improved designs. The power circuit model was augmented by a plasma voltage algorithm that accounts for the propellant's time-dependent resistance and inductance to properly account for plasma dynamics and was verified using available analytic solutions of two idealized plasma problems. Comparisons of the predicted current waveforms to experimental data exhibited excellent agreement for the initial half-period, essentially capturing the dominant acceleration phase. Further validation proceeded by comparisons of the impulse for three different energy levels, 2592, 4050, and 4608 J and a wide range of propellant mass values. Predicted impulse captured both trends and magnitudes measured experimentally for nominal operation. Interpretation of the modeling results in conjunction to experimental observations further confirm the critical mass phenomenon beyond which efficiency degrades due to elevated internal energy mode deposition and anomalous operation.

  15. A Model for Microcontroller Functionality Upset Induced by External Pulsed Electromagnetic Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-21

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS- TN-2016-0003 TN-2016-0003 A Model for Microcontroller Functionality Upset Induced by External Pulsed Electromagnetic ...Functionality Upset Induced by External Pulsed Electromagnetic Irradiation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9451-15-C-0004 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...malfunction of—a microcontroller (µC) subjected to external irradiation by a narrowband electromagnetic (EM) pulse. In our model, the state of a µC is

  16. Comparison of model fitting and gated integration for pulse shape discrimination and spectral estimation of digitized lanthanum halide scintillator pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, J. E.; Mosquera, C. M.; Faust, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of digitized pulse waveforms from experiments with LaBr3(Ce) and LaCl3(Ce) detectors is presented. Pulse waveforms from both scintillator types were captured in the presence of 22Na and 60Co sources and also background alone. Two methods to extract pulse shape discrimination (PSD) parameters and estimate energy spectra were compared. The first involved least squares fitting of the pulse waveforms to a physics-based model of one or two exponentially modified Gaussian functions. The second was the conventional gated integration method. The model fitting method produced better PSD than gated integration for LaCl3(Ce) and higher resolution energy spectra for both scintillator types. A disadvantage to the model fitting approach is that it is more computationally complex and about 5 times slower. LaBr3(Ce) waveforms had a single decay component and showed no ability for alpha/electron PSD. LaCl3(Ce) was observed to have short and long decay components and alpha/electron discrimination was observed.

  17. In-flight investigation of shuttle tile pressure orifice installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    To determine shuttle orbiter wing loads during ascent, wing load instrumentation was added to Columbia (OV-102). This instrumentation included strain gages and pressure orifices on the wing. The loads derived from wing pressure measurements taken during STS 61-C did not agree with those derived from strain gage measurements or with the loads predicted from the aerodynamic database. Anomalies in the surface immediately surrounding the pressure orifices in the thermal protection system (TPS) tiles were one possible cause of errors in the loads derived from wing pressure measurements. These surface anomalies were caused by a ceramic filler material which was installed around the pressure tubing. The filler material allowed slight movement of the TPS tile and pressure tube as the airframe flexed and bent under aerodynamic loads during ascent and descent. Postflight inspection revealed that this filler material had protruded from or receeded beneath the surface, causing the orifice to lose its flushness. Flight tests were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center Dryden Flight Research Facility to determine the effects of any anomaly in surface flushness of the orifice installation on the measured pressures at Mach numbers between 0.6 and 1.4. An F-104 aircraft with a flight test fixture mounted beneath the fuselage was used for these flights. Surface flushness anomalies typical of those on the orbiter after flight (STA 61-C) were tested. Also, cases with excessive protrusion and recession of the filler material were tested. This report shows that the anomalies in STS 61-C orifice installations adversely affected the pressure measurements. But the magnitude of the affect was not great enough to account for the discrepancies with the strain gage measurements and the aerodynamic predictions.

  18. Particle-balance models for pulsed sputtering magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Chunqing; Lundin, D.; Gudmundsson, J. T.; Raadu, M. A.; Bradley, J. W.; Brenning, N.

    2017-09-01

    The time-dependent plasma discharge ionization region model (IRM) has been under continuous development during the past decade and used in several studies of the ionization region of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. In the present work, a complete description of the most recent version of the IRM is given, which includes improvements, such as allowing for returning of the working gas atoms from the target, a separate treatment of hot secondary electrons, addition of doubly charged metal ions, etc. To show the general applicability of the IRM, two different HiPIMS discharges are investigated. The first set concerns 400 μs long discharge pulses applied to an Al target in an Ar atmosphere at 1.8 Pa. The second set focuses on 100 μs long discharge pulses applied to a Ti target in an Ar atmosphere at 0.54 Pa, and explores the effects of varying the magnetic field strength. The model results show that Al2+ -ions contribute negligibly to the production of secondary electrons, while Ti2+ -ions effectively contribute to the production of secondary electrons. Similarly, the model results show that for an argon discharge with Al target the contribution of Al+-ions to the discharge current at the target surface is over 90% at 800 V. However, at 400 V the Al+-ions and Ar+-ions contribute roughly equally to the discharge current in the initial peak, while in the plateau region Ar+-ions contribute to roughly \\frac{2}{3} of the current. For high currents the discharge with Al target develops almost pure self-sputter recycling, while the discharge with Ti target exhibits close to a 50/50 combination of self-sputter recycling and working gas-recycling. For a Ti target, a self-sputter yield significantly below unity makes working gas-recycling necessary at high currents. For the discharge with Ti target, a decrease in the B-field strength, resulted in a corresponding stepwise increase in the discharge resistivity.

  19. Experimental verification of physical model of pulsed laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Whereas most experimental and theoretical studies of the role of convection in fusion welding have been concerned with continuous heat sources, a pulsed heat source is the focus of this study. This is primarily an experimental study of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of austenitic stainless steels. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Dissipative attached length of an orifice in a baffle in a circular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komkin, A. I.; Mironov, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    The viscous dissipation accompanying plane wave propagation through an orifice in a baffle in a circular duct is theoretically analyzed. The solution is sought in the form of a series in the eigenfunctions of the duct. The resulting surface resistance is described in terms of the dissipative attached length of the orifice. The dependence of the dissipative attached length of the orifice on the ratio of the orifice diameter to the duct diameter is determined.

  1. A Pulse-Type Hardware CPG Model for Generation and Transition of Quadruped Locomotion Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Keiko; Sekine, Yoshifumi; Nakabora, Yoshifumi; Saeki, Katsutoshi

    The purpose of our research is to clarify information processing functions of living organisms by neural networks using pulse-type hardware neuron models and applying pulse-type hardware neural networks to engineered models. It is known that locomotion such as walking by a living organism is generated and transited by CPG (Central Pattern Generator) in the central nervous system. We investigate a pulse-type hardware CPG model using coupled oscillator composed of pulse-type hardware neuron models. A CPG model is need to generate and control quadruped locomotion. In this paper, we describe generation and transition of oscillation patterns, corresponding to quadruped locomotion patterns. As a result, it is shown that generation and transition of oscillation patterns are possible by giving external inputs of one pulse to the CPG model.

  2. One-dimensional bubble model of pulsed discharge in water

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xinpei

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, a one-dimensional bubble model of pulsed discharge in water is presented. With a total input energy of 0.63 J, the simulation results show that when the bubble collapses at the center of the bubble, the plasma pressure oscillates strongly. It oscillates between 800 and 1150 atm with an oscillation frequency of about 6.9 MHz, while at r=R/2 (R: bubble radius), the gas velocity oscillates intensely at the same frequency. It oscillates between -235 and 229 m/s when the bubble radius reaches its minimum. But it does not oscillate at r=R because of the inertia of the surrounding water. The bubble collapses and reexpands with almost the same speed as that of the zero-dimensional (0D) model. This further confirms why the shock wave pressure from the 0D mode has a good agreement with the experimental results since the shock wave pressure is only determined by the bubble wall velocity v(R)

  3. Investigation of the Acoustic Source Characteristics of High Energy Laser Pulses: Models and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    consistent with the expected approximately 1/r relationship for pressure amplitudes under 100MPa. The modeling effort employed AUTODYN , a finite...agreed with Vogel’s measured values. The efficiency, pulse length, pulse shape, and variation of pressure amplitude with range achieved with AUTODYN ...Nonlinear Acoustics, AUTODYN , Acoustic Modeling, Shock Acoustics 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  4. Modeling of High Efficiency Solar Cells Under Laser Pulse for Power Beaming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells may be used as receivers for laser power beaming. To understand the behavior of solar cells when illuminated by a pulsed laser, the time response of gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells to pulsed monochromatic input has been modeled using a finite element solar cell model.

  5. Effects of Orifice-Weir Outlet on Hydrology and Water Quality of a Drained Forested Watershed

    Treesearch

    Devendra M. Amatya; R. Wayne Skaggs; J.W. Gilliam; J.H. Hughes

    2003-01-01

    Orifice-weir structures at ditch outlets are proposed to reduce peak drainage rates during high flows and to store water during the growing season in poorly drained managed pine plantations. Two coastal watersheds, one conventionally drained (D1) and another with an orifice-weir outlet (D3), were monitored to examine the effects of this orifice treatment on drainage...

  6. Individualization of the parameters of the three-elements Windkessel model using carotid pulse signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Strasz, Anna; GÄ siorowska, Anna; Berka, Martin; Młyńczak, Marcel; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    The haemodynamics of the arterial system can be described by the three-elements Windkessel model. As it is a lumped model, it does not account for pulse wave propagation phenomena: pulse wave velocity, reflection, and pulse pressure profile changes during propagation. The Modelflowmethod uses this model to calculate stroke volume and total peripheral resistance (TPR) from pulse pressure obtained from finger; the reliability of this method is questioned. The model parameters are: aortic input impedance (Zo), TPR, and arterial compliance (Cw). They were obtained from studies of human aorta preparation. Individual adjustment is performed based on the subject's age and gender. As Cw is also affected by diseases, this may lead to inaccuracies. Moreover, the Modelflowmethod transforms the pulse pressure recording from the finger (Finapres©) into a remarkably different pulse pressure in the aorta using a predetermined transfer function — another source of error. In the present study, we indicate a way to include in the Windkessel model information obtained by adding carotid pulse recording to the finger pressure measurement. This information allows individualization of the values of Cw and Zo. It also seems reasonable to utilize carotid pulse, which better reflects aortic pressure, to individualize the transfer function. Despite its simplicity, the Windkessel model describes essential phenomena in the arterial system remarkably well; therefore, it seems worthwhile to check whether individualization of its parameters would increase the reliability of results obtained with this model.

  7. Reactive nanolaminate pulsed-laser ignition mechanism: Modeling and experimental evidence of diffusion limited reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarrington, C. D.; Abere, M. J.; Adams, D. P.; Hobbs, M. L.

    2017-04-01

    Al/Pt nanolaminates with a bilayer thickness (tb, width of an Al/Pt pair-layer) of 164 nm were irradiated with single laser pulses with durations of 10 ms and 0.5 ms at 189 W/cm2 and 1189 W/cm2, respectively. The time to ignition was measured for each pulse, and shorter ignition times were observed for the higher power/shorter pulse width. Videographic images of the irradiated area shortly after ignition show a non-uniform radial brightness for the longer pulse, while the shorter pulse shows uniform brightness. A diffusion-limited single step reaction mechanism was implemented in a finite element package to model the progress from reactants to products at both pulse widths. The model captures well both the observed ignition delay and qualitative observations regarding the non-uniform radial temperature.

  8. Reactive nanolaminate pulsed-laser ignition mechanism: Modeling and experimental evidence of diffusion limited reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Yarrington, C. D.; Abere, M. J.; Adams, D. P.; ...

    2017-04-03

    We irradiated Al/Pt nanolaminates with a bilayer thickness (tb, width of an Al/Pt pair-layer) of 164 nm with single laser pulses with durations of 10 ms and 0.5 ms at 189 W/cm2 and 1189 W/cm2, respectively. The time to ignition was measured for each pulse, and shorter ignition times were observed for the higher power/shorter pulse width. While the shorter pulse shows uniform brightness, videographic images of the irradiated area shortly after ignition show a non-uniform radial brightness for the longer pulse. A diffusion-limited single step reaction mechanism was implemented in a finite element package to model the progress frommore » reactants to products at both pulse widths. Finally, the model captures well both the observed ignition delay and qualitative observations regarding the non-uniform radial temperature.« less

  9. Measuring Neutron Star Radii via Pulse Profile Modeling with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Morsink, Sharon; Bauböck, Michi

    2016-11-01

    The Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer is an X-ray astrophysics payload that will be placed on the International Space Station. Its primary science goal is to measure with high accuracy the pulse profiles that arise from the non-uniform thermal surface emission of rotation-powered pulsars. Modeling general relativistic effects on the profiles will lead to measuring the radii of these neutron stars and to constraining their equation of state. Achieving this goal will depend, among other things, on accurate knowledge of the source, sky, and instrument backgrounds. We use here simple analytic estimates to quantify the level at which these backgrounds need to be known in order for the upcoming measurements to provide significant constraints on the properties of neutron stars. We show that, even in the minimal-information scenario, knowledge of the background at a few percent level for a background-to-source countrate ratio of 0.2 allows for a measurement of the neutron star compactness to better than 10% uncertainty for most of the parameter space. These constraints improve further when more realistic assumptions are made about the neutron star emission and spin, and when additional information about the source itself, such as its mass or distance, are incorporated.

  10. Parametric Modeling and Estimation of Pulse Propagation on Microwave Integrated Circuit Interconnections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    microstrip structure. An incident transient pulse delivers a fiite amount of energy to the microstrip transmission line. Discontinuities in multi -section mi...microstrip structure of Figure 6.19 was excited by a 18.5 GHz incident pulse . The performance of the layer reflection coefficient Table 18. MULTI ...for on-chip pulsing and gating," PhD thesis, Stanford University, 1985. [54] E.M. Siomacco and S. R. Parker, "Modeling of dispersive multi -layered me

  11. Pulse radiolysis in model studies toward radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Sonntag, C.; Bothe, E.; Ulanski, P.; Deeble, D. J.

    1995-02-01

    Using the pulse radiolysis technique, the OH-radical-induced reactions of poly(vinyl alcohol) PVAL, poly(acrylic acid) PAA, poly(methacrylic acid) PMA, and hyaluronic acid have been investigated in dilute aqueous solution. The reactions of the free-radical intermediates were followed by UV-spectroscopy and low-angle laser light-scattering; the scission of the charged polymers was also monitored by conductometry. For more detailed product studies, model systems such as 2,4-dihydroxypentane (for PVAL) and 2,4-dimethyl glutaric acid (for PAA) was also investigated. With PVA, OH-radicals react predominantly by abstraction of an H-atom in α-position to the hydroxyl group (70%). The observed bimolecular decay rate constant of the PVAL-radicals decreases with time. This has been interpreted as being due to an initially fast decay of proximate radicals and a decrease of the probability of such encounters with time. Intramolecular crosslinking (loop formation) predominates at high doses per pulse. In the presence of O 2, peroxyl radicals are formed which in the case of the α-hydroxyperoxyl radicals can eliminate HO 2-radicals in competition with bimolecular decay processes which lead to a fragmentation of the polymer. In PAA, radicals both in α-position (characterized by an absorption near 300 nm) and in β-position to the carboxylate groups are formed in an approximately 1:2 ratio. The lifetime of the radicals increases with increasing electrolytic dissociation of the polymer. The β-radicals undergo a slow (intra- as well as intermolecular) H-abstraction yielding α-radicals, in competition to crosslinking and scission reactions. In PMA only β-radicals are formed. Their fragmentation has been followed by conductometry. In hyaluronic acid, considerable fragmeentation is observed even in the absence of oxygen which, in fact, has some protective effect against this process. Thus free-radical attack on this important biopolymer makes it especially vulnerable with respect

  12. A model of preliminary breakdown pulse peak currents and their relation to the observed electric field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašpar, Petr; Santolík, Ondřej; Kolmašová, Ivana; Farges, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary breakdown pulses (PBPs) occur in the initial phase of lightning. A realistic model for their description is employed to investigate relation between PBP peak currents and PBP electric field amplitudes and their relation to the return stroke (RS) peak currents. We demonstrate that the PBP peak currents can reach 200 kA and can be comparable or higher than the corresponding RS peak currents. For a typical PBP electric field waveform PBP peak currents are approximately proportional to the electric field amplitudes. We show that the PBP bipolar overshoot depends primarily on the characteristic time of the line conductivity increase. The magnitude of the charge centers is demonstrated to be very large in order to model the observed PBPs with amplitudes up to 32 V/m at 100 km. Such energetic current pulses might be capable to produce elves or terrestrial gamma ray flashes.

  13. Thermomolecular effect on pressure measurements with orifices in transitional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. L.; Blanchard, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a study carried out in order to verify a version of the method (presented at the 7th International Rarefied Gas Dynamics Symposium) for calculating the influence of thermomolecular flow on the pressures measured by means of orifices in walls exposed to rarefied gases. In these experiments, the 'orifice effect' is examined under conditions that are significantly different from those for which the semiempirical (SE) method of Kinslow and Potter (1971) was shown to be successful. Comparisons between the predicted results with flight data and the results obtained in the laboratory, combined with limited DSMC calculations, indicate that the SE method remains a useful tool which is relatively easy to apply and which gives good results when an appropriate energy accommodation coefficient is used.

  14. Vortex structures in turbulent channel flow behind an orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Soichiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a channel flow with an orifice has been performed for Reτ0=10 - 600, where uτ0 is the friction velocity calculated from the mean pressure gradient, δ the channel half width and ν the kinematic viscosity. In the wake region, the mean flow becomes asymmetric by the Coanda effect. The degree of asymmetry increases with increasing the Reynolds number for the laminar flow at Reτ0< 50. The degree decreases abruptly at Reτ0=50, where the transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow take places. Large-scale spanwise vortices generated at the orifice edges. They become deformed and break up into disordered small-scale structures in shear layer. The small-scale vortices are convected towards the channel center. The large-scale vortices have an important effect upon the reattachment locations and streamwise vortices near the wall in the wake region.

  15. Thermomolecular effect on pressure measurements with orifices in transitional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. L.; Blanchard, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a study carried out in order to verify a version of the method (presented at the 7th International Rarefied Gas Dynamics Symposium) for calculating the influence of thermomolecular flow on the pressures measured by means of orifices in walls exposed to rarefied gases. In these experiments, the 'orifice effect' is examined under conditions that are significantly different from those for which the semiempirical (SE) method of Kinslow and Potter (1971) was shown to be successful. Comparisons between the predicted results with flight data and the results obtained in the laboratory, combined with limited DSMC calculations, indicate that the SE method remains a useful tool which is relatively easy to apply and which gives good results when an appropriate energy accommodation coefficient is used.

  16. Acoustic impedance measurements of pulse tube refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Takashi; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2010-02-01

    Complex acoustic impedance is determined in a prototype refrigerator that can mimic orifice-type, inertance-type, and double inlet-type pulse tube refrigerators from simultaneous measurements of pressure and velocity oscillations at the cold end. The impedance measurements revealed the means by which the oscillatory flow condition in the basic pulse tube refrigerator is improved by additional components such as a valve and a tank. The working mechanism of pulse tube refrigerators is explained based on an electrical circuit analogy.

  17. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  18. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  19. Studies of flows through N-sequential orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Stetz, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    Critical mass flux and axial pressure profile data for fluid nitrogen are presented for N = 20, 15, 10, and 7 N-sequential-orifice-inlet configurations uniformly spaced at 15.5 cm. These data correlate well over a wide range in reduced temperature and reduced pressure, and are in general agreement with previous studies of one to four inlets. Experimental and theoretical agreement is good for liquid and gas critical mass flux, but inconclusive in the near thermodynamic critical regions.

  20. Standards for discharge measurement with standardized nozzles and orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    The following standards give the standardized forms for two throttling devices, standard nozzles and standard orifices, and enable them to be used in circular pipes without calibration. The definition of the standards are applicable in principle to the calibration and use of nonstandardized throttling devices, such as the venturi tube. The standards are valid, likewise, as a basis for discharge measurements in the German acceptance standards.

  1. A miniaturized robotic platform for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: in vivo validation.

    PubMed

    Tognarelli, Selene; Salerno, Marco; Tortora, Giuseppe; Quaglia, Claudio; Dario, Paolo; Schurr, Marc Oliver; Menciassi, Arianna

    2015-12-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) involves accessing the abdominal cavity via one of the body natural orifices for enabling minimally invasive surgical procedures. However, the constraints imposed by the access modality and the limited available technology make NOTES very challenging for surgeons. Tools redesign and introduction of novel surgical instruments are imperative in order to make NOTES operative in a real surgical scenario, reproducible and reliable. Robotic technology has major potential to overcome current limitations. The robotic platform described here consists of a magnetic anchoring frame equipped with dedicated docking/undocking mechanisms to house up to three modular robots for surgical interventions. The magnetic anchoring frame guarantees the required stability for surgical tasks execution, whilst dedicated modular robots provide the platform with adequate vision, stability and manipulation capabilities. Platform potentialities were demonstrated in a porcine model. Assessment was organized into two consecutive experimental steps, with a hybrid testing modality. First, platform deployment, anchoring and assembly through transoral-transgastric access were demonstrated in order to assess protocol feasibility and guarantee the safe achievement of the following experimental session. Second, transabdominal deployment, anchoring, assembly and robotic module actuation were carried out. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of inserting an endoluminal robotic platform composed of an anchoring frame and modular robotic units into a porcine model through a natural orifice. Once inserted into the peritoneal cavity, the platform provides proper visualization from multiple orientations. For the first time, a platform with interchangeable modules has been deployed and its components have been connected, demonstrating in vivo the feasibility of intra-abdominal assembly. Furthermore, increased dexterity employing different robotic

  2. Sonic injection through diamond orifices into a hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Huaiguo

    The objective for the present study was to experimentally characterize the performance of diamond shaped injectors for hypersonic flow applications. First, an extensive literature review was performed. Second, a small scale Mach 5.0 wind tunnel facility was installed. Third, a detailed experimental parametric investigation of sonic injection through a diamond orifice (five incidence angles and three momentum ratios) and a circular injector (three momentum ratios) into the Mach 5.0 freestream was performed. Also, the use of downstream plume vorticity control ramps was investigated. Fourth, a detailed analysis of the experimental data to characterize and model the flow for the present range of conditions was achieved. The experimental techniques include surface oil flow visualization, Mie-Scattering flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), shadowgraph photograph, and a five-hole mean flow probe. The results show that the diamond injectors have the potential to produce attached shock depending on the incidence angle and jet momentum ratio. For example, the incidence angles less than or equal to 45° at J = 0.43 generated attached interaction shocks. The attached shock produced reduced total pressure loss (drag for scramjet) and eliminated potential hot spots, associated with the upstream flow separation. The jet interaction shock angle increased with jet incidence angle and momentum ratio due to increased penetration and flow disturbances. The plume penetration and cross-sectional area increased with incidence angle and momentum ratio. The increased jet interaction shock angle and strength produced increased total pressure loss, jet interaction force and total normal force. The characteristic kidney bean shaped plume was not discernable from the diamond injectors indicating increased effectiveness for film cooling applications. A vorticity generation ramp increased the penetration of the plume and the plume shape was indicative of higher levels of

  3. LANL Efforts on Neutron Coincidence Modeling of INL Pulsed Neutron Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott; Thron, Jonathan L.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Geist, William H.; Charlton, William S.

    2012-06-25

    Overview of this presentation is: (1) pulsed histogram analysis, (2) creation of SPNS, (3) use of SPNS for modeling pulsed neutron data, (4) creation of MUDI, (5) calculated accidentals correction using GUAM + MUDI, (6) background subtraction analysis, and (7) current/figure work with MCNP.

  4. Bessel-Gauss pulse as an appropriate mathematical model for optically realizable localized waves.

    PubMed

    Reivelt, Kaido; Saari, Peeter

    2004-06-01

    We show that the field of the optically feasible luminal localized wave solutions of the scalar homogeneous wave equation can be modeled by means of Bessel-Gauss pulses. As the Bessel-Gauss pulses have a closed-form expression, this fact may be of great value in numerical simulations of various experimental situations.

  5. Model for transient behavior of pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Gershon; Bradley, Peter E.; Lewis, Michael A.; Radebaugh, Ray

    2011-03-01

    This article describes an investigation of the transient behavior of a small (2.0 W at 85 K) pulse tube cryocooler operating at 120 Hz with an average pressure of 3.5 MPa, capable of relatively fast cool-down from ambient to about 60 K. In a series of experiments, the cold end temperature was measured as a function of time in a complete cool-down and subsequent warm-up cycle, with no heat load and different quantities of excess mass at the cold end. A transient heat transfer model was developed, that considers the effects of the cooling power extracted at the cold end and that of the heat gain at the warm end on the cool-down time. The heat gain factor was calculated from warm-up data, and found to be approximately the same for all experiments. Using the same model with cool-down data enables a determination of both the gross and net cooling power as functions of time, but more importantly - as functions of the cold end temperature. An expression was derived for the cold end temperature as a function of time for any amount of excess mass, including zero. The cool-down time of the "lean" cryocooler (with no excess mass) was found to be less than 50 s. This cool-down/warm-up method for evaluating the cooling power of a cryocooler seems simpler than steady-state experiments with a heater simulating load at the cold end. Use of the heat transfer model with data from one or two good experiments conducted in the above manner, can yield both the gross and net cooling powers of a cryocooler as functions of the cold end temperature, and allow the determination of cool-down time with any amount of excess thermal mass. While the net cooling power during cool-down differs somewhat from that under steady-state operation, the former can serve as a good measure for the latter.

  6. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred a great deal of interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the difficulties in comparing the available experimental measurements with numerical models. In a previous paper by the author, parametric studies of the performance of a single, straight-tube PDRE were reported. A 1-D, unsteady method of characteristics code, employing a constant-gamma assumption behind the detonation front, was developed for that study. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and are particularly useful for parametric performance comparisons. For example, a plot showing the specific impulse of various PDRE and steady-state rocket engine (SSRE) configurations as a function of blowdown pressure ratio. The performance curves clearly indicate that a straight-tube PDRE is superior in specific impulse to a SSRE with a sonic nozzle over the entire range of pressure ratios. Note, however, that a straight-tube PDRE in general does not compare favorably to a SSRE fitted with an optimized de Laval supersonic nozzle, particularly at the high pressure ratios typical for boost or in-space rocket applications. However, the calculations also show that if a dynamically optimized, supersonic de Laval nozzle could be could be fitted to a PDRE, then the specific impulse of the device would exceed that of a comparable SSRE

  7. Stochastic analysis of a pulse-type prey-predator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Zhu, W. Q.

    2008-04-01

    A stochastic Lotka-Volterra model, a so-called pulse-type model, for the interaction between two species and their random natural environment is investigated. The effect of a random environment is modeled as random pulse trains in the birth rate of the prey and the death rate of the predator. The generalized cell mapping method is applied to calculate the probability distributions of the species populations at a state of statistical quasistationarity. The time evolution of the population densities is studied, and the probability of the near extinction time, from an initial state to a critical state, is obtained. The effects on the ecosystem behaviors of the prey self-competition term and of the pulse mean arrival rate are also discussed. Our results indicate that the proposed pulse-type model shows obviously distinguishable characteristics from a Gaussian-type model, and may confer a significant advantage for modeling the prey-predator system under discrete environmental fluctuations.

  8. Stochastic analysis of a pulse-type prey-predator model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Zhu, W Q

    2008-04-01

    A stochastic Lotka-Volterra model, a so-called pulse-type model, for the interaction between two species and their random natural environment is investigated. The effect of a random environment is modeled as random pulse trains in the birth rate of the prey and the death rate of the predator. The generalized cell mapping method is applied to calculate the probability distributions of the species populations at a state of statistical quasistationarity. The time evolution of the population densities is studied, and the probability of the near extinction time, from an initial state to a critical state, is obtained. The effects on the ecosystem behaviors of the prey self-competition term and of the pulse mean arrival rate are also discussed. Our results indicate that the proposed pulse-type model shows obviously distinguishable characteristics from a Gaussian-type model, and may confer a significant advantage for modeling the prey-predator system under discrete environmental fluctuations.

  9. Modeling the Pulse Signal by Wave-Shape Function and Analyzing by Synchrosqueezing Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Li; Yang, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST) to model and analyze oscillatory physiological signals. To demonstrate how the model and algorithm work, we apply them to study the pulse wave signal. By extracting features called the spectral pulse signature, and based on functional regression, we characterize the hemodynamics from the radial pulse wave signals recorded by the sphygmomanometer. Analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features. PMID:27304979

  10. Accurate modeling of high-repetition rate ultrashort pulse amplification in optical fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Robert; Zeil, Peter; Malmström, Mikael; Laurell, Fredrik; Pasiskevicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model for amplification of ultrashort pulses with high repetition rates in fiber amplifiers is presented. The pulse propagation is modeled by jointly solving the steady-state rate equations and the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which allows accurate treatment of nonlinear and dispersive effects whilst considering arbitrary spatial and spectral gain dependencies. Comparison of data acquired by using the developed model and experimental results prove to be in good agreement. PMID:27713496

  11. Modeling of Beam Wave Pulse Propagation in Vegetation Using Transport Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-31

    SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Modeling of Beam Wave Pulse Propagation in Vegetation using Transport Theory DAAD190110- S S 6. AUTHOR(S) Gerald M. Whitman...real- time modeling ( of interest to the soldier in the field), three new approximate theories for beam wave propagation in vegetation were developed and...Enclosure 1 MODELING OF BEAM WAVE PULSE PROPAGATION IN VEGETATION USING TRANSPORT THEORY By Gerald M. Whitman Felix K. Schwering Michael Yu-Chi Wu DISB

  12. Understanding variation in ecosystem pulse responses to wetting: Benefits of data-model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenerette, D.

    2011-12-01

    Metabolic pulses of activity are a common ecological response to intermittently available resources and in water-limited ecosystems these pulses often occur in response to wetting. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) in response to episodic wetting events is hypothesized to have a complex trajectory reflecting the distinct responses, or "pulses", of respiration and photosynthesis. To help direct research activities a physiological-based model of whole ecosystem metabolic activity up- and down-regulation was developed to investigate ecosystem energy balance and gas exchange pulse responses following precipitation events. This model was to investigate pulse dynamics from a local network of sites in southern Arizona, a global network of eddy-covariance ecosystem monitoring sites, laboratory incubation studies, and field manipulations. Pulse responses were found to be ubiquitous across ecosystem types. These pulses had a highly variable influence on NEE following wetting, ranging from large net sinks to sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Much of the variability in pulse responses of NEE could be described through a coupled up- and down-regulation pulse response model. Respiration pulses were hypothesized to occur through a reduction in whole ecosystem activation energy; this model was both useful and corroborated through laboratory incubation studies of soil respiration. Using the Fluxnet eddy-covariance measurement database event specific responses were combined with the pulse model into an event specific twenty-five day net flux calculation. Across all events observed a general net accumulation of CO2 following a precipitation event, with the largest net uptake within deciduous broadleaf forests and smallest within grasslands. NEE pulses favored greater uptake when pre-event ecosystem respiration rates and total precipitation were higher. While the latter was expected, the former adds to previous theory by suggesting a larger net uptake of CO2 when pre-event metabolic

  13. Bubble Formation at a Submerged Orifice in High-Speed Horizontal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ningzhen; Chen, Xiang; Yuan, Jianyu; Wang, Guiquan; Li, Yanxiang; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Reducing the cell size of aluminum foams is always a hot and difficult topic in the fabrication of aluminum foams by gas injection route. There lacks theoretical guidance for the bubble size reduction when foaming by the dynamic gas injection method. For the convenience of observation, the aqueous bubbles from small-sized orifice in the high-speed horizontal oscillation were investigated in this paper. A bubble formation and detachment model in the high-speed horizontal oscillation system was proposed. The high-speed system with horizontal simple harmonic oscillation could reduce the average bubble size of aqueous foam effectively. The regularity of bubble formation and the influence of experimental parameters on average bubble size can be predicted by the theoretical model, and the experimental results agree well with the theoretical calculation. The results have shown that bubbles generally detach from the orifice at deceleration periods of the simple harmonic oscillation, and there exist several fixed sizes of bubbles with the fixed experimental parameters due to the effects of periodic forces. The average bubble size decreases with the increase of oscillation frequency and amplitude, and it roughly increases with the increase of gas flow rate. Using the high-speed horizontal oscillation method to prepare aluminum foams, the cell size can be reduced to about 1 mm. Moreover, the cell sizes of aluminum foam can be well predicted by this theoretical model.

  14. High Amplitude Acoustic Behavior of a Slit-Orifice Backed by a Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; DAgostino, M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to acquire detailed acoustic data and limited flow visualization data for numerical validation of a new model of sound absorption by a very narrow rectangular slit backed by a cavity. The sound absorption model is that being developed by Dr. C. K. W. Tam of Florida State University. This report documents normal incidence impedance measurements of a singular rectangular slit orifice with no mean flow. All impedance measurements are made within a 1.12 inch (28.5 mm) diameter impedance tube using the two-microphone method for several frequencies in the range 1000 - 6000Hz and incident sound pressure levels in the range 130 - 150 dB. In the interest of leaving the analysis of the data to the developers of more advanced Analytical and computational models of sound absorption by narrow slits, we authors have refrained from giving our own explanations of the observed results, although many of the observed results can be explained using the classical understanding of sound absorption by orifices.

  15. High Amplitude Acoustic Behavior of a Slit-Orifice Backed by a Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; DAgostino, M.; Jones, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire detailed acoustic data and limited and flow visualization data for numerical validation a new model of sound absorption by a very narrow rectangular slit backed by a cavity. The sound absorption model is being developed by Dr. C. K. W. Tam of Florida State University. This report documents normal incidence impedance measurements of a singular rectangular slit orifice with no mean flow. All impedance measurements are made within a 1.12 inch (28.5 mm) diameter impedance tube using the two-microphone method for several frequencies in the range 1000-6000Hz and incident sound pressure levels in the range 130 - 150 dB. In the interest of leaving the analysis of the data to the developers of more advanced analytical and computational models of sound absorption by narrow slits, we have refrained from giving our own explanations of the observed results, although many of the observed results can be explained using the classical explanations of sound absorption by orifices.

  16. Modeling particle injections during magnetospheric substorm by a propagating earthward electromagnetic pulse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugin, G. A.; Kabin, K.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.

    2016-12-01

    During substorm expansion phase the electrons and ions with energies of up to 100 keV appear in the near-Earth magnetotail. Often, this increase occurs simultaneously for a broad range of particle energies; such events are called dispersionless injections (DIs). Explanations of DIs usually relay on some form of an earthward propagating electromagnetic pulse, which is capable of effectively energizing an initial distribution of electrons and ions. Most of the previous models of such pulses were developed for the equatorial plane only. We propose a new model of an electromagnetic pulse which is two-dimensional in the meridional plane. Electric and magnetic fields in the pulse are calculated self-consistently and satisfy Maxwell's equations. We use realistic time-independent stretched magnetic field as the background. Our model has several adjustable parameters, such as the speed of the pulse propagation, its amplitude and spatial extent, which makes it versatile enough to investigate effects of the pulse characteristics on the particle energization. We present and discuss several examples of particle energization in our model and find that in some cases the energies of the seed electrons can increase by a factor of 10 or more. Two-dimensional nature of our model allows us to visualize the motion of the field lines in the meridional plane associated with the travelling electromagnetic pulse and to calculate the ionospheric footprints of the particle dynamics in the equatorial plane.

  17. Dynamical modeling of pulsed two-photon interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Kevin A.; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-11-01

    Single-photon sources are at the heart of quantum-optical networks, with their uniquely quantum emission and phenomenon of two-photon interference allowing for the generation and transfer of nonclassical states. Although a few analytical methods have been briefly investigated for describing pulsed single-photon sources, these methods apply only to either perfectly ideal or at least extremely idealized sources. Here, we present the first complete picture of pulsed single-photon sources by elaborating how to numerically and fully characterize non-ideal single-photon sources operating in a pulsed regime. In order to achieve this result, we make the connection between quantum Monte-Carlo simulations, experimental characterizations, and an extended form of the quantum regression theorem. We elaborate on how an ideal pulsed single-photon source is connected to its photocount distribution and its measured degree of second- and first-order optical coherence. By doing so, we provide a description of the relationship between instantaneous source correlations and the typical experimental interferometers (Hanbury-Brown and Twiss, Hong-Ou-Mandel, and Mach-Zehnder) used to characterize such sources. Then, we use these techniques to explore several prototypical quantum systems and their non-ideal behaviors. As an example numerical result, we show that for the most popular single-photon source—a resonantly excited two-level system—its error probability is directly related to its excitation pulse length. We believe that the intuition gained from these representative systems and characters can be used to interpret future results with more complicated source Hamiltonians and behaviors. Finally, we have thoroughly documented our simulation methods with contributions to the Quantum Optics Toolbox in Python in order to make our work easily accessible to other scientists and engineers.

  18. A three-pulse model of d. c. side harmonic flow in HVDC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, N.L.; Andersson, G.; Canelhas, A.P.; Asplund, G.

    1989-07-01

    A new model for analysis of d.c. side harmonics in HVDC systems is proposed. The model includes the stray capacitances of converter transformers and bushings and represents the 12-pulse converter as four three-pulse harmonic voltage sources. The appearance of ground mode triplen harmonics of troublesome magnitude in pole and electrode lines, as noted in recent site measurements, is explained, as is the increase in magnitude of the characteristic 12-pulse harmonics. The consequences for d.c. filter design and the specification of telephone interference criteria are also discussed.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of the Side Branch Orifice after Bifurcation Stenting Using En Face Processing of OCT Images: A Comparison between Xience V and Resolute Integrity Stent

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Yoshiyasu; Wang, Zhao; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Lee, Stephen; Uemura, Shiro; Soeda, Tsunenari; Vergallo, Rocco; Raffel, O. Christopher; Barlis, Peter; Itoh, Tomonori; Lee, Hang; Fujimoto, James; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective Methods for intravascular assessment of the side branch (SB) orifice after stenting are not readily available. The aim of this study is to assess the utility of an en face projection processing for optical coherence tomography (OCT) images for the SB evaluation. Methods Measurements of the SB orifice using en face OCT images were validated using a phantom model. Linear regression modeling was applied to estimated area measurements made on the en face images. The SB orifice was then analyzed in 88 patients with bifurcation lesions treated with either a Xience V (EES) or a Resolute Integrity (ZES). The SB orifice area (A) and the area obstructed by struts (B) were calculated, and the %open area was evaluated as (A-B)/A*100. Results Linear regression modeling demonstrated observed departures of the intercept and slope was not significantly different from 0 (−0.12 ± 0.22, p=0.59) and from 1 (1.01 ± 0.06, R2=0.88, p=0.87), respectively. In cases without SB dilatation, the %open area was significantly larger in EES group (n=25) than in ZES group (n=32) (89.2% [83.7–91.3] vs. 84.3% [78.9–87.8], P=0.04). A significant difference in the %open area between with and without SB dilatation was demonstrated in the ZES group (91.4% [86.1–94.0] vs. 84.3% [78.9–87.8], P=0.04). Conclusions The accuracy of SB orifice measurement on the en face OCT image was validated using a phantom model. This novel approach can quantitatively evaluate the differences in SB orifice area free from struts among different stent types and different treatment strategies in vivo. PMID:26554662

  20. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Osteoporosis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaowei, Yang; Liming, Wang; Guan, Z. C.; Yaou, Zhang; Xiangpeng, Wang

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the preventive effects and long term effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), generated by circular coils and pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulators, on osteoporosis in bilaterally ovariectomized rats. In preventive experiment, thirty three-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three different groups: sham (SHAM), ovariectomy (OVX), PEMFs stimulation (PEMFs). All rats were subjected to bilaterally ovariectomy except those in SHAM group. The PEMFs group was exposed to pulsed electromagnetic fields with frequency 15 Hz, peak magnetic induction density 2.2mT and exposure time 2 hours per day. The bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebra and left femur were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at eighth week, twelfth week and sixteenth week after surgery. In long term effects experiment, forty four rats were randomly divided into sham (14 rats, SHAM), ovariectomy group (10 rats, OVX), 15Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 15Hz) and 30Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 30Hz) at twenty-sixth week after surgery. Rats in PEMFs groups were stimulated sixteen weeks. In preventive experiment, the Corrected BMD of vertebra and femur was significantly higher than that of OVX group after 16 weeks (P<0.001, P<0.001 respectively). In long term effects experiment, the vertebral BMD of 15Hz PEMFs group and 30Hz PEMFs group was significantly higher than that of OVX groups (P<0.01, P<0.05 respectively). The experimental results demonstrated that extremely low intensity, low frequency, single pulsed electromagnetic fields significantly slowed down the loss of corrected vertebral and femoral BMD in bilaterally ovariectomized rats and suggest that PEMFs may be beneficial in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  1. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  2. Modeling of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Likhanskii, Alexandre V.; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Macheret, Sergey O.; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-07-15

    A detailed physical model for an asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air driven by repetitive nanosecond voltage pulses is developed. In particular, modeling of DBD with high voltage repetitive negative and positive nanosecond pulses combined with positive dc bias is carried out. Operation at high voltage is compared with operation at low voltage, highlighting the advantage of high voltages, however the effect of backward-directed breakdown in the case of negative pulses results in a decrease of the integral momentum transferred to the gas. The use of positive repetitive pulses with dc bias is demonstrated to be promising for DBD performance improvement. The effects of the voltage waveform not only on force magnitude, but also on the spatial profile of the force, are shown. The crucial role of background photoionization in numerical modeling of ionization waves (streamers) in DBD plasmas is demonstrated.

  3. Characterization of surface position in a liquid dispensing orifice

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R H; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas George; Lereu, Aude L; Tetard, Laurene; Jones, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Precision microdispencing technology delivers picoliter amounts of fluid for printing, electronic, optical, chemical and biomedical applications. In particular, microjetting is capable of accurate, flexible, and non-contact coating with polymers, thus allowing the functionalization of delicate microsensors such as microcantilevers. Information on various phases of droplet formation are important to control volume, uniformity, velocity and rate. One such aspect is the ringing of the meniscus after droplet breakoff which can affect subsequent drop formation. We present analysis of an optical characterization technique and experimental results on the behaviour of menisus oscillations in an orifice of a piezoelectric microjet.

  4. An Experimental Study of Synthetic Jets from Rectangular Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    During the past two summers Professor Milanovic conducted Wind tunnel experiments on steady jets-in-cross-flow and synthetic jets. In her anticipated visit during the upcoming summer, she will continue and complete the research on synthetic jets involving 2-dimensional orifices of different aspect ratio as well as inclined slots. In addition, experiments will be conducted on pulsatile jets-in-cross-flow. The pulsation will be provided via an oscillating valve at controllable frequencies. The experiment will involve mainly hot-wire anemometer measurements in the low-speed wind tunnel. Overall goal will be to obtain database and investigate flow control strategies. The research will be of fundamental nature.

  5. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of micro-orifices for diesel fuel injectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.; Woodford, J.; Wang, J.; El-Hannouny, E.; Schaefer, R.; Hamady, F.; National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Lab.

    2007-04-01

    Stringent emission standards are driving the development of diesel-fuel injection concepts to mitigate in-cylinder formation of particulates. While research has demonstrated significant reduction in particulate formation using micro-orifice technology, implementation requires development of industrial processes to fabricate micro-orifices with diameters as low as 50 gmm and with large length-to-diameter ratios. This paper reviews the different processes being pursued to fabricate micro-orifices and the advanced techniques applied to characterize the performance of micro-orifices. The latter include the use of phase-contrast x-ray imaging of electroless nickel-plated, micro-orifices and laser imaging of fuel sprays at elevated pressures. The experimental results demonstrate an industrially viable process to create small uniform orifices that improve spray formation for fuel injection.

  7. Modelling the effects of pulse exposure of several PSII inhibitors on two algae.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    Subsequent to crop application and during precipitation events, herbicides can reach surface waters in pulses of high concentrations. These pulses can exceed the Annual Average Environmental Quality Standards (AA-EQS), defined in the EU Water Framework Directive, which aims to protect the aquatic environment. A model was developed in a previous study to evaluate the effects of pulse exposure for the herbicide isoproturon on the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus. In this study, the model was extended to other substances acting as photosystem II inhibitors and to other algae. The measured and predicted effects were equivalent when pulse exposure of atrazine and diuron were tested on S. vacuolatus. The results were consistent for isoproturon on the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The model is thus suitable for the effect prediction of phenylureas and triazines and for the algae used: S. vacuolatus and P. subcapitata. The toxicity classification obtained from the dose-response curves (diuron>atrazine>isoproturon) was conserved for the pulse exposure scenarios modelled for S. vacuolatus. Toxicity was identical for isoproturon on the two algae when the dose-response curves were compared and also for the pulse exposure scenarios. Modelling the effects of any pulse scenario of photosystem II inhibitors on algae is therefore feasible and only requires the determination of the dose-response curves of the substance and growth rate of unexposed algae. It is crucial to detect the longest pulses when measurements of herbicide concentrations are performed in streams because the model showed that they principally affect the cell density inhibition of algae.

  8. Fast measurements of flow through mitral regurgitant orifices with magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haosen; Halliburton, Sandra S; White, Richard D; Chatzimavroudis, George P

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic-resonance (MR) phase velocity mapping (PVM) shows promise in measuring the mitral regurgitant volume. However, in its conventional nonsegmented form, MR-PVM is slow and impractical for clinical use. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of rapid, segmented k-space MR-PVM in quantifying the mitral regurgitant flow through a control volume (CV) method. Two segmented MR-PVM schemes, one with seven (seg-7) and one with nine (seg-9) lines per segment, were evaluated in acrylic regurgitant mitral valve models under steady and pulsatile flow. A nonsegmented (nonseg) MR-PVM acquisition was also performed for reference. The segmented acquisitions were considerably faster (<10 min) than the nonsegmented (>45 min). The regurgitant flow rates and volumes measured with segmented MR-PVM agreed closely with those measured with nonsegmented MR-PVM (differences <5%, p > 0.05), when the CV was large enough to exclude the region of flow acceleration and aliasing from its boundaries. The regurgitant orifice shape (circular vs. slit-like) and the presence of aortic outflow did not significantly affect the accuracy of the results under both steady and pulsatile flow (p > 0.05). This study shows that segmented k-space MR-PVM can accurately quantify the flow through regurgitant orifices using the CV method and demonstrates great clinical potential.

  9. Computationally efficient method for Fourier transform of highly chirped pulses for laser and parametric amplifier modeling.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Alexey; Szabo, Aron; Sergeev, Alexander; Kim, Arkady; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalashnikov, Mikhail

    2016-11-14

    We developed an improved approach to calculate the Fourier transform of signals with arbitrary large quadratic phase which can be efficiently implemented in numerical simulations utilizing Fast Fourier transform. The proposed algorithm significantly reduces the computational cost of Fourier transform of a highly chirped and stretched pulse by splitting it into two separate transforms of almost transform limited pulses, thereby reducing the required grid size roughly by a factor of the pulse stretching. The application of our improved Fourier transform algorithm in the split-step method for numerical modeling of CPA and OPCPA shows excellent agreement with standard algorithms.

  10. On the performance and flow characteristics of jet pumps with multiple orifices.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Joris P; Timmer, Michael A G; Bühler, Simon; van der Meer, Theo H; Wilcox, Douglas

    2016-05-01

    The design of compact thermoacoustic devices requires compact jet pump geometries, which can be realized by employing jet pumps with multiple orifices. The oscillatory flow through the orifice(s) of a jet pump generates asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects, which result in a time-averaged pressure drop that can counteract Gedeon streaming in traveling wave thermoacoustic devices. In this study, the performance of jet pumps having 1-16 orifices is characterized experimentally in terms of the time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. Upon increasing the number of orifices, a significant decay in the jet pump performance is observed. Further analysis shows a relation between this performance decay and the diameter of the individual holes. Possible causes of this phenomenon are discussed. Flow visualization is used to study the differences in vortex ring interaction from adjacent jet pump orifices. The mutual orifice spacing is varied and the corresponding jet pump performance is measured. The orifice spacing is shown to have less effect on the jet pump performance compared to increasing the number of orifices.

  11. Computational model for time development of the EM field in pulsed laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrabelj, D.; Marincek, M.; Drevensek-Olenik, I.; Leskovar, M.; Copic, M.

    2007-05-01

    A computational model, which describes EM field formation in a pulsed laser from a randomly generated initial spontaneous field inside the laser cavity has been developed. The model is based on a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform and describes a real laser system taking into account a lensing and a diaphragm effect of the laser rod. The laser cavity is described by five effective planes, which represent different laser cavity elements-the back and the front mirror, the Q-switch element and the laser rod. At each plane the EM field is calculated in real space and propagation between the planes is achieved in Fourier space by multiplication with an appropriate phase factor. The computational time needed for simulation of a realistic pulse formation is in order of minutes. The model can predict the shape and the integral energy of the pulse, its transverse profile at different distances from the front mirror (including near and far field) and beam divergence. The results of the model were found to be in good agreement with measured parameters for a Q-switched ruby laser system running in stable as well as unstable cavity configurations. The temporal shape of a laser pulse was measured and calculated not only for the ruby laser, but also for a Nd:YAG laser. It was found that FWHM of a pulse produced by ruby laser is three times longer than FWHM of a pulse produced by Nd:YAG laser.

  12. Update on Phelix Pulsed-Power Hydrodynamics Experiments and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM , USA Abstract The PHELIX pulsed-power driver is a 300 kJ, portable, transformer-coupled...PO Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM , USA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR...PHELIX platform. i  P. J. Turchi, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 34, 1919- 1927 , 2006. ii P. J. Turchi et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 39, 2006- 2013, 2011. 828

  13. Pulsating-flow measurement with an orifice flange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossart, L. M.

    1981-05-01

    A measurement problem encountered during instrumentation of a geothermal air drilling operation on the Baca Ranch in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico was how to measure the flow of ammonia water solution injected into the air line. The pump that develops the pressure in the ammonia line is not a positive displacement pump, therefore, counting pump strokes does not determine the number of gal/min of ammonia flow. The flow was measured using an orifice flange differential pressure technique but, the range of flow measured, exceeded the 4:1 range ability of an orifice. A computer smoothing of the differential pressure and the line pressure together with a scaling factor, determined by the shape of the raw differential pressure, provided a smoothing of the flow data which was checked against the actual flow over a long time period to determine the volume of solution injected into the system per hour. An instantaneous reading of ammonia flow was thereby determined. It showed small variations in corrosion rate measured in the standpipe that may have been caused by a momentary variation in the flow of ammonia solution.

  14. [A current perspective of natural orifices transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES)].

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Javé, Eduardo E; Crisanto-Campos, Braulio A; Tapia-Jurado, Jesús; Montes de Oca-Duran, Edgar; Ortega-León, Luis Humberto; Alcántara-Medina, Stefany; Mendoza-Barrera, German Eduardo; Athie Gutierrez, César

    2016-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) represents an alternative in surgical approach, combined with the progress and experience gained from conventional and endoscopic surgery. Bibliographic research in PubMed, Medline database from 2000 to 2015 and analysis of the literature reviews found. NOTES provides vision and natural orifice approach, it has optimized operating times as well as reduced complications and better cosmetic results. Small series of patients have been reported, but there is not a valid clinical multicenter study by evidence-based medicine. NOTES can help to improve the standard operations, complemented with laparoscopic surgery rather than replace it and thus develop tools for the resolution of various diseases that require surgical treatment. This option in current surgery is safe and presents satisfactory results in the reported cases. The development of this new approach of performing surgical procedures requires further study and development of new technology in order to increase the accessibility of these procedures and represent in a practical and sustained way, a better option to approach surgical pathology.

  15. Adjustable steam producing flexible orifice independent of fluid pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A self-adjusting choke for a fluids nozzle includes a membrane constructed of a single piece of flexible or elastic material. This flexible material is shaped to fit into the outlet of a nozzle. The body of the membrane has at least two flow channels, from one face to the other, which directs two streams of water to cross at the opening of the nozzle or at some point beyond. The elasticity and thickness of the membrane is selected to match the range of expected pressures and fluid velocities. The choke may have more than two flow channels, as long as they are aligned adjacent to one another and directed towards each other at the exit face. In a three orifice embodiment, one is directed upward, one is directed downward, and the one in the middle is directed forward. In this embodiment all three fluid streams intersect at some point past the nozzle opening. Under increased pressure the membrane will deform causing the orifices to realign in a more forward direction, causing the streams to intersect at a smaller angle. This reduces the force with which the separate streams impact each other, still allowing the separate streams to unify into a single stable spiralling stream in spite of the increased pressure.

  16. Elimination of Pulses and Spirals by External Forces in Luo-Rudy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maruyama, Toru

    2008-08-01

    The Luo-Rudy model is one of the standard models for the excitation of cardiac cells. Traveling pulses and spiral waves appear in one-dimensional or two-dimensional Luo-Rudy models. Spiral waves in two-dimensional systems are interpreted as a possible origin of ventricular fibrillation, which is the most serious type of cardiac arrhythmia. Defibrillation is a process to eliminate spiral waves and stop ventricular fibrillation. We perform numerical simulations to eliminate traveling pulses and spiral waves by applying direct current or alternating current to the Luo-Rudy model.

  17. A review of pulse tube refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Ray

    This paper reviews the development of the three types of pulse tube refrigerators: basic, resonant, and orifice types. The principles of operation are given. It is shown that the pulse tube refrigerator is a variation of the Stirling-cycle refrigerator, where the moving displacer is substituted by a heat transfer mechanism or by an orifice to bring about the proper phase shifts between pressure and mass flow rate. A harmonic analysis with phasors is described which gives reasonable results for the refrigeration power, yet is simple enough to make clear the processes which give rise to the refrigeration. The efficiency and refrigeration power are compared with those of other refrigeration cycles. A brief review is given of the research being done at various laboratories on both one- and two-stage pulse tubes. A preliminary assessment of the role of pulse tube refrigerators is discussed.

  18. A review of pulse tube refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radebaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the three types of pulse tube refrigerators: basic, resonant, and orifice types. The principles of operation are given. It is shown that the pulse tube refrigerator is a variation of the Stirling-cycle refrigerator, where the moving displacer is substituted by a heat transfer mechanism or by an orifice to bring about the proper phase shifts between pressure and mass flow rate. A harmonic analysis with phasors is described which gives reasonable results for the refrigeration power, yet is simple enough to make clear the processes which give rise to the refrigeration. The efficiency and refrigeration power are compared with those of other refrigeration cycles. A brief review is given of the research being done at various laboratories on both one- and two-stage pulse tubes. A preliminary assessment of the role of pulse tube refrigerators is discussed.

  19. Incorporation of a Variable Discharge Coefficient for the Primary Orifice into the Benet Labs Recoil Analysis Model via Results from Quasi-Steady State Simulations Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    function, its value at zero time is indeterminate; however, by using techniques of calculus , it is found to be zero. The third is the 3 parameter Hill...cavitation and collapse of the fluid. Based on these results, it makes sense that the application of CFD modeling for an incompressible Newtonian fluid...regard to execution time. In addition the trend is non -linear in that the time increases by a factor of 70 from the smallest to the largest ratio and

  20. Reproduction of Consistent Pulse-Waveform Changes Using a Computational Model of the Cerebral Circulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Mark; He, Xing; Gonzalez, Nestor; Vespa, Paul; DiStefano, Joe; Hu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of the cranial vault, it is difficult to study cerebral blood flow dynamics directly. A mathematical model can be useful to study these dynamics. The model presented here is a novel combination of a one-dimensional fluid flow model representing the major vessels of the circle of Willis (CoW), with six individually parameterized auto-regulatory models of the distal vascular beds. This model has the unique ability to simulate high temporal resolution flow and velocity waveforms, amenable to pulse-waveform analysis, as well as sophisticated phenomena such as auto-regulation. Previous work with human patients has shown that vasodilation induced by CO2 inhalation causes 12 consistent pulse-waveform changes as measured by the Morphological Clustering and Analysis of Intracranial Pressure algorithm. To validate this model, we simulated vasodilation and successfully reproduced 9 out of the 12 pulse-waveform changes. A subsequent sensitivity analysis found that these 12 pulse-waveform changes were most affected by the parameters associated with the shape of the smooth muscle tension response and vessel elasticity, providing insight into the physiological mechanisms responsible for observed changes in the pulse-waveform shape. PMID:24389244

  1. Reproduction of consistent pulse-waveform changes using a computational model of the cerebral circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mark; He, Xing; Gonzalez, Nestor; Vespa, Paul; DiStefano, Joe; Hu, Xiao

    2014-03-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of the cranial vault, it is difficult to study cerebral blood flow dynamics directly. A mathematical model can be useful to study these dynamics. The model presented here is a novel combination of a one-dimensional fluid flow model representing the major vessels of the circle of Willis (CoW), with six individually parameterized auto-regulatory models of the distal vascular beds. This model has the unique ability to simulate high temporal resolution flow and velocity waveforms, amenable to pulse-waveform analysis, as well as sophisticated phenomena such as auto-regulation. Previous work with human patients has shown that vasodilation induced by CO2 inhalation causes 12 consistent pulse-waveform changes as measured by the morphological clustering and analysis of intracranial pressure algorithm. To validate this model, we simulated vasodilation and successfully reproduced 9 out of the 12 pulse-waveform changes. A subsequent sensitivity analysis found that these 12 pulse-waveform changes were most affected by the parameters associated with the shape of the smooth muscle tension response and vessel elasticity, providing insight into the physiological mechanisms responsible for observed changes in the pulse-waveform shape. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. All rights reserved.

  2. Ballistic and Diffuse Ultrafast Laser Pulses Propagation in Model Random Media and Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng

    The goal of this thesis is to study light scattering and ultrashort laser pulse propagation in the model discrete random media and biological tissues. The temporal profiles of the scattered ultrashort laser pulses were measured by using ultrashort laser pulses, streak camera with 10 ps time response and the femtosecond cross correlation technique. The intensity of the diffuse pulse is found to be preferentially reduced by the absorption with respect to the intensity of the ballistic light because the diffuse light on the average travel through a longer path than the ballistic light. A simple experiment was performed to demonstrate that one can image through a highly scattering medium by increasing the absorption in the medium. The speed of the ballistic pulse was measured by the femtosecond second harmonic cross correlation method and was found to be reduced by the scattering. This speed reduction can be accounted for by the volume fraction combination of the indices of refraction of the scatterers and the water or by the coherent interference between the scattered waves and the primary wave. No distinct ballistic pulse was observed when the laser pulse transmitted through a thin tissue. The continuous random variation of the dielectric constant in tissue may account for the lack of a distinct ballistic pulse. Nevertheless, the early arriving portion of the transmitted pulse was shown to carry image information. The earlier arriving photons were found to produce image of the hidden object with better quality. The intensity of the early arriving transmitted photons was found to decay exponentially with increasing tissue thickness. The earlier the photons arrive, the quicker their intensity decay. Diffusion theory was found to describe the overall transmitted pulse profiles well, but it underestimates the intensity of the early arriving photons. Compressing tissue was found not to change the key optical parameters of the tissue. The scattered laser pulse profile in

  3. Evaluation of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound exposures on metastasis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Hilary; Dreher, Matthew R.; Crawford, Nigel; Pollock, Claire B.; Shih, Jennifer; Wood, Bradford J.; Hunter, Kent; Frenkel, Victor

    2014-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) may be employed in two ways: continuous exposures for thermal ablation of tissue (>60°C), and pulsed-exposures for non-ablative effects, including low temperature hyperthermia (37–45°C), and non thermal effects (e.g. acoustic cavitation and radiation forces). Pulsed-HIFU effects may enhance the tissue's permeability for improved delivery of drugs and genes, for example, by opening up gaps between cells in the vasculature and parenchyma. Inducing these effects may improve local targeting of therapeutic agents, however; concerns exist that pulsed exposures could theoretically also facilitate dissemination of tumor cells and exacerbate metastases. In the present study, the influence of pulsed-HIFU exposures on increasing metastatic burden was evaluated in a murine model with metastatic breast cancer. A preliminary study was carried out to validate the model and determine optimal timing for treatment and growth of lung metastases. Next, the effect of pulsed-HIFU on the metastatic burden was evaluated using quantitative image processing of whole-lung histological sections. Compared to untreated controls (2/15), a greater number of mice treated with pulsed-HIFU were found to have lungs “overgrown” with metastases (7/15), where individual metastases grew together such that they could not accurately be counted. Furthermore, area fraction of lung metastases (area of metastases/area of lungs) was ~30% greater in mice treated with pulsed-HIFU; however, these differences were not statistically significant. The present study details the development of an animal model for investigating the influence of interventional techniques or exposures (such as pulsed HIFU) on metastatic burden. PMID:19517258

  4. AxBAxB… pulsed atomic layer deposition: Numerical growth model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely used for the fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices and related nanoscale structures. During ALD, large precursor doses (>1000 L per pulse) are often required to achieve surface saturation, of which only a small fraction is utilized in film growth while the rest is pumped from the system. Since the metal precursor constitutes a significant cost of ALD, strategies to enhance precursor utilization are essential for the scaling of ALD processes. In the precursor reaction step, precursor physisorption is restricted by steric hindrance (mA1) from ligands on the precursor molecules. On reaction, some of these ligands are removed as by-products resulting in chemisorbed species with reduced steric hindrance (mA1 → mA2, where mA2 < mA1) and some of the initially hindered surface reaction sites becoming accessible for further precursor physisorption. To utilize these additional reaction sites, we propose a generalized AxBAxB… pulsed deposition where the total precursor dose (ΦA) is introduced as multiple x (x > 1, x ∈ I) short-pulses rather than a single pulse. A numerical first-order surface reaction kinetics growth model is presented and applied to study the effect of AxBAxB… pulsed ALD on the growth per cycle (GPC). The model calculations predict higher GPC for AxBAxB… pulsing than with ABAB… deposition. In agreement with the model predictions, with AxBAxB… pulsed deposition, the GPC was found to increase by ˜46% for ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD), ˜49% for HfO2 PEALD, and ˜8% for thermal Al2O3 ALD with respect to conventional ABAB… pulsed growth.

  5. Numerical study of a macroscopic finite pulse model of the diffusion MRI signal.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Rebecca; Nguyen, Hang Tuan; Nguyen, Dang Van; Haddar, Houssem; Coatléven, Julien; Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-11-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is an imaging modality that probes the diffusion characteristics of a sample via the application of magnetic field gradient pulses. The dMRI signal from a heterogeneous sample includes the contribution of the water proton magnetization from all spatial positions in a voxel. If the voxel can be spatially divided into different Gaussian diffusion compartments with inter-compartment exchange governed by linear kinetics, then the dMRI signal can be approximated using the macroscopic Karger model, which is a system of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs), under the assumption that the duration of the diffusion-encoding gradient pulses is short compared to the diffusion time (the narrow pulse assumption). Recently, a new macroscopic model of the dMRI signal, without the narrow pulse restriction, was derived from the Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation (PDE) using periodic homogenization techniques. When restricted to narrow pulses, this new homogenized model has the same form as the Karger model. We conduct a numerical study of the new homogenized model for voxels that are made up of periodic copies of a representative volume that contains spherical and cylindrical cells of various sizes and orientations and show that the signal predicted by the new model approaches the reference signal obtained by solving the full Bloch-Torrey PDE in O(ε(2)), where ε is the ratio between the size of the representative volume and a measure of the diffusion length. When the narrow gradient pulse assumption is not satisfied, the new homogenized model offers a much better approximation of the full PDE signal than the Karger model. Finally, preliminary results of applying the new model to a voxel that is not made up of periodic copies of a representative volume are shown and discussed.

  6. Determination of modeling parameters for power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Van Gordon, Jim A; Kovaleski, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    While the power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGRT) is used in many applications, it is not well characterized under pulsed power conditions. This makes the IGBT difficult to model for solid state pulsed power applications. The Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model is utilized to simulate IGBTs in some circuit simulation software packages. However, the seventeen parameters necessary for the Oziemkiewicz implementation must be known for the conditions under which the device will be operating. Using both experimental and simulated data with a least squares curve fitting technique, the parameters necessary to model a given IGBT can be determined. This paper presents two sets of these seventeen parameters that correspond to two different models of power IGBTs. Specifically, these parameters correspond to voltages up to 3.5 kV, currents up to 750 A, and pulse widths up to 10 {micro}s. Additionally, comparisons of the experimental and simulated data will be presented.

  7. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: New minimally invasive surgery come of age

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Huang, Ren-Xiang; Qiu, Zheng-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Although in the past two decades, laparoscopic surgery, considered as a great revolution in the minimally invasive surgery field, has undergone major development worldwide, another dramatic surgical revolution has quietly appeared in recent years. Ever since Kalloo’s first report on transgastric peritoneoscopy in a porcine model in 2004, interest in a new surgical procedure named natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has blossomed worldwide. Considering that a NOTES procedure could theoretically avoid any abdominal incision, operation-related pain and scarring, many surgeons and endoscopists have been enthusiastic in their study of this new technique. In recent years, several NOTES studies have been carried out on porcine models and even on humans, including transvaginal cholecystectomy, transgastric appendectomy, transvaginal appendectomy, and transvesical peritoneoscopy. So what is the current situation of NOTES and how many challenges do we still face? This review discusses the current research progress in NOTES. PMID:22110263

  8. Novel Totally Laparoscopic Endolumenal Rectal Resection With Transanal Natural Orifice Specimen Extraction (NOSE) Without Rectal Stump Opening: A Modification of Our Recently Published Clean Surgical Technique in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Kvasha, Anton; Hadary, Amram; Biswas, Seema; Szvalb, Sergio; Willenz, Udi; Waksman, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Our group has recently described a novel technique for clean endolumenal bowel resection, in which abdominal and transanal approaches were used. In the current study, 2 modifications of this procedure were tested for feasibility in a porcine model. A laparoscopic approach to the peritoneal cavity was employed in rectal mobilization; this was followed by a transanal rectorectal intussusception and pull-through (IPT). IPT was established in a stepwise fashion. First, the proximal margin of resection was attached to the shaft of the anvil of an end-to-end circular stapler with a ligature around the rectum. Second, this complex was pulled transanally to produce IPT. Once IPT was established, a second ligature was placed around the rectum approximating the proximal and distal resection margins. This was followed by a purse string suture through 2 bowel walls, encircling the shaft of the anvil just proximal to the ligatures. The specimen was resected and extracted by making a full-thickness incision through the 2 bowel walls distal to the previously placed purse string suture and ligatures. The anastomosis was achieved by applying the stapler. The technique was found to be feasible. Peritoneal samples, collected after transanal specimen extraction, did not demonstrate bacterial growth. Although, this is a novel and evolving procedure, its minimally invasive nature, as well as aseptic bowel manipulation during endolumenal rectal resection, has the potential to limit the complications associated with abdominal wall incision and surgical site infection.

  9. Modeling crater formation in femtosecond-pulse laser damage from basic principles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert A; Schumacher, Douglass W; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-05-15

    We present the first fundamental simulation method for the determination of crater morphology due to femtosecond-pulse laser damage. To this end we have adapted the particle-in-cell (PIC) method commonly used in plasma physics for use in the study of laser damage and developed the first implementation of a pair potential for PIC codes. We find that the PIC method is a complementary approach to modeling laser damage, bridging the gap between fully ab-initio molecular dynamics approaches and empirical models. We demonstrate our method by modeling a femtosecond-pulse laser incident on a flat copper slab for a range of intensities.

  10. Simple model for the effectiveness of PDT with pulsed-laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Heck, Ansgar; Diddens, Heyke C.

    1994-08-01

    Irradiation with pulsed lasers can change mechanisms and efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) depending on the laser pulse parameters. Since most photosensitizers have a relatively high triplet quantum yield and triplet lifetimes of tens of microseconds, even moderate power densities below 100 kW/cm2 can lead to a saturation of the singlet oxygen production, thereby reducing the PDT effect. A simple quantitative model is developed to estimate this effect. According to this, for laser pulses not longer than the triplet lifetime, the PDT efficacy depends on the product of single pulse energy, irradiation wavelength, and the extinction coefficient of the photosensitizer. Peak irradiance and pulse width have minor influence on the efficacy of pulsed irradiation, which decreases as the triplet quantum yield reaches one. The model is supported by in vitro experiments with Photosan 3 and in vivo and in vitro experiments with Photosan 3, Photofrin, aluminum sulphonated phthalocyanine (AlSPc) and benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA) reported in the literature.

  11. A quantitative model for heat pulse propagation across large helical device plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Inagaki, S.

    2015-06-01

    It is known that rapid edge cooling of magnetically confined plasmas can trigger heat pulses that propagate rapidly inward. These can result in large excursion, either positive or negative, in the electron temperature at the core. A set of particularly detailed measurements was obtained in Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas [S. Inagaki et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 52, 075002 (2010)], which are considered here. By applying a travelling wave transformation, we extend the model of Dendy et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 55, 115009 (2013), which successfully describes the local time-evolution of heat pulses in these plasmas, to include also spatial dependence. The new extended model comprises two coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the (x, t) evolution of the deviation from steady state of two independent variables: the excess electron temperature gradient and the excess heat flux, both of which are measured in the LHD experiments. The mathematical structure of the model equations implies a formula for the pulse velocity, defined in terms of plasma quantities, which aligns with empirical expectations and is within a factor of two of the measured values. We thus model spatio-temporal pulse evolution, from first principles, in a way which yields as output the spatiotemporal evolution of the electron temperature, which is also measured in detail in the experiments. We compare the model results against LHD datasets using appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Sensitivity of this nonlinear model with respect to plasma parameters, initial conditions, and boundary conditions is also investigated. We conclude that this model is able to match experimental data for the spatio-temporal evolution of the temperature profiles of these pulses, and their propagation velocities, across a broad radial range from r /a ≃0.5 to the plasma core. The model further implies that the heat pulse may be related mathematically to soliton solutions of the

  12. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  13. Mechanical bioeffects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound on a simple neural model.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Radia Abdul; Choi, Mina; Liu, Yunbo; Krauthamer, Victor; Zderic, Vesna; Myers, Matthew R

    2012-07-01

    To study how pressure pulses affect nerves through mechanisms that are neither thermal nor cavitational, and investigate how the effects are related to cumulative radiation-force impulse (CRFI). Applications include traumatic brain injury and acoustic neuromodulation. A simple neural model consisting of the giant axon of a live earthworm was exposed to trains of pressure pulses produced by an 825 kHz focused ultrasound transducer. The peak negative pressure of the pulses and duty cycle of the pulse train were controlled so that neither cavitation nor significant temperature rise occurred. The amplitude and conduction velocity of action-potentials triggered in the worm were measured as the magnitude of the pulses and number of pulses in the pulse trains were varied. The functionality of the axons decreased when sufficient pulse energy was applied. The level of CRFI at which the observed effects occur is consistent with the lower levels of injury observed in this study relative to blast tubes. The relevant CRFI values are also comparable to CRFI values in other studies showing measureable changes in action-potential amplitudes and velocities. Plotting the measured action-potential amplitudes and conduction velocities from different experiments with widely varying exposure regimens against the single parameter of CRFI yielded values that agreed within 21% in terms of amplitude and 5% in velocity. A predictive model based on the assumption that the temporal rate of decay of action-potential amplitude and velocity is linearly proportional the radiation force experienced by the axon predicted the experimental amplitudes and conduction velocities to within about 20% agreement. The functionality of axons decreased due to noncavitational mechanical effects. The radiation force, possibly by inducing changes in ion-channel permeability, appears to be a possible mechanism for explaining the observed degradation. The CRFI is also a promising parameter for quantifying neural

  14. Mechanical bioeffects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound on a simple neural model.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Radia Abdul; Choi, Mina; Liu, Yunbo; Krauthamer, Victor; Zderic, Vesna; Myers, Matthew R

    2012-07-01

    To study how pressure pulses affect nerves through mechanisms that are neither thermal nor cavitational, and investigate how the effects are related to cumulative radiation-force impulse (CRFI). Applications include traumatic brain injury and acoustic neuromodulation. A simple neural model consisting of the giant axon of a live earthworm was exposed to trains of pressure pulses produced by an 825 kHz focused ultrasound transducer. The peak negative pressure of the pulses and duty cycle of the pulse train were controlled so that neither cavitation nor significant temperature rise occurred. The amplitude and conduction velocity of action-potentials triggered in the worm were measured as the magnitude of the pulses and number of pulses in the pulse trains were varied. The functionality of the axons decreased when sufficient pulse energy was applied. The level of CRFI at which the observed effects occur is consistent with the lower levels of injury observed in this study relative to blast tubes. The relevant CRFI values are also comparable to CRFI values in other studies showing measureable changes in action-potential amplitudes and velocities. Plotting the measured action-potential amplitudes and conduction velocities from different experiments with widely varying exposure regimens against the single parameter of CRFI yielded values that agreed within 21% in terms of amplitude and 5% in velocity. A predictive model based on the assumption that the temporal rate of decay of action-potential amplitude and velocity is linearly proportional the radiation force experienced by the axon predicted the experimental amplitudes and conduction velocities to within about 20% agreement. The functionality of axons decreased due to noncavitational mechanical effects. The radiation force, possibly by inducing changes in ion-channel permeability, appears to be a possible mechanism for explaining the observed degradation. The CRFI is also a promising parameter for quantifying neural

  15. Simulation of the electrically stimulated cochlear neuron: modeling adaptation to trains of electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jihwan; Miller, Charles A; Abbas, Paul J

    2009-05-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model does not simulate the significant changes in auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses to sustained stimulation that are associated with neural adaptation. Given that the electric stimuli used by cochlear prostheses can result in adapted responses, a computational model incorporating an adaptation process is warranted if such models are to remain relevant and contribute to related research efforts. In this paper, we describe the development of a modified HH single-node model that includes potassium ion ( K(+)) concentration changes in response to each action potential. This activity-related change results in an altered resting potential, and hence, excitability. Our implementation of K(+)-related changes uses a phenomenological approach based upon K(+) accumulation and dissipation time constants. Modeled spike times were computed using repeated presentations of modeled pulse-train stimuli. Spike-rate adaptation was characterized by rate decrements and time constants and compared against ANF data from animal experiments. Responses to relatively low (250 pulse/s) and high rate (5000 pulse/s) trains were evaluated and the novel adaptation model results were compared against model results obtained without the adaptation mechanism. In addition to spike-rate changes, jitter and spike intervals were evaluated and found to change with the addition of modeled adaptation. These results provide one means of incorporating a heretofore neglected (although important) aspect of ANF responses to electric stimuli. Future studies could include evaluation of alternative versions of the adaptation model elements and broadening the model to simulate a complete axon, and eventually, a spatially realistic model of the electrically stimulated nerve within extracochlear tissues.

  16. Microdosimetric study for nanosecond pulsed electric fields on a cell circuit model with nucleus.

    PubMed

    Denzi, Agnese; Merla, Caterina; Camilleri, Paola; Paffi, Alessandra; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2013-10-01

    Recently, scientific interest in electric pulses, always more intense and shorter and able to induce biological effects on both plasma and nuclear membranes, has greatly increased. Hence, microdosimetric models that include internal organelles like the nucleus have assumed increasing importance. In this work, a circuit model of the cell including the nucleus is proposed, which accounts for the dielectric dispersion of all cell compartments. The setup of the dielectric model of the nucleus is of fundamental importance in determining the transmembrane potential (TMP) induced on the nuclear membrane; here, this is demonstrated by comparing results for three different sets of nuclear dielectric properties present in the literature. The results have been compared, even including or disregarding the dielectric dispersion of the nucleus. The main differences have been found when using pulses shorter than 10 ns. This is due to the fact that the high spectral components of the shortest pulses are differently taken into account by the nuclear membrane transfer functions computed with and without nuclear dielectric dispersion. The shortest pulses are also the most effective in porating the intracellular structures, as confirmed by the time courses of the TMP calculated across the plasma and nuclear membranes. We show how dispersive nucleus models are unavoidable when dealing with pulses shorter than 10 ns because of the large spectral contents arriving above 100 MHz, i.e., over the typical relaxation frequencies of the dipolar mechanism of the molecules constituting the nuclear membrane and the subcellular cell compartments.

  17. A residue-based toxicokinetic model for pulse-exposure toxicity in aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; McCarty, L.S.; Dixon, D.G.

    1995-12-01

    This pulse-exposure model (PULSETOX) is based on the simple one-compartment first-order kinetics (1CFOK) equation. It tracks the accumulation of waterborne organic chemicals by fish and predicts acute toxicity by means of previously established relationships between whole-body residues and lethality. The predictive capabilities of the model were tested with a data set of 27 acute pulse-exposure lethality tests with larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP). Tests included eight single exposures (2 to 96 h) and 19 multiple exposures, which varied in the number (2 to 15) and duration (2 to 24 h) of pulses, and time interval between pulses (6 to 24 h). Experimental work included determination of 1CFOK kinetics parameters from [{sup 14}C]PCP uptake and clearance, and from time-toxicity curves. Lethality was expected in any exposure regime where the fish reaches or exceeds the critical body residue (CBR) of 0.30 mmol PCP/kg fish (SD, {+-} 0.02; n = 11). Using the CBR endpoint, the model accounted for between 90 and 93% of variability in the observed lethality data, depending on the toxicokinetic parameters employed. Predictive power of the model was optimized by using kinetics parameters derived from the toxicity curve for pulse-toxicity tests as shown by the regression: predicted LC50 = 1.04 {center_dot} (observed LC50) + 0.01 (p < 0.001, r{sup 2} = 0.94, n = 27).

  18. A distributed parameter model of transmission line transformer for high voltage nanosecond pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtao; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Longjie; He, Jiaxin; Li, Chenjie; Wang, Yifeng; Su, Can

    2017-09-01

    A transmission line transformer has potential advantages for nanosecond pulse generation including excellent frequency response and no leakage inductance. The wave propagation process in a secondary mode line is indispensable due to an obvious inside transient electromagnetic transition in this scenario. The equivalent model of the transmission line transformer is crucial for predicting the output waveform and evaluating the effects of magnetic cores on output performance. However, traditional lumped parameter models are not sufficient for nanosecond pulse generation due to the natural neglect of wave propagations in secondary mode lines based on a lumped parameter assumption. In this paper, a distributed parameter model of transmission line transformer was established to investigate wave propagation in the secondary mode line and its influential factors through theoretical analysis and experimental verification. The wave propagation discontinuity in the secondary mode line induced by magnetic cores is emphasized. Characteristics of the magnetic core under a nanosecond pulse were obtained by experiments. Distribution and formation of the secondary mode current were determined for revealing essential wave propagation processes in secondary mode lines. The output waveform and efficiency were found to be affected dramatically by wave propagation discontinuity in secondary mode lines induced by magnetic cores. The proposed distributed parameter model was proved more suitable for nanosecond pulse generation in aspects of secondary mode current, output efficiency, and output waveform. In depth, comprehension of underlying mechanisms and a broader view of the working principle of the transmission line transformer for nanosecond pulse generation can be obtained through this research.

  19. Modeling and analysis of the HPM pulse-width upset effect on CMOS inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinhai, Yu; Changchun, Chai; Liping, Qiao; Yintang, Yang; Yang, Liu; Xiaowen, Xi

    2015-05-01

    We derive analytical models of the excess carrier density distribution and the HPM (high-power microwave) upset susceptibility with dependence of pulse-width, which are validated by the simulated results and experimental data. Mechanism analysis and model derivation verify that the excess carriers dominate the current amplification process of the latch-up. Our results reveal that the excess carrier density distribution in P-substrate behaves as pulse-width dependence. The HPM upset voltage threshold Vp decreases with the incremental pulse-width, while there is an inflection point which is caused because the excess carrier accumulation in the P-substrate will be suppressed over time. For the first time, the physical essence of the HPM pulse-width upset effect is proposed to be the excess carrier accumulation effect. Validation concludes that the Vp model is capable of giving a reliable and accurate prediction to the HPM upset susceptibility of a CMOS inverter, which simultaneously considers technology information, ambient temperature, and layout parameters. From the model, the layout parameter LB has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the pulse-width upset effect: a CMOS inverter with minor LB is more susceptible to HPM, which enables us to put forward hardening measures for inverters that are immune from the HPM upset. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 60776034) and the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2014CB339900).

  20. Modeling for V—O2 reactive sputtering process using a pulsed power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yu, He; Dong, Xiang; Jiang, Ya-Dong; Chen, Chao; Wu, Ro-Land

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we present a time-dependent model that enables us to describe the dynamic behavior of pulsed DC reactive sputtering and predict the film compositions of VOx prepared by this process. In this modeling, the average current J is replaced by a new parameter of Jeff. Meanwhile, the four species states of V, V2O3, VO2, and V2O5 in the vanadium oxide films are taken into consideration. Based on this work, the influences of the oxygen gas supply and the pulsed power parameters including the duty cycle and frequency on film compositions are discussed. The model suggests that the time to reach process equilibrium may vary substantially depending on these parameters. It is also indicated that the compositions of VOx films are quite sensitive to both the reactive gas supply and the duty cycle when the power supply works in pulse mode. The ‘steady-state’ balance values obtained by these simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental data, which indicates that the experimentally obtained dynamic behavior of the film composition can be explained by this time-dependent modeling for pulsed DC reactive sputtering process. Moreover, the computer simulation results indicate that the curves will essentially yield oscillations around the average value of the film compositions with lower pulse frequency.

  1. Study of coherent clutter model for airborne pulse-Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingyu; Guan, Yifu

    2017-08-01

    This paper gives an efficient coherent clutter model for airborne pulse-Doppler radar in arbitrary posture. The ground is separated by range rings and angle units instead of range rings with Doppler units so as to reduce the computation cost. The MATLAB simulation gives the range-Doppler map of the clutter and the result proves the effectiveness of the clutter model.

  2. Flow Coefficients for Orifices in Base of Transpiration-Cooled Turbine Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L.; Prasse, Ernst I.

    1953-01-01

    Static tests on a segment of a transpiration-cooled turbine rotor blade with a wire-cloth shell were conducted to determine the flow coefficients associated with some representative metering orifices. Average flow coefficients from 0.96 to 0.79 were obtained for orifices of 0.031 to 0.102 inch diameter.

  3. Effect of slotted exit orifice on performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Haohua; Kotsonis, Marios

    2017-03-01

    This study experimentally investigates the influence of exit orifice shape on the performance characteristics of a three-electrode plasma synthetic jet actuator. High-speed Schlieren imaging system and phase-locked two-component PIV measurements are used for flowfield characterisation in quiescent conditions. Two actuator configurations with the same exit area but different exit orifice shape (round orifice and slot orifice) are studied. Results indicate a close correspondence between the shapes of the starting vortex ring with the shapes of the respective exit orifices. For the slot orifice, the elongated starting vortex ring gradually expands during propagation, while its ends become warped. A distinct K-H instability structure is observed, inducing continuous oscillation of the high-speed jet. Compared with the jet from the round orifice, the slot jet has a higher entrainment rate of surrounding air, thus resulting in a lower propagation velocity of the jet front. The exit velocity of PSJA within one period initially shows a rapid increase, then persists at a relatively high level (100-130 m/s), and finally drops with some small-scale oscillations. The oscillation amplitude is less than 10 m/s, and the oscillation period is approximately 600 µs. Under conditions of same exit area, orifice shape has little influence on the variation of the exit velocity.

  4. Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (orifice meter studies). Volume 2B. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Godkin, B.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Wlasenko, R.G.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. Activities and methods are described and results are presented for research conducted on orifice meter accuracy. The Measurement Task Force determined that orifice metering inaccuracies were the largest single contributor to 1987 UAF.

  5. Identification of whistling ability of a single hole orifice from an incompressible flow simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, Romain; Moussou, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Pure tone noise from orifices in pipe result from vortex shedding with lock-in. Acoustic amplification at the orifice is coupled to resonant condition to create self-sustained oscillations. One key feature of this phenomenon is hence the ability of an orifice to amplify acoustic waves in a given range of frequencies. Here a numerical investigation of the linear response of an orifice is undertaken, with the support of experimental data for validation. The study deals with a sharp edge orifice. Its diameter equals to 0.015 m and its thickness to 0.005 m. The pipe diameter is 0.030 m. An air flow with a Mach number 0.026 and a Reynolds number 18000 in the main pipe is present. At such a low Mach number; the fluid behavior can reasonably be described as locally incompressible. The incompressible Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations are solved with the help of a finite volume fluid mechanics software. The orifice is submitted to an average flow velocity, with superimposed small harmonic perturbations. The harmonic response of the orifice is the difference between the upstream and downstream pressures, and a straightforward calculation brings out the acoustic impedance of the orifice. Comparison with experiments shows that the main physical features of the whistling phenomenon are reasonably reproduced. (authors)

  6. Significance of gauge line error in orifice measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, J.W.

    1995-12-01

    Pulsation induced gauge line amplification can cause errors in the recorded differential signal used to calculate flow. Its presence may be detected using dual transmitters (one connected at the orifice taps, the other at the end of the gauge lines) and comparing the relative peak to peak amplitudes. Its affect on recorded differential may be determined by averaging both signals with a PC based data acquisition and analysis system. Remedial action is recommended in all cases where amplification is detected. Use of close connect, full opening manifolds, is suggested to decouple the gauge lines` resonant frequency from that of the excitation`s, by positioning the recording device as close to the process signal`s origin as possible.

  7. Natural Orifice Surgery: Transdouglas Surgery—a New Concept

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: During the 20th century, laparoscopic procedures replaced most traditional abdominal operations and achieved high-quality standards. It seemed that the optimal surgical method had been achieved; however, a new concept, which might possibly become even safer and simpler is now being developed, the concept of Natural Orifice Surgery (NOS). The existing natural openings of the body started to be used for introduction of surgical instruments for diagnostic purposes and surgical procedures, avoiding penetrating the abdominal wall. Parallel to the American Natural Orifice Surgery Consortium for Assessment and Research (NOSCAR) group, is the New European Surgical Academy (NESA) established in Berlin on June 23, 2006. It is the first European-based NOS working group with participation of scientists and surgeons from different disciplines and countries. After the published experimental achievements had been presented and discussed, the working group decided to concentrate mainly on the transvaginal/transdouglas access in women. Database: A new surgical instrument, the Transdouglas Endoscopic Device (TED) has been designed. This is a flexible multichannel instrument enabling single-entry surgical, urological, and gynecological operations. TED respects the anatomy of the pelvis. To get to the upper abdomen, an S-shaped device was designed, bending first to the front, and then backwards. For the lower abdomen, the U-shaped mode of the instrument was designed. The wide diameter of the device (35 mm) and its multichannel design enables simultaneous use of different instruments, therefore avoiding hybrid procedures. Various surgical and gynecological procedures have been successfully simulated, and the manufacturing of the device is in progress. Preclinical studies will start soon. Conclusions: Transvaginal/transdouglas surgery is expected to be a valid alternative to traditional endoscopic procedures in women. It seems that NOS will create a spectrum of innovative

  8. The Effect of Ionospheric Models on Electromagnetic Pulse Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Triplett, Laurie A.

    2014-07-01

    Locations of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) determined by time-of-arrival (TOA) often have outliers with significantly larger errors than expected. In the past, these errors were thought to arise from high order terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation. We simulated 1000 events randomly spread around the Earth into a constellation of 22 GPS satellites. We used four different ionospheres: “simple” where the time delay goes as the inverse of the frequency-squared, “full Appleton-Hartree”, the “BobRD integrals” and a full raytracing code. The simple and full Appleton-Hartree ionospheres do not show outliers whereas the BobRD and raytracing do. This strongly suggests that the cause of the outliers is not additional terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation, but rather is due to the additional path length due to refraction. A method to fix the outliers is suggested based on fitting a time to the delays calculated at the 5 GPS frequencies with BobRD and simple ionospheres. The difference in time is used as a correction to the TOAs.

  9. Modeling the network dynamics of pulse-coupled neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sarthak; Hathcock, David; Crain, Kimberly; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Girvan, Michelle; Ott, Edward

    2017-03-01

    We derive a mean-field approximation for the macroscopic dynamics of large networks of pulse-coupled theta neurons in order to study the effects of different network degree distributions and degree correlations (assortativity). Using the ansatz of Ott and Antonsen [Chaos 18, 037113 (2008)], we obtain a reduced system of ordinary differential equations describing the mean-field dynamics, with significantly lower dimensionality compared with the complete set of dynamical equations for the system. We find that, for sufficiently large networks and degrees, the dynamical behavior of the reduced system agrees well with that of the full network. This dimensional reduction allows for an efficient characterization of system phase transitions and attractors. For networks with tightly peaked degree distributions, the macroscopic behavior closely resembles that of fully connected networks previously studied by others. In contrast, networks with highly skewed degree distributions exhibit different macroscopic dynamics due to the emergence of degree dependent behavior of different oscillators. For nonassortative networks (i.e., networks without degree correlations), we observe the presence of a synchronously firing phase that can be suppressed by the presence of either assortativity or disassortativity in the network. We show that the results derived here can be used to analyze the effects of network topology on macroscopic behavior in neuronal networks in a computationally efficient fashion.

  10. Efficiently parallelized modeling of tightly focused, large bandwidth laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Joey; Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Lefebvre, Catherine; Gagnon, Denis; MacLean, Steve

    2017-02-01

    The Stratton–Chu integral representation of electromagnetic fields is used to study the spatio-temporal properties of large bandwidth laser pulses focused by high numerical aperture mirrors. We review the formal aspects of the derivation of diffraction integrals from the Stratton–Chu representation and discuss the use of the Hadamard finite part in the derivation of the physical optics approximation. By analyzing the formulation we show that, for the specific case of a parabolic mirror, the integrands involved in the description of the reflected field near the focal spot do not possess the strong oscillations characteristic of diffraction integrals. Consequently, the integrals can be evaluated with simple and efficient quadrature methods rather than with specialized, more costly approaches. We report on the development of an efficiently parallelized algorithm that evaluates the Stratton–Chu diffraction integrals for incident fields of arbitrary temporal and spatial dependence. This method has the advantage that its input is the unfocused field coming from the laser chain, which is experimentally known with high accuracy. We use our method to show that the reflection of a linearly polarized Gaussian beam of femtosecond duration off a high numerical aperture parabolic mirror induces ellipticity in the dominant field components and generates strong longitudinal components. We also estimate that future high-power laser facilities may reach intensities of {10}24 {{W}} {{cm}}-2.

  11. Application of Multi-Stage Orifices in Letdown System- Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun Kee; Kim, Chang Ho; Park, Jong Seob; Chung, Chang Kyu; Ro, Tae Sun; Park, Boo Sung

    2002-07-01

    Cavitation, vibration and severe noise in multi-stage orifice assemblies of the letdown system have been experienced during plant startup tests. Test results were reviewed and evaluated to investigate root causes for the problems. Root causes identified are design deficiencies and inadequate shop testing including improper test conditions and corrections. If conventional design criteria for single-stage orifice are applied directly to the design of multi-stage orifice assembly, unexpected problems might occur in the field. Discharge coefficients of multi-stage orifice showed to be significantly affected by Reynolds number, while empirical discharge coefficients of single-stage orifice were reported to be almost constant in turbulent regime. Some design considerations are recommended to avoid similar problems. (authors)

  12. Three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the pulsed-power Z-pinch accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Madrid, E. A.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Savage, M. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Nash, T. J.; Sceiford, M. E.; Struve, K. W.; Corcoran, P. A.; Whitney, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional, fully electromagnetic model of the principal pulsed-power components of the 26-MA ZR accelerator [D. H. McDaniel , in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches (AIP, New York, 2002), p. 23] has been developed. This large-scale simulation model tracks the evolution of electromagnetic waves through the accelerator’s intermediate-storage capacitors, laser-triggered gas switches, pulse-forming lines, water switches, triplate transmission lines, and water convolute to the vacuum insulator stack. The insulator-stack electrodes are coupled to a transmission-line circuit model of the four-level magnetically insulated vacuum-transmission-line section and double-post-hole convolute. The vacuum-section circuit model is terminated by a one-dimensional self-consistent dynamic model of an imploding z-pinch load. The simulation results are compared with electrical measurements made throughout the ZR accelerator, and are in good agreement with the data, especially for times until peak load power. This modeling effort demonstrates that 3D electromagnetic models of large-scale, multiple-module, pulsed-power accelerators are now computationally tractable. This, in turn, presents new opportunities for simulating the operation of existing pulsed-power systems used in a variety of high-energy-density-physics and radiographic applications, as well as even higher-power next-generation accelerators before they are constructed.

  13. Modeling a Conventional Electroporation Pulse Train: Decreased Pore Number, Cumulative Calcium Transport and an Example of Electrosensitization.

    PubMed

    Son, Reuben S; Gowrishankar, Thiruvallur R; Smith, Kyle C; Weaver, James C

    2016-03-01

    Pulse trains are widely used in electroporation (EP) for both general biomedical research and clinical applications such as nonthermal tumor ablation. Here we use a computational method based on a meshed transport network to investigate a cell system model's response to a train of identical, evenly spaced electric field pulses. We obtain an unexpected result: the number of membrane pores decreases during the application of twenty 1.0 kV/cm, 100 μs pulses, delivered at 1 Hz. This pulse train initially creates 13,000 membrane pores, but pore number decreases by a factor of 15 to about 830 pores throughout subsequent pulses. We conclude that pore number can greatly diminish during a train of identical pulses, with direct consequences for the transport of solutes across an electroporated membrane. Although application of additional pulses is generally intended to increase the effects of EP, we show that these pulses do not significantly enhance calcium delivery into the cell. Instead, calcium delivery can be significantly increased by varying inter-pulse intervals. We show that inserting a 300-s interruption midway in a widely used eight-pulse train (a protocol for electrosensitization) yields a ∼ twofold delivery increase. Overall, our modeling shows support for electrosensitization, in which multiple pulse protocols that maximize pore number over time can yield significant increase of transport of calcium compared to standard pulse trains.

  14. Numerical modeling of ozone production in a pulsed homogeneous discharge: A parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, J.O.; Eninger, J.E.

    1997-02-01

    The pulsed volume discharge is an alternative for the efficient generation of ozone in compact systems. This paper presents a parameter study of the reactions in this kind of homogeneous discharge by using a numerical model which solves plasma chemical kinetic rate and energy equations. Results are presented of ozone generation efficiency versus ozone concentration for different parameter combinations. Two parameter regimes are identified and analyzed. In the plasma phase ozone formation regime, where significant amounts of ozone are produced during the discharge pulse, it is found that higher ozone concentrations can be obtained than in the neutral phase ozone formation regime, where most of the ozone is formed after the discharge pulse. In the two-step ozone formation process, the rate of conversion of atomic oxygen plays a key role. In both regimes the ozone generation efficiency increases as n is increased or T{sub 0} decreased. The maximum concentration is 3% at 10 amagat and 100 K. The results on ozone accumulation in multiple pulse discharges are presented. In contrast to the single pulse case, higher efficiency is achieved at lower gas density. This scaling can be explained by losses due to ion currents. A tradeoff can be made between ozone generation efficiency and the number of pulses required to reach a certain concentration.

  15. From regional pulse vaccination to global disease eradication: insights from a mathematical model of poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Cameron J; Smith, Robert J; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-07-01

    Mass-vaccination campaigns are an important strategy in the global fight against poliomyelitis and measles. The large-scale logistics required for these mass immunisation campaigns magnifies the need for research into the effectiveness and optimal deployment of pulse vaccination. In order to better understand this control strategy, we propose a mathematical model accounting for the disease dynamics in connected regions, incorporating seasonality, environmental reservoirs and independent periodic pulse vaccination schedules in each region. The effective reproduction number, Re, is defined and proved to be a global threshold for persistence of the disease. Analytical and numerical calculations show the importance of synchronising the pulse vaccinations in connected regions and the timing of the pulses with respect to the pathogen circulation seasonality. Our results indicate that it may be crucial for mass-vaccination programs, such as national immunisation days, to be synchronised across different regions. In addition, simulations show that a migration imbalance can increase Re and alter how pulse vaccination should be optimally distributed among the patches, similar to results found with constant-rate vaccination. Furthermore, contrary to the case of constant-rate vaccination, the fraction of environmental transmission affects the value of Re when pulse vaccination is present.

  16. Numerical simulation of Trichel pulses of negative DC corona discharge based on a plasma chemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyue; Lan, Lei; Lu, Hailiang; Wang, Yu; Wen, Xishan; Du, Xinyu; He, Wangling

    2017-10-01

    A numerical simulation method of negative direct current (DC) corona discharge based on a plasma chemical model is presented, and a coaxial cylindrical gap is adopted. There were 15 particle species and 61 kinds of collision reactions electrons involved, and 22 kinds of reactions between ions are considered in plasma chemical reactions. Based on this method, continuous Trichel pulses are calculated on about a 100 us timescale, and microcosmic physicochemical process of negative DC corona discharge in three different periods is discussed. The obtained results show that the amplitude of Trichel pulses is between 1–2 mA, and that pulse interval is in the order of 10‑5 s. The positive ions produced by avalanche ionization enhanced the electric field near the cathode at the beginning of the pulse, then disappeared from the surface of cathode. The electric field decreases and the pulse ceases to develop. The negative ions produced by attachment slowly move away from the cathode, and the electric field increases gradually until the next pulse begins to develop. The positive and negative ions with the highest density during the corona discharge process are O4+ and O3- , respectively.

  17. A Gaussian Model-Based Probabilistic Approach for Pulse Transit Time Estimation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new probabilistic approach to pulse transit time (PTT) estimation using a Gaussian distribution model. It is motivated basically by the hypothesis that PTTs normalized by RR intervals follow the Gaussian distribution. To verify the hypothesis, we demonstrate the effects of arterial compliance on the normalized PTTs using the Moens-Korteweg equation. Furthermore, we observe a Gaussian distribution of the normalized PTTs on real data. In order to estimate the PTT using the hypothesis, we first assumed that R-waves in the electrocardiogram (ECG) can be correctly identified. The R-waves limit searching ranges to detect pulse peaks in the photoplethysmogram (PPG) and to synchronize the results with cardiac beats--i.e., the peaks of the PPG are extracted within the corresponding RR interval of the ECG as pulse peak candidates. Their probabilities of being the actual pulse peak are then calculated using a Gaussian probability function. The parameters of the Gaussian function are automatically updated when a new pulse peak is identified. This update makes the probability function adaptive to variations of cardiac cycles. Finally, the pulse peak is identified as the candidate with the highest probability. The proposed approach is tested on a database where ECG and PPG waveforms are collected simultaneously during the submaximal bicycle ergometer exercise test. The results are promising, suggesting that the method provides a simple but more accurate PTT estimation in real applications.

  18. Architecture and statistical model of a pulse-mode digital multilayer neural network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Shanblatt, M A

    1995-01-01

    A new architecture and a statistical model for a pulse-mode digital multilayer neural network (DMNN) are presented. Algebraic neural operations are replaced by stochastic processes using pseudo-random pulse sequences. Synaptic weights and neuron states are represented as probabilities and estimated as average rates of pulse occurrences in corresponding pulse sequences. A statistical model of error (or noise) is developed to estimate relative accuracy associated with stochastic computing in terms of mean and variance. The stochastic computing technique is implemented with simple logic gates as basic computing elements leading to a high neuron-density on a chip. Furthermore, the use of simple logic gates for neural operations, the pulse-mode signal representation, and the modular design techniques lead to a massively parallel yet compact and flexible network architecture, well suited for VLSI implementation. Any size of a feedforward network can be configured where processing speed is independent of the network size. Multilayer feedforward networks are modeled and applied to pattern classification problems such as encoding and character recognition.

  19. Stellar acoustics. I - Adiabatic pulse propagation and modal resonance in polytropic models of bump Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, C. A.

    1983-11-01

    An understanding of the Hertzsprung progression among bump Cepheids is sought in a dualistic viewpoint which combines the idea of propagating pulse echoes with that of modal resonance. Attention is focused on the spherically symmetric pulses that can be regenerated once per cycle if their round trip propagation time equals the period of the overall pulsation. The acoustic properties of polytropic models reveal that the conditions for such reinforcement are likely to be met in models for which the periods of the fundamental and the second overtone pulsation are in the ratio 2:1. Systematic departures from precise resonance may be responsible for the Hertzsprung progression.

  20. Dynamical percolation transition in the Ising model studied using a pulsed magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soumyajyoti; Kundu, Anasuya; Chandra, Anjan Kumar

    2011-02-01

    We study the dynamical percolation transition of the geometrical clusters in the two-dimensional Ising model when it is subjected to a pulsed field below the critical temperature. The critical exponents are independent of the temperature and pulse width and are different from the (static) percolation transition associated with the thermal transition. For a different model that belongs to the Ising universality class, the exponents are found to be same, confirming that the behavior is a common feature of the Ising class. These observations, along with a universal critical Binder cumulant value, characterize the dynamical percolation of the Ising universality class.

  1. Computation of Transverse Injection Into Supersonic Crossflow With Various Injector Orifice Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lancert; Engblom, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Computational results are presented for the performance and flow behavior of various injector geometries employed in transverse injection into a non-reacting Mach 1.2 flow. 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) results are obtained for the various injector geometries using the Wind code with the Mentor s Shear Stress Transport turbulence model in both single and multi-species modes. Computed results for the injector mixing, penetration, and induced wall forces are presented. In the case of rectangular injectors, those longer in the direction of the freestream flow are predicted to generate the most mixing and penetration of the injector flow into the primary stream. These injectors are also predicted to provide the largest discharge coefficients and induced wall forces. Minor performance differences are indicated among diamond, circle, and square orifices. Grid sensitivity study results are presented which indicate consistent qualitative trends in the injector performance comparisons with increasing grid fineness.

  2. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  3. Theory and Modeling of Petawatt Laser Pulse Propagation in Low Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, Bradley A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.

    2016-12-08

    Report describing accomplishments in all-optical control of self-injection in laser-plasma accelerators and in developing advanced numerical models of laser-plasma interactions. All-optical approaches to controlling electron self-injection and beam formation in laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) were explored. It was demonstrated that control over the laser pulse evolution is the key ingredient in the generation of low-background, low-phase-space-volume electron beams. To this end, preserving a smooth laser pulse envelope throughout the acceleration process can be achieved through tuning the phase and amplitude of the incident pulse. A negative frequency chirp compensates the frequency red-shift accumulated due to wake excitation, preventing evolution of the pulse into a relativistic optical shock. This reduces the ponderomotive force exerted on quiescent plasma electrons, suppressing expansion of the bubble and continuous injection of background electrons, thereby reducing the charge in the low-energy tail by an order of magnitude. Slowly raising the density in the pulse propagation direction locks electrons in the accelerating phase, boosting their energy, keeping continuous injection at a low level, tripling the brightness of the quasi-monoenergetic component. Additionally, propagating the negatively chirped pulse in a plasma channel suppresses diffraction of the pulse leading edge, further reducing continuous injection. As a side effect, oscillations of the pulse tail may be enhanced, leading to production of low-background, polychromatic electron beams. Such beams, consisting of quasi-monoenergetic components with controllable energy and energy separation, may be useful as drivers of polychromatic x-rays based on Thomson backscattering. These all-optical methods of electron beam quality control are critically important for the development of future compact, high-repetition-rate, GeV-scale LPA using 10 TW-class, ultra-high bandwidth pulses and mm-scale, dense

  4. Modelling K shell spectra from short pulse heated buried microdot targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarty, D. J.; Sircombe, N.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.; Morton, J.; Hill, E.; Jeffery, M.; Harris, J. W. O.; Shepherd, R.; Marley, E.; Magee, E.; Emig, J.; Nilsen, J.; Chung, H. K.; Lee, R. W.; Rose, S. J.

    2017-06-01

    K shell X-ray emission measurements have been used to diagnose plasma conditions in short-pulse heated buried microdot targets on the Orion high power laser. These experiments have been used to validate simulations of short pulse laser-solid interaction that combine hybrid PIC modelling of the laser absorption with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations including an electron transport model. Comparison of these simulations with streaked K shell spectroscopy show the importance of including radial gradients in fitting the spectra. An example is presented of the emission of sulphur from a 50 μm diameter microdot sample buried in a plastic foil. Previously agreement between simulation and experiment was obtained only by treating the absorbed energy, electron temperature and beam divergence as fitting parameters. The good agreement obtained in this work used the measured laser energy and laser pulse length and calculated the laser-solid target interaction from first principles.

  5. Analysis of an SIR Epidemic Model with Pulse Vaccination and Distributed Time Delay

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shujing; Teng, Zhidong; Nieto, Juan J.; Torres, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Pulse vaccination, the repeated application of vaccine over a defined age range, is gaining prominence as an effective strategy for the elimination of infectious diseases. An SIR epidemic model with pulse vaccination and distributed time delay is proposed in this paper. Using the discrete dynamical system determined by the stroboscopic map, we obtain the exact infection-free periodic solution of the impulsive epidemic system and prove that the infection-free periodic solution is globally attractive if the vaccination rate is larger enough. Moreover, we show that the disease is uniformly persistent if the vaccination rate is less than some critical value. The permanence of the model is investigated analytically. Our results indicate that a large pulse vaccination rate is sufficient for the eradication of the disease. PMID:18322563

  6. Modeling the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA): an algorithm for quasi-static field solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Briggs, R J; Grote, D P; Henestroza, E; Waldron, W L

    2007-06-18

    The Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA) is a helical distributed transmission line. A rising pulse applied to the upstream end appears as a moving spatial voltage ramp, on which an ion pulse can be accelerated. This is a promising approach to acceleration and longitudinal compression of an ion beam at high line charge density. In most of the studies carried out to date, using both a simple code for longitudinal beam dynamics and the Warp PIC code, a circuit model for the wave behavior was employed; in Warp, the helix I and V are source terms in elliptic equations for E and B. However, it appears possible to obtain improved fidelity using a ''sheath helix'' model in the quasi-static limit. Here we describe an algorithmic approach that may be used to effect such a solution.

  7. MODELING NANOCRYSTALLINE GRAIN GROWTH DURING THE PULSED ELECTRODEPOSITION OF GOLD-COPPER

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F

    2005-10-27

    The process parameters of current density, pulse duration, and cell potential affect both the structure and composition of electrodeposits. The mechanism for nucleation and growth as determined from current transients yield relationships for nucleus density and nucleation rate. To develop an understanding of the role of the process parameters on grain size, as a design structural parameter to control strength for example, a formulation is presented to model the affects of the deposition energy on grain size and morphology. An activation energy for the deposition process is modeled that reveals different growth mechanisms, wherein nucleation and diffusion effects are each dominant as dependent upon pulse duration. A diffusion coefficient common for each of the pulsed growth modes demarcates an observed transition in growth from smooth to rough surfaces.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Laser swelling model for polymers irradiated by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, A. Yu; Bityurin, N. M.

    2005-09-01

    Mechanisms of laser swelling of polymers are considered. A theoretical model for one of such mechanisms is constructed and investigated. This mechanism is based on the formation of a thermoelastic wave upon absorption of a laser pulse. Tensile stresses in this wave lead to elastic and plastic deformation of a polymer in the heated region and to the formation of convex structures (humps). The threshold energy density of a laser pulse required for the production of a residual hump under laser irradiation is obtained analytically. A formula for the height of this hump is also derived. The model explains the earlier experimental data from the literature on swelling of a PMMA film irradiated by UV pulses.

  9. Scintillation event energy measurement via a pulse model based iterative deconvolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhenzhou; Xie, Qingguo; Duan, Zhiwen; Xiao, Peng

    2013-11-01

    This work focuses on event energy measurement, a crucial task of scintillation detection systems. We modeled the scintillation detector as a linear system and treated the energy measurement as a deconvolution problem. We proposed a pulse model based iterative deconvolution (PMID) method, which can process pileup events without detection and is adaptive for different signal pulse shapes. The proposed method was compared with digital gated integrator (DGI) and digital delay-line clipping (DDLC) using real world experimental data. For singles data, the energy resolution (ER) produced by PMID matched that of DGI. For pileups, the PMID method outperformed both DGI and DDLC in ER and counts recovery. The encouraging results suggest that the PMID method has great potentials in applications like photon-counting systems and pulse height spectrometers, in which multiple-event pileups are common.

  10. Comparison of pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields for the decontamination of water containing Legionella pneumophila as model organism.

    PubMed

    Banaschik, Robert; Burchhardt, Gerhard; Zocher, Katja; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Kolb, Juergen F; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-01

    Pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields were assessed for their capacity to kill Legionella pneumophila in water. Electrical parameters such as in particular dissipated energy were equal for both treatments. This was accomplished by changing the polarity of the applied high voltage pulses in a coaxial electrode geometry resulting in the generation of corona plasma or an electric field. For corona plasma, generated by high voltage pulses with peak voltages of +80kV, Legionella were completely killed, corresponding to a log-reduction of 5.4 (CFU/ml) after a treatment time of 12.5min. For the application of pulsed electric fields from peak voltages of -80kV a survival of log 2.54 (CFU/ml) was still detectable after this treatment time. Scanning electron microscopy images of L. pneumophila showed rupture of cells after plasma treatment. In contrast, the morphology of bacteria seems to be intact after application of pulsed electric fields. The more efficient killing for the same energy input observed for pulsed corona plasma is likely due to induced chemical processes and the generation of reactive species as indicated by the evolution of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that the higher efficacy and efficiency of pulsed corona plasma is primarily associated with the combined effect of the applied electric fields and the promoted reaction chemistry.

  11. Model for a pulsed terahertz quantum cascade laser under optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Gary; Grier, Andrew; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Ikonić, Zoran; Valavanis, Alexander; Dean, Paul; Cooper, Jonathan; Khanna, Suraj P; Lachab, Mohammad; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Harrison, Paul; Indjin, Dragan; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2016-09-05

    Optical feedback effects in lasers may be useful or problematic, depending on the type of application. When semiconductor lasers are operated using pulsed-mode excitation, their behavior under optical feedback depends on the electronic and thermal characteristics of the laser, as well as the nature of the external cavity. Predicting the behavior of a laser under both optical feedback and pulsed operation therefore requires a detailed model that includes laser-specific thermal and electronic characteristics. In this paper we introduce such a model for an exemplar bound-to-continuum terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL), illustrating its use in a selection of pulsed operation scenarios. Our results demonstrate significant interplay between electro-optical, thermal, and feedback phenomena, and that this interplay is key to understanding QCL behavior in pulsed applications. Further, our results suggest that for many types of QCL in interferometric applications, thermal modulation via low duty cycle pulsed operation would be an alternative to commonly used adiabatic modulation.

  12. Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of chromium: experimental results and two-temperature model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghebfar, M.; Tehrani, M. K.; Darbani, S. M. R.; Majd, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the results of experimental and computational single- and multi-shot ablation threshold and the incubation effect of chromium metal sample, irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses, are presented. The experimental value of the ablation threshold is determined based on D2 method by measuring the outer ablation crater diameters as a function of incident laser pulse energy using 800 nm, 30 fs, laser pulses. The value of 0.19 ± 0.04 (J/cm2 ), is obtained for the single-shot ablation threshold fluence. The experimental results are compared with time-dependent heat flow calculations based on the two-temperature model and the effect of number and separation time of two consecutive laser pulses with the same total fluence is studied for the Cr target. Moreover, the role of pulse width and absorbed fluence in thermal equilibrium time between electrons and lattice is investigated in two-temperature model. The thermal equilibrium between electron and lattice is established after a few picoseconds for low fluences and after a few tens of picoseconds at higher fluences.

  13. Prospects for measuring neutron-star masses and radii with X-ray pulse profile modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Chakrabarty, Deepto E-mail: fozel@email.arizona.edu

    2014-06-01

    Modeling the amplitudes and shapes of the X-ray pulsations observed from hot, rotating neutron stars provides a direct method for measuring neutron-star properties. This technique constitutes an important part of the science case for the forthcoming NICER and proposed LOFT X-ray missions. In this paper, we determine the number of distinct observables that can be derived from pulse profile modeling and show that using only bolometric pulse profiles is insufficient for breaking the degeneracy between inferred neutron-star radius and mass. However, we also show that for moderately spinning (300-800 Hz) neutron stars, analysis of pulse profiles in two different energy bands provides additional constraints that allow a unique determination of the neutron-star properties. Using the fractional amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic of the pulse profile in addition to the amplitude and phase difference of the spectral color oscillations, we quantify the signal-to-noise ratio necessary to achieve a specified measurement precision for neutron star radius. We find that accumulating 10{sup 6} counts in a pulse profile is sufficient to achieve a ≲ 5% uncertainty in the neutron star radius, which is the level of accuracy required to determine the equation of state of neutron-star matter. Finally, we formally derive the background limits that can be tolerated in the measurements of the various pulsation amplitudes as a function of the system parameters.

  14. Choked-Flow Inlet Orifice Bubbler for Creating Small Bubbles in Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Abdou, Ashraf A; Riemer, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, induce cavitation damage on the target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. One way to mitigate the damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, creating a bubble size distribution that is sufficiently large and disperse in mercury is challenging due to the high surface tension. Also, measuring the population is complicated by the opacity and the high level of turbulent mixing. Recent advances in bubble diagnostics by batch sampling the mercury made it possible to compare bubble populations for different techniques in a SNS-1/20th scale test loop. More than 10 bubblers were tested and the most productive bubblers were taken for in-beam testing at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) WNR user facility. One bubbler design, referred to as the inlet-orifice bubbler, that showed moderate success in creating populations also has an added advantage that it could easily be included in the existing SNS full-scale mercury target configuration. Improvements to the bubbler were planned including a reduction of the nozzle size to choke the gas injection, thus steadying the injected mass flow and allowing multiple nozzles to work off of a common plenum. For the first time, reliable bubble population data are available in the prototypical target geometry and can be compared with populations that mitigated cavitation damage. This paper presents those experimental results.

  15. A time-dependent model of pulse-driven radio frequency capacitively coupled collisional plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. T.; Hossain, M. Mofazzal

    2017-01-01

    The time-dependent model of ion motion is used to propose an analytical model for dual frequency (DF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) sheath driven by a pulsed source and a radio-frequency source. In this model, the sheath is considered to be collisional. In this model, the time dependent terms of ion fluid equations are ignored, but the electric field, ion motion and ion density remain time dependent. Electron profile is assumed to be step-like. Analytical expressions for electron sheath width and sheath potential have been developed. The calculated sheath width and potential are compared with the dual radio frequency driven time dependent models of capacitively coupled plasma sheath. From the temporal evaluation of sheath motion and potential, it has been found that pulse driven sheath has higher sheath potential and sheath width than that of conventional radio frequency driven DF CCP. Moreover, it is also found that ion energy spread can be reduced using pulsed power. From the temporal investigation of sheath motion and potential, it has been found that the duty cycle of the pulse power significantly affects sheath width and sheath potential.

  16. Modeling Techniques for Composites Subjected to Rapid Thermal Pulse Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    element code for propagating cracks between differing anisotropic materials, and WONDY , a one-dimensional, finite difference code modeling the... WONDY and the two-dimensional code CSQ that have been used in the present program. Provisions for a number of different material model types are...subsequent motions were obtained. The code WONDY (Lawrence and Masur, 1971) (Reference 3) was utilized to obtain these results. A 20-layer composite

  17. [Design and implementation of the pulse wave generator with field programmable gate array based on windkessel model].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Fu, Quanhai; Xu, Lisheng; Liu, Jia; He, Dianning; Li, Qingchun

    2014-10-01

    Pulse waves contain rich physiological and pathological information of the human vascular system. The pulse wave diagnosis systems are very helpful for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Accurate pulse waveform is necessary to evaluate the performances of the pulse wave equipment. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate pulse waveform due to several kinds of physiological and pathological conditions for testing and maintaining the pulse wave acquisition devices. A pulse wave generator was designed and implemented in the present study for this application. The blood flow in the vessel was simulated by modeling the cardiovascular system with windkessel model. Pulse waves can be generated based on the vascular systems with four kinds of resistance. Some functional models such as setting up noise types and signal noise ratio (SNR) values were also added in the designed generator. With the need of portability, high speed dynamic response, scalability and low power consumption for the system, field programmable gate array (FPGA) was chosen as hardware platform, and almost all the works, such as developing an algorithm for pulse waveform and interfacing with memory and liquid crystal display (LCD), were implemented under the flow of system on a programmable chip (SOPC) development. When users input in the key parameters through LCD and touch screen, the corresponding pulse wave will be displayed on the LCD and the desired pulse waveform can be accessed from the analog output channel as well. The structure of the designed pulse wave generator is simple and it can provide accurate solutions for studying and teaching pulse waves and the detection of the equipments for acquisition and diagnosis of pulse wave.

  18. Pulse method of structural and parametric identification of models of heterogeneous catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kafarov, V.V.; Pisarenko, V.N.; Usacheva, I.I.

    1986-04-01

    A description is given of a pulse method for the investigation of heterogeneous catalytic processes, through which the parameters of a model can be evaluated with high accuracy. An example is given of the application of the procedure to an alloy catalyst.

  19. Population balance modelling and multi-stage optimal control of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-07-01

    In this work, one-dimensional population balance models (PBMs) have been developed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The developed PBMs have linked the key binder solution spray operating factors of the binder spray rate, atomizing air pressure and pulsed frequency of spray with the granule properties to predict granule growth behaviour in the pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation process at different operating conditions with accuracy. A multi-stage open optimal control strategy based on the developed PBMs was proposed to reduce the model mismatch, in which through adjusting the trajectory of the evolution of the granule size distribution at predefined sample intervals, to determine the optimal operating variables related to the binder spray including the spray rate of binding liquid, atomizing air pressure and pulsed frequency of spray. The effectiveness of the proposed modelling and multi-stage open optimal control strategies has been validated by experimental and simulation tests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. On the intermittent route to resonance for flow through an orifice in a duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamin, Manu; Mathew, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    In experiments done by Vineeth et al. (2015) on flow in a duct-orifice arrangement, flow enters through the duct inlet, and leaves into the atmosphere through the orifice exit, "whistling" was observed at a Reynolds number of 4200, where large amplitude pressure oscillations were observed. At slightly lower Reynolds numbers, bursts of smaller amplitudes of pressure oscillations were observed to appear intermittently. For a similar configuration, LES were carried out. Both whistling and intermittency were observed in the simulations. As air flows from the duct into the orifice, it turns sharply around the corner at the duct-orifice interface, and hence, flow separation occurs, and a shear layer is formed at the mouth of the orifice. The mechanism of whistling was found to be the shear layer within the orifice flapping about and hitting the trailing edge of the orifice periodically, thus causing the shear layer to break and roll up into a vortex. Hurst exponent was measured in the time series data obtained. It was found to gradually drop to zero as the flow approached the state of whistling, since the growth rates of all the long term and short term trends in the time series vanish. A loss of multifractality in the time series was also observed as flow approached whistling. Research Scholar (MSc. Engg.), Aerospace Engineering Dept., Indian Institute of Science.

  1. Three dimensional structural insight of laser drilled orifices in osmotic pump tablets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Wang, Lebing; Wang, Shuxia; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Shao, Qun; York, Peter; Singh, Vikaramjeet; Yin, Xianzhen; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-10-10

    The orifice drilled in the membrane as a channel for drug delivery is the key functional part of the osmotic pumps for a controlled drug release system. Reported conventional microscopic evaluations of these orifices have been limited to measurement of two-dimensional cross-section diameters. This study was aimed at establishing a novel method to measure quantitatively the three-dimensional architectures of orifices based on synchrotron radiation X-ray microcomputed tomography (SR-μCT). Quantitative analysis of architectures extracted from captopril osmotic pumps drilled by a range of operating parameters indicated that laser power correlated with the cross section area, volume, surface area and depth of the orifices, while scanning speed of laser beam showed inverse relationships with the above structure characters. The synchrotron radiation based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy mapping showed that there was no apparent chemical change in the surrounding area of the orifice compared with the normal membrane region. Thus SR-μCT was successfully applied to marketed felodipine osmotic pumps for architectural evaluation of the orifices. In conclusion, the first three-dimensional structural insight of orifices in osmotic pump tablets by SR-μCT and structural reconstruction for the architectures has provided deeper insight into improving the design of advanced osmotic pumps for controlled drug release. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Analytical model for interaction of short intense laser pulse with solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, S. X.; Ma, G. J.; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Zhang, Q. J.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.

    2011-04-15

    A simple but comprehensive two-dimensional analytical model for the interaction of a normally incident short intense laser pulse with a solid-density plasma is proposed. Electron cavitation near the target surface by the laser ponderomotive force induces a strong local electrostatic charge-separation field. The cavitation makes possible mode conversion of the laser light into longitudinal electron oscillation at laser frequency, even for initial normal incidence of laser pulse. The intense charge-separation field in the cavity can significantly enhance the laser induced uxB electron oscillation at twice laser frequency to density levels even higher than that of the initial target.

  3. Universal pulse shape scaling function and exponents: critical test for avalanche models applied to Barkhausen noise.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit P; Mills, Andrea C; Dahmen, Karin A; Sethna, James P

    2002-04-01

    In order to test if the universal aspects of Barkhausen noise in magnetic materials can be predicted from recent variants of the nonequilibrium zero-temperature Random Field Ising Model, we perform a quantitative study of the universal scaling function derived from the Barkhausen pulse shape in simulations and experiment. Through data collapses and scaling relations we determine the critical exponents tau and 1/sigma nu z in both simulation and experiment. Although we find agreement in the critical exponents, we find differences between theoretical and experimental pulse shape scaling functions as well as between different experiments.

  4. Modeling transport of a pulse of radiolabeled organelles in a Drosophila unipolar motor neuron.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Based on published experimental evidence, this paper develops a model for the transport of a pulse of radiolabeled organelles in a unipolar Drosophila motor neuron. In particular, since published data indicate that no microtubules (MTs) travel from the primary neurite into the dendrite, it is investigated how organelles are transported into the dendrite. Analytical solutions describing concentrations of kinesin- and dynein-driven organelles in the primary neurite, axon, and dendrite are obtained. The effects of increasing the width of the pulse and increasing the rate of organelle transition rate from the kinesin-driven to the dynein-driven state are investigated.

  5. Investigation on stresses of superconductors under pulsed magnetic fields based on multiphysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobin; Li, Xiuhong; He, Yafeng; Wang, Xiaojun; Xu, Bo

    2017-04-01

    A multiphysics model for the numerical computation of stresses, trapped field and temperature distribution of a infinite long superconducting cylinder is proposed, based on which the stresses, including the thermal stresses and mechanical stresses due to Lorentz force, and trapped fields in the superconductor subjected to pulsed magnetic fields are analyzed. By comparing the results under pulsed magnetic fields with different pulse durations, it is found that the both the mechanical stress due to the electromagnetic force and the thermal stress due to temperature gradient contribute to the total stress level in the superconductor. For pulsed magnetic field with short durations, the thermal stress is the dominant contribution to the total stress, because the heat generated by AC-loss builds up significant temperature gradient in such short durations. However, for a pulsed field with a long duration the gradient of temperature and flux, as well as the maximal tensile stress, are much smaller. And the results of this paper is meaningful for the design and manufacture of superconducting permanent magnets.

  6. On peak current in atmospheric pulse-modulated microwave discharges by the PIC-MCC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuantao; Liu, Yu; Liu, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Pulse modulation provides a new way to tailor the electron density, electron energy and gas temperature in atmospheric radio-frequency (rf) discharges. In this paper, by increasing the rf frequency to several hundreds of MHz, or even much higher to the range of GHz, a very strong peak current in the first period (PCFP) with much larger electron energy can be formed during the power-on phase, which is not observed in the common pulse modulation discharges at a rf frequency of 13.56 MHz. The PIC-MCC model is explored to unveil the generation mechanism of PCFP, and based on the simulation data a larger voltage increasing rate over a quarter of a period and the distribution of electron density just before the power-on phase are believed to play key roles; the PCFP is usually produced in the microplasma regime driven by the pulsed power supply. The effects of duty cycle and pulse modulation frequency on the evolution of PCFP are also discussed from the computational data. Therefore, the duty cycle and pulse modulation frequency can be used to optimize the generation of PCFP and high-energy electrons.

  7. Effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields on the activity of a Hodgkin and Huxley neuron model.

    PubMed

    Camera, F; Paffi, A; Merla, C; Denzi, A; Apollonio, F; Marracino, P; d'Inzeo, G; Liberti, M

    2012-01-01

    The cell membrane poration is one of the main assessed biological effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). This structural change of the cell membrane appears soon after the pulse delivery and lasts for a time period long enough to modify the electrical activity of excitable membranes in neurons. Inserting such a phenomenon in a Hodgkin and Huxley neuron model by means of an enhanced time varying conductance resulted in the temporary inhibition of the action potential generation. The inhibition time is a function of the level of poration, the pore resealing time and the background stimulation level of the neuron. Such results suggest that the neuronal activity may be efficiently modulated by the delivery of repeated pulses. This opens the way to the use of nsPEFs as a stimulation technique alternative to the conventional direct electric stimulation for medical applications such as chronic pain treatment.

  8. Investigation of interaction femtosecond laser pulses with skin and eyes mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogov, P. U.; Smirnov, S. V.; Semenova, V. A.; Melnik, M. V.; Bespalov, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present a mathematical model of linear and nonlinear processes that takes place under the action of femtosecond laser radiation on the cutaneous covering. The study is carried out and the analytical solution of the set of equations describing the dynamics of the electron and atomic subsystems and investigated the processes of linear and nonlinear interaction of femtosecond laser pulses in the vitreous of the human eye, revealed the dependence of the pulse duration on the retina of the duration of the input pulse and found the value of the radiation power density, in which there is a self-focusing is obtained. The results of the work can be used to determine the maximum acceptable energy, generated by femtosecond laser systems, and to develop Russian laser safety standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  9. Optimal Control of a Rabies Epidemic Model with a Birth Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Tim; Duke-Sylvester, Scott; Gross, Louis J.; Lenhart, Suzanne; Real, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    A system of ordinary differential equations describes the populuation dynamics of a rabies epidemic in raccoons. The model accounts for the dynamics of vaccine, including loss of vaccine due to animal consumption and loss from factors other than racoon uptake. A control method to reduce the spread of disease is introduced through temporal distribution of vaccine packets. This work incorporates the effect of the seasonal birth pulse in the racoon population and the attendant increase in new-borns which are susceptible to the diseases, analysing the impact of the timing and length of this pulse on the optimal distribution of vaccine packets. The optimization criterion is to minimize the number of infected raccoons while minimizing the cost of distributing the vaccine. Using an optimal control setting, numerical results illustrate strategies for distributing vaccine depending on the timing of the infection outbreak with respect to the birth pulse. PMID:21423822

  10. Nanosecond laser pulse stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells

    PubMed Central

    Rettenmaier, Alexander; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Optical stimulation of the inner ear has recently attracted attention, suggesting a higher frequency resolution compared to electrical cochlear implants due to its high spatial stimulation selectivity. Although the feasibility of the effect is shown in multiple in vivo experiments, the stimulation mechanism remains open to discussion. Here we investigate in single-cell measurements the reaction of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells to irradiation with a nanosecond-pulsed laser beam over a broad wavelength range from 420 nm up to 1950 nm using the patch clamp technique. Cell reactions were wavelength- and pulse-energy-dependent but too small to elicit action potentials in the investigated spiral ganglion neurons. As the applied radiant exposure was much higher than the reported threshold for in vivo experiments in the same laser regime, we conclude that in a stimulation paradigm with nanosecond-pulses, direct neuronal stimulation is not the main cause of optical cochlea stimulation. PMID:24761285

  11. Perturbative transport modeling and comparison to cold-pulse and heat-pulse propagation experiments in Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Fernandez, P.; White, A. E.; Cao, N. M.; Creely, A. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J. H.; Petty, C. C.; Rice, J. E.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2016-10-01

    Possible ``non-local'' transport phenomena are often observed in tokamak plasmas. Different models have been proposed to explain fast responses during perturbative transport experiments, including non-diffusive effects. Specific tools to characterize the dynamic behavior and power balance analysis using TRANSP and the quasi-linear trapped gyro-landau fluid code TGLF have been developed to analyze Alcator C-Mod experiments. Recent results from cold pulse experiments show that fast core temperature increases following edge cold-pulse injections (peak within 10ms , while τE 25ms) are not correlated with the direction of intrinsic rotation, and instead the amplitude of the core response depends on density, plasma current and RF input power. The propagation of the cold pulse can be compared with propagation of heat pulses from sawteeth, and both may be used to probe changes in temperature profile stiffness. A Laser Blow Off (LBO) system is being developed for DIII-D that will allow further validation and cross-machine comparison of cold pulse experiments. LBO at DIII-D will also allow for direct comparisons with ECH perturbative heat pulse experiments. Work supported by US DOE under Grants DE-FC02-99ER54512 (C-Mod) and DE-FC02-04ER54698 (DIII-D) and La Caixa Fellowship.

  12. Scale Modeling for the PATRIOT Electromagnetic Pulse Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    modeling is possible in general is due to the linearity of Maxwell’s equations that deseribo th’ fields in any electromagnetic system. It is necessary... equations are valid for nonhomogeneous as well as homogeneous media. Sinclair shows that "for an arbitrary choice of the tour scale factors p. a, , and y it...linear dimension) scale factor, a= scale factor for electric field intensity, = scale factor for magnetic ield intencity , = scale factor for time

  13. Modeling of Bubble Oscillations Induced by a Lithotripter Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2006-05-01

    In therapeutic applications of biomedical ultrasound, it is important to understand the behavior of cavitation bubbles. Herein, the dynamics of a single, spherical bubble in water are modeled using the Gilmore equation closed by an energy balance on bubble contents for calculation of pressures inside the bubble. Moreover, heat and mass transfer at the bubble wall are incorporated using the Eller-Flynn zeroth-order approximation for gas diffusion, an estimation of non-equilibrium phase change based on the kinetic theory of gases, and assumed shapes for the spatial temperature distribution in the surrounding liquid. Bubble oscillations predicted by this model are investigated in response to a lithotripter shock wave. Model results indicate that vapor trapped inside the bubble during collapse plays a significant role in the afterbounce behavior and is sensitively dependent upon the ambient liquid temperature. Initial experiments have been conducted to quantify the afterbounce behavior of a single bubble as a function of ambient temperature; however, the results imply that many bubbles are present and collectively determine the collapse characteristics.

  14. Boundary layer separation and vortex creation in superflow through small orifices

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.; Srivastava, A.M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors report numerical solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for two dimensional flow is a superfluid condensate through a small orifice. When the superfluid velocity in the center of the orifice exceeds about 60% of the speed of sound, the flow in the throat of the orifice becomes unstable to a form of boundary layer separation. Low condensate-density regions bulge away from the walls and form the cores of singly quantized vortices. These detach from the boundary and are convected downstream.

  15. Velocity field near the jet orifice of a round jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Benson, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Experimentally determined velocities at selected locations near the jet orifice are presented and analyzed for a round jet in crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of four and eight were studied experimentally for a round subsonic jet of air exhausting perpendicularly through a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature. Velocity measurements were made in cross sections to the jet plume located from one to four jet diameters from the orifice. Jet centerline and vortex properties are presented and utilized to extend the results of a previous study into the region close to the jet orifice.

  16. Boundary layer suction through rectangular orifices: effects of aspect ratio and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Buren, T.; Smits, A. J.; Amitay, M.

    2017-07-01

    The flow field generated by suction through a rectangular orifice within a laminar boundary layer is investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. For orifice aspect ratios of 6, 12, and 18, the impact of suction on the surrounding flow field appears to be self-similar, scaling with aspect ratio and suction velocity. Changing the orifice pitch angle had almost no impact on the surrounding boundary layer, but, as expected, changing the skew angle significantly altered the extent of the suction impact on the flow field.

  17. Simulink based behavioural modelling of a pulse oximeter for deployment in rapid development, prototyping and verification.

    PubMed

    Shokouhian, M; Morling, R C S; Kale, I

    2012-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a well-known device for measuring the level of oxygen in blood. Since their invention, pulse oximeters have been under constant development in both aspects of hardware and software; however there are still unsolved problems that limit their performance [6], [7]. Many fresh algorithms and new design techniques are being suggested every year by industry and academic researchers which claim that they can improve accuracy of measurements [8], [9]. With the lack of an accurate computer-based behavioural model for pulse oximeters, the only way for evaluation of these newly developed systems and algorithms is through hardware implementation which can be both expensive and time consuming. This paper presents an accurate Simulink based behavioural model for a pulse oximeter that can be used by industry and academia alike working in this area, as an exploration as well as productivity enhancement tool during their research and development process. The aim of this paper is to introduce a new computer-based behavioural model which provides a simulation environment from which new ideas can be rapidly evaluated long before the real implementation.

  18. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Martín, Fernando; Argenti, Luca

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate ab initio calculations or be extracted from a few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N =2 threshold for the RABITT (reconstruction of attosecond beating by interference of two-photon transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association with a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate ab initio simulations. In particular, we show that (i) the use of finite pulses results in a homogeneous redshift of the RABITT beating frequency, as well as a resonant modulation of the beating frequency in proximity to intermediate autoionizing states; (ii) the phase of resonant two-photon amplitudes generally experiences a continuous excursion as a function of the intermediate detuning, with either zero or 2 π overall variation.

  19. Numerical modeling of the intracavity stimulated Raman scattering as a source of subnanosecond optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri M.; Yashkir, Yuriy Y.

    2004-09-01

    We present a computer numerical model (virtual sub-nanosecond laser) utilizing intracavity stimulated Raman scattering. The goal of this work is to shorten laser output pulses (for which the highly nonlinear frequency conversion process stimulated Raman scattering is used) and to obtain high efficiency (which is enhanced by placing a Raman-active crystal inside the cavity where the fundamental laser frequency intensity is maximal). The following laser components were modeled: a diodepumped solidstate laser active medium (a crystal of the Nd3+:YLF type), a closed cavity for a wave on its fundamental frequency with a Q-switching element and an internal subcavity with a Ramanactive crystal with controlled output coupler transmission at the Raman frequency. The model components are: a numerical integrator of a set of three rate equations (for an inverse population of the laser medium and for the number of fundamental and Stokes frequency photons), random number sources for radiation seeding, and an interactive data input interface and graphic output. A wide range of parameters was investigated and output pulses as short as 0.8 ns were found. The optimal conditions for the maximal peak power of Stokes pulses were determined and the conditions for generating pulse trains for burst laser machining were identified.

  20. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH PULSE PROFILES OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR B1821–24

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yuanjie; Shuai, Ping; Bei, Xiaomin; Chen, Shaolong; Fu, Linzhong; Huang, Liangwei; Lin, Qingqing; Meng, Jing; Wu, Yaojun; Zhang, Hengbin; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Xinyuan; Qiao, Guojun

    2015-03-10

    PSR B1821–24 is a solitary millisecond pulsar that radiates multi-wavelength pulsed photons. It has complex radio, X-ray, and γ-ray pulse profiles with distinct peak phase separations that challenge the traditional caustic emission models. Using the single-pole annular gap model with a suitable magnetic inclination angle (α = 40°) and viewing angle (ζ = 75°), we managed to reproduce its pulse profiles of three wavebands. It is found that the middle radio peak originated from the core gap region at high altitudes, and the other two radio peaks originated from the annular gap region at relatively low altitudes. Two peaks of both X-ray and γ-ray wavebands basically originated from the annular gap region, while the γ-ray emission generated from the core gap region contributes somewhat to the first γ-ray peak. Precisely reproducing the multi-wavelength pulse profiles of PSR B1821–24 enables us to understand emission regions of distinct wavebands and justify pulsar emission models.

  1. The Design of Control Pulses for Heisenberg Always-On Qubit Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, Rudolph

    2015-03-01

    One model for a universal quantum computer is a spin array with constant nearest neighbor interactions and a controlled unidirectional site-specific magnetic field to generate unitary transformations. This system can be described by a Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian and can be simulated for on the order of 50 spins. It has recently been shown that time-dependent density functional inspired methods may be used to relate various spin models of qubits to ones that may be easier to compute numerically allowing potentially the efficient simulation of greater numbers of spins. One of the challenges of such an agenda is the identification of control pulses that produce desired gate operations (CNOT and single qubit phase gates). We apply control theory to design a universal set of pulses for a Heisenberg always-on model Hamiltonian for a few qubits and compare to known pulses when available. We suggest how this approach may be useful to design control pulses in other realistic designs. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Neev, J.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  3. Pulse-transmission Oscillators: Autonomous Boolean Models and the Yeast Cell Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua

    2010-03-01

    Models of oscillatory gene expression typically involve a constitutively expressed or positively autoregulated gene which is repressed by a negative feedback loop. In Boolean representations of such systems, which include the repressilator and relaxation oscillators, dynamical stability stems from the impossibility of satisfying all of the Boolean rules at once. We consider a different class of networks, in which oscillations are due to the transmission of a pulse of gene activation around a ring. Using autonomous Boolean modeling methods, we show how the circulating pulse can be stabilized by decoration of the ring with certain feedback and feed-forward motifs. We then discuss the relation of these models to ODE models of transcriptional networks, emphasizing the role of explicit time delays. Finally, we show that a network recently proposed as a generator of cell cycle oscillations in yeast contains the motifs required to support stable transmission oscillations.

  4. Thermal Modeling for Pulsed Inductive FRC Plasmoid Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, Michael

    Due to the rising importance of space based infrastructure, long-range robotic space missions, and the need for active attitude control for spacecraft, research into Electric Propulsion is becoming increasingly important. Electric Propulsion (EP) systems utilize electric power to accelerate ions in order to produce thrust. Unlike traditional chemical propulsion, this means that thrust levels are relatively low. The trade-off is that EP thrusters have very high specific impulses (Isp), and can therefore make do with far less onboard propellant than cold gas, monopropellant, or bipropellant engines. As a consequence of the high power levels used to accelerate the ionized propellant, there is a mass and cost penalty in terms of solar panels and a power processing unit. Due to the large power consumption (and waste heat) from electric propulsion thrusters, accurate measurements and predictions of thermal losses are needed. Excessive heating in sensitive locations within a thruster may lead to premature failure of vital components. Between the fixed cost required to purchase these components, as well as the man-hours needed to assemble (or replace) them, attempting to build a high-power thruster without reliable thermal modeling can be expensive. This paper will explain the usage of FEM modeling and experimental tests in characterizing the ElectroMagnetic Plasmoid Thruster (EMPT) and the Electrodeless Lorentz Force (ELF) thruster at the MSNW LLC facility in Redmond, Washington. The EMPT thruster model is validated using an experimental setup, and steady state temperatures are predicted for vacuum conditions. Preliminary analysis of the ELF thruster indicates possible material failure in absence of an active cooling system for driving electronics and for certain power levels.

  5. First model of the shielded pulsed superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Shintomi, T.; Masuda, M.; Eyssa, Y.M.; Boom, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    The model was designed and constructed to test the effectiveness, the construction problems, and the scaling problems. The stored energy is 200 kJ, and its available energy is designed as 50 kJ at the transfer time less than 50 ms. The shield coil is distributed around the superconductive coil in a simple form for easy construction. The measurement of the leakage field showed that the simplified distribution of the shield coil was available. The dewar was constructed to have a wall as thin as possible with small heat leak by using GFRP supports. The design value of heat leak agreed with measurement. 4 refs.

  6. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (hybrid) cholecystectomy: The Dhillon technique

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Kanwarjit Singh; Awasthi, Divya; Dhillon, Arshbir Singh

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study presents a novel technique to perform cholecystectomy and assess its outcome and feasibility. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study presents the novel Dhillon technique and experience of hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) technique, that is, laparoscopic-assisted transvaginal cholecystectomy. We have evaluated the outcomes in terms of cosmesis, post-operative recovery and analgesic requirement. The study included 257 patients who underwent hybrid NOTES cholecystectomy at single tertiary hospital. The biographical data, surgical time, pain score on day 1 and 2, need of analgesia, intra- and post-operative complication and aesthetic assessment on day 7 were recorded. RESULTS: Out of a total of 1100 cases of laparoscopic cholecystectomy 257 had hybrid NOTES cholecystectomy. Only two of these cases were converted to standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The mean operative time was 31.5 ± 5.1 (25–40) min. None of the patients had any complication or biliary leakage. The mean pain score on day 1 and 2 was 3.6 ± 0.4 (3–4) and 1.0 ± 0.06 (1–2), respectively. The mean paracetamol (analgesic) dose requirement was 6.1 ± 0.6 (4–6.9) g. The aesthetic score was excellent in all the cases. CONCLUSIONS: Using the present technique of hybrid NOTES is beneficial in terms of cosmetic results, lesser need of analgesic and shorter hospital stay. PMID:28607283

  7. A Model of Cytotoxic T Antitumor Activation Stimulated by Pulsed Dendritic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennisi, Marzio; Pappalardo, Francesco; Chiacchio, Ferdinando; Motta, Santo

    2011-09-01

    We present a preliminary ODE model to sketch the immune response of cytotoxic T cells against cancer through the use of pulsed autologous dendritic cells. The model is partially based on data coming from experiments that are presently in progress in the wet lab of our collaborators, but it can be applied in principle to different tumors. To this end, we show the immune response of cytotoxic T cells stimulated by autologous dendritic cells for different cancers.

  8. Improved volume-averaged model for steady and pulsed-power electronegative discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sungjin; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2006-11-15

    An improved volume-averaged global model is developed for a cylindrical (radius R, length L) electronegative (EN) plasma that is applicable over a wide range of electron densities, electronegativities, and pressures. It is applied to steady and pulsed-power oxygen discharges. The model incorporates effective volume and surface loss factors for positive ions, negative ions, and electrons combining three electronegative discharge regimes: a two-region regime with a parabolic EN core surrounded by an electropositive edge, a one-region parabolic EN plasma, and a one-region flat-topped EN plasma, spanning the plasma parameters and gas pressures of interest for low pressure processing (below a few hundred millitorr). Pressure-dependent effective volume and surface loss factors are also used for the neutral species. A set of reaction rate coefficients, updated from previous model calculations, is developed for oxygen for the species O{sub 2}, O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}{sub g}), O, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, and O{sup -}, based on the latest published cross-section sets and measurements. The model solutions yield all of the quantities above together with such important processing quantities such as the neutral/ion flux ratio {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i}, with the discharge aspect ratio 2R/L and pulsed-power period and duty ratio (pulse on-time/pulse period) as parameters. The steady discharge results are compared to an experiment, giving good agreement. For steady discharges, increasing 2R/L from 1 to 6 leads to a factor of 0.45 reduction in {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i}. For pulsed discharges with a fixed duty ratio, {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i} is found to have a minimum with respect to pulse period. A 25% duty ratio pulse reduces {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i} by a factor of 0.75 compared to the steady-state case.

  9. Effects of 420-nm intense pulsed light in an acne animal model.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Xing, Y-Z; Liu, L-H; Liu, C; Wang, D-D; Yang, R-Y; Lapidoth, M

    2013-09-01

    Blue light in the 400-420 nm range has been shown to reduce the levels of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the skin. P. acnes has been postulated to be a critical trigger for inflammatory acne. Thus, treatment with 420 nm-intense pulsed light should reduce inflammatory activity in acne. To evaluate the clinical and histological effects of 420 nm-intense pulsed light treatment on acne in animal model. Inflammation acne animal model was constructed by intradermal injection of P. acnes of rat auricular. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), markers of inflammation implicated in acne, were assessed in treated and untreated animals by immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Treatment with 420 nm intense pulsed light led to marked improvement after 6 biweekly treatments. Immunohistochemistry and PCR showed that TNF-α and MMP-2 levels correlated with the extent of acneiform activity and were reduced by treatment with 420 nm light. A 420-nm intense pulsed light may exert its beneficial effects on inflammatory acne by reducing the levels of P. acnes and secondarily reducing inflammation induced by the bacteria. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Computational modeling of pulsed-power-driven magnetized target fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Lindemuth, I.

    1995-08-01

    Direct magnetic drive using electrical pulsed power has been considered impractically slow for traditional inertial confinement implosion of fusion targets. However, if the target contains a preheated, magnetized plasma, magnetothermal insulation may allow the near-adiabatic compression of such a target to fusion conditions on a much slower time scale. 100-MJ-class explosive flux compression generators with implosion kinetic energies far beyond those available with conventional fusion drivers, are an inexpensive means to investigate such magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems. One means of obtaining the preheated and magnetized plasma required for an MTF system is the recently reported {open_quotes}MAGO{close_quotes} concept. MAGO is a unique, explosive-pulsed-power driven discharge in two cylindrical chambers joined by an annular nozzle. Joint Russian-American MAGO experiments have reported D-T neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 13} from this plasma preparation stage alone, without going on to the proposed separately driven NM implosion of the main plasma chamber. Two-dimensional MED computational modeling of MAGO discharges shows good agreement to experiment. The calculations suggest that after the observed neutron pulse, a diffuse Z-pinch plasma with temperature in excess of 100 eV is created, which may be suitable for subsequent MTF implosion, in a heavy liner magnetically driven by explosive pulsed power. Other MTF concepts, such as fiber-initiated Z-pinch target plasmas, are also being computationally and theoretically evaluated. The status of our modeling efforts will be reported.

  11. A mathematical model of pulse-coded hormone signal responses in pituitary gonadotroph cells

    PubMed Central

    Magill, John C.; Ciccone, Nick A.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the pituitary that synthesize luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones regulate the relative production of these two key reproductive hormones in response to signals from the hypothalamus. These signals are encoded in the frequency of gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone pulses. In vitro experiments with a murine-derived cell line have identified key elements of the processes that decode the signal to regulate transcription of the subunits encoding these hormones. The mathematical model described in this paper is based on the results of those experiments and advances quantitative understanding of the biochemical decoder. The model consists of non-linear differential equations for each of six processes that lead to the synthesis of follicle-stimulating hormone. Simulations of the model exhibit key characteristics found in the experiments, including a preference for follicle-stimulating hormone synthesis at low pulse frequencies and a loss of this characteristic when a mutation is introduced. PMID:24095971

  12. Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis: Application of a Computer Model to the Separation of Large DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalande, Marc; Noolandi, Jaan; Turmel, Chantal; Rousseau, Jean; Slater, Gary W.

    1987-11-01

    The biased reptation theory has been applied to the pulsed-field electrophoresis of DNA in agarose gels. A computer simulation of the theoretical model that calculates the mobility of large DNA molecules as a function of agarose pore size, DNA chain properties, and electric field conditions has been used to generate mobility curves for DNA molecules in the size range of the larger yeast chromosomes. Pulsed-field electrophoresis experiments resulting in the establishment of an electrophoretic karyotype for yeast, where the mobility of the DNA fragments is a monotonic function of molecular size for the entire size range that is resolved (200-2200 kilobase pairs), has been compared to the theoretical mobility curves generated by the computer model. The various physical mechanisms and experimental conditions responsible for band inversion and improved electrophoretic separation are identified and discussed in the framework of the model.

  13. Energy iteration model research of DCM Buck converter with multilevel pulse train technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    According as the essence of switching converter is the nature of energy, the energy iteration model of the Multilevel Pulse Train (MPT) technique is studied in this paper. The energy iteration model of DCM Buck converter with MPT technique can reflect the control law and excellent transient performance of the MPT technique. The iteration relation of energy transfer in switching converter is discussed. The structure and operation principle of DCM Buck converter with MPT technique is introduced and the energy iteration model of this converter is set up. The energy tracks of MPT-control Buck converter and PT converter is researched and compared to show that the ratio of steady-state control pulse satisfies the expectation for the MPT technique and the MPT-controlled switching converter has much lower output voltage ripple than the PT converter.

  14. Research on the injected effect by the narrow-slit injection orifice in screw compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Feng, J.; Liu, F.; Peng, C.; Feng, Q.

    2017-08-01

    A narrow-slit injection orifice in screw compressors (mainly in single screw compressors) is described in this paper. In contrast to the traditional injection orifice, the section is slit shaped but not circular. Liquid which is injected by the narrow-slit injection orifice appears as a curtain shape. The heat transfer area is increased so that the cooling effect is enhanced and the efficiency of the compressor is improved. The injected effect was simulated through the CFD software, and then the experiments were carried out. The study verified the accuracy of the simulation results and will provide a theoretical foundation for the design of a narrow-slit injection orifice in screw compressors.

  15. Effect of the Reversal of Air Flow upon the Discharge Coefficient of Durley Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Marsden

    1921-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to obtain information on the relationship between the coefficients for flow in two directions through thin plate orifices at low velocities. The results indicate that the ratio of the orifice discharge coefficient from standard orifice C(sub s)(sup 1) to the discharge coefficient from the reverse flow C(sub s) is always less than unity with increasing ratio of box area to orifice area. Even for areas as low as twenty, the ratios of the coefficients are not much less than unity. It is probable, however, that when the ratio of box area is less than twenty, the ratio of discharge coefficients would be greatly reduced. Specific results are given for the case of an apparatus for the laboratory testing of superchargers.

  16. The whistling potentiality of an orifice in a confined flow using an energetic criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testud, P.; Aurégan, Y.; Moussou, P.; Hirschberg, A.

    2009-09-01

    Using a two-source method, the scattering matrices of 10 sharp-edged thin orifices are measured under different subsonic flow conditions. The data are analysed in terms of net acoustical energy balance: the potential whistling frequency range is defined as the one associated with acoustical energy production. A Strouhal number describing the maximum whistling potentiality is found to be equal to 0.2-0.35, based on the orifice thickness and the orifice jet velocity. It appears to depend on the Reynolds number and on the ratio of orifice to pipe diameters. Tests are performed to compare theoretically and experimentally the potential whistling frequency to the actual whistling frequency. They are found to coincide within the measurement uncertainty.

  17. A field example of a gas orifice meter with debris-ridden liquid in mist flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, J.L.; Mooney, C.V.; Datta-Barua, L.; Feldmann, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    A field example of debris-ridden liquids in an orifice meter is presented in this paper. Flow conditions in gas pipelines containing hydrocarbon liquids and particulate matter are discussed. Known effects on measurement of the presence of these materials in orifice meters is presented. By definition, gas measurement is accurate if performed on a clean and dry flow stream. This paper demonstrates the importance of removing as much liquid and debris as possible prior to measurement.

  18. [Fourth branchial cleft deformity with skin orifice: a series of 10 cases].

    PubMed

    Huang, S L; Zhang, B; Chen, L S; Liang, L; Luo, X N; Lu, Z M; Zhang, S Y

    2016-10-07

    Objective: To report rare cases of congenital neck cutaneous sinus with an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint and to investigate their origins and managements. Methods: A total of ten patients with congenital neck cutaneous sinus having an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint treated in the Guangdong General Hospital from January 2010 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There four boys and six girls, aging from 11 months to 96 months with an average of 33.4 months, and they had a common feature showing a congenital cutaneous sinus with an orifice near sternoclavicular joint. Discharge of pus from the orifice or abscess formation was commonly seen soon after infection. With bacteriological study, staphylococcus aureus was positive in five cases and klebsiella pneumonia in a case. Another orifice of fistula/sinus was not depicted in pyriform with barium swallow X-ray in five cases Ultrasound studies of three cases demonstrated anechoic (i.e., nearly black) and solid-cystic lesion near sternoclavicular joint with posterior acoustic enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed isointensity of the lesion on T1 and T2 weighted images with heterogeneous enhancement and a close relationship with sternoclavicular joint. All patients underwent laryngoscopic examination, which showed no orifice of sinus in pyriform at same side. Surgical resection of fistula/sinus was performed in all cases. The lengths of the fistula varied from 5 mm to 22 mm with an average of 11 mm. Postoperative pathological examination showed all specimens were accordance with fistula. No complications were noticed. Recurrence was not observed in the cases by following-up of 6 months to 70 months (median: 33 months). Conclusion: Congenital neck cutaneous sinus with orifice near the sternoclavicular joint maybe a special clinical phenotype of the fourth branchial cleft sinus with skin orifice in cervicothoracic junction. Differential diagnoses between low cervical diseases

  19. Modeling of early stages of island growth during pulsed deposition: Role of closed compact islands

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrla, M.; Masin, M.

    2011-03-24

    After a brief review of recent modeling of growth during Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD), we present the study of a role of adatom interactions on growth of surface islands during PLD in submonolayer regime. We employ kinetic Monte Carlo simulation with reversible growth. Attachment of monomers to islands is irreversible at low temperatures while it becomes reversible at higher temperatures, small islands become unstable with growing temperature. In the case of real system we have to take into account not only diffusion of monomers but also diffusivity of dimers and larger clusters and theirs stability. Our new code allows us to study processes which proceed on different time scales which are typical in PLD experiments: fast deposition (on scale order of 10{sup -5} s) during individual pulses, and relaxation of a system between pulses (on scale order of 0.1 s). We calculate and compare the temperature dependence of island density for two modes pulsed deposition and continuous Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) growth. The island densities in PLD mode are substantially higher than in MBE mode, provided the temperature is sufficiently high. In the case of PLD, we observe anomalous temperature dependence of the island density in a certain temperature interval. It is due to the interplay between a cluster decay time and an interval between pulses. The cluster decay time depends not only on temperature but also on clusters size and shape. The anomalous behavior is caused by the temperature limited stability of the closed--compact clusters. This scenario was revealed for the simplified model with only nearest-neighbor interaction. Now, it is elucidated further and we also include interaction to second and third neighbors. We analyze role of the closed-compact surface island in kinetics of both growth modes. Furthermore, by varying interactions energies, diffusion barrier and parameters of deposition, we compare results of simulations with the PLD experiment for Fe/Mo system.

  20. Preference pulses and the win-stay, fix-and-sample model of choice.

    PubMed

    Hachiga, Yosuke; Sakagami, Takayuki; Silberberg, Alan

    2015-11-01

    Two groups of six rats each were trained to respond to two levers for a food reinforcer. One group was trained on concurrent variable-ratio 20 extinction schedules of reinforcement. The second group was trained on a concurrent variable-interval 27-s extinction schedule. In both groups, lever-schedule assignments changed randomly following reinforcement; a light cued the lever providing the next reinforcer. In the next condition, the light cue was removed and reinforcer assignment strictly alternated between levers. The next two conditions redetermined, in order, the first two conditions. Preference pulses, defined as a tendency for relative response rate to decline to the just-reinforced alternative with time since reinforcement, only appeared during the extinction schedule. Although the pulse's functional form was well described by a reinforcer-induction equation, there was a large residual between actual data and a pulse-as-artifact simulation (McLean, Grace, Pitts, & Hughes, 2014) used to discern reinforcer-dependent contributions to pulsing. However, if that simulation was modified to include a win-stay tendency (a propensity to stay on the just-reinforced alternative), the residual was greatly reduced. Additional modifications of the parameter values of the pulse-as-artifact simulation enabled it to accommodate the present results as well as those it originally accommodated. In its revised form, this simulation was used to create a model that describes response runs to the preferred alternative as terminating probabilistically, and runs to the unpreferred alternative as punctate with occasional perseverative response runs. After reinforcement, choices are modeled as returning briefly to the lever location that had been just reinforced. This win-stay propensity is hypothesized as due to reinforcer induction. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  1. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2012-09-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices

  2. Effect of Orifice Diameter on Bubble Generation Process in Melt Gas Injection to Prepare Aluminum Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianyu; Li, Yanxiang; Wang, Ningzhen; Cheng, Ying; Chen, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The bubble generation process in conditioned A356 alloy melt through submerged spiry orifices with a wide diameter range (from 0.07 to 1.0 mm) is investigated in order to prepare aluminum foams with fine pores. The gas flow rate and chamber pressure relationship for each orifice is first determined when blowing gas in atmospheric environment. The effects of chamber pressure ( P c) and orifice diameter ( D o) on bubble size are then analyzed separately when blowing gas in melt. A three-dimensional fitting curve is obtained illustrating both the influences of orifice diameter and chamber pressure on bubble size based on the experimental data. It is found that the bubble size has a V-shaped relationship with orifice diameter and chamber pressure neighboring the optimized parameter ( D o = 0.25 mm, P c = 0.4 MPa). The bubble generation mechanism is proposed based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. It is found that the bubbles will not be generated until a threshold pressure difference is reached. The threshold pressure difference is dependent on the orifice diameter, which determines the time span of pre-formation stage and bubble growth stage.

  3. Noise generated by cavitating single-hole and multi-hole orifices in a water pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testud, P.; Moussou, P.; Hirschberg, A.; Aurégan, Y.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the acoustical effects of cavitation caused by a water flow through an orifice. A circular-centered single-hole orifice and a multi-hole orifice are tested. Experiments are performed under industrial conditions: the pressure drop across the orifice varies from 3 to 30 bar, corresponding to cavitation numbers from 0.74 to 0.03. Two regimes of cavitation are discerned. In each regime, the broadband noise spectra obtained far downstream of the orifice are presented. A nondimensional representation is proposed: in the intermediate ‘developed cavitation’ regime, spectra collapse reasonably well; in the more intense ‘super cavitation’ regime, spectra depend strongly on the quantity of air remaining in the water downstream of the orifice, which is revealed by the measure of the speed of sound at the downstream transducers. In the ‘developed cavitation’ regime, whistling associated with periodic vortex shedding is observed. The corresponding Strouhal number agrees reasonably well with literature for single-phase flows. In the 'super cavitation’ regime, the whistling disappears.

  4. Accuracy of various methods of localization of the orifice of the coronary sinus at electrophysiologic study.

    PubMed

    Davis, L M; Byth, K; Lau, K C; Uther, J B; Richards, D A; Ross, D L

    1992-08-01

    The coronary sinus (CS) orifice is an important reference point for determining electrode and, thereby, accessory pathway location at electrophysiologic study. The reliability of fluoroscopic landmarks used to identify the CS orifice is not known. This study compared the accuracy of several fluoroscopic landmarks for identifying the CS orifice with the location defined by radiopaque contrast injection of the CS. Forty patients were studied. Radiographic markers of the CS orifice that were examined included: (1) the point at which the CS catheter prolapsed during advancement, (2) the point of maximum convexity of the CS catheter when a superior vena caval approach was used, (3) the right side of the ventricular septum, and (4) the relation to the underlying vertebrae. The least-significant difference method of multiple comparisons was used for statistical analysis. The point at which the CS catheter prolapsed was the most accurate noncontrast method for determining the location of the CS orifice (p less than 0.05), but was possible without the use of excessive force in only 48% of patients. The point of catheter prolapse was a median of 1 mm (range 0 to 11) from the true location of the os. Errors with other examined landmarks ranged up to 3 cm. Identification of the CS orifice is best performed by radiopaque contrast injection. The point of prolapse during catheter advancement in the CS is an accurate alternative when contrast injection is not feasible. Other noncontrast fluoroscopic landmarks are less reliable and are best avoided.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Fine structures around the orifice of the intercostal artery of the rabbit thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Emura, S; Masuko, S; Sunaga, T

    1992-03-01

    In hypercholesterolemic rabbits, atherosclerotic lesions easily occur in the thoracic aorta, especially at the distal and lateral sides of the walls around the orifices of the dorsal intercostal arteries. In order to examine whether some special structures that lead to atherosclerotic lesions are present even in normal conditions, the authors investigated the morphologic features around the orifice of the intercostal artery of 20 normal rabbit aortae under electron microscopy. The endothelial cells were generally fusiform but tended to be round and have a cobblestone-like appearance at the lateral side. There was intimal protrusion at the distal and lateral sides of the orifice, where the distribution and arrangement of elastic fibers and smooth muscle cells were different from those at the proximal side. At the proximal edge of the orifice, elastic fibers formed a thick plate-like internal elastic lamina beneath the endothelial cells. On the other hand, at the distal and lateral sides, elastic fibers formed close-meshed structures over the proper plate-like internal elastic lamina. These results indicate that the aortic walls at the distal and lateral sides of the orifice are structurally different from those at other regions even in normal conditions and suggest the involvement of special structures at the distal and lateral sides of the orifice in atherogenesis.

  6. Modeling of beam-target interaction during pulsed electron beam ablation of graphite: Case of melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muddassir; Henda, Redhouane

    2017-02-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model based on a two-stage heat conduction equation is employed to investigate the ablation of graphite target during nanosecond pulsed electron beam ablation. This comprehensive model accounts for the complex physical phenomena comprised of target heating, melting and vaporization upon irradiation with a polyenergetic electron beam. Melting and vaporization effects induced during ablation are taken into account by introducing moving phase boundaries. Phase transition induced during ablation is considered through the temperature dependent thermodynamic properties of graphite. The effect of electron beam efficiency, power density, and accelerating voltage on ablation is analyzed. For an electron beam operating at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency of 0.6, the model findings show that the target surface temperature can reach up to 7500 K at the end of the pulse. The surface begins to melt within 25 ns from the pulse start. For the same process conditions, the estimated ablation depth and ablated mass per unit area are about 0.60 μm and 1.05 μg/mm2, respectively. Model results indicate that ablation takes place primarily in the regime of normal vaporization from the surface. The results obtained at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency factor of 0.6 are satisfactorily in good accordance with available experimental data in the literature.

  7. Theoretical Modeling of Damage Mechanisms for Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Ocular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstman, Bernard

    2002-10-01

    The funding provided in this grant has allowed the development of a comprehensive computational model for predicting the effect that any laser pulse will have on any spherical absorbing particle. This model is based upon fundamental principles and therefore is capable of determining all thermomechanical responses (temperature rise, shock wave, explosive vaporization) and is applicable to a wide range of materials with unprecedented accuracy. This allows the assessment of potential damage to a variety of materials, such as biological tissue. The computational model is also applicable for investigating and predicting laser induced damage in synthetic polymers and optical and electronic communication materials. The research also furnishes a technique for determining thermomechanical properties of microparticles used in novel medical, biological and material science applications. In addition, we have seen evidence that the thermomechanical response in various materials to a laser pulse is not only non-linear, but chaotic. This implies that small changes in laser pulse characteristics such as duration or energy may lead to enormous changes in response that are extremely damaging to the material whether biological or synthetic. The detailed nature of the investigation and resulting model allowed for the discovery of this chaotic behavior, which had not been previously reported by any other investigators.

  8. Analysis based on global model of nitrogen plasma produced by pulsed microwave at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Feng; Yan, Eryan Meng, Fanbao; Ma, Hongge; Liu, Minghai

    2015-07-15

    This paper analyzes certain evolution processes in nitrogen plasmas discharged using pulsed microwaves at low pressure. Comparing the results obtained from the global model incorporating diffusion and the microwave transmission method, the temporal variation of the electron density is analyzed. With a discharge pressure of 300 Pa, the results obtained from experiments and the global model calculation show that when the discharge begins the electron density in the plasma rises quickly, to a level above the critical density corresponding to the discharge microwave frequency, but falls slowly when the discharge microwave pulse is turned off. The results from the global model also show that the electron temperature increases rapidly to a peak, then decays after the electron density reaches the critical density, and finally decreases quickly to room temperature when the discharge microwave pulse is turned off. In the global model, the electron density increases because the high electron temperature induces a high ionization rate. The decay of the electron density mainly comes from diffusion effect.

  9. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery applications in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Coomber, Ross S; Sodergren, Mikael H; Clark, James; Teare, Julian; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2012-03-16

    To review natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) applications in clinical practice and assess the evidence base for each application as reported in the literature. An electronic literature search was performed. Inclusion criteria were publications relating to NOTES applications in humans. For each type of operation the highest level of evidence available for clinical NOTES publications was evaluated. Morbidity and short-term operative outcomes were compared with gold standard published evidence where available. Finally, registered trials recruiting patients for NOTES applications were identified. Human NOTES publications with the highest level of evidence in each application are identified. There were no RCTs in the literature to date. The strongest evidence came in the form of large, multi-centre trials with 300-500 patients. The results are encouraging, comparable with gold standard techniques on morbidity and mortality. While short-term operative outcomes were also similar when compared to the gold standard techniques, other than improved cosmesis little else can definitely be concluded as a clear benefit of a NOTES procedure. The most common procedures are cholecystectomy, appendicectomy and peritoneoscopy mainly performed via transvaginal access. It is evident that morbidity appears to be higher when the transgastric route is used. The safety profile of hybrid NOTES transvaginal procedures is beginning to be confirmed as is evident from the large number of procedures presented in this review. A number of authors have presented work on pure NOTES procedures but the results are inconsistent and thus the vast majority of NOTES procedures worldwide are performed in a hybrid fashion with a variable amount of laparoscopy. This review of the clinical applications of NOTES summarises the growing evidence behind this surgical discipline and highlights NOTES procedures with an acceptable safety profile.

  10. S-IV-B Aft Swing Arm Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s. Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets. Affectionately nicknamed 'The Arm Farm', the Random Motion/ liftoff Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions. The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm orifice on the PV 43D soloniod valve.

  11. Pressure and flow characteristics of restrictive flow orifice devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Shrouf, Roger D.

    2003-06-01

    A Restrictive Flow Orifice (RFO) can be used to enhance the safe design of a pressure system in several ways. Pressure systems frequently incorporate a regulator and relief valve to protect the downstream equipment from accidental overpressure caused by regulator failure. Analysis frequently shows that in cases of high-flow regulator failure, the downstream pressure may rise significantly above the set pressure of the relief valve. This is due to limited flow capacity of the relief valve. A different regulator or relief valve may need to be selected. A more economical solution to this problem is to use an RFO to limit the maximum system flow to acceptable limits within the flow capacity of the relief valve, thereby enhancing the overpressure protection of laboratory equipment. An RFO can also be used to limit the uncontrolled release of system fluid (gas or liquid) upon component or line failure. As an example, potential asphyxiation hazards resultant from the release of large volumes of inert gas from a 'house' nitrogen system can be controlled by the use of an RFO. This report describes a versatile new Sandia-designed RFO available from the Swagelok Company and specifies the gas flow characteristics of this device. Two sizes, 0.010 and 0.020 inch diameter RFOs are available. These sizes will allow enhanced safety for many common applications. This new RFO design are now commercially available and provide advantages over existing RFOs: a high pressure rating (6600 psig); flow through the RFO is equal for either forward or reverse directions; they minimize the potential for leakage by incorporating the highest quality threaded connections; and can enhance the safety of pressure systems.

  12. Reversal of the Hartmann procedure through only a stomal orifice.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Cemalettin; Olmez, Aydemir; Isik, Sevil; Sumer, Fatih; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2011-06-01

    We performed reversal of the Hartmann procedure only through the stoma site and we did not use either any other incision nor laparoscopic assistance. A total of 8 patients (7 males), ages between 23 and 80 years, were treated by means of a defined technique. The indications of the Hartmann procedure were sigmoid volvulus (4), sigmoid cancer obstruction (2), rectal trauma (1), and Fournier gangrene (one). The duration from the first procedure was a mean of 5 months (range, 2 to 8 months). The length of the rectal stump was at least 5 cm over the pelvic peritoneum and the body mass indices of all patients were less than 30 kg/m². The diameter of the stoma opening was a mean of 50 mm (range, 40 to 55 mm). Incision extensions from the stomal orifice (accepted as conversion) were needed for two cases as a result of injury on the intestine and inability to identify the distal bowel stump (25%). The mean operative blood loss and duration of operation were 50 mL (range, 30 to 100 mL) and 65 minutes (range, 45 to 80 minutes), respectively. Fecal discharge of all patients was weighed before hospital discharge and the length of postoperative hospital stay was a mean of 5.5 days (range, 4 to 9 days). Neither anastomosis leakage nor surgical site infections were observed in any of the patients and all had an uneventful postoperative course. The described technique can be the least invasive one than the previously described techniques for the reversal of the Hartmann procedure by only using the stoma site, particularly for nonobese patients with a long distal rectal stump.

  13. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery applications in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross S; Sodergren, Mikael H; Clark, James; Teare, Julian; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2012-01-01

    To review natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) applications in clinical practice and assess the evidence base for each application as reported in the literature. An electronic literature search was performed. Inclusion criteria were publications relating to NOTES applications in humans. For each type of operation the highest level of evidence available for clinical NOTES publications was evaluated. Morbidity and short-term operative outcomes were compared with gold standard published evidence where available. Finally, registered trials recruiting patients for NOTES applications were identified. Human NOTES publications with the highest level of evidence in each application are identified. There were no RCTs in the literature to date. The strongest evidence came in the form of large, multi-centre trials with 300-500 patients. The results are encouraging, comparable with gold standard techniques on morbidity and mortality. While short-term operative outcomes were also similar when compared to the gold standard techniques, other than improved cosmesis little else can definitely be concluded as a clear benefit of a NOTES procedure. The most common procedures are cholecystectomy, appendicectomy and peritoneoscopy mainly performed via transvaginal access. It is evident that morbidity appears to be higher when the transgastric route is used. The safety profile of hybrid NOTES transvaginal procedures is beginning to be confirmed as is evident from the large number of procedures presented in this review. A number of authors have presented work on pure NOTES procedures but the results are inconsistent and thus the vast majority of NOTES procedures worldwide are performed in a hybrid fashion with a variable amount of laparoscopy. This review of the clinical applications of NOTES summarises the growing evidence behind this surgical discipline and highlights NOTES procedures with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:22442743

  14. Full 3D modelling of pulse propagation enables efficient nonlinear frequency conversion with low energy laser pulses in a single-element tripler

    PubMed Central

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Nejbauer, Michał; Wnuk, Paweł; Resan, Bojan; Radzewicz, Czesław; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Although new optical materials continue to open up access to more and more wavelength bands where femtosecond laser pulses can be generated, light frequency conversion techniques are still indispensable in filling the gaps on the ultrafast spectral scale. With high repetition rate, low pulse energy laser sources (oscillators) tight focusing is necessary for a robust wave mixing and the efficiency of broadband nonlinear conversion is limited by diffraction as well as spatial and temporal walk-off. Here we demonstrate a miniature third harmonic generator (tripler) with conversion efficiency exceeding 30%, producing 246 fs UV pulses via cascaded second order processes within a single laser beam focus. Designing this highly efficient and ultra compact frequency converter was made possible by full 3-dimentional modelling of propagation of tightly focused, broadband light fields in nonlinear and birefringent media. PMID:28225007

  15. Modeling of time evolution of power and temperature in single-pulse and multi-pulses diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Binglin; Huang, Jinghua; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2017-06-12

    A physical model combining rate, power propagation, and transient heat conduction equations for diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPAL) is applied to a pulsed Rb-CH4 DPAL, which agrees well with the time evolution of laser power and temperature measured by K absorption spectroscopy. The output feature and temperature rise of a multi-pulse DPAL are also calculated in the time domain, showing that if we energize the pump light when the temperature rise decays to 1/2, rather than 1/e of its maximum, we can increase the duty cycle and obtain more output energy. The repetition rate of >100Hz is high enough to achieve QCW (quasi-continuous-wave) laser pulses.

  16. Full 3D modelling of pulse propagation enables efficient nonlinear frequency conversion with low energy laser pulses in a single-element tripler.

    PubMed

    Kardaś, Tomasz M; Nejbauer, Michał; Wnuk, Paweł; Resan, Bojan; Radzewicz, Czesław; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2017-02-22

    Although new optical materials continue to open up access to more and more wavelength bands where femtosecond laser pulses can be generated, light frequency conversion techniques are still indispensable in filling the gaps on the ultrafast spectral scale. With high repetition rate, low pulse energy laser sources (oscillators) tight focusing is necessary for a robust wave mixing and the efficiency of broadband nonlinear conversion is limited by diffraction as well as spatial and temporal walk-off. Here we demonstrate a miniature third harmonic generator (tripler) with conversion efficiency exceeding 30%, producing 246 fs UV pulses via cascaded second order processes within a single laser beam focus. Designing this highly efficient and ultra compact frequency converter was made possible by full 3-dimentional modelling of propagation of tightly focused, broadband light fields in nonlinear and birefringent media.

  17. Full 3D modelling of pulse propagation enables efficient nonlinear frequency conversion with low energy laser pulses in a single-element tripler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Nejbauer, Michał; Wnuk, Paweł; Resan, Bojan; Radzewicz, Czesław; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2017-02-01

    Although new optical materials continue to open up access to more and more wavelength bands where femtosecond laser pulses can be generated, light frequency conversion techniques are still indispensable in filling the gaps on the ultrafast spectral scale. With high repetition rate, low pulse energy laser sources (oscillators) tight focusing is necessary for a robust wave mixing and the efficiency of broadband nonlinear conversion is limited by diffraction as well as spatial and temporal walk-off. Here we demonstrate a miniature third harmonic generator (tripler) with conversion efficiency exceeding 30%, producing 246 fs UV pulses via cascaded second order processes within a single laser beam focus. Designing this highly efficient and ultra compact frequency converter was made possible by full 3-dimentional modelling of propagation of tightly focused, broadband light fields in nonlinear and birefringent media.

  18. Electromagnetic pulse from supernovae. [model for old low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Upper and lower limits to the radiated electromagnetic pulse from a supernova are calculated assuming that the mass fraction of the matter expanding inside the dipole magnetic field shares energy and maintains the pressure balance in the process. A supernova model is described in which the explosion occurs in old low-mass stars containing less than 10% hydrogen in their ejecta and a remnant neutron star is produced. The analysis indicates that although the surface layer of a star of 1 g/cu thickness may be shock-accelerated to an energy factor of about 100 and may expand into the vacuum with an energy factor approaching 10,000, the equatorial magnetic field will retard this expansion so that the inner, more massive ejecta layers will effectively accelerate the presumed canonical dipole magnetic field to greater velocities than would the surface layer alone. A pulse of 10 to the 46th power ergs in a width of about 150 cm will result which will not be affected by circumstellar matter or electron self-radiation effects. It is shown that interstellar matter will attenuate the pulse, but that charge separation may reduce the attenuation and allow a larger pulse to escape.

  19. Comprehensive modeling of structural modification induced by a femtosecond laser pulse inside fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Somayeh; Sadat Arabanian, Atoosa; Massudi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model is proposed based on equations describing the nonlinear propagation of an ultrashort pulse inside transparent material, electron density evolution, non-Fourier heat conduction, and thermo-elasto plastic displacement which are respectively solved by various methods. These methods include the split-step finite difference technique and alternating-direction implicit algorithm, fourth-order Range-Kutta algorithm, hybrid finite-element method/finite-difference method, and finite-element method in both space and time to achieve refractive index changes. The whole chain of processes occurring in the interaction of a focused ultrashort laser pulse with fused silica glass in prevalent conditions of micromachining applications is numerically investigated. By optimizing the numerical method and by using an adaptive mesh approach, the execution time of the program is significantly reduced so that the calculations are done at each time step in a fraction of a second. Simulation results show that the energy and duration of the input pulse are very important parameters in induced changes, but the chirp of the input pulse is not an effective parameter. Consequently, by appropriate setting of those parameters one can design a desired refractive index profile.

  20. A multiphase model for pulsed ns-laser ablation of copper in an ambient gas

    SciTech Connect

    Autrique, D.; Chen, Z.; Alexiades, V.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2012-07-30

    Laser ablation in an ambient gas is nowadays used in a growing number of applications, such as chemical analysis and pulsed laser deposition. Despite the many applications, the technique is still poorly understood. Therefore models describing the material evolution in time during short pulse laser irradiation can be helpful to unravel the puzzle and finally result in the optimization of the related applications. In the present work, a copper target is immersed in helium, initially set at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Calculations are performed for a Gaussian-shaped laser pulse with a wavelength of 532 nm, full width at half maximum of 6 ns, and laser fluences up to 10 J/cm{sup 2}. In order to describe the transient behaviour in and above the copper target, hydrodynamic equations are solved. An internal energy method accounting for pressure relaxation is applied for the description of the target. In the plume domain a set of conservation equations is solved, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Calculated crater depths and transmission profiles are compared with experimental results and similar trends are found. Our calculations indicate that for the laser fluence regime under study, explosive boiling could play a fundamental role in the plasma formation of metals under ns-pulsed laser irradiation.

  1. A new paradigm in modeling pulselike ruptures: The pulse energy equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, A. E.; Heaton, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake ruptures are complex processes both spatially and temporally. Seismic source inversions and numerical simulations show that ruptures can occur in one of two primary modes; the slip pulse mode and the expanding crack mode. In order to understand the long time behavior of fault systems sustaining repeated earthquake ruptures we have to run models through hundreds or thousands of events so that the system under consideration evolves into a statistically stable stressed state that is consistent with the assumed friction law. For systems that fail primarily in pulse-like ruptures, the ruptures and the prestress can become very complex at many length scales. With the current computational methods and resources, we are unable to deduce which prestresses are compatible with an assumed friction law. However, the spatial compactness of slip pulses may provide another alternative approach to simulating many complex events. Here we construct a nonlinear ordinary differential equation that relates the final slip in a pulselike event to the prestress that exists before that event. The differential equation is based on an energy conservation principle for the slip pulse. We illustrate our methodology within the framework of 1D spring block slider system with strong velocity weakening friction. In this system, as the slip pulse propagates, it changes the potential energy of the springs, it loses energy through frictional dissipation, and it possesses a nonzero kinetic energy. The energy conservation dictates that the difference between the change in potential energy and the frictional work dissipated has to be equal to the kinetic energy of the pulse. By expressing the change in the potential energy of the system exactly in terms of slip and prestress, and through approximating the frictional dissipation and pulse kinetic energy as power law functions in the pulse slip (an approximation that is motivated by the approximate self-similarity of the propagating pulse) we

  2. Comparisons of wing pressure distribution from flight tests of flush and external orifices for Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.97

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Lux, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Wing pressure distributions obtained in flight with flush orifice and external tubing orifice installations for Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.97 are compared. The procedure used to install the external tubing orifice is discussed. The results indicate that external tubing orifice installations can give useful results.

  3. Limits of applicability of a two-temperature model under nonuniform heating of metal by an ultrashort laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, D S; Yakovlev, E B

    2015-10-31

    The heating of metals (silver and aluminium) by ultrashort laser pulses is analysed proceeding from a spatially nonuniform kinetic equation for the electron distribution function. The electron subsystem thermalisation is estimated in a wide range of absorbed pulse energy density. The limits of applicability are determined for the two-temperature model. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. Measurement and modeling of dispersive pulse propagation in draw wire waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Kohl, Thomas W.; Rogers, Wayne P.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model of dispersive pulse propagation in semi-infinite cylinders due to transient axially symmetric end conditions has been experimentally investigated. Specifically, the dispersive propagation of the first axially symmetric longitudinal mode in thin wire waveguides, which have ends in butt contact with longitudinal piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers, is examined. The method allows for prediction of a propagated waveform given a measured source waveform, together with the material properties of the cylinder. Alternatively, the source waveform can be extracted from measurement of the propagated waveform. The material properties required for implementation of the pulse propagation model are determined using guided wave phase velocity measurements. Hard tempered aluminum 1100 and 304 stainless steel wires, with 127, 305, and 406 micron diam., were examined. In general, the drawn wires were found to behave as transversely isotropic media.

  5. Incorporation of an energy equation into a pulsed inductive plasma acceleration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneau, Jarred

    Electric propulsion systems utilize electrical energy to produce thrust for spacecraft propulsion. These systems have multiple applications ranging from Earth orbit North-South station keeping to solar system exploratory missions such as NASA's Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship class missions that focus on exploring scientifically interesting targets. In an electromagnetic thruster, a magnetic field interacting with current in an ionized gas (plasma) accelerates the propellant to produce thrust. Pulsed inductive thrusters rely on an electrodeless discharge where both the magnetic field in the plasma and the plasma current are induced by a time-varying current in an external circuit. The multi-dimensional acceleration model for a pulsed inductive plasma thruster consists of a set of circuit equations describing the electrical behavior of the thruster coupled to a one-dimensional momentum equation that allow for estimating thruster performance. Current models lack a method to account for the time-varying energy distribution in an inductive plasma accelerator.

  6. Measurement and Modeling of Dispersive Pulse Propagation in Drawn Wire Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Kohl, Thomas W.; Rogers, Wayne P.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model of dispersive pulse propagation in semi-infinite cylinders due to transient axially symmetric end conditions has been experimentally investigated. Specifically, the dispersive propagation of the first axially symmetric longitudinal mode in thin wire waveguides, which have ends in butt contact with longitudinal piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers, is examined. The method allows for prediction of a propagated waveform given a measured source waveform, together with the material properties of the cylinder. Alternatively, the source waveform can be extracted from measurement of the propagated waveform. The material properties required for implementation of the pulse propagation model are determined using guided wave phase velocity measurements. Hard tempered aluminum 1100 and 304 stainless steel wires, with 127, 305, and 406 micron diam., were examined. In general, the drawn wires were found to behave as transversely isotropic media.

  7. Arterial pulse pressure amplification described by means of a nonlinear wave model: characterization of human aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M.; Cymberknop, L.; Armentano, R.; Pessana, F.; Wray, S.; Legnani, W.

    2016-04-01

    The representation of blood pressure pulse as a combination of solitons captures many of the phenomena observed during its propagation along the systemic circulation. The aim of this work is to analyze the applicability of a compartmental model for propagation regarding the pressure pulse amplification associated with arterial aging. The model was applied to blood pressure waveforms that were synthesized using solitons, and then validated by waveforms obtained from individuals from differentiated age groups. Morphological changes were verified in the blood pressure waveform as a consequence of the aging process (i.e. due to the increase in arterial stiffness). These changes are the result of both a nonlinear interaction and the phenomena present in the propagation of nonlinear mechanic waves.

  8. The fan beam model for the pulse evolution of PSR J0737-3039B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, L.; Dyks, J.

    2017-01-01

    Average radio pulse profile of a pulsar B in a double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B exhibits an interesting behaviour. During the observation period between 2003 and 2009, the profile evolves from a single-peaked to a double-peaked form, following disappearance in 2008 indicating that the geodetic precession of the pulsar is a possible origin of such behaviour. The known pulsar beam models can be used to determine the geometry of PSR J0737-3039B in the context of the precession. We study how the fan-beam geometry performs in explaining the observed variations of the radio profile morphology. It is shown that the fan beam can successfully reproduce the observed evolution of the pulse width, and should be considered as a serious alternative for the conal-like models.

  9. Pulsed radiolysis of model aromatic polymers and epoxy based matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Moacanin, J.; Liang, R.; Coulter, D.

    1982-01-01

    Models of primary processes leading to deactivation of energy deposited by a pulse of high energy electrons were derived for epoxy matrix materials and polyl-vinyl naphthalene. The basic conclusion is that recombination of initially formed charged states is complete within 1 nanosecond, and subsequent degradation chemistry is controlled by the reactivity of these excited states. Excited states in both systems form complexes with ground state molecules. These excimers or exciplexes have their characteristics emissive and absorptive properties and may decay to form separated pairs of ground state molecules, cross over to the triplet manifold or emit fluorescence. ESR studies and chemical analyses subsequent to pulse radiolysis were performed in order to estimate bond cleavage probabilities and net reaction rates. The energy deactivation models which were proposed to interpret these data have led to the development of radiation stabilization criteria for these systems.

  10. A statistical model of the photomultiplier gain process with applications to optical pulse detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    A Markov diffusion model was used to determine an approximate probability density for the random gain. This approximate density preserves the correct second-order statistics and appears to be in reasonably good agreement with experimental data. The receiver operating curve for a pulse counter detector of PMT cathode emission events was analyzed using this density. The error performance of a simple binary direct detection optical communication system was also derived. Previously announced in STAR as N82-25100

  11. A statistical model of the photomultiplier gain process with applications to optical pulse detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    A Markov diffusion model was used to determine an approximate probability density for the random gain. This approximate density preserves the correct second-order statistics and appears to be in reasonably good agreement with experimental data. The receiver operating curve for a pulse counter detector of PMT cathode emission events was analyzed using this density. The error performance of a simple binary direct detection optical communication system was also derived.

  12. Model and Subcomponent Development for a Pulse-Combustor-Driven Microgenerator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    emphasis was on performing modeling, and numerical simulations of the pulse combustors and free piston generator and the development of magnetic...subcomponents. During the last phase of the project (under a no-cost extension) some limited simulations of close-loop control of the engine performance...time and depth into the wall material. An apparent change in the slope of temperature curve can be seen on the interface between the chamber’s steel

  13. Modeling of asymmetric pulsed phenomena in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ha Yan; Wang Huijuan; Wang Xiaofei

    2012-01-15

    Asymmetric current pulses in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges are investigated by a self-consistent, one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the glow mode and Townsend mode can coexist in the asymmetric discharge even though the gas gap is rather large. The reason for this phenomenon is that the residual space charge plays the role of anode and reduces the gap width, resulting in the formation of a Townsend discharge.

  14. Electrical pulse induced biological effects using dielectric spectroscopy and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Allen Lawrence

    This dissertation studies the effects of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) on biological cells by measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the pulsed cells and mathematically modeling avascular tumor growth, cell population dynamics, and Ohmic heating. These issues are critical because of the recent use of intense ultrashort PEFs for various biological and medical applications. Recent research using PEFs for tumor treatment motivated an investigation of a simple model for the growth of an avascular tumor. We modeled tumor growth before and after necrotic core formation by incorporating spatial dependence into a one dimensional scaling law. This model emphasized the importance of cell metabolic rate in determining the final steady state size of the tumor. Experimental results showing changes in cell survival and cell cycle due to PEFs led to an investigation of a simple mathematical model for cell population dynamics that considered the cells to be proliferating (dividing) or quiescent (resting). Although some cell populations apparently reached steady state quickly, the proliferating cell population fell below one, meaning that the overall cell population would eventually decay away. This result, which was unaltered by including a transition from the quiescent to proliferating state, emphasized the importance of targeting proliferating cells for successful cancer treatments. Time domain dielectric spectroscopy was used to measure the electrical properties of a biological cell suspension over a wide frequency range with a single pulse following multiple PEFs. Fitting the dielectric properties of a cancer cell (Jurkat) suspension to a double shell model yielded the dielectric parameters of the cell membrane, cytoplasm, nuclear envelope, and nucleoplasm. Decreased cytoplasm and nucleoplasm conductivity and increased suspension conductivity suggestion transport from the cell interior to the exterior consistent with electroporation. Reduced cell membrane

  15. Sensorless Modeling of Varying Pulse Width Modulator Resolutions in Three-Phase Induction Motors

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Matthew David; Shevach, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    A sensorless algorithm was developed to predict rotor speeds in an electric three-phase induction motor. This sensorless model requires a measurement of the stator currents and voltages, and the rotor speed is predicted accurately without any mechanical measurement of the rotor speed. A model of an electric vehicle undergoing acceleration was built, and the sensorless prediction of the simulation rotor speed was determined to be robust even in the presence of fluctuating motor parameters and significant sensor errors. Studies were conducted for varying pulse width modulator resolutions, and the sensorless model was accurate for all resolutions of sinusoidal voltage functions. PMID:28076418

  16. Sensorless Modeling of Varying Pulse Width Modulator Resolutions in Three-Phase Induction Motors.

    PubMed

    Marko, Matthew David; Shevach, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    A sensorless algorithm was developed to predict rotor speeds in an electric three-phase induction motor. This sensorless model requires a measurement of the stator currents and voltages, and the rotor speed is predicted accurately without any mechanical measurement of the rotor speed. A model of an electric vehicle undergoing acceleration was built, and the sensorless prediction of the simulation rotor speed was determined to be robust even in the presence of fluctuating motor parameters and significant sensor errors. Studies were conducted for varying pulse width modulator resolutions, and the sensorless model was accurate for all resolutions of sinusoidal voltage functions.

  17. Realistic modeling of the pulse profile of PSR J0737-3039A

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, B. B. P.; Kim, C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Stairs, I. H.; Possenti, A.

    2014-05-20

    The Double Pulsar, PSR J0737-3039A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be ∼30° and ∼10 neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J0737-3039A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars (Δ{sub S}) is estimated to be ∼(138° ± 5°) at the current epoch and will likely remain constant until tidal interactions become important in ∼85 Myr, at merger.

  18. Modeling acoustic propagation of airgun array pulses recorded on tagged sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    DeRuiter, Stacy L; Tyack, Peter L; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Newhall, Arthur E; Lynch, James F; Miller, Patrick J O

    2006-12-01

    In 2002 and 2003, tagged sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) were experimentally exposed to airgun pulses in the Gulf of Mexico, with the tags providing acoustic recordings at measured ranges and depths. Ray trace and parabolic equation (PE) models provided information about sound propagation paths and accurately predicted time of arrival differences between multipath arrivals. With adequate environmental information, a broadband acoustic PE model predicted the relative levels of multipath arrivals recorded on the tagged whales. However, lack of array source signature data limited modeling of absolute received levels. Airguns produce energy primarily below 250 Hz, with spectrum levels about 20-40 dB lower at 1 kHz. Some arrivals recorded near the surface in 2002 had energy predominantly above 500 Hz; a surface duct in the 2002 sound speed profile helps explain this effect, and the beampattern of the source array also indicates an increased proportion of high-frequency sound at near-horizontal launch angles. These findings indicate that airguns sometimes expose animals to measurable sound energy above 250 Hz, and demonstrate the influences of source and environmental parameters on characteristics of received airgun pulses. The study also illustrates that on-axis source levels and simple geometric spreading inadequately describe airgun pulse propagation and the extent of exposure zones.

  19. Endometrial thermal balloon ablation using a high temperature, pulsed system: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Daniel M; Baldwin, Susan A; Bert, Joel L

    2003-12-01

    A new endometrial thermal balloon ablation treatment for menorrhagia is modeled mathematically to predict its efficacy and safety. A device preheats a fluid to 173 degrees C within a reservoir external to the uterus, and then pulses this fluid without further heating between the reservoir and the balloon for 2.1 min of treatment time. The model predicted this treatment to result in consistent immediate tissue death (coagulation) depths of 3.4 +/- 0.1 mm for uterine cavities of 7 to 26 mL, and that eventual necrosis (tissue death that would occur 1-5 days post burn) may occur to depths of 6.5 +/- 0.2 mm. Whereas, burn depths varied with uterine cavity volume when a low temperature treatment (constant 75 degrees C for 15 min) was modeled (2.3-2.9 mm and 6.8-8.2 mm, for immediate tissue death and eventual necrosis respectively). Similarly, the high temperature, pulsed treatment was less sensitive to blood perfusion rate than the low temperature treatment. Predicted eventual necrosis depth was 1.5 mm less for the high temperature, pulsed treatment than that predicted for a low temperature treatment (constant 87 degrees C for 7 min) for the same immediate tissue death depth (3.5 mm), indicating that the new high temperature treatment may result in less damage to non targeted tissues.

  20. Comparison of two models of a double inlet miniature pulse tube refrigerator: Part A thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nika, Philippe; Bailly, Yannick

    2002-10-01

    The cooling of electronic components is of great interest to improve their capabilities, especially for CMOS components or infrared sensors. The purpose of this paper is to present the design and the optimization of a miniature double inlet pulse tube refrigerator (DIPTR) dedicated to such applications. Special precautions have to be considered in modeling the global functioning of small scale DIPTR systems and also in estimating the net cooling power. In fact, thermal gradients are greater than those observed in normal scale systems, and moreover, because of the small dimensions of ducts (diameter), the pulse tube cannot be assumed to be adiabatic. Hence thermal heat conduction phenomena must be considered. Besides dead volumes introduced by junctions and capillaries cannot be neglected any more in front of the volume of the gas tube itself. The hydrodynamic and thermal behaviors of the cooler are predicted by means of two different approaches: a classical thermodynamic model and a model based on an electrical analogy. The results of these analysis are tested and criticized by comparing them with experimental data obtained on a small commercial pulse tube refrigerator.

  1. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  2. Prediction of flow rates through an orifice at pressures corresponding to the transition between molecular and isentropic flow

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.; Watson, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    A model of compressible flow through an orifice, in the region of transition from free molecular to isentropic expansion flow, has been developed and tested for accuracy. The transitional or slip regime is defined as the conditions where molecular interactions are too many for free molecular flow modeling, yet not great enough for isentropic expansion flow modeling. Due to a lack of literature establishing a well-accepted model for predicting transitional flow, it was felt such work would be beneficial. The model is nonlinear and cannot be satisfactorily linearized for a linear regression analysis. Consequently, a computer routine was developed which minimized the sum of the squares of the residual flow for the nonlinear model. The results indicate an average accuracy within 15% of the measured flow throughout the range of test conditions. Furthermore, the results of the regression analysis indicate that the transitional regime lies between Knudsen numbers of approximately 2 and 45. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Evaluating the use of a continuous approximation for model-based quantification of pulsed chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Y. K.; Khrapitchev, A. A.; Sibson, N. R.; Payne, S. J.; Chappell, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Many potential clinical applications of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have been studied in recent years. However, due to various limitations such as specific absorption rate guidelines and scanner hardware constraints, most of the proposed applications have yet to be translated into routine diagnostic tools. Currently, pulsed CEST which uses multiple short pulses to perform the saturation is the only viable irradiation scheme for clinical translation. However, performing quantitative model-based analysis on pulsed CEST is time consuming because it is necessary to account for the time dependent amplitude of the saturation pulses. As a result, pulsed CEST is generally treated as continuous CEST by finding its equivalent average field or power. Nevertheless, theoretical analysis and simulations reveal that the resulting magnetization is different when the different irradiation schemes are applied. In this study, the quantification of important model parameters such as the amine proton exchange rate from a pulsed CEST experiment using quantitative model-based analyses were examined. Two model-based approaches were considered - discretized and continuous approximation to the time dependent RF irradiation pulses. The results showed that the discretized method was able to fit the experimental data substantially better than its continuous counterpart, but the smaller fitted error of the former did not translate to significantly better fit for the important model parameters. For quantification of the endogenous CEST effect, such as in amide proton transfer imaging, a model-based approach using the average power equivalent saturation can thus be used in place of the discretized approximation.

  4. Laboratory model of the cardiovascular system for experimental demonstration of pulse wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Nestorović, Zorica; Djurić, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikić, Dejan

    2017-03-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Here, we present a laboratory model of the cardiovascular system. We have designed an experimental setup which can help medical and nursing students to properly learn and understand basic fluid hemodynamic principles, pulse wave and the phenomenon of wave propagation in blood vessels. Demonstration of wave propagation allowed a real time observation of the formation of compression and expansion waves by students, thus enabling them to better understand the difference between the two waves, and also to measure the pulse wave velocity for different fluid viscosities. The laboratory model of the cardiovascular system could be useful as an active learning methodology and a complementary tool for understanding basic principles of hemodynamics.

  5. Comparison of electrostatic and time dependent simulation codes for modeling a pulsed power gun

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Batchelor, K.; Farrell, J.P.; Dudnikova, G.

    1998-06-01

    This paper is a result of a group of simulations used to determine the optimal parameters for a pulsed power electron gun. As electrostatic codes such as PBGUNS tend to be cheaper, easier to use, and have less stringent computational requirements than time dependent codes such as MAFIA, it was desirable to determine those regimes in which the electrostatic codes agree with time dependent models. It was also necessary to identify those problems that required time dependence, such as longitudinal variation in an electron bunch. PBGUNS was then used to perform the bulk of the optimization, with only those issues that required time dependence being resolved with MAFIA. Good agreement in transverse phase space values was found between the electrostatic code (PBGUNS) and the time dependent code (MAFIA) for a variety of pulse durations, even for pulse durations short compared to the electron transit time of the accelerating region. To obtain values for the longitudinal energy spread and the variation of the transverse phase space across the bunch, it was necessary to use MAFIA. The electrostatic codes have an advantage in terms of required computational resources and run time, and are therefore a good choice for modeling jobs in which the longitudinal energy spread is unimportant.

  6. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of the jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. The emergence of NO(x) regulations for stationary gas turbines and the anticipation of aero-engine regulations requires an improved understanding of jet mixing as new combustor concepts are introduced. For example, the success of the staged combustor to reduce the emission of NO(x) is almost entirely dependent upon the rapid and complete dilution of the rich zone products within the mixing section. It is these mixing challenges to which the present study is directed. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of a conventional design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice length-to- width ratio, and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that the best mixing orifice geometry tested involves eight orifices with a long-to-short side aspect ratio of 3.5 at a twenty-three degree inclination from the center-line of the mixing section.

  7. CFD Assessment of Orifice Aspect Ratio and Mass Flow Ratio on Jet Mixing in Rectangular Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Isothermal CFD analysis was performed on axially opposed rows of jets mixing with cross flow in a rectangular duct. Laterally, the jets' centerlines were aligned with each other on the top and bottom walls. The focus of this study was to characterize the effects of orifice aspect ratio and jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio on jet penetration and mixing. Orifice aspect ratios (L/W) of 4-to-1, 2-to-1, and 1-to-1, along with circular holes, were parametrically analyzed. Likewise, jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratios (MR) of 2.0, 0.5, and 0.25 were systematically investigated. The jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J) was maintained at 36 for all cases, and the orifice spacing-to-duct height (S/H) was varied until optimum mixing was attained for each configuration. The numerical results showed that orifice aspect ratio (and likewise orifice blockage) had little effect on jet penetration and mixing. Based on mixing characteristics alone, the 4-to-1 slot was comparable to the circular orifice. The 4-to-1 slot has a smaller jet wake which may be advantageous for reducing emissions. However, the axial length of a 4-to-1 slot may be prohibitively long for practical application, especially for MR of 2.0. The jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio had a more significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. For a 4-to-1 aspect ratio orifice, the design correlating parameter for optimum mixing (C = (S/H)(sq. root J)) varied from 2.25 for a mass flow ratio of 2.0 to 1.5 for a mass flow ratio of 0.25.

  8. 3-D Modeling of Modifications to the Z Accelerator for Generating Shaped Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointon, Timothy D.; Savage, Mark E.; Harjes, Henry C.

    2002-12-01

    One option to temporally shape the power pulse at the load on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories is timing delays between the 36 pulse-forming lines. However, this can lead to the formation of magnetic nulls in the vacuum section, with the potential for greatly increasing electron losses to—and possibly damaging—the anode. Three-dimensional computer simulations are now being conducted to study this concern. The simulation geometry models a single level of Z, with a radial transmission line driven by nine parallel-plate lines. Every third line is driven early relative to the other six. Results from preliminary runs without particle emission are presented. Voltage and current diagnostics agree quite well with circuit simulations, and spatial field profiles illustrate the evolution of the magnetic nulls in detail.

  9. An extended diffusive model for calculating thermal diffusivity from single monopole tokamak heat pulse propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M. )

    1990-02-01

    The problem of deducing {chi}{sub e} from measurements of the propagation of a monopole heatpulse is considered. An extended diffusive model, which takes into account perturbed sources and sinks is extended to the case of a monopole heat input. {chi}{sub e} is expressed as a function of two observables, the heat pulse velocity and the radial damping rate. Two simple expressions valid for two different ranges of the radius of the poloidal waist of the beam power profile are given. The expressions are valid in the heat pulse measurement region, extending radially 0.05a beyond the beam power waist to near 0.6a. The inferred {chi}{sub e} is a local value, not an average value of the radial {chi}{sub e} profile. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Interaction of pulse laser radiation of 532 nm with model coloration layers for medieval stone artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colson, J.; Nimmrichter, J.; Kautek, W.

    2014-05-01

    Multilayer polychrome coatings on medieval and Renaissance stone artefacts represent substantial challenges in laser cleaning. Therefore, polychromic models with classical pigments, minium Pb22+PbO, zinc white (ZnO), and lead white ((PbCO3)2·Pb(OH)2) in an acrylic binder, were irradiated with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm. The studied medieval pigments exhibit strongly varying incubation behaviours directly correlated to their band gap energies. Higher band gaps beyond the laser photon energy of 2.3 eV require more incubative generation of defects for resonant transitions. A matching of the modification thresholds after more than four laser pulses was observed. Laser cleaning with multiple pulsing should not exceed ca. 0.05 J/cm2 when these pigments coexist in close spatial proximity.

  11. Analytical solutions and moment analysis of chromatographic models for rectangular pulse injections.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Shamsul; Abbasi, Javeria N; Javeed, Shumaila; Shah, Munawar; Khan, Farman U; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2013-11-08

    This work focuses on the analysis of two standard liquid chromatographic models, namely the lumped kinetic model and the equilibrium dispersive model. Analytical solutions, obtained by means of Laplace transformation, are derived for rectangular single solute concentration pulses of finite length and breakthrough curves injected under linear conditions. In order to analyze the solute transport behavior by means of the two models, the temporal moments up to fourth order are calculated from the Laplace-transformed solutions. The limiting cases of continuous injection and negligible mass transfer limitations are evaluated. For validation, the analytical solutions are compared with the numerical solutions of models using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. Results of different case studies are discussed for linear and nonlinear adsorption isotherms. The discontinuous Galerkin method is employed to obtain moments for both linear and nonlinear models numerically. Analytically and numerically determined concentration profiles and moments were found to be in good agreement.

  12. Performance model for optical extraction from a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, D. A.; Bauer, A. H.; Jones, K. D.

    A comprehensive time-dependent gain model for pulsed optical extraction from a flowing oxygen-iodine laser medium is described. Gas flow is treated using an unsteady, premixed, quasi-one-dimensional model which accounts for gas motion and expansion as well as heat release in the cavity. The model uses a simplified, temperature-dependent, chemical kinetics package which consists of several reactions among the 3Sigma, 1Delta, and 1Sigma states of oxygen, atomic and molecular iodine, water, and helium. Hyperfine relaxation effects on the gain and optical extraction from the 3-4 line are treated using a simple four-level laser model. An efficient algorithm for solving the coupled medium and optical extraction equations is described. This gain model, in conjunction with a geometric model of an unstable confocal resonator, is used to examine energy extraction from the medium as a function of pulse repetition rate, duty cycle, and optical mode width. It is shown that the output power may exhibit flow-induced relaxation oscillations and the conditions under which these oscillations occur are discussed.

  13. Predicting the threshold of pulse-train electrical stimuli using a stochastic auditory nerve model: the effects of stimulus noise.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie M

    2004-04-01

    The incorporation of low levels of noise into an electrical stimulus has been shown to improve auditory thresholds in some human subjects (Zeng et al., 2000). In this paper, thresholds for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli are predicted utilizing a stochastic neural-behavioral model of ensemble fiber responses to bi-phasic stimuli. The neural refractory effect is described using a Markov model for a noise-free pulse-train stimulus and a closed-form solution for the steady-state neural response is provided. For noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli, a recursive method using the conditional probability is utilized to track the neural responses to each successive pulse. A neural spike count rule has been presented for both threshold and intensity discrimination under the assumption that auditory perception occurs via integration over a relatively long time period (Bruce et al., 1999). An alternative approach originates from the hypothesis of the multilook model (Viemeister and Wakefield, 1991), which argues that auditory perception is based on several shorter time integrations and may suggest an NofM model for prediction of pulse-train threshold. This motivates analyzing the neural response to each individual pulse within a pulse train, which is considered to be the brief look. A logarithmic rule is hypothesized for pulse-train threshold. Predictions from the multilook model are shown to match trends in psychophysical data for noise-free stimuli that are not always matched by the long-time integration rule. Theoretical predictions indicate that threshold decreases as noise variance increases. Theoretical models of the neural response to pulse-train stimuli not only reduce calculational overhead but also facilitate utilization of signal detection theory and are easily extended to multichannel psychophysical tasks.

  14. CORONAL FUZZINESS MODELED WITH PULSE-HEATED MULTI-STRANDED LOOP SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Guarrasi, Massimiliano; Reale, Fabio; Peres, Giovanni

    2010-08-10

    Coronal active regions are observed to get increasingly fuzzy (i.e., increasingly confused and uniform) in increasingly hard energy bands or lines. We explain this as evidence of fine multi-temperature structure of coronal loops. To this end, we model bundles of loops made of thin strands, each heated by short and intense heat pulses. For simplicity, we assume that the heat pulses are all equal and triggered only once in each strand at a random time. The pulse intensity and cadence are selected so as to have steady active region loops ({approx}3 MK) on average. We compute the evolution of the confined heated plasma with a hydrodynamic loop model. We then compute the emission along each strand in several spectral lines, from cool ({<=}1 MK), to warm (2-3 MK) lines, detectable with Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer, to hot X-ray lines. The strands are then put side by side to construct an active region loop bundle. We find that in the warm lines (2-3 MK) the loop emission fills all the available image surface. Therefore, the emission appears quite uniform and it is difficult to resolve the single loops, while in the cool lines the loops are considerably more contrasted and the region is less fuzzy. The main reasons for this effect are that, during their evolution, i.e., pulse heating and slow cooling, each strand spends a relatively long time at temperatures around 2-3 MK and it has a high emission measure during that phase, so the whole region appears more uniform or smudged. We predict that fuzziness should be reduced in the hot UV and X-ray lines.

  15. Extinction and permanence of two-nutrient and two-microorganism chemostat model with pulsed input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tieying; Chen, Lansun; Zhang, Ping

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, a model of the chemostat involving two species of microorganisms competing for two perfectly complementary, growth-limiting nutrients and periodically pulsed input is considered. By using the Floquet's theorem, we find the two-microorganism eradication periodic solution is globally asymptotically stable if R1 < 1 . At the same time we can find nutrients and microorganisms are permanent if R2 > 1 . Meanwhile, sufficient conditions based on biologically meaningful parameters in the model are given that predict competitive exclusion for certain parameter ranges and coexistence for others. Finally, our results are illustrated by numerical simulation.

  16. Intrinsic chirp of attosecond pulses: Single-atom model versus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kazamias, S.; Balcou, Ph.

    2004-06-01

    We demonstrate and evaluate the importance of an intrinsic chirp inherent to attosecond pulse creation accompanying high-order harmonic generation in recently published experimental data by Dinu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 063901 (2003)]. We present an analytical model, from which the atomic origin of the harmonic chirp is clearly understood. Moreover, the behavior of the chirp as a function of experimental parameters such as laser intensity is inferred. The comparison between our model and the experimental data provides us with useful information about the conditions in which the high-order harmonics is generated.

  17. Modeling of testosterone regulation by pulse-modulated feedback: An experimental data study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Per; Medvedev, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The continuous part of a hybrid (pulse-modulated) model of testosterone feedback regulation is extended with infinite-dimensional and nonlinear dynamics, to better explain the testosterone concentration profiles observed in clinical data. A linear least-squares based optimization algorithm is developed for the purpose of detecting impulses of gonadotropin-realsing hormone from measured concentration of luteinizing hormone. The parameters in the model are estimated from hormone concentration measured in human males, and simulation results from the full closed-loop system are provided.

  18. Nonstationary flow in the model channel of a ramjet engine in pulse-periodic energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2008-05-01

    A study has been made of the influence of the pulse-periodic supply of energy that is equal to the energy released in the combustion of hydrogen in air on the structure of supersonic flow in a channel of variable cross section, modeling the duct of a ramjet engine. The flow has been modeled on the basis of two-dimensional nonstationary gas-dynamic equations. Different flow regimes have been obtained depending on the configuration of the zones of energy supply and the excess-air coefficients.

  19. Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT): Modeling and Validation Using the MACH2 Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven (Technical Monitor); Mikellides, Pavlos G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical modeling of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster exercising the magnetohydrodynamics code, MACH2 aims to provide bilateral validation of the thruster's measured performance and the code's capability of capturing the pertinent physical processes. Computed impulse values for helium and argon propellants demonstrate excellent correlation to the experimental data for a range of energy levels and propellant-mass values. The effects of the vacuum tank wall and massinjection scheme were investigated to show trivial changes in the overall performance. An idealized model for these energy levels and propellants deduces that the energy expended to the internal energy modes and plasma dissipation processes is independent of the propellant type, mass, and energy level.

  20. A model for diffusive transport through a spherical interface probed by pulsed-field gradient NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Price, W S; Barzykin, A V; Hayamizu, K; Tachiya, M

    1998-01-01

    In biological systems, because of higher intracellular viscosity and/or the restriction of the diffusion space inside cells, the (apparent) diffusion coefficient of an intracellular species (e.g., water) is generally smaller than when it is in the extracellular medium. This difference affects the spin-echo signal attenuation in the pulsed field gradient NMR experiment and thus affords a means of separating the intracellular from the extracellular species, thereby providing a basis for studying transmembrane transport. Such experiments have commonly been analyzed using the macroscopic model of Kärger (see Adv. Magn. Reson. 21:1-89 (1988)). In our previous study, we considered a microscopic model of diffusive transport through a spherical interface using the short gradient pulse approximation (J. Magn. Reson. A114:39-46 (1995)). The spins in the external medium were modeled with the "partially absorbing wall" condition or as having a small but finite lifetime. In the present paper, we extend our treatment to the case in which there is no limitation upon the lifetime in either medium. We also consider a simple modification of Kärger's model that more properly accounts for the restricted intracellular diffusion. Importantly, it was found that the exact solution within the short gradient pulse approximation developed here and the modified Kärger model are in close agreement in the (experimentally relevant) long-time limit. The results of this study show that when there is no limitation upon the lifetime of the transported species in either phase, the spin-echo attenuation curve is very sensitive to transport. PMID:9591653

  1. Experimental investigation of the effect orifice shape and fluid pressure has on high aspect ratio cross-sectional jet behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wakes, S J; Holdø, A E; Meares, A J

    2002-01-04

    Prevention of major disasters such as Piper Alpha is a concern of oil and gas companies when commissioning a new offshore superstructure. Safety studies are undertaken to identify potential major hazards, risks to personnel and that sufficient precautions have been employed to minimise these. Such an assessment will also include the consideration of the protection from gas leaks such as the optimum positions of gas leak detectors and startup safety procedures after a leak. This requires a comprehensive knowledge of the behaviour of the leaking hydrocarbons as they emerge from the leak into the area of concern. Such leaks are most likely to emanate from a high aspect ratio cross-sectional curved slot in a pipeline. This paper challenges the conventional view that it is sufficient to model such leaks as axisymmetric jets. This paper is therefore concerned with an experimental study carried out on a series of more realistic high aspect ratio cross-sectional jets issuing from a flange orifice. Both high quality photographs in both planes of the jets and some quantitative pressure data is examined for a high aspect ratio cross-sectional jet of air at pressures up to 4.136bar. The effect of changing aspect ratio, fluid pressure and orifice shape will be discussed and put into context with regard to how this relates to offshore analysis studies.

  2. Predictions of psychophysical measurements for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) pulse-train stimuli from a stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifang; Collins, Leslie M

    2007-08-01

    Two approaches have been proposed to reduce the synchrony of the neural response to electrical stimuli in cochlear implants. One approach involves adding noise to the pulse-train stimulus, and the other is based on using a high-rate pulse-train carrier. Hypotheses regarding the efficacy of the two approaches can be tested using computational models of neural responsiveness prior to time-intensive psychophysical studies. In our previous work, we have used such models to examine the effects of noise on several psychophysical measures important to speech recognition. However, to date there has been no parallel analytic solution investigating the neural response to the high-rate pulse-train stimuli and their effect on psychophysical measures. This work investigates the properties of the neural response to high-rate pulse-train stimuli with amplitude modulated envelopes using a stochastic auditory nerve model. The statistics governing the neural response to each pulse are derived using a recursive method. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and model simulations is demonstrated for sinusoidal amplitude modulated (SAM) high rate pulse-train stimuli. With our approach, predicting the neural response in modern implant devices becomes tractable. Psychophysical measurements are also predicted using the stochastic auditory nerve model for SAM high-rate pulse-train stimuli. Changes in dynamic range (DR) and intensity discrimination are compared with that observed for noise-modulated pulse-train stimuli. Modulation frequency discrimination is also studied as a function of stimulus level and pulse rate. Results suggest that high rate carriers may positively impact such psychophysical measures.

  3. Neural network modeling of pulsed-laser weld pool shapes in aluminum alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Smartt, H.B.; Pace, D.P. Tolle, C.R.

    1998-11-01

    A model was developed to predict the weld pool shape in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds of aluminum alloy 5754. The model utilized neural network analysis to relate the weld process conditions to four pool shape parameters: penetration, width, width at half-penetration, and cross-sectional area. The model development involved the identification of the input (process) variables, the desired output (shape) variables, and the optimal neural network architecture. The latter was influenced by the number of defined inputs and outputs as well as the amount of data that was available for training the network. After appropriate training, the best network was identified and was used to predict the weld shape. A routine to convert the shape parameters into predicted weld profiles was also developed. This routine was based on the actual experimental weld profiles and did not impose an artificial analytical function to describe the weld profile. The neural network model was tested on experimental welds. The model predictions were excellent. It was found that the predicted shapes were within the experimental variations that were found along the length of the welds (due to the pulsed nature of the weld power) and the reproducibility of welds made under nominally identical conditions.

  4. Neural network modeling of pulsed-laser weld pool shapes in aluminum alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Smartt, H.B.

    1998-09-01

    A model was developed to predict the weld pool shape in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds of aluminum alloy 5754. The model utilized neural network analysis to relate the weld process conditions to four pool shape parameters: (1) penetration width, (2) width at half-penetration, and (3) cross-sectional area. The model development involved the identification of the input (process) variables, the desired output (shape) variables, and the optimal neural network architecture. The latter was influenced by the number of defined inputs and outputs as well as the amount of data that was available for training the network. After appropriate training, die best network was identified and was used to predict the weld shape. A routine to convert the shape parameters into predicted weld profiles was also developed. This routine was based on the actual experimental weld profiles and did not impose an artificial analytical function to describe the weld profile. The neural network model was tested on experimental welds. The model predictions were excellent. It was found that the predicted shapes were within the experimental variations that were found along the length of the welds (due to the pulsed nature of the weld power) and the reproducibility of welds made under nominally identical conditions.

  5. Self-healing slip pulses in dynamic rupture models due to velocity-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    rise time and rupture propagation velocity depend on the choice of constitutive parameters. The second strength function is a natural log velocity-dependent form similar to constitutive laws that fit experimental rock friction data at lower velocities. Slip pulses also arise with this function. For a reasonable choice of constitutive parameters, slip pulses with this function do not propagate at speeds greater than the Raleighwave velocity. The calculated slip pulses are similar in many aspects to seismic observations of short rise time. In all cases of self-healing slip pulses, the residual stress increases with distance behind the trailing edge of the pulse so that the final stress drop is much less than the dynamic stress drop, in agreement with the model of Brune (1976) and some recent seismological observations of rupture.

  6. Air release measurements of V-oil 1404 downstream of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudigmann, H.-A.; Iben, U.; Pelz, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents measurements on air release of V-oil 1404 in the back flow of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions using a shadowgraph imaging method. The released air was determined at three positions downstream of the orifice for different pressure conditions. It was found that more than 23% of the initially dissolved air is released and appears downstream of the orifice in the form of bubbles.

  7. Modeling of Dense Plasma Effects in Short-Pulse Laser Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Timothy; Golovkin, Igor; Macfarlane, Joseph; Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, WI Team

    2016-10-01

    Warm and Hot Dense Matter produced in short-pulse laser experiments can be studied with new high resolving power x-ray spectrometers. Data interpretation implies accurate modeling of the early-time heating dynamics and the radiation conditions that are generated. Producing synthetic spectra requires a model that describes the major physical processes that occur inside the target, including the hot-electron generation and relaxation phases and the effect of target heating. An important issue concerns the sensitivity of the predicted K-line shifts to the continuum lowering model that is used. We will present a set of PrismSPECT spectroscopic simulations using various continuum lowering models: Hummer/Mihalas, Stewart-Pyatt, and Ecker-Kroll and discuss their effect on the formation of K-shell features. We will also discuss recently implemented models for dense plasma shifts for H-like, He-like and neutral systems.

  8. Kinetic model for the inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum by pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, D; Ruíz, P; Barbosa-Cánovas, G V; Martínez, A; Rodrigo, M

    2003-03-25

    The kinetics of Lactobacillus plantarum inactivation by pulsed electric fields (PEF) was studied in two different growth stages (exponential and stationary), but in the same reference medium (0.6% peptone water). Electric field intensity and treatment time varied from 20 to 28 kV/cm and 30 to 240 micros, respectively. The experimental data showed that cells in the exponential growth stage were more sensitive to PEF treatment than those in the stationary stage. The inactivation data were adjusted to the Bigelow and Hülsheger models and the Weibull frequency distribution function, and constants were calculated for both growth stages in each model. The models were tested and their accuracy was assessed by using the Accuracy Factor. According to this parameter, the Weibull frequency distribution function gave better fittings for the inactivation by PEF than Bigelow or Hülsheger models. On the other hand, the Bigelow model gave a good accuracy factor and is simpler.

  9. Apparatus and process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1994-12-20

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

  10. Apparatus and process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOEpatents

    Flynn, Paul L.; Giammarise, Anthony W.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

  11. Impact of orifice orientation on a finite-span synthetic jet interaction with a crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Buren, Tyler; Leong, Chia Min; Whalen, Edward; Amitay, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The formation and evolution of flow structures associated with a finite-span synthetic jet issued into a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer were investigated experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. A synthetic jet with an aspect ratio of AR = 18 was mounted on a flat plate and its interaction with a free stream, having a velocity of U∞ = 10 m/s (Reδ = 2000) at momentum coefficients of Cμ = 0.08, 0.33, and 0.75, was studied. The effect of the orifice pitch (α = 20∘-90∘) and skew (β = 0∘-90∘) angles on vortex formation as well as the global impact of the synthetic jet on the flow field was explored in detail. It was found that the orifice orientation had a significant impact on the steady and unsteady flow structures. Different orifice skew and pitch angles could result in several types of vortical structures downstream, including: no coherent vortex structure, a single (positive or negative) strong vortex, or a symmetric vortex pair. In all cases, the velocity near the wall was increased; however, cases with higher blockage (i.e., more wall-normal, transverse orifice) resulted in a strong velocity deficit in the free stream where orifices with lower pitch angles yielded in an increase in velocity throughout. The analysis is concluded with a summary of quantitative metrics that allude to flow control effectiveness.

  12. Multi-scale modelling of pulsed nanosecond dielectric barrier plasma discharges in plane-to-plane geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Sharath; Yang, Vigor; Adamovich, Igor

    2013-04-01

    An integrated theoretical and numerical framework is developed to study the dynamics of energy coupling, gas heating and generation of active species by repetitively pulsed nanosecond dielectric barrier discharges (NS DBDs) in air. The work represents one of the first attempts to simulate, in a self-consistent manner, multiple (more than 100) nanosecond pulses. Detailed information is obtained about the electric-field transients during each voltage pulse, and accumulation of plasma generated species and gas heating over ms timescales. The plasma is modelled using a two-temperature, detailed chemistry scheme, with ions and neutral species in thermal equilibrium at the gas temperature, and electrons in thermal nonequilibrium. The analysis is conducted with pressures and pulsing frequency in the range 40-100 Torr and 1-105 Hz, respectively. The input electrical energy is directly proportional to the number density, and remains fairly constant on a per molecule basis from pulse to pulse. Repetitive pulsing results in uniform production of atomic oxygen in the discharge volume via electron-impact dissociation during voltage pulses, and through quenching of excited nitrogen molecules in the afterglow. The ion Joule effect causes rapid gas heating of ˜40 K/pulse in the cathode sheath and generates weak acoustic waves. Conductive heat loss to the walls during the time interval between voltage pulses prevents overheating of the cathode layer and development of ionization instabilities. A uniform ‘hat-shaped’ temperature profile develops in the discharge volume after multiple pulses, due to chemical heat release from quenching of excited species. This finding may explain experimentally observed volumetric ignition (as opposed to hot-spot ignition) in fuel-air mixtures subject to NS DBD.

  13. Spectral-spatial fusion model for robust blood pulse waveform extraction in photoplethysmographic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Amelard, Robert; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic imaging is an optical solution for non-contact cardiovascular monitoring from a distance. This camera-based technology enables physiological monitoring in situations where contact-based devices may be problematic or infeasible, such as ambulatory, sleep, and multi-individual monitoring. However, automatically extracting the blood pulse waveform signal is challenging due to the unknown mixture of relevant (pulsatile) and irrelevant pixels in the scene. Here, we propose a signal fusion framework, FusionPPG, for extracting a blood pulse waveform signal with strong temporal fidelity from a scene without requiring anatomical priors. The extraction problem is posed as a Bayesian least squares fusion problem, and solved using a novel probabilistic pulsatility model that incorporates both physiologically derived spectral and spatial waveform priors to identify pulsatility characteristics in the scene. Evaluation was performed on a 24-participant sample with various ages (9–60 years) and body compositions (fat% 30.0 ± 7.9, muscle% 40.4 ± 5.3, BMI 25.5 ± 5.2 kg·m−2). Experimental results show stronger matching to the ground-truth blood pulse waveform signal compared to the FaceMeanPPG (p < 0.001) and DistancePPG (p < 0.001) methods. Heart rates predicted using FusionPPG correlated strongly with ground truth measurements (r2 = 0.9952). A cardiac arrhythmia was visually identified in FusionPPG’s waveform via temporal analysis. PMID:28018712

  14. On the Modeling of PHELIX and Other Pulsed-Power Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, Christopher; Reass, William; Oro, David; Turchi, Peter; Holtkamp, David; Griego, Jeffery; Reinovsky, Robert

    2011-10-01

    At LANL, pulsed power hydrodynamics employs multi mega-Amp currents, over tens of microseconds, producing hundreds of kilogauss fields in a Z-pinch configuration for the study of shocks, fluids, and material physics. The new PHELIX portable pulsed power machine demonstrated for first time the efficient coupling of a high-power capacitor bank via a toroidal transformer to a central load. The whole system sits on a 200 square foot platform for use at the LANL proton radiography facility. Additionally, magnetic FCGs are employed for very high energy density experiments. Here, explosives propel metal conductors in a coaxial, helical, or disk system to produce tens of mega-Amp currents. Currents carried in the skin depth are subject to intense Lorentz forces and Joule heating. Single-fluid, resistive MHD theory with material properties of the conductors well characterizes the experiments. One and two-dimensional computational codes solve the equations of mass, momentum, field, and energy. The grids are coupled to circuit equations describing the pulsed power driver. Results of recent experiments will be compared to modeling.

  15. Spectral-spatial fusion model for robust blood pulse waveform extraction in photoplethysmographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Amelard, Robert; Clausi, David A; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Photoplethysmographic imaging is an optical solution for non-contact cardiovascular monitoring from a distance. This camera-based technology enables physiological monitoring in situations where contact-based devices may be problematic or infeasible, such as ambulatory, sleep, and multi-individual monitoring. However, automatically extracting the blood pulse waveform signal is challenging due to the unknown mixture of relevant (pulsatile) and irrelevant pixels in the scene. Here, we propose a signal fusion framework, FusionPPG, for extracting a blood pulse waveform signal with strong temporal fidelity from a scene without requiring anatomical priors. The extraction problem is posed as a Bayesian least squares fusion problem, and solved using a novel probabilistic pulsatility model that incorporates both physiologically derived spectral and spatial waveform priors to identify pulsatility characteristics in the scene. Evaluation was performed on a 24-participant sample with various ages (9-60 years) and body compositions (fat% 30.0 ± 7.9, muscle% 40.4 ± 5.3, BMI 25.5 ± 5.2 kg·m(-2)). Experimental results show stronger matching to the ground-truth blood pulse waveform signal compared to the FaceMeanPPG (p < 0.001) and DistancePPG (p < 0.001) methods. Heart rates predicted using FusionPPG correlated strongly with ground truth measurements (r(2) = 0.9952). A cardiac arrhythmia was visually identified in FusionPPG's waveform via temporal analysis.

  16. Pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams: a depleted wave model for type II second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Motazedian, Alireza; Mohammad Rezaee, Mostafa; Jalil-Abadi, Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2014-11-10

    In this work, a three-dimensional and time-dependent nonlinear wave model to describe the generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss second-harmonic waves (SHWs) is presented. Three coupled equations, two for ordinary and extraordinary fundamental waves and one for extraordinary SHWs, describing type II second-harmonic generation (SHG) in a KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal were solved by considering the depletion of fundamental waves (FWs). The results examined the validity of nondepleted wave approximation against the energy of pulses, beam spot size, and interaction length. It was shown that for pulses with spot sizes of ωf=80  μm and energy of 0.8j, the nonlinear interaction was accomplished over a distance of ∼5  mm. Therefore, for KTP crystals with lengths longer than 5 mm, the nondepleted wave approximation can no longer be valid. To be valid, the crystal must be shorter than the interaction length, i.e., 5 mm.

  17. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery in urology: Review of the world literature.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Wassim M; Raheem, Omer A; Cohen, Seth A; Derweesh, Ithaar H

    2012-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has gained momentum in the recent urologic literature as a new surgical approach for intra-abdominal organs with scarless and painless postoperative recoveries. We sought to review the published literature concerning the safety and reproducibility of NOTES in urology. PubMed literature review of articles published in the English language was performed over a 10-year period, i.e., between 2001 and 2011; all articles were critically reviewed and analyzed. Despite its novelty, pure or hybrid surgical approaches have been adapted in performing NOTES. NOTES essentially utilizes transluminal flexible endoscopic instruments along with laparoscopic instruments to gain access to abdominal, pelvic, and/or retroperitoneal cavities. The preliminary results of NOTES in surgery and to a limited extent in urology appear promising, yet further research in animal survival and human cadaveric models is requisite prior to human applications, especially for complex surgeries. Future innovative research, particularly biomedical engineering, should be directed to improving the technicality and mechanistic application of NOTES; hence, better safety and efficacy of NOTES.

  18. Modeling high-intensity pulsed electric field inactivation of a lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Soliva-Fortuny, R; Bendicho-Porta, S; Martín-Belloso, O

    2006-11-01

    The inactivation kinetics of a lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens (EC 3.1.1.3.) were studied in a simulated skim milk ultrafiltrate treated with high-intensity pulsed electric fields. Samples were subjected to electric field intensities ranging from 16.4 to 27.4 kV/cm for up to 314.5 micros, thus achieving a maximum inactivation of 62.1%. The suitability of describing experimental data using mechanistic first-order kinetics and an empirical model based on the Weibull distribution function is discussed. In addition, different mathematical expressions relating the residual activity values to field strength and treatment time are supplied. A first-order fractional conversion model predicted residual activity with good accuracy (A(f) = 1.018). A mechanistic insight of the model kinetics was that experimental values were the consequence of different structural organizations of the enzyme, with uneven resistance to the pulsed electric field treatments. The Weibull model was also useful in predicting the energy density necessary to achieve lipase inactivation.

  19. Inductive pulsed plasma thruster model with time-evolution of energy and state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sankaran, K.; Ritchie, A. G.; Reneau, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional (1D) equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically equivalent approximations that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous 1D performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the temperature consistent with the time-varying energy flux into the plasma. The plasma state properties are also more realistically modelled and evolved in time, allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. Computational results for argon propellant are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. The scaling of different energy sinks as a function of the dynamic impedance parameter provides insight into the global energy partitioning in these types of accelerators. Results from the present model deviate from the previous version where temperature is selected as an input without regard for the energy that would be deposited to heat the gas to that temperature. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model predicts specific impulse values that compare favourably with those measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters. Efficiency is underpredicted in the regime where data are available, but the trends in the data and simulations follow similar trajectories that appear to be converging towards a predicted peak efficiency as the dynamic impedance parameter is increased.

  20. Fluid modeling of plasma dynamics in pulsed RF capacitive glow discharges in low pressure argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruiqiang; Liu, Yue; Jia, Wenzhu; Zhou, Yanwen

    2017-08-01

    Based on the drift-diffusive approximation, one-dimensional fluid modeling is carried out for the pulsed RF capacitive glow discharges in low pressure argon. Investigated are the effects of various discharge parameters, such as the duty cycle ratio and frequency of the pulsed modulation, and the material properties of the electrode, on the plasma characteristics such as the electron recombination rate, during both the initial and the steady state phases of the discharge. The modeling results show that, after switching off the applied voltage during the pulsed modulation of the RF discharge, the electron density increases first and then decreases. This phenomenon is particularly pronounced before the discharge reaches steady state. Meanwhile, independent of whether the discharge has reached steady state or not, right after the applied voltage is switched on during each modulation period, the electron and ion densities and the metastable argon atom density, as well as their generation rate, experience a time delay (phase lag) with respect to the applied voltage. The results also show that, at the initial phase of the pulsed modulation, during the steady state discharge, the electron temperature in the center of the bulk plasma is almost not affected by the applied voltage, or by the material properties of the electrode such as the secondary electron emission rate. The electron density, however, does increase with these parameters, resulting in increased power density dissipation of the plasma. On the other hand, at fixed applied voltage, the central electron temperature of the bulk plasma is reduced by increasing several parameters, including the modulation duty ratio, the distance between two electrodes, and the modulation frequency, as well as the electron recombination rate due to different choices of the electrode material. This eventually leads to a reduction of the dissipated power density in the plasma. In particular, with the increase of the modulation duty

  1. Theoretical modeling and optimization of ablation-fed pulsed plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikellides, Yiangos George

    Theoretical modeling of ablation-fed, pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs) with the MACH2 code has shown that after repeated pulsed operation, the total expelled mass is due to ablation during the discharge and solid decomposition that persists long after the pulse. The latter mass does not considerably contribute to the impulse-bit thus degrading thruster performance. For the rectangular PPT geometry, optimizing current waveforms in combination with channel widths are presented, that utilize all decomposed mass, electromagnetically. These waveforms are characterized by short rise times (<1 musec) and prolonged decays (>25 musec). Simplified modeling based on steady-state, one-dimensional flow reveals that the mass flow rate vanes linearly with the square of the magnetic field and that the downstream flow speed is driven towards the Alfven wave speed when the magnetic pressure is much greater than the gasdynamic pressure. The model has been confirmed by MACH2. The mass flow requirement for such magnetosonic flow in turn, determines the surface temperature of the solid. Numerical simulations of coaxial geometries show that, compared with the rectangular, annular and linear pinch configurations, only an arrangement which operates an inverse-pinch discharge offers the convenience of axisymmetry for better correlation between theory and experiment, and operation at relatively high magnetic fields with propellant temperatures below the decomposition limit. Design guidelines for an inverse pinch thruster are provided. The inverse-pinch discharge produced by a non-reversing, waveform that rises to 18 kAmps; in 0.625 musec and decays in 6 musec, in a 1cm-(propellant) radius thruster, is found to prevent solid decomposition while still providing ablated mass for acceleration. At these lower magnetic field levels ( ˜ 0.4 T, maximum) it is found that thermal effects are driving the surface temperature of the solid, during the latter times of current decay.

  2. Visual study of the effect of grazing flow on the oscillatory flow in a resonator orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    Grazing flow and oscillatory flow in an orifice were studied in a plexiglass flow channel with a single side branch Helmholtz resonator using water as the fluid medium. An oscillatory flow was applied to the resonatory cavity, and color dyes were injected in both the orifice and the grazing flow field to record the motion of the fluid. The flow regimes associated with linear and nonlinear (high sound pressure level) impedances with and without grazing flows were recorded by a high-speed motion-picture camera. Appreciable differences in the oscillatory flow field were seen in the various flow regimes. With high grazing flows, the outflow and inflow from the resonator cavity are found to be asymmetric. The visual study confirms that jet energy loss during flow into a resonator cavity is much larger than the loss for ejection from the cavity into the grazing flow. For inflow into the resonator cavity, the effective orifice area was significantly reduced.

  3. Effect of flow rate of side-type orifice intake on withdrawn water temperature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueping; Li, Guangning; Han, Yunpeng

    2014-01-01

    Side-type orifice intake is a type of selective withdrawal facility used in managing reservoirs to mitigate the negative effects of low-temperature water. Based on the temperature data of a thermal stratified reservoir in China, an experiment was conducted in flume to study the influence of intake flow rate on withdrawn water temperature with different temperature distributions. Results indicated that withdrawn water temperature changed with different flow rates. The temperature change was determined by the water temperature gradients above and below the intake, whereas the change trend of temperature depended on the difference between the water temperature gradient above and below the intake. We likewise proposed a new equation with which the withdrawn water temperature of a thermal stratified reservoir using a side-type orifice could be calculated. These findings could be directly applied to the design and operation of side-type orifice intake in thermal stratified reservoirs.

  4. Modeling the absorption of intense, short laser pulses in steep density gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, W.E.

    1991-01-28

    A subroutine which calculates the absorption of short pulse electromagnetic radiation in a material has been installed into the laser fusion modeling program called LASNEX. Calculational results show the necessity for NLTE physics to account for ionization, the development of non-exponential density profiles for the expanding plasma and movement of the critical point toward the surface which results in Doppler shifts of the reflected light. Comparison of calculations of local scale lengths with experiments shows not only good agreement but the correct scaling with intensity. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  5. A nonlinear dynamical system for combustion instability in a pulse model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Kazushi; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically and numerically study the bifurcation phenomena of nonlinear dynamical system describing combustion instability in a pulse model combustor on the basis of dynamical system theory and complex network theory. The dynamical behavior of pressure fluctuations undergoes a significant transition from steady-state to deterministic chaos via the period-doubling cascade process known as Feigenbaum scenario with decreasing the characteristic flow time. Recurrence plots and recurrence networks analysis we adopted in this study can quantify the significant changes in dynamic behavior of combustion instability that cannot be captured in the bifurcation diagram.

  6. MATLAB/Simulink Pulse-Echo Ultrasound System Simulator Based on Experimentally Validated Models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Shin, Sangmin; Lee, Hyongmin; Lee, Hyunsook; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Eunhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2016-02-01

    A flexible clinical ultrasound system must operate with different transducers, which have characteristic impulse responses and widely varying impedances. The impulse response determines the shape of the high-voltage pulse that is transmitted and the specifications of the front-end electronics that receive the echo; the impedance determines the specification of the matching network through which the transducer is connected. System-level optimization of these subsystems requires accurate modeling of pulse-echo (two-way) response, which in turn demands a unified simulation of the ultrasonics and electronics. In this paper, this is realized by combining MATLAB/Simulink models of the high-voltage transmitter, the transmission interface, the acoustic subsystem which includes wave propagation and reflection, the receiving interface, and the front-end receiver. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our simulator, the models are experimentally validated by comparing the simulation results with the measured data from a commercial ultrasound system. This simulator could be used to quickly provide system-level feedback for an optimized tuning of electronic design parameters.

  7. Analysis of dc harmonics using the three-pulse model for the intermountain power project HVDC transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Dickmander, D.L.; Peterson, K.J.

    1989-04-01

    The harmonic analysis of the dc-side of an HVDC line transmission requires realistic models of the converters, the dc line, and other relevant equipment. These models must include all important paths for harmonic current, and appropriate sources of harmonic voltage generation. The classical converter modeling technique has been demonstrated to be insufficient in field measurements and analysis of the harmonic spectra found on recent HVDC line transmission. For this reason, a new model of the converter bridge which takes into account the major stray capacitances in the converter (the three-pulse model) has been developed, and is described in detail elsewhere. This paper presents comparisons between the classical and three-pulse calculations for the Intermountain Power Project (IPP) HVDC transmission. The calculation results from the three-pulse model agree favorably with the harmonics found in field measurements.

  8. New insights on the propagation of pulsed atmospheric plasma streams: From single jet to multi jet arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, E.; Darny, T.; Dozias, S.; Iseni, S.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure plasma propagation inside long dielectric tubes is analyzed for the first time through nonintrusive and nonperturbative time resolved bi-directional electric field (EF) measurements. This study unveils that plasma propagation occurs in a region where longitudinal EF exists ahead the ionization front position usually revealed from plasma emission with ICCD measurement. The ionization front propagation induces the sudden rise of a radial EF component. Both of these EF components have an amplitude of several kV/cm for helium or neon plasmas and are preserved almost constant along a few tens of cm inside a capillary. All these experimental measurements are in excellent agreement with previous model calculations. The key roles of the voltage pulse polarity and of the target nature on the helium flow patterns when plasma jet is emerging in ambient air are documented from Schlieren visualization. The second part of this work is then dedicated to the development of multi jet systems, using two different setups, based on a single plasma source. Plasma splitting in dielectric tubes drilled with sub millimetric orifices, but also plasma transfer across metallic tubes equipped with such orifices are reported and analyzed from ICCD imaging and time resolved EF measurements. This allows for the design and the feasibility validation of plasma jet arrays but also emphasizes the necessity to account for voltage pulse polarity, target potential status, consecutive helium flow modulation, and electrostatic influence between the produced secondary jets.

  9. New insights on the propagation of pulsed atmospheric plasma streams: From single jet to multi jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, E.; Darny, T.; Dozias, S.; Iseni, S.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma propagation inside long dielectric tubes is analyzed for the first time through nonintrusive and nonperturbative time resolved bi-directional electric field (EF) measurements. This study unveils that plasma propagation occurs in a region where longitudinal EF exists ahead the ionization front position usually revealed from plasma emission with ICCD measurement. The ionization front propagation induces the sudden rise of a radial EF component. Both of these EF components have an amplitude of several kV/cm for helium or neon plasmas and are preserved almost constant along a few tens of cm inside a capillary. All these experimental measurements are in excellent agreement with previous model calculations. The key roles of the voltage pulse polarity and of the target nature on the helium flow patterns when plasma jet is emerging in ambient air are documented from Schlieren visualization. The second part of this work is then dedicated to the development of multi jet systems, using two different setups, based on a single plasma source. Plasma splitting in dielectric tubes drilled with sub millimetric orifices, but also plasma transfer across metallic tubes equipped with such orifices are reported and analyzed from ICCD imaging and time resolved EF measurements. This allows for the design and the feasibility validation of plasma jet arrays but also emphasizes the necessity to account for voltage pulse polarity, target potential status, consecutive helium flow modulation, and electrostatic influence between the produced secondary jets.

  10. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients’ compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. Methods The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box–Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Results and Discussion Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box–Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry

  11. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  12. Developing Modularized Virtual Reality Simulators for Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES).

    PubMed

    Ahn, Woojin; Dorozhkin, Denis; Schwaitzberg, Steven; Jones, Daniel B; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures are rapidly being developed in diverse surgical fields. We are developing a Virtual Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery Trainer (VTEST™) built on a modularized platform that facilitates rapid development of virtual reality (VR) NOTES simulators. Both the hardware interface and software components consist of independent reusable and customizable modules. The developed modules are integrated to build a VR-NOTES simulator for training in the hybrid transvaginal NOTES cholecystectomy. The simulator was demonstrated and evaluated by expert NOTES surgeons at the 2015 Natural Orifice Surgery Consortium for Assessment and Research (NOSCAR) summit.

  13. An intercomparison of NEL and DHL water flow facilities using a twin orifice plate flowmeter assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejong, J.; Spencer, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    A 205 mm transfer standard orifice plate meter assembly, consisting of two orifice plates in series separated by a length of pipe containing a flow straightener, was calibrated in two water flow facilities. Results show that the agreement in the characteristics of such a differential pressure transfer standard package is within 0.17% over a 10:1 range from flow rates of approximately 8 to 80 l/sec. When the range over which the comparison was made was limited to that for which the calibration graphs gave straight lines, the agreement is 0.1% in 3 of the 4 calibrations (0.17% in the fourth).

  14. Challenging mitral valve repair for double-orifice mitral valve with noncompaction of left ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Manabu; Misumi, Hiroyasu; Abe, Kohei; Kawazoe, Kohei

    2017-02-25

    Double-orifice mitral valve (DOMV) is a relatively rare cardiac anomaly. Although usually associated with various cardiac anomalies, co-presence of DOMV and noncompaction of left ventricular myocardium (NCLVM) is extremely rare. Here, we present a 24-year-old male who underwent mitral valve repair using artificial chordae and annuloplasty at the posterior commissure for severe mitral regurgitation (MR), resulting from flail anterior leaflet of the larger postero-medial orifice and dilatation of left ventricle with NCLVM. One year later, he underwent second mitral valve repair for recurrence of MR. Further endoscopic evaluation of the left ventricle, and reinforcement via artificial ring, enabled us to achieve repair.

  15. Successful treatment of double-orifice mitral stenosis with percutaneous balloon mitral commissurotomy.

    PubMed

    Patted, Suresh V; Halkati, Prabhu C; Ambar, Sameer S; Sattur, Ameet G

    2012-01-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve (DOMV) is an uncommon congenital anomaly, being present in 0.05% of the general population. The isolated occurrence of this anomaly is very rare and, to our knowledge, no data are currently available on the incidence of an isolated DOMV. A DOMV is characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus with 2 orifices opening into the left ventricle (LV). Subvalvular structures, especially the tensor apparatus, invariably show various degrees of abnormality. It can substantially obstruct mitral valve inflow or cause mitral valve incompetence. We present a rare case of nineteen-year-old male who underwent percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy in stenotic DOMV.

  16. The critical parameters of the thermal explosion micro hot-spot model dependence on the pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskii, A. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Galkina, E. V.

    2017-05-01

    The dependencies of critical laser initiation energy density of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) - aluminum nanoparticles, PETN - cobalt nanoparticles and lead azide - lead nanoparticles on pulse duration were calculated in terms of the refined micro hot-spot model. It was shown that the absorption efficiency of the laser irradiation taken into account makes the initiation criterion change. According to the calculation results, the criterion in the limit of short pulses is energy density matching the experimental data. If the neodymium pulses duration is less than 50 ns, the radius of the nanoparticles with highest temperature varies insignificantly. The expression for the critical hot-spot temperature dependence on the pulse duration was derived. The conclusion was made that the model refining with nanoparticles absorption efficiency dependence on their radius is sufficient for the “small particles’ paradox” solution.

  17. A comparative study on continuous and pulsed RF argon capacitive glow discharges at low pressure by fluid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruiqiang; Liu, Yue; Jia, Wenzhu; Zhou, Yanwen

    2017-01-01

    Based on the plasma fluid theory and using the drift-diffusion approximation, a mathematical model for continuous and pulsed radial frequency (RF) argon capacitive glow discharges at low pressure is established. The model is solved by a finite difference method and the numerical results are reported. Based on the systematic analysis of the results, plasma characteristics of the continuous and pulsed RF discharges are comparatively investigated. It is shown that, under the same condition for the peak value of the driving potential, the cycle-averaged electron density, the current density, and other essential physical quantities in the continuous RF discharge are higher than those from the pulsed RF discharge. On the other hand, similar plasma characteristics are obtained with two types of discharges, by assuming the same deposited power. Consequently, higher driving potential is needed in pulsed discharges in order to maintain the same effective plasma current. Furthermore, it is shown that, in the bulk plasma region, the peak value of the bipolar electric field from the continuous RF discharge is greater than that from the pulsed RF discharge. In the sheath region, the ionization rate has the shape of double-peaking and the explanation is given. Because the plasma input power depends on the driving potential and the plasma current phase, the phase differences between the driving potential and the plasma current are compared between the continuous and the pulsed RF discharges. It is found that this phase difference is smaller in the pulsed RF discharge compared to that of the continuous RF discharge. This means that the input energy coupling in the pulsed RF discharge is less efficient than the continuous counterpart. This comparative study, carried out also under other conditions, thus can provide instructive ideas in applications using the continuous and pulsed RF capacitive glow discharges.

  18. co2amp: A software program for modeling the dynamics of ultrashort pulses in optical systems with CO2 amplifiers

    DOE PAGES

    Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a computer code for simulating the amplification of ultrashort mid-infrared laser pulses in CO2 amplifiers and their propagation through arbitrary optical systems. This code is based on a comprehensive model that includes an accurate consideration of the CO2 active medium and a physical optics propagation algorithm, and takes into account the interaction of the laser pulse with the material of the optical elements. Finally, the application of the code for optimizing an isotopic regenerative amplifier is described.

  19. The Arctic Marine Pulses Model: Linking Contiguous Domains in the Pacific Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S. E.; Stabeno, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Pacific Arctic marine ecosystem extends from the northern Bering Sea, across the Chukchi and into the East Siberian and Beaufort seas. Food webs in this domain are short, a simplicity that belies the biophysical complexity underlying trophic linkages from primary production to humans. Existing biophysical models, such as pelagic-benthic coupling and advective processes, provide frameworks for connecting certain aspects of the marine food web, but do not offer a full accounting of events that occur seasonally across the Pacific Arctic. In the course of the Synthesis of Arctic Research (SOAR) project, a holistic Arctic Marine Pulses (AMP) model was developed that depicts seasonal biophysical `pulses' across a latitudinal gradient, and linking four previously-described contiguous domains, including the: (i) Pacific-Arctic domain = the focal region; (ii) seasonal ice zone domain; (iii) Pacific marginal domain; and (iv) riverine coastal domain. The AMP model provides a spatial-temporal framework to guide research on dynamic ecosystem processes during this period of rapid biophysical changes in the Pacific Arctic. Some of the processes included in the model, such as pelagic-benthic coupling in the Northern Bering and Chukchi seas, and advection and upwelling along the Beaufort shelf, are already the focus of sampling via the Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) and other research programs. Other aspects such as biological processes associated with the seasonal ice zone and trophic responses to riverine outflow have received less attention. The AMP model could be enhanced by the application of visualization tools to provide a means to watch a season unfold in space and time. The capability to track sea ice dynamics and water masses and to move nutrients, prey and upper-trophic predators in space and time would provide a strong foundation for the development of predictive human-inclusive ecosystem models for the Pacific Arctic.

  20. The removal of Direct Orange 39 by pulsed corona discharge from model wastewater.

    PubMed

    Vujevic, D; Koprivanac, N; Bozic, A Loncaric; Locke, B R

    2004-07-01

    Untreated wastewater from the dye industry and dyehouses cannot be directly discharged into the environment due to the high content of organic matter and intensive colouration, even with low concentrations of dye. In this paper, the application of a high voltage pulsed electrical discharge in the aqueous phase has been assessed for the dye degradation. Experiments were conducted in a batch reactor using model wastewater of the commercial water-soluble monoazo dye C.I. Direct Orange 39 (DO39). The effects of zeolite and ferrous sulphate in combination with the corona discharge were examined. Experiments were conducted for a range of process parameters including pH, conductivity, type and amount of zeolite, and ferrous sulphate concentration. A mathematical model to describe the kinetics of DO39 degradation in the corona reactor was developed. Aqueous phase pulsed streamer corona discharge as a method for coloured wastewater treatment showed very high effectiveness in the case of iron salt addition (Fenton's reaction). Low pH enhanced dye removal by corona in the absence of zeolite, thus implying that the acid properties of zeolites are important in dye degradation. Ecological parameters such as COD, TC, IC, TOC and IC50 measured before and after corona treatment showed that the treated wastewater can be discharged into the environment or reused as process water.

  1. 2D positive streamer modelling in NTP air under extreme pulse fronts. What about runaway electrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marode, E.; Dessante, Ph; Tardiveau, P.

    2016-12-01

    Using a 2D model, an attempt is made to understand the properties and aspects of a diffuse discharge, appearing in a positive point-to-plane gap submitted to very high voltage pulses. After presenting the model, comparisons between the computed low and high pulse heights of 10 kV and 50 kV, respectively, will be shown and analysed. A streamer ionising wave is still formed, but its role in ionising a region of low field is replaced by the role of providing a plasma within which the electrons will benefit from the presence of a high electrical field meant to induce strong electron collision activities. A comparison between the aspect of the computed and experimental discharge carried out in the same conditions at 50 kV will be presented, which seems to be in agreement with the diffuse aspect. Although the difference in order of magnitude of the speed of development and the height of the current must be underlined, similarities between the structures of both situations will, however, be recognised. A high probability of obtaining highly energetic electrons and runaways (RAEs) will also be derived following a simple approach.

  2. Thermal and damage data from multiple microsecond pulse trains at 532nm in an in vitro retinal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Michael L.; Tijerina, Amanda J.; Hoffman, Aaron; Clark, Clifton D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rickman, John M.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Boukhris, Sarah J.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-03-01

    An artificially pigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell model was used to study the damage rates for exposure to 1, 10, 100, and 1,000 230-μs laser pulses at 532 nm, at two different concentrations of melanosome particles (MPs) per cell. Multiple pulses were delivered at pulse repetition rates of 50 and 99 pulses per second. Standard fluorescence viability indicator dyes and the method of microthermography were used to assess damage and thermal responses, respectively. Although frame rate during microthermography was more than five times slower than the duration of laser pulses, thermal information was useful in refining the BTEC computational model for simulating high-resolution thermal responses by the pigmented cells. When we temporally sampled the thermal model output at a rate similar to our microthermography, the resulting thermal profiles for multiple pulses resembled the thermal experimental profiles. Complementary to the thermal simulations, our computer-generated thresholds were in good agreement with the in vitro data. Findings are examined within the context of common exposure limit definitions in the national and international laser safety standards.

  3. Prediction of Bubble Diameter at Detachment from a Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross Flow Under Reduced and Normal Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two-phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to theoretically investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate embodied in the momentum flux force, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. A two-dimensional one-stage theoretical model based on a global force balance on the bubble evolving from a wall orifice in a cross liquid flow is presented in this work. In this model, relevant forces acting on the evolving bubble are expressed in terms of the bubble center of mass coordinates and solved simultaneously. Relevant forces in low gravity included the momentum flux, shear-lift, surface tension, drag and inertia forces. Under normal gravity conditions, the buoyancy force, which is dominant under such conditions, can be added to the force balance. Two detachment criteria were applicable depending on the gas to liquid momentum force ratio. For low ratios, the time when the bubble acceleration in the direction of the detachment angle is greater or equal to zero is calculated from the bubble x and y coordinates. This time is taken as the time at which all the detaching forces that are acting on the bubble are greater or equal to the attaching forces. For high gas to liquid momentum force ratios, the time at which the y coordinate less the bubble radius equals zero is calculated. The bubble diameter is evaluated at this time as the diameter at detachment from the fact that the bubble volume is simply given by the product of the gas flow rate and time elapsed. Comparison of the model s predictions was also made with predictions from a two-dimensional normal gravity model based on Kumar-Kuloor formulation and such a comparison is presented in this work.

  4. Evaluating the use of a continuous approximation for model-based quantification of pulsed chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Y.K.; Khrapitchev, A.A.; Sibson, N.R.; Payne, S.J.; Chappell, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Many potential clinical applications of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have been studied in recent years. However, due to various limitations such as specific absorption rate guidelines and scanner hardware constraints, most of the proposed applications have yet to be translated into routine diagnostic tools. Currently, pulsed CEST which uses multiple short pulses to perform the saturation is the only viable irradiation scheme for clinical translation. However, performing quantitative model-based analysis on pulsed CEST is time consuming because it is necessary to account for the time dependent amplitude of the saturation pulses. As a result, pulsed CEST is generally treated as continuous CEST by finding its equivalent average field or power. Nevertheless, theoretical analysis and simulations reveal that the resulting magnetization is different when the different irradiation schemes are applied. In this study, the quantification of important model parameters such as the amine proton exchange rate from a pulsed CEST experiment using quantitative model-based analyses were examined. Two model-based approaches were considered – discretized and continuous approximation to the time dependent RF irradiation pulses. The results showed that the discretized method was able to fit the experimental data substantially better than its continuous counterpart, but the smaller fitted error of the former did not translate to significantly better fit for the important model parameters. For quantification of the endogenous CEST effect, such as in amide proton transfer imaging, a model-based approach using the average power equivalent saturation can thus be used in place of the discretized approximation. PMID:22858666

  5. Effect of Intra-Orifice Depth on Sealing Ability of Four Materials in the Orifices of Root-Filled Teeth: An Ex-Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghulman, Motaz Ahmad; Gomaa, Madiha

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of orifice cavity depth on the sealing ability of Fusio, Fuji II, Fuji IX, and MTA“G”. Materials and Methods. Ninety-two canals in extracted mandibular premolars were prepared, obturated, and randomly grouped into 4 groups. Each group was subgrouped for a 2 mm and 3 mm orifice cavity depth (n = 10). The remaining roots were divided to serve as positive and negative controls (n = 6). Cavities of the 4 experimental groups were filled with the respective materials and subjected to methylene blue dye leakage. Linear leakage was measured in mm using a stereomicroscope. Statistical Analysis. Kruskall-Wallis test was used at P < 0.05, and t-test was done to compare 2 mm and 3 mm. Results. All tested materials leaked to various degrees. Significantly higher leakage score was found for Fuji IX, Fusio, Fuji II, and MTA “G” in a descending order, when the materials were placed at 3 mm depths. A significant difference was found in the leakage score between the 2 mm and 3 mm depths in all tested materials with the 3 mm depth showing a greater leakage score in all tested materials. Exception was in MTA “G” at 2 mm and 3 mm depths (0.551 mm ± 0.004 mm and 0.308 mm ± 0.08 mm, resp.). Conclusion. The null hypothesis should be partially rejected. Fusio and MTA “G” were affected by orifice cavity depth with regard to their sealing ability. MTA “G” had the least leakage when placed at 2 or 3 mm depths, and Fusio is the next when placed at 2 mm depth. Two millimeters orifice cavity depth is suitable for most adhesive orifice barrier materials. PMID:22675356

  6. Requirements for Vertically Installed Runoff Control Boards for the “Paddy Field Dam” and Appropriate Orifice Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsuki, Yoshikawa; Hideyuki, Koide; Shin-Ichi, Misawa

    While the “Paddy Field Dam” project has been recognized as an effective flood control measure, there are some cases in which the runoff control boards are vertically installed on the opening of the drainage boxes without careful consideration of the orifice shape and size. The important criteria for the runoff control boards to be satisfied are: 1. to maintain a sufficient peak runoff control function, 2. to avoid excessive ponding causing overflow, 3. to minimize the influence to the ordinary water management, and 4. to reserve sufficient orifice area to avoid blockage of the orifice with floating litters. The purpose of this study is to examine proper shapes and sizes of the orifice to satisfy the criteria for the vertically installed runoff control boards through experiments and simulations. Given the condition that the orifice has sufficient area to avoid overflow with 10 and 20 year return period rainfall event (criteria 2), the simulation results show that the orifice with horizontally wider shapes has advantages over the square or circular shapes in terms of the criteria 1 and 3. The disadvantage of the horizontally wider shapes is the blockage of the orifice with floating litters (criteria 4). In conclusion, we proposed to secure sufficient vertical distance to avoid this problem by setting a lower limit on the vertical distance and then determine the widest horizontal distance to optimize all the criteria. In addition, we have constructed the “Orifice Design Assist Tool” on the basis of the examinations in this study.

  7. Modeling and calibration of pulse-modulation based ToF imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süss, Andreas; Varga, Gabor; Marx, Michael; Fürst, Peter; Gläsener, Stefan; Tiedke, Wolfram; Jung, Melanie; Spickermann, Andreas; Hosticka, Bedrich J.

    2016-03-01

    Conversely to the continuous wave indirect time-of-flight (CW-iToF) imaging scheme, pulsed modulation ToF (PM-iToF) imaging is a promising depth measurement technique for operation at high ambient illumination. It is known that non-linearity and finite charge-transfer speed impact trueness and precision of ToF systems.1-3 As pulses are no Eigenfunctions to the shutter system, this issue is especially pronounced in pulsed modulation.2, 3 Despite these effects, it is possible to find analytical expressions founded on physical observations that map scenery parameters such as depth information, reflectance and ambient light level to sensor output.3, 4 In the application, the inverse of this map has to be evaluated. In PM-iToF, an inverse function cannot be yielded in a direct manner, as models proposed in the literature were transcendental.3, 4 For a limited range an approximating linearization can be performed to yield depth information.5 To extend the usable range, recently, an alternative approach that indirectly approximates the inverse function was presented.6 This method was founded on 1D doping concentration profiles, which, however, are typically not made available to end users. Also, limitations of the 1D approximation as well as stability are yet to be explored. This work presents a calibration methodology that copes with detector insufficiencies such as finite charge transfer speed. Contrarily to the state of the art, no prior knowledge on details of the underlying devices is required. The work covers measurement setup, a benchmark of various calibration schemes and deals with issues such as overfitting or defect pixels.

  8. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-08-15

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed.

  9. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic State-Space Models from CFD-Based Pulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Raveh, Daniella E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for computing discrete-time state-space models of linearized unsteady aerodynamic behavior directly from aeroelastic CFD codes is presented. The method involves the treatment of CFD-based pulse responses as Markov parameters for use in a system identification /realization algorithm. Results are presented for the AGARD 445.6 Aeroelastic Wing with four aeroelastic modes at a Mach number of 0.96 using the EZNSS Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver with aeroelastic capability. The System/Observer/Controller Identification Toolbox (SOCIT) algorithm, based on the Ho-Kalman realization algorithm, is used to generate 15th- and 32nd-order discrete-time state-space models of the unsteady aerodynamic response of the wing over the entire frequency range of interest.

  10. Jitter model and signal processing techniques for pulse width modulation optical recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Max M.-K.

    1991-01-01

    A jitter model and signal processing techniques are discussed for data recovery in Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) optical recording. In PWM, information is stored through modulating sizes of sequential marks alternating in magnetic polarization or in material structure. Jitter, defined as the deviation from the original mark size in the time domain, will result in error detection if it is excessively large. A new approach is taken in data recovery by first using a high speed counter clock to convert time marks to amplitude marks, and signal processing techniques are used to minimize jitter according to the jitter model. The signal processing techniques include motor speed and intersymbol interference equalization, differential and additive detection, and differential and additive modulation.

  11. Neural Network Modeling of Weld Pool Shape in Pulsed-Laser Aluminum Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Vitek, J.M.

    1998-11-16

    A neural network model was developed to predict the weld pool shape for pulsed-laser aluminum welds. Several different network architectures were examined and the optimum architecture was identified. The neural network was then trained and, in spite of the small size of the training data set, the network accurately predicted the weld pool shape profiles. The neural network output was in the form of four weld pool shape parameters (depth, width, half-width, and area) and these were converted into predicted weld pool profiles with the use of the actual experimental poo1 profiles as templates. It was also shown that the neural network model could reliably predict the change from conduction-mode type shapes to keyhole-mode shapes.

  12. Incorporation of an Energy Equation into a Pulsed Inductive Thruster Performance Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Reneau, Jarred P.; Sankaran, Kameshwaran

    2011-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration containing an energy equation to account for the various sources and sinks in such devices is presented. The model consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to an equation of motion and energy equation for the plasma. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a one-element finite volume, integrating the equations over that volume, and then matching known terms or quantities already calculated in the model to the resulting current sheet-averaged terms in the equations. Calculations showing the time-evolution of the various sources and sinks in the system are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model, with two separate resistivity models employed to show an example of how the plasma transport properties can affect the calculation. While neither resistivity model is fully accurate, the demonstration shows that it is possible within this modeling framework to time-accurately update various plasma parameters.

  13. Intensity-Duration Relation in the Bartlett-Lewis Rectangular Pulse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, Christoph; Rust, Henning; Ulbrich, Uwe; Névir, Peter

    2015-04-01

    For several hydrological modelling tasks precipitation time series with a high (sub-daily) resolution are indispensable. This data is, however, not always available and thus replaced by model data. A canonical class of stochastic models for sub-daily precipitation is the class of Poisson cluster processes, e.g. the Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulse model (BLRPM). The BLRPM has been shown to be able to well reproduce certain characteristics found in observations. Our focus is on intensity-duration relationship which are of particular importance in the context of hydrological modelling. We analyse several high resolution precipitation time series (5min) from Berlin and derive empirical intensity-duration relations for several return levels of intensities (intensity-duration-frequency curves, IDF curves). In a second step, we investigate to what extend the variants of a BLRPM are able to reproduce these relations (i.e., the IDF curves) for different situations (e.g., seasons) and for the various return-levels of intensities. By means of a sensitivity study with the BLRPM, we investigate to what extend the ability to reproduce the intensity-duration relationships is related to certain relations between the model parameters. Such relations are typically useful to reduce the complexity of the model and thus robustify and facilitate parameter estimation.

  14. Applicability of the polynomial chaos expansion method for personalization of a cardiovascular pulse wave propagation model.

    PubMed

    Huberts, W; Donders, W P; Delhaas, T; van de Vosse, F N

    2014-12-01

    Patient-specific modeling requires model personalization, which can be achieved in an efficient manner by parameter fixing and parameter prioritization. An efficient variance-based method is using generalized polynomial chaos expansion (gPCE), but it has not been applied in the context of model personalization, nor has it ever been compared with standard variance-based methods for models with many parameters. In this work, we apply the gPCE method to a previously reported pulse wave propagation model and compare the conclusions for model personalization with that of a reference analysis performed with Saltelli's efficient Monte Carlo method. We furthermore differentiate two approaches for obtaining the expansion coefficients: one based on spectral projection (gPCE-P) and one based on least squares regression (gPCE-R). It was found that in general the gPCE yields similar conclusions as the reference analysis but at much lower cost, as long as the polynomial metamodel does not contain unnecessary high order terms. Furthermore, the gPCE-R approach generally yielded better results than gPCE-P. The weak performance of the gPCE-P can be attributed to the assessment of the expansion coefficients using the Smolyak algorithm, which might be hampered by the high number of model parameters and/or by possible non-smoothness in the output space.

  15. Predicted effects of pulse width programming in spinal cord stimulation: a mathematical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongchul; Hershey, Brad; Bradley, Kerry; Yearwood, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    To understand the theoretical effects of pulse width (PW) programming in spinal cord stimulation (SCS), we implemented a mathematical model of electrical fields and neural activation in SCS to gain insight into the effects of PW programming. The computational model was composed of a finite element model for structure and electrical properties, coupled with a nonlinear double-cable axon model to predict nerve excitation for different myelinated fiber sizes. Mathematical modeling suggested that mediolateral lead position may affect chronaxie and rheobase values, as well as predict greater activation of medial dorsal column fibers with increased PW. These modeling results were validated by a companion clinical study. Thus, variable PW programming in SCS appears to have theoretical value, demonstrated by the ability to increase and even 'steer' spatial selectivity of dorsal column fiber recruitment. It is concluded that the computational SCS model is a valuable tool to understand basic mechanisms of nerve fiber excitation modulated by stimulation parameters such as PW and electric fields.

  16. Wexler's Great Smoke Pall: a chemistry-climate model analysis of a singularly large emissions pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2011-12-01

    We model the effects of the smoke plume from what was arguably the largest forest fire in recorded history. The Chinchaga fire burned continuously during the summer of 1950 in northwestern Canada during a very dry fire season. On September 22nd, the fire made a major advance, burning an area of approximately 1400 km2. Ground and aircraft observations showed that from September 22 to 28, the smoke plume from the emissions pulse travelled over northern Canada, southward over the Great Lakes region and eastern US, across the Atlantic, and to Western Europe. Over the Great Lakes region, the plume remained thick enough to create twilight conditions in the mid-afternoon, and was estimated to have caused a 4 oC cooling at the surface. While many instances of long-range transport of wildfire emissions have been detected over the past decade, we know of no other wildfire which created such an acute effect on downward shortwave radiation at such a long distance. As a result, the fire was an important analogue event used in estimating the effects of a nuclear winter. Simulations with the nudged version of the GISS chemistry-climate model accurately capture the long-range transport pattern of the smoke emissions in the free-troposphere. The timing and location of aircraft observations of the plume over the eastern US, North Atlantic and the United Kingdom were well-matched to modeled anomalies of CO and aerosol optical depth. Further work will examine the model's ability to create twilight conditions during the day, and to provide an estimate of the consequent cooling effects at the surface from this remarkable emissions pulse.

  17. Propagation of an ultimately short electromagnetic pulse in a nonlinear medium described by the fifth-order Duffing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maĭmistov, A. I.

    2003-02-01

    We discuss propagation of an ultimately short (single-cycle) pulse of an electromagnetic field in a medium whose dispersion and nonlinear properties can be described by the cubic-quintic Duffing model, i.e., by an oscillator with third-and fifth-order anharmonicity. A system of equations governing the evolution of a unidirectional electromagnetic wave is analyzed without using the approximation of slowly varying envelopes. Three types of solutions of this system describing stationary propagation of a pulse in such a medium are found. When the signs of the anharmonicity constants are different, then the amplitude of a steady-state pulse is limited, but its energy may grow on account of an increase in its duration. The characteristics of such a pulse, referred to as an electromagnetic domain, are discussed.

  18. Experimental study on the performance of an inverter heat pump system with bypass orifices

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.; Kim, Y.

    1999-07-01

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the optimum cycle of an inverter heat pump as a function of frequency. The performance of an inverter heat pump was measured with a variation of frequency and length of capillary tube, and applying a newly designed bypass orifice. The inverter heat pump with the standard capillary tube that was optimum size at the rated frequency and ASHRAE test condition ``A'' was tested by varying frequency. The optimum cycles were also investigated by changing the length of capillary tube at individual level of low, rated, and high frequency. Since the inverter heat pump with a capillary tube does not provide optimal cycles at all operating frequencies, a bypass orifice was invented to improve the performance of the system at the wide frequency range. The flow rate change of the bypass orifice with respect to frequency was higher than that of the capillary tube. As a results of applying the bypass orifice to the inverter heat pump system, the performance was enhanced in the low frequency level compared with the conventional expansion device of a capillary tube.

  19. Bubble Formation from Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross-Flow Under Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Two-phase flows present a wide variety of applications for spacecraft thermal control systems design. Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. Data were taken mainly under reduced gravity conditions but some data were taken in normal gravity for comparison. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted aboard the NASA DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The results show that the process of bubble formation and detachment depends on gravity, the orifice diameter, the gas flow rate, and the liquid cross-flow velocity. The data are analyzed based on a force balance, and two different detachment mechanisms are identified. When the gas momentum is large, the bubble detaches from the injection orifice as the gas momentum overcomes the attaching effects of liquid drag and inertia. The surface tension force is much reduced because a large part of the bubble pinning edge at the orifice is lost as the bubble axis is tilted by the liquid flow. When the gas momentum is small, the force balance in the liquid flow direction is important, and the bubble detaches when the bubble axis inclination exceeds a certain angle.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Heat Transfer Behind a Rectangular Orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Soihiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer with a rectangular orifice has been performed for Reτ0(=uτ0δ⁄ν) = 300, where uτ0 is the friction velocity calculated from the mean pressure gradient imposed to drive the flow, δ the channel half width and ν the kinematic viscosity. The Prandtl number is 0.71. The ratio of slit height to channel height is assumed to be β=0.3,0.4,0.5,0.6 and 0.7. For β=0.3-0.6, the mean flow becomes asymmetric in the wall-normal direction by the Coanda effect behind the orifice. In the case of β=0.7, however, the mean flow is symmetry. The Nusselt number profiles over the bottom and top walls are different significantly for the asymmetric cases. Large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz(K-H) vortices are generated at the orifice edges. An entrainment process is observed in the temperature field around these vortices. Subsequently, these K-H vortices become deformed and break up into disordered small-scale structures in the shear layers behind the orifice. In this scenario, the turbulent transport is promoted in the temperature field. In addition, the separation, the reattachment and also the contraction effects are discussed on the profiles of the mean temperature, the temperature variance and the turbulent heat fluxes.