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Sample records for modeling part ii

  1. A pesticide emission model (PEM) Part II: model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, M. T.; Voldner, E.; Van Heyst, B. J.; McMillan, A. C.; Pattey, E.

    In the first part of the paper, the development of a numerical pesticide emission model (PEM) is described for predicting the volatilization of pesticides applied to agricultural soils and crops through soil incorporation, surface spraying, or in the furrow at the time of planting. In this paper the results of three steps toward the evaluation of PEM are reported. The evaluation involves: (i) verifying the numerical algorithms and computer code through comparison of PEM simulations with an available analytical solution of the advection/diffusion equation for semi-volatile solutes in soil; (ii) comparing hourly heat, moisture and emission fluxes of trifluralin and triallate modeled by PEM with fluxes measured using the relaxed eddy-accumulation technique; and (iii) comparison of the PEM predictions of persistence half-life for 29 pesticides with the ranges of persistence found in the literature. The overall conclusion from this limited evaluation study is that PEM is a useful model for estimating the volatilization rates of pesticides from agricultural soils and crops. The lack of reliable estimates of chemical and photochemical degradation rates of pesticide on foliage, however, introduces large uncertainties in the estimates from any model of the volatilization of pesticide that impacts the canopy.

  2. Implementing a predictive modeling program, part II: Use of motivational interviewing in a predictive modeling program.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Jean; Admire, Kaye S

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article of a two-part series about issues encountered in implementing a predictive modeling program. Part I looked at how to effectively implement a program and discussed helpful hints and lessons learned for case managers who are required to change their approach to patients. In Part II, we discuss the readiness to change model, examine the spirit of motivational interviewing and related techniques, and explore how motivational interviewing is different from more traditional interviewing and assessment methods.

  3. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  4. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  5. Dynamic spreading of nanofluids on solids part II: modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Kondiparty, Kirtiprakash; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh

    2012-11-27

    Recent studies on the spreading phenomena of liquid dispersions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) have revealed that the self-layering and two-dimensional structuring of nanoparticles in the three-phase contact region exert structural disjoining pressure, which drives the spreading of nanofluids by forming a continuous wedge film between the liquid (e.g., oil) and solid surface. Motivated by the practical applications of the phenomenon and experimental results reported in Part I of this two-part series, we thoroughly investigated the spreading dynamics of nanofluids against an oil drop on a solid surface. With the Laplace equation as a starting point, the spreading process is modeled by Navier-Stokes equations through the lubrication approach, which considers the structural disjoining pressure, gravity, and van der Waals force. The temporal interface profile and advancing inner contact line velocity of nanofluidic films are analyzed through varying the effective nanoparticle concentration, the outer contact angle, the effective nanoparticle size, and capillary pressure. It is found that a fast and spontaneous advance of the inner contact line movement can be obtained by increasing the nanoparticle concentration, decreasing the nanoparticle size, and/or decreasing the interfacial tension. Once the nanofluidic film is formed, the advancing inner contact line movement reaches a constant velocity, which is independent of the outer contact angle if the interfacial tension is held constant.

  6. Simulation of Slag Freeze Layer Formation: Part II: Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Fernando J.; Irons, Gordon A.

    2011-08-01

    The experiments from Part I with CaCl2-H2O solidification in a differentially heated, square cavity were simulated in two dimensions using a control volume technique in a fixed grid. The test conditions and physical properties of the fluid resulted in Prandtl and Rayleigh numbers in the range of 50 and 2.1 × 108, respectively, and the solidification was observed to be planar with dispersed solid particles. In the mathematical model, temperature-dependent viscosity and density functions were employed. To suppress velocities in the solid phase, various models were tested, and a high effective viscosity was found most appropriate. The results compare well with the experiments in terms of solid layer growth, horizontal and vertical velocities, heat transfer coefficients, and temperature distributions. Hydrodynamic boundary layers on the solidified front and on the hot vertical wall tend to be nonsymmetric, as well on the top and bottom adiabatic walls. The high viscosity value imposed on the two-phase zone affects the velocity profile close to the solid front and modifies the heat transfer rate.

  7. Models and the dynamics of theory-building in physics. Part II-Case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emch, Gérard G.

    In Part I, it was argued that models are best explained by considering the strategies from which they issue. A distinction was proposed between two classes of modeling that contribute to theory-building: H-modeling and L-modeling. Case studies are presented in this Part II to illustrate the characteristic features of these modeling strategies; examples are drawn from classical statistical mechanics and quantum physics.

  8. Conceptual Modeling in the Time of the Revolution: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylopoulos, John

    Conceptual Modeling was a marginal research topic at the very fringes of Computer Science in the 60s and 70s, when the discipline was dominated by topics focusing on programs, systems and hardware architectures. Over the years, however, the field has moved to centre stage and has come to claim a central role both in Computer Science research and practice in diverse areas, such as Software Engineering, Databases, Information Systems, the Semantic Web, Business Process Management, Service-Oriented Computing, Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Management, and more. The transformation was greatly aided by the adoption of standards in modeling languages (e.g., UML), and model-based methodologies (e.g., Model-Driven Architectures) by the Object Management Group (OMG) and other standards organizations. We briefly review the history of the field over the past 40 years, focusing on the evolution of key ideas. We then note some open challenges and report on-going research, covering topics such as the representation of variability in conceptual models, capturing model intentions, and models of laws.

  9. Modeling an electro-photographic printer, part II: color systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will outline a simplified model for the development of toner dots on a reflective support in a color electro-photographic system. A model developed for a monochrome system will be adapted to a color imaging system where four pigments, each capable of scatting light, is used to form a digital halftone image. The combination of physical and optical dot gains, interlayer scattering, on-dot and off-dot digital halftones will be explored and the results demonstrated in terms color shifts due to layer order and dot gain due to halftone geometry.

  10. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  11. Unified Model of the rf Plasma Sheath, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle

    1996-10-01

    By developing an approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation, one can obtain solutions for the current-voltage characteristics of an rf plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current. (M.E.Riley, 1995 GEC, abstract QA5, published in Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 40, 1587 (1995).) The theory has been shown to adequately reproduce current-voltage characteristics of two extreme cases (M.A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988). A. Metze, D.W. Ernie, and H.J.Oskam, J.Appl.Phys., 60, 3081 (1986).) of ion response. In this work I show the effect of different conventions for connecting the sheath model to the bulk plasma. Modifications of the Mach number and a finite electric field at the Bohm point are natural choices. The differences are examined for a sheath in a high density Ar plasma and are found to be insignificant. A theoretical argument favors the electric field modification. *Work performed at Sandia National Labs and supported by US DoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the…

  13. A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error. Part II: Working Memory Load and Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error, Part II: Working Memory Load and Capacity Franklin P. Tamborello, II...00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error, Part II: Working Memory Load and...07370024.2011.601692 Tamborello, F. P., & Trafton, J. G. (2013). A long-term competitive process model of a common procedural error. In Proceedings of the 35th

  14. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  15. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Models for Change in Quantitative Variables, Part II Scholastic Models. Part II, Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannan, Michael T.

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. Stochastic models for the sociological analysis of change and the change process in quantitative variables are presented. The author lays groundwork for the statistical treatment of simple stochastic differential equations (SDEs) and discusses some of the continuities of…

  16. A model of neurovascular coupling and the BOLD response PART II.

    PubMed

    Mathias, E J; Plank, M J; David, T

    2017-04-01

    A mathematical model is developed which describes a signalling mechanism of neurovascular coupling with a model of a pyramidal neuron and its corresponding fMRI BOLD response. In the first part of two papers (Part I) we described the integration of the neurovascular coupling unit extended to include a complex neuron model, which includes the important Na/K ATPase pump, with a model that provides a BOLD signal taking its input from the cerebral blood flow and the metabolic rate of oxygen consumption. We showed that this produced a viable signal in terms of initial dip, positive and negative BOLD signals. In this paper (PART II) our model predicts the variations of the BOLD response due to variations in neuronal activity and indicates that the BOLD signal could be used as an initial biomarker for neuronal dysfunction or variations in the perfusion of blood to the cerebral tissue. We have compared the simulated hypoxic BOLD response to experimental BOLD signals observed in the hippocampus during hypoxia showing good agreement. This approach of combined quantitative modelling of neurovascular coupling response and its BOLD response will enable more specific assessment of a brain region.

  17. Fracture prediction for the proximal femur using finite element models: Part II--Nonlinear analysis.

    PubMed

    Lotz, J C; Cheal, E J; Hayes, W C

    1991-11-01

    In Part I we reported the results of linear finite element models of the proximal femur generated using geometric and constitutive data collected with quantitative computed tomography. These models demonstrated excellent agreement with in vitro studies when used to predict ultimate failure loads. In Part II, we report our extension of those finite element models to include nonlinear behavior of the trabecular and cortical bone. A highly nonlinear material law, originally designed for representing concrete, was used for trabecular bone, while a bilinear material law was used for cortical bone. We found excellent agreement between the model predictions and in vitro fracture data for both the onset of bone yielding and bone fracture. For bone yielding, the model predictions were within 2 percent for a load which simulated one-legged stance and 1 percent for a load which simulated a fall. For bone fracture, the model predictions were within 1 percent and 17 percent, respectively. The models also demonstrated different fracture mechanisms for the two different loading configurations. For one-legged stance, failure within the primary compressive trabeculae at the subcapital region occurred first, leading to load transfer and, ultimately, failure of the surrounding cortical shell. However, for a fall, failure of the cortical and trabecular bone occurred simultaneously within the intertrochanteric region. These results support our previous findings that the strength of the subcapital region is primarily due to trabecular bone whereas the strength of the intertrochanteric region is primarily due to cortical bone.

  18. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  19. Sorption modelling on illite. Part II: Actinide sorption and linear free energy relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B.

    2009-02-01

    Sorption edge data for Ni(II), Co(II), Eu(III) and Sn(IV) [Bradbury M. H. and Baeyens B. (2009) Sorption modelling on illite. Part I: titration measurements and sorption of Ni(II), Co(II), Eu(III) and Sn(IV), Part I] on purified Na-Illite du Puy are available from some previous work, and some new measurements for Am(III), Th(IV), Pa(V) and U(VI) are presented here. All of these sorption edge measurements have been modelled with a 2 site protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model for which the site types, site capacities and protolysis constants were fixed [Bradbury M. H. and Baeyens B. (2009), Part I]. In addition, two further data sets for the sorption of Am(III) and Np(V) on Illite du Puy, obtained from the literature, were also modelled in this work. Thus, surface complexation constants for the strong sites in the 2SPNE SC/CE sorption model for nine metals with valence states from II to VI have been obtained. A linear relationship between the logarithm of strong site metal binding constants, SK x-1, and the logarithm of the corresponding aqueous hydrolysis stability constant, OHK x, extending over nearly 35 orders of magnitude is established here for illite for these nine metals. Such correlations are often termed linear free energy relationships (LFER), and although they are quite common in aqueous phase chemistry, they are much less so in surface chemistry, especially over this large range. The LFER for illite could be described by the equation: logSK=7.9±0.4+(0.83±0.02)logOHKx where, " x" is an integer. A similar relationship has been previously obtained for montmorillonite, thus LFERs relating to the sorption on two of the most important clay minerals present in natural systems have been established. Such an LFER approach is an extremely useful tool for estimating surface complexation constants for metals in a chemically consistent manner. It provides a means of obtaining sorption values for

  20. Part I. Inviscid, Swirling Flows and Vortex Breakdown. Part II. a Numerical Investigation of the Lundgren Turbulence Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntine, James Douglas

    Part I. A study of the behaviour of an inviscid, swirling fluid is performed. This flow can be described by the Squire-Long equation if the constraints of time -independence and axisymmetry are invoked. The particular case of flow through a diverging pipe is selected and a study is conducted to determine over what range of parameters (both pipe inlet conditions and geometry) does a (unique) solution exist. The work is performed with a view to understanding how the phenomenon of vortex breakdown develops. Experiments and previous numerical studies have indicated that the flow is sensitive to boundary conditions particularly at the pipe inlet. A "quasi-cylindrical" simplification of the Squire-Long equation is compared with the more complete model and shown to be able to account for most of its behaviour. An advantage of this latter representation is the relatively undetailed description of the flow geometry it requires in order to calculate a solution. "Criticality" or the ability of small disturbances to propagate upstream is related to results of the quasi -cylindrical and axisymmetric flow models. This leads to an examination of claims made by researchers such as Benjamin and Hall concerning the interrelationship between "failure" of the quasi-cylindrical model and the occurrence of a "critical" flow state. Other criteria for predicting the onset of vortex breakdown are considered in the context of the model employed, particularly those of Brown & Lopez and Spall, Gatski & Grosch. Part II. Lundgren (1982) developed an analytical model for homogeneous turbulence based on a collection of contracting spiral vortices each embedded in an axisymmetric strain field. Using asymptotic approximations he was able to deduce the Kolmogorov k^{-5/3} behaviour for inertial scales in the turbulence energy spectrum. Pullin & Saffman have enlarged upon his work to make a number of predictions about the behaviour of turbulence described by the model. This work investigates the

  1. Mycotoxins revisited: Part II.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kyan J; Guss, David A

    2005-02-01

    Mushrooms are ubiquitous in nature. They are an important source of nutrition, however, certain varieties contain chemicals that can be highly toxic to humans. Industrially cultivated mushrooms are historically very safe, whereas foraging for mushrooms or accidental ingestion of mushrooms in the environment can result in serious illness and death. The emergency department is the most common site of presentation for patients suffering from acute mushroom poisoning. Although recognition can be facilitated by identification of a characteristic toxidrome, the presenting manifestations can be variable and have considerable overlap with more common and generally benign clinical syndromes. The goal of this two-part article is to review the knowledge base on this subject and provide information that will assist the clinician in the early consideration, diagnosis and treatment of mushroom poisoning. Part I reviewed the epidemiology and demographics of mushroom poisoning, the physical characteristics of the most toxic varieties, the classification of the toxic species, and presented an overview of the cyclopeptide-containing mushroom class. Part II is focused on the presentation of the other classes of toxic mushrooms along with an up-to-date review of the most recently identified poisonous varieties.

  2. Multiscale modeling, simulations, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers. Part II. Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buldum, A.; Clemons, C.B.; Dill, L.H.; Kreider, K.L.; Young, G.W.; Zheng, X.; Evans, E.A.; Zhang, G.; Hariharan, S.I.

    2005-08-15

    This work is Part II of an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin-film materials using plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with aluminum materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. This procedure begins with the sputtering of the coating material from a target. Part I [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 044303 (2005)] focused on the sputtering aspect and transport of the sputtered material through the reactor. That reactor level model determines the concentration field of the coating material. This field serves as input into the present species transport and deposition model for the region surrounding an individual nanofiber. The interrelationships among processing factors for the transport and deposition are investigated here from a detailed modeling approach that includes the salient physical and chemical phenomena. Solution strategies that couple continuum and atomistic models are used. At the continuum scale, transport dynamics near the nanofiber are described. At the atomic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the deposition and sputtering mechanisms at the coating surface. Ion kinetic energies and fluxes are passed from the continuum sheath model to the MD simulations. These simulations calculate sputtering and sticking probabilities that in turn are used to calculate parameters for the continuum transport model. The continuum transport model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating-free surface. This equation is solved using boundary perturbation and level set methods to determine the coating morphology as a function of operating conditions.

  3. Towards multi-resolution global climate modeling with ECHAM6-FESOM. Part II: climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackow, T.; Goessling, H. F.; Jung, T.; Sidorenko, D.; Semmler, T.; Barbi, D.; Handorf, D.

    2016-06-01

    This study forms part II of two papers describing ECHAM6-FESOM, a newly established global climate model with a unique multi-resolution sea ice-ocean component. While part I deals with the model description and the mean climate state, here we examine the internal climate variability of the model under constant present-day (1990) conditions. We (1) assess the internal variations in the model in terms of objective variability performance indices, (2) analyze variations in global mean surface temperature and put them in context to variations in the observed record, with particular emphasis on the recent warming slowdown, (3) analyze and validate the most common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns, (4) diagnose the potential predictability of various climate indices, and (5) put the multi-resolution approach to the test by comparing two setups that differ only in oceanic resolution in the equatorial belt, where one ocean mesh keeps the coarse ~1° resolution applied in the adjacent open-ocean regions and the other mesh is gradually refined to ~0.25°. Objective variability performance indices show that, in the considered setups, ECHAM6-FESOM performs overall favourably compared to five well-established climate models. Internal variations of the global mean surface temperature in the model are consistent with observed fluctuations and suggest that the recent warming slowdown can be explained as a once-in-one-hundred-years event caused by internal climate variability; periods of strong cooling in the model (`hiatus' analogs) are mainly associated with ENSO-related variability and to a lesser degree also to PDO shifts, with the AMO playing a minor role. Common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns are simulated largely consistent with their real counterparts. Typical deficits also found in other models at similar resolutions remain, in particular too weak non-seasonal variability of SSTs over large parts of the ocean and episodic periods of almost absent

  4. An Interactive Activation Model of the Effect of Context in Perception. Part II. Report No. 8003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumelhart, David E.; McClelland, James L.

    This report is the second in a two-part series introducing an interactive activation model of context effects in perception. In the first part, a model for the perception of letters in words and other contexts was described and applied to a number of experiments. This second part applies the same model to a number of new experiments designed to…

  5. Thermohaline Circulation Stability: A Box Model Study. Part II: Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Stone, Peter H.

    2005-02-01

    A thorough analysis of the stability of a coupled version of an interhemispheric three-box model of thermohaline circulation (THC) is presented. This study follows a similarly structured analysis of an uncoupled version of the same model presented in Part I of this paper. The model consists of a northern high-latitude box, a tropical box, and a southern high-latitude box, which can be thought of as corresponding to the northern, tropical, and southern Atlantic Ocean, respectively. This paper examines how the strength of THC changes when the system undergoes forcings representing global warming conditions.Since a coupled model is used, a direct representation of the radiative forcing is possible because the main atmospheric physical processes responsible for freshwater and heat fluxes are formulated separately. Each perturbation to the initial equilibrium is characterized by the total radiative forcing realized, by the rate of increase, and by the north-south asymmetry. Although only weakly asymmetric or symmetric radiative forcings are representative of physically reasonable conditions, general asymmetric forcings are considered in order to get a more complete picture of the mathematical properties of the system. The choice of suitably defined metrics makes it possible to determine the boundary dividing the set of radiative forcing scenarios that lead the system to equilibria characterized by a THC pattern similar to the present one, from those that drive the system to equilibria where the THC is reversed. This paper also considers different choices for the atmospheric transport parameterizations and for the ratio between the high-latitude and tropical radiative forcing. It is generally found that fast forcings are more effective than slow forcings in disrupting the present THC pattern, forcings that are stronger in the northern box are also more effective in destabilizing the system, and very slow forcings do not destabilize the system whatever their asymmetry

  6. Mathematics in Marine Botany: Examples of the Modelling Process. Part II: Continuous Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyman, Melvin A.; Brown, Murray T.

    1996-01-01

    Describes some continuous models for growth of the seaweed Macrocystis pyrifera. Uses observed growth rates over several months to derive first-order differential equations as models for growth rates of individual fronds. The nature of the solutions is analyzed and comparison between these theoretical results and documented characteristics of…

  7. Rockets -- Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  8. Understanding Math - Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyks, Hollis W.; Austin, Robert J.

    This is the second remedial workbook-text in a two-part series written for deaf students at the secondary level. It covers fractions, geometry formulas, decimals and percents, and time. For the first workbook, see SE 015 827, and for the teacher's guide, see SE 015 829. (DT)

  9. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  10. Modeling of surface myoelectric signals--Part II: Model-based signal interpretation.

    PubMed

    Merletti, R; Roy, S H; Kupa, E; Roatta, S; Granata, A

    1999-07-01

    Experimental electromyogram (EMG) data from the human biceps brachii were simulated using the model described in [10] of this work. A multichannel linear electrode array, spanning the length of the biceps, was used to detect monopolar and bipolar signals, from which double differential signals were computed, during either voluntary or electrically elicited isometric contractions. For relatively low-level voluntary contractions (10%-30% of maximum force) individual firings of three to four-different motor units were identified and their waveforms were closely approximated by the model. Motor unit parameters such as depth, size, fiber orientation and length, location of innervation and tendonous zones, propagation velocity, and source width were estimated using the model. Two applications of the model are described. The first analyzes the effects of electrode rotation with respect to the muscle fiber direction and shows the possibility of conduction velocity (CV) over- and under-estimation. The second focuses on the myoelectric manifestations of fatigue during a sustained electrically elicited contraction and the interrelationship between muscle fiber CV, spectral and amplitude variables, and the length of the depolarization zone. It is concluded that a) surface EMG detection using an electrode array, when combined with a model of signal propagation, provides a useful method for understanding the physiological and anatomical determinants of EMG waveform characteristics and b) the model provides a way for the interpretation of fatigue plots.

  11. A dynamic, embedded Lagrangian model for ocean climate models, Part II: Idealised overflow tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Michael L.; Griffies, Stephen M.; England, Matthew H.

    2012-12-01

    Dense gravity current overflows occur in several regions throughout the world and are an important process in the meridional overturning circulation. Overflows are poorly represented in coarse resolution level coordinate ocean climate models. Here, the embedded Lagrangian model formulated in the companion paper of Bates et al. (2012) is used in two idealised test cases to examine the effect on the representation of dense gravity driven plumes, as well as the effect on the circulation of the bulk ocean in the Eulerian model. The results are compared with simulations with no parameterisation for overflows, as well as simulations that use traditional hydrostatic overflow schemes. The use of Lagrangian "blobs" is shown to improve three key characteristics that are poorly represented in coarse resolution level coordinate models: (1) the depth of the plume, (2) the along slope velocity of the plume, and (3) the response of the bulk ocean to the bottom boundary layer. These improvements are associated with the more appropriate set of dynamics satisfied by the blobs, leading to a more physically sound representation. Experiments are also conducted to examine sensitivity to blob parameters. The blob parameters are examined over a large parameter space.

  12. High resolution meteorological modelling of the Inntal valley atmosphere, Part II: applications to dispersion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Schicker, I.; Seibert, P.

    2009-09-01

    Orography and local meteorology play a major role in Alpine valleys, as they are linked with valley and slope wind systems, stagnation and recirculation, temperature inversions and turbulence. Thus, they have a strong influence of transport and dilution of pollutants in the valley, affecting human health, and sound propagation. Shallow stable layers at the valley floor and low wind speed conditions, especially in autumn and winter, trap pollutants and thus cause unfavourable dispersion conditions , possibly leading to exceedances of air pollution limits. Moreover, under certain synoptic conditions such as persistent high-pressure systems inversion conditions prevail for days. Emissions may accumulate in the valley from day to day and thus critical levels of pollutants may be reached. With the current computer capabilities, numerical meteorological models and particle dispersion models are powerful tools to investigate such situations and their impact on emission-side measures. Output from the limited area meteorological model MM5 for selected synoptic periods of special interest regarding air quality conditions (see contribution by Schicker et al., this session) will be used as input to the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPARTv6.2. Currently two specific versions of FLEXPART exist to work in the meso and local scale, WRF-FLEXPARTv6.2 and MM5v3-7.FLEXPARTv6.2, which use WRF and MM5 fields as meteorological input, respectively. Extensive tests will be performed with the MM5-driven version and additional preliminary ones with the WRF version. Dispersion calculations for CO and NOx will be performed in a receptor-oriented approach for three stations and with different meteorological input resolutions. The target stations will be Innsbruck, located at the bottom of the Inn valley, and Nordkette, located on the northern slopes of the valley. Source-receptor sensitivities (SRS) will be obtained to see the major sources which contribute to the measurements for

  13. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremliovsky, M.; Kadtke, J.

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremliovsky, Michael; Kadtke, James

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes.

  15. An Introduction to Flow and Transport in Fractal Models of Porous Media: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianchao; San José Martínez, Fernando; Martín, Miguel Angel; Hu, Xiangyun

    2015-03-01

    This is the second part of the special issue on fractal geometry and its applications to the modeling of flow and transport in porous media, in which 10 original research articles and one review article are included. Combining to the first part of 11 original research articles, these two issues summarized current research on fractal models applied to porous media that will help to further advance this multidisciplinary development. This whole special issue is published also to celebrate the 70th birthday of Professor Boming Yu for his distinguished researches on fractal geometry and its application to transport physics of porous media.

  16. Part I. Inviscid, swirling flows and vortex breakdown. Part II. A numerical investigation of the Lundgren turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Buntine, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Part I. A study of the behaviour of an inviscid, swirling fluid is performed. This flow can be described by the Squire-Long equation if the constraints of time-independence and axisymmetry are invoked. The particular case of flow through a diverging pipe is selected and a study is conducted to determine over what range of parameters does a solution exist. The work is performed with a view to understanding how the phenomenon of vortex breakdown develops. Experiments and previous numerical studies have indicated that the flow is sensitive to boundary conditions particularly at the pipe inlet. A {open_quotes}quasi-cylindrical{close_quotes} amplification of the Squire-Long equation is compared with the more complete model and shown to be able to account for most of its behaviour. An advantage of this latter representation is the relatively undetailed description of the flow geometry it requires in order to calculate a solution. {open_quotes}Criticality{close_quotes} or the ability of small disturbances to propagate upstream is related to results of the quasi-cylindrical and axisymmetric flow models. This leads to an examination of claims made by researchers such as Benjamin and Hall concerning the interrelationship between {open_quotes}failure{close_quotes} of the quasi-cylindrical model and the occurrence of a {open_quotes}critical{close_quotes} flow state. Lundgren developed an analytical model for homogeneous turbulence based on a collection of contracting spiral vortices each embedded in an axisymmetric strain field. Using asymptotic approximations he was able to deduce the Kolmogorov k{sup {minus}5/3} behaviour for inertial scales in the turbulence energy spectrum. Pullin & Saffman have enlarged upon his work to make a number of predictions about the behaviour of turbulence described by the model. This work investigates the model numerically. The first part considers how the flow description compares with numerical simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. Optical and radiometric models of the NOMAD instrument part II: the infrared channels - SO and LNO.

    PubMed

    Thomas, I R; Vandaele, A C; Robert, S; Neefs, E; Drummond, R; Daerden, F; Delanoye, S; Ristic, B; Berkenbosch, S; Clairquin, R; Maes, J; Bonnewijn, S; Depiesse, C; Mahieux, A; Trompet, L; Neary, L; Willame, Y; Wilque, V; Nevejans, D; Aballea, L; Moelans, W; De Vos, L; Lesschaeve, S; Van Vooren, N; Lopez-Moreno, J-J; Patel, M R; Bellucci, G

    2016-02-22

    NOMAD is a suite of three spectrometers that will be launched in 2016 as part of the joint ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission. The instrument contains three channels that cover the IR and UV spectral ranges and can perform solar occultation, nadir and limb observations, to detect and map a wide variety of Martian atmospheric gases and trace species. Part I of this work described the models of the UVIS channel; in this second part, we present the optical models representing the two IR channels, SO (Solar Occultation) and LNO (Limb, Nadir and Occultation), and use them to determine signal to noise ratios (SNRs) for many expected observational cases. In solar occultation mode, both the SO and LNO channel exhibit very high SNRs >5000. SNRs of around 100 were found for the LNO channel in nadir mode, depending on the atmospheric conditions, Martian surface properties, and observation geometry.

  18. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part II: proofs of results.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-03-03

    In this companion article to "Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part I: Main Content" [Orellana, Rotnitzky and Robins (2010), IJB, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Art. 7] we present (i) proofs of the claims in that paper, (ii) a proposal for the computation of a confidence set for the optimal index when this lies in a finite set, and (iii) an example to aid the interpretation of the positivity assumption.

  19. Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part II: Proofs of Results*

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M.

    2010-01-01

    In this companion article to “Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part I: Main Content” [Orellana, Rotnitzky and Robins (2010), IJB, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Art. 7] we present (i) proofs of the claims in that paper, (ii) a proposal for the computation of a confidence set for the optimal index when this lies in a finite set, and (iii) an example to aid the interpretation of the positivity assumption. PMID:20405047

  20. [Pain sensitivity changes in schizophrenic patients and animal models--Part II].

    PubMed

    Tuboly, Gábor; Horváth, Gyöngyi

    2009-05-30

    Diminished pain sensitivity in schizophrenic patients has been reported for more than 50 years, however little is known about the substrate and the basic mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity in this disease, therefore, relevant animal models are of decisive importance in the study of psychiatric diseases. The authors report a review consisting of two parts focusing on pain sensitivity changes in patients and in different animal models which proved the eligibility as schizophrenia models and pain sensitivities have also been determined. The second part of this article analyzed the results regarding knock out mice as schizophrenia models. These data proved that several genes have significant role in the pathomechanism of schizophrenia; therefore deficiency in one gene does not produce animals showing all signs of this disease. As regards the pain sensitivity changes, only a few data are available with controversial results. Data originated from complex chronic animal models indicate that they might be more adequate methods for studying the mechanisms of schizophrenia including the pain-sensitivity changes.

  1. Nanoparticle mass transfer from lung airways to systemic regions--Part II: Multi-compartmental modeling.

    PubMed

    Kolanjiyil, Arun V; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2013-12-01

    This is the second article of a two-part paper, combining high-resolution computer simulation results of inhaled nanoparticle deposition in a human airway model (Kolanjiyil and Kleinstreuer, 2013, "Nanoparticle Mass Transfer From Lung Airways to Systemic Regions--Part I: Whole-Lung Aerosol Dynamics," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 135(12), p. 121003) with a new multicompartmental model for insoluble nanoparticle barrier mass transfer into systemic regions. Specifically, it allows for the prediction of temporal nanoparticle accumulation in the blood and lymphatic systems and in organs. The multicompartmental model parameters were determined from experimental retention and clearance data in rat lungs and then the validated model was applied to humans based on pharmacokinetic cross-species extrapolation. This hybrid simulator is a computationally efficient tool to predict the nanoparticle kinetics in the human body. The study provides critical insight into nanomaterial deposition and distribution from the lungs to systemic regions. The quantitative results are useful in diverse fields such as toxicology for exposure-risk analysis of ubiquitous nanomaterial and pharmacology for nanodrug development and targeting.

  2. Heavy metals in urban soils of East St. Louis, IL. Part II: Leaching characteristics and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, M D; Landsberger, S

    2000-09-01

    The city of East St. Louis, IL, has a history of abundant industrial activities including smelters of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, a coal-fired power plant, companies that produced organic and inorganic chemicals, and petroleum refineries. Following a gross assessment of heavy metals in the community soils (see Part I of this two-part series), leaching tests were performed on specific soils to elucidate heavy metal-associated mineral fractions and general leachability. Leaching experiments, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TLCP) and column tests, and sequential extractions, illustrated the low leachability of metals in East St. Louis soils. The column leachate results were modeled using a formulation developed for fly ash leaching. The importance of instantaneous dissolution was evident from the model. By incorporating desorption/adsorption terms into the source term, the model was adapted very well to the time-dependent heavy metal leachate concentrations. The results demonstrate the utility of a simple model to describe heavy metal leaching from contaminated soils.

  3. Heavy Metals in Urban Soils of East St. Louis, IL Part II: Leaching Characteristics and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Michael D; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2000-09-01

    The city of East St. Louis, IL, has a history of abundant industrial activities including smelters of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, a coal-fired power plant, companies that produced organic and inorganic chemicals, and petroleum refineries. Following a gross assessment of heavy metals in the community soils (see Part I of this two-part series), leaching tests were performed on specific soils to elucidate heavy metal-associated mineral fractions and general leachability. Leaching experiments, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TLCP) and column tests, and sequential extractions, illustrated the low leachability of metals in East St. Louis soils. The column leachate results were modeled using a formulation developed for fly ash leaching. The importance of instantaneous dissolution was evident from the model. By incorporating desorption/adsorption terms into the source term, the model was adapted very well to the time-dependent heavy metal leachate concentrations. The results demonstrate the utility of a simple model to describe heavy metal leaching from contaminated soils.

  4. Knowledge representation and qualitative simulation of salmon redd functioning. Part II: qualitative model of redds.

    PubMed

    Guerrin, F; Dumas, J

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes a qualitative model of the functioning of salmon redds (spawning areas of salmon) and its impact on mortality rates of early stages. For this, we use Qsim, a qualitative simulator, which appeared adequate for representing available qualitative knowledge of freshwater ecology experts (see Part I of this paper). Since the number of relevant variables was relatively large, it appeared necessary to decompose the model into two parts, corresponding to processes occurring at separate time-scales. A qualitative clock allows us to submit the simulation of salmon developmental stages to the calculation of accumulated daily temperatures (degree-days), according to the clock ticks and a water temperature regime set by the user. Therefore, this introduces some way of real-time dating and duration in a purely qualitative model. Simulating both sub-models, either separately or by means of alternate transitions, allows us to generate the evolutions of variables of interest, such as the mortality rates according to two factors (flow of oxygenated water and plugging of gravel interstices near the bed surface), under various scenarios.

  5. Recent developments in modeling of hot rolling processes: Part II - Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Gerhard; Bambach, Markus; Seuren, Simon; Henke, Thomas; Lohmar, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    This publication gives a short overview of current developments in modeling and simulation of hot rolling processes of metals at the Institute of Metal Forming of RWTH Aachen University. It is based on the fundamentals treated in Part I also contained in this conference issue. It features applications in the field of fast on-line models, where a fast multi-stage rolling model and an analytical approach for predicting the through-thickness shear distribution are presented. In addition, a new concept for sensitivity analysis by automatic differentiation is introduced and discussed. Finally, applications of rolling simulations in the field of integrated computational materials engineering are presented with a focus on TWIP and linepipe steels as well as aluminum.

  6. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  7. The macroscopic entrainment processes of simulated cumulus ensemble. Part II: Testing the entraining-plume model

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, Akio

    1997-04-15

    According to Part I of this paper, is seems that ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP), such as the spectral cumulus ensemble model in the Arakawa-Schubert parameterization, is an acceptable simplification for tropical deep convection. Since each subensemble in the spectral cumulus ensemble model is formally analogous to an entraining plume, the latter is examined using the simulated data from a cloud-resolving model (CRM). The authors first follow the analysis procedure of Warner. With the data from a nonprecipitating experiment, the authors show that the entraining-plume model cannot simultaneously predict the mean liquid water profile and cloud top height of the clouds simulated by the CRM. However, the mean properties of active elements of clouds, which are characterized by strong updrafts, can be described by an entraining plume of similar top height. With data from a precipitating experiment, the authors examine the spectral cumulus ensemble model using the Paluch diagram. It is found that the spectral cumulus ensemble model appears adequate if different types of clouds in the spectrum are interpreted as subcloud elements with different entrainment characteristics. The resolved internal structure of clouds can thus be viewed as a manifestation of a cloud spectrum. To further investigate whether the fractional rate of entrainment is an appropriate parameter for characterizing cloud types in the spectral cumulus ensemble model, the authors stratify the simulated saturated updrafts (subcloud elements) into different types according to their eventual heights and calculate the cloud mass flux and mean moist static energy for each type. Entrainment characteristics are then inferred through the cloud mass flux and in-cloud moist static energy. It is found that different types of subcloud elements have distinguishable thermodynamic properties and entrainment characteristics. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  8. The Rossby Centre Regional Atmospheric Climate Model part II: application to the Arctic climate.

    PubMed

    Jones, Colin G; Wyser, Klaus; Ullerstig, Anders; Willén, Ulrika

    2004-06-01

    The Rossby Centre regional climate model (RCA2) has been integrated over the Arctic Ocean as part of the international ARCMIP project. Results have been compared to observations derived from the SHEBA data set. The standard RCA2 model overpredicts cloud cover and downwelling longwave radiation, during the Arctic winter. This error was improved by introducing a new cloud parameterization, which significantly improves the annual cycle of cloud cover. Compensating biases between clear sky downwelling longwave radiation and longwave radiation emitted from cloud base were identified. Modifications have been introduced to the model radiation scheme that more accurately treat solar radiation interaction with ice crystals. This leads to a more realistic representation of cloud-solar radiation interaction. The clear sky portion of the model radiation code transmits too much solar radiation through the atmosphere, producing a positive bias at the top of the frequent boundary layer clouds. A realistic treatment of the temporally evolving albedo, of both sea-ice and snow, appears crucial for an accurate simulation of the net surface energy budget. Likewise, inclusion of a prognostic snow-surface temperature seems necessary, to accurately simulate near-surface thermodynamic processes in the Arctic.

  9. A New Look at Stratospheric Sudden Warmings. Part II: Evaluation of Numerical Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Andrew J.; Polvani, Lorenza M.; Perlwitz, Judith; Sassi, Fabrizio; Manzini, Elisa; Shibata, Kiyotaka; Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rind, David

    2007-01-01

    The simulation of major midwinter stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) in six stratosphere-resolving general circulation models (GCMs) is examined. The GCMs are compared to a new climatology of SSWs, based on the dynamical characteristics of the events. First, the number, type, and temporal distribution of SSW events are evaluated. Most of the models show a lower frequency of SSW events than the climatology, which has a mean frequency of 6.0 SSWs per decade. Statistical tests show that three of the six models produce significantly fewer SSWs than the climatology, between 1.0 and 2.6 SSWs per decade. Second, four process-based diagnostics are calculated for all of the SSW events in each model. It is found that SSWs in the GCMs compare favorably with dynamical benchmarks for SSW established in the first part of the study. These results indicate that GCMs are capable of quite accurately simulating the dynamics required to produce SSWs, but with lower frequency than the climatology. Further dynamical diagnostics hint that, in at least one case, this is due to a lack of meridional heat flux in the lower stratosphere. Even though the SSWs simulated by most GCMs are dynamically realistic when compared to the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, the reasons for the relative paucity of SSWs in GCMs remains an important and open question.

  10. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part II: Thermohydraulic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    In part one of this publication experimental results for a single-channel transfer line used at liquid helium (LHe) decant stations are presented. The transfer of LHe into mobile dewars is an unavoidable process since the places of storage and usage are generally located apart from each other. The experimental results have shown that reasonable amounts of LHe evaporate due to heat leak and pressure drop. Thus, generated helium cold gas has to be collected and reliquefied, demanding a huge amount of electrical energy. Although this transfer process is common in cryogenic laboratories, no existing code could be found to model it. Therefore, a thermohydraulic model has been developed to model the LHe flow at operating conditions using published heat transfer and pressure drop correlations. This paper covers the basic equations used to calculate heat transfer and pressure drop, as well as the validation of the thermohydraulic code, and its application within the optimisation process. The final transfer line design features reduced heat leak and pressure drop values based on a combined measurement and modelling campaign in the range of 0.112 < pin < 0.148 MPa, 190 < G < 450 kg/(m2 s), and 0.04 < xout < 0.12.

  11. Steady flow in a model of the human carotid bifurcation. Part II--laser-Doppler anemometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Bharadvaj, B K; Mabon, R F; Giddens, D P

    1982-01-01

    The evidence for hypothesizing a relationship between hemodynamics and atherogenesis as well as the motivation for selecting the carotid bifurcation for extensive fluid dynamic studies has been discussed in Part I of this two-paper sequence. Part II deals with velocity measurements within the bifurcation model described by Fig. 1 and Table 1 of the previous paper. A plexiglass model conforming to the dimensions of the average carotid bifurcation was machined and employed for velocity measurements with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA). The objective of this phase of the study was to obtain quantitative information on the velocity field and to estimate levels and directions of wall shear stress in the region of the bifurcation.

  12. MEDSLIK-II, a Lagrangian marine oil spill model for short-term forecasting - Part 1: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dominicis, M.; Pinardi, N.; Zodiatis, G.

    2013-03-01

    The processes of transport, diffusion and transformation of surface oil in seawater can be simulated using a Lagrangian model formalism coupled with Eulerian circulation models. This paper describes the formalism and the conceptual assumptions of a Lagrangian marine oil slick numerical model and re-writes the constitutive equations in a modern mathematical framework. The Lagrangian numerical representation of the oil slick requires three different state variables: the slick, the particle and the structural state variables. Transformation processes (evaporation, spreading, dispersion and coastal adhesion) act on the slick state variables, while particles variables are used to model the transport and diffusion processes. The slick and particle variables are recombined together to compute the oil concentration in water, a structural state variable. The mathematical and numerical formulation of oil transport, diffusion and transformation processes described in this paper, together with the many simplifying hypothesis and parameterizations, form the basis of a new, open source Lagrangian surface oil spill model, so-called MEDSLIK-II. Part 2 of this paper describes the applications of MEDSLIK-II to oil spill simulations that allow the validation of the model results and the study of the sensitivity of the simulated oil slick to different model numerical parameterizations.

  13. Kinetic modeling of hardwood prehydrolysis. Part II. Xylan removal by dilute hydrochloric acid prehydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, A.H.; Libkie, K.; Springer, E.L.

    1986-06-01

    A study was made of the kinetics of xylan hemicellulose removal with 0.10 M HCl at 120 degrees C from quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), paper birch (Betula papyrifera), American elm (Ulmus americana), red maple (Acer rubrum), and southern red oak (Quercus falcata). The mathematical model developed in Part I to describe the kinetics of xylan removal by water prehydrolysis of these species could be used to model xylan removal with dilute hydrochloric acid. Xylan removal could thus be modelled as the sum of two parallel first-order reactions - one fast and one slow. However, unlike the case with water prehydrolysis where the rate constants for the fast and slow reaction processes could be correlated with each other, they could not be correlated for HCl prehydrolysis. Instead, these constant values determined for each species clustered about average values for all the species as a whole. A single set of parameters determined from a nonlinear least squares fit of the experimental prehydrolysis data for all the species as a whole to the model could be used to describe the course of xylan removal from all the species. The fact that one set of parameters could be used suggests that the same reactions are taking place on prehydrolysis and the chemical structure and physical morphology of the xylan hemicellulose were essentially the same in the species studied and probably in all temperate hardwood species. The model thus provides a good approximation of xylan removal from any temperate hardwood with dilute hydrochloric acid at the reaction conditions studied. 20 references.

  14. Weighed scalar averaging in LTB dust models: part II. A formalism of exact perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Roberto A.

    2013-03-01

    We examine the exact perturbations that arise from the q-average formalism that was applied in the preceding article (part I) to Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. By introducing an initial value parametrization, we show that all LTB scalars that take an FLRW ‘look-alike’ form (frequently used in the literature dealing with LTB models) follow as q-averages of covariant scalars that are common to FLRW models. These q-scalars determine for every averaging domain a unique FLRW background state through Darmois matching conditions at the domain boundary, though the definition of this background does not require an actual matching with an FLRW region (Swiss cheese-type models). Local perturbations describe the deviation from the FLRW background state through the local gradients of covariant scalars at the boundary of every comoving domain, while non-local perturbations do so in terms of the intuitive notion of a ‘contrast’ of local scalars with respect to FLRW reference values that emerge from q-averages assigned to the whole domain or the whole time slice in the asymptotic limit. We derive fluid flow evolution equations that completely determine the dynamics of the models in terms of the q-scalars and both types of perturbations. A rigorous formalism of exact spherical nonlinear perturbations is defined over the FLRW background state associated with the q-scalars, recovering the standard results of linear perturbation theory in the appropriate limit. We examine the notion of the amplitude and illustrate the differences between local and non-local perturbations by qualitative diagrams and through an example of a cosmic density void that follows from the numeric solution of the evolution equations.

  15. Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2005-12-01

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

  16. Atmospheric mercury in the Canadian Arctic. Part II: insight from modeling.

    PubMed

    Dastoor, Ashu; Ryzhkov, Andrew; Durnford, Dorothy; Lehnherr, Igor; Steffen, Alexandra; Morrison, Heather

    2015-03-15

    A review of mercury in the Canadian Arctic with a focus on field measurements is presented in part I (see Steffen et al., this issue). Here we provide insights into the dynamics of mercury in the Canadian Arctic from new and published mercury modeling studies using Environment Canada's mercury model. The model simulations presented in this study use global anthropogenic emissions of mercury for the period 1995-2005. The most recent modeling estimate of the net gain of mercury from the atmosphere to the Arctic Ocean is 75 Mg year(-1) and the net gain to the terrestrial ecosystems north of 66.5° is 42 Mg year(-1). Model based annual export of riverine mercury from North American, Russian and all Arctic watersheds to the Arctic Ocean are in the range of 2.8-5.6, 12.7-25.4 and 15.5-31.0 Mg year(-1), respectively. Analysis of long-range transport events of Hg at Alert and Little Fox Lake monitoring sites indicates that Asia contributes the most ambient Hg to the Canadian Arctic followed by contributions from North America, Russia, and Europe. The largest anthropogenic Hg deposition to the Canadian Arctic is from East Asia followed by Europe (and Russia), North America, and South Asia. An examination of temporal trends of Hg using the model suggests that changes in meteorology and changes in anthropogenic emissions equally contribute to the decrease in surface air elemental mercury concentrations in the Canadian Arctic with an overall decline of ~12% from 1990 to 2005. A slow increase in net deposition of Hg is found in the Canadian Arctic in response to changes in meteorology. Changes in snowpack and sea-ice characteristics and increase in precipitation in the Arctic related with climate change are found to be primary causes for the meteorology-related changes in air concentrations and deposition of Hg in the region. The model estimates that under the emissions reduction scenario of worldwide implementation of the best emission control technologies by 2020, mercury

  17. AERMOD: A DISPERSION MODEL FOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCE APPLICATIONS PART II: MODEL PERFORMANCE AGAINST 17 FIELD STUDY DATABASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formulations of the AMS/EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee's applied air dispersion model (AERMOD) are described. This is the second in a series of three articles. Part I describes the model's methods for characterizing the atmospheric boundary layer and complex ter...

  18. Post-Messinian evolution of the Florence Rise area (Western Cyprus Arc) Part II: Experimental modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, N. C.; Vendeville, B. C.; Loncke, L.

    2013-04-01

    The Florence rise is located southwest of the island of Cyprus and belongs to the western part of the Cyprus arc. The Florence rise is an accretionary prism, with some amount of strike slip, where the thick layer of evaporitic Messinian decouples deformation in the post-Messinian cover from that in the pre-Messinian "basement." The basement structural highs, whether presently active or inactive, influence the deformation and displacement patterns of the salt and its overburden. Our first experiment focused on the presence, in nature, of normal faults located above basement thrusts. Deformation of the salt layer and its overburden was influenced by several processes. On one hand, the entire model was subjected to regional shortening, and basement thrusts formed. On the other hand, the local vertical rise associated with basement thrusts created local slopes down which the salt and overburden glided gravitationally, in some places leading to the formation of normal faults in an otherwise compressional regional setting. Our second experiment was designed to model the buttressing effect of the Florence rise and the Eratosthenes Seamount on thin-skinned displacement patterns during regional gravity spreading of the Nile cone. Results indicate that in the Northeastern distal region, buttressing by these two basement highs forced the salt and its overburden to flow northeastward, as a lateral escape toward the free boundary of the region.

  19. A new coincidence model for single particle counters, Part II: Advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Knapp, J Z; Lieberman, A; Abramson, L R

    1994-01-01

    Accuracy, acceptance limits and methods for U.S.P. (788) contaminating particle assays published in the XXII Revision are refined in U.S.P. XXIII. In both Revisions, although different numerical values and methods are employed, particle contamination limits remain constants for all S.V.I. container volumes. The effect of this quality standard is high particle concentration acceptance limits in the smallest S.V.I. container sizes. The effect of these high concentrations is to introduce both undercount errors and false counts into U.S.P. (788) SVI contaminating particle assays. There is general agreement that the count of high concentrations of particles by a single particle light extinction counter result in an increase of the average size of the distribution of particles reported and a decrease in their total number. The error mechanism is termed "signal coincidence." Understanding and control of both these problems is unified with the introduction of the count efficiency parameter. Part I of this paper makes available two core concepts with which evaluation and control of coincidence error in single particle counters can be accurately quantified. These two core concepts are the "Particle Triggered Poisson Model," a new more accurate statistical model of the particle counting process and a concentration measure that includes the effect of particle size on the counting capability of a detector. Use of these concepts make it possible to evaluate particle detector count efficiency capability from experimental data of the coincidence effect. This is an application paper. It combines the theory in the Part I paper with the replicability of particle counters into a simple test protocol. The test results can be used to calculate a contour of particle size and count within which both undercount errors and the introduction of false counts into U.S.P. (788) particle assays are controlled. From the data analyzed it can be seen that any single particle size test cannot

  20. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part II: A new modelling approach and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexandre; Mailliat, Alain; Amielh, Muriel; Anselmet, Fabien

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the modelling of aerosol dry deposition on vegetation. It follows a companion article, in which a review of the current knowledge highlights the need for a better description of the aerosol behaviour within the canopy [Petroff, A., Mailliat, A., Amielh, M., Anselmet, F., 2008. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part I: Review of present knowledge. Atmospheric Environment, in press, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.09.043]. Concepts from multi-phase flow studies are used for describing the canopy medium and deriving a time and space-averaged aerosol balance equation and the associated deposition terms. The closure of the deposition terms follows an up-scaling procedure based on the statistical distribution of the collecting elements. This aerosol transport model is then applied in a stationary and mono-dimensional configuration and takes into account the properties of the vegetation, the aerosol and the turbulent flow. Deposition mechanisms are Brownian diffusion, interception, inertial and turbulent impactions, and gravitational settling. For each of them, a parameterisation of the particle collection is derived and the quality of their predictions is assessed by comparison with wind-tunnel deposition measurements on coniferous twigs [Belot, Y., Gauthier, D., 1975. Transport of micronic particles from atmosphere to foliar surfaces. In: De Vries, D.A., Afgan, N.H. (Eds.), Heat and Mass Transfer in the Biosphere. Scripta Book, Washington, DC, pp. 583-591; Belot, Y., 1977. Etude de la captation des polluants atmosphériques par les végétaux. CEA, R-4786, Fontenay-aux-Roses; Belot, Y., Camus, H., Gauthier, D., Caput, C., 1994. Uptake of small particles by canopies. The Science of the Total Environment 157, 1-6]. Under a real canopy configuration, the predictions of the aerosol transport model compare reasonably well with detailed on-site deposition measurements of Aitken mode particles [Buzorius, G., Rannik, Ü., M

  1. MEDSLIK-II, a Lagrangian marine surface oil spill model for short-term forecasting - Part 1: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dominicis, M.; Pinardi, N.; Zodiatis, G.; Lardner, R.

    2013-11-01

    The processes of transport, diffusion and transformation of surface oil in seawater can be simulated using a Lagrangian model formalism coupled with Eulerian circulation models. This paper describes the formalism and the conceptual assumptions of a Lagrangian marine surface oil slick numerical model and rewrites the constitutive equations in a modern mathematical framework. The Lagrangian numerical representation of the oil slick requires three different state variables: the slick, the particle and the structural state variables. Transformation processes (evaporation, spreading, dispersion and coastal adhesion) act on the slick state variables, while particle variables are used to model the transport and diffusion processes. The slick and particle variables are recombined together to compute the oil concentration in water, a structural state variable. The mathematical and numerical formulation of oil transport, diffusion and transformation processes described in this paper, together with the many simplifying hypothesis and parameterizations, form the basis of a new, open source Lagrangian surface oil spill model, the so-called MEDSLIK-II, based on its precursor MEDSLIK (Lardner et al., 1998, 2006; Zodiatis et al., 2008a). Part 2 of this paper describes the applications of the model to oil spill simulations that allow the validation of the model results and the study of the sensitivity of the simulated oil slick to different model numerical parameterizations.

  2. Circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution for scalar transmissibility functions. Part II: Probabilistic model and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wang-Ji; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2016-12-01

    In Part I of this study, some new theorems, corollaries and lemmas on circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution have been mathematically proved. This part II paper is dedicated to providing a rigorous treatment of statistical properties of raw scalar transmissibility functions at an arbitrary frequency line. On the basis of statistics of raw FFT coefficients and circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution, explicit closed-form probabilistic models are established for both multivariate and univariate scalar transmissibility functions. Also, remarks on the independence of transmissibility functions at different frequency lines and the shape of the probability density function (PDF) of univariate case are presented. The statistical structures of probabilistic models are concise, compact and easy-implemented with a low computational effort. They hold for general stationary vector processes, either Gaussian stochastic processes or non-Gaussian stochastic processes. The accuracy of proposed models is verified using numerical example as well as field test data of a high-rise building and a long-span cable-stayed bridge. This study yields new insights into the qualitative analysis of the uncertainty of scalar transmissibility functions, which paves the way for developing new statistical methodologies for modal analysis, model updating or damage detection using responses only without input information.

  3. Effective Thermal and Electrical Conductivities of AgSnO2 During Sintering. Part II: Constitutive Modeling and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisson, Elodie; Desplats, Henri; Carre, Patrick; Keryvin, Vincent; Rogeon, Philippe; Feulvarch, Eric; Bonhomme, Alexandre

    2016-12-01

    During resistance sintering (RS) of a conductive porous material, effective electrical and thermal conductivities have a great influence on the thermal gradients inside the matter, which could induce heterogeneous microstructures. Part I of this investigation focused on the characterization of the effective conductivities of AgSnO2 during sintering conditions, with the understanding of the relations between their evolutions and the microstructure. In Part II, the emphasis is on the development of appropriate constitutive equations able to describe the evolutions of the effective conductivities of AgSnO2 during RS. This work proposes constitutive equations taking into account the two main mechanisms, identified in Part I, which modify the contact conditions between the particles. The first mechanism corresponds to viscoplastic deformations of particles. A creep behavior law is used to calculate the macroscopic deformation and the densification kinetics. The second one deals with bonding diffusion under the effect of temperature, which decreases the contact resistance between the particles. As no specific effect of current has been highlighted in the case of AgSnO2, the effective conductivities' behavior laws are available for RS and for hot pressing (HP). Relationships for effective conductivities are included in the numerical HP model and combined with governing laws. Finite element analyses are compared to experimental results obtained from HP tests to validate and discuss the model.

  4. AUTH Regional Climate Model Contributions to EURO-CORDEX. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katragkou, E.; Gkotovou, I.; Kartsios, S.; Pavlidis, V.; Tsigaridis, K.; Trail, M.; Nazarenko, L.; Karacostas, Theodore S.

    2017-01-01

    Regional climate downscaling techniques are being increasingly used to provide higher-resolution climate information than is available directly from contemporary global climate models. The Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) initiative was build to foster communication and knowledge exchange between regional climate modelers. The Department of Meteorology and Climatology of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki has been contributing to the CORDEX initiative since 2010, with regional climate model simulations over the European domain (EURO-CORDEX). Results of this work are presented here, including two hindcasts and a historical simulation with the Weather Research Forecasting model (WRF), driven by ERA-interim reanalysis and the NASA Earth System Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2, respectively. Model simulations are evaluated with the EOBS climatology and the model performance is assessed.

  5. On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nabawy, Mostafa R. A.; Crowther, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a generic, transparent and compact model for the evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of insect-like flapping wings in hovering flight. The model is generic in that it can be applied to wings of arbitrary morphology and kinematics without the use of experimental data, is transparent in that the aerodynamic components of the model are linked directly to morphology and kinematics via physical relationships and is compact in the sense that it can be efficiently evaluated for use within a design optimization environment. An important aspect of the model is the method by which translational force coefficients for the aerodynamic model are obtained from first principles; however important insights are also provided for the morphological and kinematic treatments that improve the clarity and efficiency of the overall model. A thorough analysis of the leading-edge suction analogy model is provided and comparison of the aerodynamic model with results from application of the leading-edge suction analogy shows good agreement. The full model is evaluated against experimental data for revolving wings and good agreement is obtained for lift and drag up to 90° incidence. Comparison of the model output with data from computational fluid dynamics studies on a range of different insect species also shows good agreement with predicted weight support ratio and specific power. The validated model is used to evaluate the relative impact of different contributors to the induced power factor for the hoverfly and fruitfly. It is shown that the assumption of an ideal induced power factor (k = 1) for a normal hovering hoverfly leads to a 23% overestimation of the generated force owing to flapping. PMID:24554578

  6. On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2014-05-06

    This paper introduces a generic, transparent and compact model for the evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of insect-like flapping wings in hovering flight. The model is generic in that it can be applied to wings of arbitrary morphology and kinematics without the use of experimental data, is transparent in that the aerodynamic components of the model are linked directly to morphology and kinematics via physical relationships and is compact in the sense that it can be efficiently evaluated for use within a design optimization environment. An important aspect of the model is the method by which translational force coefficients for the aerodynamic model are obtained from first principles; however important insights are also provided for the morphological and kinematic treatments that improve the clarity and efficiency of the overall model. A thorough analysis of the leading-edge suction analogy model is provided and comparison of the aerodynamic model with results from application of the leading-edge suction analogy shows good agreement. The full model is evaluated against experimental data for revolving wings and good agreement is obtained for lift and drag up to 90° incidence. Comparison of the model output with data from computational fluid dynamics studies on a range of different insect species also shows good agreement with predicted weight support ratio and specific power. The validated model is used to evaluate the relative impact of different contributors to the induced power factor for the hoverfly and fruitfly. It is shown that the assumption of an ideal induced power factor (k = 1) for a normal hovering hoverfly leads to a 23% overestimation of the generated force owing to flapping.

  7. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part II: Thickness length scale effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of the Eringen's nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam model. In literature, most work has taken the axial coordinate derivative in the Laplacian operator presented in nonlocal elasticity. This causes that the non-locality always makes the beam soften as compared to the local counterpart. In this paper, the thickness scale effect is solely considered to investigate if the nonlocal model can simulate stiffening effect. Taking the thickness derivative in the Laplacian operator leads to the presence of a surface stress state. The governing equation derived is compared to that of the EB model with the surface stress. The results obtained reveal that the nonlocality tends to decrease the bending moment stiffness whereas to increase the bending rigidity in the governing equation. This tendency also depends on the surface conditions.

  8. A unifying neuro-fasciagenic model of somatic dysfunction - Underlying mechanisms and treatment - Part II.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    This paper offers an extensive review of the main fascia-mediated mechanisms underlying various therapeutic processes of clinical relevance for manual therapy. The concept of somatic dysfunction is revisited in light of the several fascial influences that may come into play during and after manual treatment. A change in perspective is thus proposed: from a nociceptive model that for decades has viewed somatic dysfunction as a neurologically-mediated phenomenon, to a unifying neuro-fascial model that integrates neural influences into a multifactorial and multidimensional interpretation of manual therapeutic effects as being partially, if not entirely, mediated by the fascia. By taking into consideration a wide spectrum of fascia-related factors - from cell-based mechanisms to cognitive and behavioural influences - a model emerges suggesting, amongst other results, a multidisciplinary-approach to the intervention of somatic dysfunction. Finally, it is proposed that a sixth osteopathic 'meta-model' - the connective tissue-fascial model - be added to the existing five models in osteopathic philosophy as the main interface between all body systems, thus providing a structural and functional framework for the body's homoeostatic potential and its inherent abilities to heal.

  9. Modelling air pollution for epidemiologic research--part II: predicting temporal variation through land use regression.

    PubMed

    Mölter, A; Lindley, S; de Vocht, F; Simpson, A; Agius, R

    2010-12-01

    Over recent years land use regression (LUR) has become a frequently used method in air pollution exposure studies, as it can model intra-urban variation in pollutant concentrations at a fine spatial scale. However, very few studies have used the LUR methodology to also model the temporal variation in air pollution exposure. The aim of this study is to estimate annual mean NO(2) and PM(10) concentrations from 1996 to 2008 for Greater Manchester using land use regression models. The results from these models will be used in the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort to determine health effects of air pollution exposure. The Greater Manchester LUR model for 2005 was recalibrated using interpolated and adjusted NO(2) and PM(10) concentrations as dependent variables for 1996-2008. In addition, temporally resolved variables were available for traffic intensity and PM(10) emissions. To validate the resulting LUR models, they were applied to the locations of automatic monitoring stations and the estimated concentrations were compared against measured concentrations. The 2005 LUR models were successfully recalibrated, providing individual models for each year from 1996 to 2008. When applied to the monitoring stations the mean prediction error (MPE) for NO(2) concentrations for all stations and years was -0.8μg/m³ and the root mean squared error (RMSE) was 6.7μg/m³. For PM(10) concentrations the MPE was 0.8μg/m³ and the RMSE was 3.4μg/m³. These results indicate that it is possible to model temporal variation in air pollution through LUR with relatively small prediction errors. It is likely that most previous LUR studies did not include temporal variation, because they were based on short term monitoring campaigns and did not have historic pollution data. The advantage of this study is that it uses data from an air dispersion model, which provided concentrations for 2005 and 2010, and therefore allowed extrapolation over a longer time period.

  10. A partitioner-centric model for SAMR partitioning trade-off optimization : Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2004-03-01

    Optimal partitioning of structured adaptive mesh applications necessitates dynamically determining and optimizing for the most time-inhibiting factor, such as data migration and communication volume. However, a trivial monitoring of an application evaluates the current partitioning rather than the inherent properties of the grid hierarchy. We present a model that given a structured adaptive grid, determines ab initio to what extent the partitioner should focus on reducing the amount of data migration to reduce execution time. This model contributes to the meta-partitioner, our ultimate aim of being able to select and configure the optimal partitioner based on the dynamic properties of the grid hierarchy and the computer. We validate the predictions of this model by comparing them with actual measurements (via traces) from four different adaptive simulations. The results show that the proposed model generally captures the inherent optimization-need in SAMR applications. We conclude that our model is a useful contribution, since tracking and adapting to the dynamic behavior of such applications lead to potentially large decreases in execution times.

  11. A General Pressure Gradient Formulation for Ocean Models - Part II: Energy, Momentum, and Bottom Torque Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y.; Wright, D.

    1998-01-01

    A formulation of the pressure gradient force for use in models with topography-following coordinates is proposed and diagnostically analyzed by Song. We investigate numerical consistency with respect to global energy conservation, depth-integrated momentum changes, and the represent of the bottom pressure torque.

  12. QUANTIFYING SEASONAL SHIFTS IN NITROGEN SOURCES TO OREGON ESTUARIES: PART II: TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in estuaries is complicated by the multiple sources, temporal variability in inputs, and variations in transport. We used a hydrodynamic model to simulate the transport and uptake of three sources of DIN (oceanic, riv...

  13. Thermodynamical model of mixed aggregation of ligands with caffeine in aqueous solution. Part II.

    PubMed

    Zdunek, M; Piosik, J; Kapuscinski, J

    2000-02-14

    A statistical-thermodynamical model of mixed association in which one component's self-association is unlimited while the second component does not self-aggregate is described. The model was tested with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl-indole-dihydrochloride (DAPI) and ethidium bromide (EB) using light absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry. The system is controlled by two parameters, which represent self-aggregation 'neighborhood' association constant KCC and mixed 'neighborhood' association constant KAC. Calculated, using this model, KAC = 58.2 +/- 1 M-1, KAC = 64.6 +/- 2 M-1 for DAPI and EB, respectively, are in good agreement with known values of stacking interactions. The titration microcalorimetric measurement of DAPI-CAF interaction delta H = -11.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol is also consistent with this type of reaction. The structures of the stacking complexes were also confirmed by semi-empirical molecular modeling in the presence of water. The data indicate that CAF forms stacking complexes with DAPI and EB, thus effectively lowering the concentration of the free ligands in the solution, and therefore, CAF can be used to modulate aromatic compound activity.

  14. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann; Field, Kevin G.; Remec, Igor

    2014-11-15

    The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These results are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation of the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. Finally, the radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste.

  15. DIVWAG Model Documentation. Volume II. Programmer/Analyst Manual. Part 3. Chapter 7 Through 8.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    weapon types q carried by the same trans- port as weapon type i. The model utilizes Gauss -Legendre integration, the 10-point formula, to evaluate... Gauss -Legendre 10-point fohmula. he values of these parameters are specified in Equation IV-7-142e: w 1 0.295524225 ri = 0.148874339 w 2 - 0.269266719...firing of all transports within each unit. The true kill fractions are obtained by Gauss -Legendre inte- gration with the results given in Equation IV

  16. DIVWAG Model Documentation. Volume II. Programmer/Analyst Manual. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    personnel replacement. 3. FUNCTIONAL COMPONENTS AND CAPABILITIES. Functionally the DIVWAG Model is a dual system; it functions physically ...units that are not performing another military activity such as firing, moving, or combat. Whether or not addressed by gamer orders, an inactive gamed...unit will consume classes I and III or IIIA supplies and can be assessed as to losses and status; other units can gain information about the inactive

  17. An efficient model for three-dimensional surface wave simulations. Part II: Generation and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clamond, Didier; Fructus, Dorian; Grue, John; Kristiansen, Øyvind

    2005-05-01

    Water wave generation procedures and efficient numerical beaches are crucial components of a fully non-linear numerical tank for water wave simulations. Linear formulae for pneumatic wave makers are optimized for efficient fully non-linear wave generation in three dimensions. Analytical integration of the (linear) applied free surface pressure provides formulae valid for all times of the simulation. The purely non-linear part of the wave making procedure becomes integrated in the fully non-linear formulation. Novel numerical beaches are introduced, damping the (scaled) tangential velocity at the free surface. More specifically, an additional term is introduced in the Bernoulli equation at the free surface, namely ∇-1·(γ∇ϕ˜), where γ is a non-zero (smooth) function in regions where damping is required and zero in the wave propagation domain, ∇ϕ˜ is the scaled tangential velocity at the free surface, and ∇ -1 the inverse horizontal gradient operator. The new term results in a modified dynamic free surface condition which is integrated in time in the fully non-linear formulation. Extensive numerical tests show that the energy of the outgoing waves is completely absorbed by the new damper. Neither wave reflection nor emission are observed. A steep solitary wave is completely absorbed at the numerical beach. Damping of waves due to advancing pressure distributions are efficient as well. The implementation of the absorber in any existing numerical tank is rather trivial.

  18. CO2-induced dissolution of low permeability carbonates. Part II: Numerical modeling of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yue; Smith, Megan; Sholokhova, Yelena; Carroll, Susan

    2013-12-01

    We used the 3D continuum-scale reactive transport models to simulate eight core flood experiments for two different carbonate rocks. In these experiments the core samples were reacted with brines equilibrated with pCO2 = 3, 2, 1, 0.5 MPa (Smith et al., 2013 [27]). The carbonate rocks were from specific Marly dolostone and Vuggy limestone flow units at the IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project in south-eastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Initial model porosity, permeability, mineral, and surface area distributions were constructed from micro tomography and microscopy characterization data. We constrained model reaction kinetics and porosity-permeability equations with the experimental data. The experimental data included time-dependent solution chemistry and differential pressure measured across the core, and the initial and final pore space and mineral distribution. Calibration of the model with the experimental data allowed investigation of effects of carbonate reactivity, flow velocity, effective permeability, and time on the development and consequences of stable and unstable dissolution fronts. The continuum scale model captured the evolution of distinct dissolution fronts that developed as a consequence of carbonate mineral dissolution and pore scale transport properties. The results show that initial heterogeneity and porosity contrast control the development of the dissolution fronts in these highly reactive systems. This finding is consistent with linear stability analysis and the known positive feedback between mineral dissolution and fluid flow in carbonate formations. Differences in the carbonate kinetic drivers resulting from the range of pCO2 used in the experiments and the different proportions of more reactive calcite and less reactive dolomite contributed to the development of new pore space, but not to the type of dissolution fronts observed for the two different rock types. The development of the dissolution front was much more

  19. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  20. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Le Pape, Yann; Field, Kevin G.; Remec, Igor

    2014-11-15

    The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These results are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation ofmore » the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. Finally, the radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste.« less

  1. The Cotton-Mouton effect of liquid water. Part II: The semi-continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruud, Kenneth; A˚Gren, Hans; Dahle, Pa˚L.; Helgaker, Trygve; Rizzo, Antonio; Coriani, Sonia; Koch, Henrik; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.

    1998-01-01

    We present gauge-origin independent calculations of the Cotton-Mouton effect of liquid water. The liquid is represented by a semi-continuum model such that the central molecule is surrounded by its first solvation shell, which explicitly accounts for the strong interaction between the water molecule of interest and its closest neighbors. The long-range interactions with the solvent are modeled by a dielectric continuum surrounding the water molecule and the first solvation shell. We employ large basis sets, using London atomic orbitals in order to obtain gauge-origin independent results close to the Hartree-Fock limit. It is demonstrated that the direct interaction between neighboring molecules leads to a large effect on the calculated Cotton-Mouton constant, which undergoes a sign change from the gas to liquid phase, as observed previously for the linear electro-optical effect [K. V. Mikkelsen et al., J. Chem. Phys 102, 9362 (1995)]. Our best estimate for the molar Cotton-Mouton constant, -38.1ṡ10-20 G-2 cm3 mol-1 (corrected for local field effects), is in reasonable agreement with the experimental value of -118(15)ṡ10-20 G-2 cm3 mol-1. We expect that the remaining discrepancy is mainly due to an inadequate treatment of electron correlation.

  2. Mid-Holocene and last glacial maximum climate simulations with the IPSL model: part II: model-data comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Masa; Braconnot, Pascale; Bopp, Laurent; Mariotti, Véronique; Roy, Tilla; Woillez, Marie-Noëlle; Caubel, Arnaud; Foujols, Marie-Alice; Guilyardi, Eric; Khodri, Myriam; Lloyd, James; Lombard, Fabien; Marti, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    The climates of the mid-Holocene (MH, 6,000 years ago) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21,000 years ago) have been extensively documented and as such, have become targets for the evaluation of climate models for climate contexts very different from the present. In Part 1 of the present work, we have studied the MH and LGM simulations performed with the last two versions of the IPSL model: IPSL_CM4, run for the PMIP2/CMIP3 (Coupled Model Intercomparion Project) projects and IPSL_CM5A, run for the most recent PMIP3/CMIP5 projets. We have shown that not only are these models different in their simulations of the PI climate, but also in their simulations of the climatic anomalies for the MH and LGM. In the Part 2 of this paper, we first examine whether palaeo-data can help discriminate between the model performances. This is indeed the case for the African monsoon for the MH or for North America south of the Laurentide ice sheet, the South Atlantic or the southern Indian ocean for the LGM. For the LGM, off-line vegetation modelling appears to offer good opportunities to distinguish climate model results because glacial vegetation proves to be very sensitive to even small differences in LGM climate. For other cases such as the LGM North Atlantic or the LGM equatorial Pacific, the large uncertainty on the SST reconstructions, prevents model discrimination. We have examined the use of other proxy-data for model evaluation, which has become possible with the inclusion of the biogeochemistry morel PISCES in the IPSL_CM5A model. We show a broad agreement of the LGM-PI export production changes with reconstructions. These changes are related to the mixed layer depth in most regions and to sea-ice variations in the high latitudes. We have also modelled foraminifer abundances with the FORAMCLIM model and shown that the changes in foraminifer abundance in the equatorial Pacific are mainly forced by changes in SSTs, hence confirming the SST-foraminifer abundance relationship

  3. MODELING OF NI-CR-MO BASED ALLOYS: PART II - KINETICS

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Liu, Z

    2006-07-07

    The CALPHAD approach is applied to kinetic studies of phase transformations and aging of prototypes of Ni-Cr-Mo-based alloys selected for waste disposal canisters in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Based on a previous study on alloy stability for several candidate alloys, the thermodynamic driving forces together with a newly developed mobility database have been used to analyze diffusion-controlled transformations in these Ni-based alloys. Results on precipitation of the Ni{sub 2}Cr-ordered phase in Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and of the complex P- and {delta}-phases in a surrogate of Alloy 22 are presented, and the output from the modeling are compared with experimental data on aging.

  4. Verification Test of the SURF and SURFplus Models in xRage: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2016-06-20

    The previous study used an underdriven detonation wave (steady ZND reaction zone profile followed by a scale invariant rarefaction wave) for PBX 9502 as a validation test of the implementation of the SURF and SURFplus models in the xRage code. Even with a fairly fine uniform mesh (12,800 cells for 100mm) the detonation wave profile had limited resolution due to the thin reaction zone width (0.18mm) for the fast SURF burn rate. Here we study the effect of finer resolution by comparing results of simulations with cell sizes of 8, 2 and 1 μm, which corresponds to 25, 100 and 200 points within the reaction zone. With finer resolution the lead shock pressure is closer to the von Neumann spike pressure, and there is less noise in the rarefaction wave due to fluctuations within the reaction zone. As a result the average error decreases. The pointwise error is still dominated by the smearing the pressure kink in the vicinity of the sonic point which occurs at the end of the reaction zone.

  5. Robust detection of gearbox deterioration using compromised autoregressive modeling and Kolmogorov Smirnov test statistic. Part II: Experiment and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yimin; Mechefske, Chris K.

    2007-07-01

    Optimal maintenance decision analysis is heavily dependent on the accuracy of condition indicators. A condition indicator that is subject to such varying operating conditions as load is unable to provide precise condition information of the monitored object for making optimal operational maintenance decisions even if the maintenance program is established within a rigorous theoretical framework. For this reason, the performance of condition monitoring techniques applied to rotating machinery under varying load conditions has been a long-term concern and has attracted intensive research interest. Part I of this study proposed a novel technique based on adaptive autoregressive modeling and hypothesis tests. The method is able to automatically search for the optimal time-series model order and establish a compromised autoregressive model fitting based on the healthy gear motion residual signals under varying load conditions. The condition of the monitored gearbox is numerically represented by a modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov test statistic. Part II of this study is devoted to applications of the proposed technique to entire lifetime condition detection of three gearboxes with distinct physical specifications, distinct load conditions, and distinct failure modes. A comprehensive and thorough comparative study is conducted between the proposed technique and several counterparts. The detection technique is further enhanced by a proposed method to automatically identify and generate fault alerts with the aid of the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and thus requires no supervision from maintenance personnel. Experimental analysis demonstrated that the proposed technique applied to automatic identification and generation of fault alerts also features two highly desirable properties, i.e. few false alerts and early alert for incipient faults. Furthermore, it is found that the proposed technique is able to identify two types of abnormalities, i.e. strong ghost components abruptly

  6. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    Part I. A series of novel cobalt dithiolate complexes with mixed imine/amine ligand systems is presented here as electronic and structural models for the active site in the bacterial enzyme class, nitrile hydratase (NHase). Pentadentate cobalt(II) complexes with S2N 3 ligand environments are first studied as precursors to the more relevant cobalt(III) complexes. Adjustment of the backbone length by removal of a methylene group increases the reactivity of the system; whereas reduction of the two backbone imine bonds to allow free rotation about those bonds may decrease reactivity. Reactivity change due to the replacement of the backbone amine proton with a more sterically challenging methyl group is not yet clear. Upon oxidation, the monocationic pentadentate cobalt(III) complex, 1b, shows promising reactivity similar to that of NHase. The metal's open coordination site allows reversible binding of the endogenous, monoanionic ligands, N 3- and NCS-. Oxygenation of the thiolate sulfur atoms by exposure to O2 and H2O 2 produces sulfenate and sulfinate ligands in complex 8, which resembles the crystal structure of "deactivated" Fe NHase. However, its lack of reactivity argues against the oxygenated enzyme structure as the active form. Six-coordinate cobalt(III) complexes with S2N4 amine/amine ligand systems are also presented as analogues of previously reported iron(III) compounds, which mimic the spectroscopic properties of Fe NHase. The cobalt complexes do not seem to similarly model Co NHase. However, the S = 0 cobalt(III) center can be spectroscopically silent and difficult to detect, making comparison with synthetic models using common techniques hard. Part II. Dodecameric Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase mutant, E165C, stacks along its six-fold axis to produce tubular nanostructures in the presence of some divalent metal ions, as does the wild type enzyme. The centrally located, engineered Cys-165 residues appear to bind to various species and may serve as

  7. Exploring Water Pollution. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1975-01-01

    This is part two of a three part article related to the science activity of exploring environmental problems. Part one dealt with background information for the classroom teacher. Presented here is a suggested lesson plan on water pollution. Objectives, important concepts and instructional procedures are suggested. (EB)

  8. The model SIRANE for atmospheric urban pollutant dispersion; PART II, validation of the model on a real case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulhac, L.; Salizzoni, P.; Mejean, P.; Didier, D.; Rios, I.

    2012-03-01

    We analyse the performance of the model SIRANE by comparing its outputs to field data measured within an urban district. SIRANE is the first urban dispersion model based on the concept of street network, and contains specific parametrical law to explicitly simulate the main transfer mechanisms within the urban canopy. The model validation is performed by means of field data collected during a 15 days measurement campaign in an urban district in Lyon, France. The campaign provided information on traffic fluxes and cars emissions, meteorological conditions, background pollution levels and pollutant concentration in different location within the district. This data set, together with complementary modelling tools needed to estimate the spatial distribution of traffic fluxes, allowed us to estimate the input data required by the model. The data set provide also the information essential to evaluate the accuracy of the model outputs. Comparison between model predictions and field measurements was performed in two ways. By evaluate the reliability of the model in simulating the spatial distribution of the pollutant and of their time variability. The study includes a sensitivity analysis to identify the key input parameters influencing the performance of the model, namely the emissions rates and the wind velocity. The analysis focuses only on the influence of varying input parameters in the modelling chain in the model predictions and complements the analyses provided by wind tunnel studies focussing on the parameterisation implemented in the model. The study also elucidates the critical role of background concentrations that represent a significant contribution to local pollution levels. The overall model performance, measured using the Chang and Hanna (2004) criteria can be considered as 'good' except for NO and some of BTX species. The results suggest that improvements of the performances on NO require testing new photochemical models, whereas the improvement on BTX

  9. Expertise revisited, Part II: Contributory expertise.

    PubMed

    Collins, Harry; Evans, Robert; Weinel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    In Part I of this two part paper we tried to elicit the 'essence' of the notion of interactional expertise by looking at its origins. In Part II we will look at the notion of contributory expertise. The exercise has been triggered by recent discussion of these concepts in this journal by Plaisance and Kennedy and by Goddiksen.

  10. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part II. Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A predictive mathematical model was developed to simulate heat transfer in a tomato undergoing double sided infrared (IR) heating in a dry-peeling process. The aims of this study were to validate the developed model using experimental data and to investigate different engineering parameters that mos...

  11. Playing It Safe: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.; Niccolai, Frances R.

    1985-01-01

    Explains how to prevent outdoor sports injuries; discusses related litigation and specific cases involving playing field turf, tennis, skiing, and pools; and sets out facility design and maintenance considerations and recommendations. A sidebar provides information about injury insurance available to NCAA schools. Part I of this article appeared…

  12. Local Area Networks: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses five approaches used by industry/colleges to provide local area network (LAN) capabilities in the analytical laboratory: (1) mixed baseband bus network coupled to a star net; (2) broadband bus network; (3) ring network; (4) star network coupled to broadband net; and (5) simple multiprocessor center. Part I (September issue) focused on…

  13. Roots/Routes: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dalene M.

    2009-01-01

    This narrative acts as an articulation of a journey of many routes. Following Part I of the same research journey of rootedness/routedness, it debates the nature of transformation and transcendence beyond personal and political paradoxes informed by neoliberalism and related repressive globalizing discourses. Through a more personal, descriptive,…

  14. Modelling anaerobic digestion in an industrial biogas digester: Application of lactate-including ADM1 model (Part II).

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Preseela; Biernacki, Piotr; Cypionka, Heribert; Steinigeweg, Sven

    2016-12-05

    A modified Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1xp) including lactate was applied to a full-scale biogas plant. This model considers monosaccharides to degrade through lactic acid, which further degrades majorly into acetate followed by propionate and butyrate. Experimental data were derived from the previous works in the same laboratory, and the proposed parameters were validated against batch experiments. After successful validation, the biogas plant bearing a fermenter size of 7 dam(3) and operated with food waste and cattle manure was simulated. The biogas production and methane content were reliably simulated, and a good fit could be obtained against the experimental data with an average difference of less than 1%. When compared to the original ADM1 model, the performance of the lactate-incorporated model was found to be improved. Inclusion of lactate as a parameter in the ADM1xp model is recommended for an increased sensitivity and enhanced prediction principally for systems dealing with high carbohydrate and lactate loads.

  15. Modeling of adsorption isotherms of phenol and chlorophenols onto granular activated carbon. Part II. Models with more than two parameters.

    PubMed

    Hamdaoui, Oualid; Naffrechoux, Emmanuel

    2007-08-17

    The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of five phenolic compounds, phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, from aqueous solutions onto granular activated carbon were studied and modeled. In order to determine the best-fit isotherm, the experimental equilibrium data were analyzed using thirteen adsorption isotherm models with more than two-parameter; nine three-parameter equations - the Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Langmuir-Freundlich, Fritz-Schlunder, Radke-Prasnitz (three models), Tóth, and Jossens isotherms - three four-parameter equation - the Weber-van Vliet, Fritz-Schlunder, and Baudu isotherms - and one five-parameter equation - the Fritz-Schlunder isotherm. The results reveal that the adsorption isotherm models fitted the experimental data in the order: Baudu (four-parameter)>Langmuir-Freundlich (three-parameter)>Sips (three-parameter)>Fritz-Schlunder (five-parameter)>Tóth (three-parameter)>Fritz-Schlunder (four-parameter)>Redlich-Peterson (three-parameter). The influence of solution pH on the adsorption isotherms of 4-CP was investigated. It was shown that the solution pH has not an effect on the adsorption isotherms for pH

  16. Understanding Radiation Thermometry. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    This document is a two-part course on the theory and practice of radiation thermometry. Radiation thermometry is the technique for determining the temperature of a surface or a volume by measuring the electromagnetic radiation it emits. This course covers the theory and practice of radiative thermometry and emphasizes the modern application of the field using commercially available electronic detectors and optical components. The course covers the historical development of the field, the fundamental physics of radiative surfaces, along with modern measurement methods and equipment.

  17. Three-component competitive adsorption model for fixed-bed and moving-bed granular activated carbon adsorbers. Part II. Model parameterization and verification

    SciTech Connect

    Lance C. Schideman; Benito J. Marinas; Vernon L. Snoeyink; Carlos Campos

    2006-11-01

    COMPSORB-GAC is a 3-component competitive adsorption kinetic model for granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers that was developed in Part I of this study, including a proposed procedure for determining model parameters in natural water applications with background natural organic matter (NOM). Part II of this study demonstrates the proposed parameterization procedure and validates the modeling approach by comparing predictions with experimental breakthrough curves at multiple empty-bed contact times for both fixed-bed and moving-bed reactors. The parameterization procedure consists of a set of independent, short-term experimental tests with fresh and batch preloaded adsorbents (using F-400 GAC, a coal-based adsorbent) and then data fitting using both classic and recently developed theoretical expressions. The model and parameterization procedure simplifies NOM into two fictive fractions (pore-blocking and strongly competing) and incorporates three competitive effects that vary both temporally and axially in a GAC column (direct competition for sites, intraparticle pore blockage, and external surface pore blockage). With all three competitive mechanisms accounted for, the model could accurately predict breakthrough profiles for column lengths and durations that were much longer than those used for model parameterization. Model predictions that ignored one or more of the competitive mechanisms showed that each mechanism was important for different regions of the breakthrough curve. The external surface pore-blockage effect was predominant for the prediction of early breakthrough data, whereas direct competition for sites and intraparticle pore blockage were prevalent when predicting higher breakthrough levels and data later in the column run. 22 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

  19. Information technology in chemistry research and education: Part I. Ab initio studies on the hydrolysis of aromatic diazonium ions. Part II. Theoretical study and molecular modeling of non-covalent interactions. Part III. Applying information technology in chemistry education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengyu

    Part I of this dissertation studies the bonding in chemical reactions, while Part II studies the bonding related to inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Part III studies the application of IT technology in chemistry education. Part I of this dissertation (chapter 1 and chapter 2) focuses on the theoretical studies on the mechanism of the hydrolysis reactions of benzenediazonium ion and guaninediazonium ion. The major conclusion is that in hydrolysis reactions the "unimolecular mechanism" actually has to involve the reacting solvent molecule. Therefore, the unimolecular pathway can only serve as a conceptual model but will not happen in the reality. Chapter I concludes that the hydrolysis reaction of benzenediazonium ion takes the direct SN2Ar mechanism via a transition state but without going through a pre-coordination complex. Chapter 2 concludes that the formation of xanthine from the dediazoniation reaction of guaninediazonium ion in water takes the SN2Ar pathway without a transition state. And oxanine might come from an intermediate formed by the bimolecular deprotonation of the H atom on N3 of guaninediazonium ion synchronized with the pyrimidine ring opening reaction. Part II of this dissertation includes chapters 3, 4, and 5. Chapter 3 studies the quadrupole moment of benzene and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. We concluded that the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is important in the arene-arene interactions. Our study shows the most stable structure of benzene dimer is the point-to-face T-shaped structure. Chapter 4 studies the intermolecular interactions that result in the disorder of the crystal of 4-Chloroacetophenone-(4-methoxyphenylethylidene). We analyzed all the nearest neighbor interactions within that crystal and found that the crystal structure is determined by its thermo-dynamical properties. Our calculation perfectly reproduced the percentage of parallel-alignment of the crystal. Part III of this dissertation is focused on the

  20. Revenue cycle management, Part II.

    PubMed

    Crew, Matt

    2007-01-01

    The proper management of your revenue cycle requires the application of "best practices" and the continual monitoring and measuring of the entire cycle. The correct technology will enable you to gain the insight and efficiencies needed in the ever-changing healthcare economy. The revenue cycle is a process that begins when you negotiate payor contracts, set fees, and schedule appointments and continues until claims are paid in full. Every single step in the cycle carries equal importance. Monitoring all phases and a commitment to continually communicating the results will allow you to achieve unparalleled success. In part I of this article, we explored the importance of contracting, scheduling, and case management as well as coding and clinical documentation. We will now take a closer look at the benefits charge capture, claim submission, payment posting, accounts receivable follow-up, and reporting can mean to your practice.

  1. An Instructional Model for Preparing Accounting/Computing Clerks in Michigan Secondary School Office Education Programs, Part I and Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskovis, L. Michael; McKitrick, Max O.

    Outlined in this two-part document is a model for the implementation of a business-industry oriented program designed to provide high school seniors with updated training in the skills and concepts necessary for developing competencies in entry-level and second-level accounting jobs that involve accounts receivable, accounts payable, and payroll…

  2. Dynamic modeling of the neck muscles during horizontal head movement. Part II: Model construction in Pro/Engineer.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Enderle, John D

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the next phase of research on a parametric model of the head-neck system for dynamic simulation of horizontal head rotation. A skull has been imported into Pro/Engineer software and has been assigned mass properties such as density, surface area and moments of inertia. The origin of a universal coordinate system has been located at the center of gravity of the T1 vertebrae. Identification of this origin allows insertion and attachment points of the sternocleidomastoid (SCOM) and splenius capitis to be located. An assembly has been created, marking the location of both muscle sets. This paper will also explore the obstacles encountered when working with an imported feature in Pro/E and attempts to resolve some of these issues. The goal of this work involves the creation of a 3D homeomorphic saccadic eye and head movement system.

  3. Tubing extrusion made easier, Part II.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Mike

    2004-11-01

    An increased understanding of the primary elements will lead to greater control of the extrusion process. In the ongoing quest to produce tubing with consistent properties. Part II of this two-part article makes recommendations on best practice in barrel and screw design, compression ratios and dies.

  4. Sports Concussion Management: part II.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Thomas R; Cox, Conrad B; Bielak, Ken; Casmus, Robert; Laskowitz, Daniel; Nichols, Gregory

    2014-02-01

    Millions of concussions occur every year in the United States. The public interest in concussion has increased after a number of high-profile deaths in high school athletes from sports-related head trauma and in some professional athletes from chronic traumatic encephalopathy. One of the most active areas of research in sports medicine during the last decade has been the evaluation and management of concussion. In this second article of a two-part series, we provide an overview of the latest scientific advances in concussion research. This overview includes an update on the pathobiological changes that occur during concussion and the results of biomechanical studies. In addition, to aid the practicing clinician, we review the literature on proven and currently studied concussion risk factors, including a history of concussion, fatigue, and age. Genetic polymorphisms and biomarkers may provide risk-prediction capability, but at present the research remains inconclusive. Diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging are promising technologies that reveal more sophisticated data about the impact of concussion on the brain. We review the existing literature on the application of these neuroimaging modalities to sports concussion. An update from the Fourth International Conference on Concussion in Sport, with highlights of new recommendations, and the presentation of the third edition of the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool to evaluate acute concussion, concludes our review.

  5. Estimation of energetic efficiency of heat supply in front of the aircraft at supersonic accelerated flight. Part II. Mathematical model of the trajectory boost part and computational results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2009-03-01

    The fuel economy was estimated at boost trajectory of aerospace plane during energy supply to the free stream. Initial and final velocities of the flight were given. A model of planning flight above cold air in infinite isobaric thermal wake was used. The comparison of fuel consumption was done at optimal trajectories. The calculations were done using a combined power plant consisting of ramjet and liquid-propellant engine. An exergy model was constructed in the first part of the paper for estimating the ramjet thrust and specific impulse. To estimate the aerodynamic drag of aircraft a quadratic dependence on aerodynamic lift is used. The energy for flow heating is obtained at the sacrifice of an equivalent decrease of exergy of combustion products. The dependencies are obtained for increasing the range coefficient of cruise flight at different Mach numbers. In the second part of the paper, a mathematical model is presented for the boost part of the flight trajectory of the flying vehicle and computational results for reducing the fuel expenses at the boost trajectory at a given value of the energy supplied in front of the aircraft.

  6. Epilepsy Care in Developing Countries: Part II of II

    PubMed Central

    Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2010-01-01

    Although 80% of people with epilepsy reside in resource poor, developing countries, epilepsy care in these regions remains limited and the majority of epilepsy patients go untreated. Cost-effective, sustainable epilepsy care services, delivering first-line antiepileptic drugs through established primary health care facilities, are needed to decrease these treatment gaps. Neurologists with local experience and knowledge of the culture, who are willing to serve as educators, policy advisors, and advocates, can make a difference. This is Part II of a two-part article. Part I reviewed the burden of epilepsy and the current state of resources for treatment in developing countries, while Part II will now discuss various aspects of care in these countries. PMID:20944819

  7. Model-Predictive Cascade Mitigation in Electric Power Systems With Storage and Renewables-Part II: Case-Study

    SciTech Connect

    Almassalkhi, MR; Hiskens, IA

    2015-01-01

    The novel cascade-mitigation scheme developed in Part I of this paper is implemented within a receding-horizon model predictive control (MPC) scheme with a linear controller model. This present paper illustrates the MPC strategy with a case-study that is based on the IEEE RTS-96 network, though with energy storage and renewable generation added. It is shown that the MPC strategy alleviates temperature overloads on transmission lines by rescheduling generation, energy storage, and other network elements, while taking into account ramp-rate limits and network limitations. Resilient performance is achieved despite the use of a simplified linear controller model. The MPC scheme is compared against a base-case that seeks to emulate human operator behavior.

  8. Effects of using two- versus three-dimensional computational modeling of fluidized beds: Part II, budget analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Nan; Battaglia, Francine; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2008-01-01

    The partial differential equations for modeling gas-solid flows using computational fluid dynamics are compared for different coordinate systems. The numerical results of 2D and 3D simulations for both cylindrical and rectangular domains are presented in Part I (N. Xie, F. Battaglia, S. Pannala, Effects of using two- versus three-dimensional computational modeling of fluidized beds: Part I, Hydrodynamics (2007-this volume), doi:10.1016/j.powtec.2007.07.005), comparing the hydrodynamic features of a fluidized bed. The individual terms of the governing equations in 2D and 3D simulations with the cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems are evaluated in this study through a budget analysis. The additional terms appearing in the 3D equations can be used to explain the discrepancies between 2D and 3D simulations. The values of the additional terms is shown to increase as inlet gas velocity increases. This explains the good agreement between 2D and 3D simulations that is observed for bubbling regimes with low gas velocity, and why the differences between 2D and 3D simulations increases for slugging and turbulent regimes.

  9. The Greening of the McGill Paleoclimate Model. Part II: Simulation of Holocene Millennial-Scale Natural Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysak, L. A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Brovkin, V.

    2003-12-01

    Multiple proxy data reveal that the middle Holocene (6 kyr BP) was warmer than the early Holocene (8 kyr BP) as well as the preindustrial period (1700 AD) in most regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This warmth is somewhat counterintuitive because the summer insolation was decreasing during this time. Cooling in the late Holocene (after 6 kyr BP) is hypothesized to be due mainly to the astronomical forcing. This cooling was also accompanied by significant changes in vegetation cover (i.e., treeline retreat from northern high latitudes; the desertification of the Sahara/Sahel region) and a small but gradual increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration (from 260 ppm to 280 ppm). The early-to-middle Holocene warming, on the other hand, is hypothesized to be due in part to ice-albedo feedback in Northern America, associated with decreases in the Laurentide ice sheet, which completely disappeared by 6 kyr BP. The snow-vegetation-albedo feedback is also hypothesized to have played a role in this early warming event. To test the above hypotheses, the earlier geophysical McGill Paleoclimate Model has been coupled to the vegetation model known as VECODE (VEgetation COntinuous DEscription, one of the simpler dynamic global vegetation models), and a number of sensitivity experiments have been performed. The model results illustrate the role that Northern Hemisphere land cover changes played in explaining the natural millennial-scale climate variability from the early Holocene (8 kyr BP) to the preindustrial period (1700 AD).

  10. The greening of the McGill Paleoclimate Model. Part II: Simulation of Holocene millennial-scale natural climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Mysak, Lawrence A.; Wang, Zhaomin; Brovkin, Victor

    2005-04-01

    Various proxy data reveal that in many regions of the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the middle Holocene (6 kyr BP) was warmer than the early Holocene (8 kyr BP) as well as the later Holocene, up to the end of the pre-industrial period (1800 AD). This pattern of warming and then cooling in the NH represents the response of the climate system to changes in orbital forcing, vegetation cover and the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) during the Holocene. In an attempt to better understand these changes in the climate system, the McGill Paleoclimate Model (MPM) has been coupled to the dynamic global vegetation model known as VECODE (see Part I of this two-part paper), and a number of sensitivity experiments have been performed with the "green" MPM. The model results illustrate the following: (1) the orbital forcing together with the vegetation—albedo feedback result in the gradual cooling of global SAT from about 6 kyr BP to the end of the pre-industrial period; (2) the disappearance of the LIS over the period 8-6 kyr BP, associated with vegetation—albedo feedback, allows the global SAT to increase and reach its maximum at around 6 kyr BP; (3) the northern limit of the boreal forest moves northward during the period 8-6.4 kyr BP due to the LIS retreat; (4) during the period 6.4-0 kyr BP, the northern limit of the boreal forest moves southward about 120 km in response to the decreasing summer insolation in the NH; and (5) the desertification of northern Africa during the period 8-2.6 kyr BP is mainly explained by the decreasing summer monsoon precipitation.

  11. A Multi-Model Assessment for the 2006 and 2010 Simulations under the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase 2 over North America: Part II. Evaluation of Column Variable Predictions Using Satellite Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the context of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative phase 2 (AQMEII2) project, this part II paper performs a multi-model assessment of major column abundances of gases, radiation, aerosol, and cloud variables for 2006 and 2010 simulations with three on...

  12. The Theory of Ice Nucleation by Heterogeneous Freezing of Deliquescent Mixed CCN. Part II: Parcel Model Simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2005-02-01

    The new theory of ice nucleation by heterogeneous freezing of deliquescent mixed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) presented in Part I is incorporated into a parcel model with explicit water and ice bin microphysics to simulate the process of ice nucleation under transient thermodynamic conditions. Simulations are conducted over the temperature range -4° to -60°C, with vertical velocities varying from 1 to 100 cm s-1, for varying initial relative humidities and aerosol characteristics. These simulations show that the same CCN that are responsible for the drop nucleation may initiate crystal nucleation and can be identified as ice nuclei (IN) when crystals form. The simulated nucleation rates and concentrations of nucleated crystals depend on temperature and supersaturation simultaneously, showing good agreement with observations but with noticeable differences when compared with classical temperature-only and supersaturation-only parameterizations. The kinetics of heterogeneous ice nucleation exhibits a negative feedback via water supersaturation, whereby ice nucleation depends on the water supersaturation that is diminished by ice crystal diffusional growth. This feedback is stronger than the corresponding feedback for drop nucleation, and may explain discrepancies between observed ice nuclei concentrations and ice crystal concentrations, the very small fraction of CCN that may serve as IN, and the much smaller crystal concentrations as compared to drop concentrations. The relative importance of heterogeneous versus homogeneous nucleation is examined for a variety of cloud conditions. Based on these calculations, a simple parameterization for ice crystal concentration is suggested for use in cloud models and large-scale models.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL VERSION 4.5: UNCERTAINTIES AND SENSITIVITIES IMPACTING MODEL PERFORMANCE: PART II - PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of the CMAQ v4.5 model performance for particulate matter and its chemical components for the simulated year 2001. This is part two is two part series of papers that examines the model performance of CMAQ v4.5.

  14. Globalization in the pharmaceutical industry, Part II.

    PubMed

    Casadio Tarabusi, C; Vickery, G

    1998-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report on the pharmaceutical industry. Part II begins with a discussion of foreign direct investment and inter-firm networks, which covers international mergers, acquisitions, and minority participation; market shares of foreign-controlled firms; international collaboration agreements (with a special note on agreements in biotechnology); and licensing agreements. The final section of the report covers governmental policies on health and safety regulation, price regulation, industry and technology, trade, foreign investment, protection of intellectual property, and competition.

  15. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  16. A Three-Attribute Transfer Skills Framework--Part II: Applying and Assessing the Model in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasson, Irit; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2015-01-01

    In an era in which information is rapidly growing and changing, it is very important to teach with the goal of students' engagement in life-long learning in mind. This can partially be achieved by developing transferable thinking skills. In our previous paper--Part I, we conducted a review of the transfer literature and suggested a three-attribute…

  17. Before the Roof Caves in: A Predictive Model for Physical Plant Renewal--Part II. APPA Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutson, Robert E.; Biedenweg, Frederick M.

    1982-01-01

    Examples of the use of a mathematical model to evaluate the future renewal and replacement, or maintenance requirements, of the college physical plant are provided. The model, which was developed at Stanford University, simulates actual conditions at a specific location and allows resource allocation to be based on a definable quantitative base.…

  18. “Transference Ratios” to Predict Total Oxidized Sulfur and Nitrogen Deposition – Part II, Modeling Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current study examines predictions of transference ratios and related modeled parameters for oxidized sulfur and oxidized nitrogen using five years (2002-2006) of 12-km grid cell-specific annual estimates from EPA’s Community Air Quality Model (CMAQ) for five selected sub-re...

  19. Harmful algal bloom forecast system for SW Ireland. Part II: Are operational oceanographic models useful in a HAB warning system.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Caroline; Dabrowski, Tomasz; Lyons, Kieran; Berry, Alan; Westbrook, Guy; Salas, Rafael; Duffy, Conor; Nolan, Glenn; Silke, Joe

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the application of a three-dimensional physical hydrodynamic model in a harmful algal bloom forecast system for Bantry Bay, southwest Ireland. Modelled oceanographic conditions were studied and used to help understand observed changes in the chemical and biological patterns from the national biotoxins and phytoplankton monitoring program. The study focused on two toxic events in 2013. An upwelling event was predicted by the model prior to the appearance and population increase of potentially toxic diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia, and associated domoic acid in shellfish. A downwelling episode was provided as a forecast in the model prior to the arrival of a Dinophysis bloom and detection of its associated biotoxins in Bay shellfish. The modelled forecast products developed included expected surface, mid-depth and bottom current pathways at the mouth of the Bay and on the adjacent shelf. The rate and direction of water volume flow at the mouth and mid-bay sections were produced by the model to examine predicted upwelling and downwelling pulses. The model also calculated the evolution of water properties (temperature, salinity and density) with depth along the Bay axis and on the adjacent continental shelf. Direct measurements of water properties at a fixed point, mid-bay, were comparable to model calculations. The operational model for southwest Ireland produces a reliable 3-day physical hydrodynamic forecast of the dominant regional physical processes that result in water exchange events between Bantry Bay and its adjacent shelf. While simulated physical hydrodynamics were provided as a 3-day forecast, the upwelling and downwelling signals from the model, closely linked to toxic HAB episodes, were evident up to 10 days prior to the contamination of shellfish in the Bay.

  20. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part 504—Fuel Price Computation (a) Introduction. This appendix provides the equations and...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part 504—Fuel Price Computation (a) Introduction. This appendix provides the equations and...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... example fuel price and inflation indices based on the latest data appearing in the Energy...

  3. Zonal rate model for stacked membrane chromatography part II: characterizing ion-exchange membrane chromatography under protein retention conditions.

    PubMed

    Francis, Patrick; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2012-03-01

    The Zonal Rate Model (ZRM) has previously been shown to accurately account for contributions to elution band broadening, including external flow nonidealities and radial concentration gradients, in ion-exchange membrane (IEXM) chromatography systems operated under nonbinding conditions. Here, we extend the ZRM to analyze and model the behavior of retained proteins by introducing terms for intra-column mass transfer resistances and intrinsic binding kinetics. Breakthrough curve (BTC) data from a scaled-down anion-exchange membrane chromatography module using ovalbumin as a model protein were collected at flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 20 mL min(-1). Through its careful accounting of transport nonidealities within and external to the membrane stack, the ZRM is shown to provide a useful framework for characterizing putative protein binding mechanisms and models, for predicting BTCs and complex elution behavior, including the common observation that the dynamic binding capacity can increase with linear velocity in IEXM systems, and for simulating and scaling separations using IEXM chromatography. Global fitting of model parameters is used to evaluate the performance of the Langmuir, bi-Langmuir, steric mass action (SMA), and spreading-type protein binding models in either correlating or fundamentally describing BTC data. When combined with the ZRM, the bi-Langmuir, and SMA models match the chromatography data, but require physically unrealistic regressed model parameters to do so. In contrast, for this system a spreading-type model is shown to accurately predict column performance while also providing a realistic fundamental explanation for observed trends, including an observed increase in dynamic binding capacity with flow rate.

  4. Method and device for dynamic modelling of rubbery materials applied to human soft tissues. Part II: device and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaci, S.; Ciornei, M. C.; Ciornei, F. C.; Filote, C.; Romanu, I. C.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained on an experimental device where a horizontal rubber wire is stretched by a transversal oscillating force - that is a body with an acceleration sensor attached, placed at the middle of it that oscillates freely. A nonlinear model was proposed for the experimental test rig, the differential equation of motion was offered and a series of curves were traced and compared to the experimental ones. One can conclude that the theoretical model certifies very well the behaviour of the real model. An open problem remains the manner of adopting the parameters characteristic to the dissipative element of the system.

  5. A General Pressure Gradient Formulation for Ocean Models, Part 1: Scheme Design and Diagnostic Analysis, Part II: Energy, Momentum, and Bottom Torque Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y. T.

    1998-01-01

    A Jacobian formulation of the pressure gradient force for use in models with topography following coordinates is proposed. It can be used in conjunction with any vertical coordinate system and is easily implemented.

  6. Numerical forecasting of radiation fog. Part II: A comparison of model simulation with several observed fog events

    SciTech Connect

    Guedalia, D.; Bergot, T. )

    1994-06-01

    A 1D model adapted for forecasting the formation and development of fog, and forced with mesoscale parameters derived from a 3D limited-area model, was used to simulate three fog event observations made during the Lille 88 campaign. The model simulation correctly reproduced the time of fog formation and its vertical development when forcing terms derived from observations were used. It determined the influence of different physical processes and in particular that of dew deposition. The initial conditions deduced from the 3D model proved to be correct in two of the three events. On the other hand, the prediction of advection terms necessary for forecasting the vertical growth of fog was a more delicate matter. 15 refs., 21 figs.

  7. Phenomenology of electromagnetic coupling. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.J.; Ludwigsen, A.P.; Kunz, K.S.

    1985-08-01

    This report is the second of a planned series which summarize efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory relating to phenomenology studies of back door coupling from several MHz to 10's of GHz. These studies are pertinent to high altitude EMP (HEMP), enhanced HEMP and microwave coupling. Part I dealt with coupling through apertures into large free-standing cavities having, at most, one interior cable. An overview of the effort is given, and a summary of the effects observed in Part I. The main effort since Part I has been devoted to Facilities Development, development of an interior coupling decomposition model and coupling experiments. Projected future effort is discussed.

  8. Global modeling of land water and energy balances. Part II: Land-characteristic contributions to spatial variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Shmakin, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Land water and energy balances vary around the globe because of variations in amount and temporal distribution of water and energy supplies and because of variations in land characteristics. The former control (water and energy supplies) explains much more variance in water and energy balances than the latter (land characteristics). A largely untested hypothesis underlying most global models of land water and energy balance is the assumption that parameter values based on estimated geographic distributions of soil and vegetation characteristics improve the performance of the models relative to the use of globally constant land parameters. This hypothesis is tested here through an evaluation of the improvement in performance of one land model associated with the introduction of geographic information on land characteristics. The capability of the model to reproduce annual runoff ratios of large river basins, with and without information on the global distribution of albedo, rooting depth, and stomatal resistance, is assessed. To allow a fair comparison, the model is calibrated in both cases by adjusting globally constant scale factors for snow-free albedo, non-water-stressed bulk stomatal resistance, and critical root density (which is used to determine effective root-zone depth). The test is made in stand-alone mode, that is, using prescribed radiative and atmospheric forcing. Model performance is evaluated by comparing modeled runoff ratios with observed runoff ratios for a set of basins where precipitation biases have been shown to be minimal. The withholding of information on global variations in these parameters leads to a significant degradation of the capability of the model to simulate the annual runoff ratio. An additional set of optimization experiments, in which the parameters are examined individually, reveals that the stomatal resistance is, by far, the parameter among these three whose spatial variations add the most predictive power to the model in

  9. Molecular dynamics study of non-equilibrium energy transport from a cylindrical track: Part II. Spike models for sputtering yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringa, E. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Dutkiewicz, Ł .

    1999-05-01

    Thermal spike models have been used to calculate the yields for electronic sputtering of condensed-gas solids by fast ions. In this paper molecular dynamics (MD) calculations are carried out to describe the evolution of solid Ar and O 2 following the excitation of a cylindrical track in order to test spike models. The calculated sputtering yields were found to depend linearly on the energy deposition per unit path length, d E/d x, at the highest d E/d x. This is in contrast to the spike models and the measured yields for a number of condensed-gas solids which depend quadratically on d E/d x at high d E/d x. In paper I [E.M. Bringa, R.E. Johnson, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 143 (1998) 513] we showed that the evolution of energy from the cylindrical track was, typically, not diffusive, as assumed in the spike models. Here we show that it is the description of the radial transport and the absence of energy transport to the surface, rather than the treatment of the ejection process, that accounts for the difference between the analytic spike models and the MD calculations. Therefore, the quadratic dependence on d E/d x of the measured sputtering yield reflects the nature of the energizing process rather than the energy transport. In this paper we describe the details of the sputtering process and compare the results here for crystalline samples to the earlier results for amorphous solids.

  10. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael D.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Yoon, Miyoung; Keene, Athena M.; Dorman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans) and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers. PMID:22645610

  11. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT-Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael D; Clewell, Harvey J; Andersen, Melvin E; Schroeter, Jeffry D; Yoon, Miyoung; Keene, Athena M; Dorman, David C

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans) and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers.

  12. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of two papers in which we study the inverse refraction problem. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," studies and classifies the types of nonuniqueness that exist when solving inverse problems depending on the participation of a priori information required to obtain reliable solutions of inverse geophysical problems. In view of the classification developed, in this paper we study the type of nonuniqueness associated with the inverse refraction problem. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined by using a simple three-layer model. Like many other inverse geophysical problems, the inverse refraction problem does not have a unique solution. Conventionally, nonuniqueness is considered to be a result of insufficient data and/or error in the data, for any fixed number of model parameters. This study illustrates that even for overdetermined and error free data, nonlinear inverse refraction problems exhibit exact-data nonuniqueness, which further complicates the problem of nonuniqueness. By evaluating the nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem, this paper targets the improvement of refraction inversion algorithms, and as a result, the achievement of more realistic solutions. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined initially by using a simple three-layer model. The observations and conclusions of the three-layer model nonuniqueness study are used to evaluate the nonuniqueness of more complicated n-layer models and multi-parameter cell models such as in refraction tomography. For any fixed number of model parameters, the inverse refraction problem exhibits continuous ranges of exact-data nonuniqueness. Such an unfavorable type of nonuniqueness can be uniquely solved only by providing abundant a priori information

  13. Process-based modeling of temperature and water profiles in the seedling recruitment zone: Part II. Seedling emergence timing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictions of seedling emergence timing for spring wheat are facilitated by process-based modeling of the microsite environment in the shallow seedling recruitment zone. Hourly temperature and water profiles within the recruitment zone for 60 days after planting were simulated from the process-base...

  14. Method of Curved Models and Its Application to the Study of Curvilinear Flight of Airships. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourjienko, G A

    1937-01-01

    This report compares the results obtained by the aid of curved models with the results of tests made by the method of damped oscillations, and with flight tests. Consequently we shall be able to judge which method of testing in the tunnel produces results that are in closer agreement with flight test results.

  15. Error Modeling of Multi-baseline Optical Truss. Part II; Application to SIM Metrology Truss Field Dependent Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Liwei Dennis; Milman, Mark; Korechoff, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The current design of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) employs a 19 laser-metrology-beam system (also called L19 external metrology truss) to monitor changes of distances between the fiducials of the flight system's multiple baselines. The function of the external metrology truss is to aid in the determination of the time-variations of the interferometer baseline. The largest contributor to truss error occurs in SIM wide-angle observations when the articulation of the siderostat mirrors (in order to gather starlight from different sky coordinates) brings to light systematic errors due to offsets at levels of instrument components (which include comer cube retro-reflectors, etc.). This error is labeled external metrology wide-angle field-dependent error. Physics-based model of field-dependent error at single metrology gauge level is developed and linearly propagated to errors in interferometer delay. In this manner delay error sensitivity to various error parameters or their combination can be studied using eigenvalue/eigenvector analysis. Also validation of physics-based field-dependent model on SIM testbed lends support to the present approach. As a first example, dihedral error model is developed for the comer cubes (CC) attached to the siderostat mirrors. Then the delay errors due to this effect can be characterized using the eigenvectors of composite CC dihedral error. The essence of the linear error model is contained in an error-mapping matrix. A corresponding Zernike component matrix approach is developed in parallel, first for convenience of describing the RMS of errors across the field-of-regard (FOR), and second for convenience of combining with additional models. Average and worst case residual errors are computed when various orders of field-dependent terms are removed from the delay error. Results of the residual errors are important in arriving at external metrology system component requirements. Double CCs with ideally co-incident vertices

  16. Ernst Mach and George Sarton's Successors: The Implicit Role Model of Teaching Science in USA and Elsewhere, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemsen, Hayo

    2013-05-01

    George Sarton had a strong influence on modern history of science. The method he pursued throughout his life was the method he had discovered in Ernst Mach's Mechanics when he was a student in Ghent. Sarton was in fact throughout his life implementing a research program inspired by the epistemology of Mach. Sarton in turn inspired many others in several generations (James Conant, Thomas Kuhn, Gerald Holton, etc.). What were the origins of these ideas in Mach and what can this origin tell us about the history of science and science education nowadays? Which ideas proved to be successful and which ones need to be improved upon? The following article will elaborate the epistemological questions, which Charles Darwin's "Origin" raised concerning human knowledge and scientific knowledge and which led Mach to adapt the concept of what is "empirical" in contrast to metaphysical a priori assumptions a second time after Galileo. On this basis Sarton proposed "genesis and development" as the major goal of his journal Isis. Mach had elaborated this epistemology in La Connaissance et l'Erreur ( Knowledge and Error), which Sarton read in 1911 (Hiebert in Knowledge and error. Reidel, Dordrecht, 1976; de Mey in George Sarton centennial. Communication & Cognition, Ghent, pp. 3-6, 1984). Accordingly for Sarton, history becomes not only a subject of science, but a method of science education. Culture—and science as part of culture—is a result of a genetic process. History of science shapes and is shaped by science and science education in a reciprocal process. Its epistemology needs to be adapted to scientific facts and the philosophy of science. Sarton was well aware of the need to develop the history of science and the philosophy of science along the lines of this reciprocal process. It was a very fruitful basis, but a specific part of it Sarton did not elaborate further, namely the erkenntnis-theory and psychology of science education. This proved to be a crucial missing

  17. The meteorology of Gale Crater as determined from Rover Environmental Monitoring Station observations and numerical modeling. Part II: Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Pla-Garcia, Jorge; Kahre, Melinda; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Hamilton, Victoria E.; Marín, Mercedes; Navarro, Sara; Torres, Josefina; Vasavada, Ashwin

    2016-12-01

    Numerical modeling results from the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System are used to interpret the landed meteorological data from the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station onboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. In order to characterize seasonal changes throughout the Martian year, simulations are conducted at Ls 0, 90, 180 and 270. Two additional simulations at Ls 225 and 315 are explored to better understand the unique meteorological setting centered on Ls 270. The synergistic combination of model and observations reveals a complex meteorological environment within the crater. Seasonal planetary circulations, the thermal tide, slope flows along the topographic dichotomy, mesoscale waves, slope flows along the crater slopes and Mt. Sharp, and turbulent motions all interact in nonlinear ways to produce the observed weather. Ls 270 is shown to be an anomalous season when air within and outside the crater is well mixed by strong, flushing northerly flow and large amplitude, breaking mountain waves. At other seasons, the air in the crater is more isolated from the surrounding environment. The potential impact of the partially isolated crater air mass on the dust, water, noncondensable and methane cycles is also considered. In contrast to previous studies, the large amplitude diurnal pressure signal is attributed primarily to necessary hydrostatic adjustments associated with topography of different elevations, with contributions of less than 25% to the diurnal amplitude from the crater circulation itself. The crater circulation is shown to induce a suppressed boundary layer.

  18. Arsenic Re-Mobilization in Water Treatment Adsorbents Under Reducing Conditions: Part II, XAS and Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,S.; Jing, C.; Meng, X.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of arsenic re-mobilization in spent adsorbents under reducing conditions was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and surface complexation model calculations. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that As(V) was partially reduced to As(III) in spent granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), titanium dioxide (TiO2), activated alumina (AA) and modified activated alumina (MAA) adsorbents after 2 years of anaerobic incubation. As(V) was completely reduced to As(III) in spent granular ferric oxide (GFO) under 2-year incubation. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis showed that As(III) formed bidentate binuclear surface complexes on GFO as evidenced by an average As(III)-O bond distance of 1.78 Angstroms and As(III)-Fe distance of 3.34 Angstroms . The release of As from the spent GFO and TiO2 was simulated using the charge distribution multi-site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model. The observed redox ranges for As release and sulfate mobility were described by model calculations.

  19. A non-oscillatory balanced scheme for an idealized tropical climate model. Part II: Nonlinear coupling and moisture effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouider, Boualem; Majda, Andrew J.

    2005-10-01

    We use the non-oscillatory balanced numerical scheme developed in Part I to track the dynamics of a dry highly nonlinear barotropic/baroclinic coupled solitary wave, as introduced by Biello and Majda (2004), and of the moisture fronts of Frierson et al. (2004) in the presence of dry gravity waves, a barotropic trade wind, and the beta effect. It is demonstrated that, for the barotropic/baroclinic solitary wave, except for a little numerical dissipation, the scheme utilized here preserves total energy despite the strong interactions and exchange of energy between the baroclinic and barotropic components of the flow. After a short transient period where the numerical solution stays close to the asymptotic predictions, the flow develops small scale eddies and ultimately becomes highly turbulent. It is found here that the interaction of a dry gravity wave with a moisture front can either result in a reflection of a fast moistening front or the pure extinction of the precipitation. The barotropic trade wind stretches the precipitation patches and increases the lifetime of the moisture fronts which decay naturally by the effects of dissipation through precipitation while the Coriolis effect makes the moving precipitation patches disappear and appear at other times and places.

  20. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  1. Ground-motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes, part II: Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aagaard, Brad T.; Graves, Robert W.; Rodgers, Arthur; Brocher, Thomas M.; Simpson, Robert W.; Dreger, Douglas; Petersson, N. Anders; Larsen, Shawn C.; Ma, Shuo; Jachens, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    We simulate long-period (T>1.0–2.0 s) and broadband (T>0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenario earthquakes (Mw 6.7–7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault, we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions, compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with about 50% of the urban area experiencing modified Mercalli intensity VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland earthquake and the 2007 Mw 5.45 Alum Rock earthquake show that the U.S. Geological Survey’s Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area for Hayward fault earthquakes, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions for the suite of scenarios exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute much of this difference to the seismic velocity structure in the San Francisco Bay area and how the NGA models account for basin amplification; the NGA relations may underpredict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins. The simulations also suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period.

  2. A marching in space and time (MAST) solver of the shallow water equations. Part II: The 2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, C.; Nasello, C.; Tucciarelli, T.

    2007-05-01

    A novel methodology for the solution of the 2D shallow water equations is proposed. The algorithm is based on a fractional step decomposition of the original system in (1) a convective prediction, (2) a convective correction, and (3) a diffusive correction step. The convective components are solved using a Marching in Space and Time (MAST) procedure, that solves a sequence of small ODEs systems, one for each computational cell, ordered according to the cell value of a scalar approximated potential. The scalar potential is sought after computing first the minimum of a functional via the solution of a large linear system and then refining locally the optimum search. Model results are compared with the experimental data of two laboratory tests and with the results of other simulations carried out for the same tests by different authors. A comparison with the analytical solution of the oblique jump test has been also considered. Numerical results of the proposed scheme are in good agreement with measured data, as well as with analytical and higher order approximation methods results. The growth of the CPU time versus the cell number is investigated successively refining the elements of an initially coarse mesh. The CPU specific time, per element and per time step, is found out to be almost constant and no evidence of Courant-Friedrichs-Levi (CFL) number limitation has been detected in all the numerical experiments.

  3. An animal model for open femur fracture and osteomyelitis--Part II: Immunomodulation with systemic IL-12.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brock A; Clovis, Nina B; Smith, E Suzanne; Salihu, Sydha; Hubbard, David F

    2010-01-01

    Infection resulting from open fracture is a common problem in orthopedics. The purpose of this project was to study the effect of Interleukin-12 (IL-12) systemic therapy on a previously established open fracture model. One hundred seven male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to five groups: (1) normal (baseline), (2) control (controlled for anesthesia), (3) fracture, (4) staph, and (5) staph and IL-12 (SIL). Each group was divided into four time periods: 6, 10, 14, and 21 days after injury and fixation. The operative groups had a standardized femur fracture and fixation using a Kirschner wire as an intramedullary device. The two infection groups (staph and SIL) were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus following fracture and fixed with an identical technique. The SIL group was treated with systemic IL-12 for a total of 10 doses over 10 days. Significantly decreased serum IL-12 levels were noted at day 10 in the operative groups compared to the normal and control groups. The SIL group showed significantly higher macrophage activation levels and total platelet counts at day 21 compared to all the other groups. The overall infection rate was not changed by IL-12 supplementation; however, bacterial qualitative growth scores were significantly lower in the SIL group at day 10, which corresponded to the lowest level of systemic IL-12 in the fracture group.

  4. Modeling the effects of UV variability and the QBO on the troposphere-stratosphere system. Part II: The troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Rind, D.; Balachandran, N.K.

    1995-08-01

    Results of experiments with a GCM involving changes in UV input ({plus_minus} 25%, {plus_minus}5% at wavelengths below 0.3 {mu}) and simulated equatorial QBO are presented, with emphasis on the tropospheric response. The QBO and UV changes alter the temperature in the lower stratosphere/upper troposphere warms, tropospheric eddy energy is reduced, leading to extratropical tropospheric cooling of some 0.5{degrees}C on the zonal average, and surface temperature changes up to {plus_minus}5{degrees}C locally. Opposite effects occur when the extratropical lower stratosphere/upper troposphere cools. Cooling or warming of the comparable region in the Tropics decreases/increases static stability, accelerating/decelerating the Hadley circulation. Tropospheric dynamical changes are on the order of 5%. The combined UV/QBO effect in the troposphere results from its impact on the middle atmosphere; in the QBO east phase, more energy is refracted to higher latitudes, due to the increased horizontal shear of the zonal wind, but with increased UV, this energy propagates preferentially out of the polar lower stratosphere, in response to the increased vertical shear of the zonal winds; therefore, it is less effective in warming the polar lower stratosphere. Due to their impacts on planetary wave generation and propagation, all combinations of UV and QBO phases affect the longitudinal patterns of tropospheric temperatures and geopotential heights. The modeled perturbations often agree qualitatively with observations and are of generally similar orders of magnitude. The results are sensitive to the forcing employed. In particular, the nature of the tropospheric response depends upon the magnitude (and presumably wavelength) of the solar irradiance perturbation. The results of the smaller UV variations ({plus_minus}5%) are more in agreement with observations, showing clear differences between the UV impact in the east and west QBO phase. 34 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems. Part II. Experimental assessment of spatial resolution performance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods have been introduced to clinical CT systems and are being used in some clinical diagnostic applications. The purpose of this paper is to experimentally assess the unique spatial resolution characteristics of this nonlinear reconstruction method and identify its potential impact on the detectabilities and the associated radiation dose levels for specific imaging tasks. Methods: The thoracic section of a pediatric phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 or 100 times using a 64-slice clinical CT scanner at four different dose levels [CTDI{sub vol} =4, 8, 12, 16 (mGy)]. Both filtered backprojection (FBP) and MBIR (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for image reconstruction and results were compared with one another. Eight test objects in the phantom with contrast levels ranging from 13 to 1710 HU were used to assess spatial resolution. The axial spatial resolution was quantified with the point spread function (PSF), while the z resolution was quantified with the slice sensitivity profile. Both were measured locally on the test objects and in the image domain. The dependence of spatial resolution on contrast and dose levels was studied. The study also features a systematic investigation of the potential trade-off between spatial resolution and locally defined noise and their joint impact on the overall image quality, which was quantified by the image domain-based channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detectability index d′. Results: (1) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR depends on both radiation dose level and image contrast level, whereas it is supposedly independent of these two factors in FBP. The axial spatial resolution of MBIR always improved with an increasing radiation dose level and/or contrast level. (2) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR became equivalent to that of FBP at some transitional contrast level, above which MBIR demonstrated superior spatial resolution than

  6. Submodeling Simulations in Fusion Welds: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    In part I, three-dimensional transient non-linear sub modeling heat transfer simulations were performed to study the thermal histories and thermal cycles that occur during the welding process at the macro, meso and micro scales. In the present work, the corresponding non-uniform temperature changes were imposed as load conditions on structural calculations to study the evolution of localized plastic strains and residual stresses at these sub-level scales. To reach the goal, a three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic model (ABAQUS code) was developed. The sub-modeling technique proposed to be used in coupling phase-field (and/or digital microstructures) codes with finite element codes, was used to mesh a local part of the model with a refined mesh based on interpolation of the solution from an initial, relatively coarse, macro global model. The meso-sub-model is the global model for the subsequent micro sub-model. The strategy used to calculate temperatures, strains and residual stresses at the macro, meso and micro scale level, is very flexible to be used to any number of levels. The objective of this research was to initiate the development of microstructural models to identify fusion welding process parameters for preserving the single crystal nature of gas turbine blades during repair procedures. The multi-scale submodeling approach can be used to capture weld pool features at the macro-meso scale level, and micro residual stress and secondary dendrite arm spacing features at the micro scale level.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendix II to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix II to Part 261...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equations II-1 and II-2. This table contains annual fuel price indices for distillate oil, residual oil... i = MPB where: FPB i = Price of the proposed fuel (distillate oil, residual oil, or natural gas) in... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504...

  9. Probabilistic finite-state machines--part II.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Enrique; Thollard, Frank; de la Higuera, Colin; Casacuberta, Francisco; Carrasco, Rafael C

    2005-07-01

    Probabilistic finite-state machines are used today in a variety of areas in pattern recognition or in fields to which pattern recognition is linked. In Part I of this paper, we surveyed these objects and studied their properties. In this Part II, we study the relations between probabilistic finite-state automata and other well-known devices that generate strings like hidden Markov models and n-grams and provide theorems, algorithms, and properties that represent a current state of the art of these objects.

  10. A novel population balance model to investigate the kinetics of in vitro cell proliferation: part II. Numerical solution, parameters' determination, and model outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Sarah; Cincotti, Alberto; Cao, Giacomo

    2012-03-01

    Based on the general theoretical model developed in Part I of this work, a series of numerical simulations related to the in vitro proliferation kinetics of adherent cells is here presented. First the complex task of assigning a specific value to all the parameters of the proposed population balance (PB) model is addressed, by also highlighting the difficulties arising when performing proper comparisons with experimental data. Then, a parametric sensitivity analysis is performed, thus identifying the more relevant parameters from a kinetics perspective. The proposed PB model can be adapted to describe cell growth under various conditions, by properly changing the value of the adjustable parameters. For this reason, model parameters able to mimic cell culture behavior under microgravity conditions are identified by means of a suitable parametric sensitivity analysis. Specifically, it is found that, as the volume growth parameter is reduced, proliferation slows down while cells arrest in G0/G1 or G2/M depending on the initial distribution of cell population. On the basis of this result, model capabilities have been tested by means of a proper comparison with literature experimental data related to the behavior of synchronized and not-synchronized cells under micro- and standard gravity levels.

  11. Computationally efficient analysis of particle transport and deposition in a human whole-lung-airway model. Part II: Dry powder inhaler application.

    PubMed

    Kolanjiyil, Arun V; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2016-11-03

    Pulmonary drug delivery is becoming a favored route for administering drugs to treat both lung and systemic diseases. Examples of lung diseases include asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as well as respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis. Special respiratory drugs are administered to the lungs, using an appropriate inhaler device. Next to the pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), the dry powder inhaler (DPI) is a frequently used device because of the good drug stability and a minimal need for patient coordination. Specific DPI-designs and operations greatly affect drug-aerosol formation and hence local lung deposition. Simulating the fluid-particle dynamics after use of a DPI allows for the assessment of drug-aerosol deposition and can also assist in improving the device configuration and operation. In Part I of this study a first-generation whole lung-airway model (WLAM) was introduced and discussed to analyze particle transport and deposition in a human respiratory tract model. In the present Part II the drug-aerosols are assumed to be injected into the lung airways from a DPI mouth-piece, forming the mouth-inlet. The total as well as regional particle depositions in the WLAM, as inhaled from a DPI, were successfully compared with experimental data sets reported in the open literature. The validated modeling methodology was then employed to study the delivery of curcumin aerosols into lung airways using a commercial DPI. Curcumin has been implicated to possess high therapeutic potential as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent. However, efficacy of curcumin treatment is limited because of the low bioavailability of curcumin when ingested. Hence, alternative drug administration techniques, e.g., using inhalable curcumin-aerosols, are under investigation. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that use of a DPI leads to low lung deposition efficiencies because large amounts of

  12. Cloud Properties Simulated by a Single-Column Model. Part II: Evaluation of Cumulus Detrainment and Ice-phase Microphysics Using a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Yali; Krueger, Steven K.; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series in which kilometer-scale-resolving observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and a cloud-resolving model (CRM) are used to evaluate the single-column model (SCM) version of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System model. Part I demonstrated that kilometer-scale cirrus properties simulated by the SCM significantly differ from the cloud radar observations while the CRM simulation reproduced most of the cirrus properties as revealed by the observations. The present study describes an evaluation, through a comparison with the CRM, of the SCM's representation of detrainment from deep cumulus and ice-phase microphysics in an effort to better understand the findings of Part I. It is found that detrainment occurs too infrequently at a single level at a time in the SCM, although the detrainment rate averaged over the entire simulation period is somewhat comparable to that of the CRM simulation. Relatively too much detrained ice is sublimated when first detrained. Snow falls over too deep of a layer due to the assumption that snow source and sink terms exactly balance within one time step in the SCM. These characteristics in the SCM parameterizations may explain many of the differences in the cirrus properties between the SCM and the observations (or between the SCM and the CRM). A possible improvement for the SCM consists of the inclusion of multiple cumulus cloud types as in the original Arakawa-Schubert scheme, prognostically determining the stratiform cloud fraction and snow mixing ratio. This would allow better representation of the detrainment from deep convection, better coupling of the volume of detrained air with cloud fraction, and better representation of snow field.

  13. Wave Propagation in Polymers, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newlander, David C.; Charest, Jacques A.; Lilly, Martin D.; Eisler, Robert D.

    1999-06-01

    Work reported in a previous study (Wave Propagations in Polymers, Part I, J.A. Charest, M.D. Lilly, 44th ARA Meeting Munich, Germany Sept. 17-20, 1993) discussed gas gun plane wave impact work and the measurements of stress wave profiles in Polycarbonate at around 2 kbars. The wave profiles were obtained using combined carbon and PVDF thin film stress gauges. The results showed amplitude attenuation and dispersion effects which were neither expected nor predictable from available hydrocode models. The data have been revisited using a modified material model and the PUFF74 computer code. These new wave profile calculations show remarkable agreement with the previous experiments in Polycarbonate. The model treats the material as viscoelastic-plastic using methods developed by Bade (Dynamic Response Model for PMMA, W. L. Bade, AVCO Systems Division, TR K500-74-WLB-204, Oct. 1, 1974). The measured and calculated results are quite different from those exhibited by PMMA at similar impact conditions. This work is expected to further our understanding of the processes that control wave propagation in highly-compressible and viscoelastic/viscoplastic media. It is also expected to provide clues on the effects of high strain rates on properties such as the modulus of elasticity, strength, and material loading behavior.

  14. A musculoskeletal model of the equine forelimb for determining surface stresses and strains in the humerus-part II. Experimental testing and model validation.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Sarah; Stover, Susan M; Hull, M L; Galuppo, Larry D

    2008-08-01

    The first objective of this study was to experimentally determine surface bone strain magnitudes and directions at the donor site for bone grafts, the site predisposed to stress fracture, the medial and cranial aspects of the transverse cross section corresponding to the stress fracture site, and the middle of the diaphysis of the humerus of a simplified in vitro laboratory preparation. The second objective was to determine whether computing strains solely in the direction of the longitudinal axis of the humerus in the mathematical model was inherently limited by comparing the strains measured along the longitudinal axis of the bone to the principal strain magnitudes and directions. The final objective was to determine whether the mathematical model formulated in Part I [Pollock et al., 2008, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 130, p. 041006] is valid for determining the bone surface strains at the various locations on the humerus where experimentally measured longitudinal strains are comparable to principal strains. Triple rosette strain gauges were applied at four locations circumferentially on each of two cross sections of interest using a simplified in vitro laboratory preparation. The muscles included the biceps brachii muscle in addition to loaded shoulder muscles that were predicted active by the mathematical model. Strains from the middle grid of each rosette, aligned along the longitudinal axis of the humerus, were compared with calculated principal strain magnitudes and directions. The results indicated that calculating strains solely in the direction of the longitudinal axis is appropriate at six of eight locations. At the cranial and medial aspects of the middle of the diaphysis, the average minimum principal strain was not comparable to the average experimental longitudinal strain. Further analysis at the remaining six locations indicated that the mathematical model formulated in Part I predicts strains within +/-2 standard deviations of experimental strains at

  15. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  16. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... II-2. This table contains annual fuel price indices for distillate oil, residual oil, natural gas...=Price of the proposed fuel (distillate oil, residual oil, or natural gas) in year i. MPB=The current... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  1. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  2. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  3. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  4. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  5. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  6. Reclaiming Kindergarten: Part II--Questions about Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullo, Dominic F.; Hughes, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Part II of "Reclaiming Kindergarten" continues the discussion related to responding to the crisis in today's kindergarten. In Part II, two policy questions are posed, the answers to which seek to respond to this continuing crisis. The questions center on issues related to engaging families in kindergarten and the need to consider a new early…

  7. Talking about the Weather, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Allan A.

    1984-01-01

    This second part of a two-part article highlights some mathematics involved in the study of meteorology. Examples are given of the application of mathematics to the study of the atmosphere, with three problems discussed. (MNS)

  8. Water Pollution: Part I, Municipal Wastewaters; Part II, Industrial Wastewaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, K. E. M.

    This publication is an annotated bibliography of municipal and industrial wastewater literature. This publication consists of two parts plus appendices. Part one is entitled Municipal Wastewaters and includes publications in such areas as health effects of polluted waters, federal policy and legislation, biology and chemistry of polluted water,…

  9. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Internal Politics of Growth and Decline. Part II, Chapter 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannan, Michael T.; Freeman, John

    The document, part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759, describes a model that incorporates organizational politics and environmental dependence into a study of the effects of growth and decline on the number of school personnel. The first section describes the original model which assumes that as the number of students in a district…

  10. Fire prevention on airplanes. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, J

    1929-01-01

    This part of the report presents a detailed examination of spark prevention, fire extinguishers, and fuel tank location and design. A continued program of investigations and research is also proposed.

  11. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries.

  12. Prescription pricing across Canada (Part II).

    PubMed

    Archer, F

    1984-09-01

    The first of a two part article entitled "Prescription Pricing Across Canada" appeared in the June issue of CPJ. The article was prompted by recent press reports of a prescription drug study commissioned by the Saskatchewan government, and the consequent attention-getting headlines. The first article dealt with the Western provinces. The second part discusses prescription pricing in Ontario, Québec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and the Northwest Territories.

  13. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health - Part II: principles, methods, applications, and value of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in veterinary medicine and food safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Gehring, R; Mochel, J P; Lavé, T; Riviere, J E

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a tutorial for individuals interested in quantitative veterinary pharmacology and toxicology and offers a basis for establishing guidelines for physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development and application in veterinary medicine. This is important as the application of PBPK modeling in veterinary medicine has evolved over the past two decades. PBPK models can be used to predict drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals, to estimate chemical concentrations at the site of action and target organ toxicity to aid risk assessment of environmental contaminants and/or drugs in both domestic animals and wildlife, as well as to help design therapeutic regimens for veterinary drugs. This review provides a comprehensive summary of PBPK modeling principles, model development methodology, and the current applications in veterinary medicine, with a focus on predictions of drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals. The advantages and disadvantages of PBPK modeling compared to other pharmacokinetic modeling approaches (i.e., classical compartmental/noncompartmental modeling, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, and interspecies allometric scaling) are further presented. The review finally discusses contemporary challenges and our perspectives on model documentation, evaluation criteria, quality improvement, and offers solutions to increase model acceptance and applications in veterinary pharmacology and toxicology.

  14. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer - first results from a feasibility study Part II: Meteorological characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmuth, O.

    2006-09-01

    While in Paper I of four papers a revised columnar high-order modelling approach to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL) was deduced, in the present Paper II the model capability to predict the evolution of meteorological CBL parameters is demonstrated. Based on a model setup to simulate typical CBL conditions, predicted first-, second- and third-order moments were shown to agree very well with those obtained from in situ and remote sensing turbulence measurements such as aircraft, SODAR and LIDAR measurements as well as with those derived from ensemble-averaged large eddy simulations and wind tunnel experiments. The results show, that the model is able to predict the meteorological CBL parameters, required to verify or falsify, respectively, previous hypothesis on the interaction between CBL turbulence and new particle formation.

  15. Inquiry and Living History, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon; Smalley, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of this article, the authors introduced the living history program. This yearly, weeklong program features living portrayals of famous people, which becomes a catalyst for teaching curricular standards, as well as providing the spark for inquiry. Successful implementation of this program requires providing teachers with…

  16. The Metis Nation--Part Two II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorian, John

    1978-01-01

    This article deals with historical events involving the Metis people from the time Manitoba entered the Confederation to the conclusion of the 1885 battle at Fish Creek near Batoche, Saskatchewan. Part I is in the Summer, 1978 issue of the Northian. (Author/RTS)

  17. Cutting out the Middleman: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Shirley; Crittenden, Chris

    1985-01-01

    The second part of the article published in "American School and University," December 1984 (EA 518 236), outlines specific steps administrators need to take to determine whether or not a direct purchase of natural gas is going to benefit their schools. (MLF)

  18. What Clients of Couple Therapy Model Developers and Their Former Students Say about Change, Part II: Model-Independent Common Factors and an Integrative Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sean D.; Piercy, Fred P.

    2007-01-01

    Proponents of the common factors movement in marriage and family therapy (MFT) suggest that, rather than specific models of therapy, elements common across models of therapy and common to the process of therapy itself are responsible for therapeutic change. This article--the second of two companion articles--reports on a study designed to further…

  19. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part II: Constraint methodology of hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Audebert, M; Oxarango, L; Duquennoi, C; Touze-Foltz, N; Forquet, N; Clément, R

    2016-09-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactors. To ensure optimal water content distribution, bioreactor operators need tools to design leachate injection systems. Prediction of leachate flow by subsurface flow modelling could provide useful information for the design of such systems. However, hydrodynamic models require additional data to constrain them and to assess hydrodynamic parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a suitable method to study leachate infiltration at the landfill scale. It can provide spatially distributed information which is useful for constraining hydrodynamic models. However, this geophysical method does not allow ERT users to directly measure water content in waste. The MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to delineate the infiltration area precisely during time-lapse ERT survey in order to avoid the use of empirical petrophysical relationships, which are not adapted to a heterogeneous medium such as waste. The infiltration shapes and hydrodynamic information extracted with MICS were used to constrain hydrodynamic models in assessing parameters. The constraint methodology developed in this paper was tested on two hydrodynamic models: an equilibrium model where, flow within the waste medium is estimated using a single continuum approach and a non-equilibrium model where flow is estimated using a dual continuum approach. The latter represents leachate flows into fractures. Finally, this methodology provides insight to identify the advantages and limitations of hydrodynamic models. Furthermore, we suggest an explanation for the large volume detected by MICS when a small volume of leachate is injected.

  20. What clients of couple therapy model developers and their former students say about change, part II: model-independent common factors and an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sean D; Piercy, Fred P

    2007-07-01

    Proponents of the common factors movement in marriage and family therapy (MFT) suggest that, rather than specific models of therapy, elements common across models of therapy and common to the process of therapy itself are responsible for therapeutic change. This article-the second of two companion articles-reports on a study designed to further investigate common factors in couple therapy. We used grounded theory techniques to analyze data from interviews with MFT model developers Dr. Susan M. Johnson, Dr. Frank M. Dattilio, Dr. Richard C. Schwartz, former students of Dr. Johnson and Dr. Schwartz, and each of their clients who had been successful in couple therapy. This article reports model-independent variables, that is, general aspects of therapy that are not directly related to the therapist's model. Model-independent categories include client variables, therapist variables, the therapeutic alliance, therapeutic process, and expectancy and motivational factors, each with several subcategories. We also present a conceptual framework that outlines how model-dependent and model-independent common factors may interact to produce change. We discuss our findings and proposed framework in relation to the current common factors literature in psychology and MFT. We also discuss clinical, training, and research implications.

  1. Short period forecasting of catchment-scale precipitation. Part II: a water-balance storm model for short-term rainfall and flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, V. A.; Moore, R. J.

    A simple two-dimensional rainfall model, based on advection and conservation of mass in a vertical cloud column, is investigated for use in short-term rainfall and flood forecasting at the catchment scale under UK conditions. The model is capable of assimilating weather radar, satellite infra-red and surface weather observations, together with forecasts from a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model, to obtain frequently updated forecasts of rainfall fields. Such data assimilation helps compensate for the simplified model dynamics and, taken together, provides a practical real-time forecasting scheme for catchment scale applications. Various ways are explored for using information from a numerical weather prediction model (16.8 km grid) within the higher resolution model (5 km grid). A number of model variants is considered, ranging from simple persistence and advection methods used as a baseline, to different forms of the dynamic rainfall model. Model performance is assessed using data from the Wardon Hill radar in Dorset for two convective events, on 10 June 1993 and 16 July 1995, when thunderstorms occurred over southern Britain. The results show that (i) a simple advection-type forecast may be improved upon by using multiscan radar data in place of data from the lowest scan, and (ii) advected, steady-state predictions from the dynamic model, using "inferred updraughts", provides the best performance overall. Updraught velocity is inferred at the forecast origin from the last two radar fields, using the mass-balance equation and associated data and is held constant over the forecast period. This inference model proves superior to the buoyancy parameterisation of updraught employed in the original formulation. A selection of the different rainfall forecasts is used as input to a catchment flow forecasting model, the IH PDM (Probability Distributed Moisture) model, to assess their effect on flow forecast accuracy for the 135 km2 Brue catchment in Somerset.

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  3. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  4. A model for lignin alteration - Part II: Numerical model of natural gas generation and application to the Piceance Basin, Western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, D.F.; Ortoleva, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    The model presented here simulates a network of parallel and sequential reactions that describe the structural and chemical transformation of lignin-derived sedimentary organic matter (SOM) and the resulting generation of mobile species from shallow burial to approximately low-volatile bituminous rank. The model is calibrated to the Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation coal of the Piceance Basin at the Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) Site, assuming this coal is largely derived from lignin. The model calculates the content of functional groups on the residual molecular species, C, H, and O elemental weight percents of the residual species, and moles of residual molecular species and mobile species (including components of natural gas) through time. The model is generally more sensitive to initial molecular structure of the lignin-derived molecule and the H2O content of the system than to initial temperature, as the former affect the fundamental reaction paths. The model is used to estimate that a total of 314 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of methane is generated by the Williams Fork coal over the basin history. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Theoretical study of the electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part II. Dynamics consequences.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Nuclear dynamics is investigated theoretically from first principles by employing the ab initio vibronic models of the prototypical naphthalene and anthracene radical cations developed in Part I. This Part is primarily aimed at corroborating a large amount of available experimental data with a specific final goal to establish an unambiguous link with the current observations in astrophysics and astronomy. The detailed analyses presented here perhaps establish that these two prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations are indeed potential carriers of the observed diffuse interstellar bands.

  6. Drugs, money and society (Part II).

    PubMed

    Walley, Tom

    2010-09-01

    Pharmacoeconomics started as marketing but has developed into a valuable tool in the fuller assessment of drug therapies. Its principles are now widely accepted, and many countries have government-funded agencies with responsibility for its application, most notably the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in England. Many clinical pharmacologists are active in this area, and the discipline itself is part of the clinical pharmacology trainees' curriculum. Further developments will include value-based pricing and its use in cost sharing arrangements between health service and manufacturers.

  7. Treatment of superficial mycoses: review - part II*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes-Filho, Fred; Quaresma-Santos, Maria Victória Pinto; Amorim, Adriana Gutstein da Fonseca; Schechtman, Regina Casz; Azulay, David Rubem

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections of the hair, skin and nails are a major cause of morbidity in the world. Choosing the right treatment is not always simple because of the possibility of drug interactions and side effects. The first part of the article discusses the main treatments for superficial mycoses - keratophytoses, dermatophytosis, candidiasis, with a practical approach to the most commonly-used topical and systemic drugs , referring also to their dosage and duration of use. Promising new, antifungal therapeutic alternatives are also highlighted, as well as available options on the Brazilian and world markets. PMID:24474103

  8. Wave propagation in polymers. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newlander, C. D.; Cherest, J. A.; Lilly, M. C.; Eisler, R. D.

    2000-04-01

    Wave profile measurements made in Polycarbonate at around 2.2 kbars were previously reported showing dispersion and amplitude attenuation that were neither expected nor predicted from available models. This data is being re-visited here and analyzed using a modified material model and the PUFF74 computer code. The new computation shows remarkable agreement with the experiments. The modeling treated the material as a visco-elastic/plastic medium using the method developed by Bade. This work is expected to further our understanding of wave propagation in highly compressible and visco-elastic/plastic media. It is also expected to provide insights on the role of strain rate effects on material properties such as elastic moduli, strengths and loading behaviors.

  9. Biosimilars in Dermatology: Current Situation (Part II).

    PubMed

    Puig, L; Carretero, G; Daudén, E; Ferrándiz, C; Marrón, S E; Martorell, A; Pérez-Suárez, B; Rodriguez-Cerdeira, C; Ruiz-Villaverde, R; Sánchez-Carazo, J L; Velasco, M

    2015-09-01

    The first biosimilar version of a biologic agent used to treat psoriasis (infliximab) entered the Spanish market on February 16 of this year, and more biosimilars can be expected to follow in the coming months and years. Logically, this new situation will have economic repercussions and alter prescribing patterns among dermatologists. In this second part of the review, we will look at several somewhat contentious issues, such as the extrapolation of indications, interchangeability, and automatic substitution. We will also review the biosimilars with indications for psoriasis currently in the clinical development pipeline and assess their potential to offer comparable efficacy and safety to the reference product while contributing to the sustainability of the public health care system.

  10. Bases of Radio Direction Finding, Part II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-22

    FTD-ID(RS)T-2232-77 Part 2 of 2 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION BASES OF RADIO DIRECTION FINDING by I. S. Kukes, M. Ye. Starik -3- 0DAM Approved for...FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DI- FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION I VISION. j WP.AFB, OHIO. FTD- ID(RS)T-2232-77 Date22 Dec 1977 Table of Contents U.S. Board on...2939, Nt 8, LTI). 3. 11.2 WI ir-p x( o a~ B. B OcitowiwN -punpcKi:. si’Hovim’ paAisonve.1CI* MONil . PCJA.-.It3A. OTA. A9JI1041-1oTS, .1943. 11.3. C a R

  11. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.; Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  12. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  13. Photoprotection: part II. Sunscreen: development, efficacy, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Rebecca; Osterwalder, Uli; Wang, Steven Q; Burnett, Mark; Lim, Henry W

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the naturally occurring, physical, and systemic photoprotective agents reviewed in part I, topical ultraviolet radiation filters are an important cornerstone of photoprotection. Sunscreen development, efficacy, testing, and controversies are reviewed in part II of this continuing medical education article.

  14. Nurses' perceptions of the impact of a renal nursing professional practice model on nursing outcomes, characteristics of practice environments and empowerment--Part II.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Ridley, Jane; Lawrence-Murphy, Julie Ann; White, Sharon; Spence-Laschinger, Heather K; Bevan, Joy; O'Brien, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a renal nursing professional practice model (PPM) on nurses'perceptions of empowerment, characteristics of practice environments and the impact on nursing care outcomes in a university-based teaching hospital in Canada. Quantitative and qualitative methodologies were used. This paper will focus on the qualitative results. Content analysis was the data analysis method used. The following themes emerged: 1) Attunement, familiarity/knowing the patient, going the distance, 2) Patient outcomes, consistency and continuity of care, autonomy/taking the initiative, 3) Nurse rewards: satisfaction and accountability, empowerment/input, and 4) Facilitating systems: communication, support and assignment. The quantitative results had a significant (p = .005) improvement post-PPM implementation in the nursing foundations for quality of care subscale of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (NWI-PES) and organizational relationships (p =.016) measured by the Conditions of Work Effectiveness II (CWEQ-II) questionnaires. This study provides evidence for PPMs and primary nursing as effective frameworks to positively impact nursing and patient outcomes in a hemodialysis unit.

  15. A Physicist for All Seasons: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The second part of this interview covers Frank Oppenheimer's move to the University of California at Berkeley and wartime work at the Westinghouse Research Laboratories in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, at the electromagnetic-separation plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and at Los Alamos, New Mexico (1941-1945); his postwar research at Berkeley (1945-1947); his appointment at the University of Minnesota in 1947 and firing two years later after being required to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee; his decade as a rancher in Colorado (1949-1959) and high-school science teacher toward the end of this period; his research at the University of Colorado in Boulder after 1959; his year as a Guggenheim Fellow at University College London in 1965; and his founding of the Exploratorium in San Francisco. California, in 1969. He also discusses his wartime relations with his older brother Robert and postwar events in Robert's life, including his Hearings before the Personnel Security Board of the Atomic Energy Commission in 1954.

  16. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder.

  17. DICOM: key concepts--part II.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    The objective of these two installments of IT World was to give a general overview of DICOM and to take a look at different parts of the standard to get a sense of its main themes. We found that the standard provides a common reference for all developers but does not impose a single type of implementation. This allows for innovation. The standard is also built for flexibility, able to adapt to new modalities that have a need to communicate. The speedy acceptance of DICOM by the medical imaging industry is opening new possibilities for healthcare organizations to increase the quality while decreasing the cost of patient care. All of the DICOM networked supporting medical equipment as well as the organization's computer systems made by multiple original equipment manufacturers and located at one site or many sites can communicate by means of DICOM. This gives us the opportunity for medical images to be captured and communicated quicker. The result enables physicians to make diagnoses and treatment decisions sooner. It's all good stuff and even more reason why we should endeavor to understand the basics of DICOM. DICOM is here to stay!

  18. Selective desorption of carbon dioxide from sewage sludge for in situ methane enrichment--Part II: Modelling and evaluation of experiments.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Anna; Rasmuson, Ake C

    2007-08-01

    In situ methane enrichment in anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has been investigated by experiments and by modelling. Sludge from a full scale digester was fed to a pilot scale bubble column having 0.3 m diameter for preferential desorption of carbon dioxide. In this second part, a model describing the steady-state performance of the bubble column for desorption of carbon dioxide and methane has been developed. The column is assumed to operate in the homogeneous flow regime, and with respect to carbon dioxide and methane both phases are described by the axial dispersion model. The model treats the chemical reaction equilibrium between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate as being slow and the bicarbonate concentration as being constant. The model is correlated to previously reported experimental results to determine the liquid side mass transfer coefficient in each experiment. A simple power law model is used to correlate the mass transfer coefficient to the gas flow rate. In general, the model allows for a reasonable qualitative description of the behaviour of the bubble column performance but the quantitative agreement with experimental results is not satisfactory. It is believed, though that the main problem is actually not in the model but is related to experimental uncertainties concerning inlet concentrations of liquid phase methane and bicarbonate.

  19. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Andrade, R.M.; Taylor, D. J.; Stimmel, J. J.; Zaelke, R. L.; Balkey, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants

  20. Electroconvulsive Therapy Part II: A Biopsychosocial Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Nancy A.; Prudic, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The myths surrounding electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and the misconceptions held by the general public, clinicians, and patients have interfered with acceptance of this treatment throughout its history. Misunderstandings surrounding ECT, and its consequent stigmatization, are reviewed, including negative depictions of ECT in film, print media, and on the Internet. Clinicians involved in the delivery of ECT benefit from gaining an understanding of how ECT may be perceived by patients and other mental health professionals; they can play a vital role in educating patients and helping ensure the delivery of a successful course of ECT. Guidance is provided for clinicians on how to support patients and families through the ECT process using a model team approach. Anxiety reduction, meeting individual needs, patient and family psychoeducation, assessment of psychosocial supports, and discharge planning are discussed. PMID:19820554

  1. AI And Early Vision - Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julesz, Bela

    1989-08-01

    A quarter of a century ago I introduced two paradigms into psychology which in the intervening years have had a direct impact on the psychobiology of early vision and an indirect one on artificial intelligence (AI or machine vision). The first, the computer-generated random-dot stereogram (RDS) paradigm (Julesz, 1960) at its very inception posed a strategic question both for AI and neurophysiology. The finding that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis) is possible without the many enigmatic cues of monocular form recognition - as assumed previously - demonstrated that stereopsis with its basic problem of finding matches between corresponding random aggregates of dots in the left and right visual fields became ripe for modeling. Indeed, the binocular matching problem of stereopsis opened up an entire field of study, eventually leading to the computational models of David Marr (1982) and his coworkers. The fusion of RDS had an even greater impact on neurophysiologists - including Hubel and Wiesel (1962) - who realized that stereopsis must occur at an early stage, and can be studied easier than form perception. This insight recently culminated in the studies by Gian Poggio (1984) who found binocular-disparity - tuned neurons in the input stage to the visual cortex (layer IVB in V1) in the monkey that were selectively triggered by dynamic RDS. Thus the first paradigm led to a strategic insight: that with stereoscopic vision there is no camouflage, and as such was advantageous for our primate ancestors to evolve the cortical machinery of stereoscopic vision to capture camouflaged prey (insects) at a standstill. Amazingly, although stereopsis evolved relatively late in primates, it captured the very input stages of the visual cortex. (For a detailed review, see Julesz, 1986a)

  2. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART II: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS IN REGULATORY FACTORS AND OTHER COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Iommarini, Luisa; Peralta, Susana; Torraco, Alessandra; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are defined as defects that affect the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). They are characterized by a heterogeneous array of clinical presentations due in part to a wide variety of factors required for proper function of the components of the OXPHOS system. There is no cure for these disorders owing our poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of disease. To understand the mechanisms of human disease numerous mouse models have been developed in recent years. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to those factors affecting mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, translation as well to other proteins that are involved in mitochondrial dynamics and quality control which affect mitochondrial OXPHOS function without been intrinsic components of the system. We discuss how these models have contributed to our understanding of mitochondrial diseases and their pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25640959

  3. Levels of 137Cs in muddy sediments on the seabed in the Bay of Cadiz (Spain). Part II. Model of vertical migration of (137)Cs.

    PubMed

    Ligero, R A; Barrera, M; Casas-Ruiz, M

    2005-01-01

    This second part of the study reports the development of a model to describe the vertical migration of the artificial radioisotope (137)Cs in the sediment column on the seabed of the Bay of Cadiz. The application of the model provides an overall picture of the process of sedimentation in the Inner Bay of Cadiz. The spatial distribution of the rate of sedimentation enables us to study the sources of sediments and the means by which the sediments have been transported. A method has been derived from the rate of sedimentation to perform the dating of the layers of sediment. The model describes the behaviour of (137)Cs in the area under study, taking into account the time of residence in the zones that are the source of accumulation, the origin of the sedimentary material, together with the diffusion of the radionuclide in the sediment of the seabed.

  4. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1991-92. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Senior Administrative Officers--Universities of Ontario, Toronto.

    This report, which combined Part I and Part II of a benefit study, presents data from a survey of Ontario universities concerning fringe benefits offered in 1991-92. Part I is made up of a series of tables displaying the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution. The first five tables cover general aspects of benefits,…

  5. EDUCATION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF IN-RESIDENCE TRAINING PROGRAMS, PART I, PART II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MELICAN, ROBERT L.; PURCELL, FRANCIS P.

    THE TWO PARTS OF THIS DISCUSSION CONSIDER THE DEVELOPMENT OF RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS FOR VOCATIONAL AND SOCIAL TRAINING TO MEET THE PROBLEMS OF THE LOW-INCOME SCHOOL DROPOUT. PART I REVIEWS THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF RESIDENCY PROGRAMS IN SUCH EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS AS COLLEGES, UNIVERSITIES, CHURCHES, AND SUMMER CAMPS. PART II DEALS WITH THE…

  6. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  7. Key to Opening Kidney for In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation Entrance in Health and Disease: Part II: Mechanistic Models and In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Posada, Maria; Galetin, Aleksandra; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2016-09-01

    It is envisaged that application of mechanistic models will improve prediction of changes in renal disposition due to drug-drug interactions, genetic polymorphism in enzymes and transporters and/or renal impairment. However, developing and validating mechanistic kidney models is challenging due to the number of processes that may occur (filtration, secretion, reabsorption and metabolism) in this complex organ. Prediction of human renal drug disposition from preclinical species may be hampered by species differences in the expression and activity of drug metabolising enzymes and transporters. A proposed solution is bottom-up prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters based on in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE), mediated by recent advances in in vitro experimental techniques and application of relevant scaling factors. This review is a follow-up to the Part I of the report from the 2015 AAPS Annual Meeting and Exhibition (Orlando, FL; 25th-29th October 2015) which focuses on IVIVE and mechanistic prediction of renal drug disposition. It describes the various mechanistic kidney models that may be used to investigate renal drug disposition. Particular attention is given to efforts that have attempted to incorporate elements of IVIVE. In addition, the use of mechanistic models in prediction of renal drug-drug interactions and potential for application in determining suitable adjustment of dose in kidney disease are discussed. The need for suitable clinical pharmacokinetics data for the purposes of delineating mechanistic aspects of kidney models in various scenarios is highlighted.

  8. 30 CFR Appendix II to Subpart D of... - Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment Pt. 18, Subpt. D, App. II Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18 LIST OF FIGURES Figure No. Title 1 Typical layout drawing of a machine. 2 Sample bill...

  9. 30 CFR Appendix II to Subpart D of... - Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment Pt. 18, Subpt. D, App. II Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18 LIST OF FIGURES Figure No. Title 1 Typical layout drawing of a machine. 2 Sample bill...

  10. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-17

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  11. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  12. Limit analysis and homogenization of porous materials with Mohr-Coulomb matrix. Part II: Numerical bounds and assessment of the theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, F.; Anoukou, K.; Pastor, J.; Kondo, D.

    2016-06-01

    This second part of the two-part study is devoted to the numerical Limit Analysis of a hollow sphere model with a Mohr-Coulomb matrix and its use for the assessment of theoretical results. Brief background and fundamental of the static and kinematic approaches in the context of numerical limit analysis are first recalled. We then present the hollow sphere model, together with its axisymmetric FEM discretization and its mechanical position. A conic programming adaptation of a previous iterative static approach, based on a piecewise linearization (PWL) of the plasticity criterion, was first realized. Unfortunately, the resulting code, no more than the PWL one, did not allow sufficiently refined meshes for loss of convergence of the conic optimizer. This problem was solved by using the projection algorithm of Ben Tal and Nemriovski (BTN) and the (interior point) linear programming code XA. For the kinematic approach, a first conic adaptation appeared also inefficient. Then, an original mixed (but fully kinematic) approach dedicated to the general Mohr-Coulomb axisymmetric problem was elaborated. The final conic mixed code appears much more robust than the classic one when using the conic code MOSEK, allowing us to take into account refined numerical meshes. After a fine validation in the case of spherical cavities and isotropic loadings (for which the exact solution is known) and comparison to previous (partial) results, numerical lower and upper bounds (a posteriori verified) of the macroscopic strength are provided. These bounds are used to assess and validate the theoretical results of the companion (part I) paper. Effects of the friction angle as well as that of the porosity are illustrated.

  13. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  14. Evolution of a detailed physiological model to simulate the gastrointestinal transit and absorption process in humans, part II: extension to describe performance of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Kirstin; Coboeken, Katrin; Willmann, Stefan; Dressman, Jennifer B; Lippert, Jörg

    2012-03-01

    The physiological absorption model presented in part I of this work is now extended to account for dosage-form-dependent gastrointestinal (GI) transit as well as disintegration and dissolution processes of various immediate-release and modified-release dosage forms. Empirical functions of the Weibull type were fitted to experimental in vitro dissolution profiles of solid dosage forms for eight test compounds (aciclovir, caffeine, cimetidine, diclofenac, furosemide, paracetamol, phenobarbital, and theophylline). The Weibull functions were then implemented into the model to predict mean plasma concentration-time profiles of the various dosage forms. On the basis of these dissolution functions, pharmacokinetics (PK) of six model drugs was predicted well. In the case of diclofenac, deviations between predicted and observed plasma concentrations were attributable to the large variability in gastric emptying time of the enteric-coated tablets. Likewise, oral PK of furosemide was found to be predominantly governed by the gastric emptying patterns. It is concluded that the revised model for GI transit and absorption was successfully integrated with dissolution functions of the Weibull type, enabling prediction of in vivo PK profiles from in vitro dissolution data. It facilitates a comparative analysis of the parameters contributing to oral drug absorption and is thus a powerful tool for formulation design.

  15. Kinetics of the conversion of dihydroxyacetone to methylglyoxal in New Zealand mānuka honey: Part II--Model systems.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Megan N C; Manley-Harris, Merilyn; Lane, Joseph R; Field, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    The irreversible dehydration reaction of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to methylglyoxal (MGO) in a honey model system has been examined to investigate the influence of added perturbant species on the reaction rate. The secondary amino acid proline, primary amino acids (alanine, lysine and serine), and iron, or combinations of these perturbants, were added to artificial honey with either DHA or MGO and stored at 20, 27 and 37°C. These systems were monitored over time. A 1:1 conversion of DHA to MGO was not observed in any system studied, including the control system with no added perturbants. Addition of proline to the matrix increased consumption of DHA but did not produce any more MGO than the control sample. Lysine and serine behaved similarly. Alanine enhanced the conversion of DHA to MGO and had the best efficiency of conversion of DHA to MGO for the amino acids studied. An iron II salt enhanced the conversion of DHA to MGO, even in the presence of proline.

  16. Recent Economic Perspectives on Political Economy, Part II*

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Torun; Shepsle, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years some of the best theoretical work on the political economy of political institutions and processes has begun surfacing outside the political science mainstream in high quality economics journals. This two-part paper surveys these contributions from a recent five-year period. In Part I, the focus is on elections, voting and information aggregation, followed by treatments of parties, candidates, and coalitions. In Part II, papers on economic performance and redistribution, constitutional design, and incentives, institutions, and the quality of political elites are discussed. Part II concludes with a discussion of the methodological bases common to economics and political science, the way economists have used political science research, and some new themes and arbitrage opportunities. PMID:23606754

  17. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs.

  18. SAR versus S(inc): What is the appropriate RF exposure metric in the range 1-10 GHz? Part II: Using complex human body models.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Robert L; Anderson, Vitas

    2010-09-01

    This is the second of the two articles that present modeling data and reasoned arguments for specifying the appropriate crossover frequency at which incident power flux density (S(inc)) replaces the peak 10 g averaged value of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) as the designated basic restriction for protecting against radiofrequency electromagnetic heating effects in the 1-10 GHz range. In our first study, we compared the degree of correlation between these basic restrictions and the peak-induced tissue temperature rise (DeltaT) for a representative range of population/exposure scenarios using simple multi-planar models exposed to plane wave conditions. In this complementary study, complex heterogeneous head models for an adult and 12-year-old child were analyzed at 1, 3, 6, 8, and 10 GHz for a variety of exposure conditions. The complex models indicate that peak DeltaT is better correlated with peak 10 g SAR than S(inc) at 1 and 3 GHz and with S(inc) at 6-10 GHz, in contrast to the results from Part I. Considering the planar and complex body modeling results together, and given the equivocal indications of the two metrics in the 6-10 GHz range, we recommend that the breakpoint be set at 6 GHz. This choice is also based on other considerations such as ease of assessment. We also recommend that the limit level of S(inc) should be adjusted to provide a better match with 10 g SAR in the induced tissue temperature rise.

  19. High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Video Fluorometry. Part II. Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY /VIDEO FLUOROMETRY. PART...REP«T_N&:-ŗ/ High Performance Liquid Chromatography /Video Fluorometry» Part II. Applications« by | Dennis C./Shelly* Michael P./Vogarty and...Data EnlirtdJ REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE t. REPORT NUMBER 2 GOVT ACCESSION NO 4. T1TI.F (and Submit) lP-^fffsyva High Performance Liquid Chromatography

  20. Monte Carlo Bayesian Inference on a Statistical Model of Sub-gridcolumn Moisture Variability Using High-resolution Cloud Observations . Part II; Sensitivity Tests and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I presented a Monte Carlo Bayesian method for constraining a complex statistical model of GCM sub-gridcolumn moisture variability using high-resolution MODIS cloud data, thereby permitting large-scale model parameter estimation and cloud data assimilation. This part performs some basic testing of this new approach, verifying that it does indeed significantly reduce mean and standard deviation biases with respect to the assimilated MODIS cloud optical depth, brightness temperature and cloud top pressure, and that it also improves the simulated rotational-Ramman scattering cloud optical centroid pressure (OCP) against independent (non-assimilated) retrievals from the OMI instrument. Of particular interest, the Monte Carlo method does show skill in the especially difficult case where the background state is clear but cloudy observations exist. In traditional linearized data assimilation methods, a subsaturated background cannot produce clouds via any infinitesimal equilibrium perturbation, but the Monte Carlo approach allows finite jumps into regions of non-zero cloud probability. In the example provided, the method is able to restore marine stratocumulus near the Californian coast where the background state has a clear swath. This paper also examines a number of algorithmic and physical sensitivities of the new method and provides guidance for its cost-effective implementation. One obvious difficulty for the method, and other cloud data assimilation methods as well, is the lack of information content in the cloud observables on cloud vertical structure, beyond cloud top pressure and optical thickness, thus necessitating strong dependence on the background vertical moisture structure. It is found that a simple flow-dependent correlation modification due to Riishojgaard (1998) provides some help in this respect, by better honoring inversion structures in the background state.

  1. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  2. Ethical Research Practices: Collaborative Action Research, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This is part II of a case study involving a large federally funded technology grant program implemented across several central Texas school districts and was followed by the researcher-participant at the university level as well as one of the campus sites. Many ethical research questions were raised during this study such as the use of participant…

  3. Preparation of Power Distribution System for High Penetration of Renewable Energy Part I. Dynamic Voltage Restorer for Voltage Regulation Pat II. Distribution Circuit Modeling and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshkbar Sadigh, Arash

    by simulation and experimental tests under various conditions considering all possible cases such as different amounts of voltage sag depth (VSD), different amounts of point-on-wave (POW) at which voltage sag occurs, harmonic distortion, line frequency variation, and phase jump (PJ). Furthermore, the ripple amount of fundamental voltage amplitude calculated by the proposed method and its error is analyzed considering the line frequency variation together with harmonic distortion. The best and worst detection time of proposed method were measured 1ms and 8.8ms, respectively. Finally, the proposed method has been compared with other voltage sag detection methods available in literature. Part 2: Power System Modeling for Renewable Energy Integration: As power distribution systems are evolving into more complex networks, electrical engineers have to rely on software tools to perform circuit analysis. There are dozens of powerful software tools available in the market to perform the power system studies. Although their main functions are similar, there are differences in features and formatting structures to suit specific applications. This creates challenges for transferring power system circuit models data (PSCMD) between different software and rebuilding the same circuit in the second software environment. The objective of this part of thesis is to develop a Unified Platform (UP) to facilitate transferring PSCMD among different software packages and relieve the challenges of the circuit model conversion process. UP uses a commonly available spreadsheet file with a defined format, for any home software to write data to and for any destination software to read data from, via a script-based application called PSCMD transfer application. The main considerations in developing the UP are to minimize manual intervention and import a one-line diagram into the destination software or export it from the source software, with all details to allow load flow, short circuit and

  4. Scenario analysis of carbon emissions' anti-driving effect on Qingdao's energy structure adjustment with an optimization model, Part II: Energy system planning and management.

    PubMed

    Wu, C B; Huang, G H; Liu, Z P; Zhen, J L; Yin, J G

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an inexact multistage stochastic mixed-integer programming (IMSMP) method was developed for supporting regional-scale energy system planning (EPS) associated with multiple uncertainties presented as discrete intervals, probability distributions and their combinations. An IMSMP-based energy system planning (IMSMP-ESP) model was formulated for Qingdao to demonstrate its applicability. Solutions which can provide optimal patterns of energy resources generation, conversion, transmission, allocation and facility capacity expansion schemes have been obtained. The results can help local decision makers generate cost-effective energy system management schemes and gain a comprehensive tradeoff between economic objectives and environmental requirements. Moreover, taking the CO2 emissions scenarios mentioned in Part I into consideration, the anti-driving effect of carbon emissions on energy structure adjustment was studied based on the developed model and scenario analysis. Several suggestions can be concluded from the results: (a) to ensure the smooth realization of low-carbon and sustainable development, appropriate price control and fiscal subsidy on high-cost energy resources should be considered by the decision-makers; (b) compared with coal, natural gas utilization should be strongly encouraged in order to insure that Qingdao could reach the carbon discharges peak value in 2020; (c) to guarantee Qingdao's power supply security in the future, the construction of new power plants should be emphasised instead of enhancing the transmission capacity of grid infrastructure.

  5. The engineering analysis of bioheat equation and penile hemodynamic relationships in the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction: part II-model optimization using the ANOVA and Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Huang, J; Tan, Y K

    2008-01-01

    The authors aimed to study the skin surface bioheat perfusion model described in part I numerically. The influence of each constituent in the determination of surface temperature profile was statistically examined. The theoretically derived data will then be benchmarked with clinically measured data to develop the artificial intelligence system for the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction (ED). The new approach is based on the hypothesis that there exists a constitutive relationship between surface temperature profiles and the etiology of ED. By considering the penis model as a group of reservoirs with irregular cavities, we built a numerical model, simplified to save computational costs while still realistically able to represent the actual for partial differential calculation. Incompressible blood flow was assumed coupled with the classical bioheat transfer equation which was solved using the finite element method. Isotropic homogeneous heat diffusivity was assigned to each tissue layer. The results of simulations were tested for sensitivity analysis and further optimized to obtain the 'best' signal from the simulations using the Taguchi method. Four important parameters were identified and analysis of variance was performed using the 2(n) design (n=number of parameters, in this case, 4). The implications of these parameters were hypothesized based on physiological observations. Our results show that for an optimum signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, the noise factors (thermal conductivity of skin, A and tunica albuginea, B) must be set high and low, respectively. Hence, at this setting, the signal will be captured based on the perfusion rate of the boundary layer of the sinusoidal space and the blood pressure (perfusion of sinusoidal space, C and blood pressure, D) will be optimal as their S/N ratios (C (low) and D (low)) are larger than the former.

  6. Metropolitan-scale Transport and Dispersion from the New York World Trade Center Following September 11, 2001. Part II: An Application of the CALPUFF Plume Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, Robert C.; Huber, Alan H.; Raman, Sethu

    2005-10-01

    Following the collapse of the New York World Trade Center (WTC) towers on September 11, 2001, Local, State, and Federal agencies initiated numerous air monitoring activities to better understand the ongoing impacts of emissions from the disaster. The collapse of the World Trade Center towers and associated fires that lasted for several weeks resulted at times in a noticeable plume of material that was dispersed around the Metropolitan New York City (NYC) area. In general, the plume was only noticeable for a short period of time following September 11, and only apparent close to the World Trade Center site. A study of the estimated pathway which the plume of WTC material would likely follow was completed to support the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s 2002 initial exposure assessments. In this study, the WTC emissions were simulated using the CALMET-CALPUFF model in order to examine the general spatial and temporal dispersion patterns over NYC. This paper presents the results of the CALPUFF plume model in terms of plume dilution and location, since the exact source strength remains unknown. Independent observations of PM2.5 are used to support the general dispersion features calculated by the model. Results indicate that the simulated plume matched well with an abnormal increase (600 1000% of normal) in PM2.5 two nights after the WTC collapse as the plume rotated north to southeast, towards parts of NYC. Very little if any evidence of the plume signature was noted during a similar flow scenario a week after September 11. This leads to the conclusion that other than areas within a few kilometers from the WTC site, the PM2.5 plume was not observable over NYC’s background concentration after the first few days.

  7. Formation of high-grade ignimbrites Part II. A pyroclastic suspension current model with implications also for low-grade ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundt, Armin

    Analogue experiments in part I led to the conclusion that pyroclastic flows depositing very high-grade ignimbrite move as dilute suspension currents. In the thermo-fluid-dynamical model developed, the degree of cooling of expanded turbulent pyroclastic flows dynamically evolves in response to entrainment of air and mass loss to sedimentation. Initial conditions of the currents are derived from column-collapse modeling for magmas with an initial H2O content of 1-3wt.% erupting through circular vents and caldera ring-fissures. The flows spread either longitudinally or radially from source up to a runout distance that increases with higher mass flux but decreases with higher gas content, temperature, bottom slope and coarser initial grain size. Progressive dilution by entrainment and sedimentation causes pyroclastic currents to transform into buoyant ash plumes at the runout distance. The ash plumes reach stratospheric heights and distribute 30-80% of the erupted material as widespread co-ignimbrite ash. Pyroclastic suspension currents with initial mass fluxes of 107-1012kg/s can spread for tens of kilometers with only limited cooling, although they move as supercritical, strongly entraining currents for the eruption conditions considered here. With increasing eruption mass flux, cooling during passage through the fountain diminishes while cooling during flow transport increases. The net effect is that eruption temperature exerts the prime control on emplacement temperature. Pyroclastic suspension currents can form welded ignimbrite across their entire extent if eruption temperature is To>1.3.Tmw, the minimum welding temperature. High eruption rates, a large fraction of fine ash, and a ring-fissure vent favor the formation of extensive high-grade ignimbrite. For very hot eruptions producing sticky, partially molten pyroclasts, analysis of particle aggregation systematics shows that factors favoring longer runout also favor more efficient aggregation, which reduces

  8. Drivers of soil organic matter vulnerability to climate change, Part II: RothC modelling of carbon dynamics including radiocarbon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Abiven, Samuel; González Domínguez, Beatriz R.; Hagedorn, Frank; Reisser, Moritz; Walthert, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Stephan; Niklaus, Pascal A.

    2016-04-01

    It is still largely unknown what drives the vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to climate change, i.e. the likelihood of a soil to loose its SOC along with the change in environmental conditions. Our objective is to assess the SOC vulnerability of Swiss forest soils and identify its potential drivers: climate (temperature, soil moisture), soil (clay content, pH) and landscape (slope, aspect) properties. Fifty-four sites were selected for balanced spatial and driver magnitudes distribution. We measured the SOC characteristics (content and radiocarbon) and studied the C decomposition by laboratory soil incubations (details in Part I, abstract by B. González Domínguez). In order to assess the current SOC pool distribution and its radiocarbon signatures, we extended the Rothamsted Carbon (RothC) model with radiocarbon (14C) isotope modelling (RothCiso). The RothC model distinguishes four active SOC pools, decomposable and resistant plant material, microbial biomass and humified organic matter, and an inert SOC pool (Jenkinson 1990). The active pools are decomposed and mineralized to CO2 by first order kinetics. The RothCiso assigns all pools a 14C signature, based on the atmospheric 14C concentrations of the past century (plant C inputs) and their turnover. Currently we constrain the model with 14C signatures measured on the 54 fresh and their corresponding archived bulk soil samples, taken 12-24 years before. We were able to reproduce the measured radiocarbon concentrations of the SOC with the RothCiso and first results indicate, that the assumption of an inert SOC pool, that is radiocarbon dead, is not appropriate. In a second step we will compare the SOC mean residence time assessed by the two methodological approaches - incubation (C efflux based) and modelling (C stock based) - and relate it to the environmental drivers mentioned above. With the combination of the two methodological approaches and 14C analysis we hope to gain more insights into

  9. The Nature of Reinforcement: Part I. (Volume I), Part II. (Volume II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Robert, Ed.

    Part One of this report describes the first half of a conference, designed to examine the nature of reinforcement, which was held at the University of Pittsburgh in June 1969. The topics discussed include: "Reward in Human Learning: Theoretical Issues and Strategic Choice Points"; "Are Reinforcement Concepts Able to Provide Reinforcement for…

  10. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  15. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  16. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported.

  17. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  18. PREDICTIONS IN AN INVADED WORLD - PART II: USING NICHE MODELS TO PREDICT DISTRIBUTIONS OF MARINE/ESTUARINE SPECIES AT THE ESTUARY SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the potential geographical distributions of nonindigenous species (NIS), we are evaluating the ability of niche models to predict the presence of existing native and NIS species within individual estuaries based on landscape characteristics. One model being ...

  19. Evaluation of operational online-coupled regional air quality models over Europe and North America in the context of AQMEII phase 2. Part II: Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) brought together seventeen modeling groups from Europe and North America, running eight operational online-coupled air quality models over Europe and North America on common emissions and bound...

  20. Nitrogen and carbon cycling in the North Sea and exchange with the North Atlantic—A model study, Part II: Carbon budget and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Wilfried; Pätsch, Johannes; Thomas, Helmuth; Borges, Alberto V.; Schiettecatte, Laure-Sophie; Bozec, Yann; Prowe, A. E. Friederike

    2010-09-01

    The 3-d coupled physical-biogeochemical model ECOHAM (version 3) was applied to the Northwest-European Shelf (47°41'-63°53'N, 15°5'W-13°55'E) for the years 1993-1996. Carbon fluxes were calculated for the years 1995 and 1996 for the inner shelf region, the North Sea (511,725 km 2). This period was chosen because it corresponds to a shift from a very high winter-time North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) in 1994/1995, to an extremely low one in 1995/1996, with consequences for the North Sea physics and biogeochemistry. During the first half of 1996, the observed mean SST was about 1 °C lower than in 1995; in the southern part of the North Sea the difference was even larger (up to 3 °C). Due to a different wind regime, the normally prevailing anti-clockwise circulation, as found in winter 1995, was replaced by more complicated circulation patterns in winter 1996. Decreased precipitation over the drainage area of the continental rivers led to a reduction in the total (inorganic and organic) riverine carbon load to the North Sea from 476 Gmol C yr -1 in 1995 to 340 Gmol C yr -1 in 1996. In addition, the North Sea took up 503 Gmol C yr -1 of CO 2 from the atmosphere. According to our calculations, the North Sea was a sink for atmospheric CO 2, at a rate of 0.98 mol C m -2 yr -1, for both years. The North Sea is divided into two sub-systems: the shallow southern North Sea (SNS; 190,765 km 2) and the deeper northern North Sea (NNS; 320,960 km 2). According to our findings the SNS is a net-autotrophic system (net ecosystem production NEP>0) but released CO 2 to the atmosphere: 159 Gmol C yr -1 in 1995 and 59 Gmol C yr -1 in 1996. There, the temperature-driven release of CO 2 outcompetes the biological CO 2 drawdown. In the NNS, where respiratory processes prevail (NEP<0), 662 and 562 Gmol C yr -1 were taken up from the atmosphere in 1995 and 1996, respectively. Stratification separates the productive, upper layer from the deeper layers of the water column where

  1. Basic Diagnosis and Prediction of Persistent Contrail Occurrence using High-resolution Numerical Weather Analyses/Forecasts and Logistic Regression. Part II: Evaluation of Sample Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duda, David P.; Minnis, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that probabilistic forecasting may be a useful method for predicting persistent contrail formation. A probabilistic forecast to accurately predict contrail formation over the contiguous United States (CONUS) is created by using meteorological data based on hourly meteorological analyses from the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) and from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) as well as GOES water vapor channel measurements, combined with surface and satellite observations of contrails. Two groups of logistic models were created. The first group of models (SURFACE models) is based on surface-based contrail observations supplemented with satellite observations of contrail occurrence. The second group of models (OUTBREAK models) is derived from a selected subgroup of satellite-based observations of widespread persistent contrails. The mean accuracies for both the SURFACE and OUTBREAK models typically exceeded 75 percent when based on the RUC or ARPS analysis data, but decreased when the logistic models were derived from ARPS forecast data.

  2. Estimation of the chemical-induced eye injury using a Weight-of-Evidence (WoE) battery of 21 artificial neural network (ANN) c-QSAR models (QSAR-21): part II: corrosion potential.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajeshwar P; Matthews, Edwin J

    2015-03-01

    This is part II of an in silico investigation of chemical-induced eye injury that was conducted at FDA's CFSAN. Serious eye damage caused by chemical (eye corrosion) is assessed using the rabbit Draize test, and this endpoint is an essential part of hazard identification and labeling of industrial and consumer products to ensure occupational and consumer safety. There is an urgent need to develop an alternative to the Draize test because EU's 7th amendment to the Cosmetic Directive (EC, 2003; 76/768/EEC) and recast Regulation now bans animal testing on all cosmetic product ingredients and EU's REACH Program limits animal testing for chemicals in commerce. Although in silico methods have been reported for eye irritation (reversible damage), QSARs specific for eye corrosion (irreversible damage) have not been published. This report describes the development of 21 ANN c-QSAR models (QSAR-21) for assessing eye corrosion potential of chemicals using a large and diverse CFSAN data set of 504 chemicals, ADMET Predictor's three sensitivity analyses and ANNE classification functionalities with 20% test set selection from seven different methods. QSAR-21 models were internally and externally validated and exhibited high predictive performance: average statistics for the training, verification, and external test sets of these models were 96/96/94% sensitivity and 91/91/90% specificity.

  3. Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum Powder: Part II. Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2009-12-01

    The optimal processing parameters that are required to atomize amorphous Al were established on the basis of numerical simulations in part I of this study. In this part II, the characterization of cooling rate experienced by gas-atomized, Al-based amorphous powders was studied via experiments. An experimental investigation was implemented to validate the numerical predictions reported in part I of this study. The cooling rate experienced by the powders, for example, was experimentally determined on the basis of dendrite arm spacing correlations, and the results were compared with the numerical predictions. The experimental studies were completed using commercial Al 2024 as a baseline material and Al90Gd7Ni2Fe1 metallic glass (MG). The results showed that the cooling rate of droplets increases with decreasing particle size, with an increasing proportion of helium in the atomization gas and with increasing melt superheat. The experimental results reported in this article suggest good agreement between experiments and numerical simulations.

  4. Calculation of broadband time histories of ground motion, Part II: Kinematic and dynamic modeling using theoretical Green's functions and comparison with the 1994 northridge earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Mai, P.M.; Liu, P.-C.; Fisk, M. R.

    2005-01-01

    In the evolution of methods for calculating synthetic time histories of ground motion for postulated earthquakes, kinematic source models have dominated to date because of their ease of application. Dynamic models, however, which incorporate a physical relationship between important faulting parameters of stress drop, slip, rupture velocity, and rise time, are becoming more accessible. This article compares a class of kinematic models based on the summation of a fractal distribution of subevent sizes with a dynamic model based on the slip-weakening friction law. Kinematic modeling is done for the frequency band 0.2 to 10.0. Hz, dynamic models are calculated from 0.2 to 2.0. Hz. The strong motion data set for the 1994 Northridge earthquake is used to evaluate and compare the synthetic time histories. Source models are propagated to the far field by convolution with 1D and 3D theoretical Green’s functions. In addition, the kinematic model is used to evaluate the importance of propagation path effects: velocity structure, scattering, and nonlinearity. At present, the kinematic model gives a better broadband fit to the Northridge ground motion than the simple slip-weakening dynamic model. In general, the dynamic model overpredicts rise times and produces insufficient shorter-period energy. Within the context of the slip-weakening model, the Northridge ground motion requires a short slip-weakening distance, on the order of 0.15 m or less. A more complex dynamic model including rate weakening or one that allows shorter rise times near the hypocenter may fit the data better.

  5. Parameterization of sheared entrainment in a well-developed CBL. Part II: A simple model for predicting the growth rate of the CBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Jianning; Shen, Lidu

    2016-10-01

    Following the parameterization of sheared entrainment obtained in the companion paper, Liu et al. (2016), the present study aims to further investigate the characteristics of entrainment, and develop a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. The relative stratification, defined as the ratio of the stratification in the free atmosphere to that in the entrainment zone, is found to be a function of entrainment flux ratio ( A e). This leads to a simple expression of the entrainment rate, in which A e needs to be parameterized. According to the results in Liu et al. (2016), A e can be simply expressed as the ratio of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL to that in the shear-free CBL. The parameterization of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL is obtained by analytically solving the bulk model with several assumptions and approximations. Results indicate that the entrainment process is influenced by the dynamic effect, the interaction between mean shear and environmental stratification, and one other term that includes the Coriolis effect. These three parameterizations constitute a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. This model is validated by outputs of LESs, and the results show that it performs satisfactorily. Compared with bulk models, this model does not need to solve a set of equations for the CBL. It is more convenient to apply in numerical models.

  6. Polycystic ovary syndrome: a review for dermatologists: Part II. Treatment.

    PubMed

    Buzney, Elizabeth; Sheu, Johanna; Buzney, Catherine; Reynolds, Rachel V

    2014-11-01

    Dermatologists are in a key position to treat the manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The management of PCOS should be tailored to each woman's specific goals, reproductive interests, and particular constellation of symptoms. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended. In part II of this continuing medical education article, we present the available safety and efficacy data regarding treatments for women with acne, hirsutism, and androgenetic alopecia. Therapies discussed include lifestyle modification, topical therapies, combined oral contraceptives, antiandrogen agents, and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Treatment recommendations are made based on the current available evidence.

  7. A novel approach for the characterisation of transport and optical properties of aerosol particles near sources - Part II: Microphysics-chemistry-transport model development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdebenito B, Álvaro M.; Pal, Sandip; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Lammel, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    A new high-resolution microphysics-chemistry-transport model (LES-AOP) was developed and applied for the investigation of aerosol transformation and transport in the vicinity of a livestock facility in northern Germany (PLUS1 field campaign). The model is an extension of a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. The PLUS1 field campaign included the first deployment of the new eye-safe scanning aerosol lidar system of the University of Hohenheim. In a combined approach, model and lidar results were used to characterise a faint aerosol source. The farm plume structure was investigated and the absolute value of its particle backscatter coefficient was determined. Aerosol optical properties were predicted on spatial and temporal resolutions below 100 m and 1 min, upon initialisation by measured meteorological and size-resolved particulate matter mass concentration and composition data. Faint aerosol plumes corresponding to a particle backscatter coefficient down to 10 -6 sr -1 m -1 were measured and realistically simulated. Budget-related quantities such as the emission flux and change of the particulate matter mass, were estimated from model results and ground measurements.

  8. Analysis of the quench propagation along Nb3Sn Rutherford cables with the THELMA code. Part II: Model predictions and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfreda, G.; Bellina, F.; Bajas, H.; Perez, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    To improve the technology of the new generation of accelerator magnets, prototypes are being manufactured and tested in several laboratories. In parallel, many numerical analyses are being carried out to predict the magnets behaviour and interpret the experimental results. This paper focuses on the quench propagation velocity, which is a crucial parameter as regards the energy dissipation along the magnet conductor. The THELMA code, originally developed for cable-in-conduit conductors for fusion magnets, has been used to study such quench propagation. To this purpose, new code modules have been added to describe the Rutherford cable geometry, the material non-linear thermal properties and to describe the thermal conduction problem in transient regime. THELMA can describe the Rutherford cable at the strand level, modelling both the electrical and thermal contact resistances between strands and enabling the analysis of the effects of local hot spots and quench heaters. This paper describes the model application to a sample of Short Model Coil tested at CERN: a comparison is made between the experimental results and the model prediction, showing a good agreement. A comparison is also made with the prediction of the most common analytical models, which give large inaccuracies when dealing with low n-index cables like Nb3Sn cables.

  9. Inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere during the MaCWAVE winter campaign - Part II: Radar investigations and modelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Zülicke, Ch.; Hoffmann, P.; Peters, D.; Dalin, P.; Singer, W.

    2006-11-01

    We present an experimental and modelling study of a strong gravity wave event in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere near the Scandinavian mountain ridge. Continuous VHF radar measurements during the MaCWAVE rocket and ground-based measurement campaign were performed at the Norwegian Andoya Rocket Range (ARR) near Andenes (69.3° N, 16° E) in January 2003. Detailed gravity wave investigations based on PSU/NCAR Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model (MM5) data have been used for comparison with experimentally obtained results. The model data show the presence of a mountain wave and of an inertia gravity wave generated by a jet streak near the tropopause region. Temporal and spatial dependencies of jet induced inertia gravity waves with dominant observed periods of about 13 h and vertical wavelengths of ~4.5-5 km are investigated with wavelet transform applied on radar measurements and model data. The jet induced wave packet is observed to move upstream and downward in the upper troposphere. The model data agree with the experimentally obtained results fairly well. Possible reasons for the observed differences, e.g. in the time of maximum of the wave activity, are discussed. Finally, the vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum are estimated with different methods and provide similar amplitudes. We found indications that the derived positive vertical flux of the horizontal momentum corresponds to the obtained parameters of the jet-induced inertia gravity wave, but only at the periods and heights of the strongest wave activity.

  10. A study of hand vibration on chipping and grinding operators, part II: Four-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter model of the vibration response of the human hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D. D.; Falkenberg, R. J.

    1984-08-01

    The results of the development of a four-degree-of-freedom, lumped parameter model of the vibration response characteristics of the human hand are presented. For this study dynamic compliance measurements were made on 75 foundry workers. Curve fitting techniques were then employed to identify the values of the model parameters that yielded empirically generated dynamic compliance curves that correlated well with the measured dynamic compliance values. The agreement was good between 20 Hz and 1000 Hz in the X- and Y-directions. The agreement was good between 20 Hz and 1000 Hz in the Z-direction.

  11. Anion leaching from refinery oily sludge and ash from incineration of oily sludge stabilized/solidified with cement. Part II. Modeling.

    PubMed

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2008-08-15

    This paper presents the modeling of anion leaching (SO4(2-) and CrO4(2-)) from refinery oily sludge and ash produced by incineration of oily sludge, stabilized/solidified (s/s) with two types of cement, 142.5 and 1142.5. Anion leaching was examined using a sequential toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. To elucidate the mechanisms of sulfate and chromate leaching, we employed Visual MINTEQ, incorporating a multiple-problem setup. Specifically, 10-14 different problems, depending on the pH range of the leachates, were connected together in the same run. Each problem corresponded to one pH value of the leachate and the model run covered the pH range of the five sequential TCLP extractions. This modeling approach was tested using chemical equilibrium with or without sorption onto ferrihydrite. Good agreement between experimental and modeling results was obtained for sulfate leaching from solidified oily sludge and ash, considering surface complexation onto ferrihydrite on top of chemical equilibrium controlled by gypsum at pH <11 and ettringite at pH >11. Chromate leaching was described by chemical equilibrium, controlled by CaCrO4(s) (at pH <11) and Cr(VI)ettringite (at pH >11).

  12. Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ: Part II - Parameterization Based on Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  13. A MULTIPLE TESTING OF THE ABC METHOD AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SECOND-GENERATION MODEL. PART II, TEST RESULTS AND AN ANALYSIS OF RECALL RATIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALTMANN, BERTHOLD

    AFTER A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE TEST PROGRAM (DESCRIBED MORE FULLY IN LI 000 318), THE STATISTICAL RESULTS TABULATED AS OVERALL "ABC (APPROACH BY CONCEPT)-RELEVANCE RATIOS" AND "ABC-RECALL FIGURES" ARE PRESENTED AND REVIEWED. AN ABSTRACT MODEL DEVELOPED IN ACCORDANCE WITH MAX WEBER'S "IDEALTYPUS" ("DIE OBJEKTIVITAET…

  14. Variations in the elemental ratio of organic matter in the central Baltic Sea: Part II - Sensitivities of annual mass flux estimates to model parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreus, Markus; Schartau, Markus

    2015-06-01

    This study describes a sensitivity analysis that allows the parameters of a one-dimensional ecosystem model to be ranked according to their specificity in determining biochemical key fluxes. Key fluxes of interest are annual (a) total production (TP), (b) remineralization above the halocline (RM), and (c) export at 50 m (EX) at the Baltic Sea monitoring site BY15 located in the Gotland Deep basin. The model resolves mass flux of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorous (P), while considering nitrogen fixation explicitly. Our first null hypothesis is that the variation of the value of every single model parameter affects each annual C, N, and P budget simultaneously. Our second null hypothesis states that the variation of every parameter value induces changes at least in either of the annual C, N or P budgets. Our analyses falsify both null hypotheses and reveal that 8 out of 36 parameters must be regarded redundant, as their variation neither alter annual key fluxes nor produce considerable time-shifts in model trajectories at the respective site. Seven parameters were found to induce substantial changes in annual C, N, and P flux estimates simultaneously. The assimilation efficiency of zooplankton turned out to be of vital importance. This parameter discriminates between the assimilation and destruction of algal prey during grazing. The fraction of unassimilated dead algal cells is critical for the amount of organic matter exported out of the euphotic zone. The maximum cellular N:C quota of diazotrophs and the degradation/hydrolysis rate of detrital carbon are two parameters that will likely remain unconstrained by time series data, but both affect the annual C budget considerably. Overall, our detailed specification of model sensitivities to parameter variations will facilitate the formulation of a well-posed inverse problem for the estimation of C, N and P fluxes from stock observations at the Gotland Deep.

  15. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis – Part II: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa, Carlos; Baumgardner, Darrel; Grutter, M.; Allan, James D.; Fast, Jerome D.; Rappengluck, B.

    2012-10-31

    This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009) in which measurements of trace gases and particles at a remote, high-altitude mountain site 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), acyl peroxy nitrate (APN) and particle size distributions (PSDs) of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM) were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model prediction of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional boundary layer reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentrations after that time. The differences are caused by an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model with too much dilution. There also appears to be more O3 produced by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources, than predicted by the model. The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log normally distributed with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200 ±20 nm, with little observed or predicted change with respect to the origin of the air mass or the time when the RBL is above the Altzomoni research. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of the average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation after six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexico’s Megapolis.

  16. The "Pseudocommando" mass murderer: part II, the language of revenge.

    PubMed

    Knoll, James L

    2010-01-01

    In Part I of this article, research on pseudocommandos was reviewed, and the important role that revenge fantasies play in motivating such persons to commit mass murder-suicide was discussed. Before carrying out their mass shootings, pseudocommandos may communicate some final message to the public or news media. These communications are rich sources of data about their motives and psychopathology. In Part II of this article, forensic psycholinguistic analysis is applied to clarify the primary motivations, detect the presence of mental illness, and discern important individual differences in the final communications of two recent pseudocommandos: Seung-Hui Cho (Virginia Tech) and Jiverly Wong (Binghamton, NY). Although both men committed offenses that qualify them as pseudocommandos, their final communications reveal striking differences in their psychopathology.

  17. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Deepjyoti; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  18. A New Two-Moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 3 (CAM3). Part II: Single-Column and Global Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2008-08-11

    The global performance of a new 2-moment cloud microphysics scheme for a General Circulation Model (GCM) is presented and evaluated relative to observations. The scheme produces reasonable representations of cloud particle size and number concentration when compared to observations, and represents expected and observed spatial variations in cloud microphysical quantities. The scheme has smaller particles and higher number concentrations over land than the standard bulk microphysics in the GCM, and is able to balance the radiation budget of the planet with 60% the liquid water of the standard scheme, in better agreement with observations. The new scheme treats both the mixing ratio and number concentration of rain and snow, and is therefore able to differentiate the two key regimes, consisting of drizzle in shallow warm clouds and larger rain drops in deeper cloud systems. The modeled rain and snow size distributions are consistent with observations.

  19. The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational data assimilation systems . Part II - Performance and application to the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Andrew M.; Arango, Hernan G.; Broquet, Gregoire; Edwards, Chris; Veneziani, Milena; Powell, Brian; Foley, Dave; Doyle, James D.; Costa, Dan; Robinson, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation systems have been systematically applied to the mesoscale circulation environment of the California Current to demonstrate the performance and practical utility of the various components of ROMS 4D-Var. In particular, we present a comparison of three approaches to 4D-Var, namely: the primal formulation of the incremental strong constraint approach; the dual formulation “physical-space statistical analysis system”; and the dual formulation indirect representer approach. In agreement with theoretical considerations all three approaches converge to the same ocean circulation estimate when using the same observations and prior information. However, the rate of convergence of the dual formulation was found to be inferior to that of the primal formulation. Other aspects of the 4D-Var performance that relate to the use of multiple outer-loops, preconditioning, and the weak constraint are also explored. A systematic evaluation of the impact of the various components of the 4D-Var control vector (i.e. the initial conditions, surface forcing and open boundary conditions) is also presented. It is shown that correcting for uncertainties in the model initial conditions exerts the largest influence on the ability of the model to fit the available observations. Various important diagnostics of 4D-Var are also examined, including estimates of the posterior error, the information content of the observation array, and innovation-based consistency checks on the prior error assumptions. Using these diagnostic tools, we find that more than 90% of the observations assimilated into the model provide redundant information. This is a symptom of the large percentage of satellite data that are used and to some extent the nature of the data processing employed. This is the second in a series of three papers describing the ROMS 4D-Var systems.

  20. Effects of monovalent anions of the hofmeister series on DPPC lipid bilayers Part II: modeling the perpendicular and lateral equation-of-state.

    PubMed

    Leontidis, E; Aroti, A; Belloni, L; Dubois, M; Zemb, T

    2007-09-01

    The effects of Hofmeister anions on the perpendicular and lateral equation-of-state (EOS) of the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine lamellar phase discussed in the companion article are here examined using appropriate free energy models for the intra- and interbilayer interactions. Minimizing the free energy with respect to the two basic geometrical parameters of the lamellar phase, which are the interbilayer water thickness, d(w), and the lipid headgroup area, a(L), provides the perpendicular (osmotic pressure balance) and lateral EOS. Standard models were used for the hydration, undulation, and Van der Waals attractive force between the bilayers in the presence of electrolytes whereas two alternative treatments of electrostatic interactions were used to obtain "binding" or "partitioning" constants of anions to the lipid bilayers both in the absence and in the presence of sodium binding. The computed binding constants depend on anion type and follow the Hofmeister series, but were found to increase with electrolyte concentration, implying that the local binding approximation cannot fit bilayer repulsion data. The partitioning model was also found inadequate at high electrolyte concentrations. The fitting attempts revealed two additional features worthy of future investigation. First, at maximum swelling in the presence of electrolytes the osmotic pressure of the bilayer system cannot be set equal to zero. Second, at high salt concentrations an additional repulsion appears to come into effect in the presence of strongly adsorbing anions such as I(-) or SCN(-). Both these phenomena may reflect an inconsistent treatment of the ion-surface interactions, which have an impact on the osmotic pressure. Alternatively, they may arise from bulk solution nonidealities that cannot be handled by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann formalism. The inability of current models to explain the "lateral" EOS by fitting the area per lipid headgroup as a function of salt type and concentration

  1. Effects of Monovalent Anions of the Hofmeister Series on DPPC Lipid Bilayers Part II: Modeling the Perpendicular and Lateral Equation-of-State

    PubMed Central

    Leontidis, E.; Aroti, A.; Belloni, L.; Dubois, M.; Zemb, T.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of Hofmeister anions on the perpendicular and lateral equation-of-state (EOS) of the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine lamellar phase discussed in the companion article are here examined using appropriate free energy models for the intra- and interbilayer interactions. Minimizing the free energy with respect to the two basic geometrical parameters of the lamellar phase, which are the interbilayer water thickness, dw, and the lipid headgroup area, aL, provides the perpendicular (osmotic pressure balance) and lateral EOS. Standard models were used for the hydration, undulation, and Van der Waals attractive force between the bilayers in the presence of electrolytes whereas two alternative treatments of electrostatic interactions were used to obtain “binding” or “partitioning” constants of anions to the lipid bilayers both in the absence and in the presence of sodium binding. The computed binding constants depend on anion type and follow the Hofmeister series, but were found to increase with electrolyte concentration, implying that the local binding approximation cannot fit bilayer repulsion data. The partitioning model was also found inadequate at high electrolyte concentrations. The fitting attempts revealed two additional features worthy of future investigation. First, at maximum swelling in the presence of electrolytes the osmotic pressure of the bilayer system cannot be set equal to zero. Second, at high salt concentrations an additional repulsion appears to come into effect in the presence of strongly adsorbing anions such as I− or SCN−. Both these phenomena may reflect an inconsistent treatment of the ion-surface interactions, which have an impact on the osmotic pressure. Alternatively, they may arise from bulk solution nonidealities that cannot be handled by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann formalism. The inability of current models to explain the “lateral” EOS by fitting the area per lipid headgroup as a function of salt type and

  2. Application of permeability-limited physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models: part II - prediction of P-glycoprotein mediated drug-drug interactions with digoxin.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, Sibylle; Yeo, Karen Rowland; Barter, Zoe; Jamei, Masoud; Turner, David B; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2013-09-01

    Digoxin is the recommended substrate for assessment of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in vivo. The overall aim of our study was to investigate the inhibitory potential of both verapamil and norverapamil on the P-gp-mediated efflux of digoxin in both gut and liver. Therefore, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for verapamil and its primary metabolite was developed and validated through the recovery of observed clinical plasma concentration data for both moieties and the reported interaction with midazolam, albeit a cytochrome P450 3A4-mediated DDI. The validated inhibitor model was then used in conjunction with the model developed previously for digoxin. The range of values obtained for the 10 trials indicated that increases in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) profiles and maximum plasma concentration observed (Cmax ) values of digoxin following administration of verapamil were more comparable with in vivo observations, when P-gp inhibition by the metabolite, norverapamil, was considered as well. The predicted decrease in AUC and Cmax values of digoxin following administration of rifampicin because of P-gp induction was 1.57- (range: 1.42-1.77) and 1.62-fold (range: 1.53-1.70), which were reasonably consistent with observed values of 1.4- and 2.2-fold, respectively. This study demonstrates the application of permeability-limited models of absorption and distribution within a PBPK framework together with relevant in vitro data on transporters to assess the clinical impact of modulated P-gp-mediated efflux by drugs in development.

  3. Theoretical investigations into the nucleation of silica growth in basic solution part II--derivation and benchmarking of a first principles kinetic model of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Grant J

    2013-10-28

    A kinetic model of silicate oligomerization in water, up to and including tetramer formation, has been compiled exclusively from rate constants derived from transition state theory based on either quantum chemical data (derived under a hybrid solvation framework) for all bond breaking-forming reactions, or using empirically-based approximated pKa's and diffusion coefficients for rate constants of pH-based and bimolecular steps. The rate constants, based on an exhaustive search of all relevant elementary steps, form the basis of our kinetic model; numerical solution of the resulting rate equations allows the simulation of the reaction system, given a set of initial conditions and with almost no restriction on concentrations, pH, or reaction time, in a matter of only minutes. The model, which we believe contains all possible isomers of both neutral and singly anionic clusters, has been extensively benchmarked and reproduces a number of important experimental observations in the range pH ≈ 4-10. In particular, it provides a good description of the dominant products; product yields and reaction times (also as a function of pH) are in agreement with experiment; the linear relationship between the log of the rate of silica dissolution and pH is well reproduced; the origin of silica scaling naturally arises; and we can also simulate the observed fourth order dependence of the rate of monomer consumption on H4SiO4 concentration. This should be a general approach to exploring solution phase chemistry, and could be a useful complement to more conventional molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo modelling approaches in understanding complex reaction networks in solution.

  4. Quantification on source/receptor relationship of primary pollutants and secondary aerosols from ground sources—Part II. Model description and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Pan, Rong-Chang; Tu, Chia-Ying; Liu, Jen-Hui; Huang, Pei-Ling; Bai, Hsunling; Cheng, Man-Ting

    A Circuit Trajectory transfer-coefficient model (CTx) is developed in this study based on the parameterization presented in a companion paper (Tsuang et al., Atmos. Environ., in this issue). CTx was tested by applying it to Metropolitan Taipei for the entire year 1998. The model was calibrated in January and verified throughout the year. The results indicate that the correlation coefficients ( r) for daily concentrations of CO, NO x, SO 2, PM 2.5 and PM 10 were 0.75, 0.69, 0.39, 0.55 and 0.55, respectively, with biases of the means ranging from 0% to 20% during the verification period. According to contour plots of contributed concentrations to the city, "teleconnections" between source emissions and their contributions to the city can be identified. In addition, the model captures most of the dust episodes except during the periods of Asian dust storms. The sensitivity analysis shows that the calculated PM 10 concentration is most sensitive to its dry deposition velocity as well as its emission rate. A more thorough study on the deposition velocity of PM 2.5 is suggested.

  5. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties. Part II: Scale-awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Sha; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Li, Zhijin; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin; Zhang, Minghua; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi

    2015-01-20

    Fine-resolution three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multi-scale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scales larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.

  6. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties. Part II: Scale-awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Sha; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Li, Zhijin; ...

    2015-01-20

    Fine-resolution three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multi-scale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scalesmore » larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.« less

  7. A mathematical model of Bloch NMR equations for quantitative analysis of blood flow in blood vessels of changing cross-section-PART II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awojoyogbe, O. B.

    2003-05-01

    Unlike most medical imaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is based on effects that cross multiple biological levels: contrast depends on interactions between the local chemistry, water mobility, microscopic magnetic environment at the subcellular, cellular or vascular level, cellular integrity, etc. These interactions potentially allow for imaging functional changes in the same reference frame as the anatomic information. However, to tap this potential, we need methodologies that robustly incorporate the best models of the underlying physics interactions in order to extract the best possible interaction obtainable on flow velocity and rates. Due to the fundamental role the Bloch NMR equations play in the analysis of the properties of magnetic resonance imaging, this presentation will focus on mathematical modeling of the Bloch NMR flow equations into the harmonic differential equation. This simplification allows us to explain qualitatively, the effects of coriolis force on the motion of flowing fluid. The Transverse magnetization My, is introduced as a stream function. Our choice of conditions has led to a linear equation for My. We derived the stream function as a form of solution which contains the linearity property demanded by conditions at x=0. The resulting flow reveals some interesting wave-like properties which were examined directly. The existence of the waves is associated with the non-uniformity of the Coriolis parameter, and it is not difficult to see the general mechanism. The quantum mechanical models of Bloch NMR equations describe dynamical states of particles in flowing fluid. We introduce the basic background for understanding some of the applications of quantum mechanics to NMR and explain their significance and potentials. It also describes the behavior of the rF B1 field when the fluid particles flow under physiological and some modeled pathological conditions. The wave function is explored to determine the minimum energy, a

  8. PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  9. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being

  10. Impact of Cloud Model Microphysics on Passive Microwave Retrievals of Cloud Properties. Part II: Uncertainty in Rain, Hydrometeor Structure, and Latent Heating Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Biggerstaff, Michael I.

    2006-07-01

    The impact of model microphysics on the retrieval of cloud properties based on passive microwave observations was examined using a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate a mesoscale convective system over ocean. Two microphysical schemes, based on similar bulk two-class liquid and three-class ice parameterizations, were used to simulate storms with differing amounts of supercooled cloud water typical of both the tropical oceanic environment, in which there is little supercooled cloud water, and midlatitude continental environments in which supercooled cloud water is more plentiful. For convective surface-level rain rates, the uncertainty varied between 20% and 60% depending on which combination of passive and active microwave observations was used in the retrieval. The uncertainty in surface rain rate did not depend on the microphysical scheme or the parameter settings except for retrievals over stratiform regions based on 85-GHz brightness temperatures TB alone or 85-GHz TB and radar reflectivity combined. In contrast, systematic differences in the treatment of the production of cloud water, cloud ice, and snow between the parameterization schemes coupled with the low correlation between those properties and the passive microwave TB examined here led to significant differences in the uncertainty in retrievals of those cloud properties and latent heating. The variability in uncertainty of hydrometeor structure and latent heating associated with the different microphysical parameterizations exceeded the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations. This was true at the finescales of the cloud model as well as at scales consistent with satellite footprints in which the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations are reduced by area averaging.

  11. Ground-motion modeling of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, part II: Ground-motion estimates for the 1906 earthquake and scenario events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aagaard, B.T.; Brocher, T.M.; Dolenc, D.; Dreger, D.; Graves, R.W.; Harmsen, S.; Hartzell, S.; Larsen, S.; McCandless, K.; Nilsson, S.; Petersson, N.A.; Rodgers, A.; Sjogreen, B.; Zoback, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate the ground motions produce by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake making use of the recently developed Song et al. (2008) source model that combines the available geodetic and seismic observations and recently constructed 3D geologic and seismic velocity models. Our estimates of the ground motions for the 1906 earthquake are consistent across five ground-motion modeling groups employing different wave propagation codes and simulation domains. The simulations successfully reproduce the main features of the Boatwright and Bundock (2005) ShakeMap, but tend to over predict the intensity of shaking by 0.1-0.5 modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) units. Velocity waveforms at sites throughout the San Francisco Bay Area exhibit characteristics consistent with rupture directivity, local geologic conditions (e.g., sedimentary basins), and the large size of the event (e.g., durations of strong shaking lasting tens of seconds). We also compute ground motions for seven hypothetical scenarios rupturing the same extent of the northern San Andreas fault, considering three additional hypocenters and an additional, random distribution of slip. Rupture directivity exerts the strongest influence on the variations in shaking, although sedimentary basins do consistently contribute to the response in some locations, such as Santa Rosa, Livermore, and San Jose. These scenarios suggest that future large earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault may subject the current San Francisco Bay urban area to stronger shaking than a repeat of the 1906 earthquake. Ruptures propagating southward towards San Francisco appear to expose more of the urban area to a given intensity level than do ruptures propagating northward.

  12. Trophic modeling of the Northern Humboldt Current Ecosystem, Part II: Elucidating ecosystem dynamics from 1995 to 2004 with a focus on the impact of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marc H.; Tam, Jorge; Blaskovic, Verónica; Espinoza, Pepe; Michael Ballón, R.; Wosnitza-Mendo, Claudia; Argüelles, Juan; Díaz, Erich; Purca, Sara; Ochoa, Noemi; Ayón, Patricia; Goya, Elisa; Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Quipuzcoa, Luis; Wolff, Matthias

    2008-10-01

    The Northern Humboldt Current Ecosystem is one of the most productive in the world in terms of fish production. Its location near to the equator permits strong upwelling under relatively low winds, thus creating optimal conditions for the development of plankton communities. These communities ultimately support abundant populations of grazing fish such as the Peruvian anchoveta, Engraulis ringens. The ecosystem is also subject to strong inter-annual environmental variability associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which has major effects on nutrient structure, primary production, and higher trophic levels. Here our objective is to model the contributions of several external drivers (i.e. reconstructed phytoplankton changes, fish immigration, and fishing rate) and internal control mechanisms (i.e. predator-prey) to ecosystem dynamics over an ENSO cycle. Steady-state models and time-series data from the Instituto del Mar del Perú (IMARPE) from 1995 to 2004 provide the base data for simulations conducted with the program Ecopath with Ecosim. In simulations all three external drivers contribute to ecosystem dynamics. Changes in phytoplankton quantity and composition (i.e. contribution of diatoms and dino- and silicoflagellates), as affected by upwelling intensity, were important in dynamics of the El Niño of 1997-98 and the subsequent 3 years. The expansion and immigration of mesopelagic fish populations during El Niño was important for dynamics in following years. Fishing rate changes were the most important of the three external drivers tested, helping to explain observed dynamics throughout the modeled period, and particularly during the post-El Niño period. Internal control settings show a mix of predator-prey control settings; however a “wasp-waist” control of the ecosystem by small pelagic fish is not supported.

  13. Gravity wave momentum fluxes in the MLT—Part II: Meteor radar investigations at high and midlatitudes in comparison with modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placke, Manja; Hoffmann, Peter; Becker, Erich; Jacobi, Christoph; Singer, Werner; Rapp, Markus

    2011-06-01

    For the analysis of gravity waves the method presented by Hocking (2005) is used, which enables us to derive wind variances and gravity wave momentum fluxes in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from all-sky interferometric meteor radar wind measurements considering waves and variances with periods less than 2 h. A sensitivity study for the applicability of this method has been performed for the first time using a mechanistic general circulation model with high spatial resolution and explicit description of gravity waves. Wind variances and momentum fluxes have been determined from the model directly and by Hocking’s method. Results of both methods are in good agreement except for vertical wind variances in case of weak vertical winds, which in the model are of the order of 1 m/s, whereas short period gravity waves estimated by meteor radar lead to larger vertical winds with a smaller ratio between horizontal and vertical wind fluctuations. A latitudinal comparison of mean annual variations of wind variances and momentum fluxes has been performed using meteor radar measurements at the high latitude site Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E) and the midlatitude site Juliusruh (54.6°N, 13.4°E). A semi-annual variation of the activity of short period gravity waves has been found having stronger magnitudes at high latitudes. The mean zonal winds show the typical summer wind reversal that shifts to higher altitudes from middle to high latitudes. Finally, the coupling between gravity waves and the mean background circulation is investigated based on long-term measurements at Andenes and the midlatitude site Collm (51.3°N, 13.0°E) during a period from 2004 to 2009.

  14. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  15. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II Appendix II to Part 1054 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1048 - Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle II Appendix II to Part 1048 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... 1048, App. II Appendix II to Part 1048—Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance II Appendix II to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC...

  6. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  7. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  8. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 2; Ballistic Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, D. M.; Pereira, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the ballistic impact testing that was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade-out events in fabric containment systems. The ballistic impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar(TradeName) 49 and Zylon(TradeName) AS (as spun) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation, and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases, the tests were designed so the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models to predict the response of fabrics under conditions that simulate those of a jet engine blade-release situation. In addition, some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different fabric materials.

  9. Improving ozone modeling in complex terrain at a fine grid resolution - Part II: Influence of schemes in MM5 on daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations and RRFs (Relative Reduction Factors) for SIPs in the non-attainment areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunhee; Fu, Joshua S.; Miller, Terry L.

    2010-06-01

    Part II presents a comprehensive evaluation of CMAQ for August of 2002 on twenty-one sensitivity simulations (detailed in Part I) in MM5 to investigate the model performance for O 3 SIPs (State Implementation Plans) in the complex terrain. CMAQ performance was quite consistent with the results of MM5, meaning that accurate meteorological fields predicted in MM5 as an input resulted in good model performance of CMAQ. In this study, PBL scheme plays a more important role than its land surface models (LSMs) for the model performance of CMAQ. Our results have shown that the outputs of CMAQ on eighteen sensitivity simulations using two different nudging coefficients for winds (2.5 and 4.5 × 10 -4 s -1, respectively) tend to under predict daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations at valley areas except the TKE PBL sensitivity simulations (ETA M-Y PBL scheme with Noah LSMs and 5-layer soil model and Gayno-Seaman PBL) using 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1 with positive MB (Mean Bias). At mountain areas, none of the sensitivity simulations has presented over predictions for 8-h O 3, due to relatively poor meteorological model performance. When comparing 12-km and 4-km grid resolutions for the PX simulation in CMAQ statistics analysis, the CMAQ results at 12-km grid resolution consistently show under predictions of 8-h O 3 at both of valley and mountain areas and particularly, it shows relatively poor model performance with a 15.1% of NMB (Normalized Mean Bias). Based on our sensitivity simulations, the TKE PBL sensitivity simulations using a maximum value (6 × 10 -4) among other sensitivity simulations yielded better model performance of CMAQ at all areas in the complex terrain. As a result, the sensitivity of RRFs to the PBL scheme may be considerably significant with about 1-3 ppb in difference in determining whether the attainment test is passed or failed. Furthermore, we found that the result of CMAQ model performance depending on meteorological variations is affected on estimating

  10. Discover common properties of human observers' visual search and mathematical observers' scanning PART II: emperical studies using human and model observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Samuelson, Frank; Sahiner, Berkman

    2014-03-01

    In a companion paper, we proposed the well-delineated-object conjecture to describe a rational observer's behavior in a search task. We discovered two intrinsic properties to describe the performance of rational search observers: rationality in classification and location uncertainty. We proposed to use the location-known-exactly (LKE) ROC curve and the effective number of well-delineated objects or effective set size (M*) to quantify these two properties. The purpose of this paper is to develop an experimental framework to test the conjecture that was put forward in the companion paper. In particular, for each observer, we designed experiments to measure LKE ROC curve and M*, which were then used to predict the same observer's performance in other search tasks. The predictions were then compared to the experimentally measured observer performance. Our results indicate that modeling the search performance using the LKE ROC curve and M* leads to successful predictions in most cases.

  11. A distributed real-time model of degradation in a solid oxide fuel cell, part II: Analysis of fuel cell performance and potential failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccaria, V.; Tucker, D.; Traverso, A.

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are characterized by very high efficiency, low emissions level, and large fuel flexibility. Unfortunately, their elevated costs and relatively short lifetimes reduce the economic feasibility of these technologies at the present time. Several mechanisms contribute to degrade fuel cell performance during time, and the study of these degradation modes and potential mitigation actions is critical to ensure the durability of the fuel cell and their long-term stability. In this work, localized degradation of a solid oxide fuel cell is modeled in real-time and its effects on various cell parameters are analyzed. Profile distributions of overpotential, temperature, heat generation, and temperature gradients in the stack are investigated during degradation. Several causes of failure could occur in the fuel cell if no proper control actions are applied. A local analysis of critical parameters conducted shows where the issues are and how they could be mitigated in order to extend the life of the cell.

  12. Mammalian Toxicity of Munitions Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses Part II. 2,4-Dinitrotoluene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    II: Effects of Multiple Doses Part !I: 2,4-T)initrotoiuene I Progres Report No. 3 oNovember 1978 by 3I Cheng-Chun Lee U Hirty V. Ellis, III Jo.,n J...Sciences Division November 1978 vii :. •I~~~~AMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUNDS ... ... PHASE IIz Effects of Multiple Doses m . ............... PART...161 xi MAMOMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITION COMPOUNDS PHASE II: Effects of Multiple Dones PART II: 2,4

  13. Unravelling the complex interaction between mantle and crustal magmas encoded in the lavas of San Vincenzo (Tuscany, Italy). Part II: Geochemical overview and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, Filippo; Renzulli, Alberto; Perugini, Diego; Cesare, Bernardo; Braga, Roberto; Del Moro, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    This work reports a geochemical overview and modelling of the lavas erupted ~ 4.4 Ma ago at San Vincenzo (Tuscan Magmatic Province, TMP). Although these lavas cover a relatively small area (~ 10 km2), they show very large geochemical variations caused by the interaction of mantle-derived and crustal-anatectic magmas. The lavas consist of peraluminous rhyolites (87Sr/86Sr(i) up to 0.726) hosting primarily variably sized magmatic enclaves with shoshonite/latite compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) down to 0.708). New whole-rock data for a large shoshonite enclave show high concentrations of LREE, LILE, and tetravalent HFSE, coupled with pentavalent HFSE depletions and enrichments in compatible elements such as Cr and Co. The chondrite-normalised REE pattern is strongly fractionated and characterised by a negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.79). Hybridisation and AFC models suggest that the shoshonite enclave is the result of 12% rhyolite contamination of a mantle-derived magma akin to the potassic trachybasalt/shoshonite lavas of Capraia Island (~ 4.6 Ma; TMP), following an 18.5% assimilation of Late Triassic metasediments (13% evaporite and 5.5% carbonate) and 56% fractionation of clinopyroxene (39%), plagioclase (10%), and biotite (7%). Each rhyolite sample is characterised by mineral-scale isotopic disequilibria (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.711-0.726), glass inclusions with large K2O/Na2O variations (1.1-3.4) and a poli-thermobarometric history of crustal melt production at eutectic conditions. A multi-parametric approach accounting for K2O/Na2O (1.3-2.2), 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.713-0.725), Sr (104-311 ppm) and Rb (294-403 ppm) whole-rock variations, allowed us to divide the anatectic (A) rhyolites into five groups (A1, A2.1, A2.2, A2.3, A3). Group A1 shows the highest 87Sr/86Sr(i) ratios and the lowest values of Sr, K2O/Na2O and Rb. It is related to A2.1 and A3 rhyolites by positive K2O/Na2O-Rb and K2O/Na2O-FeO correlations. These three rhyolite groups crop out in the south of San

  14. EURADOS intercomparison exercise on MC modelling for the in-vivo monitoring of AM-241 in skull phantoms (Part II and III).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Tomas; Broggio, David; Caldeira, Margarida; Capello, Kevin; Fantínová, Karin; Franck, Didier; Gómez-Ros, Jose Maria; Hunt, John; Kinase, Sakae; Leone, Debora; Lombardo, Pasquale Alessandro; Manohari, Murugan; Marzocchi, Olaf; Moraleda, Montserrat; Nogueira, Pedro; Ośko, Jakub; Arron, Shutt; Suhl, Soheigh; Takahashi, Masa; Teles, Pedro; Tremblay, Marilyn; Tymińska, Katarzyna; Lopez, Maria Antonia; Tanner, Rick

    2015-08-01

    An intercomparison on in-vivo monitoring for determination of Am-241 in three skull phantoms was launched by EURADOS in 2011. The project focused on measurement and estimation of the activity of Am-241 in the human skull. Three human skull phantoms of different complexity were used. A Monte Carlo (MC) intercomparison exercise with the voxel representations of the physical phantom was launched additionally in September of 2012. The main goals of the action were (1) to investigate the different methodologies for developing MC calibrations that might arise from a complex radiological assessment and (2) to compare individual approaches of the participating laboratories in order to determine international guidance for best practice. The MC exercise consisted of three tasks with increasing difficulty, in order to test the extent of skills needed by the participating laboratory. The first task was to simulate a given detector and a well-defined semi-skull phantom. The second and third tasks presented in this paper-introduced more complex simulations with individual geometry and real detector modelling. The paper provides an overview of the participant's results, analyses of the observed issues concerning tasks two and three, and a general evaluation of the whole project.

  15. Escitalopram affects cytoskeleton and synaptic plasticity pathways in a rat gene-environment interaction model of depression as revealed by proteomics. Part II: environmental challenge.

    PubMed

    Piubelli, Chiara; Vighini, Miriam; Mathé, Aleksander A; Domenici, Enrico; Carboni, Lucia

    2011-07-01

    Large-scale investigations aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanism of action of antidepressant treatment are achievable through the application of proteomic technologies. We performed a proteomic study on the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), a genetically selected rat model of depression, and the control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). To evaluate gene-environment interactions, FSL and FRL animals were separated from their mothers for 3 h from postnatal days 2 to 14 (maternal separation; MS), since early-life trauma is considered an important antecedent of depression. All groups received either escitalopram (Esc) admixed to food pellets (25 mg/kg.d) or vehicle for 1 month. Protein extracts from prefrontal/frontal cortex and hippocampus were separated by 2D electrophoresis. Proteins differentially modulated were identified by mass spectrometry. Bioinformatics analyses were performed to discover gene ontology terms associated with the modulated proteins. This paper was focused on the modifications induced by the environmental challenge of MS, both on the predisposed genetic background and on the resistant phenotype. The combination between Esc treatment and MS was investigated by comparing the MS, Esc-treated rats with rats subjected to each single procedure. In MS rats, antidepressant treatment influenced mainly proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism in FSL rats and in vesicle-mediated transport in FRL rats. When studying the interaction between Esc and MS vs. non-separated rats, proteins playing a role in cytoskeleton organization, neuronal development, vesicle-mediated transport and synaptic plasticity were identified. The results provide further support to the available reports that antidepressant treatment affects intracellular pathways and also suggest new potential targets for future therapeutic intervention.

  16. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040... Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Schedule F... Number: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040). Abstract: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)...

  17. Study of Chemical Surface Structure of Natural Sorbents Used for Removing of Pb2+ Ions from Model Aqueous Solutions (part Ii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożęcka, Agnieszka; Bożęcki, Piotr; Sanak-Rydlewska, Stanisława

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the results of the chemical structure research of organic sorbent surface such as walnut shells, plums stones and sunflower hulls with using such methods as infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and elemental analysis. Based on the IR spectra identification of functional groups present on the surface of studied materials has been done as well as determination of their effect on the sorption mechanism of Pb2+ ions from aqueous model solutions W artykule przedstawiono wyniki badań chemicznej struktury powierzchni sorbentów organicznych takich jak: łupiny orzecha włoskiego, pestki śliwek oraz łuski słonecznika z wykorzystaniem metody spektrometrii w podczerwieni (FTIR) oraz analizy elementarnej. W oparciu o uzyskane widma IR dokonano identyfikacji grup funkcyjnych obecnych na powierzchni tych materiałów i określono ich wpływ na mechanizm sorpcji jonów Pb2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych. Analiza elementarna wykazała, że spośród badanych sorbentów, największą zawartość węgla (49,91%) i wodoru (5,93%) mają pestki śliwek. Najwięcej azotu (1,59%) zawierają łuszczyny słonecznika (tabela 1). Zawartość siarki we wszystkich badanych materiałach jest znikoma, dlatego nie udało się jej oznaczyć tą metodą. Obecność pozostałych pierwiastków może świadczyć o istnieniu zarówno alifatycznych jak i aromatycznych połączeń organicznych. Potwierdzeniem tego są również zarejestrowane widma IR (rysunki 1-3). W oparciu o uzyskane wyniki można przypuszczać także, iż udział procesu wymiany jonowej w sorpcji ołowiu z roztworów wodnych jest znaczący. Świadczą o tym m.in. intensywności pasm na widmach IR dla próbek badanych materiałów po ich kontakcie z roztworami jonów Pb2+ (rysunki 4-6).

  18. Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part II: Impact on Cloudiness, the Earth's Radiation Budget, and the General Circulation of the Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    1996-03-01

    A prognostic equation for the mass of condensate associated with large-scale cloudiness introduces a direct coupling between the atmospheric moisture budget and the radiation budget through interactive cloud amounts and cloud optical properties. We have compared the cloudiness, the top-of-the-atmosphere and surface radiation budgets, the radiative forcing of clouds, and the atmospheric general circulation simulated with the Colorado State University general circulation model with and without such a prognostic cloud parameterization. In the EAULIQ run, the radiative effects of cloud water, cloud ice, and snow are considered; those of rain are omitted. The cloud optical depth and cloud infrared emissivity depend on the cloud water, cloud ice, and snow paths predicted by a bulk cloud microphysics parameterization. In the CONTROL run, a conventional large-scale condensation scheme is used. Cloud optical properties depend on the mean cloud temperatures. Results are presented in terms of January and July means.Comparisons with data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment show that EAULIQ yields improved simulations of the geographical distributions of the simulated cloudiness, the top-of-the-atmosphere radiation budget, and the longwave and shortwave cloud radiative forcings. Differences between EAULIQ and CONTROL are largest in the Tropics and are mostly due to a decrease, in the EAULIQ run, in the amount and optical thickness of upper-tropospheric clouds. In particular, the cold bias in the outgoing longwave radiation and the overestimation of the planetary albedo obtained in the CONTROL run over the tropical convective regions are substantially reduced. Differences in the radiative and latent heating rates between EAULIQ and CONTROL lead to some improvements in the atmospheric general circulation simulated by EAULIQ when compared against statistics on the observed circulation assembled by the European Centre

  19. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II... STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A-II Appendix A-II to Part 541—Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II... STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A-II Appendix A-II to Part 541—Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted...

  1. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part II: HIV.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Anna; Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

    This is a second part of a review under a main title Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. In the part we published in Mini Rev Med Chem. 2013,13(13):1837-45, we have described mechanisms of action and mechanism of resistance to antiviral agents used in genital herpes and genital HPV infection. The Part II review focuses on therapeutic options in HIV infection. In 1987, 6 years after the recognition of AIDS, the FDA approved the first drug against HIV--zidovudine. Since then a lot of antiretroviral drugs are available. The most effective treatment for HIV is highly active antiretroviral therapy--a combination of several antiretroviral medicines that cause a reduction of HIV blood concentration and often results in substantial recovery of impaired immunologic function. At present, there are over 20 drugs licensed and used for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, and these drugs are divided into one of six classes. Investigational agents include GS-7340, the prodrug of tenofovir and BMS-663068--the first in a novel class of drugs that blocks the binding of the HIV gp120 to the CD4 receptor.

  2. Curriculum Guide for Hospitality Education. Part II. Exemplary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalani, Henry

    This second of a two-part study designed to develop a hospitality education program model for Hawaii's community colleges is based on the primary data gathered in a survey of the hospitality industry characteristics, manpower requirements, and employment demands. (Survey data is reported in volume 1 of the study.) The introductory section of this…

  3. Primer of statistics in dental research: Part II.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Ayumi

    2014-04-01

    The Part I of Primer of Statistics in Dental Research covered five topics that are often mentioned in statistical check list of many peer-review journals including (1) statistical graph, (2) how to deal with outliers, (3) p-value and confidence interval, (4) testing equivalence, and (5) multiplicity Adjustment. The Part II of the series covers another set of important topics in dental statistics including (1) selecting the proper statistical tests, (2) repeated measures analysis, (3) epidemiological consideration for causal association, and (4) analysis of agreement. First, a guide in selecting the proper statistical tests based on the research question will be laid out in text and with a table so that researchers choose the univariable statistical test by answering five simple questions. Second, the importance of utilizing repeated measures analysis will be illustrated. This is a key component of data analysis as in many dental studies, observations are considered repeated in a single patient (several teeth are measured in a single patient). Third, concepts of confounding and the use of regression analysis are explained by going over a famous observational cohort study. Lastly, the use of proper agreement analysis vs. correlation for study of agreement will be discussed to avoid a common pitfall in dental research.

  4. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific “philosophy” of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with disparate “visions” tied to competing research programs as well as school-based curricular paradigms. The impasse in the goals of science education and thereto, the contending views of science literacy, were themselves associated with three underlying fundamental aims of education (knowledge-itself; personal development; socialization) which, it was argued, usually undercut the potential of each other. During periods of “crisis-talk” and throughout science educational history these three aims have repeatedly attempted to assert themselves. The inability of science education research to affect long-term change in classrooms was correlated not only to the failure to reach a consensus on the aims (due to competing programs and to the educational ideologies of their social groups), but especially to the failure of developing true educational theories (largely neglected since Hirst). Such theories, especially metatheories, could serve to reinforce science education’s growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. In Part II, I offer as a suggestion Egan’s cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general, and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science.

  5. Assimilation of Geosat Altimetric Data in a Nonlinear Shallow-Water Model of the Indian Ocean by Adjoint Approach. Part II: Some Validation and Interpretation of the Assimilated Results. Part 2; Some Validation and Interpretation of the Assimilated Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, Eric; Perigaud, Claire

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the results of assimilating Geosat sea level variations relative to the November 1986-November 1988 mean reference, in a nonlinear reduced-gravity model of the Indian Ocean, Data have been assimilated during one year starting in November 1986 with the objective of optimizing the initial conditions and the yearly averaged reference surface. The thermocline slope simulated by the model with or without assimilation is validated by comparison with the signal, which can be derived from expandable bathythermograph measurements performed in the Indian Ocean at that time. The topography simulated with assimilation on November 1986 is in very good agreement with the hydrographic data. The slopes corresponding to the South Equatorial Current and to the South Equatorial Countercurrent are better reproduced with assimilation than without during the first nine months. The whole circulation of the cyclonic gyre south of the equator is then strongly intensified by assimilation. Another assimilation experiment is run over the following year starting in November 1987. The difference between the two yearly mean surfaces simulated with assimilation is in excellent agreement with Geosat. In the southeastern Indian Ocean, the correction to the yearly mean dynamic topography due to assimilation over the second year is negatively correlated to the one the year before. This correction is also in agreement with hydrographic data. It is likely that the signal corrected by assimilation is not only due to wind error, because simulations driven by various wind forcings present the same features over the two years. Model simulations run with a prescribed throughflow transport anomaly indicate that assimilation is rather correcting in the interior of the model domain for inadequate boundary conditions with the Pacific.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1039 - Steady-State Duty Cycles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... II to Part 1039 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Pt. 1039, App. II Appendix II to Part 1039—Steady-State Duty Cycles (a) The following duty cycles apply for...

  7. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions. Part II: source contribution assessment using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model.

    PubMed

    Badol, Caroline; Locoge, Nadine; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-25

    In Part I of this study (Badol C, Locoge N, Leonardis T, Gallo JC. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions, Part I: Study area description, data set acquisition and qualitative data analysis of the data set. Sci Total Environ 2007; submitted as companion manuscript.) the study area, acquisition of the one-year data set and qualitative analysis of the data set have been described. In Part II a source profile has been established for each activity present in the study area: 6 profiles (urban heating, solvent use, natural gas leakage, biogenic emissions, gasoline evaporation and vehicle exhaust) have been extracted from literature to characterise urban sources, 7 industrial profiles have been established via canister sampling around industrial plants (hydrocarbon cracking, oil refinery, hydrocarbon storage, lubricant storage, lubricant refinery, surface treatment and metallurgy). The CMB model is briefly described and its implementation is discussed through the selection of source profiles and fitting species. Main results of CMB modellings for the Dunkerque area are presented. (1) The daily evolution of source contributions for the urban wind sector shows that the vehicle exhaust source contribution varies between 40 and 55% and its relative increase at traffic rush hours is hardly perceptible. (2) The relative contribution of vehicle exhaust varies from 55% in winter down to 30% in summer. This decrease is due to the increase of the relative contribution of hydrocarbon storage source reaching up to 20% in summer. (3) The evolution of source contributions with wind directions has confirmed that in urban wind sectors the contribution of vehicle exhaust dominate with around 45-55%. For the other wind sectors that include some industrial plants, the contribution of industrial sources is around 60% and could reach 80% for the sector 280-310 degrees , which corresponds to the most dense

  8. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II Appendix II to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II Appendix II to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II...

  10. Recovery in soccer : part ii-recovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Nédélec, Mathieu; McCall, Alan; Carling, Chris; Legall, Franck; Berthoin, Serge; Dupont, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In the formerly published part I of this two-part review, we examined fatigue after soccer matchplay and recovery kinetics of physical performance, and cognitive, subjective and biological markers. To reduce the magnitude of fatigue and to accelerate the time to fully recover after completion, several recovery strategies are now used in professional soccer teams. During congested fixture schedules, recovery strategies are highly required to alleviate post-match fatigue, and then to regain performance faster and reduce the risk of injury. Fatigue following competition is multifactorial and mainly related to dehydration, glycogen depletion, muscle damage and mental fatigue. Recovery strategies should consequently be targeted against the major causes of fatigue. Strategies reviewed in part II of this article were nutritional intake, cold water immersion, sleeping, active recovery, stretching, compression garments, massage and electrical stimulation. Some strategies such as hydration, diet and sleep are effective in their ability to counteract the fatigue mechanisms. Providing milk drinks to players at the end of competition and a meal containing high-glycaemic index carbohydrate and protein within the hour following the match are effective in replenishing substrate stores and optimizing muscle-damage repair. Sleep is an essential part of recovery management. Sleep disturbance after a match is common and can negatively impact on the recovery process. Cold water immersion is effective during acute periods of match congestion in order to regain performance levels faster and repress the acute inflammatory process. Scientific evidence for other strategies reviewed in their ability to accelerate the return to the initial level of performance is still lacking. These include active recovery, stretching, compression garments, massage and electrical stimulation. While this does not mean that these strategies do not aid the recovery process, the protocols implemented up until

  11. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks, Part II: Localization and Network Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zazo, Javier; Macua, Sergio Valcarcel; Zazo, Santiago; Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Álvarez, Iván; Jiménez, Eugenio; Cardona, Laura; Brito, Joaquín Hernández; Quevedo, Eduardo

    2016-12-17

    In the first part of the paper, we modeled and characterized the underwater radio channel in shallowwaters. In the second part,we analyze the application requirements for an underwaterwireless sensor network (U-WSN) operating in the same environment and perform detailed simulations. We consider two localization applications, namely self-localization and navigation aid, and propose algorithms that work well under the specific constraints associated with U-WSN, namely low connectivity, low data rates and high packet loss probability. We propose an algorithm where the sensor nodes collaboratively estimate their unknown positions in the network using a low number of anchor nodes and distance measurements from the underwater channel. Once the network has been self-located, we consider a node estimating its position for underwater navigation communicating with neighboring nodes. We also propose a communication system and simulate the whole electromagnetic U-WSN in the Castalia simulator to evaluate the network performance, including propagation impairments (e.g., noise, interference), radio parameters (e.g., modulation scheme, bandwidth, transmit power), hardware limitations (e.g., clock drift, transmission buffer) and complete MAC and routing protocols. We also explain the changes that have to be done to Castalia in order to perform the simulations. In addition, we propose a parametric model of the communication channel that matches well with the results from the first part of this paper. Finally, we provide simulation results for some illustrative scenarios.

  12. Underwater Electromagnetic Sensor Networks, Part II: Localization and Network Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zazo, Javier; Valcarcel Macua, Sergio; Zazo, Santiago; Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Álvarez, Iván; Jiménez, Eugenio; Cardona, Laura; Brito, Joaquín Hernández; Quevedo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, we modeled and characterized the underwater radio channel in shallow waters. In the second part, we analyze the application requirements for an underwater wireless sensor network (U-WSN) operating in the same environment and perform detailed simulations. We consider two localization applications, namely self-localization and navigation aid, and propose algorithms that work well under the specific constraints associated with U-WSN, namely low connectivity, low data rates and high packet loss probability. We propose an algorithm where the sensor nodes collaboratively estimate their unknown positions in the network using a low number of anchor nodes and distance measurements from the underwater channel. Once the network has been self-located, we consider a node estimating its position for underwater navigation communicating with neighboring nodes. We also propose a communication system and simulate the whole electromagnetic U-WSN in the Castalia simulator to evaluate the network performance, including propagation impairments (e.g., noise, interference), radio parameters (e.g., modulation scheme, bandwidth, transmit power), hardware limitations (e.g., clock drift, transmission buffer) and complete MAC and routing protocols. We also explain the changes that have to be done to Castalia in order to perform the simulations. In addition, we propose a parametric model of the communication channel that matches well with the results from the first part of this paper. Finally, we provide simulation results for some illustrative scenarios. PMID:27999309

  13. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part II. Effects of Information and Skills Training on Health-Related Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Ivan L.; Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a model that was used as a framework for reviewing studies of psychoeducational interventions intended to influence illness- and treatment-related behaviors and attitudes in pediatric cancer patients. In Part II, we distinguish between interventions that attempt to influence patients' behaviors just by…

  14. Wideband, low-frequency springless vibration energy harvesters: part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendame, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Soliman, Mostafa

    2016-11-01

    This paper concludes a two-part investigation of a novel architecture for vibration energy harvesting (VEH), the springless VEH. In this part, we study vertical springless electromagnetic VEHs where the direction of motion is aligned with the gravitational field. Experimental results show the existence of three topologies in the response of vertical springless VEHs; linear, single-impact, and double-impact. A model, encompassing all three topologies, was developed and validated by comparison to experimental results. We found that vertical springless VEHs demonstrate low frequency harvesting (<20 Hz), widebeand harvesting (bandwidths up to \\text{BW}=11.2 Hz), and an optimal output power of P  =  7.52 mW at a base acceleration of 0.6 g. While horizontal springless VEHs typically offer more output power, the single-impact regime of the vertical springless VEHs offers the simultaneous advantages of wider harvesting bandwidths at lower operating frequencies.

  15. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  16. Radiation Modeling and Finite Cloud Effects for Atmospheric Dispersion Calculations in Near-field Applications: Modeling of the Full Scale RDD Experiments with Operational Models in Canada, Part II.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Luke; Bourgouin, Pierre; Chouhan, Sohan; Ek, Nils; Korolevych, Volodymyr; Malo, Alain; Bensimon, Dov; Erhardt, Lorne

    2016-05-01

    Three radiological dispersal devices were detonated in 2012 under controlled conditions at Defence Research and Development Canada's Experimental Proving Grounds in Suffield, Alberta. Each device comprised a 35-GBq source of (140)La. The dataset obtained is used in this study to assess the MLCD, ADDAM, and RIMPUFF atmospheric dispersion models. As a continuation of Lebel et al. (2016), this paper examines different methodologies for making dose estimates with atmospheric dispersion models.

  17. Part I. Mechanisms of injury associated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy; Part II. Exsolution of volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Danny Dwayne

    Part I - Shock waves are focused in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) machines to strengths sufficient to fracture kidney stones. Substantial side effects-most of them acute-have resulted from this procedure, including injury to soft tissue. The focusing of shock waves through various layers of tissue is a complex process which stimulates many bio-mechano-chemical responses.This thesis presents results of an in vitro study of the initial mechanical stimulus. Planar nitrocellulose membranes of order 10 um thick were used as models of thin tissue structures. Two modes of failure were recorded: Failure due to cavitation collapsing on or near the membranes, and failure induced by altering the structure of shock waves. Tests were done in water at and around F2 to characterize the extent of cavitation damage, and was found to be confined within the focal region, 1.2 cm along the axis of focus.Scattering media were used to simulate the effects of acoustic nonuniformity of tissue and to alter the structure of focusing shock waves. 40 um diameter (average) hollow glass spheres were added to ethylene glycol, glycerine and castor oil to vary the properties of the scattering media. Multiple layer samples of various types of phantom tissue were tested in degassed castor oil to gauge the validity of the scattering media. The scattering media and tissue samples increased the rise time decreased strain rate in a similar fashion. Membranes were damaged by the decreased strain rate and accumulated effects of the altered structure: After about 20 or so shocks immersed in the scattering media and after about 100 shocks behind the tissue samples. The mode of failure was tearing with multiple tears in some cases from about .1 cm to about 3 cm depending of the number of shocks and membrane thickness.Part II - This work examines the exsolution of volatiles-carbon dioxide from water-in a cylindrical test cell under different pressure conditions. Water was supersaturated with

  18. Modelling of the long-term fate of pesticide residues in agricultural soils and their surface exchange with the atmosphere: Part II. Projected long-term fate of pesticide residues.

    PubMed

    Scholtz, M T; Bidleman, T F

    2007-05-01

    In the first part of this paper, a simple coupled dynamic soil-atmosphere model for studying the gaseous exchange of pesticide soil residues with the atmosphere is described and evaluated by comparing model results with published measurements of pesticide concentrations in air and soil. In Part II, the model is used to study the concentration profiles of pesticide residues in both undisturbed and annually tilled agricultural soils. Future trends are estimated for the measured air and soil concentrations of lindane and six highly persistent pesticides (toxaphene, p,p'-DDE, dieldrin, cis- and trans-chlordane and trans-nonachlor) over a twenty-year period due to volatilization and leaching into the deeper soil. Wet deposition and particle associated pesticide deposition (that increase soil residue concentrations) and soil erosion, degradation in the soil (other than for lindane) and run-off in precipitation are not considered in this study. Estimates of the rain deposition fluxes are reported that show that, other than for lindane, net volatilization fluxes greatly exceed rain deposition fluxes. The model shows that the persistent pesticides studied are highly immobile in soil and that loss of these highly persistent residues from the soil is by volatilization rather than leaching into the deeper soil. The soil residue levels of these six pesticides are currently sources of net volatilization to the atmosphere and will remain so for many years. The maximum rate of volatilization from the soil was simulated by setting the atmospheric background concentration to zero; these simulations show that the rates of volatilization will not be significantly increased since soil resistance rather than the atmospheric concentration controls the volatilization rates. Annual tilling of the soils increases the volatilization loss to the atmosphere. Nonetheless, the model predicts that, if only air-soil exchange is considered, more than 76% of current persistent pesticide residues

  19. Research and Development: A Complex Relationship Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John Douglas Edward

    Part 1 of this document describes the background, format, and early groundwork that went into the development of a test sponsored entirely by private enterprise. The discipline imposed by a financial bottom line imposes special pressures but also offers new opportunities. This private enterprise model is a multi-constructional process where…

  20. IPCC Working Group II: Impacts and Adaptation Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2007-12-01

    The IPCC (as opposed to the UN Framework Convention) defines climate change as" any change in climate over time, whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity". The IPCC Working Group II (Impacts, Adaptation, Vulnerability) was charged with assessing the scientific, technical, environmental, economic, and social aspects of vulnerability to climate change, and, the negative and positive consequences for ecological systems, socio-economic sectors, and human health. The Working Group II report focused on the following issues for different sectors and regions (e.g. water, agriculture, biodiversity) and communities (coastal, island, etc.): · The role of adaptation in reducing vulnerability and impacts, · Assessment of adaptation capacity, options and constraints, and · Enhancing adaptation practice and operations. This presentation will address the following questions in the context of the results of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report WG II: · What are the barriers, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for impacts assessments? · How are decisions about adaptation being made, and what types of adaptation strategies are being undertaken? · What are good adaptation practices and how are they learned over time? Examples will be drawn from the freshwater resources, small islands and adaptation chapters to which the presenter contributed. Many lessons have been identified but few have been implemented or evaluated over time. Adaptation occurs in the context of multiple stresses. Adaptation will be important in coping with early impacts in the near-term and continue to be important as our climate changes, regardless of how that change is derived. It is important to note that unmitigated climate change could, in the long term, exceed the capacity of different natural, managed and human systems to adapt. The assessment leads to the following conclusions: · Adaptation to climate change is already taking place, but on a limited basis · Adaptation measures

  1. Autism and EMF? Plausibility of a pathophysiological link part II.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Martha R; Sage, Cindy

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) are defined behaviorally, but they also involve multileveled disturbances of underlying biology that find striking parallels in the physiological impacts of electromagnetic frequency and radiofrequency radiation exposures (EMF/RFR). Part I (Vol 776) of this paper reviewed the critical contributions pathophysiology may make to the etiology, pathogenesis and ongoing generation of behaviors currently defined as being core features of ASCs. We reviewed pathophysiological damage to core cellular processes that are associated both with ASCs and with biological effects of EMF/RFR exposures that contribute to chronically disrupted homeostasis. Many studies of people with ASCs have identified oxidative stress and evidence of free radical damage, cellular stress proteins, and deficiencies of antioxidants such as glutathione. Elevated intracellular calcium in ASCs may be due to genetics or may be downstream of inflammation or environmental exposures. Cell membrane lipids may be peroxidized, mitochondria may be dysfunctional, and various kinds of immune system disturbances are common. Brain oxidative stress and inflammation as well as measures consistent with blood-brain barrier and brain perfusion compromise have been documented. Part II of this paper documents how behaviors in ASCs may emerge from alterations of electrophysiological oscillatory synchronization, how EMF/RFR could contribute to these by de-tuning the organism, and policy implications of these vulnerabilities. It details evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction, immune system dysregulation, neuroinflammation and brain blood flow alterations, altered electrophysiology, disruption of electromagnetic signaling, synchrony, and sensory processing, de-tuning of the brain and organism, with autistic behaviors as emergent properties emanating from this pathophysiology. Changes in brain and autonomic nervous system electrophysiological function and sensory processing predominate, seizures

  2. Can focusing on UPDRS Part II make assessments of Parkinson disease progression more efficient?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Cristina

    2009-03-01

    Harrison et al. have attempted to validate Part II of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS II) as a medication-independent measure of disease progression. The authors collected cross-sectional data from a cohort of 888 patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease, and they found a robust association between UPDRS II scores and disease duration. Other variables considered were the patients' levodopa status, age at disease onset, and scores on UPDRS I, II and III. The results suggest that a single UPDRS II measurement might be a good indicator of progression at a given time point, irrespective of the current disease-related circumstances. This concept is attractive in its simplicity and patient-centeredness. However, this evidence came from a single-center, retrospective study, the statistical model was constructed using a nonvalidated surrogate as an independent variable, and no external replication was conducted. Until further confirmation, therefore, Harrison et al.'s proposal can only be considered to be a working hypothesis.

  3. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts.

  4. Application of an Online-Coupled Regional Climate Model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for Examination of Ice Nucleation Schemes: Part II. Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Parameterizations and Dust Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of ice supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O3, SO42-, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO2, and SO2 over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and

  5. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of ice supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on

  6. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; ...

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore » supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  10. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR WASTE TANKS - PART II

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    As part of an ongoing study to evaluate the discontinuity in the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm, a study was conducted this year to assess the minimum concentrations below 1 molar nitrate, see Figure 1. Current controls on the tank farm solution chemistry are in place to prevent the initiation and propagation of pitting and stress corrosion cracking in the primary steel waste tanks. The controls are based upon a series of experiments performed with simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks, namely ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537). During FY09, an experimental program was undertaken to investigate the risk associated with reducing the minimum molar nitrite concentration required to confidently inhibit pitting in dilute solutions (i.e., less than 1 molar nitrate). The experimental results and conclusions herein provide a statistical basis to quantify the probability of pitting for the tank wall exposed to various solutions with dilute concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Understanding the probability for pitting will allow the facility to make tank-specific risk-based decisions for chemistry control. Based on previous electrochemical testing, a statistical test matrix was developed to refine and solidify the application of the statistical mixture/amount model to corrosion of A537 steel. A mixture/amount model was identified based on statistical analysis of recent and historically collected electrochemical data. This model provides a more complex relationship between the nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the probability of pitting than is represented by the model underlying the current chemistry control program, and its use may provide a technical basis for the utilization of less nitrite to inhibit pitting at concentrations below 1 molar nitrate. FY09 results fit within the mixture/amount model, and further refine the nitrate regime in which the model is applicable. The combination of visual observations and cyclic

  11. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part I: Benchmark comparisons of WIMS-D5 and DRAGON cell and control rod parameters with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure-vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels, and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update calculation methods and models (cell, supercell and reactor) was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. As a validation of the new models some benchmark comparisons were done with Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5. This paper presents comparisons of cell and supercell benchmark problems based on a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the WIMS-D5 and DRAGON codes with MCNP5 results. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, and more symmetric than Atucha-II Cell parameters compared include cell k-infinity, relative power levels of the different rings of fuel rods, and some two-group macroscopic cross sections. Supercell comparisons include supercell k-infinity changes due to the control rods (tubes) of steel and hafnium. (authors)

  12. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation, Cl. Thermoluminescence: Part II. Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Presents part two on the use of the detection of thermoluminescence as an analytical tool for the chemistry laboratory and allied science. This part discusses instrumentation used and investigates recent developments in instrumentation for thermoluminescence. (HM)

  13. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  14. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  15. Coping With the Problems of a Technological Age, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is another report in a series of programs dealing with the problems of a technological age. It is assumed that teachers will use both parts of this report. Part I deals with the problems of technology and how it affects our lives. It also discusses the energy crisis created, in part, by technology and deals specifically with coal and…

  16. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 1050 - DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement II Appendix II to.... II Appendix II to Part 1050—DOE Form 3735.3—Foreign Travel Statement EC01OC91.041 Statement Concerning Acceptance of Travel or Travel Expenses From a Foreign Government Item 1. This statement is to...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 1050 - DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement II Appendix II to.... II Appendix II to Part 1050—DOE Form 3735.3—Foreign Travel Statement EC01OC91.041 Statement Concerning Acceptance of Travel or Travel Expenses From a Foreign Government Item 1.This statement is to...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 1050 - DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement II Appendix II to.... II Appendix II to Part 1050—DOE Form 3735.3—Foreign Travel Statement EC01OC91.041 Statement Concerning Acceptance of Travel or Travel Expenses From a Foreign Government Item 1.This statement is to...

  19. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 1050 - DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement II Appendix II to.... II Appendix II to Part 1050—DOE Form 3735.3—Foreign Travel Statement EC01OC91.041 Statement Concerning Acceptance of Travel or Travel Expenses From a Foreign Government Item 1.This statement is to...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 1050 - DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement II Appendix II to.... II Appendix II to Part 1050—DOE Form 3735.3—Foreign Travel Statement EC01OC91.041 Statement Concerning Acceptance of Travel or Travel Expenses From a Foreign Government Item 1.This statement is to...

  1. Neuromorphic meets neuromechanics, part II: the role of fusimotor drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaleddini, Kian; Minos Niu, Chuanxin; Chakravarthi Raja, Suraj; Sohn, Won Joon; Loeb, Gerald E.; Sanger, Terence D.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. We studied the fundamentals of muscle afferentation by building a Neuro–mechano–morphic system actuating a cadaveric finger. This system is a faithful implementation of the stretch reflex circuitry. It allowed the systematic exploration of the effects of different fusimotor drives to the muscle spindle on the closed-loop stretch reflex response. Approach. As in Part I of this work, sensory neurons conveyed proprioceptive information from muscle spindles (with static and dynamic fusimotor drive) to populations of α-motor neurons (with recruitment and rate coding properties). The motor commands were transformed into tendon forces by a Hill-type muscle model (with activation-contraction dynamics) via brushless DC motors. Two independent afferented muscles emulated the forces of flexor digitorum profundus and the extensor indicis proprius muscles, forming an antagonist pair at the metacarpophalangeal joint of a cadaveric index finger. We measured the physical response to repetitions of bi-directional ramp-and-hold rotational perturbations for 81 combinations of static and dynamic fusimotor drives, across four ramp velocities, and three levels of constant cortical drive to the α-motor neuron pool. Main results. We found that this system produced responses compatible with the physiological literature. Fusimotor and cortical drives had nonlinear effects on the reflex forces. In particular, only cortical drive affected the sensitivity of reflex forces to static fusimotor drive. In contrast, both static fusimotor and cortical drives reduced the sensitivity to dynamic fusimotor drive. Interestingly, realistic signal-dependent motor noise emerged naturally in our system without having been explicitly modeled. Significance. We demonstrate that these fundamental features of spinal afferentation sufficed to produce muscle function. As such, our Neuro–mechano–morphic system is a viable platform to study the spinal mechanisms for healthy muscle function

  2. Part I - Viscous evolution of point vortex equilibria Part II - Effects of body elasticity on stability of fish motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Fangxu

    2011-12-01

    Vortex dynamics and solid-fluid interactions are two of the most important and most studied topics in fluid dynamics for their relevance to a wide range of applications from geophysical flows to locomotion in moving fluids. In this work, we investigate two problems in two parts: Part I studies the viscous evolution of point vortex equilibria; Part II studies the effects of body elasticity on the passive stability of submerged bodies. In Part I, we describe the viscous evolution of point vortex configurations that, in the absence of viscosity, are in a state of fixed or relative equilibrium. In particular, we examine four cases, three of them correspond to relative equilibria in the inviscid point vortex model and one corresponds to a fixed equilibrium. Our goal is to elucidate the dominant transient dynamical features of the flow. A multi-Gaussian "core growing" type of model is typically used in high fidelity numerical simulations, but we propose to implement it as a low-order model for the flow field. We show that all four configurations immediately begin to rotate unsteadily. We then examine in detail the qualitative and quantitative evolution of the structures as they evolve, and for each case show the sequence of topological bifurcations that occur both in a fixed reference frame, and in an appropriately chosen rotating reference frame. Comparisons between the cases help to reveal different features of the viscous evolution for short and intermediate time scales of vortex structures. We examine the dynamical evolution of passive particles in the viscously evolving flows and interpret it in relation to the evolving streamline patterns. Although the low-order multi-Gaussian model does not exactly coincide with the Navier-Stokes solution, the two results show remarkable resemblances in many aspects. In Part II, we examine the effects of body geometry and elasticity on the passive stability of motion in a perfect fluid. Our main motivation is to understand the

  3. A Conversation with William A. Fowler Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, John

    2005-06-01

    Physicist William A.Fowler initiated an experimental program in nuclear astrophysics after World War II. He recalls here the Steady State versus Big Bang controversy and his celebrated collaboration with Fred Hoyle and Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge on nucleosynthesis in stars. He also comments on the shift away from nuclear physics in universities to large accelerators and national laboratories.

  4. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific "philosophy" of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with…

  5. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses, part II: photoelastic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Zahoui, Abbas; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-06-01

    In part I of the study, two attachment systems [O-ring; bar-clip (BC)] were used, and the system with three individualized O-rings provided the lowest stress on the implants and the support tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution, through the photoelastic method, on implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses associated with different attachment systems: BOC-splinted implants with a bar connected to two centrally placed O-rings, and BOD-splinted implants with a BC connected to two distally placed O-rings (cantilever). One photoelastic model of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication with three parallel implants was fabricated. Afterward, two implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses with the two attachment systems described above were constructed. Each assembly was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions with implants by using a universal testing machine. The results were obtained through photograph record analysis of stress. The BOD system exhibited the highest stress concentration, followed by the BOC system. The O-ring, centrally placed on the bar, allows higher mobility of the prostheses and homogeneously distributes the stress to the region of the alveolar ridge and implants. It can be concluded that the use of implants with O-rings, isolated or connected with a bar, to rehabilitate maxillectomized patients allows higher prosthesis mobility and homogeneously distributes the stress to the alveolar ridge region, which may result in greater chewing stress distribution to implants and bone tissue. The clinical implication of the augmented bone support loss after maxillectomy is the increase of stress in the attachment systems and, consequently, a higher tendency for displacement of the prosthesis.

  6. The intra-uterine device. Part II: technical problems.

    PubMed

    Alexander, I

    1980-10-01

    In discussing the technical problems associated with the IUD, focus is on the basic insertion technique, the technique to use with the various IUDs (Copper 7, Lippes Loop, Copper T models, the Saf-T-coil, and the multiload 250), the timing of the insertion, and removal of the IUD. Bimanual examination of the pelvis must be performed before an IUD is inserted. Prior to starting the insertion, the patient should be given an explanation of what is to be done. As patients are unfamiliar with the appearance of most of the instruments, it is advisable to keep them from view. Having visualized the cervix and fixed the blades of the Cusco speculum in the open position, the cervix can be seized with a single toothed tenaculum or 7 inch Allis forceps. It is generally necessary to steady the cervix with a forcep as it straightens out the canal and uterine flexion. Sounding the uterine cavity will reveal its length and confirm any angulation. On occasion it is impossible to sound the cavity because the internal os is too tight or the endocervical canal has a pinhole external os. Force should be avoided. High fundal placement without perforating the uterus is the objective when inserting any IUD, and this is particularly important with the copper IUDs which depend on a close association of their copper elements to the endometrium. Generally, it is easier to insert a coil towards the end of the period when the cervix is partly dilated and any bleeding that occurs is masked. Insertion following abortion is commonly performed, and encouraging results have been achieved with insertions immediately postpartum. Removal can be done at any time.

  7. Classroom Demonstrations of Polymer Principles Part II. Polymer Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This is part two in a series on classroom demonstrations of polymer principles. Described is how large molecules can be assembled from subunits (the process of polymerization). Examples chosen include both linear and branched or cross-linked molecules. (RH)

  8. Predictors of performance on the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners Parts I and II*

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Angela R.; Harvey, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine predictors for success on Parts I and II of the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) written examinations. Methods Two validity studies were conducted to examine the criterion validity of Logan College assessments for Part I and II NBCE scores. Both studies consisted of a longitudinal design to examine the validity of entrance grade point average (GPA), in-program chiropractic course content GPA, and an institutional practice exam on Parts I and II of the NBCE. Results Analyses revealed that Part I GPA and practice exam scores combined accounted for 72% of the variance within Part I NBCE scores. Furthermore, every subtest of the Part I NBCE could be reliably predicted by course performance. In the 2nd study, Part I GPA, Part I NBCE score, and Part II GPA accounted for 75% of the variance within Part II NBCE scores. Conclusions Internal training and educational assessments (eg, course grades and practice exams) proved to be strong determinants of NBCE performance above and beyond initial levels of preparedness, thus validating the impact of the chiropractic curriculum on NBCE test achievement. PMID:24611459

  9. Addressing future challenges for cancer services: part II.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jane; Radford, Gina

    2016-02-01

    Jane Maher & Gina Radford speak to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor Jane Maher has been Macmillan's Chief Medical Officer since 1999 and now shares the role as Joint Chief Medical Officer with general practitioner Rosie Loftus, reflecting the growing need for specialists and generalists to work more effectively together. She has been an National Health Service (NHS) improvement clinical leader for over 10 years and is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre and Hillingdon Hospital where she has worked for more than 20 years, during which she helped develop nonsurgical oncology services in five district general hospitals. She is a senior Clinical Lecturer at University College London and Visiting Professor in Cancer and Supportive Care at the Centre for Complexity Management at the University of Hertfordshire. Jane chaired the Maher Committee for the Department of Health in 1995, led the UK National Audit of Late Effects Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in 2000 and, most recently, chaired the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative Consequences of Treatment work stream. She co-founded one of the first Cancer Support and Information services in the UK, winning the Nye Bevan award in 1992 and there are now more than 60 units based on this model. She is a member of the Older People and Cancer Clinical Advisory Group. She has written more than 100 published articles and is a UK representative for cancer survivorship in Europe and advises on cancer survivorship programs in Denmark and Canada. Gina Radford is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, a post she took up in January 2015. Prior to that, she has held a number of roles in public health, at local and regional level. Most recently she was Centre Director for Anglia and Essex for Public Health England, and as a part of that role helped lead nationally on the public health response to Ebola. She was until very recently Chair of one of the NICE public health

  10. Mental Retardation Grants; Part II, Research and Demonstration. Fiscal Year 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC. Secretary's Committee on Mental Retardation.

    Part II of a two-part publication listing mental retardation grants awarded by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in fiscal year 1968 (July 1, 1967, to June 30, 1968), the text includes grants awarded in the areas of research and demonstration. (Part I covers grants in training and construction.) Grants are arranged according to…

  11. Operational strategies for dispatchable combined cycle plants, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.P.; Landis, F.P.

    1996-11-01

    The Brush Cogeneration Facility is a dual-unit, combined cycle, cogeneration plant, operating in a dual cycling, automatically-dispatchable mode. Part I of this report described the contract, including automatic generation control (AGC) by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO), and the operation of Unit One. This part of the report covers the operation of Unit Two. Unit two is still in its operating infancy, but is showing that fuel efficiency and low emissions levels are not incompatible with cycling, load-following service. 1 fig.

  12. Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Waele, Jo; Gutierrez, Francisco; Audra, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    In January 2015, the first part of the special issue on karst, entitled "Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions" was published (Geomorphology, Vol. 229). This second part of the special issue comprises seven research papers covering a broad geographical canvas including Japan, Slovenia, France, Spain, Croatia, and Poland-Ukraine. Both issues mainly emanate from the contributions presented in the Karst session of the 8th International Conference of Geomorphology (International Association of Geomorphologists), held in Paris in August 2013, enriched with some invited papers.

  13. Biomedical research ethics: an Islamic view part II.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Raafat Y

    2007-12-01

    In part I of this article I discussed why Islam rejects secularization and this is not because the ethical principles embedded in Islam's teachings are archaic and out of touch with current realities. In addition, I pointed out the agreement between general broad principles of research ethics and Islamic teachings concerning life; which showed clearly that Islam has addressed the regulation of ethics in research more than 14 centuries ago. In this part, I will address two controversial issues concerning women's rights and age of consent for children as possible research subjects in a Muslim community.

  14. Finding Out about Archaeology: Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archaeological Inst. of America, Boston, MA.

    This packet of materials presents selected, descriptive bibliographies for children and young adults. Instructional materials for the use of teachers and parents are also included. Focusing on the subject of archaeology, part 1 of the annotated bibliography presents instructional materials coded for appropriate grade level use. Each entry…

  15. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  16. CONTEMPORARY ARABIC READERS--II. ARABIC ESSAYS, PART 1. TEXTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCARUS, ERNEST N.; AND OTHERS

    INTENDED FOR INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL STUDENTS, "PART 1" OF THIS SECOND VOLUME IN THE "CONTEMPORARY ARABIC READERS" SERIES PRESENTS A COLLECTION OF 20 ESSAYS WRITTEN BY OUTSTANDING ARAB LITERARY FIGURES. SUBJECTS RANGE FROM POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS PHILOSOPHY IN THE ARAB WORLD TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND REFORMS IN AGRICULTURE AND THE WRITING SYSTEM. THE…

  17. The Need for Ocean Literacy in the Classroom: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoedinger, Sarah; Cava, Francesca; Jewell, Beth

    2006-01-01

    As mentioned in Part I, certain classroom activities can help students learn about the ocean and empower them to make informed decisions about their impacts on the environment. One such activity focuses on harmful algal blooms (HABs). In this article, the authors include background information on HABs and then present two activities. Activity 1 is…

  18. Aesthetic Pursuits: Windows, Frames, Words, Images--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In Part I of this study (Burke, 2005), the author presented the essentials of Image Presentation Theory--IPT--and its application to the analytical explication of various spatial designs in and psychological responses to images, from the illusions of depth in what is referred to as "windows" in cinema theory to the more patterned abstractions of…

  19. DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part II: Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates some simple applications of how temperature logging systems may be used to monitor simple heat experiments, and how the data obtained can be analysed to get some additional insight into the physical processes. [For "DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part I: Design," see EJ1114124.

  20. Topics in Finance: Part II--Financial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The second article in a series designed to supplement the introductory financial management course, this essay addresses financial statement analysis, including its impact on stock valuation, disclosure, and managerial behavior. [For "Topics in Finance Part I--Introduction and Stockholder Wealth Maximization," see EJ1060345.

  1. Surface anatomy and surface landmarks for thoracic surgery: Part II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shona E; Darling, Gail E

    2011-05-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of a thoracic surgeon's armamentarium to assist with the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of thoracic pathology. As reviewed in this article, the surface landmarks of the lungs, heart, great vessels, and mediastinum are critical for appropriate patient care and should be learned in conjunction with classic anatomy.

  2. Searching for the Right Way to Begin Class: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawry, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Part I, "Searching for the Right Way to Begin Class," described the various iterations of beginning class rituals the author used over the years. Those rituals began with a prayer to the Holy Spirit as was required at the Catholic women's college Marymount in Tarrytown, New York, where he first taught out of graduate school in 1965. That…

  3. Laboratory Animal Housing--Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runkle, Robert S.

    1963-01-01

    In recent years, the use of laboratory animals for bio-medical research has shown marked increase. Economic and efficient housing is a necessity. This two part report established guidelines for design and selection of materials for conventional animal housing. Contents include--(1) production and breeding facilities, (2) quarantine facilities, (3)…

  4. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Part II. Advantages of FT-IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II in a series on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Described are various advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy including energy advantages, wavenumber accuracy, constant resolution, polarization effects, and stepping at grating changes. (RH)

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1068 - Emission-Related Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission-Related Parameters and Specifications II Appendix II to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... Pressure and vacuum relief settings. XI. Warning Systems Related to Emission Controls. 1....

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1042 - Steady-State Duty Cycles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Steady-State Duty Cycles II Appendix II to Part 1042 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES AND VESSELS Pt....

  8. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine II Appendix II to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine II Appendix II to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine II Appendix II to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine II Appendix II to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine II Appendix II to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1045 - Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Pt. 1045, App. II Appendix II to Part 1045—Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines (a)...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical abstracts...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... 258—List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... 258—List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... 258—List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... 258—List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical...

  19. 31 CFR Appendix II to Part 13 - Form of Bill for Reimbursement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Form of Bill for Reimbursement II Appendix II to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PROCEDURES FOR... Accounting Office at such reasonable times and places as may be mutually agreed upon by said...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1045 - Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Pt. 1045, App. II Appendix II to Part 1045—Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines (a)...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1045 - Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Pt. 1045, App. II Appendix II to Part 1045—Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines (a)...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1045 - Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Pt. 1045, App. II Appendix II to Part 1045—Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines (a)...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1045 - Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Pt. 1045, App. II Appendix II to Part 1045—Duty Cycles for Propulsion Marine Engines (a)...

  4. Repository Planning, Design, and Engineering: Part II-Equipment and Costing.

    PubMed

    Baird, Phillip M; Gunter, Elaine W

    2016-08-01

    Part II of this article discusses and provides guidance on the equipment and systems necessary to operate a repository. The various types of storage equipment and monitoring and support systems are presented in detail. While the material focuses on the large repository, the requirements for a small-scale startup are also presented. Cost estimates and a cost model for establishing a repository are presented. The cost model presents an expected range of acquisition costs for the large capital items in developing a repository. A range of 5,000-7,000 ft(2) constructed has been assumed, with 50 frozen storage units, to reflect a successful operation with growth potential. No design or engineering costs, permit or regulatory costs, or smaller items such as the computers, software, furniture, phones, and barcode readers required for operations have been included.

  5. Toxicological Models Part B: Environmental Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garric, Jeanne; Thybaud, Eric

    Assessment of ecotoxicological risks due to chemical substances is based in part on establishing concentration-response relationships for different organisms, including plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates living on land, fresh water, or sea water. European regulations for assessing the risks due to chemical products thus recommend the measurement of toxic effects on at least three taxons (algae, crustacea, fish) [1]. The assessment becomes more relevant when based upon a variety of different organisms, with a range of different biological and ecological features (autotrophic or heterotrophic, benthic or pelagic habitat, and different modes of reproduction, growth, respiration, or feeding, etc.), but also when it describes the effects of contaminants on sensitive physiological functions such as growth and reproduction, which determine the balance of populations of terrestrial and aquatic species in their environment.

  6. Achieving hemostasis in dermatology-Part II: Topical hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Glick, Jaimie B; Kaur, Ravneet R; Siegel, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence during any dermatologic surgery that disrupts blood vessels. The complications of excess bleeding can include delayed wound healing, hematoma formation, infection, dehiscence, and necrosis. In part one of this review, we discussed the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative management of patients undergoing dermatologic surgery. In Part two, we discuss traditional and new topical hemostatic agents used to achieve hemostasis in dermatological procedures and surgery. We will evaluate the caustic and non-caustic hemostatic agents as well as hemostatic dressings. The mechanisms of action, side effect profile, and advantages and disadvantages of the topical hemostatic agents are provided. Sources for this article were found searching the English literature in PubMed for the time period 1940 to March 2012. A thorough bibliography search was also performed and key references examined.

  7. A multi-level simulation platform of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid generation system - Part II. Balancing units model library and system simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Cheng; Cai, Ningsheng; Croiset, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Following our integrated hierarchical modeling framework of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC), this paper firstly introduces the model libraries of main balancing units, including some state-of-the-art achievements and our specific work. Based on gPROMS programming code, flexible configuration and modular design are fully realized by specifying graphically all unit models in each level. Via comparison with the steady-state experimental data of Siemens-Westinghouse demonstration system, the in-house multi-level SOFC-gas turbine (GT) simulation platform is validated to be more accurate than the advanced power system analysis tool (APSAT). Moreover, some units of the demonstration system are designed reversely for analysis of a typically part-load transient process. The framework of distributed and dynamic modeling in most of units is significant for the development of control strategies in the future.

  8. Population-based public health interventions: innovations in practice, teaching, and management. Part II.

    PubMed

    Keller, Linda Olson; Strohschein, Susan; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Lia-Hoagberg, Betty

    2004-01-01

    The Intervention Wheel is a population-based practice model that encompasses three levels of practice (community, systems, and individual/family) and 17 public health interventions. Each intervention and practice level contributes to improving population health. The Intervention Wheel, previously known as the Public Health Intervention Model, was originally introduced in 1998 by the Minnesota Department of Health, Section of Public Health Nursing (PHN). The model has been widely disseminated and used throughout the United States since that time. The evidence supporting the Intervention Wheel was recently subjected to a rigorous critique by regional and national experts. This critical process, which involved hundreds of public health nurses, resulted in a more robust Intervention Wheel and established the validity of the model. The critique also produced basic steps and best practices for each of the 17 interventions. Part I describes the Intervention Wheel, defines population-based practice, and details the recommended modifications and validation process. Part II provides examples of the innovative ways that the Intervention Wheel is being used in public health/PHN practice, education, and administration. The two articles provide a foundation and vision for population-based PHN practice and direction for improving population health.

  9. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--part II: derivation and special cases

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier's law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as non-linear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coefficient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier's law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or sufficient.

  10. Part I---Evaluating Effects of Oligomer Formation on Cytochrome P450 2C9 Electron Transfer and Drug Metabolism, Part II---Utilizing Molecular Modeling Techniques to Study the Src-Interacting Proteins Actin Filament Associated Protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and Cortactin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jett, John Edward, Jr.

    nanopillars, the immobilization of CYP2C9 enzymes to those nanopillars, and the utilization of the array to perform conductive probe atomic force microscopy experiments examining the electron transfer process of CYP2C9 in the absence and presence of substrate molecules. Part II. The Src protein has been known to play a role in cancer cell progression for over 30 years. The function of a non-receptor tyrosine kinase such as Src is to relay extracellular signals through intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation. As a tyrosine kinase, Src and the cellular signaling pathways it is involved in play many functional roles in the cell, both in cellular proliferation and in cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesion, motility and invasion. Two of the many proteins comprising Src cellular signaling pathways are actin filament associated protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and cortactin. AFAP-110 is a known activator of Src; one mechanism to abrogate the AFAP-110-induced activation of Src is to inhibit their colocalization within the cell. This colocalization is expected to occur when the pleckstrin homology (PH1 and PH2) domains of AFAP-110 are allowed to interact with membrane-bound phospholipids. Cortactin, on the other hand, is a cytosolic protein capable of being phosphorylated on various tyrosine residues, activating it and allowing it to interact with actin. The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Src has been shown to be capable of interacting with cortactin, an association which will be probed here. This section of the dissertation will discuss the use of molecular modeling techniques to develop structural models of the AFAP-110 PH1 and PH2 domains and use them to make predictions about how the protein interacts with phospholipids in the plasma membrane and how they might be stabilized to interact with other proteins. Structural models were designed using homology modeling methods, docking programs were used to predict key residues of AFAP-110 involved in binding to phospholipids and mutational

  11. High Current Cathode Thermal Behavior, Part II: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodfellow, K. D.; Polk, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode erosion is one of the life limiting mechanisms for several classes of electric thrusters. Since cathode erosion is strongly dependent on the cathode temperature, a quantitative understanding of the effects of cathode operation on the cathode temperature is required. The development of a cathode/plasma interaction model for determining the heat loads to the cathode as function of the various free stream plasma parameters is presented. This model is combined with a cathode thermal model in order to provide a complete and integrated picture of high current cathode operation.

  12. Cancer Chemotherapy: Past, Present, and Future—Part II

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1984-01-01

    Cancer is of major concern today because of its high mortality. It is estimated that 66 million people in this country will eventually develop cancer; 1983 estimates were 855,000 new cases and 440,000 deaths from cancer. Because of limitations of surgery and radiation therapy in effecting a cure for cancer, chemotherapy has become increasingly important. The developments in the chemical control of cancer in man are encouraging. This two-part paper* covers the historical milestones in the development of the chemical and hormonal control of cancer, present successes with the use of polychemotherapy, and the hopeful trend in research. PMID:6492179

  13. Responsive Persistence Part II. Practices of Postmodern Therapists.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Olga; Dienhart, Anna; Turner, Jean

    2013-10-01

    This article, a companion to Part I of this series of articles, discusses how therapists informed by social constructionist and postmodern ideas enact persistence in their work with families. Transcripts and video-recordings of therapy interaction facilitated by selected major champions for three postmodern (collaborative) therapies: Michael White (narrative therapy), Harlene Anderson (collaborative language systems approach), and Bill O'Hanlon (solution-oriented therapy) were examined for persistence practices. The article offers a range of possible ways in which postmodern therapists may enact their influence in facilitating generative and helpful conversations with families and remain responsive to clients' preferences and understandings. Implications for family therapy practice, training, and supervision are discussed.

  14. Phenomenology of COMPASS data: Multiplicities and phenomenology - part II

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Gonzalez H., J. O.; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.

    2015-01-23

    In this study, we present some of the main features of the multidimensional COMPASS multiplicities, via our analysis using the simple Gaussian model. We briefly discuss these results in connection with azimuthal asymmetries.

  15. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part II: safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-06-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with the blood coagulation system can be beneficial or adverse depending on the intended use of a nanomaterial. Nanoparticles can be engineered to be procoagulant or to carry coagulation-initiating factors to treat certain disorders. Likewise, they can be designed to be anticoagulant or to carry anticoagulant drugs to intervene in other pathological conditions in which coagulation is a concern. An overview of the coagulation system was given and a discussion of a desirable interface between this system and engineered nanomaterials was assessed in part I, which was published in the May 2013 issue of Nanomedicine. Unwanted pro- and anti-coagulant properties of nanoparticles represent significant concerns in the field of nanomedicine, and often hamper the development and transition into the clinic of many promising engineered nanocarriers. This part will focus on the undesirable effects of engineered nanomaterials on the blood coagulation system. We will discuss the relationship between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity) that determine their negative effects on the blood coagulation system in order to understand how manipulation of these properties can help to overcome unwanted side effects.

  16. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions.

  17. Solar System: Surfing the Edge of Chaos Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Danforth, C. M.

    2008-05-01

    The orbital positions and masses of the Jovian planets are known only to a few parts in 107. At the 2006 DDA meeting in Halifax, I presented results, recently published in Nature Physics and MNRAS, which demonstrated the existence of both chaotic and near-regular orbits within the current observational error volume. In this talk, joint work with Chris Danforth of the University of Vermont, we present results demonstrating extremely rich structure of Lyapunov times within the uncertainty volume across many two-dimensional slices through initial-condition space. These slices include the Cartesian product of every pair of orbital semi-major axes ap, plus Cartesian products between ap and eccentricity ep for each Jovian planet p. Some of the observed structure is reminiscent of Guzzo's "Web of 3-body resonances", although it is not clear that 3-body resonances are the cause in this case since the structure extends several orders of magnitude below the scale at which Murray + Holman's 3-body resonance theory has been explored. Some of the structure is entirely unlike that seen in Guzzo's Web, and may require further theoretical development to understand. Finally, several "zoom-in” plots, reminiscent of those done for the Mandelbrot set, demonstrate that the structure continues down, at least, to scales of about one part in 109. In all cases, we verify the reliability of our integrations using convergence tests to demonstrate that the picture does not change even when the integration timestep is decreased significantly.

  18. Collagenolytic (necrobiotic) granulomas: part II--the 'red' granulomas.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jane M; Barrett, Terry L

    2004-07-01

    A collagenolytic or necrobiotic non-infectious granuloma is one in which a granulomatous infiltrate develops around a central area of altered collagen and elastic fibers. The altered fibers lose their distinct boundaries and exhibit new staining patterns, becoming either more basophilic or eosinophilic. Within the area of altered collagen, there may be deposition of acellular substances such as mucin (blue) or fibrin (red), or there may be neutrophils with nuclear dust (blue), eosinophils (red), or flame figures (red). These color distinctions can be used as a simple algorithm for the diagnosis of collagenolytic granulomas, i.e. 'blue' granulomas vs. 'red' granulomas. Eight diagnoses are included within these two groupings, which are discussed in this two-part article. In the previously published first part, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis and histologic features of the 'blue' collagenolytic granulomas were discussed. These are the lesions of granuloma annulare, Wegener's granulomatosis, and rheumatoid vasculitis. In this second half of the series, the 'red' collagenolytic granulomas are discussed; these are the lesions of necrobiosis lipoidica, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, rheumatoid nodules, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and eosinophilic cellulitis (Well's Syndrome).

  19. Active flow control for a NACA-0012 Profile: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oualli, H.; Makadem, M.; Ouchene, H.; Ferfouri, A.; Bouabdallah, A.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2016-11-01

    Active flow control is applied to a NACA-0012 profile. The experiments are conducted in a wind tunnel. Using a high-resolution visible-light camera and tomography, flow visualizations are carried out. LES finite-volume 3D code is used to complement the physical experiments. The symmetric wing is clipped into two parts, and those parts extend and retract along the chord according to the same sinusoidal law we optimized last year for the same profile but clipped at an angle of 60 deg, instead of the original 90 deg. The Reynolds number range is extended to 500,000, thus covering the flying regimes of micro-UAVs, UAVs, as well as small aircraft. When the nascent cavity is open and the attack angle is 30 deg, the drag coefficient is increased by 1,300%, as compared to the uncontrolled case. However, when the cavity is covered and Re <=105 , a relatively small frequency, f <= 30 Hz, is required for the drag coefficient to drop to negative values. At the maximum Reynolds number, thrust is generated but only at much higher frequencies, 12 <= f <= 16 kHz.

  20. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder.

  1. Modified sprint interval training protocols. Part II. Psychological responses.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Logan K; Islam, Hashim; Dunn, Emily; Eys, Mark; Robertson-Wilson, Jennifer; Hazell, Tom J

    2017-04-01

    Sprint-interval training (SIT) is a viable method to improve health and fitness. However, researchers have questioned the utility of SIT because of its strenuous nature. The current study aimed to determine if manipulating the sprint and recovery duration, while maintaining the 1:8 work to rest ratio, could uncover a more favourable SIT protocol. Nine healthy active males (age, 23.3 ± 3.0 years; body mass index, 22.4 ± 2.2 kg·m(-2); maximal oxygen consumption, 48.9 ± 5.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) participated in 3 experimental running SIT sessions: (i) 30:240 (4 × 30-s efforts, 240-s recovery), (ii) 15:120 (8 × 15-s efforts, 120-s recovery), (iii) 5:40 (24 × 5-s efforts, 40-s recovery), and (iv) a final behavioural choice follow-up session. Affect, intentions, task self-efficacy, enjoyment, and preference were evaluated. Midway through exercise, affect became more positive for 5:40 compared with 30:240 (p < 0.05) and postexercise affect was greater for both 5:40 (p = 0.014) and 15:120 (p = 0.015) compared with 30:240. Participants expressed greater intentions to perform 5:40 3 and 5 times/week compared with 15:120 and 30:240 (p < 0.05). Participants felt more confident in their ability to perform 5:40 (p = 0.001) and 15:120 (p = 0.008) compared with 30:240. The 5:40 session was also rated as more enjoyable than 15:120 (p = 0.025) and 30:240 (p = 0.026). All participants preferred the 5:40 protocol. These data suggest that shorter sprints with more repetitions are perceived as more enjoyable and lead to greater intentions to engage in SIT.

  2. Thermomechanical fatigue, oxidation, and Creep: Part II. Life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, R. W.; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    1989-09-01

    A life prediction model is developed for crack nucleation and early crack growth based on fatigue, environment (oxidation), and creep damage. The model handles different strain-temperature phasings (i.e., in-phase and out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue, isothermal fatigue, and others, including nonproportional phasings). Fatigue life predictions compare favorably with experiments in 1070 steel for a wide range of test conditions and strain-temperature phasings. An oxide growth (oxide damage) model is based on the repeated microrupture process of oxide observed from microscopic measurements. A creep damage expression, which is stress-based, is coupled with a unified constitutive equation. A set of interrupted tests was performed to provide valuable damage progression information. Tests were performed in air and in helium atmospheres to isolate creep damage from oxidation damage.

  3. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: Part II: clinical and imaging considerations *

    PubMed Central

    Burns, SH; O’Connor, SM; Mior, SA

    1991-01-01

    In this, the second of a two part series, we continue to review the recent literature pertaining to cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Caused by the compromise of the spinal canal resulting from the superimposition of spondylotic changes upon a congenitally narrowed canal, CSM has a predictable radiographic and clinical presentation. The clinical presentation frequently includes both upper and lower motor neuron signs and symptoms. Careful analysis of the plain film images usually reveals a spinal canal measuring 12 mm or less. Additional imaging modalities confirm the diagnosis. This paper presents the clinical and imaging characteristics underlying CSM and stresses the importance of including CSM in the differential diagnosis of patients complaining of neck and leg dysfunctions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  4. Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, Daryl; Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George; Abel, David

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

  5. Microcomputers and School Libraries in the United Kingdom: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pain-Lewins, Helen; Watson, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Describes study of seven local education authorities in the United Kingdom which was conducted to discover how models of microcomputer use were being adopted by school libraries. Highlights include database information retrieval; computerized catalogs; improving students' information-handling skills; curriculum-centered plans; integrated systems;…

  6. The microbe 1984: Part II. Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.P.; Carr, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Transposable elements, genome reorganization and cellular differentiation in gram-negative bacteria; Gene expression in microbes: the lactose operon model system; New microbes from old habitats.; and The impact of the microbe in medicine.

  7. Elastodynamic analysis of a gear pump. Part II: Meshing phenomena and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Rivola, A.

    2010-10-01

    A non-linear lumped kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps is presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machines. Two main sources of noise and vibration can be considered: pressure and gear meshing. Fluid pressure distribution on gears, which is time-varying, is computed and included as a resultant external force and torque acting on the gears. Parametric excitations due to time-varying meshing stiffness, the tooth profile errors (obtained by a metrological analysis), the backlash effects between meshing teeth, the lubricant squeeze and the possibility of tooth contact on both lines of action were also included. Finally, the torsional stiffness and damping of the driving shaft and the non-linear behaviour of the hydrodynamic journal bearings were also taken into account. Model validation was carried out on the basis of experimental data concerning case accelerations and force reactions. The model can be used in order to analyse the pump dynamic behaviour and to identify the effects of modifications in design and operation parameters, in terms of vibration and dynamic forces. Part I is devoted to the calculation of the gear eccentricity in the steady-state condition as result of the balancing between mean pressure loads, mean meshing force and bearing reactions, while in Part II the meshing phenomena are fully explained and the main simulation results are presented.

  8. Puffing flame instability - Part II: Predicting the onset and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Philipp; Shepherd, Joseph; Menon, Shyam; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2011-11-01

    Experiments and simulations have been performed on fuel rich n- hexane air mixtures in a closed vessel. Both experiments and simulations show a distinct cyclic combustion or ``puffing'' mode. The misalignment of buoyancy induced pressure gradients and density gradients across the flame front is responsible for the generation of vorticity and its subsequent roll-up into vortex rings. In the present work, a simplified model is proposed based on the fundamental interactions between fluid mechanical and chemical parameters. This simplified fluid mechanics model is based on dimensional analysis and is used to predict the onset and frequency of the puffing behavior. This work was sponsored by The Boeing Company through CTBA-GTA-1.

  9. Medical Education: Barefoot Doctors, Health Care, Health Education, Nursing Education, Pharmacy Education, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part annotated bibliography of selected references on medical education in the People's Republic of China. The references date from 1913 to 1982. Most of the references are from the 1960's and 1970's. (RH)

  10. An Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) Part II: Pilot Clinical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajo, Lenin C.; Candler, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) is an intervention approach for children with reading difficulties that emphasizes reading as an important occupation of children. Part I presented the theoretical basis of the OPARI. Part II describes a pilot clinical application of the OPARI. Guided by Schkade and…

  11. MONGOLS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, PART II. URALIC AND ALTAIC SERIES, VOLUME 37, PART 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUPEN, ROBERT A.

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY DIRECTLY SUPPLEMENTS AND IS INTENDED AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF "MONGOLS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, PART I." THE RANGE OF SUBJECT MATTER, HOWEVER, GOES FAR BEYOND THE SPECIFIC CONCERNS OF THE FIRST VOLUME, COVERING GENERAL AND SPECIFIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES, UNSIGNED REPORTS AND DOCUMENTS, ENCYCLOPEDIAS, OFFICIAL HISTORIES,…

  12. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part I - Observations, Part II - Control Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the first in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Part I of this document deals with physical observations which should be performed during each routine control test. Part II…

  13. Advanced lithography parameters extraction by using scatterometry system: part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhan; Hsieh, Michael; Koh, Huipeng; Zhou, Meisheng

    2008-03-01

    As the advanced IC device process shrinks to below sub-micron dimensions (65nm, 45 nm and beyond), the overall CD error budget becomes more and more challenging. The impact of lithography process parameters other than exposure energy and defocus on final CD results cannot be ignored any more. In this paper we continue the development of the advanced lithography parameters model which we presented last year. This year we achieved to decouple 4 lithography parameters: exposure, focus, PEB temperature and laser bandwidth (or z-blur). To improve the accuracy and precision of the model, new scatterometry marks are designed to reduce the pitch dependent accuracy impact of sidewall angle and photoresist height for scatterometry metrology. The concept of this kind of scatterometry mark design is from T.A. Brunner's paper "Process Monitor Gating" [SPIE Vol. 6518, 2007]. With this concept, new scatterometry marks are designed to increase the accuracy of scatterometry measurement without sacrificing the process sensitivity and thus improve the model prediction accuracy.

  14. Modeling dry and wet deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China using a source-oriented CMAQ model: Part II. Emission sector and source region contributions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Tang, Ya; Kota, Sri Harsha; Li, Jingyi; Wu, Li; Hu, Jianlin; Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2015-11-01

    A source-oriented Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model driven by the meteorological fields generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to study the dry and wet deposition of nitrate (NO3(-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and ammonium (NH4(+)) ions in the Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve (JNNR), China from June to August 2010 and to identify the contributions of different emission sectors and source regions that were responsible for the deposition fluxes. Contributions from power plants, industry, transportation, domestic, biogenic, windblown dust, open burning, fertilizer, and manure management sources to deposition fluxes in JNNR watershed and four EANET sites are determined. In JNNR, 96%, 82%, and 87% of the SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) deposition fluxes are in the form of wet deposition of the corresponding aerosol species. Industry and power plants are the two major sources of SO4(2-) deposition flux, accounting for 86% of the total wet deposition of SO4(2-), and industry has a higher contribution (56%) than that of power plants (30%). Power plants and industry are also the top sources that are responsible for NO3(-) wet deposition, and contributions from power plants (30%) are generally higher than those from industries (21%). The major sources of NH4(+) wet deposition flux in JNNR are fertilizer (48%) and manure management (39%). Source-region apportionment confirms that SO2 and NOx emissions from local and two nearest counties do not have a significant impact on predicted wet deposition fluxes in JNNR, with contributions less than 10%. While local NH3 emissions account for a higher fraction of the NH4(+) deposition, approximately 70% of NH4(+) wet deposition in JNNR originated from other source regions. This study demonstrates that S and N deposition in JNNR is mostly from long-range transport rather than from local emissions, and to protect JNNR, regional emission reduction controls are needed.

  15. Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

  16. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  17. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology--part II: vascular.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this second part of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary vasculature, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake.

  18. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part II: Two-dimensional characterization and boundary kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    A companion paper presented the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients were a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation through the source term of the conservation law and of kinetics through an interfacial velocity field. This model overcomes an important shortcoming of existing phase-field models, namely that the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. In this paper, we present a number of numerical calculations - in one and two dimensions - that characterize our formulation. These calculations illustrate (i) highly-sensitive rate-dependent nucleation; (ii) independent prescription of the forward and backward nucleation stresses without changing the energy landscape; (iii) stick-slip interface kinetics; (iii) the competition between nucleation and kinetics in determining the final microstructural state; (iv) the effect of anisotropic kinetics; and (v) the effect of non-monotone kinetics. These calculations demonstrate the ability of this formulation to precisely prescribe complex nucleation and kinetics in a simple and transparent manner. We also extend our conservation statement to describe the kinetics of the junction lines between microstructural interfaces and boundaries. This enables us to prescribe an additional kinetic relation for the boundary, and we examine the interplay between the bulk kinetics and the junction kinetics.

  19. Part I: Microscopic description of liquid He II. Part II: Uniformly approximated WKB method as used for the calculation of phase shifts in heavy-ion collision problems

    SciTech Connect

    Suebka, P.

    1984-01-01

    In Part I, the excitation spectrum of liquid He II is obtained using the two-body potential consists of a hardcore potential plus an outside attractive potential. The sum of two gaussian potential of Khanna and Das which is similar to the Lennard-Jones potential is chosen as the attractive potential. The t-matrix method due to Brueckner and Sawada is adopted with modifications to replace the interaction potential. The spectrum gives the phonon branch and the roton dip which resemble the excitation spectrum for liquid He II. The temperature dependence of the excitation spectrum enters into calculation through the zero-momentum state occupation number. A better approximation of thermodynamic functions is obtained by extending Landau's theory to the situation where the excitation is a function of temperature as well as of momentum. Our thermodynamic calculations also bear qualitative agreement with measurements on He II as expected.

  20. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache with CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  1. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache With CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  2. Why does Bangladesh remain so poor? Part II: eight answers.

    PubMed

    Maloney, C

    1985-01-01

    Bangladeshis of varying background all over the country were asked why they think poverty persists to such an extent in Bangladesh. Their answers provide a new perspective on the situation. The initial response often blames outside and natural causes -- floods, droughts, lack of resources, low demand for the country's exports, or historic exploitation. It is true that Bangladesh has virtually no mineral resources except gas. Yet, the soil, water, and human labor add up to a huge potential. The Third Five Year Plan emphasizes use of the soil, irrigation, tanks, rivers, and human labor. These provide the only hope for reducing poverty a little during the next 5 years. Bangladeshis as well as foreign observers most commonly cite overpopulation as the cause of poverty. Population growth is a cause of present poverty in Bangladesh but is not the only cause of poverty. The Third Five Year Plan goal to reduce annual growth to 1.8% is ambitious, but even if it is achieved the population will double in a few decades. As it would most likely be impossible for Bangladesh to support such numbers and maintain political and economic stability, such growth will have to be prevented. Poverty in Bangladesh is party a result of the long history of low urbanization, weak institutions, spotty and inadequate physical infrastructure, and insufficient entrapreneurship. Other reasons cited as causes of persisting poverty include illiteracy, idleness, class exploitation, the selfishness of individuals, and a lack of trust among people. All of the efforts of the poor themselves, various agencies, and the government, as examined in the 1st part of this discussion, fail to indicate any reason to hope that poverty in Bangladesh can be dramatically reduced any time soon. The Third Five Year Plan foresees a possible reduction of the number of those in poverty by 10%. According to the Plan itself, those in or near poverty comprise 85% of the people. The conditions under which the people of some

  3. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part II. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the key continuum mechanics concepts required for the systematic prescription and numerical solution of finite deformation solid mechanics problems. Topics surveyed include measures of deformation appropriate for media undergoing large deformations, stress measures appropriate for such problems, balance laws and their role in nonlinear continuum mechanics, the role of frame indifference in description of large deformation response, and the extension of these theories to encompass two dimensional idealizations, structural idealizations, and rigid body behavior. There are three companion reports that describe the problem formulation, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology for nonlinear continuum mechanics systems.

  4. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Barth, A.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Beckert, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present progressive work that is based on our recently developed rapid control prototyping system (RCP), designed for the implementation of high-performance adaptive optical control algorithms using a continuous de-formable mirror (DM). The RCP system, presented in 2014, is resorting to a Xilinx Kintex-7 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), placed on a self-developed PCIe card, and installed on a high-performance computer that runs a hard real-time Linux operating system. For this purpose, algorithms for the efficient evaluation of data from a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) on an FPGA have been developed. The corresponding analog input and output cards are designed for exploiting the maximum possible performance while not being constrained to a specific DM and control algorithm due to the RCP approach. In this second part of our contribution, we focus on recent results that we achieved with this novel experimental setup. By presenting results which are far superior to the former ones, we further justify the deployment of the RCP system and its required time and resources. We conducted various experiments for revealing the effective performance, i.e. the maximum manageable complexity in the controller design that may be achieved in real-time without performance losses. A detailed analysis of the hidden latencies is carried out, showing that these latencies have been drastically reduced. In addition, a series of concepts relating the evaluation of the wavefront as well as designing and synthesizing a wavefront are thoroughly investigated with the goal to overcome some of the prevalent limitations. Furthermore, principal results regarding the closed-loop performance of the low-speed dynamics of the integrated heater in a DM concept are illustrated in detail; to be combined with the piezo-electric high-speed actuators in the next step

  5. Is extreme learning machine feasible? A theoretical assessment (part II).

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaobo; Liu, Xia; Fang, Jian; Xu, Zongben

    2015-01-01

    An extreme learning machine (ELM) can be regarded as a two-stage feed-forward neural network (FNN) learning system that randomly assigns the connections with and within hidden neurons in the first stage and tunes the connections with output neurons in the second stage. Therefore, ELM training is essentially a linear learning problem, which significantly reduces the computational burden. Numerous applications show that such a computation burden reduction does not degrade the generalization capability. It has, however, been open that whether this is true in theory. The aim of this paper is to study the theoretical feasibility of ELM by analyzing the pros and cons of ELM. In the previous part of this topic, we pointed out that via appropriately selected activation functions, ELM does not degrade the generalization capability in the sense of expectation. In this paper, we launch the study in a different direction and show that the randomness of ELM also leads to certain negative consequences. On one hand, we find that the randomness causes an additional uncertainty problem of ELM, both in approximation and learning. On the other hand, we theoretically justify that there also exist activation functions such that the corresponding ELM degrades the generalization capability. In particular, we prove that the generalization capability of ELM with Gaussian kernel is essentially worse than that of FNN with Gaussian kernel. To facilitate the use of ELM, we also provide a remedy to such a degradation. We find that the well-developed coefficient regularization technique can essentially improve the generalization capability. The obtained results reveal the essential characteristic of ELM in a certain sense and give theoretical guidance concerning how to use ELM.

  6. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    PubMed Central

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  7. Kinetic modeling of light limitation and sulfur deprivation effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Part II: Definition of model-based protocols and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Degrenne, B; Pruvost, J; Titica, M; Takache, H; Legrand, J

    2011-10-01

    Photosynthetic hydrogen production under light by the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was investigated in a torus-shaped PBR in sulfur-deprived conditions. Culture conditions, represented by the dry biomass concentration of the inoculum, sulfate concentration, and incident photon flux density (PFD), were optimized based on a previously published model (Fouchard et al., 2009. Biotechnol Bioeng 102:232-245). This allowed a strictly autotrophic production, whereas the sulfur-deprived protocol is usually applied in photoheterotrophic conditions. Experimental results combined with additional information from kinetic simulations emphasize effects of sulfur deprivation and light attenuation in the PBR in inducing anoxia and hydrogen production. A broad range of PFD was tested (up to 500 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) ). Maximum hydrogen productivities were 1.0 ± 0.2 mL H₂ /h/L (or 25 ± 5 mL H₂ /m(2) h) and 3.1 mL ± 0.4 H₂ /h L (or 77.5 ± 10 mL H₂ /m(2) h), at 110 and 500 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) , respectively. These values approached a maximum specific productivity of approximately 1.9 mL ± 0.4 H₂ /h/g of biomass dry weight, clearly indicative of a limitation in cell capacity to produce hydrogen. The efficiency of the process and further optimizations are discussed.

  8. Practice improvement, part II: trends in employment versus private practice.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Mary Thoesen; Roett, Michelle A

    2013-11-01

    A growing percentage of physicians are selecting employment over solo practice, and fewer family physicians have hospital admission privileges. Results from surveys of recent medical school graduates indicate a high value placed on free time. Factors to consider when choosing a practice opportunity include desire for independence, decision-making authority, work-life balance, administrative responsibilities, financial risk, and access to resources. Compensation models are evolving from the simple fee-for-service model to include metrics that reward panel size, patient access, coordination of care, chronic disease management, achievement of patient-centered medical home status, and supervision of midlevel clinicians. When a practice is sold, tangible personal property and assets in excess of liabilities, patient accounts receivable, office building, and goodwill (ie, expected earnings) determine its value. The sale of a practice includes a broad legal review, addressing billing and coding deficiencies, noncompliant contractual arrangements, and potential litigations as well as ensuring that all employment agreements, leases, service agreements, and contracts are current, have been executed appropriately, and meet regulatory requirements.

  9. Fibre reinforced composite dental bridge. Part II: Numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Swain, M V; Li, Q; Ironside, J; Steven, G P

    2004-09-01

    Motivated by the clinical success and limitations on experimental investigation of the fibre-reinforced composite dental bridge, this paper aims at providing a numerical investigation into the bridge structure. The finite element (FE) model adopted here is constructed from computer tomography images of a physical bridge specimen. The stress and strain distributions in the bridge structure especially in the bonding interfaces are analyzed in detail. The peak stresses and their variations with the different bridge designs are evaluated. Due to the lower bond strengths of adhesives and the high stress concentration in the pontic-abutment interface, the likelihood of failure in the interface is predicted by finite element analysis. The validity of the numerical results is established by a good agreement between the FE prediction and the tests in the load-deflection responses, the structural stiffness as well as the failure location of the composite dental bridge.

  10. Neuroimaging studies of striatum in cognition part II: Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Provost, Jean-Sebastien; Monchi, Oury

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a gradual shift in the definition of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been established, from a classical akinetic-rigid movement disorder to a multi-system neurodegenerative disease. While the pathophysiology of PD is complex and goes much beyond the nigro-striatal degeneration, the striatum has been shown to be responsible for many cognitive functions. Patients with PD develop impairments in multiple cognitive domains and the PD model is probably the most extensively studied regarding striatum dysfunction and its influence on cognition. Up to 40% of PD patients present cognitive impairment even in the early stages of disease development. Thus, understanding the key patterns of striatum and connecting regions' influence on cognition will help develop more specific approaches to alleviate cognitive impairment and slow down its decline. This review focuses on the contribution of neuroimaging studies in understanding how striatum impairment affects cognition in PD. PMID:26500512

  11. North Atlantic Simulations in Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments Phase II (CORE-II) . Part II; Inter-Annual to Decadal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Boening, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Howard, Armando M.; Kelley, Maxwell

    2015-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which include

  12. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part II: Inter-annual to decadal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Karspeck, Alicia R.; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Nurser, A. J. George; Pirani, Anna; Romanou, Anastasia; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Sun, Shan; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Yashayaev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their temporal representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which

  13. Family patterns of development dyslexia, Part II: Behavioral phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, P.H.; Melngailis, I.; Bedrosian, M.

    1995-12-18

    The motor control of bimanual coordination and motor speech was compared between first degree relatives from families with at least 2 dyslexic family members, and families where probands were the only affected family members. Half of affected relatives had motor coordination deficits; and they came from families in which probands also showed impaired motor coordination. By contrast, affected relatives without motor deficits came from dyslexia families where probands did not have motor deficits. Motor coordination deficits were more common and more severe among affected offspring in families where both parents were affected than among affected offspring in families where only one parent was affected. However, motor coordination deficits were also more common and more severe in affected parents when both parents were affected than among affected parents in families where only one parent was affected. We conclude that impaired temporal resolution in motor action identifies a behavioral phenotype in some subtypes of developmental dyslexia. The observed pattern of transmission for motor deficits and reading impairment in about half of dyslexia families was most congruent with a genetic model of dyslexia in which 2 codominant major genes cosegregate in dyslexia pedigrees where the proband is also motorically impaired. 54 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Pathways to PTSD, Part II: Sexually Abused Children

    PubMed Central

    Kaplow, Julie B.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa; Saxe, Glenn N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The goal of this research was to develop and test a prospective model of posttraumatic stress symptoms in sexually abused children that includes pretrauma, trauma, and disclosure-related pathways. Method At time 1, several measures were used to assess pretrauma variables, trauma variables, and stress reactions upon disclosure for 156 sexually abused children ages 8 to 13 years. At the time 2 follow-up (7 to 36 months following the initial interview), the children were assessed for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Results A path analysis involving a series of hierarchically nested ordinary least squares multiple regression analyses indicated three direct paths to PTSD symptoms: avoidant coping, anxiety/arousal, and dissociation, all measured during or immediately after disclosure of sexual abuse. Additionally, age and gender predicted avoidant coping, while life stress and age at abuse onset predicted symptoms of anxiety/arousal. Taken together, these pathways accounted for approximately 57% of the variance in PTSD symptoms. Conclusions Symptoms measured at the time of disclosure constitute direct, independent pathways by which sexually abused children are likely to develop later PTSD symptoms. These findings speak to the importance of assessing children during the disclosure of abuse in order to identify those at greatest risk for later PTSD symptoms. PMID:15994713

  15. Guidelines for clinical engineering programs--Part I: guidelines for electrical isolation; Part II: performance evaluation of clinical engineering programs.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, M

    1980-01-01

    This series presents guidelines for: electrically isolated inputs and outputs; measuring the performance of hospital biomedical engineering programs; evaluating the risk of electric shock in hospitals; and for isolated power in anesthetizing locations. In Part I, specific recommendations are given for the use of insulated approach, battery-powered monitors in surgery, and for isolation requirements for devices connected to cardiac leads. In Part II, checklists are provided for the self-evaluation of an in-house, biomedical engineering staff. Parts III and IV, in future issues of this Journal, will include discussion of the theoretical electrical hazard potential in reference to the use of isolated power systems. The question of whether isolated power should be required in all anesthetizing locations will be discussed in Part IV.

  16. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  17. Line emission from H II blister models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical techniques to calculate the thermal and geometric properties of line emission from H II 'blister' regions are presented. It is assumed that the density distributions of the H II regions are a function of two dimensions, with rotational symmetry specifying the shape in three-dimensions. The thermal and ionization equilibrium equations of the problem are solved by spherical modeling, and a spherical sector approximation is used to simplify the three-dimensional treatment of diffuse ionizing radiation. The global properties of H II 'blister' regions near the edges of a molecular cloud are simulated by means of the geometry/density distribution, and the results are compared with observational data. It is shown that there is a monotonic increase of peak surface brightness from the i = 0 deg (pole-on) observational position to the i = 90 deg (edge-on) position. The enhancement of the line peak intensity from the edge-on to the pole-on positions is found to depend on the density, stratification, ionization, and electron temperature weighting. It is found that as i increases, the position of peak line brightness of the lower excitation species is displaced to the high-density side of the high excitation species.

  18. Effects of Mg II and Ca II ionization on ab-initio solar chromosphere models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammacher, W.; Cuntz, M.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustically heated solar chromosphere models are computed considering radiation damping by (non-LTE) emission from H(-) and by Mg II and Ca II emission lines. The radiative transfer equations for the Mg II k and Ca II K emission lines are solved using the core-saturation method with complete redistribution. The Mg II k and Ca II K cooling rates are compared with the VAL model C. Several substantial improvements over the work of Ulmschneider et al. (1987) are included. It is found that the rapid temperature rises caused by the ionization of Mg II are not formed in the middle chromosphere, but occur at larger atmospheric heights. These models represent the temperature structure of the 'real' solar chromosphere much better. This result is a major precondition for the study of ab-initio models for solar flux tubes based on MHD wave propagation and also for ab-initio models for the solar transition layer.

  19. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1993-94, Part I, Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Senior Administrative Officers--Universities of Ontario, Toronto.

    This report presents data from a survey of Ontario (Canada) universities concerning employment benefits offered in 1993-94. Part I covers benefits other than pensions. Tables display the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution including: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes,…

  20. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey 1994-96. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report presents data from a survey of Ontario (Canada) universities concerning employment benefits offered in 1994-96. Part 1 covers benefits other than pensions. Tables display the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution including: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes, life and…

  1. The Didactics of Biology. A Selected Bibliography for 1979. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 18 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  2. Helping Children Cope with Fears and Stress. Part I: Discussion and Activities. Part II: Facilitator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward H.; And Others

    How fears, phobias, anxiety and stress develop in elementary school students and how these students can be assisted in coping with fears and stress are discussed in this book. Part 1, "Discussion and Activities," contains six sections. Section 1 presents an overview of fears, and stress in children. Section 2 presents 12 fear-specific activities…

  3. 30 CFR Appendix II to Subpart D of... - Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Part 18 LIST OF FIGURES Figure No. Title 1 Typical layout drawing of a machine. 2 Sample bill of material (to accompany layout drawing shown on figure 1) 3 Material to be included with the operating... wires shall not be used for grounding except in conjunction with diode(s) or equivalent. The...

  4. Understanding Medicines: Conceptual Analysis of Nurses' Needs for Knowledge and Understanding of Pharmacology (Part I). Understanding Medicines: Extending Pharmacology Education for Dependent and Independent Prescribing (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathard, Helen L.

    2001-01-01

    Part I reviews what nurses need to know about the administration and prescription of medicines. Part II addresses drug classifications, actions and effects, and interactions. Also discussed are the challenges pharmacological issues pose for nursing education. (SK)

  5. Controlled Nonlinear Stochastic Delay Equations: Part I: Modeling and Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, Harold J.

    2012-08-15

    This two-part paper deals with 'foundational' issues that have not been previously considered in the modeling and numerical optimization of nonlinear stochastic delay systems. There are new classes of models, such as those with nonlinear functions of several controls (such as products), each with is own delay, controlled random Poisson measure driving terms, admissions control with delayed retrials, and others. There are two basic and interconnected themes for these models. The first, dealt with in this part, concerns the definition of admissible control. The classical definition of an admissible control as a nonanticipative relaxed control is inadequate for these models and needs to be extended. This is needed for the convergence proofs of numerical approximations for optimal controls as well as to have a well-defined model. It is shown that the new classes of admissible controls do not enlarge the range of the value functions, is closed (together with the associated paths) under weak convergence, and is approximatable by ordinary controls. The second theme, dealt with in Part II, concerns transportation equation representations, and their role in the development of numerical algorithms with much reduced memory and computational requirements.

  6. Providing Effective Technical Assistance in Educational Settings. Part II: Implementing the Research--The Effective Delivery of Technical Assistance. Research Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crohn, Leslie

    A two-part report, sponsored by the Northwest Regional Exchange, focuses on the role of technical assistance in educational settings. This document, part II of the report, examines selected change models for establishing technical assistance systems and implications for action. After a brief introduction, the following critical components of…

  7. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  8. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part I: Mean states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Bailey, David; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Jung, Thomas; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; George Nurser, A. J.; Pirani, Anna; y Mélia, David Salas; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Simulation characteristics from eighteen global ocean-sea-ice coupled models are presented with a focus on the mean Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and other related fields in the North Atlantic. These experiments use inter-annually varying atmospheric forcing data sets for the 60-year period from 1948 to 2007 and are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The protocol for conducting such CORE-II experiments is summarized. Despite using the same atmospheric forcing, the solutions show significant differences. As most models also differ from available observations, biases in the Labrador Sea region in upper-ocean potential temperature and salinity distributions, mixed layer depths, and sea-ice cover are identified as contributors to differences in AMOC. These differences in the solutions do not suggest an obvious grouping of the models based on their ocean model lineage, their vertical coordinate representations, or surface salinity restoring strengths. Thus, the solution differences among the models are attributed primarily to use of different subgrid scale parameterizations and parameter choices as well as to differences in vertical and horizontal grid resolutions in the ocean models. Use of a wide variety of sea-ice models with diverse snow and sea-ice albedo treatments also contributes to these differences. Based on the diagnostics considered, the majority of the models appear suitable for use in studies involving the North Atlantic, but some models require dedicated development effort.

  9. Title II, Part A: Don't Scrap It, Don't Dilute It, Fix It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggshall, Jane G.

    2015-01-01

    The Issue: Washington is taking a close look at Title II, Part A (Title IIA) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as Congress debates reauthorization. The program sends roughly $2.5 billion a year to all states and nearly all districts to "(1) increase student academic achievement through strategies such as improving teacher…

  10. Instructional Climates in Preschool Children Who Are At-Risk. Part II: Perceived Physical Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leah E.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Goodway, Jacqueline D.

    2009-01-01

    In Part II of this study, we examined the effect of two 9-week instructional climates (low-autonomy [LA] and mastery motivational climate [MMC]) on perceived physical competence (PPC) in preschoolers (N = 117). Participants were randomly assigned to an LA, MMC, or comparison group. PPC was assessed by a pretest, posttest, and retention test with…

  11. Managing the care of health and the cure of disease--Part II: Integration.

    PubMed

    Glouberman, S; Mintzberg, H

    2001-01-01

    The development of appropriate levels of integration in the system of health care and disease cure will require stronger collective cultures and enhanced communication among the key actors. Part II of this paper uses this line of argument to reframe four major issues in this system: coordination of acute cure and of community care, and collaboration in institutions and in the system at large.

  12. Student Performance on the NBME Part II Subtest and Subject Examination in Obstetrics-Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metheny, William P.; Holzman, Gerald B.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of the scores of 342 third-year medical students on the National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination and the Part II subtest on obstetrics-gynecology found significantly better performance on the former, suggesting a need to interpret the scores differently. (Author/MSE)

  13. Biology--Chemistry--Physics, Students' Guide, A Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    Parts I and II of the students' guide to the three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee are contained in this guide. A committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical…

  14. Thermoelectric Properties of Pristine and Doped Graphene Nanosheets and Graphene Nanoribbons: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muley, Sarang V.; Ravindra, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    In Part II of this study, approaches to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit ( ZT) of graphene nanosheets and nanoribbons is discussed. The presence of vacancies in graphene is found to increase the ZT of zigzag graphene nanoribbons significantly. Graphene can be a promising material with much better thermoelectric performance than conventional thermoelectrics.

  15. An Analysis of a Finite Element Method for Convection-Diffusion Problems. Part II. A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CONVECTION- DIFFUSION PROBLEMS PART II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES AND ADAPTIVITY by W. G. Szymczak Y 6a...PERIOD COVERED AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR final life of the contract CONVECTION- DIFFUSION PROBLEM S. Part II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ...Element Method for Convection- Diffusion Problems. Part II: A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity W. G. Szvmczak and I. Babu~ka# Laboratory for

  16. The Evolution of "Association" as a Model for Lay/Religious Collaboration in Catholic Education, Part II: The Emergence of Shared Mission as a Ministry Paradigm, 1986-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidd, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part series (published in the March 2009 issue), the author traced the evolution of the Brothers of the Christian Schools' (Christian Brothers in the United States) understanding of how they related to the lay people with whom they increasingly shared their apostolate of Catholic education. From a stance of wary distance in…

  17. The Basket Method for Selecting Balanced Samples. Part II. Applications to Price Estimation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    AD-AI12 949 CLEMSON UNIV SC OEPT OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES F/B 12/1 THE BASKET METHOD FOR SELECTING BALANCED SAMPLES. PART 11. APPL-ETC(U) DEC SI K T...1111󈧝 1.4 1.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHARTNN’( 4~ THE BASKET METHOD FOR SELECTING BALANCED SAMPLES - PART II: APPLICATIONS TO PRICE ESTIMATION * K...for Selecting Balanced Samples Part I: Applications to Price Estimation AB9TRACT The "Basket Method" of sampling, a tool designed to achieve

  18. An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part II: Liquid freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ilicak, Mehmet; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Drange, Helge; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bailey, David A.; Bentsen, Mats; Biastoch, Arne; Bozec, Alexandra; Böning, Claus; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Curry, Beth; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Iovino, Doroteaciro; Jahn, Alexandra; Jung, Thomas; Large, William G.; Lee, Craig; Lique, Camille; Lu, Jianhua; Masina, Simona; Nurser, A. J. George; Rabe, Benjamin; Roth, Christina; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Spence, Paul; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Xuezhu; Yeager, Steve G.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean simulated in 14 global ocean-sea ice models in the framework of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments, phase II (CORE-II) is analyzed in this study. The focus is on the Arctic liquid freshwater (FW) sources and freshwater content (FWC). The models agree on the interannual variability of liquid FW transport at the gateways where the ocean volume transport determines the FW transport variability. The variation of liquid FWC is induced by both the surface FW flux (associated with sea ice production) and lateral liquid FW transport, which are in phase when averaged on decadal time scales. The liquid FWC shows an increase starting from the mid-1990s, caused by the reduction of both sea ice formation and liquid FW export, with the former being more significant in most of the models. The mean state of the FW budget is less consistently simulated than the temporal variability. The model ensemble means of liquid FW transport through the Arctic gateways compare well with observations. On average, the models have too high mean FWC, weaker upward trends of FWC in the recent decade than the observation, and low consistency in the temporal variation of FWC spatial distribution, which needs to be further explored for the purpose of model development.

  19. Finite State Machines and Modal Models in Ptolemy II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Finite State Machines and Modal Models in Ptolemy II Edward A. Lee Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley...DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Finite State Machines and Modal Models in Ptolemy II 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...describes the usage and semantics of finite-state machines (FSMs) and modal models in Ptolemy II. FSMs are actors whose behavior is described using a

  20. Interannual Variability and Trends of Extratropical Ozone, Part II: Southern Hemisphere. Part 2; Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.

    2008-01-01

    A principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the Southern Hemisphere (SH) total column ozone following the method established for analyzing the data in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) in a companion paper. The interannual variability (IAV) of extratropical O-3 in the SH is characterized by four main modes, which account for 75% of the total variance. The first two leading modes are approximately zonally symmetric and relate to the Southern Hemisphere annular mode and the quasi-biennial oscillation. The third and fourth modes exhibit wavenumber-1 structures. Contrary to the Northern Hemisphere, the third and fourth are nor related to stationary waves. Similar results obtained for the 30 100-hPa geopotential thickness.The decreasing O3 trend in the SH is captured in the first mode. The largest trend is at the South Pole, with value similar to-2 Dobson Units (DU)/yr. Both the spatial pattern and trends in the column ozone are captured by the Goddard Earth Observation System chemistry-climate model (GEOS-CCM) in the SH.

  1. Modeling Topaz-II system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

  2. Structural interfaces in linear elasticity. Part II: Effective properties and neutrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, K.; Bigoni, D.; Drugan, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    The model of structural interfaces developed in Part I of this paper allows us to analytically attack and solve different problems of stress concentration and composites. In particular, (i) new formulae are given for effective properties of composite materials containing dilute suspensions of (randomly oriented) reinforced elliptical voids or inclusions; (ii) a new definition is proposed for inclusion neutrality (to account for the fact that the matrix is always 'overstressed', and thus non-neutral in a classical sense, at the contacts with the interfacial structure), which is shown to provide interesting stress optimality conditions. More generally, it is shown that the incorporation of an interfacial structure at the contact between two elastic solids exhibits properties that cannot be obtained using the more conventional approach of the zero-thickness, linear interface. For instance: contrary to the zero-thickness interface, both bulk and shear effective moduli can be optimized for a structural interface; effective properties higher that those possible with a perfect interface can be attained with a structural interface; and neutrality holds with a structural interface for a substantially broader range of parameters than for a zero-thickness interface.

  3. Model light curves of linear Type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, D.A.; Wheeler, J.C.; Harkness, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    Light curves computed from hydrodynamic models of supernova are compared graphically with the average observed B and V-band light curves of linear Type II supernovae. Models are based on the following explosion scenarios: carbon deflagration within a C + O core near the Chandrasekhar mass, electron-capture-induced core collapse of an O-Ne-Mg core of the Chandrasekhar mass, and collapse of an Fe core in a massive star. A range of envelope mass, initial radius, and composition is investigated. Only a narrow range of values of these parameters are consistent with observations. Within this narrow range, most of the observed light curve properties can be obtained in part, but none of the models can reproduce the entire light curve shape and absolute magnitude over the full 200 day comparison period. The observed lack of a plateau phase is explained in terms of a combination of small envelope mass and envelope helium enhancement. The final cobalt tail phase of the light curve can be reproduced only if the mass of explosively synthesized radioactive Ni-56 is small. The results presented here, in conjunction with the observed homogeneity among individual members of the supernova subclass, argue favorably for the O-Ne-Mg core collapse mechanism as an explanation for linear Type II supernovae. The Crab Nebula may arisen from such an explosion. Carbon deflagrations may lead to brighter events like SN 1979C. 62 refs.

  4. Modeling interactions of Hg(II) and bauxitic soils.

    PubMed

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J; Bandara, Atula

    2007-11-01

    The adsorptive interactions of Hg(II) with gibbsite-rich soils (hereafter SOIL-g) were modeled by 1-pK surface complexation theory using charge distribution multi-site ion competition model (CD MUSIC) incorporating basic Stern layer model (BSM) to account for electrostatic effects. The model calibrations were performed for the experimental data of synthetic gibbsite-Hg(II) adsorption. When [NaNO(3)] > or = 0.01M, the Hg(II) adsorption density values, of gibbsite, Gamma(Hg(II)), showed a negligible variation with ionic strength. However, Gamma(Hg(II)) values show a marked variation with the [Cl(-)]. When [Cl(-)] > or = 0.01M, the Gamma(Hg(II)) values showed a significant reduction with the pH. The Hg(II) adsorption behavior in NaNO(3) was modeled assuming homogeneous solid surface. The introduction of high affinity sites, i.e., >Al(s)OH at a low concentration (typically about 0.045 sites nm(-2)) is required to model Hg(II) adsorption in NaCl. According to IR spectroscopic data, the bauxitic soil (SOIL-g) is characterized by gibbsite and bayerite. These mineral phases were not treated discretely in modeling of Hg(II) and soil interactions. The CD MUSIC/BSM model combination can be used to model Hg(II) adsorption on bauxitic soil. The role of organic matter seems to play a role on Hg(II) binding when pH>8. The Hg(II) adsorption in the presence of excess Cl(-) ions required the selection of high affinity sites in modeling.

  5. Modeling of tower relief dynamics: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cassata, J.R.; Dasgupta, S.; Gandhi, S.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Dynamic simulations of individual towers or systems of distillations columns overcome limitations of steady-state models by rigorously determining dynamic responses. These will lead to a realistic quantification of relief header and flare system load and identify the design-setting relief scenario. Determination of distillation tower relief loads based on steady-state simulations or recognized methods of approximation can lead to over designing relief systems by large margins. This can result in unnecessary capital expenditure for relief headers and flare systems that can significantly alter the economics of a proposed project. Such overly conservative requirements may even cause potentially attractive projects to be unnecessarily canceled. In addition, approximate methods or analyses based on steady-state simulations sometimes do not identify the design-setting relief mode. Part 1 introduced the PRV and tower dynamic models. Different strategies were shown that can simplify these models. These strategies include tower segmentation, tray lumping and component lumping. Two case studies illustrate the advantages of dynamic models. The two studies are a depentanizer tower relief study and a delthanizer tower relief study.

  6. Partly conditional survival models for longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingye; Heagerty, Patrick J

    2005-06-01

    It is common in longitudinal studies to collect information on the time until a key clinical event, such as death, and to measure markers of patient health at multiple follow-up times. One approach to the joint analysis of survival and repeated measures data adopts a time-varying covariate regression model for the event time hazard. Using this standard approach, the instantaneous risk of death at time t is specified as a possibly semi-parametric function of covariate information that has accrued through time t. In this manuscript, we decouple the time scale for modeling the hazard from the time scale for accrual of available longitudinal covariate information. Specifically, we propose a class of models that condition on the covariate information through time s and then specifies the conditional hazard for times t, where t > s. Our approach parallels the "partly conditional" models proposed by Pepe and Couper (1997, Journal of the American Statistical Association 92, 991-998) for pure repeated measures applications. Estimation is based on the use of estimating equations applied to clusters of data formed through the creation of derived survival times that measure the time from measurement of covariates to the end of follow-up. Patient follow-up may be terminated either by the occurrence of the event or by censoring. The proposed methods allow a flexible characterization of the association between a longitudinal covariate process and a survival time, and facilitate the direct prediction of survival probabilities in the time-varying covariate setting.

  7. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 1030 - Model Clauses and Sample Forms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... 1030, App. B Appendix B to Part 1030—Model Clauses and Sample Forms Table of Contents B-1—Model Clauses.... This method applies a daily periodic rate to the principal in the account each day. (ii) Average Daily... applies a periodic rate to the average daily balance in the account for the period. The average...

  8. An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, J; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    For bulk thermoelectrics, figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT were mainly due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity cannot be measured directly at high temperatures. The combined measurements of thermal diffusivity and specific heat and density are required. It has been shown that thermal conductivity is the property with the greatest uncertainty and has a direct influence on the accuracy of the figure of merit. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper is Part II of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride. The main focuses in Part II are on thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  14. The structure and interpretation of cosmology: Part II. The concept of creation in inflation and quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Gordon

    The purpose of the paper, of which this is part II, is to review, clarify, and critically analyse modern mathematical cosmology. The emphasis is upon mathematical objects and structures, rather than numerical computations. Part II provides a critical analysis of inflationary cosmology and quantum cosmology, with particular attention to the claims made that these theories can explain the creation of the universe.

  15. AERMOD: A DISPERSION MODEL FOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCE APPLICATIONS PART I: GENERAL MODEL FORMULATION AND BOUNDARY LAYER CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formulations of the AMS/EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee's applied air dispersion model (AERMOD) as related to the characterization of the planetary boundary layer are described. This is the first in a series of three articles. Part II describes the formulation of...

  16. Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process. Phase II. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    RD-A154 613 RECRUITMENT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM AND ACCESSION i/7 CONTINGENCY PLANNING PROCE..(U) ECONOMIC RESEARCH LAB INC RESTON YA L GOLDBERG ET AL...11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process Phase II, Part 1 Final Report...GROUP Early Warning System, Forecasting, Manpower Planning LV &V WA&Vm 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block ny.1ber

  17. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  18. Paleotectonic investigations of the Mississippian System in the United States: Parts I and II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; Connor, Carol Waite; Others,

    1979-01-01

    This professional paper is the fifth in a series of paleotectonic studies each covering a geologic system in the conterminous United States. Part I provides a region-by-region discussion of data concerning the Mississippian System and an explanation and documentation for the maps and sections contained in part III. Part II of the paper provides a summary of the Mississippian System, presents interregional interpretations permitted by this study, and includes sections on notable features of the system. The maps contained in the separate case as part III may be divided into two groups: (1) a sequence of factual or basic maps that shows, with a minimum of interpretation, the Mississippian System as it occurs today, and (2) interpretive maps that attempt a reasonable reconstruction of the original extent of the system, its tectonics, environment, and geography.

  19. Friction Reduction Through Ultrasonic Vibration: Part 1: Modelling Intermittent Contact.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Eric; Virdih, Zlatko; Giamundo, Vincenzo; Lemaire-Semail, Betty; Giraud, Frederic; Rodic, Tomaz; Peric, Djordje; Adams, Michael

    2017-02-17

    Ultrasonic vibration is employed to modify the friction of a finger pad in way that induces haptic sensations. A combination of intermittent contact and squeeze film levitation has been previously proposed as the most probable mechanism. In this paper, in order to understand the underlying principles that govern friction modulation by intermittent contact, numerical models based on finite element (FE) analysis and also a spring-Coulombic slider are developed. The physical input parameters for the FE model are optimised by measuring the contact phase shift between a finger pad and a vibrating plate. The spring-slider model assists in the interpretation of the FE model and leads to the identification of a dimensionless group that allows the calculated coefficient of friction to be approximately superimposed onto an exponential function of the dimensionless group. Thus, it is possible to rationalise the computed relative reduction in friction being (i) dependent on the vibrational amplitude, frequency, and the intrinsic coefficient of friction of the device, and the reciprocal of the exploration velocity, and (ii) independent of the applied normal force, and the shear and extensional elastic moduli of the finger skin provided that intermittent contact is sufficiently well developed. Experimental validation of the modelling using real and artificial fingertips will be reported in part 2 of this work, which supports the current modelling.

  20. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts.

  1. Validity of NBME Parts I and II for the Selection of Residents: The Case of Orthopaedic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Susan M.

    The predictive validity of scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Part I and Part II examinations for the selection of residents in orthopaedic surgery was investigated. Use of NBME scores has been criticized because of the time lag between taking Part I and entering residency and because Part I content is not directly linked to…

  2. 3D modelling of the flow of self-compacting concrete with or without steel fibres. Part II: L-box test and the assessment of fibre reorientation during the flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, R.; Kulasegaram, S.; Karihaloo, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    The three-dimensional Lagrangian particle-based smooth particle hydrodynamics method described in Part I of this two-part paper is used to simulate the flow of self-compacting concrete (SCC) with and without steel fibres in the L-box configuration. As in Part I, the simulation of the SCC mixes without fibres emphasises the distribution of large aggregate particles of different sizes throughout the flow, whereas the simulation of high strength SCC mixes which contain steel fibres is focused on the distribution of fibres and their orientation during the flow. The capabilities of this methodology are validated by comparing the simulation results with the L-box test carried out in the laboratory. A simple method is developed to assess the reorientation and distribution of short steel fibres in self-compacting concrete mixes during the flow. The reorientation of the fibres during the flow is used to estimate the fibre orientation factor (FOF) in a cross section perpendicular to the principal direction of flow. This estimation procedure involves the number of fibres cut by the section and their inclination to the cutting plane. This is useful to determine the FOF in practical image analysis on cut sections.

  3. Coupled Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport/Weather Forecast and Research/Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model. Part II; Simulations of Tower-Based and Airborne CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Wofsy, Steven C.; Matross, Daniel; Gerbig, Christoph; Lin, John C.; Freitas, Saulo; Longo, Marcos; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Peters, Wouter

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates simulations of atmospheric CO2 measured in 2004 at continental surface and airborne receptors, intended to test the capability to use data with high temporal and spatial resolution for analyses of carbon sources and sinks at regional and continental scales. The simulations were performed using the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model driven by the Weather Forecast and Research (WRF) model, and linked to surface fluxes from the satellite-driven Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM). The simulations provide detailed representations of hourly CO2 tower data and reproduce the shapes of airborne vertical profiles with high fidelity. WRF meteorology gives superior model performance compared with standard meteorological products, and the impact of including WRF convective mass fluxes in the STILT trajectory calculations is significant in individual cases. Important biases in the simulation are associated with the nighttime CO2 build-up and subsequent morning transition to convective conditions, and with errors in the advected lateral boundary condition. Comparison of STILT simulations driven by the WRF model against those driven by the Brazilian variant of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS) shows that model-to-model differences are smaller than between an individual transport model and observations, pointing to systematic errors in the simulated transport. Future developments in the WRF model s data assimilation capabilities, basic research into the fundamental aspects of trajectory calculations, and intercomparison studies involving other transport models, are possible venues for reducing these errors. Overall, the STILT/WRF/VPRM offers a powerful tool for continental and regional scale carbon flux estimates.

  4. Climate Model Datasets on Earth System Grid II (ESG II)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Earth System Grid (ESG) is a project that combines the power and capacity of supercomputers, sophisticated analysis servers, and datasets on the scale of petabytes. The goal is to provide a seamless distributed environment that allows scientists in many locations to work with large-scale data, perform climate change modeling and simulation,and share results in innovative ways. Though ESG is more about the computing environment than the data, still there are several catalogs of data available at the web site that can be browsed or search. Most of the datasets are restricted to registered users, but several are open to any access.

  5. JPEG-2000 Part 10 Verification Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mniszewski, Susan; Rivenburgh, Reid; Brislawn, Chris

    2003-03-04

    VM10 is a research software implementation of the ISO/IEC JPEG-2000 Still Image Coding standard (ISO international Standard 15444). JPEG-2000 image coding involves subband codiing and compression of digital raster images to facilitate storage and transmission of such imagery. Images are decomposed into space/scale subbands using cascades of two-dimensional (tensor product) discrete wavelet transforms. The wavelet transforms can be either reversible (integer-to-integer) transforms or irreversible (integer-to-float). The subbands in each resolution level are quantized by uniform scalar quantization in the irreversible case. The resulting integer subbands in each resolution level are partitioned into spatially localized code blocks to facilitate localized entropy decoding. Code blocks are encoded and packaged into an embedded bitstream using binary arithmetic bitplane coding (the MQ Coder algorithm applied to hierarchical bitplane coding (the MQ coder algorithm applied to hierachical bitplane context modeling). The resultant compressed bitstream is configured for use with the JPIP interactive client-server protocol (JPEG-2000 part 9). VM10 is written in ANSI C++ using the Biltz++ array class library. To enable development of multidimensional image coding algorithms, VM10 is templated on the dimension of the array containers. It was developed with the GNU g++ compiler on both Linux (Red Hat) and Windows/cygwin platforms, although it should compile and run under other ANSI C++ compilers as well. Software design is highly modular and object-oriented in order to facilitate rapid development and frequent revision and experimentation. No attempt has been made to optimize the run-time performance of the code. The software performs both the encoding and decoding operations involved in JPEG-2000 image coding, as implemented in apps/compress/main.cpp and apps/expand/main.cpp. VM10 implements all of the JPEG-2000 baseline (Part 1, ISO 15444-1) and portions of the published

  6. Peak-summer East Asian rainfall predictability and prediction part II: extratropical East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, So-Young; Wang, Bin; Xing, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The part II of the present study focuses on northern East Asia (NEA: 26°N-50°N, 100°-140°E), exploring the source and limit of the predictability of the peak summer (July-August) rainfall. Prediction of NEA peak summer rainfall is extremely challenging because of the exposure of the NEA to midlatitude influence. By examining four coupled climate models' multi-model ensemble (MME) hindcast during 1979-2010, we found that the domain-averaged MME temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill is only 0.13. It is unclear whether the dynamical models' poor skills are due to limited predictability of the peak-summer NEA rainfall. In the present study we attempted to address this issue by applying predictable mode analysis method using 35-year observations (1979-2013). Four empirical orthogonal modes of variability and associated major potential sources of variability are identified: (a) an equatorial western Pacific (EWP)-NEA teleconnection driven by EWP sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, (b) a western Pacific subtropical high and Indo-Pacific dipole SST feedback mode, (c) a central Pacific-El Nino-Southern Oscillation mode, and (d) a Eurasian wave train pattern. Physically meaningful predictors for each principal component (PC) were selected based on analysis of the lead-lag correlations with the persistent and tendency fields of SST and sea-level pressure from March to June. A suite of physical-empirical (P-E) models is established to predict the four leading PCs. The peak summer rainfall anomaly pattern is then objectively predicted by using the predicted PCs and the corresponding observed spatial patterns. A 35-year cross-validated hindcast over the NEA yields a domain-averaged TCC skill of 0.36, which is significantly higher than the MME dynamical hindcast (0.13). The estimated maximum potential attainable TCC skill averaged over the entire domain is around 0.61, suggesting that the current dynamical prediction models may have large rooms to improve

  7. Prediction of a Flash Flood in Complex Terrain. Part II: A Comparison of Flood Discharge Simulations Using Rainfall Input from Radar, a Dynamic Model, and an Automated Algorithmic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, David N.; Warner, Thomas T.; Leavesley, George H.

    2000-06-01

    Three techniques were employed for the estimation and prediction of precipitation from a thunderstorm that produced a flash flood in the Buffalo Creek watershed located in the mountainous Front Range near Denver, Colorado, on 12 July 1996. The techniques included 1) quantitative precipitation estimation using the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler and the National Center for Atmospheric Research's S-band, dual-polarization radars, 2) quantitative precipitation forecasting utilizing a dynamic model, and 3) quantitative precipitation forecasting using an automated algorithmic system for tracking thunderstorms. Rainfall data provided by these various techniques at short timescales (6 min) and at fine spatial resolutions (150 m to 2 km) served as input to a distributed-parameter hydrologic model for analysis of the flash flood. The quantitative precipitation estimates from the weather radar demonstrated their ability to aid in simulating a watershed's response to precipitation forcing from small-scale, convective weather in complex terrain. That is, with the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates employed as input, the simulated peak discharge was similar to that estimated. The dynamic model showed the most promise in providing a significant forecast lead time for this flash-flood event. The algorithmic system did not show as much skill in comparison with the dynamic model in providing precipitation forcing to the hydrologic model. The discharge forecasts based on the dynamic-model and algorithmic-system inputs point to the need to improve the ability to forecast convective storms, especially if models such as these eventually are to be used in operational flood forecasting.

  8. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  9. A Lagrangian variational formulation for nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Part II: Continuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Yoshimura, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Part I of this paper introduced a Lagrangian variational formulation for nonequilibrium thermodynamics of discrete systems. This variational formulation extends Hamilton's principle to allow the inclusion of irreversible processes in the dynamics. The irreversibility is encoded into a nonlinear nonholonomic constraint given by the expression of entropy production associated to all the irreversible processes involved. In Part II, we develop this formulation for the case of continuum systems by extending the setting of Part I to infinite dimensional nonholonomic Lagrangian systems. The variational formulation is naturally expressed in the material representation, while its spatial version is obtained via a nonholonomic Lagrangian reduction by symmetry. The theory is illustrated with the examples of a viscous heat conducting fluid and its multicomponent extension including chemical reactions and mass transfer.

  10. A legacy of struggle: the OSHA ergonomics standard and beyond, Part II.

    PubMed

    Delp, Linda; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Sheikh, Hina; Lemus, Jackie

    2014-11-01

    The OSHA ergonomics standard issued in 2000 was repealed within four months through a Congressional resolution that limits future ergonomics rulemaking. This section continues the conversation initiated in Part I, documenting a legacy of struggle for an ergonomics standard through the voices of eight labor, academic, and government key informants. Part I summarized important components of the standard; described the convergence of labor activism, research, and government action that laid the foundation for a standard; and highlighted the debates that characterized the rulemaking process. Part II explores the anti-regulatory political landscape of the 1990s, as well as the key opponents, power dynamics, and legal maneuvers that led to repeal of the standard. This section also describes the impact of the ergonomics struggle beyond the standard itself and ends with a discussion of creative state-level policy initiatives and coalition approaches to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in today's sociopolitical context.

  11. Market-Based Coordination of Thermostatically Controlled Loads—Part II: Unknown Parameters and Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sen; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2016-03-01

    This two-part paper considers the coordination of a population of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs) with unknown parameters to achieve group objectives. The problem involves designing the bidding and market clearing strategy to motivate self-interested users to realize efficient energy allocation subject to a peak power constraint. The companion paper (Part I) formulates the problem and proposes a load coordination framework using the mechanism design approach. To address the unknown parameters, Part II of this paper presents a joint state and parameter estimation framework based on the expectation maximization algorithm. The overall framework is then validated using real-world weather data and price data, and is compared with other approaches in terms of aggregated power response. Simulation results indicate that our coordination framework can effectively improve the efficiency of the power grid operations and reduce power congestion at key times.

  12. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.

    PubMed

    Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used.

  13. Advances in explosives analysis—part II: photon and neutron methods

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; ...

    2015-10-07

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245–246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. Our review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers,more » electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. In Part II, we review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.« less

  14. Advances in explosives analysis—part II: photon and neutron methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2015-10-07

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245–246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. Our review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. In Part II, we review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.

  15. PREFACE: Part II of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter; Jochemsen, Reyer

    2009-03-01

    This Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series forms Part II of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. Part II contains the papers of short oral and poster presentations. In addition, it provides general information about the LT25 conference, such as a Report from the Organizers, an Activity Report to the IUPAP of the C5 Chairs, an overview of Committees, Sponsors and Exhibitors, and some Conference Statistics. Part I of the Proceedings of LT25 is a special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. It contains the majority of the special invited lectures, such as the London Prize Lectures, the IUPAP Young Scientist Award Lectures, the Plenary and Half Plenary and Public Lectures, and the Historical Lectures presented at the conference excursion to Leiden. The JPCM LT25 special issue is available for free for a period of one year from publication (Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter). To ensure the high publication standard mandated by Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Journal of Physics: Conference Series, every paper was reviewed by at least one referee before it was accepted for publication. The Editors are indebted to many colleagues for invaluable assistance in the preparation and with the reviewing of the 900 papers appearing in Parts I and II of these Proceedings. In particular, we like to thank Carlo Beenakker, Jeroen van den Brink, Hans Brom, Jos de Jongh, Horst Rogalla, and Fons de Waele. Guest Editors Peter Kes and Reijer Jochemsen Leiden University, The Netherlands Conference logo

  16. Exploring Canine-Human Differences in Product Performance. Part II: Use of Modeling and Simulation to Explore the Impact of Formulation on Ciprofloxacin In Vivo Absorption and Dissolution in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Martinez, M N; Mistry, B; Lukacova, V; Lentz, K A; Polli, J E; Hoag, S W; Dowling, T; Kona, R; Fahmy, R M

    2017-03-06

    This study explored the in vivo performance of three oral ciprofloxacin formulations (oral solution, fast, or slow dissolving tablets) in beagle dogs. The in vivo absorption and dissolution behaviors, estimated with in silico mechanistic models, were compared to the results previously published in human volunteers. Six normal healthy male beagle dogs (five to completion) received three oral formulations and an intravenous infusion in a randomized crossover design. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentrations were estimated by tandem mass spectrometry detection. A mechanistic absorption model was used to predict the in vivo dissolution and absorption characteristics of the oral formulations. Canine ciprofloxacin absorption was constrained to the duodenum/jejunum. This absorption window was far narrower than that seen in humans. Furthermore, while substantial within-individual variability in drug absorption was seen in human subjects, a greater magnitude of variability was observed in dogs. For three sets of data, a lag time in gastric emptying was necessary to improve the accuracy of model-generated in vivo blood level profile predictions. In addition to species-associated dissimilarities in drug solubilization due to human versus canine differences in gastrointestinal fluid compositions, the far more rapid intestinal transit time and potential segmental differences in drug absorption needed to be considered during human-canine extrapolation of oral drug and drug product performance. Through the use of mechanistic models, the data generated in the human and canine studies contributed insights into some aspects of the interspecies differences to be considered when extrapolating oral bioavailability/formulation effect data between dogs and humans.

  17. Matter from Outside Our Solar System -- New Insights, Part II. Experimental Measurements and Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wefel, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The second of two parts (part 1 in v20 n4, p222, Apr 1982) focuses on experimental techniques used to study cosmic-ray isotopic composition, experimental results, and comparison between cosmic-ray source matter and solar-system material. Several models for nucleosynthesis and evolution of cosmic-source matter are also discussed. (Author/JN)

  18. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part II: Program Overviews and Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part II of the proceedings includes nine presentations. They are: "Business and Foreign Language Tie the Knot at Nazareth College: A Four Year Program Model" (Octave G. Naulleau); "For an Actual Education in International Management" (Alain Eclache and Georges Labet); "A Foreign Language Program for Majors in Hotel and Restaurant Management:…

  19. PIC Simulations in Low Energy Part of PIP-II Proton Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady

    2014-07-01

    The front end of PIP-II linac is composed of a 30 keV ion source, low energy beam transport line (LEBT), 2.1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and medium energy beam transport line (MEBT). This configuration is currently being assembled at Fermilab to support a complete systems test. The front end represents the primary technical risk with PIP-II, and so this step will validate the concept and demonstrate that the hardware can meet the specified requirements. SC accelerating cavities right after MEBT require high quality and well defined beam after RFQ to avoid excessive particle losses. In this paper we will present recent progress of beam dynamic study, using CST PIC simulation code, to investigate partial neutralization effect in LEBT, halo and tail formation in RFQ, total emittance growth and beam losses along low energy part of the linac.

  20. Pedagogical progeniture or tactical translation? George Fordyce's additions and modifications to William Cullen's philosophical chemistry--Part II.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Georgette

    2014-08-01

    This paper compares the affinity theories and the associated affinity diagrams of William Cullen (1710-1790) and George Fordyce (1736-1802), exploring in particular one episode that took place during the brief hiatus between Fordyce's student years at Edinburgh University and the start of his own pedagogical career in London. This investigation complements that contained in Part I of this paper, which compared the chemistry courses given by Cullen and Fordyce, demonstrating that the knowledge originally imparted to Fordyce by Cullen in his Edinburgh lectures was augmented and translated by Fordyce for his own pedagogical purposes. Part II offers greater insight into the flow of knowledge between Fordyce and Cullen. Their correspondence suggests that the relationship between master and student transmuted into something more complicated after Fordyce left Edinburgh, while the model of knowledge transmission between the two can be seen to be more collaborative than might be expected.