Science.gov

Sample records for modeling support contract

  1. Physics modeling support contract: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    This document is the final report for the Physics Modeling Support contract between TRW, Inc. and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fiscal year 1987. It consists of following projects: TIBER physics modeling and systems code development; advanced blanket modeling task; time dependent modeling; and free electron maser for TIBER II.

  2. Past and ongoing shifts in Joshua tree distribution support future modeled range contraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Kenneth L.; Ironside, Kirsten; Eischeid, Jon K.; Garfin, Gregg; Duffy, Phil; Toney, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The future distribution of the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) is projected by combining a geostatistical analysis of 20th-century climates over its current range, future modeled climates, and paleoecological data showing its response to a past similar climate change. As climate rapidly warmed ;11 700 years ago, the range of Joshua tree contracted, leaving only the populations near what had been its northernmost limit. Its ability to spread northward into new suitable habitats after this time may have been inhibited by the somewhat earlier extinction of megafaunal dispersers, especially the Shasta ground sloth. We applied a model of climate suitability for Joshua tree, developed from its 20th-century range and climates, to future climates modeled through a set of six individual general circulation models (GCM) and one suite of 22 models for the late 21st century. All distribution data, observed climate data, and future GCM results were scaled to spatial grids of ;1 km and ;4 km in order to facilitate application within this topographically complex region. All of the models project the future elimination of Joshua tree throughout most of the southern portions of its current range. Although estimates of future monthly precipitation differ between the models, these changes are outweighed by large increases in temperature common to all the models. Only a few populations within the current range are predicted to be sustainable. Several models project significant potential future expansion into new areas beyond the current range, but the species' Historical and current rates of dispersal would seem to prevent natural expansion into these new areas. Several areas are predicted to be potential sites for relocation/ assisted migration. This project demonstrates how information from paleoecology and modern ecology can be integrated in order to understand ongoing processes and future distributions.

  3. 76 FR 81807 - Operational Contract Support

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ...This part establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and provides procedures for operational contract support (OCS), including OCS program management, contract support integration, and integration of defense contractor personnel into contingency operations outside the United States. An interim final rule is required to procedurally close gaps and ensure the correct planning, oversight and......

  4. Uterine Contraction Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Miao; Belfore, Lee A.; Shen, Yuzhong; Scerbo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Building a training system for medical personnel to properly interpret fetal heart rate tracing requires developing accurate models that can relate various signal patterns to certain pathologies. In addition to modeling the fetal heart rate signal itself, the change of uterine pressure that bears strong relation to fetal heart rate and provides indications of maternal and fetal status should also be considered. In this work, we have developed a group of parametric models to simulate uterine contractions during labor and delivery. Through analysis of real patient records, we propose to model uterine contraction signals by three major components: regular contractions, impulsive noise caused by fetal movements, and low amplitude noise invoked by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus. The regular contractions are modeled by an asymmetric generalized Gaussian function and least squares estimation is used to compute the parameter values of the asymmetric generalized Gaussian function based on uterine contractions of real patients. Regular contractions are detected based on thresholding and derivative analysis of uterine contractions. Impulsive noise caused by fetal movements and low amplitude noise by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus are modeled by rational polynomial functions and Perlin noise, respectively. Experiment results show the synthesized uterine contractions can mimic the real uterine contractions realistically, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Contract Negotiations Supported Through Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Sérgio A.; Vaz, Marco A.; Souza, Jano M.

    Many clients often view software as a commodity; then, it is critical that IT sellers know how to create value into their offering to differentiate their service from all the others. Clients sometimes refuse to contract software development due to lack of technical understanding or simply because they are afraid of IT contractual commitments. The IT negotiators who recognize the importance of this issue and the reason why it is a problem will be able to work to reach the commercial terms they want. Therefore, this chapter aims to stimulate IT professionals to improve their negotiation skills and presents a computational tool to support managers to get the best out of software negotiations through the identification of contract risks.

  6. Dual Support in Contract Workers' Triangular Employment Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buch, Robert; Kuvaas, Bard; Dysvik, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the interplay between perceived investment in contract worker development by the "client" organization and contract workers' perceived organizational support from their temporary employment "agency." A study among 2021 contract workers from three temporary employment agencies in Norway showed that the relationships between…

  7. Exchange relationships: examining psychological contracts and perceived organizational support.

    PubMed

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M; Conway, Neil

    2005-07-01

    The authors surveyed 347 public sector employees on 4 measurement occasions to investigate the conceptual distinctiveness of the psychological contract and perceived organizational support (POS) and how they are associated over time. Results support the distinctiveness of the 2 concepts. In terms of their interrelationships over time, by drawing on psychological contract theory the authors found little support for a reciprocal relationship between POS and psychological contract fulfillment. Under an alternative set of hypotheses, by drawing on organizational support theory and by separating psychological contract fulfillment into its 2 components (perceived employer obligations and inducements), the authors found that perceived employer inducements were positively related to POS, which, in turn, was negatively related to perceived employer obligations. The results suggest that POS and the components of psychological contract fulfillment are more important in predicting organizational citizenship behavior than psychological contract fulfillment.

  8. 78 FR 72572 - Operational Contract Support

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Regulations Supplement were confusing for those in the field--in particular, with regard to policy on... FR 81807), the Department published an interim final rule and public comments were solicited. At the... levels of Government. List of Subjects in 32 CFR Part 158 Armed forces, Government contracts, Health...

  9. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  10. 10 CFR 950.12 - Standby Support Contract Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Standby Support Contract... construction of the advanced nuclear facility; (5) Documented coverage of insurance required for the project by... detailed systems-level construction schedule that includes a schedule identifying projected dates...

  11. A Motivation Contract Model of Employee Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Robert B.

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a process model for identification and assessment of employee job performance, through motivation contracting. The model integrated various components of expectancy theories of motivation and performance contracting and is based on humanistic assumptions about the nature of people. More specifically, the…

  12. 48 CFR 222.402-70 - Installation support contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Installation support contracts. 222.402-70 Section 222.402-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... example, replacing broken windows, spot painting, or minor patching of a wall could be covered by...

  13. The murine excisional wound model: Contraction revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mirza, Rita; Kwon, Young; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent models of healing are considered limited because of the perception that rodent wounds heal by contraction while humans heal by re-epithelialization. The purpose of this report is to present evidence that simple murine excisional wounds provide a valid and reproducible wound model that heals by both contraction and re-epithelialization. Previous studies have shown that, although rodent wounds contract by up to 80%, much of this contraction occurs only after epithelial closure. To confirm these previous findings, we measured re-epithelialization and contraction in three separate mouse strains, (BALB/c, db/+ and db/db); re-epithelialization and contraction each accounted for ~40-60% of the initial closure of full thickness excisional wounds. After closure, the wound continues to contract and this provides the impression of dominant closure by contraction. In conclusion, the simple excisional rodent wound model produces a well-defined and readily identifiable wound bed over which the process of re-epithelialization is clearly measurable. PMID:26136050

  14. Contraction of electroweak model and neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2012-10-15

    The electroweak model, which lepton sector correspond to the contracted gauge group SU(2; j) Multiplication-Sign U(1), j {yields} 0, whereas boson and quark sectors are standard one, is suggested. The field space of the model is fibered under contraction in such a way that neutrino fields are in the fiber and all other fields are in the base. Properties of the fibered field space are understood in context of semi-Riemannian geometry. This model describes in a natural manner why neutrinos so rarely interact with matter, as well as why neutrino cross section increase with the energy. Dimensionfull parameter of the model is interpreted as neutrino energy. Dimensionless contraction parameter j at low energy is connected with the Fermi constant of weak interactions and is approximated as j{sup 2} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -5}.

  15. Preliminary Results to Support Evidence of Thermospheric Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, A.; Swinerd, G.; Lewis, H.

    Atmospheric density has an important influence in predicting the positions of satellites in low Earth orbit. For long-term predictions of satellite ephemerides, any density trend in the thermosphere would be a valuable input, not only to satellite operators, but also to studies of the future low Earth orbit environment in terms of space debris. A secular thermospheric density trend has not yet been definitively proven but predictions by Ramesh and Roble [1], along with evidence by Emmert et al. [2], strongly suggest the existence of such a phenomenon. With the ultimate goal of deriving a long-term empirical model of thermospheric cooling and contraction, the primary focus of this paper is to present preliminary results obtained to support the existing evidence for such a thermospheric contraction. There are many ways of determining atmospheric density, but inferring thermospheric density from satellite drag data is a relatively cost-effective way of gathering in-situ measurements. Given an initial satellite orbit, one approach is to use an orbital propagator to predict the satellite's state at some time ahead and then to compare that state with Two-Line Element (TLE) data at the same epoch. The difference between the semi-major axis of the satellite from the initial orbit and that after the orbit propagation is then integrated to obtain an estimate of global average density. This is the approach adopted in our new work, using a bespoke, orbital propagator that includes perturbations due to atmospheric drag, gravitational anomalies, luni-solar gravity effects and solar radiation pressure. The methods used to derive precise estimates of the ballistic coefficient of each satellite for use in the propagator are outlined, as this information is not contained explicitly in the TLE sets. In validation of the orbital propagator used in this study, Saunders et al. [3] ran simulations to predict satellite re-entry dates with satisfactory results. Now, historical satellite

  16. Sample Language of Modified Contract Elements from Existing CBAs, MOUs, or EWAs to Support Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mass Insight Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Organized by the key conditions areas for turnaround, "People, Program, Time and Money," this tool offers sample language for each contract element to serve as a model for modifications from a traditional CBA that may support a district's turnaround efforts. Sample language is offered from existing provisions in district-wide collective bargaining…

  17. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Weyl, E. Glen; Frederickson, Megan E.; Yu, Douglas W.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host–symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume–rhizobia and yucca–moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature. PMID:20733067

  18. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Weyl, E Glen; Frederickson, Megan E; Yu, Douglas W; Pierce, Naomi E

    2010-09-01

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host-symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume-rhizobia and yucca-moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature.

  19. An Exposition of Fischer's Model of Overlapping Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, T. Windsor; Hart, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests how the classic model of overlapping contracts can be incorporated into the contract wage model of aggregate supply. Illustrates dynamics of macroeconomic adjustment following a shock to aggregate demand. Concludes that overlapping contracts do not prolong the adjustment process; rather, the longest remaining contract determines the time…

  20. 76 FR 16349 - Notice of Policy Regarding Civil Aircraft Operators Providing Contract Support to Government...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Providing Contract Support to Government Entities (Public Aircraft Operations) AGENCY: Federal Aviation... provide contract support to government entities. DATES: Comments must be received before April 22, 2011... the existence of a contract between a civil operator and a government agency. The FAA considers...

  1. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  2. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  3. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  4. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability of model loan contract. Single copies of the model loan contract...

  5. Office of Inspector General report on audit of controls over the ADP support services contract

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-15

    In March 1995, the Department awarded a cost-plus-award-fee contract to DynCorp valued at approximately $246 million over 5 years for ADP support services at Headquarters. The performance period for the contract was a 3-year base period with two 1-year options. The contract statement of work identified 24 information management functional areas that required technical support services, including Automated Office Systems Support and Local Area Network support. The purpose of the audit was to evaluate the cost-plus-award-fee contract for ADP support services at Headquarters. The objective was to determine whether the Department`s program offices at Headquarters were managing their ADP support services contract costs.

  6. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

  7. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Installation Support Services (Cost-Reimbursement Contracts) (OCT 1989) (DEV) (a) Government-furnished property... Government-furnished property. The Contracting Officer may, by written notice, decrease the Government-furnished property or substitute other property for the property being used by the contractor. In the...

  8. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Installation Support Services (Cost-Reimbursement Contracts) (OCT 1989) (DEV) (a) Government-furnished property... Government-furnished property. The Contracting Officer may, by written notice, decrease the Government-furnished property or substitute other property for the property being used by the contractor. In the...

  9. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Installation Support Services (Cost-Reimbursement Contracts) (OCT 1989) (DEV) (a) Government-furnished property... Government-furnished property. The Contracting Officer may, by written notice, decrease the Government-furnished property or substitute other property for the property being used by the contractor. In the...

  10. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Installation Support Services (Cost-Reimbursement Contracts) (OCT 1989) (DEV) (a) Government-furnished property... Government-furnished property. The Contracting Officer may, by written notice, decrease the Government-furnished property or substitute other property for the property being used by the contractor. In the...

  11. 48 CFR 5152.245-9001 - Government property for installation support services (cost-reimbursement contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Installation Support Services (Cost-Reimbursement Contracts) (OCT 1989) (DEV) (a) Government-furnished property... Government-furnished property. The Contracting Officer may, by written notice, decrease the Government-furnished property or substitute other property for the property being used by the contractor. In the...

  12. Contractions

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel tightening of your uterus muscles at irregular intervals or a squeezing sensation in your lower abdomen ... beginning of childbirth. These contractions come at regular intervals, usually move from the back to the lower ...

  13. 7 CFR 1718.104 - Availability of model loan contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability of model loan contract. 1718.104 Section 1718.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN SECURITY DOCUMENTS FOR ELECTRIC BORROWERS Loan Contracts With Distribution Borrowers § 1718.104 Availability...

  14. 78 FR 40158 - Supportive Housing for the Elderly Senior Preservation Rental Assistance Contracts: 60-Day Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... was made available for SPRAC funding. On January 8, 2013, at 78 FR 1224, HUD published a proposed... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Supportive Housing for the Elderly Senior Preservation Rental Assistance Contracts: 60... Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-372, 124 Stat. 4077,...

  15. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Scientific Support Contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1988, Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) was selected as the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) Scientific Support Contractor (SSC). This was to have been a few months before the launch of NASA's first Great Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As one of five scientific instruments on HST, the GHRS was designed to obtain spectra in the 1050-3300 A ultraviolet wavelength region with a resolving power, lambda/Delta(lambda) , of up to 100,000 and relative photometric accuracy to 1%. It was built by Ball AeroSpace Systems Group under the guidance of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team (IDT), comprised of 16 scientists from the US and Canada. After launch, the IDT was to perform the initial instrument calibration and execute a broad scientific program during a five-year Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) period. After a year's delay, the launch of HST occurred in April 1990, and CSC participated in the in-orbit calibration and first four years of GTO observations with the IDT. The HST primary mirror suffered from spherical aberration, which reduced the spatial and spectral resolution of Large Science Aperture (LSA) observations and decreased the throughput of the Small Science Aperture (SSA) by a factor of two. Periodic problems with the Side 1 carrousel electronics and anomalies with the low-voltage power supply finally resulted in a suspension of the use of Side 1 less than two years after launch. At the outset, the GHRS SSC task involved work in four areas: 1) to manage and operate the GHRS Data Analysis Facility (DAF); 2) to support the second Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) program, as well as perform system engineering analysis of the GHRS as nesessary; 3) to assist the GHRS IDT with their scientific research programs, particularly the GSFC members of the team, and 4) to provide administrative and logistic support for GHRS public information and educational activities.

  16. Cross-bridge model of muscle contraction. Quantitative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, E; Hill, T L; Chen, Y

    1980-01-01

    We recently presented, in a qualitative manner, a cross-bridge model of muscle contraction which was based on a biochemical kinetic cycle for the actomyosin ATPase activity. This cross-bridge model consisted of two cross-bridge states detached from actin and two cross-bridge states attached to actin. In the present paper, we attempt to fit this model quantitatively to both biochemical and physiological data. We find that the resulting complete cross-bridge model is able to account reasonably well for both the isometric transient data observed when a muscle is subjected to a sudden change in length and for the relationship between the velocity of muscle contraction in vivo and the actomyosin ATPase activity in vitro. This model also illustrates the interrelationship between biochemical and physiological data necessary for the development of a complete cross-bridge model of muscle contraction. PMID:6455168

  17. 48 CFR 5152.245-9000 - Government property for installation support services (fixed-price contracts).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Government property for installation support services (fixed-price contracts). 5152.245-9000 Section 5152.245-9000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SOLICITATIONS PROVISIONS AND...

  18. Beyond altruistic and commercial contract motherhood: the professional model.

    PubMed

    Van Zyl, Liezl; Walker, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    It has become common to distinguish between altruistic and commercial contract motherhood (or 'surrogacy'). Altruistic arrangements are based on the 'gift relationship': a woman is motivated by altruism to have a baby for an infertile couple, who are free to reciprocate as they see fit. By contrast, in commercial arrangements both parties are motivated by personal gain to enter a legally enforceable agreement, which stipulates that the contract mother or 'surrogate' is to bear a child for the intending parents in exchange for a fee. She is required to undergo medical examinations and to refrain from behaviour that could harm the foetus. The intending parents are the child's legal parents from the outset. The parties to the contract can, but are not expected to, maintain contact after the transaction is completed. We argue that contract motherhood should not be organized according to the norms of the gift relationship, and that contract mothers should be compensated for their labour. However, we accept that there are good reasons for rejecting the commercial model as a suitable framework for contract pregnancy, and argue, instead, in favour of viewing it as a profession.

  19. Student Mental Models Related to Expansion and Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurnaz, Mehmet Altan; Emen, Ayse Yagmur

    2014-01-01

    Following up on the effects of learning environments is essential to learning. The aim of this study was to examine students' mental models related to the concepts of expansion and contraction of materials. The population of the case study consisted of 155 students in a city center in Turkey. The data was gathered using open-ended questions that…

  20. Contraction limits of the proton-neutron symplectic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganev, H. G.

    2016-01-01

    The algebraic approach to nuclear structure physics allows a certain microscopic collective motion algebra to be also interpreted on macroscopic level which is achieved in the limit of large representation quantum numbers. Such limits are referred to as macroscopic or hydrodynamic limits and show how a given microscopic discrete system starts to behave like a continuous fluid. In the present paper, two contraction limits of the recently introduced fully microscopic proton-neutron symplectic model (PNSM) with the Sp(12; R) dynamical symmetry algebra are considered. As a result, two simplified macroscopic models of nuclear collective motion are obtained in simple geometrical terms. The first one is the U(6)-phonon model with the semi-direct product structure [HW(21)]U(6), which is shown to be actually an alternative formulation of the original proton-neutron symplectic model in the familiar IBM-terms. The second model which appears in double contraction limit is the two-rotor model with the ROTp(3) ⊗ ROTn(3) ⊃ ROT(3) algebraic structure. The latter, in contrast to the original two-rotor model, is not restricted to the case of two coupled axial rotors. In this way, the second contraction limit of the PNSM, provides the phenomenological two-rotor model with a simple microscopic foundation.

  1. On the application of copula in modeling maintenance contract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, B. P.; Husniah, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the application of copula in maintenance contracts for a nonrepayable item. Failures of the item are modeled using a two dimensional approach where age and usage of the item and this requires a bi-variate distribution to modelling failures. When the item fails then corrective maintenance (CM) is minimally repaired. CM can be outsourced to an external agent or done in house. The decision problem for the owner is to find the maximum total profit whilst for the agent is to determine the optimal price of the contract. We obtain the mathematical models of the decision problems for the owner as well as the agent using a Nash game theory formulation.

  2. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  3. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  4. Contraction pre-conditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective pre-conditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modelling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analogue of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new pre-conditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1-D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulae for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations pre-conditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new pre-conditioner is advantageous over using the 1-D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2-2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1-D Green's function as a pre-conditioner.

  5. Contraction preconditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective preconditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modeling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analog of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new preconditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulas for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations preconditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that for high contrasts, the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new preconditioner is advantageous over using the 1D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2 to 2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1D Green's function as a preconditioner.

  6. PSNs: a new model for Medicare risk contracting.

    PubMed

    Prescott, F M

    1997-03-01

    The 1995 Republican House Medicare reform proposal introduced the provider services network (PSN) concept as a new healthcare delivery model for accepting and administering Medicare risk contracts. A PSN operates much like an HMO, but is not subject to the reserve requirements established for HMOs. Providers that want to enter the Medicare risk contracting arena and exercise more control over the delivery of healthcare services may consider forming a PSN. To form a PSN, providers must be sufficiently capitalized to compete with HMOs, create a formal legal organization, and develop a financial plan. To ensure that its goals are met, the PSN must develop a sales promotion plan, enroll members, control and monitor financial resources and clinical outcomes, and implement a management information system. Other crucial capabilities that a PSN must develop include establishing mechanisms for utilization review, membership information maintenance, claims adjudication, physician credentialing, quality assurance, and member grievance procedures. PMID:10165441

  7. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  8. Modeling Advance Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Marvin; Sager, John; Loader, Coleen; Drysdale, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Activities this summer consisted of two projects that involved computer simulation of bioregenerative life support systems for space habitats. Students in the Space Life Science Training Program (SLSTP) used the simulation, space station, to learn about relationships between humans, fish, plants, and microorganisms in a closed environment. One student complete a six week project to modify the simulation by converting the microbes from anaerobic to aerobic, and then balancing the simulation's life support system. A detailed computer simulation of a closed lunar station using bioregenerative life support was attempted, but there was not enough known about system restraints and constants in plant growth, bioreactor design for space habitats and food preparation to develop an integrated model with any confidence. Instead of a completed detailed model with broad assumptions concerning the unknown system parameters, a framework for an integrated model was outlined and work begun on plant and bioreactor simulations. The NASA sponsors and the summer Fell were satisfied with the progress made during the 10 weeks, and we have planned future cooperative work.

  9. Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. L.; Bergeron, G.; Drobot, A. D.; Papadopoulos, K.; Riyopoulos, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by SAIC's Applied Physics Operation on the modeling and support of Tethered Satellite System missions (TSS-1 and TSS-1R). The SAIC team, known to be Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether (TMST) investigation, was one of the original twelve teams selected in July, 1985 for the first TSS mission. The accomplishments described in this report cover the period December 19, 1985 to September 31, 1999 and are the result of a continuous effort aimed at supporting the TSS missions in the following major areas. During the contract period, the SAIC's TMST investigation acted to: Participate in the planning and the execution on both of the TSS missions; Provide scientific understanding on the issues involved in the electrodynamic tether system operation prior to the TSS missions; Predict ionospheric conditions encountered during the re-flight mission (TSS-lR) based on realtime global ionosounde data; Perform post mission analyses to enhance our understanding on the TSS results. Specifically, we have 1) constructed and improved current collection models and enhanced our understanding on the current-voltage data; 2) investigated the effects of neutral gas in the current collection processes; 3) conducted laboratory experiments to study the discharge phenomena during and after tether-break; and 4) perform numerical simulations to understand data collected by plasma instruments SPES onboard the TSS satellite; Design and produce multi-media CD that highlights TSS mission achievements and convey the knowledge of the tether technology to the general public. Along with discussions of this work, a list of publications and presentations derived from the TMST investigation spanning the reporting period is compiled.

  10. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 86, quarter ending March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Summaries are presented for 37 enhanced oil recovery contracts being supported by the Department of Energy. The projects are grouped into gas displacement methods, thermal recovery methods, geoscience technology, reservoir characterization, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Each summary includes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress, as well as information on contract dates, size of award, principal investigator, and company or facility doing the research.

  11. Modeling the contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernanda Sofia Quintela da Silva; Parente, Marco Paulo Lages; Rocha, Paulo Alexandre Gomes Gonçalves; Saraiva, Maria Teresa da Quinta E Costa de Mascarenhas; Ramos, Isabel Maria Amorim Pereira; Natal Jorge, Renato Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We performed numerical simulation of voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles to evaluate the resulting displacements of the organs and muscles. Structures were segmented in Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Different material properties and constitutive models were attributed. The Finite Element Method was applied, and displacements were compared with dynamic MRI findings. Numerical simulation showed muscle magnitude displacement ranging from 0 to 7.9 mm, more evident in the posterior area. Accordingly, the anorectum moved more than the uterus and bladder. Dynamic MRI showed less 0.2 mm and 4.1 mm muscle dislocation in the anterior and cranial directions, respectively. Applications of this model include evaluating muscle impairment, subject-specific mesh implant planning, or effectiveness of rehabilitation.

  12. A contracting island model of electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. F.; Che, H.; Swisdak, M.; Shay, M. A.

    2006-10-01

    A Fermi-like model for energetic electron production during magnetic reconnection is described that explains key observations in the magnetosphere and solar corona [1]. Magnetic reconnection with a guide field leads to the growth and dynamics of multiple magnetic islands rather than a single large x-line [2]. Above a critical energy electron acceleration is dominated by the Fermi-like reflection of electrons within the resulting magnetic islands rather than by the parallel electric fields associated with the x-line. Particles trapped within islands gain energy as they reflect from ends of contracting magnetic islands. The pressure from energetic electrons rises rapidly until the rate of electron energy gain balances the rate of magnetic energy release. A Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of energetic particles, including their feedback on island contraction, is obtained by averaging over the particle interaction with many islands. The steady state solutions in reconnection geometry result from convective losses balancing the Fermi drive. At high energy the electron distribution functions take the form of powerlaws whose spectral index depends on the initial electron β, lower (higher) β producing harder (softer) spectra.1. Drake et al., Nature, in press.2. Drake et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 33, L13105, 2006.

  13. A resource-dependence model of hospital contract management.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J A; Morrisey, M A

    1989-01-01

    This study empirically examines the determinants of hospital entry into management contracts with multihospital systems. Using a resource-dependence framework, the study tests whether market conditions, regulatory climate, management effectiveness, and certain enabling factors affect the probability of hospital entry into a contract management arrangement. The study used a pooled sample of 312 contract-managed and 936 traditionally managed hospitals. Results suggest the importance of management effectiveness, regulatory climate, and hospital ownership (investor owned or nonprofit) as predisposing conditions of contract management. PMID:2732059

  14. An electro-mechanical multiscale model of uterine pregnancy contraction.

    PubMed

    Yochum, Maxime; Laforêt, Jérémy; Marque, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Detecting preterm labor as early as possible is important because tocolytic drugs are much more likely to delay preterm delivery if administered early. Having good information on the real risk of premature labor also leads to fewer women who do not need aggressive treatment for premature labor threat. Currently, one of the most promising ways to diagnose preterm labor threat is the analysis of the electrohysterogram (EHG). Its characteristics have been related to preterm labor risk but they have not proven to be sufficiently accurate to use in clinical routine. One of the reasons for this is that the physiology of the pregnant uterus is insufficiently understood. Models already exist in literature that simulate either the electrical or the mechanical component of the uterine smooth muscle. Few include both components in a co-simulation of electrical and mechanical aspects. A model that can represent realistically both the electrical and the mechanical behavior of the uterine muscle could be useful for better understanding the EHG and therefore for preterm labor detection. Processing the EHG considers only the electrical component of the uterus but the electrical activity does not seem to explain by itself the synchronization of the uterine muscle that occurs during labor and not at other times. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of the uterine muscle seems to play an important role in uterus synchronization during labor. The aim of the proposed study is to link three different models of the uterine smooth muscle behavior by using co-simulation. The models go from the electrical activity generated at the cellular level to the mechanical force generated by the muscle and from there to the deformation of the tissue. The results show the feasibility of combining these three models to model a whole uterus contraction on 3D realistic uterus model.

  15. An electro-mechanical multiscale model of uterine pregnancy contraction.

    PubMed

    Yochum, Maxime; Laforêt, Jérémy; Marque, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Detecting preterm labor as early as possible is important because tocolytic drugs are much more likely to delay preterm delivery if administered early. Having good information on the real risk of premature labor also leads to fewer women who do not need aggressive treatment for premature labor threat. Currently, one of the most promising ways to diagnose preterm labor threat is the analysis of the electrohysterogram (EHG). Its characteristics have been related to preterm labor risk but they have not proven to be sufficiently accurate to use in clinical routine. One of the reasons for this is that the physiology of the pregnant uterus is insufficiently understood. Models already exist in literature that simulate either the electrical or the mechanical component of the uterine smooth muscle. Few include both components in a co-simulation of electrical and mechanical aspects. A model that can represent realistically both the electrical and the mechanical behavior of the uterine muscle could be useful for better understanding the EHG and therefore for preterm labor detection. Processing the EHG considers only the electrical component of the uterus but the electrical activity does not seem to explain by itself the synchronization of the uterine muscle that occurs during labor and not at other times. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of the uterine muscle seems to play an important role in uterus synchronization during labor. The aim of the proposed study is to link three different models of the uterine smooth muscle behavior by using co-simulation. The models go from the electrical activity generated at the cellular level to the mechanical force generated by the muscle and from there to the deformation of the tissue. The results show the feasibility of combining these three models to model a whole uterus contraction on 3D realistic uterus model. PMID:27567400

  16. Commercial Contract Training, Marine Corps Area VOTEC Support Center (AVSC) Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. R.; And Others

    The report provides a description of the Phase II findings of a two-phase study to determine if certain Marine Corps skill training requirements could be satisfied through contract with qualified commercial sources. It demonstrates the utility of the commercial contract training concept and contains information useful to Area VOTEC…

  17. Contracts and management services site support program plan WBS 6.10.14

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, J.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    Contracts and Management Services is recognized as the central focal point for programs having company or sitewide application in pursuit of the Hanford Missions`s financial and operational objectives. Contracts and Management Services actively pursues cost savings and operational efficiencies through: Management Standards by ensuring all employees have an accessible, integrated system of clear, complete, accurate, timely, and useful management control policies and procedures; Contract Reform by restructuring the contract, organization, and cost accounting systems to refocus Hanford contract activities on output products; Systems and Operations Evaluation by directing the Cost Reduction program, Great Ideas, and Span of Management activities; Program Administration by enforcing conditions of Accountability (whether DEAR-based or FAR-based) for WHC, BCSR, ICF KH, and BHI; Contract Performance activities; chairing the WHC Cost Reduction Review Board; and analyzing companywide Performance Measures; Data Standards and Administration by establishing and directing the company data management program; giving direction to the major RL programs and mission areas for implementation of cost-effective and efficient data management practices; directing all operations, application, and interfaces contained within the Hanford PeopleCore System; directing accomplishment and delivery of TPA data management milestones; and directing the sitewide data management processes for Data Standards and the Data Directory.

  18. Mechano-chemical Interactions in Cardiac Sarcomere Contraction: A Computational Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Lumens, Joost; Arts, Theo; Delhaas, Tammo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a model of cardiac sarcomere contraction to study the calcium-tension relationship in cardiac muscle. Calcium mediates cardiac contraction through its interactions with troponin (Tn) and subsequently tropomyosin molecules. Experimental studies have shown that a slight increase in intracellular calcium concentration leads to a rapid increase in sarcomeric tension. Though it is widely accepted that the rapid increase is not possible without the concept of cooperativity, the mechanism is debated. We use the hypothesis that there exists a base level of cooperativity intrinsic to the thin filament that is boosted by mechanical tension, i.e. a high level of mechanical tension in the thin filament impedes the unbinding of calcium from Tn. To test these hypotheses, we developed a computational model in which a set of three parameters and inputs of calcium concentration and sarcomere length result in output tension. Tension as simulated appeared in good agreement with experimentally measured tension. Our results support the hypothesis that high tension in the thin filament impedes Tn deactivation by increasing the energy required to detach calcium from the Tn. Given this hypothesis, the model predicted that the areas with highest tension, i.e. closest to the Z-disk end of the single overlap region, show the largest concentration of active Tn’s. PMID:27716775

  19. A multi-agent cell-based model for wound contraction.

    PubMed

    Boon, W M; Koppenol, D C; Vermolen, F J

    2016-05-24

    A mathematical model for wound contraction is presented. The model is based on a cell-based formalism where fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and the immune reaction are taken into account. The model is used to simulate contraction of a wound using point forces on the cell boundary and it also determines the orientation of collagen after restoration of the damage. The paper presents the mathematical model in terms of the equations and assumptions, as well as some implications of the modelling. The present model predicts that the amount of final contraction is larger if the migration velocity of the leukocytes is larger and hence it is important that the immune system functions well to prevent contractures. Further, the present model is the first cell-based model that combines the immune system to final contractions. PMID:26805459

  20. Mathematical Model Development and Simulation Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Ronald C.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in support of the Contact Dynamics 6DOF Facility and the Flight Robotics Lab at NASA/ MSFC in the areas of Mathematical Model Development and Simulation Support.

  1. Supportive Services: CETA Program Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Conradus, Carolyn

    This monograph is intended to help the operators and planners of employment and training programs, particularly those sponsored under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), in developing and providing supportive services to improve client employability. The first section, presenting the purpose of this publication, is followed by a…

  2. Alternative Education/Alternative Revenue. A. Contract Training: Public and Private Sector Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestina, Raymond; Curry, Beverly A.

    1989-01-01

    Highlights two models of contract education, using Triton College's (IL) programs as examples. Describes Triton's Employee Development Institute, which contracts to provide specific training to local businesses, and Triton's Continuing Education Center for Health Professionals (CECHP), which co-sponsors programs for the continuing education of…

  3. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

  4. Versatile Support For Electromagnetic-Test Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Ford, Eddie D.

    1994-01-01

    Supporting apparatus holds model for measurements of electromagnetic properties. Includes rigid swept strut, on end of which model oriented over range of angles. Designed to interfere minimally with electromagnetic measurements.

  5. Filial Piety by Contract? The Emergence, Implementation, and Implications of the "Family Support Agreement" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Rita Jing-Ann

    2011-01-01

    China has the largest aging population in the world today. Despite the Chinese tradition of filial piety, economic, social, cultural, and familial changes have made it increasingly difficult for older Chinese to receive support from adult children. To ensure parental support, the Family Support Agreement (FSA) emerged from a local community in the…

  6. Mathematical Modeling Of Life-Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshan, Panchalam K.; Ganapathi, Balasubramanian; Jan, Darrell L.; Ferrall, Joseph F.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1994-01-01

    Generic hierarchical model of life-support system developed to facilitate comparisons of options in design of system. Model represents combinations of interdependent subsystems supporting microbes, plants, fish, and land animals (including humans). Generic model enables rapid configuration of variety of specific life support component models for tradeoff studies culminating in single system design. Enables rapid evaluation of effects of substituting alternate technologies and even entire groups of technologies and subsystems. Used to synthesize and analyze life-support systems ranging from relatively simple, nonregenerative units like aquariums to complex closed-loop systems aboard submarines or spacecraft. Model, called Generic Modular Flow Schematic (GMFS), coded in such chemical-process-simulation languages as Aspen Plus and expressed as three-dimensional spreadsheet.

  7. Mechanisms test bed math model modification and simulation support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Andrea C.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract NAS8-38771 in support of the Marshall Space Flight Center Six Degree of Freedom Motion Facility and Flight Robotics Laboratory. The contract activities included the development of the two flexible body and Remote Manipulator System simulations, Dynamic Overhead Target Simulator control system and operating software, Global Positioning System simulation, and Manipulator Coupled Spacecraft Controls Testbed. Technical support was also provided for the Lightning Imaging Sensor and Solar X-Ray Imaging programs. The cover sheets and introductory sections for the documentation written under this contract are provided as an appendix.

  8. Chesapeake Bay mainstem monitoring program statistical and analytical support contract: final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The primary focus of this contract was the development of a statistical analysis framework for detection of trends in Chesapeake Bay water quality attributable to pollution-control-management actions. The report found that, while there are aspects of the main Bay water-quality monitoring program that can be improved, the overall approach of the program is sound and will provide the empirical information needed to characterize and detect trends in Chesapeake Bay water quality and to evaluate the effectiveness of management actions. Continuation of this coordinated monitoring effort provides the best opportunity for generation of rigorous statements concerning the State-of-the-Bay and for the development of an ecologically sound water-quality management strategy.

  9. Chesapeake bay mainstem monitoring program statistical and analytical support contract: final report, volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The primary focus of this contract was the development of a statistical analysis framework for detection of trends in Chesapeake Bay water quality attributable to pollution-control-management actions. The report found that, while there are aspects of the main Bay water-quality monitoring program that can be improved, the overall approach of the program is sound and will provide the empirical information needed to characterize and detect trends in Chesapeake Bay water quality and to evaluate the effectiveness of management actions. Continuation of this coordinated monitoring effort provides the best opportunity for generation of rigorous statements concerning the State-of-the-Bay and for the development of an ecologically sound water-quality management strategy.

  10. It's all in the timing: modeling isovolumic contraction through development and disease with a dynamic dual electromechanical bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kathy Ye; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    This commentary discusses the rationale behind our recently reported work entitled "Mimicking isovolumic contraction with combined electromechanical stimulation improves the development of engineered cardiac constructs," introduces new data supporting our hypothesis, and discusses future applications of our bioreactor system. The ability to stimulate engineered cardiac tissue in a bioreactor system that combines both electrical and mechanical stimulation offers a unique opportunity to simulate the appropriate dynamics between stretch and contraction and model isovolumic contraction in vitro. Our previous study demonstrated that combined electromechanical stimulation that simulated the timing of isovolumic contraction in healthy tissue improved force generation via increased contractile and calcium handling protein expression and improved hypertrophic pathway activation. In new data presented here, we further demonstrate that modification of the timing between electrical and mechanical stimulation to mimic a non-physiological process negatively impacts the functionality of the engineered constructs. We close by exploring the various disease states that have altered timing between the electrical and mechanical stimulation signals as potential future directions for the use of this system.

  11. An ionic-chemical-mechanical model for muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Manning, Gerald S

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic process underlying muscle contraction is the parallel sliding of thin actin filaments along an immobile thick myosin fiber powered by oar-like movements of protruding myosin cross bridges (myosin heads). The free energy for functioning of the myosin nanomotor comes from the hydrolysis of ATP bound to the myosin heads. The unit step of translational movement is based on a mechanical-chemical cycle involving ATP binding to myosin, hydrolysis of the bound ATP with ultimate release of the hydrolysis products, stress-generating conformational changes in the myosin cross bridge, and relief of built-up stress in the myosin power stroke. The cycle is regulated by a transition between weak and strong actin-myosin binding affinities. The dissociation of the weakly bound complex by addition of salt indicates the electrostatic basis for the weak affinity, while structural studies demonstrate that electrostatic interactions among negatively charged amino acid residues of actin and positively charged residues of myosin are involved in the strong binding interface. We therefore conjecture that intermediate states of increasing actin-myosin engagement during the weak-to-strong binding transition also involve electrostatic interactions. Methods of polymer solution physics have shown that the thin actin filament can be regarded in some of its aspects as a net negatively charged polyelectrolyte. Here we employ polyelectrolyte theory to suggest how actin-myosin electrostatic interactions might be of significance in the intermediate stages of binding, ensuring an engaged power stroke of the myosin motor that transmits force to the actin filament, and preventing the motor from getting stuck in a metastable pre-power stroke state. We provide electrostatic force estimates that are in the pN range known to operate in the cycle.

  12. An ionic-chemical-mechanical model for muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Manning, Gerald S

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic process underlying muscle contraction is the parallel sliding of thin actin filaments along an immobile thick myosin fiber powered by oar-like movements of protruding myosin cross bridges (myosin heads). The free energy for functioning of the myosin nanomotor comes from the hydrolysis of ATP bound to the myosin heads. The unit step of translational movement is based on a mechanical-chemical cycle involving ATP binding to myosin, hydrolysis of the bound ATP with ultimate release of the hydrolysis products, stress-generating conformational changes in the myosin cross bridge, and relief of built-up stress in the myosin power stroke. The cycle is regulated by a transition between weak and strong actin-myosin binding affinities. The dissociation of the weakly bound complex by addition of salt indicates the electrostatic basis for the weak affinity, while structural studies demonstrate that electrostatic interactions among negatively charged amino acid residues of actin and positively charged residues of myosin are involved in the strong binding interface. We therefore conjecture that intermediate states of increasing actin-myosin engagement during the weak-to-strong binding transition also involve electrostatic interactions. Methods of polymer solution physics have shown that the thin actin filament can be regarded in some of its aspects as a net negatively charged polyelectrolyte. Here we employ polyelectrolyte theory to suggest how actin-myosin electrostatic interactions might be of significance in the intermediate stages of binding, ensuring an engaged power stroke of the myosin motor that transmits force to the actin filament, and preventing the motor from getting stuck in a metastable pre-power stroke state. We provide electrostatic force estimates that are in the pN range known to operate in the cycle. PMID:27603027

  13. Non-invasive muscle contraction assay to study rodent models of sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related sarcopenia is a disease state of loss of muscle mass and strength that affects physical function and mobility leading to falls, fractures, and disability. The need for therapies to treat age-related sarcopenia has attracted intensive preclinical research. To facilitate the discovery of these therapies, we have developed a non-invasive rat muscle functional assay system to efficiently measure muscle force and evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates. Methods The lower leg muscles of anesthetized rats are artificially stimulated with surface electrodes on the knee holders and the heel support, causing the lower leg muscles to push isometric pedals that are attached to force transducers. We developed a stimulation protocol to perform a fatigability test that reveals functional muscle parameters like maximal force, the rate of fatigue, fatigue-resistant force, as well as a fatigable muscle force index. The system is evaluated in a rat aging model and a rat glucocorticoid-induced muscle loss model Results The aged rats were generally weaker than adult rats and showed a greater reduction in their fatigable force when compared to their fatigue-resistant force. Glucocorticoid treated rats mostly lost fatigable force and fatigued at a higher rate, indicating reduced force from glycolytic fibers with reduced energy reserves. Conclusions The involuntary contraction assay is a reliable system to assess muscle function in rodents and can be applied in preclinical research, including age-related sarcopenia and other myopathy. PMID:22035016

  14. From hydrological modelling to decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberlandt, U.

    2010-08-01

    Decision support for planning and management of water resources needs to consider many target criteria simultaneously like water availability, water quality, flood protection, agriculture, ecology, etc. Hydrologic models provide information about the water balance components and are fundamental for the simulation of ecological processes. Objective of this contribution is to discuss the suitability of classical hydrologic models on one hand and of complex eco-hydrologic models on the other hand to be used as part of decision support systems. The discussion is based on results from two model comparison studies. It becomes clear that none of the hydrologic models tested fulfils all requirements in an optimal sense. Regarding the simulation of water quality parameters like nitrogen leaching a high uncertainty needs to be considered. Recommended for decision support is a hybrid metamodel approach, which comprises a hydrologic model, empirical relationships for the less dynamic processes and makes use of simulation results from complex eco-hydrologic models through second-order modelling at a generalized level.

  15. Evaluation of an in vitro muscle contraction model in mouse primary cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Ogino, Shinya; Ito, Miyuki; Furuichi, Yasuro; Takagi, Mayumi; Yamada, Mio; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Ono, Yusuke; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2016-03-15

    To construct an in vitro contraction model with the primary cultured myotubes, we isolated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus. Differentiated myotubes possessed a greater number of sarcomere assemblies and higher expression levels of myosin heavy chain, cytochrome c oxidase IV, and myoglobin than in C2C12 myotubes. In agreement with these results regarding the sarcomere assemblies and protein expressions, the primary myotubes showed higher contractile activity stimulated by the electric pulses than that in the C2C12 myotubes. These data suggest that mouse primary myotubes will be a valuable research tool as an in vitro muscle contraction model. PMID:26548957

  16. DTI data modeling for unlimited query support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Hammad, Rafat; Shetty, Anil; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Sethi, Ishwar K.; Eetemadi, Ameen; Elisevich, Kost V.

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes Data Modeling for unstructured data of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Data Modeling is an essential first step for data preparation in any data management and data mining procedure. Conventional Entity- Relational (E-R) data modeling is lossy, irreproducible, and time-consuming especially when dealing with unstructured image data associated with complex systems like the human brain. We propose a methodological framework for more objective E-R data modeling with unlimited query support by eliminating the structured content-dependent metadata associated with the unstructured data. The proposed method is applied to DTI data and a minimum system is implemented accordingly. Eventually supported with navigation, data fusion, and feature extraction modules, the proposed system provides a content-based support environment (C-BASE). Such an environment facilitates an unlimited query support with a reproducible and efficient database schema. Switching between different modalities of data, while confining the feature extractors within the object(s) of interest, we supply anatomically specific query results. The price of such a scheme is relatively large storage and in some cases high computational cost. The data modeling and its mathematical framework, behind the scene of query executions and the user interface of the system are presented in this paper.

  17. Modeling Magnetomyograms of Uterine Contractions during Pregnancy Using a Multiscale Forward Electromagnetic Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxue; Tidwell, Vanessa; La Rosa, Patricio S; Wilson, James D; Eswaran, Hari; Nehorai, Arye

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of uterine contractions during pregnancy is especially important in predicting the onset of labor and thus in forecasting preterm deliveries. Preterm birth can cause serious health problems in newborns, as well as large financial burdens to society. Various techniques such as electromyography (EMG) and magnetomyography (MMG) have been developed to quantify uterine contractions. However, no widely accepted method to predict labor based on electromagnetic measurement is available. Therefore, developing a biophysical model of EMG and MMG could help better understand uterine contractions, interpret real measurements, and detect labor. In this work, we propose a multiscale realistic model of uterine contractions during pregnancy. At the cellular level, building on bifurcation theory, we apply generalized FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations that produces both plateau-type and bursting-type action potentials. At the tissue level, we introduce a random fiber orientation model applicable to an arbitrary uterine shape. We also develop an analytical expression for the propagation speed of transmembrane potential. At the organ level, a realistic volume conductor geometry model is provided based on magnetic resonance images of a pregnant woman. To simulate the measurements from the SQUID Array for Reproductive Assessment (SARA) device, we propose a sensor array model. Our model is able to reproduce the characteristics of action potentials. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of MMG to model configuration aspects such as volume geometry, fiber orientation, and pacemaker location. Our numerical results show that fiber orientation and pacemaker location are the key aspects that greatly affect the MMG as measured by the SARA device. We conclude that sphere is appropriate as an approximation of the volume geometry. The initial step towards validating the model against real MMG measurement is also presented. Our results show that the model is

  18. Modeling Magnetomyograms of Uterine Contractions during Pregnancy Using a Multiscale Forward Electromagnetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Patricio S.; Wilson, James D.; Eswaran, Hari; Nehorai, Arye

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of uterine contractions during pregnancy is especially important in predicting the onset of labor and thus in forecasting preterm deliveries. Preterm birth can cause serious health problems in newborns, as well as large financial burdens to society. Various techniques such as electromyography (EMG) and magnetomyography (MMG) have been developed to quantify uterine contractions. However, no widely accepted method to predict labor based on electromagnetic measurement is available. Therefore, developing a biophysical model of EMG and MMG could help better understand uterine contractions, interpret real measurements, and detect labor. In this work, we propose a multiscale realistic model of uterine contractions during pregnancy. At the cellular level, building on bifurcation theory, we apply generalized FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations that produces both plateau-type and bursting-type action potentials. At the tissue level, we introduce a random fiber orientation model applicable to an arbitrary uterine shape. We also develop an analytical expression for the propagation speed of transmembrane potential. At the organ level, a realistic volume conductor geometry model is provided based on magnetic resonance images of a pregnant woman. To simulate the measurements from the SQUID Array for Reproductive Assessment (SARA) device, we propose a sensor array model. Our model is able to reproduce the characteristics of action potentials. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of MMG to model configuration aspects such as volume geometry, fiber orientation, and pacemaker location. Our numerical results show that fiber orientation and pacemaker location are the key aspects that greatly affect the MMG as measured by the SARA device. We conclude that sphere is appropriate as an approximation of the volume geometry. The initial step towards validating the model against real MMG measurement is also presented. Our results show that the model is

  19. A model for educational simulation of the evolution of uterine contractions during labor.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Luísa Ferreira; van Meurs, Willem; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo

    2012-08-01

    Electronic fetal monitoring remains an important tool in labor ward settings, providing continuous information on fetal heart rate and maternal uterine contractions. A prompt detection of abnormalities in these signals is essential for the timely resolution of situations that may put both mother and fetus at risk. Uterine contraction signals provide information that is important to evaluate the onset and progress of labor, as well as the significance of certain fetal heart rate abnormalities. We present a model for educational simulation of the spontaneous evolution of uterine contractions during labor, which combines a previously published signal generator with literature-based pre-programmed scripts for educationally relevant scenarios. This model is an essential component of a high-fidelity simulator of intrapartum emergencies, aimed to improve the competency of healthcare providers. Real and simulated tracings were presented to three independent clinical experts who judged simulated signals to be indistinguishable or negligibly different from real tracings.

  20. Supporting the Serial in the SERIOL Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Carol

    2008-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that orthographical lexical access in visual word recognition takes place in parallel, with all letters activated at the same time. In contrast, in the SERIOL model of letter-position encoding, letters fire sequentially (Whitney, 2001). I present further support for such seriality on several fronts. (1) The reasons that led…

  1. Technologies, Products, and Models Supporting Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luan, Jing; Serban, Andreea M.

    2002-01-01

    Based on a taxonomy of knowledge management processes, provides a synopsis of technologies and vendors that support knowledge management. Proposes a model for classifying the various types of technologies related to knowledge management that are most often used in institutional research. (EV)

  2. Quantitative model for predicting lymph formation and muscle compressibility in skeletal muscle during contraction and stretch

    PubMed Central

    Causey, Laura; Cowin, Stephen C.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is widely perceived as nearly incompressible despite the fact that blood and lymphatic vessels within the endomysial and perimysial spaces undergo significant changes in diameter and length during stretch and contraction. These fluid shifts between fascicle and interstitial compartments have proved extremely difficult to measure. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework based on a space-filling hexagonal fascicle array to provide predictions of the displacement of blood and lymph into and out of the muscle’s endomysium and perimysium during stretch and contraction. We also use this model to quantify the distribution of blood and initial lymphatic (IL) vessels within a fascicle and its perimysial space using data for the rat spinotrapezius muscle. On average, there are 11 muscle fibers, 0.4 arteriole/venule pairs, and 0.2 IL vessels per fascicle. The model predicts that the blood volume in the endomysial space increases 24% and decreases 22% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively. However, these significant changes in blood volume in the endomysium produce a change of only ∼2% in fascicle cross-sectional area. In contrast, the entire muscle deviates from isovolumetry by 7% and 6% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively, largely attributable to the significantly larger blood volume changes that occur in the perimysial space. This suggests that arcade blood vessels in the perimysial space provide the primary pumping action required for the filling and emptying of ILs during muscular contraction and stretch. PMID:22615376

  3. Classroom Crisis Intervention through Contracting: A Moral Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaby, Marlowe H.; Tamminen, Armas W.

    1981-01-01

    A counselor can arbitrate problem situations using a systematic approach to classroom intervention which includes meetings with the teacher and students. This crisis intervention model based on moral development can be more effective than reliance on guidance activities disconnected from the actual classroom settings where the problems arise.…

  4. The Generalized Hill Model: A Kinematic Approach Towards Active Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion. PMID:25221354

  5. The generalized Hill model: A kinematic approach towards active muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göktepe, Serdar; Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion.

  6. The Generalized Hill Model: A Kinematic Approach Towards Active Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Göktepe, Serdar; Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion. PMID:25221354

  7. Modeling control systems for primary mirror supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Martin; Haque, Jaque; Wilkes, John D.; Amos, Clive S.; Steel, Darrin J.

    1995-06-01

    The RGO is involved in a number of mirror support programs, ranging from new controllers for its existing Isaac Newton Group (ING) telescopes to new primary mirror supports for the UK Infra-red Telescope (UKIRT) and design proposals for the active support of the Gemini 8 m meniscus mirrors. This work has led to the identification or development of critical components such as load cells and control valves which have high precision and stability. Even so it is still necessary to develop servo controllers capable of minimizing the effects of non- linearity and maintaining stability, particularly in regard to the highly non-linear behavior of pneumatic supports. In order to predict the performance of mirror supports and compare differing control strategies, components and systems are modelled using Matlab(superscript R) and Simulink(superscript R). These models are presented, together with parameters derived experimentally, and results from recent laboratory tests are discussed. Specific applications are described and current status of the work at the time of submission is presented.

  8. Analysis of Commercial Contract Training for the Navy (Phase II) [And] Commercial Contract Training Navy Area VOTEC Support Center (AVSC) Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. Robert; And Others

    The two-part report describing the Phase 2 findings of a two-phase study demonstrates the utility of the commercial contract training concept for satisfying certain Navy skill training requirements. Part 1 concerns source evaluation, skill analysis and selection, contractual considerations, and comparative training capability evaluation. It…

  9. Analysis of Commercial Contract Training for the Marine Corps (Phase II) [And] Commercial Contract Training Marine Corps Area VOTEC Support Center (AVSC) Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. Robert; And Others

    The two-part report describing the Phase 2 findings of a two-phase study demonstrates the utility of the commercial contract training concept for satisfying certain Marine Corps skill training requirements. Part 1 concerns source evaluation, skill analysis and selection, contractual considerations, and comparative training capability evaluation.…

  10. Modeling Ca2+-Bound Troponin in Excitation Contraction Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zot, Henry G.; Hasbun, Javier E.

    2016-01-01

    To explain disparate decay rates of cytosolic Ca2+ and structural changes in the thin filaments during a twitch, we model the time course of Ca2+-bound troponin (Tn) resulting from the free Ca2+ transient of fast skeletal muscle. In fibers stretched beyond overlap, the decay of Ca2+ as measured by a change in fluo-3 fluorescence is significantly slower than the intensity decay of the meridional 1/38.5 nm−1 reflection of Tn; this is not simply explained by considering only the Ca2+ binding properties of Tn alone (Matsuo et al., 2010). We apply a comprehensive model that includes the known Ca2+ binding properties of Tn in the context of the thin filament with and without cycling crossbridges. Calculations based on the model predict that the transient of Ca2+-bound Tn correlates with either the fluo-3 time course in muscle with overlapping thin and thick filaments or the intensity of the meridional 1/38.5 nm−1 reflection in overstretched muscle. Hence, cycling crossbridges delay the dissociation of Ca2+ from Tn. Correlation with the fluo-3 fluorescence change is not causal given that the transient of Ca2+-bound Tn depends on sarcomere length, whereas the fluo-3 fluorescence change does not. Transient positions of tropomyosin calculated from the time course of Ca2+-bound Tn are in reasonable agreement with the transient of measured perturbations of the Tn repeat in overlap and non-overlap muscle preparations. PMID:27708586

  11. Another Look at Helmholtz's Model for the Gravitational Contraction of the Sun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tort, A. C.; Nogarol, F.

    2011-01-01

    We take another look at the Helmholtz model for the gravitational contraction of the Sun. We show that there are two other pedagogically useful ways of rederiving Helmholtz's main results that make use of Gauss's law, the concept of gravitational field energy and the work-kinetic energy theorem. An account of the energy balance involved in the…

  12. Promises from Afar: A Model of International Student Psychological Contract in Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordia, Sarbari; Bordia, Prashant; Restubog, Simon Lloyd D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their significant presence in western business schools, the needs and experiences of international students have not been adequately reflected in the business education literature. We draw upon psychological contract theory--used to understand employer-employee relationships--to develop a novel theoretical model on the international…

  13. Interpretation of neutrino-matter interactions at low energies as contraction of gauge group of Electroweak Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2013-09-15

    The very weak neutrino-matter interactions are explained with the help of the gauge group contraction of the standard Electroweak Model. The mathematical contraction procedure is connected with the energy dependence of the interaction cross section for neutrinos and corresponds to the limiting case of the Electroweak Model at low energies. Contraction parameter is connected with the universal Fermi constant of weak interactions and neutrino energy as j{sup 2}(s) = {radical}(G{sub F} s)

  14. Maintenance service contract model for heavy equipment in mining industry using principal agent theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakpahan, Eka K. A.; Iskandar, Bermawi P.

    2015-12-01

    Mining industry is characterized by a high operational revenue, and hence high availability of heavy equipment used in mining industry is a critical factor to ensure the revenue target. To maintain high avaliability of the heavy equipment, the equipment's owner hires an agent to perform maintenance action. Contract is then used to control the relationship between the two parties involved. The traditional contracts such as fixed price, cost plus or penalty based contract studied is unable to push agent's performance to exceed target, and this in turn would lead to a sub-optimal result (revenue). This research deals with designing maintenance contract compensation schemes. The scheme should induce agent to select the highest possible maintenance effort level, thereby pushing agent's performance and achieve maximum utility for both parties involved. Principal agent theory is used as a modeling approach due to its ability to simultaneously modeled owner and agent decision making process. Compensation schemes considered in this research includes fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing. The optimal decision is obtained using a numerical method. The results show that if both parties are risk neutral, then there are infinite combination of fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing produced the same optimal solution. The combination of fixed price and cost sharing contract results in the optimal solution when the agent is risk averse, while the optimal combination of fixed price and revenue sharing contract is obtained when agent is risk averse. When both parties are risk averse, the optimal compensation scheme is a combination of fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing.

  15. The optimal licensing contract in a differentiated Stackelberg model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xianpei; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Huaige; Zhao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the work of Wang (2002) by considering a differentiated Stackelberg model, when the leader firm is an inside innovator and licenses its new technology by three options, that is, fixed-fee licensing, royalty licensing, and two-part tariff licensing. The main contributions and conclusions of this paper are threefold. First of all, this paper derives a very different result from Wang (2002). We show that, with a nondrastic innovation, royalty licensing is always better than fixed-fee licensing for the innovator; with a drastic innovation, royalty licensing is superior to fixed-fee licensing for small values of substitution coefficient d; however when d becomes closer to 1, neither fee nor royalty licensing will occur. Secondly, this paper shows that the innovator is always better off in case of two-part tariff licensing than fixed-fee licensing no matter what the innovation size is. Thirdly, the innovator always prefers to license its nondrastic innovation by means of a two-part tariff instead of licensing by means of a royalty; however, with a drastic innovation, the optimal licensing strategy can be either a two-part tariff or a royalty, depending upon the differentiation of the goods. PMID:24683342

  16. Simulation of the contraction of the ventricles in a human heart model including atria and pericardium.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Thomas; Wieners, Christian; Seemann, Gunnar; Steen, Henning; Dössel, Olaf

    2014-06-01

    During the contraction of the ventricles, the ventricles interact with the atria as well as with the pericardium and the surrounding tissue in which the heart is embedded. The atria are stretched, and the atrioventricular plane moves toward the apex. The atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) is considered to be a major contributor to the ventricular function, and a reduced AVPD is strongly related to heart failure. At the same time, the epicardium slides almost frictionlessly on the pericardium with permanent contact. Although the interaction between the ventricles, the atria and the pericardium plays an important role for the deformation of the heart, this aspect is usually not considered in computational models. In this work, we present an electromechanical model of the heart, which takes into account the interaction between ventricles, pericardium and atria and allows to reproduce the AVPD. To solve the contact problem of epicardium and pericardium, a contact handling algorithm based on penalty formulation was developed, which ensures frictionless and permanent contact. Two simulations of the ventricular contraction were conducted, one with contact handling of pericardium and heart and one without. In the simulation with contact handling, the atria were stretched during the contraction of the ventricles, while, due to the permanent contact with the pericardium, their volume increased. In contrast to that, in the simulations without pericardium, the atria were also stretched, but the change in the atrial volume was much smaller. Furthermore, the pericardium reduced the radial contraction of the ventricles and at the same time increased the AVPD.

  17. Automatic and quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction using model-guided segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C.; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction plays a critical role in the field of tissue engineering because it provides spatial-temporal assessment (e.g., changes of gel area and diameter during the contraction process) reflecting the cell behavior and tissue material properties. So far the assessment of collagen gels relies on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and suffers from serious intra- and inter-observer variability. In this study, we propose an automatic method combining various image processing techniques to resolve these problems. The proposed method first detects the maximal feasible contraction range of circular references (e.g., culture dish) and avoids the interference of irrelevant objects in the given image. Then, a three-step color conversion strategy is applied to normalize and enhance the contrast between the gel and background. We subsequently introduce a deformable circular model which utilizes regional intensity contrast and circular shape constraint to locate the gel boundary. An adaptive weighting scheme was employed to coordinate the model behavior, so that the proposed system can overcome variations of gel boundary appearances at different contraction stages. Two measurements of collagen gels (i.e., area and diameter) can readily be obtained based on the segmentation results. Experimental results, including 120 gel images for accuracy validation, showed high agreement between the proposed method and manual segmentation with an average dice similarity coefficient larger than 0.95. The results also demonstrated obvious improvement in gel contours obtained by the proposed method over two popular, generic segmentation methods.

  18. A mathematical model of the coupled mechanisms of cell adhesion, contraction and spreading.

    PubMed

    Vernerey, Franck J; Farsad, Mehdi

    2014-03-01

    Recent research has shown that cell spreading is highly dependent on the contractility of its cytoskeleton and the mechanical properties of the environment it is located in. The dynamics of such process is critical for the development of tissue engineering strategy but is also a key player in wound contraction, tissue maintenance and angiogenesis. To better understand the underlying physics of such phenomena, the paper describes a mathematical formulation of cell spreading and contraction that couples the processes of stress fiber formation, protrusion growth through actin polymerization at the cell edge and dynamics of cross-membrane protein (integrins) enabling cell-substrate attachment. The evolving cell's cytoskeleton is modeled as a mixture of fluid, proteins and filaments that can exchange mass and generate contraction. In particular, besides self-assembling into stress fibers, actin monomers able to polymerize into an actin meshwork at the cell's boundary in order to push the membrane forward and generate protrusion. These processes are possible via the development of cell-substrate attachment complexes that arise from the mechano-sensitive equilibrium of membrane proteins, known as integrins. After deriving the governing equation driving the dynamics of cell evolution and spreading, we introduce a numerical solution based on the extended finite element method, combined with a level set formulation. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model is able to capture the dependency of cell spreading and contraction on substrate stiffness and chemistry. The very good agreement between model predictions and experimental observations suggests that mechanics plays a strong role into the coupled mechanisms of contraction, adhesion and spreading of adherent cells. PMID:23463540

  19. Intentional anticipatory mourning, caregiver and bereavement support program for terminally ill veterans, their families & caregivers in the VA Contract Home Hospice Program.

    PubMed

    Flanagan-Kaminsky, Donnamarie

    2013-01-01

    As a response to the increasing numbers of Veterans utilizing the Veterans Affairs (VA) Contract Home Hospice Program, and with growing awareness of the increased stress at end-of-life, the social work leadership of the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center implemented a unique approach to support Veterans and their families. The role of a grief/bereavement counselor was added to enhance the VA Contract Home Hospice Program, to assess the needs of the Veterans and family caregivers, and to create a program in response to these findings. A three-prong module evolved encompassing: Anticipatory Mourning Support for both the Veteran and caregiver/ family; Caregiver Support; and Bereavement Support. The components of this module are described along with findings in each module.

  20. Intentional anticipatory mourning, caregiver and bereavement support program for terminally ill veterans, their families & caregivers in the VA Contract Home Hospice Program.

    PubMed

    Flanagan-Kaminsky, Donnamarie

    2013-01-01

    As a response to the increasing numbers of Veterans utilizing the Veterans Affairs (VA) Contract Home Hospice Program, and with growing awareness of the increased stress at end-of-life, the social work leadership of the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center implemented a unique approach to support Veterans and their families. The role of a grief/bereavement counselor was added to enhance the VA Contract Home Hospice Program, to assess the needs of the Veterans and family caregivers, and to create a program in response to these findings. A three-prong module evolved encompassing: Anticipatory Mourning Support for both the Veteran and caregiver/ family; Caregiver Support; and Bereavement Support. The components of this module are described along with findings in each module. PMID:23977781

  1. Flood Impact Modelling to support decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Much of what is known about the impacts of landuse change and Natural Flood Management (NFM) is at the local/plot scale. Evidence of the downstream impacts at the larger catchment scale is limited. However, the strategic and financial decisions of land managers, stakeholders and policy makers are made at the larger scale. There are a number of techniques that have the potential to scale local impacts to the catchment scale. This poster will show findings for the 30km2 Leven catchment, North Yorkshire, England. A NFM approach has been adopted by the Environment Agency to reduce flood risk within the catchment. A dense network of stream level gauges were installed in the catchment at the commencement of this project to gain a detailed understanding of the catchment behaviour during storm events. A novel Flood Impact Modelling (FIM) approach has been adopted which uses the network of gauges to disaggregate the outlet hydrograph in terms of source locations. Using a combination of expert opinion and local evidence, the model can be used to assess the impacts of distributed changes in land use management and NFM on flood events. A number of potential future landuse and NFM scenarios have been modelled to investigate their impact on flood peaks. These modelled outcomes are mapped to a simple Decision Support Matrix (DSM). The DSM encourages end users (e.g. land managers and policy makers) to develop an NFM scheme by studying the degree to which local runoff can be attenuated and how that flow will propagate through the network to the point of impact. The DSM relates the impact on flood peaks in terms of alterations to soil management practices and landscape flow connectivity (e.g. soil underdrainage), which can be easily understood by farmers and land managers. The DSM and the FIM together provide a simple to use and transparent modelling tool, making best use of expert knowledge, to support decision making.

  2. National Transonic Facility model and model support vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Popernack, Thomas G., Jr.; Gloss, Blair B.

    1990-01-01

    Vibrations of models and model support system were encountered during testing in the National Transonic Facility. Model support system yaw plane vibrations have resulted in model strain gage balance design load limits being reached. These high levels of vibrations resulted in limited aerodynamic testing for several wind tunnel models. The yaw vibration problem was the subject of an intensive experimental and analytical investigation which identified the primary source of the yaw excitation and resulted in attenuation of the yaw oscillations to acceptable levels. This paper presents the principal results of analyses and experimental investigation of the yaw plane vibration problems. Also, an overview of plans for development and installation of a permanent model system dynamic and aeroelastic response measurement and monitoring system for the National Transonic Facility is presented.

  3. Finding a model that supports quality.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Margaret J

    2011-01-01

    While Canadian provinces demonstrate considerable diversity of performance within the non-profit sector and further research is needed to better understand which non-profit models support the best quality, Canadian research has been generally consistent with US research in confirming a relationship between for-profit ownership and inferior quality. The quality concerns arising from public funding to the private for-profit residential long-term care sector are unlikely to be addressed by adopting tighter regulations. With the expansion of private for-profit delivery, the organizational goals of the regulator and the facilities being regulated become less aligned. The former is likely to move to a more deterrence-based model of regulation, which is costly, less effective and draws resources away from direct patient care.

  4. A comparative study of viscoelastic planar contraction flow for polymer melts using molecular constitutive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xuanping; Hu, Changxu

    2014-11-01

    The benchmark problem of planar contraction flow is often used to evaluate the stability of numerical algorithms and the predictability of viscoelastic constitutive models in predicting the rheological behavior of polymer fluids. In this paper, for the simulation of planar contraction flow, the single/simplified modified double convected Pom-Pom (S-MDCPP) model recently proposed is adopted, and in the frame of iterative stabilized fractional step algorithm, the discrete elastic viscous stress splitting (DEVSS) technique in combination with the streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) method is taken to serve as a stable numerical solution scheme for the viscoelastic flow, where the equal low-order interpolations are applied to the independent solution variables by virtue of stabilized form of mass conservation equation constructed based-on the finite incremental calculus method. The comparison of rheological behaviors by S-MDCPP model with those by experiment results and DCPP model is taken on the aspects of the material functions of shear viscosities and uniaxial elongation viscosities, stresses fields through the way of flow induced birefringence in the planar contraction flow, with the aim of assessing the constitutive models. In addition, the effects of the constitutive parameters of the S-MDCPP model and Weissenberg number on the rheological behaviors of polymer melts are discussed, with the flow field responses such as velocity, pressure, stress components, and backbone stretch included. Through these comparative studies, the capabilities of the S-MDCPP constitutive model are justified for the applications in branched polymer melts characterizations and numerical modeling.

  5. Life cycle cost-based risk model for energy performance contracting retrofits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghorn, George H.

    Buildings account for 41% of the primary energy consumption in the United States, nearly half of which is accounted for by commercial buildings. Among the greatest energy users are those in the municipalities, universities, schools, and hospitals (MUSH) market. Correctional facilities are in the upper half of all commercial building types for energy intensity. Public agencies have experienced reduced capital budgets to fund retrofits; this has led to the increased use of energy performance contracts (EPC), which are implemented by energy services companies (ESCOs). These companies guarantee a minimum amount of energy savings resulting from the retrofit activities, which in essence transfers performance risk from the owner to the contractor. Building retrofits in the MUSH market, especially correctional facilities, are well-suited to EPC, yet despite this potential and their high energy intensities, efficiency improvements lag behind that of other public building types. Complexities in project execution, lack of support for data requests and sub-metering, and conflicting project objectives have been cited as reasons for this lag effect. As a result, project-level risks must be understood in order to support wider adoption of retrofits in the public market, in particular the correctional facility sub-market. The goal of this research is to understand risks related to the execution of energy efficiency retrofits delivered via EPC in the MUSH market. To achieve this goal, in-depth analysis and improved understanding was sought with regard to ESCO risks that are unique to EPC in this market. The proposed work contributes to this understanding by developing a life cycle cost-based risk model to improve project decision making with regard to risk control and reduction. The specific objectives of the research are: (1) to perform an exploratory analysis of the EPC retrofit process and identify key areas of performance risk requiring in-depth analysis; (2) to construct a

  6. Smooth muscle modeling and experimental identification: application to bladder isometric contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforêt, Jérémy; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Taillades, Hubert; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an original smooth muscle model based on the Huxley microscopic approach. This model is the main part of a comprehensive lower urinary track model. The latter is used for simulation studies and is assessed through experiments on rabbits, for which a subset of parameters is estimated, using intravesical pressure measurements in isometric conditions. Bladder contraction is induced by electrical stimulation that determines the onset and thus synchronizes simulation and experimental data. Model sensitivity versus parameter accuracy is discussed and allows the definition of a subset of four parameters that must be accurately identified in order to obtain good fitting between experimental and acquired data. Preliminary experimental data are presented as well as model identification results. They show that the model is able to follow the pressure changes induced by an artificial stimulus in isometric contractions. Moreover, the model gives an insight into the internal changes in calcium concentration and the ratio of the different chemical species present in the muscle cells, in particular the bounded and unbounded actin and myosin and the normalized concentration of intracellular calcium.

  7. Normality Index of Ventricular Contraction Based on a Statistical Model from FADS

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ángeles, Luis; Valdés-Cristerna, Raquel; Vallejo, Enrique; Bialostozky, David; Medina-Bañuelos, Verónica

    2013-01-01

    Radionuclide-based imaging is an alternative to evaluate ventricular function and synchrony and may be used as a tool for the identification of patients that could benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). In a previous work, we used Factor Analysis of Dynamic Structures (FADS) to analyze the contribution and spatial distribution of the 3 most significant factors (3-MSF) present in a dynamic series of equilibrium radionuclide angiography images. In this work, a probability density function model of the 3-MSF extracted from FADS for a control group is presented; also an index, based on the likelihood between the control group's contraction model and a sample of normal subjects is proposed. This normality index was compared with those computed for two cardiopathic populations, satisfying the clinical criteria to be considered as candidates for a CRT. The proposed normality index provides a measure, consistent with the phase analysis currently used in clinical environment, sensitive enough to show contraction differences between normal and abnormal groups, which suggests that it can be related to the degree of severity in the ventricular contraction dyssynchrony, and therefore shows promise as a follow-up procedure for patients under CRT. PMID:23634177

  8. Nonlinear Dynamic Models in Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    To facilitate analysis, ALS systems are often assumed to be linear and time invariant, but they usually have important nonlinear and dynamic aspects. Nonlinear dynamic behavior can be caused by time varying inputs, changes in system parameters, nonlinear system functions, closed loop feedback delays, and limits on buffer storage or processing rates. Dynamic models are usually cataloged according to the number of state variables. The simplest dynamic models are linear, using only integration, multiplication, addition, and subtraction of the state variables. A general linear model with only two state variables can produce all the possible dynamic behavior of linear systems with many state variables, including stability, oscillation, or exponential growth and decay. Linear systems can be described using mathematical analysis. Nonlinear dynamics can be fully explored only by computer simulations of models. Unexpected behavior is produced by simple models having only two or three state variables with simple mathematical relations between them. Closed loop feedback delays are a major source of system instability. Exceeding limits on buffer storage or processing rates forces systems to change operating mode. Different equilibrium points may be reached from different initial conditions. Instead of one stable equilibrium point, the system may have several equilibrium points, oscillate at different frequencies, or even behave chaotically, depending on the system inputs and initial conditions. The frequency spectrum of an output oscillation may contain harmonics and the sums and differences of input frequencies, but it may also contain a stable limit cycle oscillation not related to input frequencies. We must investigate the nonlinear dynamic aspects of advanced life support systems to understand and counter undesirable behavior.

  9. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 78, quarter ending March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report presents descriptions of various research projects and field projects concerned with the enhanced recovery of petroleum. Contract numbers, principal investigators, company names, and project management information is included.

  10. Global Urbanization Modeling Supported by Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Smith, S.; Zhao, K.; Imhoff, M. L.; Thomson, A. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Elvidge, C.

    2014-12-01

    Urbanization, one of the major human induced land cover and land use change, has profound impacts on the Earth system, and plays important roles in a variety of processes such as biodiversity loss, water and carbon cycle, and climate change. Accurate information on urban areas and their spatial distribution at the regional and global scales is important in both scientific and policy-making communities. The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable light data (NTL) provide a potential way to map urban area and its dynamics economically and timely. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the DMSP/OLS NTL data. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the robustness of the derived optimal thresholds and the reliability of the cluster-based method. Compared to existing threshold techniques, our method reduces the over- and under-estimation issue, when mapping urban extent over a large area. Using this cluster-based method, we built new global maps of 1-km urban extent from the NTL data (Figure 1) and evaluated its temporal dynamics from 1992 to 2013. Supported by the derived global urban maps and socio-economic drivers, we developed an integrated modeling framework by integrating a top-down macro-scale statistical model with a bottom-up urban growth model and projected future urban expansion.

  11. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 83, quarter ending June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Summaries of 41 research projects on enhanced recovery are presented under the following sections: (1) chemical flooding; (2) gas displacement; (3) thermal recovery; (4) geoscience technology; (5) resource assessment technology; and (6) reservoir classes. Each presentation gives the title of the project, contract number, research facility, contract date, expected completion data, amount of the award, principal investigator, and DOE program manager, and describes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress.

  12. Automatic and Quantitative Measurement of Collagen Gel Contraction Using Model-Guided Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction plays a critical role in the field of tissue engineering because it provides spatial-temporal assessment (e.g., changes of gel area and diameter during the contraction process) reflecting the cell behaviors and tissue material properties. So far the assessment of collagen gels relies on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and suffers from serious intra- and inter-observer variability. In this study, we propose an automatic method combining various image processing techniques to resolve these problems. The proposed method first detects the maximal feasible contraction range of circular references (e.g., culture dish) and avoids the interference of irrelevant objects in the given image. Then, a three-step color conversion strategy is applied to normalize and enhance the contrast between the gel and background. We subsequently introduce a deformable circular model (DCM) which utilizes regional intensity contrast and circular shape constraint to locate the gel boundary. An adaptive weighting scheme was employed to coordinate the model behavior, so that the proposed system can overcome variations of gel boundary appearances at different contraction stages. Two measurements of collagen gels (i.e., area and diameter) can readily be obtained based on the segmentation results. Experimental results, including 120 gel images for accuracy validation, showed high agreement between the proposed method and manual segmentation with an average dice similarity coefficient larger than 0.95. The results also demonstrated obvious improvement in gel contours obtained by the proposed method over two popular, generic segmentation methods. PMID:24092954

  13. Modeling and control design of a wind tunnel model support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center is being restored. A major part of the restoration is the complete redesign of the aircraft model supports and their associated control systems. An accurate trajectory control servo system capable of positioning a model (with no measurable overshoot) is needed. Extremely small errors in scaled-model pitch angle can increase airline fuel costs for the final aircraft configuration by millions of dollars. In order to make a mechanism sufficiently accurate in pitch, a detailed structural and control-system model must be created and then simulated on a digital computer. The model must contain linear representations of the mechanical system, including masses, springs, and damping in order to determine system modes. Electrical components, both analog and digital, linear and nonlinear must also be simulated. The model of the entire closed-loop system must then be tuned to control the modes of the flexible model-support structure. The development of a system model, the control modal analysis, and the control-system design are discussed.

  14. 48 CFR 39.107 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.107 Contract clause. The contracting officer..., in solicitations and contracts for information technology which require security of information... information technology services or support services....

  15. IHY Modeling Support at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulaki, A.; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; MacNeice, P.; Rastaetter, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. In particular, the CCMC provides to the research community the execution of "runs-onrequest" for specific events of interest to space science researchers. Through this activity and the concurrent development of advanced visualization tools, CCMC provides, to the general science community, unprecedented access to a large number of state-of-the-art research models. CCMC houses models that cover the entire domain from the Sun to the Earth. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of CCMC modeling services that are available to support activities during the International Heliospheric Year. In order to tailor CCMC activities to IHY needs, we will also invite community input into our IHY planning activities.

  16. Isotonic contraction as a result of cooperation of sarcomeres--a model and simulation outcome.

    PubMed

    Wünsch, Z

    1996-01-01

    The molecular level of the functional structure of the contractile apparatus of cross-striated muscle has been mapped out almost minutely. Most authors accept the basic principles of the theory of sliding filaments and the theory of operation of molecular generators of force which, of course, are progressively updated by integrating new knowledge. The idea of the model delineated below does not contradict these theories, for it refers to another level of the system's hierarchy. The definition of the system, hereafter referred to Ideal Sarcomere (IS), takes into account the fact that, during isotonic contraction, a large number of not wholly independently working sarcomeres and molecular generators of force is active in a synergistic way. The shortening velocity of isotonically contracting IS is determined by the relation between quantities conveying different tasks of active generators of force and the influence of the system parameters. Although IS is derived from simple axiomatic predicates, it has properties which were not premediated in defining the system and which, in spite of this, correspond to some properties of the biological original. The equations of the system allow us to calculate the shortening velocity of 'isotonic contraction' and other variables and parameters and show, inter alia, an alternative way to derive and interpret the relations stated in Hill's force-velocity equation. The simulation results indicate that the macroscopic manifestations of isotonic contraction may be also contingent on the properties of the cooperating system of the multitude of sarcomeres, which also constitutes one part of the functional structure of muscle. PMID:8924648

  17. Characteristics of Hydraulic Shock Waves in an Inclined Chute Contraction by Using Three Dimensional Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chao; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Su, Yu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    The inclined rectangular chute construction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as the increase of bottom slope, the transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, the drainage construction, and the reduction of chute width due to bridges, flood diversion structures or irrigation systems. The converging vertical sidewalls of a chute contraction deflect the supercritical flow to form hydraulic shock waves. Hydraulic shock waves have narrow and locally extreme wavy surfaces, which commonly results in the requirement of higher height of sidewalls. Therefore, predicting the possible height and position of maximum hydraulic shock wave are necessary to design the required height of sidewalls to prevent flow overtopping. In this study, we used a three-dimensional computation fluid dynamics model (i.e., FLOW-3D) to simulate the characteristics of hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction. For this purpose, the parameters of simulated hydraulic shock wave, such as the shock angle, maximum shock wave height and maximum shock wave position in various conditions are compared with those calculated by the empirical relations obtained from literatures. We showed that the simulated results are extremely close to the experimental results. The numerical results validated the applicability of these empirical relations and extend their applicability to higher approach Froude numbers from 3.51 to 7.27. Furthermore, we also applied the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel under 200-year peak flow condition to FLOW-3D model to simulate the hydraulic shock waves and validate the effect of the installation of a diversion pier in the channel on promoting the stability of flow fluid. The results revealed that a diversion pier installed in the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel is helpful for improving the stability of flow field. In summary, this study demonstrates that FLOW-3D model can be used to simulate the

  18. Mutual Support: A Model of Participatory Support by and for People with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Sarah E.; Brandon, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Mutual Support, a model of peer support by and for people with learning difficulties, was constructed through a participatory research process. The research focussed on individual narratives from people with learning difficulties. These narratives were then brought together to form a collective model of support. This paper outlines the detailed…

  19. Microscopic model of the actin-myosin interaction in muscular contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, B.; Moreau, M.; Schuman, B.

    2004-01-01

    We define and study a detailed many body model for the muscular contraction taking into account the various myosin heads. The state of the system is defined by the position of the actin and by an internal coordinate of rotation for each myosin head. We write a system of Fokker-Planck equations and calculate the average for the position, the number of attached myosin heads, and the total force exerted on the actin. We also study the correlation between these quantities, in particular between the number of attached myosin heads and the force on the actin.

  20. Initial success and substantial government savings may mandate prime vendor contracts for Table of Organization and Equipment units and development support.

    PubMed

    Rembold, J M; Berry, T R

    1997-01-01

    In November 1994, the Department of Pharmacy at Madigan Army Medical Center and the 62nd Medical Group Logistics (Fort Lewis, Washington) examined the feasibility of prime vendor support for the 18th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in a Table of Organization and Equipment (TOE) unit rapid deployment. The TOE medication list was deemed to be out of date and a state-of-the-art formulary was developed. By identifying three National Drug Code bioequivalent substitutes for each National Stock Number, a 94% prime vendor match was achieved for pharmaceuticals form the new formulary serving as our template. The 6% of medications that were not able to be matched consisted of items deemed as military-unique or items not covered by the prime vendor government contracts with wholesalers. On August 7, 1995, a trial was conducted to determine whether the local prime vendor had the capacity to support a deployment under its present contract with Madigan Army Medical Center. Two hundred eighty-six line items were ordered, mocking the deployment of two medical units. More than 95% of the line items were filled within 5 days from the local prime vendor. Under the local contract, the prime vendor was under no obligation to have out-of-stock medications provided by overnight shipment from other national distribution sites. This advantage, which is standard in national pharmaceutical prime vendor contracts negotiated by large civilian group purchasing organizations, would have substantially decreased the period of time to attain a > 95% fill. The results of this trial have provided strong support for prime vendor utilization in future deployments. PMID:9002708

  1. On Using Model Populations to Determine Mechanical Properties of Skeletal Muscle. Application to Concentric Contraction Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sierra, M; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B; Muñoz, M J; Rodríguez, J F; Grasa, J

    2015-10-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, the experimental evaluation of the material properties is crucial for the development of computational models that closely reproduce real organ systems. When simulations of muscle tissue are concerned, stress/strain relations for both passive and active behavior are required. These experimental relations usually exhibit certain variability. In this study, a set of material parameters involved in a 3D skeletal muscle model are determined by using a system biology approach in which the parameters are randomly varied leading to a population of models. Using a set of experimental results from an animal model, a subset of the entire population of models was selected. This reduced population predicted the mechanical response within the window of experimental observations. Hence, a range of model parameters, instead of a single set of them, was determined. Rat Tibialis Anterior muscle was selected for this study. Muscles ([Formula: see text]) were activated through the sciatic nerve and during contraction the tissue pulled a weight fixed to the distal tendon (concentric contraction). Three different weights 1, 2 and 3 N were used and the time course of muscle stretch was analyzed obtaining values of (mean [Formula: see text] standard deviation): [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] respectively. A paired two-sided sign rank test showed significant differences between the muscle response for the three weights ([Formula: see text]). This study shows that the Monte Carlo method could be used for determine muscle characteristic parameters considering the variability of the experimental population.

  2. Geomechanical modeling of stress and strain evolution during contractional fault-related folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding stress states and rock mass deformation deep underground is critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and production, geothermal reservoir characterization and management, and subsurface disposal of CO2. Geomechanical modeling can predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., including competence contrasts, bed thicknesses, and bedding planes), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the overall geometry of the fold structures of interest, and allow tracking of stress and strain through the deformation history. Use of inelastic constitutive relationships (e.g., elastic-plastic behavior) allows permanent strains to develop in response to the applied loads. This ability to capture permanent deformation is superior to linear elastic models, which are often used for numerical convenience, but are incapable of modeling permanent deformation or predicting permanent deformation processes such as faulting, fracturing, and pore collapse. Finite element modeling results compared with field examples of a natural contractional fault-related fold show that well-designed geomechanical modeling can match overall fold geometries and be applied to stress, fracture, and subseismic fault prediction in geologic structures. Geomechanical modeling of this type allows stress and strain histories to be obtained throughout the model domain.

  3. Models to study airway smooth muscle contraction in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro: implications in understanding asthma.

    PubMed

    Wright, David; Sharma, Pawan; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Rissé, Paul-Andre; Ngo, Melanie; Maarsingh, Harm; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jha, Aruni; Halayko, Andrew J; West, Adrian R

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic obstructive airway disease characterised by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway wall remodelling. The effector of airway narrowing is the contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM), yet the question of whether an inherent or acquired dysfunction in ASM contractile function plays a significant role in the disease pathophysiology remains contentious. The difficulty in determining the role of ASM lies in limitations with the models used to assess contraction. In vivo models provide a fully integrated physiological response but ASM contraction cannot be directly measured. Ex vivo and in vitro models can provide more direct assessment of ASM contraction but the loss of factors that may modulate ASM responsiveness and AHR, including interaction between multiple cell types and disruption of the mechanical environment, precludes a complete understanding of the disease process. In this review we detail key advantages of common in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro models of ASM contraction, as well as emerging tissue engineered models of ASM and whole airways. We also highlight important findings from each model with respect to the pathophysiology of asthma.

  4. Paleoclimatic modeling and phylogeography of least killifish, Heterandria formosa: insights into Pleistocene expansion-contraction dynamics and evolutionary history of North American Coastal Plain freshwater biota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Climatic and sea-level fluctuations throughout the last Pleistocene glacial cycle (~130-0 ka) profoundly influenced present-day distributions and genetic diversity of Northern Hemisphere biotas by forcing range contractions in many species during the glacial advance and allowing expansion following glacial retreat ('expansion-contraction’ model). Evidence for such range dynamics and refugia in the unglaciated Gulf-Atlantic Coastal Plain stems largely from terrestrial species, and aquatic species Pleistocene responses remain relatively uninvestigated. Heterandria formosa, a wide-ranging regional endemic, presents an ideal system to test the expansion-contraction model within this biota. By integrating ecological niche modeling and phylogeography, we infer the Pleistocene history of this livebearing fish (Poeciliidae) and test for several predicted distributional and genetic effects of the last glaciation. Results Paleoclimatic models predicted range contraction to a single southwest Florida peninsula refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by northward expansion. We inferred spatial-population subdivision into four groups that reflect genetic barriers outside this refuge. Several other features of the genetic data were consistent with predictions derived from an expansion-contraction model: limited intraspecific divergence (e.g. mean mtDNA p-distance = 0.66%); a pattern of mtDNA diversity (mean Hd = 0.934; mean π = 0.007) consistent with rapid, recent population expansion; a lack of mtDNA isolation-by-distance; and clinal variation in allozyme diversity with higher diversity at lower latitudes near the predicted refugium. Statistical tests of mismatch distributions and coalescent simulations of the gene tree lent greater support to a scenario of post-glacial expansion and diversification from a single refugium than to any other model examined (e.g. multiple-refugia scenarios). Conclusions Congruent results from diverse data

  5. Supporting Students' Knowledge Transfer in Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piksööt, Jaanika; Sarapuu, Tago

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates ways to enhance secondary school students' knowledge transfer in complex science domains by implementing question prompts. Two samples of students applied two web-based models to study molecular genetics--the model of genetic code (n = 258) and translation (n = 245). For each model, the samples were randomly divided into…

  6. Modeling uncertainty in requirements engineering decision support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Maynard-Zhang, Pedrito; Kiper, James D.

    2005-01-01

    One inherent characteristic of requrements engineering is a lack of certainty during this early phase of a project. Nevertheless, decisions about requirements must be made in spite of this uncertainty. Here we describe the context in which we are exploring this, and some initial work to support elicitation of uncertain requirements, and to deal with the combination of such information from multiple stakeholders.

  7. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review quarter ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. A list of available publications is also included.

  8. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 71, quarter ending June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

  9. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 74, Quarter ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

  10. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Teacher. Edition III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful educator evaluation and support system will help improve teaching and learning. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Teacher Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all teachers improve. Through the Model, the goal is to help create a…

  11. Electrical models of excitation-contraction coupling and charge movement in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Mathias, R T; Levis, R A; Eisenberg, R S

    1980-07-01

    The consequences of ionic current flow from the T system to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscle are examined. The Appendix analyzes a simple model in which the conductance gx, linking T system and SR, is in series with a parallel resistor and capacitor having fixed values. The conductance gx is supposed to increase rapidly with depolarization and to decrease slowly with repolarization. Nonlinear transient currents computed from this model have some of the properties of gating currents produced by intramembrane charge movement. In particular, the integral of the transient current upon depolarization approximates that upon repolarization. Thus, equality of nonlinear charge movement can occur without intramembrane charge movement. A more complicated model is used in the text to fit the structure of skeletal muscle and other properties of its charge movement. Rectification is introduced into gx and the membrane conductance of the terminal cisternae to give asymmetry in the time-course of the transient currents and saturation in the curve relating charge movement to depolarization, respectively. The more complex model fits experimental data quite well if the longitudinal tubules of the sarcoplasmic reticulum are isolated from the terminal cisternae by a substantial resistance and if calcium release from the terminal cisternae is, for the most part, electrically silent. Specific experimental tests of the model are proposed, and the implications for excitation-contraction coupling are discussed.

  12. Simulation of dilute polymeric fluids in a three-dimensional contraction using a multiscale FENE model

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M. E-mail: ruettgers@ins.uni-bonn.de; Rüttgers, A. E-mail: ruettgers@ins.uni-bonn.de

    2014-05-15

    The multiscale FENE model is applied to a 3D square-square contraction flow problem. For this purpose, the stochastic Brownian configuration field method (BCF) has been coupled with our fully parallelized three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver NaSt3DGPF. The robustness of the BCF method enables the numerical simulation of high Deborah number flows for which most macroscopic methods suffer from stability issues. The results of our simulations are compared with that of experimental measurements from literature and show a very good agreement. In particular, flow phenomena such as a strong vortex enhancement, streamline divergence and a flow inversion for highly elastic flows are reproduced. Due to their computational complexity, our simulations require massively parallel computations. Using a domain decomposition approach with MPI, the implementation achieves excellent scale-up results for up to 128 processors.

  13. Iterated non-linear model predictive control based on tubes and contractive constraints.

    PubMed

    Murillo, M; Sánchez, G; Giovanini, L

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a predictive control algorithm for non-linear systems based on successive linearizations of the non-linear dynamic around a given trajectory. A linear time varying model is obtained and the non-convex constrained optimization problem is transformed into a sequence of locally convex ones. The robustness of the proposed algorithm is addressed adding a convex contractive constraint. To account for linearization errors and to obtain more accurate results an inner iteration loop is added to the algorithm. A simple methodology to obtain an outer bounding-tube for state trajectories is also presented. The convergence of the iterative process and the stability of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in controlling a quadcopter type unmanned aerial vehicle.

  14. Iterated non-linear model predictive control based on tubes and contractive constraints.

    PubMed

    Murillo, M; Sánchez, G; Giovanini, L

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a predictive control algorithm for non-linear systems based on successive linearizations of the non-linear dynamic around a given trajectory. A linear time varying model is obtained and the non-convex constrained optimization problem is transformed into a sequence of locally convex ones. The robustness of the proposed algorithm is addressed adding a convex contractive constraint. To account for linearization errors and to obtain more accurate results an inner iteration loop is added to the algorithm. A simple methodology to obtain an outer bounding-tube for state trajectories is also presented. The convergence of the iterative process and the stability of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in controlling a quadcopter type unmanned aerial vehicle. PMID:26850752

  15. Integrin receptor involvement in actin cable formation in an in vitro model of events associated with wound contraction.

    PubMed

    Stephens, P; Genever, P G; Wood, E J; Raxworthy, M J

    1997-01-01

    Actin cables have been reported to act in vivo as contractile 'purse strings' capable of closing embryonic wounds through generation of circumferential tension. Furthermore, their involvement in wounds within in vitro model systems suggests that actin cable contraction may be an important mechanism involved in the process of wound closure. The aim of this study therefore, was to investigate the appearance of actin cables in a contracting fibroblast populated collagen lattice, an in vitro model of events associated with wound contraction. Utilising this in vitro model, the time-course of actin cable production was investigated and the involvement of integrin receptors analysed using immunofluorescent labelling techniques. Over a period of hours distinct cellular cable-like structures developed at the edges of collagen lattices coinciding with the onset of contraction. Cellular organisation within the cable was evident as was polymerisation of actin microfilaments into elongated stress fibres forming a continuous cell-cell 'actin cable' around the circumference of the lattice. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that integrin receptor subunits beta 1 and alpha 2 but not alpha 5 were involved in apparent intimate cell-cell contact between juxtaposed fibroblasts within this actin cable. This study demonstrates the involvement of integrin receptors in actin cable formation within collagen lattice systems undergoing reorganisation. Such integrin involvement may enable participating cells to respond to the tensional status of their surrounding environment and via cell-cell communication, to permit a co-ordinated contraction of the cable. It is concluded that integrin receptor involvement in active actin cable contraction may be involved in the process of wound contraction.

  16. A Model for the Transient and Steady-State Mechanical Behavior of Contracting Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Julian, F. J.; Sollins, K. R.; Sollins, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    A model was developed which can simulate both the transient and steady-state mechanical behavior of contracting skeletal striated muscle. Thick filament cross-bridges undergo cycles of attachment to and detachment from thin filament sites. Cross-bridges can attach only while in the first of two stable states. Force is then generated by a transition to the second state after which detachment can occur. Cross-bridges are assumed to be connected to the thin filaments by an elastic element whose extension or compression influences the rate constants for attachment, detachment, and changes between states. The model was programmed for a digital computer and attempts made to match both the transient and the steady-state responses of the model to that of real muscle in two basic types of experiment: force response to sudden change in length and length response to sudden reduction of load from Po. Values for rate constants and other parameters were chosen to try to match the model's output to results from real muscles, while at the same time trying to accommodate structural and biochemical information. PMID:4836669

  17. Modeling the Actions of β-Adrenergic Signaling on Excitation–Contraction Coupling Processes

    PubMed Central

    GREENSTEIN, JOSEPH L.; TANSKANEN, ANTTI J.; WINSLOW, RAIMOND L.

    2005-01-01

    Activation of the β-adrenergic (β-AR) signaling pathway enhances cardiac function through protein kinase A (PKA)–mediated phosphorylation of target proteins involved in the process of excitation–contraction (EC) coupling. Experimental studies of the effects of β-AR stimulation on EC coupling have yielded complex results, including increased, decreased, or unchanged EC coupling gain. In this study, we extend a previously developed model of the canine ventricular myocyte describing local control of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium (Ca2+) release to include the effects of β-AR stimulation. Incorporation of phosphorylation-dependent effects on model membrane currents and Ca2+-cycling proteins yields changes of action potential (AP) and Ca2+ transients in agreement with those measured experimentally in response to the nonspecific β-AR agonist isoproterenol (ISO). The model reproduces experimentally observed alterations in EC coupling gain in response to β-AR agonists and predicts the specific roles of L-type Ca2+ channel (LCC) and SR Ca2+ release channel phosphorylation in altering the amplitude and shape of the EC coupling gain function. The model also indicates that factors that promote mode 2 gating of LCCs, such as β-AR stimulation or activation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), may increase the probability of occurrence of early after-depolarizations (EADs), due to the random, long-duration opening of LCC gating in mode 2. PMID:15201146

  18. Predictive analytics can support the ACO model.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Predictive analytics can be used to rapidly spot hard-to-identify opportunities to better manage care--a key tool in accountable care. When considering analytics models, healthcare providers should: Make value-based care a priority and act on information from analytics models. Create a road map that includes achievable steps, rather than major endeavors. Set long-term expectations and recognize that the effectiveness of an analytics program takes time, unlike revenue cycle initiatives that may show a quick return.

  19. Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drysdale, Alan; Thomas, Mark; Fresa, Mark; Wheeler, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to CELSS, a critical technology for the Space Exploration Initiative. OCAM (object-oriented CELSS analysis and modeling) models carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen recycling. Multiple crops and plant types can be simulated. Resource recovery options from inedible biomass include leaching, enzyme treatment, aerobic digestion, and mushroom and fish growth. The benefit of using many small crops overlapping in time, instead of a single large crop, is demonstrated. Unanticipated results include startup transients which reduce the benefit of multiple small crops. The relative contributions of mass, energy, and manpower to system cost are analyzed in order to determine appropriate research directions.

  20. Psychological contracts of hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Audrey Elizabeth; Sambrook, Sally

    2010-12-01

    Psychological contracts have been described as individuals' beliefs regarding the obligations, expectations, and contributions that exist between them and their employer. They can be influenced by the organization's culture and philosophy, through human resources policies, and through the employee's personality and characteristics. Owing to the recent economic crisis, hospices in the UK are currently in a transitional phase and are being expected to demonstrate efficiencies that might be more in line with a business model than a health-care environment. This may conflict with the philosophical views of hospice nurses. To support nurses through this transition, it might be helpful to understand the antecedents of hospice nurses' behaviour and how they construct their psychological contracts. Failure to offer adequate support might lead to negative outcomes such as a desire to leave the organisation, poorer quality work, or disruptive behaviour. This study used a modified grounded theory approach involving in-depth interviews to explore the context and content of the psychological contracts of hospice nurses in the UK. Four main themes emerged: the types of psychological contracts formed, how the contracts are formed, their contents, and the breaches and potential violations the nurses perceive. PMID:21240104

  1. Strategies to Support Students' Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunyi

    2015-01-01

    An important question for mathematics teachers is this: "How can we help students learn mathematics to solve everyday problems, rather than teaching them only to memorize rules and practice mathematical procedures?" Teaching students using modeling activities can help them learn mathematics in real-world problem-solving situations that…

  2. Using Covariation Reasoning to Support Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    For many students, making connections between mathematical ideas and the real world is one of the most intriguing and rewarding aspects of the study of mathematics. In the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010), mathematical modeling is highlighted as a mathematical practice standard for all grades. To engage in mathematical…

  3. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Building Administrator. Edition III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful educator evaluation and support system will help improve teaching, learning, and school leadership. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Building Administrator Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all building administrators improve.…

  4. Atmospheric analysis modeling in support of Seasat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langland, R. A.; Stephens, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric objective analysis models were developed and tested in preparation for assessing the utility of Seasat data. Of the several discretionary procedures in such computer programs, the effects of three were examined and documented: (1) the effect of varying the weights in the pattern conserving techniques; (2) the effect of varying the data influence region; (3) the effect of including wind information in analysis of mass-structure variables. The problem of inserting bogus reports is also examined.

  5. Nested and Dynamic Contract Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, T. Stephen; Felleisen, Matthias

    Previous work on software contracts assumes fixed and statically known boundaries between the parties to a contract. Implementations of contract monitoring systems rely on this assumption to explain the nature of contract violations and to assign blame to violators. In this paper, we explain how to implement arbitrary, nested, and dynamic contract boundaries with two examples. First, we add nestable contract regions to a static, first-order module system. Second, we show that even a dynamic, higher-order, and hierarchical module system can be equipped with software contracts that support precise blame assignment.

  6. A Fidelity Scale for the Individual Placement and Support Model of Supported Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Gary R.; Becker, Deborah R.; Drake, Robert E.; Vogler, Kathleen M.

    1997-01-01

    Developed a 15-item fidelity scale to assess the extent to which vocational programs for people with severe mental illness followed the Individual Placement and Support model of supported employment. Results indicate that interrater reliability and internal consistency were adequate. Should help differentiate programs following a specific model…

  7. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  8. Georeferenced model simulations efficiently support targeted monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlekamp, Jürgen; Klasmeier, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) demands the good ecological and chemical status of surface waters. To meet the definition of good chemical status of the WFD surface water concentrations of priority pollutants must not exceed established environmental quality standards (EQS). Surveillance of the concentrations of numerous chemical pollutants in whole river basins by monitoring is laborious and time-consuming. Moreover, measured data do often not allow for immediate source apportionment which is a prerequisite for defining promising reduction strategies to be implemented within the programme of measures. In this context, spatially explicit model approaches are highly advantageous because they provide a direct link between local point emissions (e.g. treated wastewater) or diffuse non-point emissions (e.g. agricultural runoff) and resulting surface water concentrations. Scenario analyses with such models allow for a priori investigation of potential positive effects of reduction measures such as optimization of wastewater treatment. The geo-referenced model GREAT-ER (Geography-referenced Regional Exposure Assessment Tool for European Rivers) has been designed to calculate spatially resolved averaged concentrations for different flow conditions (e.g. mean or low flow) based on emission estimations for local point source emissions such as treated effluents from wastewater treatment plants. The methodology was applied to selected pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, sotalol, metoprolol, carbamazepin) in the Main river basin in Germany (approx. 27,290 km²). Average concentrations of the compounds were calculated for each river reach in the whole catchment. Simulation results were evaluated by comparison with available data from orienting monitoring and used to develop an optimal monitoring strategy for the assessment of water quality regarding micropollutants at the catchment scale.

  9. Supportive Accountability: A Model for Providing Human Support to Enhance Adherence to eHealth Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of and adherence to eHealth interventions is enhanced by human support. However, human support has largely not been manualized and has usually not been guided by clear models. The objective of this paper is to develop a clear theoretical model, based on relevant empirical literature, that can guide research into human support components of eHealth interventions. A review of the literature revealed little relevant information from clinical sciences. Applicable literature was drawn primarily from organizational psychology, motivation theory, and computer-mediated communication (CMC) research. We have developed a model, referred to as “Supportive Accountability.” We argue that human support increases adherence through accountability to a coach who is seen as trustworthy, benevolent, and having expertise. Accountability should involve clear, process-oriented expectations that the patient is involved in determining. Reciprocity in the relationship, through which the patient derives clear benefits, should be explicit. The effect of accountability may be moderated by patient motivation. The more intrinsically motivated patients are, the less support they likely require. The process of support is also mediated by the communications medium (eg, telephone, instant messaging, email). Different communications media each have their own potential benefits and disadvantages. We discuss the specific components of accountability, motivation, and CMC medium in detail. The proposed model is a first step toward understanding how human support enhances adherence to eHealth interventions. Each component of the proposed model is a testable hypothesis. As we develop viable human support models, these should be manualized to facilitate dissemination. PMID:21393123

  10. Huxley's Model for Muscle Contraction Revisited: The Importance of Microscopic Reversibility.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2015-01-01

    Andrew Huxley's model for muscle contraction is the first mechanistic description of how an energy-providing chemical reaction, ATP hydrolysis, can be coupled by a molecule (myosin) to do work in the environment in a cyclic process. The model was originally used to fit experimentally obtained force vs velocity curves, and has served as a paradigm for understanding mechanochemical coupling ever since. Despite the remarkable success in fitting kinetic data, Huxley's model is thermodynamically inconsistent in several regards, most notably in its failure to include thermal noise in the description of the mechanical transitions by which motion occurs. This inconsistency has led subsequent workers to incorrect conclusions regarding the importance of mechanical transitions for determining the direction of motion, the efficiency of energy conversion, the ratio of forward to backward steps, and the applied force necessary to stop the motion of chemically driven molecular motors. In this chapter an extension of Huxley's model is described where the principle of microscopic reversibility provides a framework for developing a thermodynamically consistent description of a molecular machine. The results show clearly that mechanical strain and the so-called "power stroke" are irrelevant for determining the directionality and thermodynamic properties of any chemically driven molecular motor. Instead these properties are controlled entirely by the chemical specificity that describes how the relative rates of the ATP hydrolysis reaction depend, by allosteric interactions, on the mechanical state of the molecule. This mechanism has been termed an "information ratchet" in the literature. In contrast to the results for chemical driving, a power stroke can be a key component for the operation of an optically driven motor, the transitions of which do not obey microscopic reversibility. PMID:26122749

  11. A model for effective planning of SME support services.

    PubMed

    Rakićević, Zoran; Omerbegović-Bijelović, Jasmina; Lečić-Cvetković, Danica

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a model for effective planning of support services for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The idea is to scrutinize and measure the suitability of support services in order to give recommendations for the improvement of a support planning process. We examined the applied support services and matched them with the problems and needs of SMEs, based on the survey conducted in 2013 on a sample of 336 SMEs in Serbia. We defined and analysed the five research questions that refer to support services, their consistency with the SMEs' problems and needs, and the relation between the given support and SMEs' success. The survey results have shown a statistically significant connection between them. Based on this result, we proposed an eight-phase model as a method for the improvement of support service planning for SMEs. This model helps SMEs to plan better their requirements in terms of support; government and administration bodies at all levels and organizations that provide support services to understand better SMEs' problems and needs for support. PMID:26479837

  12. A model for effective planning of SME support services.

    PubMed

    Rakićević, Zoran; Omerbegović-Bijelović, Jasmina; Lečić-Cvetković, Danica

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a model for effective planning of support services for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The idea is to scrutinize and measure the suitability of support services in order to give recommendations for the improvement of a support planning process. We examined the applied support services and matched them with the problems and needs of SMEs, based on the survey conducted in 2013 on a sample of 336 SMEs in Serbia. We defined and analysed the five research questions that refer to support services, their consistency with the SMEs' problems and needs, and the relation between the given support and SMEs' success. The survey results have shown a statistically significant connection between them. Based on this result, we proposed an eight-phase model as a method for the improvement of support service planning for SMEs. This model helps SMEs to plan better their requirements in terms of support; government and administration bodies at all levels and organizations that provide support services to understand better SMEs' problems and needs for support.

  13. Integration/coordination contractor support to Environmental Restoration Program and Program Support Office. Contract status report, September 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This status report updates activities on the following tasks: Environmental restoration task planning; Waste management task planning; Waste management project support; CPP stakeholder involvement; EM site specific advisory board - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; and, Hypermedia document. A summary status assessment and forecast of all tasks is provided and A cost management report is included.

  14. Implementation of Contraction to Electrophysiological Ventricular Myocyte Models, and Their Quantitative Characterization via Post-Extrasystolic Potentiation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanyan Claire; Gray, Richard A; Fenton, Flavio H

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects over 5 million Americans and is characterized by impairment of cellular cardiac contractile function resulting in reduced ejection fraction in patients. Electrical stimulation such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) have shown some success in treating patients with HF. Computer simulations have the potential to help improve such therapy (e.g. suggest optimal lead placement) as well as provide insight into the underlying mechanisms which could be beneficial. However, these myocyte models require a quantitatively accurate excitation-contraction coupling such that the electrical and contraction predictions are correct. While currently there are close to a hundred models describing the detailed electrophysiology of cardiac cells, the majority of cell models do not include the equations to reproduce contractile force or they have been added ad hoc. Here we present a systematic methodology to couple first generation contraction models into electrophysiological models via intracellular calcium and then compare the resulting model predictions to experimental data. This is done by using a post-extrasystolic pacing protocol, which captures essential dynamics of contractile forces. We found that modeling the dynamic intracellular calcium buffers is necessary in order to reproduce the experimental data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in models the mechanism of the post-extrasystolic potentiation is highly dependent on the calcium released from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum. Overall this study provides new insights into both specific and general determinants of cellular contractile force and provides a framework for incorporating contraction into electrophysiological models, both of which will be necessary to develop reliable simulations to optimize electrical therapies for HF. PMID:26317204

  15. Three-dimensional model for aerosol transport and deposition in expanding and contracting alveoli.

    PubMed

    Balásházy, Imre; Hofmann, Werner; Farkas, Arpád; Madas, Balázs G

    2008-04-01

    Particle transport and deposition within a model alveolus, represented by a rhythmically expanding and contracting hemisphere, was modeled by a three-dimensional analytical model for the time-dependent air velocity field as a superposition of uniform and radial flow components, satisfying both the mass and momentum conservation equations. Trajectories of particles entrained in the airflow were calculated by a numerical particle trajectory code to compute simultaneously deposition by inertial impaction, gravitational sedimentation, Brownian diffusion, and interception. Five different orientations of the orifice of the alveolus relative to the direction of gravity were selected. Deposition was calculated for particles from 1 nm to 10 microm, for 3 breathing conditions, and for 5 different entrance times relative to the onset of inspiration. For the analyzed cases, the spatial orientation of the orifice of an alveolus has practically no effect on deposition for particles below about 0.1 microm, where deposition is dominated by Brownian motion. Above about 1 microm, where deposition is governed primarily by gravitational settling, deposition can vary from 0 to 100%, depending on the spatial orientation, while deposition of particles 0.1-1 microm falls between these two extreme cases. Due to the isotropic nature of Brownian motion, deposition of the 10-nm particles is practically uniform for all spatial orientations. However, for larger particles, deposition can be quite inhomogeneous, consistent with the direction of gravity. While nearly all particles are exhaled during the successive expiration phase, there are a few cases where particles still leave the alveolus even after many breathing cycles.

  16. An Investigation of Software Scaffolds Supporting Modeling Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fretz, Eric B.; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Zhang, BaoHui; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Krajcik, Joseph S.; Soloway, Elliot

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates the scaffold designed as a dynamic modeling software tool called Model-It in terms of its ability to support learners' use of modeling practices. Discusses the continued empirical validation of types and instances of tool scaffolds. (Contains 50 references.) (Author/YDS)

  17. Adiabatic Heating of Contracting Turbulent Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases "adiabatically heat," experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  18. ADIABATIC HEATING OF CONTRACTING TURBULENT FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-05-10

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases 'adiabatically heat', experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  19. Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from Common Mobile Phone Jammers Alters the Pattern of Muscle Contractions: an Animal Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, A.; Rahimi, S.; Talebi, A.; Soleimani, A.; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rapid growth of wireless communication technologies has caused public concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations on human health. Some early reports indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians such as the alterations of the pattern of muscle extractions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phone jammers on the pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period of frog’s isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz). Materials and Methods Frogs were kept in plastic containers in a room. Animals in the jammer group were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from a common Jammer at a distance of 1m from the jammer’s antenna for 2 hours while the control frogs were only sham exposed. Then animals were sacrificed and isolated gastrocnemius muscles were exposed to on/off jammer radiation for 3 subsequent 10 minute intervals. Isolated gastrocnemius muscles were attached to the force transducer with a string. Using a PowerLab device (26-T), the pattern of muscular contractions was monitored after applying single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz) as stimuli. Results The findings of this study showed that the pulse height of muscle contractions could not be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. However, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. Conclusion These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions. PMID:26396969

  20. Modelling local and global effects on the risk of contracting Tuberculosis using stochastic Markov-chain models.

    PubMed

    Hoad, K A; van't Hoog, A H; Rosen, D; Marston, B; Nyabiage, L; Williams, B G; Dye, C; Cheng, R C H

    2009-04-01

    For some diseases, the transmission of infection can cause spatial clustering of disease cases. This clustering has an impact on how one estimates the rate of the spread of the disease and on the design of control strategies. It is, however, difficult to assess such clustering, (local effects on transmission), using traditional statistical methods. A stochastic Markov-chain model that takes into account possible local or more dispersed global effects on the risk of contracting disease is introduced in the context of the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis. The model is used to analyse TB notifications collected in the Asembo and Gem Divisions of Nyanza Province in western Kenya by the Kenya Ministry of Health/National Leprosy and Tuberculosis Program and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The model shows evidence of a pronounced local effect that is significantly greater than the global effect. We discuss a number of variations of the model which identify how this local effect depends on factors such as age and gender. Zoning/clustering of villages is used to identify the influence that zone size has on the model's ability to distinguish local and global effects. An important possible use of the model is in the design of a community randomised trial where geographical clusters of people are divided into two groups and the effectiveness of an intervention policy is assessed by applying it to one group but not the other. Here the model can be used to take the effect of case clustering into consideration in calculating the minimum difference in an outcome variable (e.g. disease prevalence) that can be detected with statistical significance. It thereby gauges the potential effectiveness of such a trial. Such a possible application is illustrated with the given time/spatial TB data set.

  1. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  2. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  3. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  4. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  5. 48 CFR 242.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... may perform supporting administration of these contracts at missile activation sites during the... Defense Energy Support Center, Defense Logistics Agency. (ii) Contract administration functions for...

  6. Support System Effects on the NASA Common Research Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. Melissa B.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the NASA Common Research Model was conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel Facility for use in the Drag Prediction Workshop. As data from the experimental investigations was collected, a large difference in moment values was seen between the experimental and the computational data from the 4th Drag Prediction Workshop. This difference led to the present work. In this study, a computational assessment has been undertaken to investigate model support system interference effects on the Common Research Model. The configurations computed during this investigation were the wing/body/tail=0deg without the support system and the wing/body/tail=0deg with the support system. The results from this investigation confirm that the addition of the support system to the computational cases does shift the pitching moment in the direction of the experimental results.

  7. Autologous Graft Thickness Affects Scar Contraction and Quality in a Porcine Excisional Wound Model

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Lloyd F.; Wu, Jesse C.; Tucker, David I.; Chan, Maren M.; Christy, Robert J.; Hale, Robert G.; Leung, Kai P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Texture, color, and durability are important characteristics to consider for skin replacement in conspicuous and/or mobile regions of the body such as the face, neck, and hands. Although autograft thickness is a known determinant of skin quality, few studies have correlated the subjective and objective characters of skin graft healing with their associated morphologic and cellular profiles. Defining these relationships may help guide development and evaluation of future skin replacement strategies. Methods: Six-centimeter-diameter full-thickness wounds were created on the back of female Yorkshire pigs and covered by autografts of variable thicknesses. Skin quality was assessed on day 120 using an observer scar assessment score and objective determinations for scar contraction, erythema, pigmentation, and surface irregularities. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical assessments were performed. Results: Thick grafts demonstrated lower observer scar assessment score (better quality) and decreased erythema, pigmentation, and surface irregularities. Histologically, thin grafts resulted in scar-like collagen proliferation while thick grafts preserves the dermal architecture. Increased vascularity and prolonged and increased cellular infiltration were observed among thin grafts. In addition, thin grafts contained predominately dense collagen fibers, whereas thick grafts had loosely arranged collagen. α-Smooth muscle actin staining for myofibroblasts was observed earlier and persisted longer among thinner grafts. Conclusions: Graft thickness is an important determinant of skin quality. High-quality skin replacements are associated with preserved collagen architecture, decreased neovascularization, and decreased inflammatory cellular infiltration. This model, using autologous skin as a metric of quality, may give a more informative analysis of emerging skin replacement strategies. PMID:26301157

  8. A Generic Modeling Process to Support Functional Fault Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Hemminger, Joseph A.; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Bis, Rachael A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional fault models (FFMs) are qualitative representations of a system's failure space that are used to provide a diagnostic of the modeled system. An FFM simulates the failure effect propagation paths within a system between failure modes and observation points. These models contain a significant amount of information about the system including the design, operation and off nominal behavior. The development and verification of the models can be costly in both time and resources. In addition, models depicting similar components can be distinct, both in appearance and function, when created individually, because there are numerous ways of representing the failure space within each component. Generic application of FFMs has the advantages of software code reuse: reduction of time and resources in both development and verification, and a standard set of component models from which future system models can be generated with common appearance and diagnostic performance. This paper outlines the motivation to develop a generic modeling process for FFMs at the component level and the effort to implement that process through modeling conventions and a software tool. The implementation of this generic modeling process within a fault isolation demonstration for NASA's Advanced Ground System Maintenance (AGSM) Integrated Health Management (IHM) project is presented and the impact discussed.

  9. Prioritization of engineering support requests and advanced technology projects using decision support and industrial engineering models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavana, Madjid

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation and prioritization of Engineering Support Requests (ESR's) is a particularly difficult task at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) -- Shuttle Project Engineering Office. This difficulty is due to the complexities inherent in the evaluation process and the lack of structured information. The evaluation process must consider a multitude of relevant pieces of information concerning Safety, Supportability, O&M Cost Savings, Process Enhancement, Reliability, and Implementation. Various analytical and normative models developed over the past have helped decision makers at KSC utilize large volumes of information in the evaluation of ESR's. The purpose of this project is to build on the existing methodologies and develop a multiple criteria decision support system that captures the decision maker's beliefs through a series of sequential, rational, and analytical processes. The model utilizes the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), subjective probabilities, the entropy concept, and Maximize Agreement Heuristic (MAH) to enhance the decision maker's intuition in evaluating a set of ESR's.

  10. Issues in physician contracting.

    PubMed

    Fanburg, John D; Leone, Alyson M

    2005-09-01

    Dermatologists will enter into a number of different contracts during their professional careers. It is important that in each agreement they enter, dermatologists reap the benefits that they aspire for and understand the consequences of each provision. This article addresses just a few of the different issues that arise in physician contracting, such as choosing the appropriate form of business entity; the importance of a writing; term and termination of the contract; compensation models; benefits, vacation and other time off included in the contract; malpractice insurance; and restrictive covenants. Each provision should be carefully analyzed to ensure that it will protect the best interests of the dermatologist in that situation. PMID:16202950

  11. Operations and support cost modeling of conceptual space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The University of Dayton is pleased to submit this annual report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center which documents the development of an operations and support (O&S) cost model as part of a larger life cycle cost (LCC) structure. It is intended for use during the conceptual design of new launch vehicles and spacecraft. This research is being conducted under NASA Research Grant NAG-1-1327. This research effort changes the focus from that of the first two years in which a reliability and maintainability model was developed to the initial development of an operations and support life cycle cost model. Cost categories were initially patterned after NASA's three axis work breakdown structure consisting of a configuration axis (vehicle), a function axis, and a cost axis. A revised cost element structure (CES), which is currently under study by NASA, was used to established the basic cost elements used in the model. While the focus of the effort was on operations and maintenance costs and other recurring costs, the computerized model allowed for other cost categories such as RDT&E and production costs to be addressed. Secondary tasks performed concurrent with the development of the costing model included support and upgrades to the reliability and maintainability (R&M) model. The primary result of the current research has been a methodology and a computer implementation of the methodology to provide for timely operations and support cost analysis during the conceptual design activities.

  12. A Simple, Inexpensive Model to Demonstrate How Contraction of GI Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Promotes Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Peristalis is a propulsive activity that involves both circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus, distal stomach, and small and large intestines. During peristalsis, the circular smooth muscle contracts behind (on the orad side) the bolus and relaxes in front (on the aborad side) of the bolus. At the same time, the longitudinal…

  13. State Assessment Program Item Banks: Model Language for Request for Proposals (RFP) and Contracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Leonard C.

    2010-01-01

    This document provides recommendations for request for proposal (RFP) and contract language that state education agencies can use to specify their requirements for access to test item banks. An item bank is a repository for test items and data about those items. Item banks are used by state agency staff to view items and associated data; to…

  14. Polymer-supported membranes as models of the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Motomu; Sackmann, Erich

    2005-09-01

    Lipid-bilayer membranes supported on solid substrates are widely used as cell-surface models that connect biological and artificial materials. They can be placed either directly on solids or on ultrathin polymer supports that mimic the generic role of the extracellular matrix. The tools of modern genetic engineering and bioorganic chemistry make it possible to couple many types of biomolecule to supported membranes. This results in sophisticated interfaces that can be used to control, organize and study the properties and function of membranes and membrane-associated proteins. Particularly exciting opportunities arise when these systems are coupled with advanced semiconductor technology.

  15. Design Approaches to Support Preservice Teachers in Scientific Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, Lisa; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Hug, Barbara

    2011-02-01

    Engaging children in scientific practices is hard for beginning teachers. One such scientific practice with which beginning teachers may have limited experience is scientific modeling. We have iteratively designed preservice teacher learning experiences and materials intended to help teachers achieve learning goals associated with scientific modeling. Our work has taken place across multiple years at three university sites, with preservice teachers focused on early childhood, elementary, and middle school teaching. Based on results from our empirical studies supporting these design decisions, we discuss design features of our modeling instruction in each iteration. Our results suggest some successes in supporting preservice teachers in engaging students in modeling practice. We propose design principles that can guide science teacher educators in incorporating modeling in teacher education.

  16. A model to support nursing students with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, John

    2016-07-20

    Dyslexia is one of the most commonly declared disabilities in higher educational institutions in the UK. This article explores the effects of specific learning difficulties, in particular dyslexia, on pre-registration nursing students on practice placements in clinical environments. The author proposes use of the OPEL model, which provides a simple, structured framework for supporting nursing students with specific learning difficulties in practice placements. This model could be applied to clinical situations where constructive support is necessary to enable the student to achieve the standards and requirements set by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. PMID:27440364

  17. An Experimental Model Using Cultured Cardiac Myocytes for a Study of the Generation of Premature Ventricular Contractions Under Ultrasound Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Masaya

    2011-09-01

    It is known that use of a contrast agents in echocardiography increases the probability of generation of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). As a basic study to elucidate the mechanisms and to reduce adverse effects, the generation of PVCs was investigated using cultured cardiac myocytes instead of the intact heart in vivo. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured on a cover slip. The myocyte sample was exposed to pulsed ultrasound with microbubbles adjacent to the myocytes, and generation of PVCs was examined with ultrasound exposure at various delay times after onset of myocyte contraction. The experimental results showed that generation of PVCs had a stable threshold delay time and that PVCs were generated only when myocytes were exposed to ultrasound with delay times longer than the threshold. The results indicate that the model used in this study is useful for revealing the mechanisms by which PVCs are induced by ultrasound exposure.

  18. An Investigation of Software Scaffolds Supporting Modeling Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fretz, Eric B.; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Zhang, Baohui; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Krajcik, Joseph S.; Soloway, Elliot

    2002-08-01

    Modeling of complex systems and phenomena is of value in science learning and is increasingly emphasised as an important component of science teaching and learning. Modeling engages learners in desired pedagogical activities. These activities include practices such as planning, building, testing, analysing, and critiquing. Designing realistic models is a difficult task. Computer environments allow the creation of dynamic and even more complex models. One way of bringing the design of models within reach is through the use of scaffolds. Scaffolds are intentional assistance provided to learners from a variety of sources, allowing them to complete tasks that would otherwise be out of reach. Currently, our understanding of how scaffolds in software tools assist learners is incomplete. In this paper the scaffolds designed into a dynamic modeling software tool called Model-It are assessed in terms of their ability to support learners' use of modeling practices. Four pairs of middle school students were video-taped as they used the modeling software for three hours, spread over a two week time frame. Detailed analysis of coded videotape transcripts provided evidence of the importance of scaffolds in supporting the use of modeling practices. Learners used a variety of modeling practices, the majority of which occurred in conjunction with scaffolds. The use of three tool scaffolds was assessed as directly as possible, and these scaffolds were seen to support a variety of modeling practices. An argument is made for the continued empirical validation of types and instances of tool scaffolds, and further investigation of the important role of teacher and peer scaffolding in the use of scaffolded tools.

  19. A numerical cloud model for the support of laboratory experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical cloud model is presented which can describe the evolution of a cloud starting from moist aerosol-laden air through the diffusional growth regime. The model is designed for the direct support of cloud chamber laboratory experimentation, i.e., experiment preparation, real-time control and data analysis. In the model the thermodynamics is uncoupled from the droplet growth processes. Analytic solutions for the cloud droplet growth equations are developed which can be applied in most laboratory situations. The model is applied to a variety of representative experiments.

  20. Computer modeling for advanced life support system analysis.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, A

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the equivalent mass approach to advanced life support system analysis, describes a computer model developed to use this approach, and presents early results from modeling the NASA JSC BioPlex. The model is built using an object oriented approach and G2, a commercially available modeling package Cost factor equivalencies are given for the Volosin scenarios. Plant data from NASA KSC and Utah State University (USU) are used, together with configuration data from the BioPlex design effort. Initial results focus on the importance of obtaining high plant productivity with a flight-like configuration. PMID:11540448

  1. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 80. Quarterly report, July--September, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report contains information on petroleum enhanced recovery projects. In addition to project descriptions, contract numbers, principal investigators and project management information is included.

  2. Model-supported virtual environment for prostate cancer pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ping; McClain, Maxine A.; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Yue J.; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Moul, Judd W.; Zhang, Wei; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    As a step toward understanding complex spatial distribution patterns of prostate cancers, a 3D master model of the prostate, showing major anatomical structures and probability maps of the location of tumors, has been pilot developed. A virtual environment supported by the 3D master model and in vivo imaging features, will be used to evaluate, simulate, and optimize the image guided needle biopsy and radiation therapy, thus potentially improving the efficacy of prostate cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment. A deformable graphics algorithm has been developed to reconstruct the graphics models from 200 serially sectioned whole mount radical prostatectomy specimens and to support computerized needle biopsy simulations. For the construction of a generic model, a principal-axes 3D registration technique has been developed. Simulated evaluation and real data experiment have shown the satisfactory performance of the method in constructing initial generic model with localized prostate cancer placement. For the construction of statistical model, a blended model registration technique is advanced to perform a non-linear warping of the individual model to the generic model so that the prostate cancer probability distribution maps can be accurately positioned. The method uses a spine- surface model and a linear elastic model to dynamically deform both the surface and volume where object re-slicing is required. For the interactive visualization of the 3D master model, four modes of data display are developed: (1) transparent rendering of the generic model, (2) overlaid rendering of cancer distributions, (3) stereo rendering, and (4) true volumetric display, and a model-to-image registration technique using synthetic image phantoms is under investigation. Preliminary results have shown that use of this master model allows correct understanding of prostate cancer distribution patterns and rational optimization of prostate biopsy and radiation therapy strategies.

  3. IT-Supported Modeling, Analysis and Design of Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, Jörg; Alard, Robert; Sennheiser, Andreas

    A common language is a prerequisite for analyzing and optimizing supply chains. Based on experiences with three case studies, this paper identifies the aspects of a supply chain that have to be mapped to take informed decisions on its operations. Current, integrated modeling approaches for supply chains, like the SCOR and the GSCM model, will be analyzed and an advanced approach will be defined. The resulting approach takes advantage of IT-support.

  4. Transition to Operations Support at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the rapid prototyping centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires close collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as distributed computing facilities provided by the US Air Force. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. This paper will focus on a status report on CCMC activities in support of model transition to operations at US space weather forecasting centers. In particular, an update will be given on past and present transition activities, on developments that address operational needs, and on future opportunities for transition-to-operations support.

  5. Designing Electronic Performance Support Systems: Models and Instructional Strategies Employed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nekvinda, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine whether instructional designers and performance technologists utilize instructional design models when designing and developing electronic performance support systems (EPSS). The study also explored if these same designers were utilizing instructional strategies within their EPSS to support…

  6. Supporting Teachers, Strengthening Families: A Model Child Abuse Prevention Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Maril

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about a model child abuse prevention approach called, "Supporting Teachers, Strengthening Families." It is NAEYC's professional development initiative to help early childhood educators play leading roles in preventing child abuse and neglect through family strengthening efforts. It focuses on six strategies that high-quality…

  7. Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawer, Giselle; Jackson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models," (ED495138) and is an added resource for further information. This support document is divided into the following sections: (1) The Retail Industry--A Snapshot; (2) Case Studies--Hardware, Retail Industry…

  8. Educating All Learners: Refocusing the Comprehensive Support Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obiakor, Festus E., Ed.; Grant, Patrick A., Ed.; Dooley, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses the importance of maximizing the fullest potential of all students and leaving no child behind. The 14 papers are: (1) "The Comprehensive Support Model for All Learners: Conceptualization and Meaning" (Festus E. Obiakor, Pauline Harris-Obiakor, and Ramel L. Smith); (2) "The Power of the `Self' in Education"…

  9. Modeling Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports for Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Doris Adams; Flores, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors modeled programwide positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) principles to 26 preservice teachers during consolidated yearly extended school year (ESY) services delivered to elementary students from four school districts. While PBIS were in place for preservice teachers to implement with students, a similar system was…

  10. MSW Time to Tumor Model and Supporting Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multistage Weibull (MSW) time-to-tumor model and related documentation were developed principally (but not exclusively) for conducting time-to-tumor analyses to support risk assessments under the IRIS program. These programs and related docum...

  11. Developing a Conceptual Model for Career Support for New Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcroft, Andy

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a conceptual model which allows for an understanding of the general and discipline specific support needed by academics new to the profession. The approach taken is qualitative in nature and centers around a series of semi-structured interviews carried out with new academics and senior managers in two…

  12. Rectangular Array Model Supporting Students' Spatial Structuring in Learning Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanty, Nenden Octavarulia; Wijaya, Surya

    2012-01-01

    We examine how rectangular array model can support students' spatial structuring in learning multiplication. To begin, we define what we mean by spatial structuring as the mental operation of constructing an organization or form for an object or set of objects. For that reason, the eggs problem was chosen as the starting point in which the…

  13. A multi-physics and multi-scale lumped parameter model of cardiac contraction of the left ventricle: a conceptual model from the protein to the organ scale.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya-Ghosh, Benjamin; Schievano, Silvia; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2012-10-01

    In cardiovascular computational physiology the importance of understanding cardiac contraction as a multi-scale process is of paramount importance to understand causality across different scales. Within this study, a multi-scale and multi-physics model of the left ventricle that connects the process of cardiac excitation and contraction from the protein to the organ level is presented in a novel way. The model presented here includes the functional description of a cardiomyocyte (cellular scale), which explains the dynamic behaviour of the calcium concentration within the cell whilst an action potential develops. The cell domain is coupled to a domain that determines the kinetics of the sliding filament mechanism (protein level), which is at the basis of cardiac contraction. These processes are then linked to the generation of muscular force and from there to the generation of pressure inside the ventricle. This multi-scale model presents a coherent and unified way to describe cardiac contraction from the protein to the organ level.

  14. Online model-based diagnosis to support autonomous operation of an advanced life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Gautam; Manders, Eric-Jan; Ramirez, John; Mahadevan, Nagabhusan; Abdelwahed, Sherif

    2004-01-01

    This article describes methods for online model-based diagnosis of subsystems of the advanced life support system (ALS). The diagnosis methodology is tailored to detect, isolate, and identify faults in components of the system quickly so that fault-adaptive control techniques can be applied to maintain system operation without interruption. We describe the components of our hybrid modeling scheme and the diagnosis methodology, and then demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology by building a detailed model of the reverse osmosis (RO) system of the water recovery system (WRS) of the ALS. This model is validated with real data collected from an experimental testbed at NASA JSC. A number of diagnosis experiments run on simulated faulty data are presented and the results are discussed.

  15. Online model-based diagnosis to support autonomous operation of an advanced life support system.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Gautam; Manders, Eric-Jan; Ramirez, John; Mahadevan, Nagabhusan; Abdelwahed, Sherif

    2004-01-01

    This article describes methods for online model-based diagnosis of subsystems of the advanced life support system (ALS). The diagnosis methodology is tailored to detect, isolate, and identify faults in components of the system quickly so that fault-adaptive control techniques can be applied to maintain system operation without interruption. We describe the components of our hybrid modeling scheme and the diagnosis methodology, and then demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology by building a detailed model of the reverse osmosis (RO) system of the water recovery system (WRS) of the ALS. This model is validated with real data collected from an experimental testbed at NASA JSC. A number of diagnosis experiments run on simulated faulty data are presented and the results are discussed. PMID:15880907

  16. Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

  17. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  18. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  19. Final Report DOE Supported Activities through the Utility/DOE Matching Grant Program Contract Number DE FG02-95NE38111 For the Period 30 September 1995 through 30 September 2002 Extended until 30 March 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James F.

    2003-08-15

    This report covers activities in the Univesity of Illinois Department of Nulcear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering Matching Grant Program for the period form 30 September 1995 to 30 March 2003. The funds for this program include industrial partner funds which were matched, or nearly matched by DOE-NE. The industrial partner was Commonwealth Edison, which changed its corporate structure and name to Exelon during the course of the contract. The funds from the contract were used to support nuclear engineering educational needs, including undergraduate and graduate students support, purchase of laboratory equipment, support for seminar speakers and conferences, and support for new faculty members. The funds were instrumental in maintaining a first quality nuclear engineering educational program at the University of Illinois.

  20. 48 CFR 335.070-4 - Contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract award. 335.070-4... CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 335.070-4 Contract award. Consistent with HHS' objectives of competition and support of the small business program, Contracting Officers shall not award contracts...

  1. Educational Support for Low-Performing Students in Mathematics: The Three-Tier Support Model in Finnish Lower Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstam, Ulrika; Linnanmäki, Karin; Aunio, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, there was a legislative reform regarding educational support in Finland, with a focus on early identification, differentiation and flexible arrangement of support using a multi-professional approach, the three-tier support model. The main aim of this study was to investigate what educational support practices are used with low-performing…

  2. Architect's Contract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Board of Education, Columbus.

    An actual contract form used for architectural services is presented. Fees, duties, and services are included. Services are listed in the following phases--(1) schematic design, (2) design development, (3) contract document, and (4) construction. Extra services are listed, and owner's responsibility with regard to cost estimates is given.…

  3. Performance Contracting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tom

    The management team at Minooka (Illinois) School District 201 is actively pursuing school improvement measures by establishing Performance Contracts to increase productivity. The format of the Performance Contract highlights yearly short-term and long-term goals, which are presented in the form of Job Improvement Targets stating the goal itself, a…

  4. Student Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Hal

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the nature of student-teacher contracts pertaining to academic work to be performed by the student and evaluated by the teacher covers a wide range of related issues in this article. The nature of contracts, evaluation procedures, instructional materials, community attitudes, and the individualization of instruction are commented on…

  5. An in vitro rat model of colonic motility to determine the effect of β-casomorphin-5 on propagating contractions.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, J E; Spencer, N J; Dunstan, K E; Lynch, A T; Haggarty, N W; Gopal, P K; Roy, N C

    2014-11-01

    Beta-casomorphin-5 (βCM-5) is a milk-derived bioactive peptide that slows gastro-intestinal transit (GIT) in vivo and blocks the peristaltic reflex in the guinea pig colon in vitro. We wanted to establish an in vitro model system in which effects of dairy-derived substances containing opioid peptides on intestinal motility can be assessed and used to predict in vivo outcomes. Because βCM-5 is an opioid agonist that acts on enteric neurons, we used this substance to compare two different isolated colonic tissue preparations to determine which would more closely mimic the in vivo response previously reported in the literature. We compared and characterized the effects of βCM-5 on spontaneous contractions in isolated segments of distal colon (1 cm length) compared with propagating contractions along the isolated intact large intestine (22 cm length). In short segments of distal colon, βCM-5 increased the tension and frequency of spontaneous contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. At 20 μM βCM-5 tension increased by 71 ± 17% and the frequency doubled (n = 9), effects inhibited by naloxone (n = 7) and therefore mediated by opioid receptors. In contrast 20 μM βCM-5 disrupted propagating contractions in the large intestine preparation. At 20 μM βCM-5 reduced the proportion of contractions initiated in the proximal colon reaching the rectum by 83 ± 11% (n = 5) and this effect was also inhibited by naloxone, consistent with altered GIT reported in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the isolated whole large intestine provides an ideal preparation that mimics the reduced propagation of GIT in vivo in response to an opioid agonist, whereas short colon segments did not. The findings of the current study reveal that preserving large segments of intact large intestine, and hence intact enteric neural circuitry provides an ideal in vitro model to investigate the effect of opioid receptor modulators on intestinal transit. PMID:25093576

  6. Behavior Change Support Systems: A Research Model and Agenda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri

    This article introduces the concept of a behavior change support system and suggests it as a key construct for research on persuasive systems design, technologies, and applications. Key concepts for behavior change support systems are defined and a research agenda for them is outlined. The article suggests that a change in complying, a behavior change, and an attitude change (C-, B- or A-Change) constitute the archetypes of a behavioral change. Change in itself is either of a forming, altering or reinforcing outcome (F-, A- or R-Outcome). This research model will become helpful in researching and designing persuasive technology.

  7. An autonomy supportive model of geriatric team function.

    PubMed

    Powers, J S; White, S; Varnell, L; Turvy, C; Kidd, K; Harrell, D; Knight, B; Floyd, K; Zupko, K

    2000-08-01

    Interdisciplinary teams play a critical role in the delivery of geriatric health care. Health care professionals are commonly left to develop teamwork skills by chance. Medical team function differs from traditional group theory in that all members are caregivers. A non-competitive supportive atmosphere is appropriate for patient care. We propose a participatory (autonomy supportive) model fostering self-realization and positive reinforcement as an organizing philosophy. The primary group task is to maximize patient functional independence and personal goals. Leadership is task-dependent.

  8. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Data and Models Needed to Support Civil Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onsager, Terrance; Biesecker, D. A.; Berger, Thomas; Rutledge, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The effective utilization of existing data and models is an important element in advancing the goals of the COSPAR/ILWS space weather roadmap. This is recommended to be done through innovative approaches to data utilization, including data driving, data assimilation, and ensemble modeling. This presentation will focus on observations and models needed to support space weather services for civil aviation and commercial space transportation. The service needs for aviation will be discussed, and an overview will be given of some of the existing data and models that can provide these services. Efforts underway to define the requirements for real-time data and to assess current modeling capabilities will be described. Recommendations will be offered for internationally coordinated activities that could identify priorities and further the roadmap goals.

  10. A modular BLSS simulation model. [Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.; Volk, Tyler

    1987-01-01

    The coordination of material flows in earth's biosphere is largely made possible by the buffering effect of huge material reservoirs. Without similarly-sized buffers, a bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) for extraterrestrial use will be faced with coordination problems more acute than those in any ecosystem found on earth. A related problem in BLSS design is providing an interface between the various life-support processors, one that will allow for their coordination while still allowing for system expansion. A modular model is presented of a BLSS that interfaces system processors only with the material storage reservoirs, allowing those reservoirs to act as the principal buffers in the system and thus minimizing difficulties with processor coordination. The modular nature of the model allows independent development of the detailed submodels that exist within the model framework. Using this model, BLSS dynamics were investigated under normal conditions and under various failure modes. Partial and complete failures of various components, such as the waste processor or the plants themselves, drive transient responses in the model system, allowing examination of the effectiveness of the system reservoirs as buffers. The results from simulations of this sort will help to determine control strategies and BLSS design requirements. An evolved version of this model could be used as an interactive control aid in a future BLSS.

  11. Dynamic modeling of tube-support interaction in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Reza

    Flow-induced forces in heat exchangers can cause excessive tube vibration and interaction with their supports. Long term interaction may develop fretting-wear and consequently lead to tube failures. An accurate prediction of the tube-support interaction behavior is important to quantify tube fretting-wear. Therefore, a detailed study of the related friction and impact forces is required for formulating a precise wear model. This study aimed to develop a friction model for accurate representations of various states of the friction process, including elastic, plastic and partial slipping states. In addition, the tube-support impact model is verified both numerically and experimentally. A hybrid spring-damper rate dependent friction model was developed to precisely simulate the friction process from zero velocity to the gross slip state. This was achieved by considering various physical phenomena during the friction process including the Stribeck effect, varying break-away force, bristle elastic, plastic and partial-slipping behaviors. The slipping time in the velocity-limited friction model was compared to the LuGre friction model. The inability of the velocity limited friction model to detect the sticking region was explained by the dependency of a limiting velocity criterion on the varying break-away force and the Stribeck effect. This confirmed the importance of having an adaptive limiting velocity for the velocity limited friction model. In addition, the stress distribution within the contact region was studied in detail to demarcate different regions within a contact area during the friction process. This analysis attributed a physical meaning to each component of the new hybrid friction model. The ability of the hybrid model to accurately reproduce stick-slip behavior was examined using the Ozaki and Hashiguchi friction model and the Baumberger et al. experimental tests. The result showed better estimation of the stick-slip behavior, both qualitatively and

  12. Checking software contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.; Maung, I.; Howse, J.; Heathcote, T.

    1995-12-31

    In object-oriented software, contracts between classes can be expressed in terms of preconditions, postconditions and invariants. In the programming language Eiffel, contracts can be checked at run-time. Within inheritance hierarchies, contracts can be used to control the redefinition of services. In Eiffel, the rules ensure that redefinition is safe in the presence of polymorphism and dynamic binding. This paper shows that Eiffel`s support for contracts can be extended, both to cover the polymorphic case more fully, and to cover other uses of inheritance, including its use for selectively reusing code from a parent class. The paper proposes that software designers should state what properties they claim for any uses of inheritance, in order that extra checks on consistency can be applied, and shows that some extra debugging power could be obtained easily, by changing only the run-time system for Eiffel, rather than the language itself.

  13. Toward a transtheoretical model of interprofessional education: stages, processes and forces supporting institutional change.

    PubMed

    Clark, Phillip G

    2013-01-01

    The history of interprofessional education (IPE) in the USA is a checkered one, characterized by boom and bust cycles of advancement and retrenchment, expansion and contraction. The successful development, implementation and continuation of IPE in health and social care in US higher education institutions all depend on a number of factors related to how individuals and organizations do or do not support it in the academic setting. Deliberate and planned change to advance IPE requires a comprehensive theoretical framework to guide it and insure its success. A transtheoretical model (TTM) of institutional change is proposed as a comprehensive framework of the stages, processes and forces that can facilitate and maintain change in support of IPE. The TTM framework recognizes the complexity of change, and captures and organizes important elements from different organizational theories. It also provides a structure for conceptualizing the multiple dimensions needed for change, offering intervention strategies and leverage points to be used by leaders in promoting and maintaining it. Finally, the TTM model suggests that the stabilization of IPE programs over the long term is dependent on a real and significant shift in institutional values in response to forces from both within and without the organization.

  14. Information Model Translation to Support a Wider Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John S.; Crichton, Daniel; Ritschel, Bernd; Hardman, Sean; Joyner, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS), NASA's long-term archive for solar system exploration data, has just released PDS4, a modernization of the PDS architecture, data standards, and technical infrastructure. This next generation system positions the PDS to meet the demands of the coming decade, including big data, international cooperation, distributed nodes, and multiple ways of analysing and interpreting data. It also addresses three fundamental project goals: providing more efficient data delivery by data providers to the PDS, enabling a stable, long-term usable planetary science data archive, and enabling services for the data consumer to find, access, and use the data they require in contemporary data formats. The PDS4 information architecture is used to describe all PDS data using a common model. Captured in an ontology modeling tool it supports a hierarchy of data dictionaries built to the ISO/IEC 11179 standard and is designed to increase flexibility, enable complex searches at the product level, and to promote interoperability that facilitates data sharing both nationally and internationally. A PDS4 information architecture design requirement stipulates that the content of the information model must be translatable to external data definition languages such as XML Schema, XMI/XML, and RDF/XML. To support the semantic Web standards we are now in the process of mapping the contents into RDF/XML to support SPARQL capable databases. We are also building a terminological ontology to support virtually unified data retrieval and access. This paper will provide an overview of the PDS4 information architecture focusing on its domain information model and how the translation and mapping are being accomplished.

  15. Neighborhood Supported Model Level Fuzzy Aggregation for Moving Object Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chiranjeevi, Pojala; Sengupta, Somnath

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new algorithm for moving object detection in the presence of challenging dynamic background conditions. We use a set of fuzzy aggregated multifeature similarity measures applied on multiple models corresponding to multimodal backgrounds. The algorithm is enriched with a neighborhood-supported model initialization strategy for faster convergence. A model level fuzzy aggregation measure driven background model maintenance ensures more robustness. Similarity functions are evaluated between the corresponding elements of the current feature vector and the model feature vectors. Concepts from Sugeno and Choquet integrals are incorporated in our algorithm to compute fuzzy similarities from the ordered similarity function values for each model. Model updating and the foreground/background classification decision is based on the set of fuzzy integrals. Our proposed algorithm is shown to outperform other multi-model background subtraction algorithms. The proposed approach completely avoids explicit offline training to initialize background model and can be initialized with moving objects also. The feature space uses a combination of intensity and statistical texture features for better object localization and robustness. Our qualitative and quantitative studies illustrate the mitigation of varieties of challenging situations by our approach. PMID:24235250

  16. Contraction of cross-linked actomyosin bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko; Marcq, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Cross-linked actomyosin bundles retract when severed in vivo by laser ablation, or when isolated from the cell and micromanipulated in vitro in the presence of ATP. We identify the timescale for contraction as a viscoelastic time τ, where the viscosity is due to (internal) protein friction. We obtain an estimate of the order of magnitude of the contraction time τ ≈ 10-100 s, consistent with available experimental data for circumferential microfilament bundles and stress fibers. Our results are supported by an exactly solvable, hydrodynamic model of a retracting bundle as a cylinder of isotropic, active matter, from which the order of magnitude of the active stress is estimated.

  17. Quantitative Study of the Effect of Tissue Microstructure on Contraction in a Computational Model of Rat Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Carapella, Valentina; Bordas, Rafel; Pathmanathan, Pras; Lohezic, Maelene; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Kohl, Peter; Burrage, Kevin; Grau, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Tissue microstructure, in particular the alignment of myocytes (fibre direction) and their lateral organisation into sheets, is fundamental to cardiac function. We studied the effect of microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricular electromechanics. Different fibre models, globally rule-based or locally optimised to DT-MRI data, were compared, in order to understand whether a subject-specific fibre model would enhance the predictive power of our model with respect to the global ones. We also studied the impact of sheets on ventricular deformation by comparing: (a) a transversely isotropic versus an orthotropic material law and (b) a linear model with a bimodal model of sheet transmural variation. We estimated ejection fraction, wall thickening and base-to-apex shortening and compared them with measures from cine-MRI. We also evaluated Lagrangian strains as local metrics of cardiac deformation. Our results show that the subject-specific fibre model provides little improvement in the metric predictions with respect to global fibre models while material orthotropy allows closer agreement with measures than transverse isotropy. Nonetheless, the impact of sheets in our model is smaller than that of fibres. We conclude that further investigation of the modelling of sheet dynamics is necessary to fully understand the impact of tissue structure on cardiac deformation. PMID:24695115

  18. Model-It: A Case Study of Learner-Centered Software Design for Supporting Model Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shari L.; Stratford, Steven J.; Krajcik, Joseph S.; Soloway, Elliot

    Learner-centered software design (LCSD) guides the design of tasks, tools, and interfaces in order to support the unique needs of learners: growth, diversity and motivation. This paper presents a framework for LCSD and describes a case study of its application to the ScienceWare Model-It, a learner-centered tool to support scientific modeling and…

  19. Interactive decision-making support model in MOSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Lan, Ze-ying; Liu, Yao-lin; Qin, Liang-jun

    2009-10-01

    The Multi-objective spatial optimization problem is common in the word, which usually has a set of non-dominated resolutions, also called Pareto resolutions, instead of a single ideal one. So, the Multi-objectives spatial decision support system (MOSDSS) has two vital basements: how to acquire all the Pareto resolutions by Multi-objective optimization arithmetic, and how to analysis and appraise the candidates to determinate the final satisfying solution. At present, there are abundant research fruit for the former problem, however the latter one hasn't attracted abroad attention in the field. Nowadays, the findings about analyzing and evaluating the Pareto resolutions mainly focus on three aspects: the visual expression of candidates, appraising the comparability among the solutions, and designing the prototype system of visual support tools, which are lack of systemic conclusion and summarization. Hence, this paper emphasizes the latter problem of MOSDSS and puts up an interactive decision-making support model to largely improve the efficiency of analyzing and evaluating the Pareto resolutions. This model is composed of 3 pivotal parts: the geographic brush mechanism, the similarity querying operators as well as the interactive searching method. Then, the paper designs a prototype system on the base of the model, which is successfully tested in the exam.

  20. PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

    2012-08-31

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

  1. Experimental-based modeling of a support structure as part of a full system model

    SciTech Connect

    CARNE,THOMAS G.; DOHRMANN,CLARK R.

    2000-02-29

    Structural dynamic systems are often attached to a support structure to simulate proper boundary conditions during testing. In some cases the support structure is fairly simple and can be modeled by discrete springs and dampers. In other cases the desired test conditions necessitate the use of a support structural that introduces dynamics of its own. For such cases a more complex structural dynamic model is required to simulate the response of the full combined system. In this paper experimental frequency response functions, admittance function modeling concepts, and least squares reductions are used to develop a support structure model including both translational and rotational degrees of freedom at an attachment location. Subsequently, the modes of the support structure are estimated, and a NASTRAN model is created for attachment to the tested system.

  2. Mechanics of Vorticella Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Gaurav; Dickinson, Richard B.; Ladd, Anthony J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Vorticella convallaria is one of a class of fast-moving organisms that can traverse its body size in less than a millisecond by rapidly coiling a slender stalk anchoring it to a nearby surface. The stalk houses a fiber called the spasmoneme, which winds helically within the stalk and rapidly contracts in response to calcium signaling. We have developed a coupled mechanical-chemical model of the coiling process, accounting for the coiling of the elastic stalk and the binding of calcium to the protein spasmin. Simulations of the model describe the contraction and recovery processes quantitatively. The stalk-spasmoneme system is shown to satisfy geometric constraints, which explains why the cell body sometimes rotates during contraction. The shape of the collapsing and recovering stalk bounds its effective bending stiffness. Simulations suggest that recovery from the contracted state is driven by the stalk at a rate controlled by dissociation of calcium from spasmin. PMID:20550905

  3. Mimetic butterflies support Wallace's model of sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Kunte, Krushnamegh

    2008-07-22

    Theoretical and empirical observations generally support Darwin's view that sexual dimorphism evolves due to sexual selection on, and deviation in, exaggerated male traits. Wallace presented a radical alternative, which is largely untested, that sexual dimorphism results from naturally selected deviation in protective female coloration. This leads to the prediction that deviation in female rather than male phenotype causes sexual dimorphism. Here I test Wallace's model of sexual dimorphism by tracing the evolutionary history of Batesian mimicry-an example of naturally selected protective coloration-on a molecular phylogeny of Papilio butterflies. I show that sexual dimorphism in Papilio is significantly correlated with both female-limited Batesian mimicry, where females are mimetic and males are non-mimetic, and with the deviation of female wing colour patterns from the ancestral patterns conserved in males. Thus, Wallace's model largely explains sexual dimorphism in Papilio. This finding, along with indirect support from recent studies on birds and lizards, suggests that Wallace's model may be more widely useful in explaining sexual dimorphism. These results also highlight the contribution of naturally selected female traits in driving phenotypic divergence between species, instead of merely facilitating the divergence in male sexual traits as described by Darwin's model. PMID:18426753

  4. Mimetic butterflies support Wallace's model of sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Kunte, Krushnamegh

    2008-07-22

    Theoretical and empirical observations generally support Darwin's view that sexual dimorphism evolves due to sexual selection on, and deviation in, exaggerated male traits. Wallace presented a radical alternative, which is largely untested, that sexual dimorphism results from naturally selected deviation in protective female coloration. This leads to the prediction that deviation in female rather than male phenotype causes sexual dimorphism. Here I test Wallace's model of sexual dimorphism by tracing the evolutionary history of Batesian mimicry-an example of naturally selected protective coloration-on a molecular phylogeny of Papilio butterflies. I show that sexual dimorphism in Papilio is significantly correlated with both female-limited Batesian mimicry, where females are mimetic and males are non-mimetic, and with the deviation of female wing colour patterns from the ancestral patterns conserved in males. Thus, Wallace's model largely explains sexual dimorphism in Papilio. This finding, along with indirect support from recent studies on birds and lizards, suggests that Wallace's model may be more widely useful in explaining sexual dimorphism. These results also highlight the contribution of naturally selected female traits in driving phenotypic divergence between species, instead of merely facilitating the divergence in male sexual traits as described by Darwin's model.

  5. Knowledge representation to support reasoning based on multiple models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, April; Seidel, Jorge P.; Parker, Alice C.

    1990-01-01

    Model Based Reasoning is a powerful tool used to design and analyze systems, which are often composed of numerous interactive, interrelated subsystems. Models of the subsystems are written independently and may be used together while they are still under development. Thus the models are not static. They evolve as information becomes obsolete, as improved artifact descriptions are developed, and as system capabilities change. Researchers are using three methods to support knowledge/data base growth, to track the model evolution, and to handle knowledge from diverse domains. First, the representation methodology is based on having pools, or types, of knowledge from which each model is constructed. In addition information is explicit. This includes the interactions between components, the description of the artifact structure, and the constraints and limitations of the models. The third principle we have followed is the separation of the data and knowledge from the inferencing and equation solving mechanisms. This methodology is used in two distinct knowledge-based systems: one for the design of space systems and another for the synthesis of VLSI circuits. It has facilitated the growth and evolution of our models, made accountability of results explicit, and provided credibility for the user community. These capabilities have been implemented and are being used in actual design projects.

  6. Bridging groundwater models and decision support with a Bayesian network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Masterson, John P.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Resource managers need to make decisions to plan for future environmental conditions, particularly sea level rise, in the face of substantial uncertainty. Many interacting processes factor in to the decisions they face. Advances in process models and the quantification of uncertainty have made models a valuable tool for this purpose. Long-simulation runtimes and, often, numerical instability make linking process models impractical in many cases. A method for emulating the important connections between model input and forecasts, while propagating uncertainty, has the potential to provide a bridge between complicated numerical process models and the efficiency and stability needed for decision making. We explore this using a Bayesian network (BN) to emulate a groundwater flow model. We expand on previous approaches to validating a BN by calculating forecasting skill using cross validation of a groundwater model of Assateague Island in Virginia and Maryland, USA. This BN emulation was shown to capture the important groundwater-flow characteristics and uncertainty of the groundwater system because of its connection to island morphology and sea level. Forecast power metrics associated with the validation of multiple alternative BN designs guided the selection of an optimal level of BN complexity. Assateague island is an ideal test case for exploring a forecasting tool based on current conditions because the unique hydrogeomorphological variability of the island includes a range of settings indicative of past, current, and future conditions. The resulting BN is a valuable tool for exploring the response of groundwater conditions to sea level rise in decision support.

  7. General KBE model with inheritance and multi CAD support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiuca, T. L.; Rusu, C.; Noveanu, S.; Mandru, D.

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge-Based Engineering (KBE) is a research field that studies methodologies and technologies for capture and re-use engineering knowledge. The primary objective of KBE is to reduce time and cost of product research processes and/or product development, which is primarily achieved through automation of repetitive design tasks while capturing, retaining and re-using engineering knowledge. Every CAD System includes KBE Tools. The power of these tools is incremented by the use of external high level programming language. The model presented in this paper has the aim to reduce times and costs of particular KBE Models development, by programming inheritance concepts and also the multi CAD Support. The model is implemented through a C# application that is also presented.

  8. The system support associate model at Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaut, Marie-Claire; Coulson, Dolores

    2008-07-01

    At Gemini Observatory, the traditional employment position of telescope operator has been discarded in favor of a more diverse and flexible position known as System Support Associate (SSA). From the very beginning, the operational model of Gemini was designed to involve SSAs in observatory projects well beyond the strict operation of the telescope systems. We describe the motivation behind the original model, how it was eventually implemented and how it has evolved. We describe how the schedule allows SSAs to assume different roles within Gemini and how flexible time allows them to participate to a wide range of projects, increasing their motivation, deepening their knowledge and strengthening communication between groups, as well as allowing management to allocate resources to projects that would otherwise lack manpower. We give examples of such projects and comment on the difficulties inherent in the model.

  9. Extending the Clapper-Yule model to rough printing supports.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Mathieu; Hersch, Roger David

    2005-09-01

    The Clapper-Yule model is the only classical spectral reflection model for halftone prints that takes explicitly into account both the multiple internal reflections between the print-air interface and the paper substrate and the lateral propagation of light within the paper bulk. However, the Clapper-Yule model assumes a planar interface and does not take into account the roughness of the print surface. In order to extend the Clapper-Yule model to rough printing supports (e.g., matte coated papers or calendered papers), we model the print surface as a set of randomly oriented microfacets. The influence of the shadowing effect is evaluated and incorporated into the model. By integrating over all incident angles and facet orientations, we are able to express the internal reflectance of the rough interface as a function of the rms facet slope. By considering also the rough interface transmittances both for the incident light and for the emerging light, we obtain a generalization of the Clapper-Yule model for rough interfaces. The comparison between the classical Clapper-Yule model and the model extended to rough surfaces shows that the influence of the surface roughness on the predicted reflectance factor is small. For high-quality papers such as coated and calendered papers, as well as for low-quality papers such as newsprint or copy papers, the influence of surface roughness is negligible, and the classical Clapper-Yule model can be used to predict the halftone-print reflectance factors. The influence of roughness becomes significant only for very rough and thick nondiffusing coatings.

  10. Emulation Modeling with Bayesian Networks for Efficient Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienen, M. N.; Masterson, J.; Plant, N. G.; Gutierrez, B. T.; Thieler, E. R.

    2012-12-01

    Bayesian decision networks (BDN) have long been used to provide decision support in systems that require explicit consideration of uncertainty; applications range from ecology to medical diagnostics and terrorism threat assessments. Until recently, however, few studies have applied BDNs to the study of groundwater systems. BDNs are particularly useful for representing real-world system variability by synthesizing a range of hydrogeologic situations within a single simulation. Because BDN output is cast in terms of probability—an output desired by decision makers—they explicitly incorporate the uncertainty of a system. BDNs can thus serve as a more efficient alternative to other uncertainty characterization methods such as computationally demanding Monte Carlo analyses and others methods restricted to linear model analyses. We present a unique application of a BDN to a groundwater modeling analysis of the hydrologic response of Assateague Island, Maryland to sea-level rise. Using both input and output variables of the modeled groundwater response to different sea-level (SLR) rise scenarios, the BDN predicts the probability of changes in the depth to fresh water, which exerts an important influence on physical and biological island evolution. Input variables included barrier-island width, maximum island elevation, and aquifer recharge. The variability of these inputs and their corresponding outputs are sampled along cross sections in a single model run to form an ensemble of input/output pairs. The BDN outputs, which are the posterior distributions of water table conditions for the sea-level rise scenarios, are evaluated through error analysis and cross-validation to assess both fit to training data and predictive power. The key benefit for using BDNs in groundwater modeling analyses is that they provide a method for distilling complex model results into predictions with associated uncertainty, which is useful to decision makers. Future efforts incorporate

  11. Managing Higher Education in a Climate of Contraction: A Conceptual Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    Five categories of opportunity for managing institutions successfully in no-growth periods include: producing new or different products, improving productivity with new production methods, opening new markets, locating new sources of support, and restructuring activities. (MSE)

  12. 48 CFR 1022.7000 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MINORITY AND WOMEN INCLUSION Fair inclusion of minorities and women 1022.7000 Contract clause. Insert the clause at 1052.222-70, Minority and Women Inclusion, in all solicitations and contracts in support...

  13. Distributed Hydrologic Modeling Apps for Decision Support in the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, N. R.; Latu, K.; Christiensen, S.; Jones, N.; Nelson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in computation resources and greater availability of water resources data represent an untapped resource for addressing hydrologic uncertainties in water resources decision-making. The current practice of water authorities relies on empirical, lumped hydrologic models to estimate watershed response. These models are not capable of taking advantage of many of the spatial datasets that are now available. Physically-based, distributed hydrologic models are capable of using these data resources and providing better predictions through stochastic analysis. However, there exists a digital divide that discourages many science-minded decision makers from using distributed models. This divide can be spanned using a combination of existing web technologies. The purpose of this presentation is to present a cloud-based environment that will offer hydrologic modeling tools or 'apps' for decision support and the web technologies that have been selected to aid in its implementation. Compared to the more commonly used lumped-parameter models, distributed models, while being more intuitive, are still data intensive, computationally expensive, and difficult to modify for scenario exploration. However, web technologies such as web GIS, web services, and cloud computing have made the data more accessible, provided an inexpensive means of high-performance computing, and created an environment for developing user-friendly apps for distributed modeling. Since many water authorities are primarily interested in the scenario exploration exercises with hydrologic models, we are creating a toolkit that facilitates the development of a series of apps for manipulating existing distributed models. There are a number of hurdles that cloud-based hydrologic modeling developers face. One of these is how to work with the geospatial data inherent with this class of models in a web environment. Supporting geospatial data in a website is beyond the capabilities of standard web frameworks and it

  14. Case Studies in Educational Performance Contracting. Part 3. Texarkana, Arkansas; Liberty-Eylau, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Polly; And Others

    The Texarkana model of performance contracting consists of five major elements: (1) turnkeying of cost-effective new technology as a basic program goal, (2) use of a performance contract for instruction, (3) use of a management support contractor, (4) selection of the learning system contractor by formal competition, and (5) use of independent…

  15. Computational Science Research in Support of Petascale Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.-Q.; Akcelik, V; Ge, L; Chen, S; Schussman, G; Candel, A; Li, Z; Xiao, L; Kabel, A; Uplenchwar, R; Ng, C; Ko, K; /SLAC

    2008-06-20

    Computational science research components were vital parts of the SciDAC-1 accelerator project and are continuing to play a critical role in newly-funded SciDAC-2 accelerator project, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS). Recent advances and achievements in the area of computational science research in support of petascale electromagnetic modeling for accelerator design analysis are presented, which include shape determination of superconducting RF cavities, mesh-based multilevel preconditioner in solving highly-indefinite linear systems, moving window using h- or p- refinement for time-domain short-range wakefield calculations, and improved scalable application I/O.

  16. Mass balances for a biological life support system simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rumel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Design decisions to aid the development of future space-based biological life support systems (BLSS) can be made with simulation models. Here the biochemical stoichiometry is developed for: (1) protein, carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and lignin production in the edible and inedible parts of plants; (2) food consumption and production of organic solids in urine, feces, and wash water by the humans; and (3) operation of the waste processor. Flux values for all components are derived for a steady-state system with wheat as the sole food source.

  17. Inverse Modeling of Experiments to Support More Realistic Simulations of Sorbing Radionuclide Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, B. W.; James, S. C.; Reimus, P. W.

    2012-12-01

    A series of adsorption, desorption, and column transport experiments were conducted to evaluate the transport of uranium (U) and neptunium (Np) through saturated volcanic tuffs. For potential high-level radioactive waste sites, these experiments demonstrate that slow radionuclide desorption processes, which are typically not accounted for in transport models implementing simple partition coefficients (Kd values), may dominate field-scale transport. A complimentary interpretive numerical model couples a simplified geochemical description of the system with transport calculations where heterogeneities are represented as an ensemble of sorption sites with characteristic adsorption and desorption rate constants that have widely varying values. Adsorption and desorption rate constants were estimated through inverse modeling such that reliable upscaled predictions of reactive transport in field settings could be simulated. The inverse modeling software, PEST, was also used to perform advanced uncertainty quantification. The multicomponent model/parameters matching the combined data sets suggest that over much longer time and distance scales the transport of U and Np under the experimental conditions would result in very little transport over field scales because even a small number of strong sorption sites will have an exaggerated retarding influence on the transport of a radionuclide plume. Modeling of combined sorption/desorption experiments and column transport experiments that involve both the measurement of column effluent breakthrough curves and the distribution of radionuclides remaining in the column at the conclusion of the experiments holds significant promise for supporting an improved approach to properly account for mineralogical heterogeneity over long time and distance scales in reactive radionuclide transport models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed

  18. Psychological contract breach and outcomes: Combining meta-analysis and structural equation models.

    PubMed

    Topa Cantisano, Gabriela; Morales Domínguez, J Francisco; Depolo, Marco

    2008-08-01

    In this study, meta-analytic procedures were used to examine the relationships between psychological contract perceived breach and certain outcome variables, such as organizational commitment, job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behaviours (OCB). Our review of the literature generated 41 independent samples in which perceived breach was used as a predictor of these personal and organizational outcomes. A medium effect size (ES) for desirable outcomes (job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational trust, OCB and performance) was obtained (r=-.35). For undesirable outcomes (neglect in role duties and intention to leave), ES were also medium (r=.31). When comparing attitudinal (job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational trust) and behavioural outcomes (OCB, neglect in role duties and performance), a stronger ES was found for attitudinal (r=-.24) than for behavioural outcomes (r=-.11). Potential moderator variables were examined, and it was found that they explained only a percentage of variability of primary studies. Structural equation analysis of the pooled meta-analytical correlation matrix indicated that the relationships of perceived breach with satisfaction, OCB, intention to leave and performance are fully mediated by organizational trust and commitment. Results are discussed in order to suggest theoretical and empirical implications.

  19. Tactile length contraction as Bayesian inference.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jonathan; Ngo, Vy; Goldreich, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    To perceive, the brain must interpret stimulus-evoked neural activity. This is challenging: The stochastic nature of the neural response renders its interpretation inherently uncertain. Perception would be optimized if the brain used Bayesian inference to interpret inputs in light of expectations derived from experience. Bayesian inference would improve perception on average but cause illusions when stimuli violate expectation. Intriguingly, tactile, auditory, and visual perception are all prone to length contraction illusions, characterized by the dramatic underestimation of the distance between punctate stimuli delivered in rapid succession; the origin of these illusions has been mysterious. We previously proposed that length contraction illusions occur because the brain interprets punctate stimulus sequences using Bayesian inference with a low-velocity expectation. A novel prediction of our Bayesian observer model is that length contraction should intensify if stimuli are made more difficult to localize. Here we report a tactile psychophysical study that tested this prediction. Twenty humans compared two distances on the forearm: a fixed reference distance defined by two taps with 1-s temporal separation and an adjustable comparison distance defined by two taps with temporal separation t ≤ 1 s. We observed significant length contraction: As t was decreased, participants perceived the two distances as equal only when the comparison distance was made progressively greater than the reference distance. Furthermore, the use of weaker taps significantly enhanced participants' length contraction. These findings confirm the model's predictions, supporting the view that the spatiotemporal percept is a best estimate resulting from a Bayesian inference process.

  20. Numerical modeling of hemodynamics with pulsatile impeller pump support.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney

    2010-08-01

    There is significant interest in the development and application of variable speed impeller-pump type ventricular assist devices designed to generate pulsatile blood flow. However, no study has so far been carried out to investigate the systemic cardiovascular response to various aspects of pump motion. In this article, a numerical model is constructed for the simulation of the cardiovascular response in the heart failure condition under representative cases of pulsatile impeller pump support. The native cardiovascular model is based on a previously validated model, and the impeller pump is modeled by directly fitting the pressure-flow curves that describe the pump characteristics. The model developed is applied to study circulatory dynamics under different degrees of phase shift and pulsation ratio in the pump motion profile. The characteristic variables are discussed as criteria for the evaluation of system response for comparison of the pulsatile flows. Simulation results show that a constant pump speed is the most efficient work mode for the rotary pump, and with the application of either a phase shift of 75% and a pulsation ratio of 0.5, or a phase shift of 42% and a pulsation ratio of 0.55, it is possible to generate arterial pulse pressure with the maximal magnitude of about 28 mmHg. However, this is achieved at the cost of reduced cardiac output and pump efficiency.

  1. Modelling and control of a rotor supported by magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Pradeep, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dynamical model of a rotor and the active magnetic bearings used to support the rotor. We use this model to develop a stable state feedback control of the magnetic bearing system. We present the development of a rigid body model of the rotor, utilizing both Rotation Matrices (Euler Angles) and Euler Parameters (Quaternions). In the latter half of the paper we develop a stable state feedback control of the actively controlled magnetic bearing to control the rotor position under inbalances. The control law developed takes into account the variation of the model with rotational speed. We show stability over the whole operating range of speeds for the magnetic bearing system. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the closed loop system performance. We develop the model of the magnetic bearing, and present two schemes for the excitation of the poles of the actively controlled magnetic bearing. We also present a scheme for averaging multiple sensor measurements and splitting the actuation forces amongst redundant actuators.

  2. Making Risk Models Operational for Situational Awareness and Decision Support

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Coles, Garill A.; Shoemaker, Steven V.

    2012-06-12

    Modernization of nuclear power operations control systems, in particular the move to digital control systems, creates an opportunity to modernize existing legacy infrastructure and extend plant life. We describe here decision support tools that allow the assessment of different facets of risk and support the optimization of available resources to reduce risk as plants are upgraded and maintained. This methodology could become an integrated part of the design review process and a part of the operations management systems. The methodology can be applied to the design of new reactors such as small nuclear reactors (SMR), and be helpful in assessing the risks of different configurations of the reactors. Our tool provides a low cost evaluation of alternative configurations and provides an expanded safety analysis by considering scenarios while early in the implementation cycle where cost impacts can be minimized. The effects of failures can be modeled and thoroughly vetted to understand their potential impact on risk. The process and tools presented here allow for an integrated assessment of risk by supporting traditional defense in depth approaches while taking into consideration the insertion of new digital instrument and control systems.

  3. Modeling and Performance of Anode-Supported SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Simner, Steven P.; Jaffe, John E.; Williford, Rick E.

    2001-02-28

    A "one-dimensional", steady-state model of an SOFC stack was needed to support the design of balance-of-plant components for a 5 kW mobile SOFC system. This "stack module" was required to predict appropriate stack voltage responses to changes in fuel composition, fuel flow rate, stack temperature and current demand, with response characteristics that were adjustable to changes in stack component materials and dimensions as well as to electrode porosity. The spreadsheet-based stack module was derived from the work by Kim, Virkar et al (see J. Electrochem. Soc. 146(1) 69-78 (1999)), with modifications suggested by Riess and Schoonman, p291 in CRC Handbook of Electrochemistry (1997) CRC Press. The usual overpotential terms account for ohmic resistance of the cell components, losses due to charge transfer at the electrodes, and losses due to diffusion of reactants into and products out of the porous electrodes. Response of the module is compared to published cell and stack data. After fitting adjustable parameters to match particular cell performance characteristics, the module responds reasonably well to changes in temperature and fuel concentration. The module is used to analyze the performance of anode-supported cells that were fabricated at PNNL (see abstract submitted by Stevenson, Meinhardt, Simner, Habeger and Canfield, "Fabrication and Testing of Anode-Supported SOFC").

  4. Modeling and analysis of LAMOST primary mirror support structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xuefei; Cui, Xiangqun

    2002-07-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is a national large scientific project in China at the beginning of this century. It is an unconventional designed modern optical telescope and has the both large field of view and large aperture. The spherical primary mirror MB in LAMOST is a segmented mirror with 37 sub-mirrors. The MB will be supported by a very stable truss structure and the mirror surface will be kept in a high optical accuracy. This paper presents the work on the finite element model of the truss structure of MB and gives the results of static and dynamic analysis with this model especially for the optimization of the higher stiffness and the lighter weight.

  5. Advanced development of atmospheric models. [SEASAT Program support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesel, P. G.; Langland, R. A.; Stephens, P. L.; Welleck, R. E.; Wolff, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    A set of atmospheric analysis and prediction models was developed in support of the SEASAT Program existing objective analysis models which utilize a 125x125 polar stereographic grid of the Northern Hemisphere, which were modified in order to incorporate and assess the impact of (real or simulated) satellite data in the analysis of a two-day meteorological scenario in January 1979. Program/procedural changes included: (1) a provision to utilize winds in the sea level pressure and multi-level height analyses (1000-100 MBS); (2) The capability to perform a pre-analysis at two control levels (1000 MBS and 250 MBS); (3) a greater degree of wind- and mass-field coupling, especially at these controls levels; (4) an improved facility to bogus the analyses based on results of the preanalysis; and (5) a provision to utilize (SIRS) satellite thickness values and cloud motion vectors in the multi-level height analysis.

  6. Mass balances for a biological life support system simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rummel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Design decisions to aid the development of future space based biological life support systems (BLSS) can be made with simulation models. The biochemistry stoichiometry was developed for: (1) protein, carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and lignin production in the edible and inedible parts of plants; (2) food consumption and production of organic solids in urine, feces, and wash water by the humans; and (3) operation of the waste processor. Flux values for all components are derived for a steady state system with wheat as the sole food source. The large scale dynamics of a materially closed (BLSS) computer model is described in a companion paper. An extension of this methodology can explore multifood systems and more complex biochemical dynamics while maintaining whole system closure as a focus.

  7. A community college model to support nursing workforce diversity.

    PubMed

    Colville, Janet; Cottom, Sherry; Robinette, Teresa; Wald, Holly; Waters, Tomi

    2015-02-01

    Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC), Allegheny Campus, is situated on the North Side of Pittsburgh. The neighborhood is 60% African American. At the time of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) application, approximately one third of the students admitted to the program were African American, less than one third of whom successfully completed it. With the aid of HRSA funding, CCAC developed a model that significantly improved the success rate of disadvantaged students. Through the formation of a viable cohort, the nursing faculty nurtured success among the most at-risk students. The cohort was supported by a social worker, case managers who were nursing faculty, and tutors. Students formed study groups, actively participated in community activities, and developed leadership skills through participation in the Student Nurse Association of Pennsylvania. This article provides the rationale for the Registered Nurse (RN) Achievement Model, describes the components of RN Achievement, and discusses the outcomes of the initiative.

  8. Concepts to Support HRP Integration Using Publications and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindock, J.; Lumpkins, S.; Shelhamer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Initial efforts are underway to enhance the Human Research Program (HRP)'s identification and support of potential cross-disciplinary scientific collaborations. To increase the emphasis on integration in HRP's science portfolio management, concepts are being explored through the development of a set of tools. These tools are intended to enable modeling, analysis, and visualization of the state of the human system in the spaceflight environment; HRP's current understanding of that state with an indication of uncertainties; and how that state changes due to HRP programmatic progress and design reference mission definitions. In this talk, we will discuss proof-of-concept work performed using a subset of publications captured in the HRP publications database. The publications were tagged in the database with words representing factors influencing health and performance in spaceflight, as well as with words representing the risks HRP research is reducing. Analysis was performed on the publication tag data to identify relationships between factors and between risks. Network representations were then created as one type of visualization of these relationships. This enables future analyses of the structure of the networks based on results from network theory. Such analyses can provide insights into HRP's current human system knowledge state as informed by the publication data. The network structure analyses can also elucidate potential improvements by identifying network connections to establish or strengthen for maximized information flow. The relationships identified in the publication data were subsequently used as inputs to a model captured in the Systems Modeling Language (SysML), which functions as a repository for relationship information to be gleaned from multiple sources. Example network visualization outputs from a simple SysML model were then also created to compare to the visualizations based on the publication data only. We will also discuss ideas for

  9. Models for Deploying Open Source and Commercial Software to Support Earth Science Data Processing and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetman, G.; Downs, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Software deployment is needed to process and distribute scientific data throughout the data lifecycle. Developing software in-house can take software development teams away from other software development projects and can require efforts to maintain the software over time. Adopting and reusing software and system modules that have been previously developed by others can reduce in-house software development and maintenance costs and can contribute to the quality of the system being developed. A variety of models are available for reusing and deploying software and systems that have been developed by others. These deployment models include open source software, vendor-supported open source software, commercial software, and combinations of these approaches. Deployment in Earth science data processing and distribution has demonstrated the advantages and drawbacks of each model. Deploying open source software offers advantages for developing and maintaining scientific data processing systems and applications. By joining an open source community that is developing a particular system module or application, a scientific data processing team can contribute to aspects of the software development without having to commit to developing the software alone. Communities of interested developers can share the work while focusing on activities that utilize in-house expertise and addresses internal requirements. Maintenance is also shared by members of the community. Deploying vendor-supported open source software offers similar advantages to open source software. However, by procuring the services of a vendor, the in-house team can rely on the vendor to provide, install, and maintain the software over time. Vendor-supported open source software may be ideal for teams that recognize the value of an open source software component or application and would like to contribute to the effort, but do not have the time or expertise to contribute extensively. Vendor-supported software may

  10. Advancing Cyberinfrastructure to support high resolution water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Ogden, F. L.; Jones, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Addressing the problem of how the availability and quality of water resources at large scales are sensitive to climate variability, watershed alterations and management activities requires computational resources that combine data from multiple sources and support integrated modeling. Related cyberinfrastructure challenges include: 1) how can we best structure data and computer models to address this scientific problem through the use of high-performance and data-intensive computing, and 2) how can we do this in a way that discipline scientists without extensive computational and algorithmic knowledge and experience can take advantage of advances in cyberinfrastructure? This presentation will describe a new system called CI-WATER that is being developed to address these challenges and advance high resolution water resources modeling in the Western U.S. We are building on existing tools that enable collaboration to develop model and data interfaces that link integrated system models running within an HPC environment to multiple data sources. Our goal is to enhance the use of computational simulation and data-intensive modeling to better understand water resources. Addressing water resource problems in the Western U.S. requires simulation of natural and engineered systems, as well as representation of legal (water rights) and institutional constraints alongside the representation of physical processes. We are establishing data services to represent the engineered infrastructure and legal and institutional systems in a way that they can be used with high resolution multi-physics watershed modeling at high spatial resolution. These services will enable incorporation of location-specific information on water management infrastructure and systems into the assessment of regional water availability in the face of growing demands, uncertain future meteorological forcings, and existing prior-appropriations water rights. This presentation will discuss the informatics

  11. Modelling Vague Knowledge for Decision Support in Planning Archaeological Prospections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, S.; Hornung, S.; Müller, H.

    2012-07-01

    Most archaeological predictive models lack significance because fuzziness of data and uncertainty in knowledge about human behaviour and natural processes are hardly ever considered. One possibility to cope with such uncertainties is utilization of probability based approaches like Bayes Theorem or Dempster-Shafer-Theory. We analyzed an area of 50 km2 in Rhineland Palatinate (Germany) near a Celtic oppidum by use of Dempster-Shafer's theory of evidence for predicting spatial probability distribution of archaeological sites. This technique incorporates uncertainty by assigning various weights of evidence to defined variables, in that way estimating the probability for supporting a specific hypothesis (in our case the hypothesis presence or absence of a site). Selection of variables for our model relied both on assumptions about settlement patterns and on statistically tested relationships between known archaeological sites and environmental factors. The modelling process was conducted in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by generating raster-based likelihood surfaces. The corresponding likelihood surfaces were aggregated to a final weight of evidence surface, which resulted in a likelihood value for every single cell of being a site or a non-site. Finally the result was tested against a database of known archaeological sites for evaluating the gain of the model. For the purpose of enhancing the gain of our model and sharpening our criteria we used a two-step approach to improve the modelling of former settlement strategies in our study area. Applying the developed model finally yielded a 100 percent success rate of known archaeological sites located in predicted high potential areas.

  12. Semantic Web Infrastructure Supporting NextFrAMES Modeling Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhankar, T.; Fekete, B. M.; Vörösmarty, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    from observation to the delivery of highly aggregated information. Our presentation will discuss the web services ranging from OpenDAP and WaterOneFlow data services to metadata provided through catalog services that could serve NextFrAMES modeling applications. We will also discuss the support infrastructure needed to streamline the integration of NextFrAMES into an End-to-End application to deliver highly processed information to end users. The End-to-End application will be demonstrated through examples from the State-of-the Global Water System effort that builds on data services provided through WMO's Global Terrestrial Network for Hydrology to deliver water resources related information to policy makers for better water management. Key components of this E2E system are promoted as Community of Practice examples for the Global Observing System of Systems therefore the State-of-the Global Water System can be viewed as test case for the interoperability of the incorporated web service components.

  13. An innovative model of supportive clinical teaching and learning for undergraduate nursing students: the cluster model.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Sharon; Drayton, Nicola; Brown, Ann-Marie

    2011-03-01

    Students look forward to their clinical practicum to learn within the context of reality nursing. As educators we need to actively develop models of clinical practicum whereby students are supported to engage and learn in the clinical learning environment. The aim of this paper is to describe an innovative model of supportive clinical teaching and learning for undergraduate nursing students as implemented in a large teaching hospital in New South Wales, Australia. The model of supportive clinical teaching and learning situates eight students at a time, across a shift, on one ward, with an experienced registered nurse from the ward specialty, who is employed as the clinical teacher to support nursing students during their one to two week block practicum. Results from written evaluation statements inform the discussion component of the paper for a model that has proved to be successful in this large healthcare facility.

  14. Distinct Effects of Contraction-Induced Injury In Vivo on Four Different Murine Models of Dysferlinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Joseph A.; Ru, Lisa W.; Bloch, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the DYSF gene, encoding dysferlin, cause muscular dystrophies in man. We compared 4 dysferlinopathic mouse strains: SJL/J and B10.SJL-Dysfim/AwaJ (B10.SJL), and A/J and B6.A-Dysfprmd/GeneJ (B6.A/J). The former but not the latter two are overtly myopathic and weaker at 3 months of age. Following repetitive large-strain injury (LSI) caused by lengthening contractions, all except B6.A/J showed ~40% loss in contractile torque. Three days later, torque in SJL/J, B10.SJL and controls, but not A/J, recovered nearly completely. B6.A/J showed ~30% torque loss post-LSI and more variable recovery. Pre-injury, all dysferlinopathic strains had more centrally nucleated fibers (CNFs) and all but A/J showed more inflammation than controls. At D3, all dysferlinopathic strains showed increased necrosis and inflammation, but not more CNFs; controls were unchanged. Dystrophin-null DMDmdx mice showed more necrosis and inflammation than all dysferlin-nulls. Torque loss and inflammation on D3 across all strains were linearly related to necrosis. Our results suggest that (1) dysferlin is not required for functional recovery 3 days after LSI; (2) B6.A/J mice recover from LSI erratically; (3) SJL/J and B10.SJL muscles recover rapidly, perhaps due to ongoing myopathy; (4) although they recover function to different levels, all 4 dysferlinopathic strains show increased inflammation and necrosis 3 days after LSI. PMID:22431915

  15. Systems Integration, Analysis and Modeling Support to the HEDS Technology/Commercialization Initiative (HTCI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feingold, Harvey; ONeil, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In response to a recommendation from OMB, NASA's Fiscal Year 2001 budget included a new program within the HEDS (Human Exploration and Development of Space) Enterprise called HEDS Technology/ Commercialization Initiative (HTCI). HTCI had three overarching goals: to support REDS analysis and planning for safe, affordable and effective future programs and projects that advance human exploration, scientific discovery, and the commercial development of space; to pursue research, development, and validation of breakthrough technologies and highly innovative systems concepts; and to advance die creation of strong partnerships within NASA, with U.S. industry and universities, and internationally. As part of its contracted effort, SAIC was to write a report contribution, describing die results of its task activities, to a final HTCI report prepared by MSFC. Unfortunately, government cancellation of the HTCI program in the summer of 2001 curtailed all efforts on the program including die Final HTCI report. In the absence of that report, SAIC has issued this final report in an attempt to document some of the technical material it produced. The report contains SAIC presentations for both HTCI workshops; a set of roadmap charts for the Systems Analysis, Integration and Modeling; and charts showing the evolution of the current TITAN modeling architecture.

  16. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  17. Agricultural Model for the Nile Basin Decision Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bolt, Frank; Seid, Abdulkarim

    2014-05-01

    To analyze options for increasing food supply in the Nile basin the Nile Agricultural Model (AM) was developed. The AM includes state-of-the-art descriptions of biophysical, hydrological and economic processes and realizes a coherent and consistent integration of hydrology, agronomy and economics. The AM covers both the agro-ecological domain (water, crop productivity) and the economic domain (food supply, demand, and trade) and allows to evaluate the macro-economic and hydrological impacts of scenarios for agricultural development. Starting with the hydrological information from the NileBasin-DSS the AM calculates the available water for agriculture, the crop production and irrigation requirements with the FAO-model AquaCrop. With the global commodity trade model MAGNET scenarios for land development and conversion are evaluated. The AM predicts consequences for trade, food security and development based on soil and water availability, crop allocation, food demand and food policy. The model will be used as a decision support tool to contribute to more productive and sustainable agriculture in individual Nile countries and the whole region.

  18. Supporting user-defined granularities in a spatiotemporal conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khatri, V.; Ram, S.; Snodgrass, R.T.; O'Brien, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Granularities are integral to spatial and temporal data. A large number of applications require storage of facts along with their temporal and spatial context, which needs to be expressed in terms of appropriate granularities. For many real-world applications, a single granularity in the database is insufficient. In order to support any type of spatial or temporal reasoning, the semantics related to granularities needs to be embedded in the database. Specifying granularities related to facts is an important part of conceptual database design because under-specifying the granularity can restrict an application, affect the relative ordering of events and impact the topological relationships. Closely related to granularities is indeterminacy, i.e., an occurrence time or location associated with a fact that is not known exactly. In this paper, we present an ontology for spatial granularities that is a natural analog of temporal granularities. We propose an upward-compatible, annotation-based spatiotemporal conceptual model that can comprehensively capture the semantics related to spatial and temporal granularities, and indeterminacy without requiring new spatiotemporal constructs. We specify the formal semantics of this spatiotemporal conceptual model via translation to a conventional conceptual model. To underscore the practical focus of our approach, we describe an on-going case study. We apply our approach to a hydrogeologic application at the United States Geologic Survey and demonstrate that our proposed granularity-based spatiotemporal conceptual model is straightforward to use and is comprehensive.

  19. Modeling Global Urbanization Supported by Nighttime Light Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization, a major driver of global change, profoundly impacts our physical and social world, for example, altering carbon cycling and climate. Understanding these consequences for better scientific insights and effective decision-making unarguably requires accurate information on urban extent and its spatial distributions. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the nighttime light remote sensing data, extended this method to the global domain by developing a computational method (parameterization) to estimate the key parameters in the cluster-based method, and built a consistent 20-year global urban map series to evaluate the time-reactive nature of global urbanization (e.g. 2000 in Fig. 1). Supported by urban maps derived from nightlights remote sensing data and socio-economic drivers, we developed an integrated modeling framework to project future urban expansion by integrating a top-down macro-scale statistical model with a bottom-up urban growth model. With the models calibrated and validated using historical data, we explored urban growth at the grid level (1-km) over the next two decades under a number of socio-economic scenarios. The derived spatiotemporal information of historical and potential future urbanization will be of great value with practical implications for developing adaptation and risk management measures for urban infrastructure, transportation, energy, and water systems when considered together with other factors such as climate variability and change, and high impact weather events.

  20. A coupled electromechanical model for the excitation-dependent contraction of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Böl, Markus; Weikert, Roman; Weichert, Christine

    2011-10-01

    This work deals with the development and implementation of an electromechanical skeletal muscle model. To this end, a recently published hyperelastic constitutive muscle model with transversely isotropic characteristics, see Ehret et al. (2011), has been weakly coupled with Ohm's law describing the electric current. In contrast to the traditional way of active muscle modelling, this model is rooted on a non-additive decomposition of the active and passive components. The performance of the proposed modelling approach is demonstrated by the use of three-dimensional illustrative boundary-value problems that include electromechanical analysis on tissue strips. Further, simulations on the biceps brachii muscle document the applicability of the model to realistic muscle geometries.

  1. Urban modeling over Houston in support of SIMMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlage, M. J.; Monaghan, A. J.; Feddema, J. J.; Oleson, K. W.; Brunsell, N. A.; Wilhelmi, O.

    2011-12-01

    Extreme heat is a leading cause of weather-related human mortality in the United States. As global warming patterns continue, researchers anticipate increases in the severity, frequency and duration of extreme heat events, especially in the southern and western U.S. Many cities in these regions may have amplified vulnerability due to their rapidly evolving socioeconomic fabric (for example, growing elderly populations). This raises a series of questions about the increased health risks of urban residents to extreme heat, and about effective means of mitigation and adaptation in present and future climates. We will introduce a NASA-funded project aimed at addressing these questions via the System for Integrated Modeling of Metropolitan Extreme Heat Risk (SIMMER). Through SIMMER, we hope to advance methodology for assessing current and future urban vulnerabilities from the heat waves through the refinement and integration of physical and social science models, and to build local capacity for heat hazard mitigation and climate change adaptation in the public health sector. We will also present results from a series of sensitivity studies over Houston and surrounding area employing a recently-implemented multi-layer urban canopy model (UCM) within the Noah Land Surface Model. The UCM has multiple layers in the atmosphere to explicitly resolve the effects of buildings, and has an indoor-outdoor exchange model that directly interacts with the atmospheric boundary layer. The goal of this work, which supports the physical science component of SIMMER, is to characterize the ill-defined and uncertain parameter space, including building characteristics and spatial organization, in the new multi-layer UCM for Houston, and to assess whether and how this parameter space is sensitive to the choice of urban morphology datasets. Results focus on the seasonal and inter-annual range of both the modeled urban heat island effect and the magnitude of surface energy components and

  2. Experimental Permeability Measurements on a Strut-Supported Transpiration-Cooled Turbine Blade with Stainless-Steel Shell made by the Federal-Mogul Corporation under Bureau of Aeronautics Contract N0as 51613-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Hadley T.

    1954-01-01

    A turbine blade with a porous stainless-steel shell sintered to a supporting steel strut has been fabricated for tests at the NACA by Federal-Mogul Corporation under contract from the Bureau of Aeronautics, Department of the Navy. The apparent permeability of this blade, on the average, more nearly approaches the values specified by the NAGA than did two strut-supported bronze blades in a previous investigation. Random variations of permeability in the present blade are substantialy greater than those of the bronze blades, but projected improvements in certain phases of the fabrication process are expected to reduce these variations.

  3. Estimation of wrist angle from sonomyography using support vector machine and artificial neural network models.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Guo, Jing-Yi; Chen, Xin; Shi, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Sonomyography (SMG) is the signal we previously termed to describe muscle contraction using real-time muscle thickness changes extracted from ultrasound images. In this paper, we used least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict dynamic wrist angles from SMG signals. Synchronized wrist angle and SMG signals from the extensor carpi radialis muscles of five normal subjects were recorded during the process of wrist extension and flexion at rates of 15, 22.5, and 30cycles/min, respectively. An LS-SVM model together with back-propagation (BP) and radial basis function (RBF) ANN was developed and trained using the data sets collected at the rate of 22.5cycles/min for each subject. The established LS-SVM and ANN models were then used to predict the wrist angles for the remained data sets obtained at different extension rates. It was found that the wrist angle signals collected at different rates could be accurately predicted by all the three methods, based on the values of root mean square difference (RMSD<0.2) and the correlation coefficient (CC>0.98), with the performance of the LS-SVM model being significantly better (RMSD<0.15, CC>0.99) than those of its counterparts. The results also demonstrated that the models established for the rate of 22.5cycles/min could be used for the prediction from SMG data sets obtained under other extension rates. It was concluded that the wrist angle could be precisely estimated from the thickness changes of the extensor carpi radialis using LS-SVM or ANN models.

  4. Scour around Support Structures of Scaled Model Marine Hydrokinetic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, M. A.; Beninati, M. L.; Krane, M.; Fontaine, A.

    2013-12-01

    Experiments are presented to explore scour due to flows around support structures of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Three related studies were performed to understand how submergence, scour condition, and the presence of an MHK device impact scour around the support structure (cylinder). The first study focuses on clear-water scour conditions for a cylinder of varying submergence: surface-piercing and fully submerged. The second study centers on three separate scour conditions (clear-water, transitional and live-bed) around the fully submerged cylinder. Lastly, the third study emphasizes the impact of an MHK turbine on scour around the support structure, in live-bed conditions. Small-scale laboratory testing of model devices can be used to help predict the behavior of MHK devices at full-scale. Extensive studies have been performed on single cylinders, modeling bridge piers, though few have focused on fully submerged structures. Many of the devices being used to harness marine hydrokinetic energy are fully submerged in the flow. Additionally, scour hole dimensions and scour rates have not been addressed. Thus, these three studies address the effect of structure blockage/drag, and the ambient scour conditions on scour around the support structure. The experiments were performed in the small-scale testing platform in the hydraulic flume facility (9.8 m long, 1.2 m wide and 0.4 m deep) at Bucknell University. The support structure diameter (D = 2.54 cm) was held constant for all tests. The submerged cylinder (l/D = 5) and sediment size (d50 = 790 microns) were held constant for all three studies. The MHK device (Dturbine = 10.2 cm) is a two-bladed horizontal axis turbine and the rotating shaft is friction-loaded using a metal brush motor. For each study, bed form topology was measured after a three-hour time interval using a traversing two-dimensional bed profiler. During the experiments, scour hole depth measurements at the front face of the support structure

  5. Survey of the Effects of Exposure to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted by a GSM Mobile Phone on the Pattern of Muscle Contractions in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Rahimi, S.; Talebi, A.; Soleimani, A.; Rafati, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rapid development of wireless telecommunication technologies over the past decades, has led to significant changes in the exposure of the general public to electromagnetic fields. Nowadays, people are continuously exposed to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile base stations, cordless phones, Wi-Fi routers, and power lines. Therefore, the last decade witnessed a rapidly growing concern about the possible health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by these sources. Materials and Methods: In this study that was aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted by a GSM mobile phone on the pattern of contraction in frog’s isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz), pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period were measured. Results: Our findings showed that the pulse height of contractions muscle could be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. Especially, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. Conclusion: These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions. PMID:26396968

  6. Study of Dependencies in Executions of E-Contract Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyasankar, K.; Krishna, P. Radha; Karlapalem, Kamalakar

    An e-contract is a contract modeled, specified, executed, controlled and monitored by a software system. A contract is a legal agreement involving parties, activities, clauses and payments. The goals of an e-contract include precise specification of the activities of the contract, mapping them into deployable workflows, and providing transactional support in their execution. Activities in a contract are generally complex and interdependent. They may be executed by different parties autonomously and in a loosely coupled fashion. They differ from database transactions in many ways: (i) Different successful executions are possible for an activity; (ii) Unsuccessful executions may be compensated or re-executed to get different results; (iii) Whether an execution is successful or not may not be known until after several subsequent activities are executed, and so it may be compensated and/or re-executed at different times relative to the execution of other activities; (iv) Compensation or re-execution of an activity may require compensation or re-execution of several other activities; etc. In this paper, we study the interdependencies between the executions of e-contract activities. This study will be helpful in monitoring behavioral conditions stated in an e-contracts during its execution.

  7. Aggregation of Environmental Model Data for Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    model output offering access to probability and calibrating information for real time decision making. The aggregation content server reports over ensemble component and forecast time in addition to the other data dimensions of vertical layer and position for each variable. The unpacking, organization and reading of many binary packed files is accomplished most efficiently on the server while weather element event probability calculations, the thresholds for more accurate decision support, or display remain for the client. Our goal is to reduce uncertainty for variables of interest, e.g, agricultural importance. The weather service operational GFS model ensemble and short range ensemble forecasts can make skillful probability forecasts to alert users if and when their selected weather events will occur. A description of how this framework operates and how it can be implemented using existing NOMADS content services and applications is described.

  8. Progressor: social navigation support through open social student modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, I.-Han; Bakalov, Fedor; Brusilovsky, Peter; König-Ries, Birgitta

    2013-06-01

    The increased volumes of online learning content have produced two problems: how to help students to find the most appropriate resources and how to engage them in using these resources. Personalized and social learning have been suggested as potential ways to address these problems. Our work presented in this paper combines the ideas of personalized and social learning in the context of educational hypermedia. We introduce Progressor, an innovative Web-based tool based on the concepts of social navigation and open student modeling that helps students to find the most relevant resources in a large collection of parameterized self-assessment questions on Java programming. We have evaluated Progressor in a semester-long classroom study, the results of which are presented in this paper. The study confirmed the impact of personalized social navigation support provided by the system in the target context. The interface encouraged students to explore more topics attempting more questions and achieving higher success rates in answering them. A deeper analysis of the social navigation support mechanism revealed that the top students successfully led the way to discovering most relevant resources by creating clear pathways for weaker students.

  9. Some advances in experimentation supporting development of viscoplastic constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.; Robinson, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a biaxial extensometer capable of measuring axial, torsion, and diametral strains to near-microstrain resolution at elevated temperatures is discussed. An instrument with this capability was needed to provide experimental support to the development of viscoplastic constitutive models. The advantages gained when torsional loading is used to investigate inelastic material response at elevated temperatures are highlighted. The development of the biaxial extensometer was conducted in two stages. The first involved a series of bench calibration experiments performed at room temperature. The second stage involved a series of in-place calibration experiments conducted at room and elevated temperature. A review of the calibration data indicated that all performance requirements regarding resolution, range, stability, and crosstalk had been met by the subject instrument over the temperature range of interest, 21 C to 651 C. The scope of the in-place calibration experiments was expanded to investigate the feasibility of generating stress relaxation data under torsional loading.

  10. Improved techniques for thermomechanical testing in support of deformation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.; Ellis, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of generating precise thermomechanical deformation data to support constitutive model development was investigated. Here, the requirement is for experimental data that is free from anomalies caused by less than ideal equipment and procedures. A series of exploratory tests conducted on Hastelloy X showed that generally accepted techniques for strain controlled tests were lacking in at least three areas. Specifically, problems were encountered with specimen stability, thermal strain compensation, and temperature/mechanical strain phasing. The source of these difficulties was identified and improved thermomechanical testing techniques to correct them were developed. These goals were achieved by developing improved procedures for measuring and controlling thermal gradients and by designing a specimen specifically for thermomechanical testing. In addition, innovative control strategies were developed to correctly proportion and phase the thermal and mechanical components of strain. Subsequently, the improved techniques were used to generate deformation data for Hastelloy X over the temperature range, 200 to 1000 C.

  11. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction - poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models requires a lot data, such as the chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data. Previously-developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be great resource for supporting the constr...

  12. The Adventure Model: A Replication Study To Determine if Different Adventure Skills Support the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Ken; Ewert, Alan

    First developed and tested in 1989, the Adventure Model suggests that as adventure participants become more skilled and specialized, they experience predictable changes in several participation behaviors. While previous studies supported the model, they were carried out with college students having similar skill and motivational characteristics.…

  13. 78 FR 54687 - International Mail Contract

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... Services--Non-Published Rates 4 model contract. This notice informs the public of the filing, ] invites...-Published Rates (GEPS-NPR) 4 model contract.\\1\\ This Order provides public notice of the Postal Service's... Concerning Revisions to Global Expedited Package Services--Non-Published Rates 4 Model Contract, August...

  14. Contract sanctity

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    Increased competition and the pressure to keep rates low is driving utilities and independent power producers alike to consider more options to keep costs down. While an important strategy for them, the results are creating some conflicts. The April 12, 1995 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) decision against New York State Electric & Gas (NYSEG) attempt to breach contracts with two independent power producers, observers say, is one of the most important decisions on contract disputes between independents and utilities. It reveals the complex issues and compelling arguments on both sides. It opens the question of utilities` ability to pay, and the future direction of independent power. The conflicts create a problem for utilities and independents alike.

  15. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  16. Managing Higher Education in a Climate of Contraction: A Conceptual Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual framework for managing higher education during a period of no growth, based on a model developed for business organizations by Joseph Schumpeter, is examined. Five categories of innovations included: new products (courses), new methods (improving productivity), new markets (students), new productive factors (sources of income), and…

  17. Integrating Cache Performance Modeling and Tuning Support in Parallelization Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    With the resurgence of distributed shared memory (DSM) systems based on cache-coherent Non Uniform Memory Access (ccNUMA) architectures and increasing disparity between memory and processors speeds, data locality overheads are becoming the greatest bottlenecks in the way of realizing potential high performance of these systems. While parallelization tools and compilers facilitate the users in porting their sequential applications to a DSM system, a lot of time and effort is needed to tune the memory performance of these applications to achieve reasonable speedup. In this paper, we show that integrating cache performance modeling and tuning support within a parallelization environment can alleviate this problem. The Cache Performance Modeling and Prediction Tool (CPMP), employs trace-driven simulation techniques without the overhead of generating and managing detailed address traces. CPMP predicts the cache performance impact of source code level "what-if" modifications in a program to assist a user in the tuning process. CPMP is built on top of a customized version of the Computer Aided Parallelization Tools (CAPTools) environment. Finally, we demonstrate how CPMP can be applied to tune a real Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) application.

  18. Practice Makes Perfect: Contracting Quantity and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how contract grading promotes quality writing as well as a larger quantity of writing. Considers how teachers can use contract grading to support and promote the behaviors, thinking skills, and writing skills they believe will help students create quality writing. Notes that contract grading leads students to write more, to have fewer…

  19. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Filée, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales). Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs) remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for five groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no trend of genome expansion or general tendency of genome contraction. Instead, GV genomes accumulated genomic mutations over the time with gene gains compensating the different losses. In addition, each lineage displays specific patterns of genome evolution. Mimiviridae (megaviruses and mimiviruses) and Chlorella Phycodnaviruses evolved mainly by duplications and losses of genes belonging to large paralogous families (including movements of diverse mobiles genetic elements), whereas Micromonas and Ostreococcus Phycodnaviruses derive most of their genetic novelties thought lateral gene transfers. Taken together, these data support an accordion-like model of evolution in which GV genomes have undergone successive steps of gene gain and gene loss, accrediting the hypothesis that genome gigantism appears early, before the diversification of the different GV lineages. PMID:26136734

  20. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution.

    PubMed

    Filée, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales). Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs) remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for five groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no trend of genome expansion or general tendency of genome contraction. Instead, GV genomes accumulated genomic mutations over the time with gene gains compensating the different losses. In addition, each lineage displays specific patterns of genome evolution. Mimiviridae (megaviruses and mimiviruses) and Chlorella Phycodnaviruses evolved mainly by duplications and losses of genes belonging to large paralogous families (including movements of diverse mobiles genetic elements), whereas Micromonas and Ostreococcus Phycodnaviruses derive most of their genetic novelties thought lateral gene transfers. Taken together, these data support an accordion-like model of evolution in which GV genomes have undergone successive steps of gene gain and gene loss, accrediting the hypothesis that genome gigantism appears early, before the diversification of the different GV lineages. PMID:26136734

  1. 7 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Model Form of Loan Contract for Electric Distribution Borrowers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN SECURITY DOCUMENTS FOR ELECTRIC BORROWERS....16. Standard Forms of Construction Contracts, and Engineering and Architectural Services Contracts... Administrator of the Rural Utilities Service (“RUS”). Recitals The Borrower has applied to RUS for a loan...

  2. A Model for Sustainable Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit (BEER) Using Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) Mechanism for Hotel Buildings in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Pengpeng

    Hotel building is one of the high-energy-consuming building types, and retrofitting hotel buildings is an untapped solution to help cut carbon emissions contributing towards sustainable development. Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) has been promulgated as a market mechanism for the delivery of energy efficiency projects. EPC mechanism has been introduced into China relatively recently, and it has not been implemented successfully in building energy efficiency retrofit projects. The aim of this research is to develop a model for achieving the sustainability of Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit (BEER) in hotel buildings under the Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) mechanism. The objectives include: • To identify a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for measuring the sustainability of BEER in hotel buildings; • To identify Critical Success Factors (CSFs) under EPC mechanism that have a strong correlation with sustainable BEER project; • To develop a model explaining the relationships between the CSFs and the sustainability performance of BEER in hotel building. Literature reviews revealed the essence of sustainable BEER and EPC, which help to develop a conceptual framework for analyzing sustainable BEER under EPC mechanism in hotel buildings. 11 potential KPIs for sustainable BEER and 28 success factors of EPC were selected based on the developed framework. A questionnaire survey was conducted to ascertain the importance of selected performance indicators and success factors. Fuzzy set theory was adopted in identifying the KPIs. Six KPIs were identified from the 11 selected performance indicators. Through a questionnaire survey, out of the 28 success factors, 21 Critical Success Factors (CSFs) were also indentified. Using the factor analysis technique, the 21 identified CSFs in this study were grouped into six clusters to help explain project success of sustainable BEER. Finally, AHP/ANP approach was used in this research to develop a model to

  3. Commerical Remote Sensing Data Contract

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Commercial Remote Sensing Data Contracts (CRSDCs) provide government agencies with access to a broad range of commercially available remotely sensed airborne and satellite data. These contracts were established to support The National Map partners, other Federal Civilian agency programs, and Department of Defense programs that require data for the United States and its territories. Experience shows that centralized procurement of remotely sensed data leads to considerable cost savings to the Federal government through volume discounts, reduction of redundant contract administrative costs, and avoidance of duplicate purchases. These contracts directly support the President's Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy, signed in 2003, by providing a centralized mechanism for civil agencies to acquire commercial remote sensing products to support their mission needs in an efficient and coordinated way. CRSDC administration is provided by the USGS Mid-Continent Mapping Center in Rolla, Missouri.

  4. Contraction Options and Optimal Multiple-Stopping in Spectrally Negative Lévy Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Kazutoshi

    2015-08-15

    This paper studies the optimal multiple-stopping problem arising in the context of the timing option to withdraw from a project in stages. The profits are driven by a general spectrally negative Lévy process. This allows the model to incorporate sudden declines of the project values, generalizing greatly the classical geometric Brownian motion model. We solve the one-stage case as well as the extension to the multiple-stage case. The optimal stopping times are of threshold-type and the value function admits an expression in terms of the scale function. A series of numerical experiments are conducted to verify the optimality and to evaluate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  5. Development of femoral bone fracture model simulating muscular contraction force by pneumatic rubber actuator.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shin; Ando, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Ohashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Sakae; Joung, Sanghyun; Park, Il-Hyung; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    In femoral fracture reduction, orthopedic surgeons must pull distal bone fragments with great traction force and return them to their correct positions, by referring to 2D-fluoroscopic images. Since this method is physically burdensome, the introduction of robotic assistance is desirable. While such robots have been developed, adequate control methods have not yet been established because of the lack of experimental data. It is difficult to obtain accurate data using cadavers or animals because they are different from the living human body's muscle characteristics and anatomy. Therefore, an experimental model for simulating human femoral characteristics is required. In this research, human muscles are reproduced using a McKibben-type pneumatic rubber actuator (artificial muscle) to develop a model that simulates typical femur muscles using artificial muscles.

  6. SDU 6 MODELING STUDY TO SUPPORT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.

    2012-05-02

    In response to Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0017 (1), SRNL performed modeling studies to evaluate alternative design features for the 32 million gallon Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) referred to as SDU 6. This initial modeling study was intended to assess the performance of major components of the structure that are most significant to the PA. Information provided by the modeling will support the development of a SDU 6 Preliminary Design Model and Recommendation Report to be written by SRR Closure and Waste Disposal Authority. Key inputs and assumptions for the modeling were provided to SRNL in SRR-SPT-2011-00113 (2). A table reiterates the base case and four sensitivity case studies requested in this reference. In general, as shown in Table 4, when compared to Vault 2 Case A, the Base Case SDU 6 design produced higher peak fluxes to the water table during the 10,000 year period of analysis but lower peak fluxes within a 15,000 to 20,000 time frame. SDU 6 will contain approximately ten times the inventory of a single Vault 2 and the SDU 6 footprint is comparable to that of a group of four Vault 2 disposal units. Therefore, the radionuclide flux from SDU 6 and that from a single Vault 2 are not directly comparable. A more direct comparison would be to compare the maximum dose obtained at the 100 m boundary from the seven SDU's that will replace the 64 FDC's analyzed in the 2009 PA. This analysis will be performed in the next set of calculations planned for SDU design evaluation. Aquifer transport and dose calculations were not intended to be part of this initial scoping study. However, results from this study do indicate that replacement of the FDC design with SDU would not yield significantly higher peak doses. If the thickness of the SDU 6 floor is increased, peak doses would not occur during the 10,000 year period of analysis.

  7. ASPEN PLUS modeling of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Task 19: modeling support activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-28

    The APCI version of ASPEN PLUS was maintained and enhanced in order to support the requirements of the simulation effort described in the earlier tasks. The support effort is conveniently divided into systems support and technical support in the areas of flowsheeting and thermophysical properties. Systems support required installation of the fourth release of ASPEN PLUS, installation of AspenTech's updates to correct program errors, and several general maintenance tasks unique to the APCI version of ASPEN PLUS. Technical support in the area of flowsheeting consisted of the organization of training courses, consultation in solving simulation problems, and identifying and resolving problems resulting from bugs in ASPEN PLUS. Thermodynamic technical support consisted of developing a few new models, implementing the coal-fluid thermophysical models into ASPEN PLUS, providing convenient access to the physical properties through INSERTs, and consultation to resolve simulation problems resulting from the nonideality of the properties. All software enhancements to ASPEN PLUS have been described and delivered so that APCI's version of the program may be duplicated and maintained at other sites. 16 references.

  8. Developing an Information Technology Support Model for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesner, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Babson College (Massachusetts) responded to expanded campus computer use and resulting demand for support services by developing service delivery tailored to user groups' needs. Resources devoted to this effort have grown dramatically, and include help desk and dispatch support, program of technology specialists, evening support to residence…

  9. Is there a need for hydrological modelling in decision support systems for nuclear emergencies.

    PubMed

    Raskob, W; Heling, R; Zheleznyak, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of hydrological modelling in decision support systems for nuclear emergencies. In particular, most recent developments such as, the radionuclide transport models integrated in to the decision support system RODOS will be explored. Recent progress in the implementation of physically-based distributed hydrological models for operational forecasting in national and supranational centres, may support a closer cooperation between national hydrological services and therefore, strengthen the use of hydrological and radiological models implemented in decision support systems.

  10. An allosteric model of the molecular interactions of excitation- contraction coupling in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A contact interaction is proposed to exist between the voltage sensor of the transverse tubular membrane of skeletal muscle and the calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This interaction is given a quantitative formulation inspired in the Monod, Wyman, and Changeux model of allosteric transitions in hemoglobin (Monod, J., J. Wyman, and J.-P. Changeux. 1965. Journal of Molecular Biology. 12:88- 118), and analogous to one proposed by Marks and Jones for voltage- dependent Ca channels (Marks, T. N., and S. W. Jones. 1992. Journal of General Physiology. 99:367-390). The allosteric protein is the calcium release channel, a homotetramer, with two accessible states, closed and open. The kinetics and equilibrium of this transition are modulated by voltage sensors (dihydropyridine receptors) pictured as four units per release channel, each undergoing independent voltage-driven transitions between two states (resting and activating). For each voltage sensor that moves to the activating state, the tendency of the channel to open increases by an equal (large) factor. The equilibrium and kinetic equations of the model are solved and shown to reproduce well a number of experimentally measured relationships including: charge movement (Q) vs. voltage, open probability of the release channel (Po) vs. voltage, the transfer function relationship Po vs. Q, and the kinetics of charge movement, release activation, and deactivation. The main consequence of the assumption of allosteric coupling is that primary effects on the release channel are transmitted backward to the voltage sensor and give secondary effects. Thus, the model reproduces well the effects of perchlorate, described in the two previous articles, under the assumption that the primary effect is to increase the intrinsic tendency of the release channel to open, with no direct effects on the voltage sensor. This modification of the open-closed equilibrium of the release channel causes a shift in the

  11. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, October--December 1992. Progress review No. 73, quarter ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Accomplishments for this quarter ending December 31, 1992 are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; reservoir classes; and novel technology.

  12. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1992. Progress review No. 72, quarter ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: Chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

  13. Characterization of infiltration rates from landfills: supporting groundwater modeling efforts.

    PubMed

    Moo-Young, Horace; Johnson, Barnes; Johnson, Ann; Carson, David; Lew, Christine; Liu, Salley; Hancocks, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to characterize infiltration rates from landfill liners to support groundwater modeling efforts. The focus of this investigation was on collecting studies that describe the performance of liners 'as installed' or 'as operated'. This document reviews the state of the science and practice on the infiltration rate through compacted clay liner (CCL) for 149 sites and geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) for 1 site. In addition, it reviews the leakage rate through geomembrane (GM) liners and composite liners for 259 sites. For compacted clay liners (CCL), there was limited information on infiltration rates (i.e., only 9 sites reported infiltration rates.), thus, it was difficult to develop a national distribution. The field hydraulic conductivities for natural clay liners range from 1 x 10(-9) cm s(-1) to 1 x 10(-4) cm s(-1), with an average of 6.5 x 10(-8) cm s(-1). There was limited information on geosynthetic clay liner. For composite lined and geomembrane systems, the leak detection system flow rates were utilized. The average monthly flow rate for composite liners ranged from 0-32 lphd for geomembrane and GCL systems to 0 to 1410 lphd for geomembrane and CCL systems. The increased infiltration for the geomembrane and CCL system may be attributed to consolidation water from the clay.

  14. Actin Assembly at Model-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Heath, George R.; Johnson, Benjamin R.G.; Olmsted, Peter D.; Connell, Simon D.; Evans, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the use of supported lipid bilayers to reveal dynamics of actin polymerization from a nonpolymerizing subphase via cationic phospholipids. Using varying fractions of charged lipid, lipid mobility, and buffer conditions, we show that dynamics at the nanoscale can be used to control the self-assembly of these structures. In the case of fluid-phase lipid bilayers, the actin adsorbs to form a uniform two-dimensional layer with complete surface coverage whereas gel-phase bilayers induce a network of randomly oriented actin filaments, of lower coverage. Reducing the pH increased the polymerization rate, the number of nucleation events, and the total coverage of actin. A model of the adsorption/diffusion process is developed to provide a description of the experimental data and shows that, in the case of fluid-phase bilayers, polymerization arises equally due to the adsorption and diffusion of surface-bound monomers and the addition of monomers directly from the solution phase. In contrast, in the case of gel-phase bilayers, polymerization is dominated by the addition of monomers from solution. In both cases, the filaments are stable for long times even when the G-actin is removed from the supernatant—making this a practical approach for creating stable lipid-actin systems via self-assembly. PMID:24268147

  15. AgBase: supporting functional modeling in agricultural organisms

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Fiona M.; Gresham, Cathy R.; Buza, Teresia J.; Chouvarine, Philippe; Pillai, Lakshmi R.; Kumar, Ranjit; Ozkan, Seval; Wang, Hui; Manda, Prashanti; Arick, Tony; Bridges, Susan M.; Burgess, Shane C.

    2011-01-01

    AgBase (http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/) provides resources to facilitate modeling of functional genomics data and structural and functional annotation of agriculturally important animal, plant, microbe and parasite genomes. The website is redesigned to improve accessibility and ease of use, including improved search capabilities. Expanded capabilities include new dedicated pages for horse, cat, dog, cotton, rice and soybean. We currently provide 590 240 Gene Ontology (GO) annotations to 105 454 gene products in 64 different species, including GO annotations linked to transcripts represented on agricultural microarrays. For many of these arrays, this provides the only functional annotation available. GO annotations are available for download and we provide comprehensive, species-specific GO annotation files for 18 different organisms. The tools available at AgBase have been expanded and several existing tools improved based upon user feedback. One of seven new tools available at AgBase, GOModeler, supports hypothesis testing from functional genomics data. We host several associated databases and provide genome browsers for three agricultural pathogens. Moreover, we provide comprehensive training resources (including worked examples and tutorials) via links to Educational Resources at the AgBase website. PMID:21075795

  16. Support for an Evolutionary Model of AGN Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultzin, D.

    2015-09-01

    I will present our recent results (2013-2015) on the role of the environment in the nuclear activity of interacting Galaxies, all of which support an evolutionary sequence in the nuclear activity. We studied close galactic pairs of similar mass in the local Universe. We analyzed 385 spectra of S S, E E, and E S pairs, and try to disentangle the role of morphology on induced activity . We compare with our own sample of bona fide isolated galaxies containing a statistically significant number of all morphological types. Our main results are in conflict with the simplest version of the so called Unified Model (UM), and suggest that high accretion rates are essential to form the Broad Line Region in active galaxies. We also investigated the structure of the dusty torus surrounding Syfert 1 and 2 nuclei, both in pairs and isolated. The results also lead to a disagreement with the UM. Finally, we present our results on the Nuclear Activity in the context of the evolution of Compact Groups of galaxies over the past 3 Gyrs. Our analysis is based on the largest multiwavelength compact group sample to-date, and the results are also in conflict with an orientation obscuration effect alone.

  17. Integrated developmental model of life-support capabilities in wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darnell, R. L.; Obrien, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a model for CO2, O2, H2O, and nitrogen use during the life cycle of wheat. Spreadsheets and accompanying graphs were developed to illustrate plant population reactions to environmental parameters established in the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program at Kennedy Space Center, Fl. The spreadsheets and graphs were produced using validated biomass production chamber (BPC) data from BWT931. Conditions of the BPC during the 83 day plant growth period were as follows: The BPC area is 27.8 m(exp 2), volume is 113 m(exp 3). Temperatures during the 83 day plant growth period ranged from 16.3 to 24.8 C during the light cycle (except for day 69, when the minimum and maximum temperatures were 7.7 C and 7.9 C, respectively) and 14.5 C and 23.6 C during the dark cycle (except for day 49, when the minimum and maximum temperatures were 11.1 C and 11.3 C, respectively). Relative humidity was 85 percent for the first seven days of plant growth, and 70 percent thereafter. The plant leaf canopy area was 10 m(exp 2). Presented is a list and explanation of each spreadsheet and accompanying graph(s), conditions under which the data were collected, and formulas used to obtain each result.

  18. 78 FR 13710 - Analysis of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventories

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Enterprise IT Helpdesk Support Services; and R704 Agency Audit Services. R407--The contract representing R407... in the amount of $1,588,851. This contract provides Enterprise IT Helpdesk Support Services for...

  19. Connecting Biochemical Photosynthesis Models with Crop Models to Support Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Alex; Song, Youhong; van Oosterom, Erik J.; Hammer, Graeme L.

    2016-01-01

    The next advance in field crop productivity will likely need to come from improving crop use efficiency of resources (e.g., light, water, and nitrogen), aspects of which are closely linked with overall crop photosynthetic efficiency. Progress in genetic manipulation of photosynthesis is confounded by uncertainties of consequences at crop level because of difficulties connecting across scales. Crop growth and development simulation models that integrate across biological levels of organization and use a gene-to-phenotype modeling approach may present a way forward. There has been a long history of development of crop models capable of simulating dynamics of crop physiological attributes. Many crop models incorporate canopy photosynthesis (source) as a key driver for crop growth, while others derive crop growth from the balance between source- and sink-limitations. Modeling leaf photosynthesis has progressed from empirical modeling via light response curves to a more mechanistic basis, having clearer links to the underlying biochemical processes of photosynthesis. Cross-scale modeling that connects models at the biochemical and crop levels and utilizes developments in upscaling leaf-level models to canopy models has the potential to bridge the gap between photosynthetic manipulation at the biochemical level and its consequences on crop productivity. Here we review approaches to this emerging cross-scale modeling framework and reinforce the need for connections across levels of modeling. Further, we propose strategies for connecting biochemical models of photosynthesis into the cross-scale modeling framework to support crop improvement through photosynthetic manipulation. PMID:27790232

  20. Modeling, design and validation of a novel microfluidic sensor for in-vitro isotonic measurement of microvessel contraction/dilation.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Ivano; Dario, Paolo

    2007-02-01

    The paper presents an innovative fluidic microdevice for in-vitro isotonic measurements of microvessel contraction/dilation. The proposed microdevice is based on the well-known fluid dynamic principle which correlates a geometrical change of a solid body immersed in a constant flow, with the differential pressure change induced in the flow itself. Indeed, a biochemically-induced change of microvessel diameter lead to a change of its hydraulic resistance which can be in-vitro measured by a differential pressure sensor. The novel microfluidic sensor has been modeled, designed and fabricated in order to properly implement this working principle. The fluidic scheme of the sensor consists of two pressure-sensorized chambers which are connected by a calibrated channel where the microvessel is placed. Experimental tests have been performed by using three microvessel passive simulators with different inner diameter (300, 600 and 800 microm), in order to validate the expected sensor functioning characterized by two sensitivities: the pressure drop S (PL) and the overall S 2-3 ones. Their measured values (S (PL,m)=2.132 mV/V/Pa, S (2-3,m)=0.787 mV/V/(mm3/s)/mm) confirm the validity of the proposed working principle and permit to be confident in a future application of the sensor in a clinical context.

  1. A Conceptual Model of Structured Support in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Vanessa; Buchanan, Alice M.; Rudisill, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Schools implement Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS) as a way of meeting students' needs in classrooms. PBIS focuses on tiered instruction. Tiered instruction is a teaching strategy in which the educator implements incremental changes that increase supports based on students' needs--academic or behavioral. Yet, tiered instruction…

  2. Cause and Event: Supporting Causal Claims through Logistic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Ann A.; Gray, DeLeon L.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to identify and support credible causal claims have received intense interest in the research community, particularly over the past few decades. In this paper, we focus on the use of statistical procedures designed to support causal claims for a treatment or intervention when the response variable of interest is dichotomous. We identify…

  3. Essays on incomplete contracts in regulatory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Eduardo Humberto

    This dissertation consists of three essays. The first essay, The Hold-Up Problem in Public Infrastructure Franchising, characterizes the equilibria of the investment decisions in public infrastructure franchising under incomplete contracting and ex-post renegotiation. The parties (government and a firm) are unable to credibly commit to the contracted investment plan, so that a second step investment is renegotiated by the parties at the revision stage. As expected, the possibility of renegotiation affects initial non-verifiable investments. The main conclusion of this essay is that not only underinvestment but also overinvestment in infrastructure may arise in equilibrium, compared to the complete contracting case. The second essay, Alternative Institutional Arrangements in Network Utilities: An Incomplete Contracting Approach, presents a theoretical assessment of the efficiency implications of privatizing natural monopolies which are vertically related to potential competitive firms. Based on the incomplete contracts and asymmetric information paradigm. I develop a model that analyzes the relative advantages of different institutional arrangements---alternative ownership and market structures in the industry--- in terms of their allocative and productive efficiencies. The main policy conclusion of this essay is that both ownership and the existence of conglomerates in network industries matter. Among other conclusions, this essay provides an economic rationale for a mixed economy in which the network is public and vertical separation of the industry when the natural monopoly is under private ownership. The last essay, Opportunistic Behavior and Legal Disputes in the Chilean Electricity Sector, analyzes post-contractual disputes in this newly privatized industry. It discusses the presumption that opportunistic behavior and disputes arise due to inadequate market design, ambiguous regulation, and institutional weaknesses. This chapter also assesses the presumption

  4. Increased Ang II Contraction of the Uterine Artery at Early Gestation in A Transgenic Model of Hypertensive Pregnancy is Reduced by Inhibition of Endocannabinoid Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pulgar, Victor M.; Yamaleyeva, Liliya M.; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne M.; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Howlett, Allyn C.; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2014-01-01

    Increased vascular sensitivity to Ang II is a marker of a hypertensive human pregnancy. Recent evidence of interactions between the RAS and the endocannabinoid system (ECS) suggests that anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) may modulate Ang II contraction. We hypothesized that these interactions may contribute to the enhanced vascular responses in hypertensive pregnancy. We studied Ang II contraction in isolated uterine artery (UA) at early gestation in a rat model that mimics many features of preeclampsia, the transgenic hAGN×hREN (TgA), and control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. We determined the role of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 by blockade with SR171416A, and the contribution of AEA and 2-AG degradation to Ang II contraction by inhibiting their hydrolyzing enzymes FAAH (with URB597) or MAGL (with JZL184) respectively. TgA UA showed increased maximal contraction and sensitivity to Ang II that was inhibited by indomethacin. FAAH blockade decreased Ang IIMAX in SD UA, and decreased both Ang IIMAX and sensitivity in TgA UA. MAGL blockade had no effect on SD UA and decreased Ang IIMAX and sensitivity in TgA UA. Blockade of the CB1 receptor in TgA UA had no effect. Immunolocalization of FAAH and MAGL showed a similar pattern between groups; FAAH predominantly localized in endothelium and MAGL in smooth muscle cells. We demonstrated an increased Ang II contraction in TgA UA before initiation of the hypertensive phenotype. AEA and 2-AG reduced Ang II contraction in a CB1-independent manner. These RAS-ECS interactions may contribute to the enhanced vascular reactivity in early stages of hypertensive pregnancy. PMID:24935942

  5. Increased angiotensin II contraction of the uterine artery at early gestation in a transgenic model of hypertensive pregnancy is reduced by inhibition of endocannabinoid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pulgar, Victor M; Yamaleyeva, Liliya M; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne M; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Howlett, Allyn C; Brosnihan, K Bridget

    2014-09-01

    Increased vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II (Ang II) is a marker of a hypertensive human pregnancy. Recent evidence of interactions between the renin-angiotensin system and the endocannabinoid system suggests that anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol may modulate Ang II contraction. We hypothesized that these interactions may contribute to the enhanced vascular responses in hypertensive pregnancy. We studied Ang II contraction in isolated uterine artery (UA) at early gestation in a rat model that mimics many features of preeclampsia, the transgenic human angiotensinogen×human renin (TgA), and control Sprague-Dawley rats. We determined the role of the cannabinoid receptor 1 by blockade with SR171416A, and the contribution of anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol degradation to Ang II contraction by inhibiting their hydrolyzing enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (with URB597) or monoacylglycerol lipase (with JZL184), respectively. TgA UA showed increased maximal contraction and sensitivity to Ang II that was inhibited by indomethacin. Fatty acid amide hydrolase blockade decreased Ang IIMAX in Sprague-Dawley UA, and decreased both Ang IIMAX and sensitivity in TgA UA. Monoacylglycerol lipase blockade had no effect on Sprague-Dawley UA and decreased Ang IIMAX and sensitivity in TgA UA. Blockade of the cannabinoid receptor 1 in TgA UA had no effect. Immunolocalization of fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase showed a similar pattern between groups; fatty acid amide hydrolase predominantly localized in endothelium and monoacylglycerol lipase in smooth muscle cells. We demonstrated an increased Ang II contraction in TgA UA before initiation of the hypertensive phenotype. Anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol reduced Ang II contraction in a cannabinoid receptor 1-independent manner. These renin-angiotensin system-endocannabinoid system interactions may contribute to the enhanced vascular reactivity in early stages of hypertensive pregnancy. PMID

  6. Modelling evolution on design-by-contract predicts an origin of Life through an abiotic double-stranded RNA world

    PubMed Central

    de Roos, Albert DG

    2007-01-01

    Background It is generally believed that life first evolved from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) that both stored genetic information and catalyzed the reactions required for self-replication. Presentation of the hypothesis By modeling early genome evolution on the engineering paradigm design-by-contract, an alternative scenario is presented in which life started with the appearance of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as an informational storage molecule while catalytic single-stranded RNA was derived from this dsRNA template later in evolution. Testing the hypothesis It was investigated whether this scenario could be implemented mechanistically by starting with abiotic processes. Double-stranded RNA could be formed abiotically by hybridization of oligoribonucleotides that are subsequently non-enzymatically ligated into a double-stranded chain. Thermal cycling driven by the diurnal temperature cycles could then replicate this dsRNA when strands of dsRNA separate and later rehybridize and ligate to reform dsRNA. A temperature-dependent partial replication of specific regions of dsRNA could produce the first template-based generation of catalytic ssRNA, similar to the developmental gene transcription process. Replacement of these abiotic processes by enzymatic processes would guarantee functional continuity. Further transition from a dsRNA to a dsDNA world could be based on minor mutations in template and substrate recognition sites of an RNA polymerase and would leave all existing processes intact. Implications of the hypothesis Modeling evolution on a design pattern, the 'dsRNA first' hypothesis can provide an alternative mechanistic evolutionary scenario for the origin of our genome that preserves functional continuity. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Anthony Poole, Eugene Koonin and Eugene Shakhnovich PMID:17466073

  7. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 34, quarter ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Linville, B.

    1983-07-01

    Progress achieved for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; and thermal/heavy oil. In addition, progress reports are presented for: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovered by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research. (ATT)

  8. The Effects of the Coordination Support on Shared Mental Models and Coordinated Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyunsong; Kim, Dongsik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coordination support (tool support and tutor support) on the development of shared mental models (SMMs) and coordinated action in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment. Eighteen students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions, including the tool condition, the…

  9. Logic Models as a Way to Support Online Students and Their Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strycker, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    As online enrollment continues to grow, students may need additional pedagogical supports to increase their likelihood of success in online environments that don't offer the same supports as those found in face to face classrooms. Logic models are a way to provide such support to students by helping to model project expectations, allowing students…

  10. Russian Contract Procurement Document

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2010-03-29

    This contract supports the enhancement of physical protection or nuclear material control and accounting systems at institutes or enterprises of the newly independent states under the material protection control and accounting (MPC&A) program. The contract is entered into pursuant to the MPC&A Program, a gratuitous technical assistance program, in accordance with the bilateral Agreements between the Russian Federation and the United States of America concerning the Safe and Secure Transportation, Storage and Destruction of Weapons and the Prevention of Weapons Proliferation of June 1992, as extended and amended by Protocol signed of June 1999, Agreement between the Government of the Russian Federation regarding Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Materials Physical Protection, Control and Accounting of October 1999 and the Russian Federation law of May 1999 on the taxation exemption of gratuitous technical assistance with Russian Federation under registration No.DOE001000.

  11. Modeling snail breeding in Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Nickolay Manukovsky, D..

    It is known that snail meat is a high quality food that is rich in protein. Hence, heliciculture or land snail farming spreads worldwide because it is a profitable business. The possibility to use the snails of Helix pomatia in Biological Life Support System (BLSS) was studied by Japanese Researches. In that study land snails were considered to be producers of animal protein. Also, snail breeding was an important part of waste processing, because snails were capable to eat the inedible plant biomass. As opposed to the agricultural snail farming, heliciculture in BLSS should be more carefully planned. The purpose of our work was to develop a model for snail breeding in BLSS that can predict mass flow rates in and out of snail facility. There are three linked parts in the model called “Stoichiometry”, “Population” and “Mass balance”, which are used in turn. Snail population is divided into 12 age groups from oviposition to one year. In the submodel “Stoichiometry” the individual snail growth and metabolism in each of 12 age groups are described with stoichiometry equations. Reactants are written on the left side of the equations, while products are written on the right side. Stoichiometry formulas of reactants and products consist of four chemical elements: C, H, O, N. The reactants are feed and oxygen, products are carbon dioxide, metabolic water, snail meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs. If formulas of substances in the stoichiometry equations are substituted with their molar masses, then stoichiometry equations are transformed to the equations of molar mass balance. To get the real mass balance of individual snail growth and metabolism one should multiply the value of each molar mass in the equations on the scale parameter, which is the ratio between mass of monthly consumed feed and molar mass of feed. Mass of monthly consumed feed and stoichiometry coefficients of formulas of meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs should be determined experimentally

  12. Artificial intelligence support for scientific model-building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time-intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot easily be distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientific development team to understand. We believe that artificial intelligence techniques can facilitate both the model-building and model-sharing process. In this paper, we overview our effort to build a scientific modeling software tool that aids the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high-level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities.

  13. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different…

  14. 48 CFR 2442.1107 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... analytical nature (e.g., applied social science research); and (3) The contract requires the delivery of an overall end product (e.g., evaluation, study, model). (b) The Contracting Officer shall use the basic... value of $500,000 or less. (d) The clause shall not be used in contracts for information...

  15. Support interference of wind tunnel models: A selective annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.; Gloss, B. B.

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography, with abstracts, consists of 143 citations arranged in chronological order by dates of publication. Selection of the citations was made for their relevance to the problems involved in understanding or avoiding support interference in wind tunnel testing throughout the Mach number range. An author index is included.

  16. Support interference of wind tunnel models: A selective annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.; Lawing, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography, with abstracts, consists of 143 citations arranged in chronological order by dates of publication. Selection of the citations was made for their relevance to the problems involved in understanding or avoiding support interference in wind tunnel testing throughout the Mach number range. An author index is included.

  17. Test of a Mediation Model of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zhen Xiong; Aryee, Samuel; Lee, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the mediating influence of trust in organization (TIO) and organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) on the relationship between perceived organization support (POS) and its work outcomes. Data were obtained from employee-supervisor dyads from multiple organizations located in a major city in southern China. Structural equation…

  18. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students' emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter et al. in "Early Child Res Q" 26:96-109, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter and Van Norman in "Early…

  19. Developing a Language Support Model for Mainstream Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Elspeth; Ellis, Sue; Boyle, James; Turnbull, Mary; Kerr, Jane

    2010-01-01

    In the UK, speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with teachers to support children with language impairment (LI) in mainstream schools. Consultancy approaches are often used, where SLTs advise educational staff who then deliver language-learning activities. However, some research suggests that schools may not always sustain activities as…

  20. Contracting and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The potential gains in efficiency of three types of contracts in college administration are contrasted. Contract types include explicit contracts in the budgeting process between the state and higher education institutions; institutional contracting for inputs; and interinstitutional contracting. The tradeoff between production cost savings and…

  1. Processing experiments on non-Czochralski silicon sheet (MEPSDU support contract). Quarterly technical report No. 1, 14 October 1980-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, R.

    1980-01-01

    A program of six months duration has been initiated to support and promote the further development of processing techniques which may be successfully and cost-effectively applied to low-cost non-Czochralski silicon sheet for solar cell fabrication. Work is proceeding and results are reported in the areas of process technology, cell design, cell metallization, and production cost simulation.

  2. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 82, quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This document consists of a list of projects supporting work on oil recovery programs. A publications list and index of companies and institutions is provided. The remaining portion of the document provides brief descriptions on projects in chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, resource assessment, and reservoir class field demonstrations.

  3. The 12-foot pressure wind tunnel restoration project model support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Glen E.

    1992-01-01

    The 12 Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel is a variable density, low turbulence wind tunnel that operates at subsonic speeds, and up to six atmospheres total pressure. The restoration of this facility is of critical importance to the future of the U.S. aerospace industry. As part of this project, several state of the art model support systems are furnished to provide an optimal balance between aerodynamic and operational efficiency parameters. Two model support systems, the Rear Strut Model Support, and the High Angle of Attack Model Support are discussed. This paper covers design parameters, constraints, development, description, and component selection.

  4. Community Mobilization Model Applied to Support Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jacque; Bruce, Ann; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly; Fruhauf, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the application of a community mobilization model through a case study of one community's response to address the needs of grandparents raising grandchildren. The community mobilization model presented is one that is replicable in addressing diverse community identified issues. Discussed is the building of the partnerships,…

  5. ESTABLISHMENT OF A COMMUNITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS SUPPORT MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the fall of 2001, a Cooperative Research Agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and MCNC began a Community Modeling and Analysis System (CMAS) center. The CMAS will foster development, distribution, and use of the Models-3/CMAQ (Community Multiscale ...

  6. Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model: Contemporary Support for an Established Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossman, Donna Cangelosi

    2010-01-01

    This study was an effort to add to the body of research surrounding Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model (BEM). The model was tested to determine its ability to explain factor relationships of organizational safety culture in a high-risk work environment. Three contextual variables were measured: communication, resource availability, and…

  7. Supporting an Externally Developed Model of Education in Greenland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tasha R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the adaptation process of an externally developed model of reform in Greenland's educational system. Under investigation was how reform leaders responded to the needs of the community after implementing an educational model developed in the United States by researchers at the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and…

  8. Bereavement Support in an Acute Hospital: An Irish Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Trish; Foreman, Maeve; Curry, Philip; O'Driscoll, Siobhan; McCormack, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the first Irish study to examine a hospital-based bereavement care program, 1 year's cohort of bereaved people was surveyed. A response rate of over 40% provided 339 completed questionnaires from bereaved next-of-kin. The findings suggest that a tiered pyramid model of bereavement care (the Beaumont model) may be functional in a number of ways.…

  9. Feedback Model to Support Designers of Blended-Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Hans G. K.

    2006-01-01

    Although extensive research has been carried out, describing the role of feedback in education, and many theoretical models are yet available, procedures and guidelines for actually designing and implementing feedback in practice have remained scarce so far. This explorative study presents a preliminary six-phase design model for feedback…

  10. The effect of temperature on basal tension and thyroarytenoid muscle contraction in an isolated rat glottis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2014-10-01

    The pitch of voice is closely related to the vocal fold tension, which is the end result of coordinated movement of the intralaryngeal muscles, and especially the thyroarytenoid muscle. It is known that vocal quality may be affected by surrounding temperature; however, the effect of temperature on vocal fold tension is mostly unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature on isolated rat glottis and thyroarytenoid muscle contraction induced by electrical field stimulation. In vitro isometric tension of the glottis ring from 30 Sprague-Dawley rats was continuously recorded by the tissue bath method. Electrical field stimulation was applied to the glottis ring with two wire electrodes placed parallel to the glottis and connected to a direct-current stimulator. The tension changes of the rat glottis rings that were either untreated or treated with electrical field stimulation were recorded continuously at temperatures from 37 to 7 °C or from 7 to 37 °C. Warming from 7 to 37 °C increased the basal tension of the glottis rings and decreased the electrical field stimulation-induced glottis ring contraction, which was chiefly due to thyroarytenoid muscle contraction. In comparison, cooling from 37 to 7 °C decreased the basal tension and enhanced glottis ring contraction by electrical field stimulation. We concluded that warming increased the basal tension of the glottis in vitro and decreased the amplitude of electrical field stimulation-induced thyroarytenoid muscle contraction. Thus, vocal pitch and the fine tuning of vocal fold tension might be affected by temperature in vivo.

  11. Phylogenies support out-of-equilibrium models of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Manceau, Marc; Lambert, Amaury; Morlon, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    There is a long tradition in ecology of studying models of biodiversity at equilibrium. These models, including the influential Neutral Theory of Biodiversity, have been successful at predicting major macroecological patterns, such as species abundance distributions. But they have failed to predict macroevolutionary patterns, such as those captured in phylogenetic trees. Here, we develop a model of biodiversity in which all individuals have identical demographic rates, metacommunity size is allowed to vary stochastically according to population dynamics, and speciation arises naturally from the accumulation of point mutations. We show that this model generates phylogenies matching those observed in nature if the metacommunity is out of equilibrium. We develop a likelihood inference framework that allows fitting our model to empirical phylogenies, and apply this framework to various mammalian families. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that biodiversity dynamics are out of equilibrium.

  12. Experimental support for a model of birdsong production.

    PubMed

    Mindlin, G B; Gardner, T J; Goller, F; Suthers, R

    2003-10-01

    In this work we present an experimental validation of a recently proposed model for the production of birdsongs. We have previously observed that driving the model with simple functions of time, which represent tensions in vocal muscles, produces a wide variety of sounds resembling birdsongs. In this work we drive the model with functions whose time dependence comes from recordings of muscle activities and air sac pressure. We simultaneously recorded the birds' songs and compared them with the synthetic songs. The model produces recognizable songs. Beyond finding a qualitative agreement, we also test some predictions of the model concerning the relative levels of activity in the gating muscles at the beginning and end of a syllable.

  13. Experimental support for a model of birdsong production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindlin, G. B.; Gardner, T. J.; Goller, F.; Suthers, R.

    2003-10-01

    In this work we present an experimental validation of a recently proposed model for the production of birdsongs. We have previously observed that driving the model with simple functions of time, which represent tensions in vocal muscles, produces a wide variety of sounds resembling birdsongs. In this work we drive the model with functions whose time dependence comes from recordings of muscle activities and air sac pressure. We simultaneously recorded the birds’ songs and compared them with the synthetic songs. The model produces recognizable songs. Beyond finding a qualitative agreement, we also test some predictions of the model concerning the relative levels of activity in the gating muscles at the beginning and end of a syllable.

  14. Experimental support for a model of birdsong production.

    PubMed

    Mindlin, G B; Gardner, T J; Goller, F; Suthers, R

    2003-10-01

    In this work we present an experimental validation of a recently proposed model for the production of birdsongs. We have previously observed that driving the model with simple functions of time, which represent tensions in vocal muscles, produces a wide variety of sounds resembling birdsongs. In this work we drive the model with functions whose time dependence comes from recordings of muscle activities and air sac pressure. We simultaneously recorded the birds' songs and compared them with the synthetic songs. The model produces recognizable songs. Beyond finding a qualitative agreement, we also test some predictions of the model concerning the relative levels of activity in the gating muscles at the beginning and end of a syllable. PMID:14682974

  15. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  16. Computational simulation of human upper airway collapse using a pressure-/state-dependent model of genioglossal muscle contraction under laminar flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaqi; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P.

    2012-01-01

    A three-element, pressure- and state (sleep and wake) -dependent contraction model of the genioglossal muscle was developed based on the microstructure of skeletal muscle and the cross-bridge theory. This model establishes a direct connection between the contractile forces generated in muscle fibers and the measured electromyogram signals during various upper airway conditions. This effectively avoids the difficulty of determining muscle shortening velocity during complex pharyngeal conditions when modeling the muscle’s contractile behaviors. The activation of the genioglossal muscle under different conditions was then simulated. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of varying each modeled parameter on the muscle’s contractile behaviors. This muscle contraction model was then incorporated into our anatomically correct, two-dimensional computational model of the pharyngeal airway to perform a finite-element analysis of air flow, tissue deformation, and airway collapse. The model-predicted muscle deformations are consistent with previous observations regarding upper airway behavior in normal subjects. PMID:15831800

  17. Dependability breakeven point mathematical model for production - quality strategy support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilcu, Adrian; Verzea, Ion; Chaib, Rachid

    2016-08-01

    This paper connects the field of dependability system with the production-quality strategies through a new mathematical model based on breakeven points. The novelties consist in the identification of the parameters of dependability system which, in safety control, represents the degree to which an item is capable of performing its required function at any randomly chosen time during its specified operating period disregarding non-operation related influences, as well as the analysis of the production-quality strategies, defining a mathematical model based on a new concept - dependability breakeven points, model validation on datasets and shows the practical applicability of this new approach.

  18. AgRISTARS. Supporting research: Algorithms for scene modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rassbach, M. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The requirements for a comprehensive analysis of LANDSAT or other visual data scenes are defined. The development of a general model of a scene and a computer algorithm for finding the particular model for a given scene is discussed. The modelling system includes a boundary analysis subsystem, which detects all the boundaries and lines in the image and builds a boundary graph; a continuous variation analysis subsystem, which finds gradual variations not well approximated by a boundary structure; and a miscellaneous features analysis, which includes texture, line parallelism, etc. The noise reduction capabilities of this method and its use in image rectification and registration are discussed.

  19. ScienceWare's Model-It: Technology to Support Authentic Science Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soloway, Elliot; Pryor, Amanda Z.; Krajcik, Joseph S.; Jackson, Shari; Stratford, Steven J.; Wisnudel, Michele; Klein, John T.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development of Model-It, a ScienceWare software tool developed by the University of Michigan in collaboration with high school science teachers to support learners in building qualitative models and then move to more quantitative models. Highlights include modeling versus simulation and assessing the impact of Model-It. (LRW)

  20. Control and modeling of a CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auslander, D. M.; Spear, R. C.; Babcock, P. S.; Nadel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Research topics that arise from the conceptualization of control for closed life support systems which are life support systems in which all or most of the mass is recycled are discussed. Modeling and control of uncertain and poorly defined systems, resource allocation in closed life support systems, and control structures or systems with delay and closure are emphasized.

  1. An Elaborated Model of Student Support to Allow for Gender Considerations in Asian Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Insung; Seongyoun, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that distance education (DE) students regard learner support systems as the key element in quality provision. This study sought to identify the key concerns of Asian DE students regarding support provision in different types of DE and dual-mode providers and formulate a student support model which took account of gender issues.…

  2. Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

    2013-11-30

    In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed

  3. Decision Support Model for Introduction of Gamification Solution Using AHP

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gamification means the use of various elements of game design in nongame contexts including workplace collaboration, marketing, education, military, and medical services. Gamification is effective for both improving workplace productivity and motivating employees. However, introduction of gamification is not easy because the planning and implementation processes of gamification are very complicated and it needs interdisciplinary knowledge such as information systems, organization behavior, and human psychology. Providing a systematic decision making method for gamification process is the purpose of this paper. This paper suggests the decision criteria for selection of gamification platform to support a systematic decision making process for managements. The criteria are derived from previous works on gamification, introduction of information systems, and analytic hierarchy process. The weights of decision criteria are calculated through a survey by the professionals on game, information systems, and business administration. The analytic hierarchy process is used to derive the weights. The decision criteria and weights provided in this paper could support the managements to make a systematic decision for selection of gamification platform. PMID:24892075

  4. Decision support model for introduction of gamification solution using AHP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangkyun

    2014-01-01

    Gamification means the use of various elements of game design in nongame contexts including workplace collaboration, marketing, education, military, and medical services. Gamification is effective for both improving workplace productivity and motivating employees. However, introduction of gamification is not easy because the planning and implementation processes of gamification are very complicated and it needs interdisciplinary knowledge such as information systems, organization behavior, and human psychology. Providing a systematic decision making method for gamification process is the purpose of this paper. This paper suggests the decision criteria for selection of gamification platform to support a systematic decision making process for managements. The criteria are derived from previous works on gamification, introduction of information systems, and analytic hierarchy process. The weights of decision criteria are calculated through a survey by the professionals on game, information systems, and business administration. The analytic hierarchy process is used to derive the weights. The decision criteria and weights provided in this paper could support the managements to make a systematic decision for selection of gamification platform. PMID:24892075

  5. Agricultural climate impacts assessment for economic modeling and decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. M.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Beach, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, K.; Monier, E.

    2013-12-01

    A range of approaches can be used in the application of climate change projections to agricultural impacts assessment. Climate projections can be used directly to drive crop models, which in turn can be used to provide inputs for agricultural economic or integrated assessment models. These model applications, and the transfer of information between models, must be guided by the state of the science. But the methodology must also account for the specific needs of stakeholders and the intended use of model results beyond pure scientific inquiry, including meeting the requirements of agencies responsible for designing and assessing policies, programs, and regulations. Here we present methodology and results of two climate impacts studies that applied climate model projections from CMIP3 and from the EPA Climate Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) project in a crop model (EPIC - Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) in order to generate estimates of changes in crop productivity for use in an agricultural economic model for the United States (FASOM - Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model). The FASOM model is a forward-looking dynamic model of the US forest and agricultural sector used to assess market responses to changing productivity of alternative land uses. The first study, focused on climate change impacts on the UDSA crop insurance program, was designed to use available daily climate projections from the CMIP3 archive. The decision to focus on daily data for this application limited the climate model and time period selection significantly; however for the intended purpose of assessing impacts on crop insurance payments, consideration of extreme event frequency was critical for assessing periodic crop failures. In a second, coordinated impacts study designed to assess the relative difference in climate impacts under a no-mitigation policy and different future climate mitigation scenarios, the stakeholder specifically requested an assessment of a

  6. Endurance Evaluation of Sintered, Porous, Strut-Supported Turbine Blades made by Federal-Mogul-Bower-Bearings, Incorporated, under Bureau of Aeronautics Contract NOas 55-124-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickel, Robert O.; Richards, Hadley T.

    1957-01-01

    Four strut-supported, transpiration-cooled turbine blades were investigated experimentally in a turbojet engine. The blade shells were fabricated by the mold-sintering method with spherical stainless-steel powder. Two blades were investigated in order to evolve suitable capping methods for the blade tip. Two other blades were used to evaluate the durability of the porous-shell material. The blades were investigated at a turbine-tip speed of 1305 feet per second, an average turbine-inlet temperature of about 1670 F, and at a porous-shell temperature limited to a maximum of approximately 1040 F.

  7. Contracts in radiology practices: contract types and key provisions.

    PubMed

    Muroff, Julie A; Muroff, Lawrence R

    2004-07-01

    A contract between a radiology group and its physician member(s) provides the foundation for the professional relationships in a group practice. The parties are not in positions of parity; contract provisions are structured to maintain the primacy of the group over the individual members. An integration clause should be included to preclude reliance on communications that are not memorialized by the language of the contract. Precise, unambiguous terms must be used to convey the intentions of the parties. The contract should have a clear date of initiation and, if applicable, an effective date of termination. Mechanisms for termination and modification should be expressed clearly to minimize the risk of judicial interference. The method of determining and adjusting the salary and other benefits of the radiologist should be stated, as consideration is necessary to support the existence of a legal contract. The obligations of the radiologist to the practice are often stated in general terms to maximize the group's flexibility. Finally, other key clauses that are discussed in the paper should be incorporated into the contract.

  8. A monomer-trimer model supports intermittent glucagon fibril growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Cordsen, Pia; Kyrsting, Anders; Otzen, Daniel E.; Oddershede, Lene B.; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate in vitro fibrillation kinetics of the hormone peptide glucagon at various concentrations using confocal microscopy and determine the glucagon fibril persistence length 60μm. At all concentrations we observe that periods of individual fibril growth are interrupted by periods of stasis. The growth probability is large at high and low concentrations and is reduced for intermediate glucagon concentrations. To explain this behavior we propose a simple model, where fibrils come in two forms, one built entirely from glucagon monomers and one entirely from glucagon trimers. The opposite building blocks act as fibril growth blockers, and this generic model reproduces experimental behavior well.

  9. Supporting SBML as a model exchange format in software applications.

    PubMed

    Keating, Sarah M; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) from its origins. It describes the rationale behind and importance of having a common language when it comes to representing models. This chapter mentions the development of SBML and outlines the structure of an SBML model. It provides a section on libSBML, a useful application programming interface (API) library for reading, writing, manipulating and validating content expressed in the SBML format. Finally the chapter also provides a description of the SBML Toolbox which provides a means of facilitating the import and export of SBML from both MATLAB and Octave ( http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/) environments. PMID:23715987

  10. Supporting parents of children with communication difficulties: a model.

    PubMed

    Stevens, L; Watson, K; Dodd, K

    2001-01-01

    The project focuses on 'shared listening' from a structured developmental framework of 'sound/no sound awareness' to basic 'phonological awareness' linking it to the Foundation Curriculum: Early Years Goals (Department for Education and Employment 2000) and National Literacy Framework (Department for Education and Employment 1998). The project is based around parents borrowing topic bags where their children have been identified by speech and language therapy/specialist language and communication support teachers as having listening/phonological difficulties. Following a simple screening assessment parents borrow the bags weekly for a potential 30 weeks. These have been shown to have an effect on both parental attitudes to helping listening (practically-based and focused) and their children's listening skills. PMID:11340847

  11. Administration of prednisolone phosphate-liposomes reduces wound contraction in a rat partial-thickness wound model.

    PubMed

    Richters, Cornelia D; Paauw, Nanne J; Mayen, Ilvy; van Bloois, Louis; Metselaer, Josbert M; Storm, Gert; du Pont, John S; Hoekstra, Matthias J; Kreis, Robert W; Kamperdijk, Eduard W A

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the inflammatory phase of wound healing and their activity regulates fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Modulation of macrophage function may result in improvement of the wound healing process. Prednisolone phosphate (PLP) encapsulated into liposomes was administered to partial-thickness wounds in rats. A single dose of 75 microg/kg, applied directly after wounding, resulted in up to a 30% reduction of wound contraction at 28 days after wounding. This effect could not be achieved in the group that was administered free PLP or liposomes containing phosphate-buffered saline to the wound. The number of myofibroblasts was up to 50% lower in wounds treated with the liposomal PLP at 4 days after wounding. The number of macrophages present in the wounds was not statistically different between groups. Most probably, the production of cytokines and growth factors by macrophages is altered after phagocytosing the liposomes, resulting in reduced wound contraction. PMID:17014673

  12. The generation contract, pension schemes, birth control and economic growth: A European model for the third world?

    PubMed

    Diessenbacher, H

    1989-10-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the relationship between the generation contract, pension schemes, fertility decline and the process of economic growth. It is shown that there is a close connection between the reproductive behavior of a population and social security in old age i.e. the introduction and effects of retirement insurances. The proof of this assumption is given by a historical analysis of the developed and a systematic analysis of the developing countries. The paper postulates that the intention to create a higher level of economic growth in developing countries will become effective if a change of the family-bound generation contract is brought about. A modern economy is not compatible with the traditional system of extended families. This thesis includes the assumption that a statutory pension scheme is not an economic burden but the very starting point of a social machine which triggers economic growth.

  13. Support for Career Development in Youth: Program Models and Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mekinda, Megan A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines four influential programs--Citizen Schools, After School Matters, career academies, and Job Corps--to demonstrate the diversity of approaches to career programming for youth. It compares the specific program models and draws from the evaluation literature to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each. The article highlights…

  14. Development of a Model for Computer Supported Learning Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicki, Thomas N.; Schell, George P.; Weinroth, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the increasing amount of educational content on the Internet for both educational and business applications and reviews basic learning theories, instructional design theories, and factors affecting successful Web-based tutorials. Proposes a model synthesizing instructional design pedagogy and Web design concepts. (Author/LRW)

  15. Scale Issues in Air Quality Modeling Policy Support

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the issues relating to the use of regional photochemical air quality models for evaluating their performance in reproducing the spatio-temporal features embedded in the observations and for designing emission control strategies needed to achieve compliance wit...

  16. Ontological Support in Modeling Learners' Problem Solving Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chun-Hung; Wu, Chia-Wei; Wu, Shih-Hung; Chiou, Guey-Fa; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new model for simulating procedural knowledge in the problem solving process with our ontological system, InfoMap. The method divides procedural knowledge into two parts: process control and action performer. By adopting InfoMap, we hope to help teachers construct curricula (declarative knowledge) and teaching strategies by…

  17. A Chemical Properties Simulator to Support Integrated Environmental Modeling (proceeding)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Users of Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) systems are responsible for defining individual chemicals and their properties, a process that is time-consuming at best and overwhelming at worst, especially for new chemicals with new structures. A software tool is needed to allo...

  18. A Chemical Properties Simulator to Support Integrated Environmental Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Users of Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) systems are responsible for defining individual chemicals and their properties, a process that is time-consuming at best and overwhelming at worst, especially for new chemicals with new structures. A software tool is needed to allo...

  19. Developing a Model to Support Students in Solving Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdiyani, Nila Mareta; Zulkardi; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; van Eerde, Dolly; van Galen, Frans

    2013-01-01

    Subtraction has two meanings and each meaning leads to the different strategies. The meaning of "taking away something" suggests a direct subtraction, while the meaning of "determining the difference between two numbers" is more likely to be modeled as indirect addition. Many prior researches found that the second meaning and…

  20. Supporting Synchronous Collaborative Learning: A Generic, Multi-Dimensional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Future CSCL technologies are described by the community as flexible, tailorable, negotiable, and appropriate for various collaborative settings, conditions and contexts. This paper describes the key design issues of a generic synchronous collaborative learning environment, called Omega+. In this approach, model-based genericity is applied to the…

  1. Prerequisite Skills That Support Learning through Video Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Rebecca P. F.; Dickson, Chata A.; Martineau, Meaghan; Ahearn, William H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between tasks that require delayed discriminations such as delayed imitation and delayed matching to sample on acquisition of skills using video modeling. Twenty-nine participants with an ASD diagnosis were assessed on a battery of tasks including both immediate and delayed imitation and…

  2. Model supports and their effects on the results of wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, David L

    1923-01-01

    The airflow about a model while being tested is often sufficiently affected by the model support to lead to erroneous conclusions unless appropriate corrections are used. In this paper some new material on the subject is presented, together with a review of the airfoil support corrections used in several other laboratories.

  3. An Application of the Social Support Deterioration Deterrence Model to Rescue Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prati, Gabriele; Pietrantoni, Luca

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of social support in promoting quality of life in the aftermath of critical incidents involvement. Participants were a sample of 586 Italian rescue workers. Structural equation modelling was used to test the social support deterioration deterrence model. Results showed that the impact of critical incident involvement…

  4. Methodology for the use of DSSAT Models for Precision Agriculture Decision Support

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prototype decision support system (DSS) called Apollo was developed to assist researchers in using the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) crop growth models to analyze precision farming datasets. Because the DSSAT models are written to simulate crop growth and development...

  5. [Cancer screening in Hungary: World Bank supported model programs].

    PubMed

    Bodó, M; Döbrössy, L; Liszka, G; Ottó, S; Péter, Z

    1997-07-13

    Since 1995, a model cancer screening program has been in operation in Hungary, the overall purpose of which is to promote the establishment of effective and efficient screening programs by means of adapting the internationally agreed principles of organized screening to the needs and opportunities in Hungary. The establishment and operation of a national population-based cancer registration system is an other aim of the Program. The model program--financed partly from a loan from the World Bank, partly from local funds provided by the Government of Hungary--is to develop standard procedure for cervical, breast and colorectal screening and to end up with tested recommendations for introduction of organized screening of proved effectiveness, integrated into the health care system, on country-wide service bases in Hungary.

  6. Space debris characterization in support of a satellite breakup model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortson, Bryan H.; Winter, James E.; Allahdadi, Firooz A.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Kinetic Impact and Debris Branch began an ambitious program to construct a fully analytical model of the breakup of a satellite under hypervelocity impact. In order to provide empirical data with which to substantiate the model, debris from hypervelocity experiments conducted in a controlled laboratory environment were characterized to provide information of its mass, velocity, and ballistic coefficient distributions. Data on the debris were collected in one master data file, and a simple FORTRAN program allows users to describe the debris from any subset of these experiments that may be of interest to them. A statistical analysis was performed, allowing users to determine the precision of the velocity measurements for the data. Attempts are being made to include and correlate other laboratory data, as well as those data obtained from the explosion or collision of spacecraft in low earth orbit.

  7. Modeling snail breeding in a bioregenerative life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, V. S.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Kolmakova, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The discrete-time model of snail breeding consists of two sequentially linked submodels: "Stoichiometry" and "Population". In both submodels, a snail population is split up into twelve age groups within one year of age. The first submodel is used to simulate the metabolism of a single snail in each age group via the stoichiometric equation; the second submodel is used to optimize the age structure and the size of the snail population. Daily intake of snail meat by crewmen is a guideline which specifies the population productivity. The mass exchange of the snail unit inhabited by land snails of Achatina fulica is given as an outcome of step-by-step modeling. All simulations are performed using Solver Add-In of Excel 2007.

  8. Roles of University Support for International Students in the United States: Analysis of a Systematic Model of University Identification, University Support, and Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Jaehee; Yu, Hongsik

    2015-01-01

    Unlike previous research on international students' social support, this current study applied the concept of organizational support to university contexts, examining the effects of university support. Mainly based on the social identity/self-categorization stress model, this study developed and tested a path model composed of four key…

  9. Modifications to the NSSDCA Information Model to Support PDS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E. V., II; McCaslin, P. W.; Grayzeck, E. J.; McLaughlin, S.; Kodis, J. M.; Williams, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Space Science Data Coordinated Archive (NSSDCA) has been working with the Planetary Data System (PDS) to redefine the deep archiving process of PDS data with a particular emphasis on data utilizing the XML-based PDS4 data model. Like many science disciplines, the volume of data being archived in planetary science is reaching epic proportions and many of the delivery mechanisms that were feasible in the past (e.g., low-speed networks, hard media) are no longer practical. In addition, as data are recalibrated or data collections are extended due to continued mission operations, redelivery of the same data and the resulting duplicative storage of said data exhausts limited resources. With the PDS4 data model there is an opportunity for the NSSDCA to provide additional services to the PDS such as the preservation, tracking, and restoration of individual products (e.g., a specific data file or document), which was unfeasible in the previous PDS3 system. At the same time, however, many ongoing missions will continue to archive their data as PDS3 products. All of this has necessitated a revamping of the NSSDCA Information Model that is flexible enough to provide new services and increased efficiency for PDS4 products while not interrupting the ingest process for PDS3 products.We will report on our progress and status.

  10. AskIT Service Desk Support Value Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ashcraft, Phillip Lynn; Cummings, Susan M.; Fogle, Blythe G.; Valdez, Christopher D.

    2015-08-07

    The value model discussed herein provides an accurate and simple calculation of the funding required to adequately staff the AskIT Service Desk (SD).  The model is incremental – only technical labor cost is considered.  All other costs, such as management, equipment, buildings, HVAC, and training are considered common elements of providing any labor related IT Service. Depending on the amount of productivity loss and the number of hours the defect was unresolved, the value of resolving work from the SD is unquestionably an economic winner; the average cost of $16 per SD resolution can commonly translate to cost avoidance exceeding well over $100. Attempting to extract too much from the SD will likely create a significant downside. The analysis used to develop the value model indicates that the utilization of the SD is very high (approximately 90%).  As a benchmark, consider a comment from a manager at Vitalyst (a commercial IT service desk) that their utilization target is approximately 60%.  While high SD utilization is impressive, over the long term it is likely to cause unwanted consequences to staff such as higher turnover, illness, or burnout.  A better solution is to staff the SD so that analysts have time to improve skills through training, develop knowledge, improve processes, collaborate with peers, and improve customer relationship skills.

  11. Biotic Origin for Mima Mounds Supported by Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, E. J.; Perron, J.; Johnson, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mima mounds are ~1-m-high hillocks found on every continent except Antarctica. Despite often numbering in the millions within a single field, their origin has been a mystery, with proposed explanations ranging from glacial processes to seismic shaking. One hypothesis proposes that mounds in North America are built by burrowing mammals to provide refuge from seasonally saturated soils. We test this hypothesis with a numerical model, parameterized with measurements of soil transport by gophers from a California mound field, that couples animal behavior with geomorphic processes. The model successfully simulates the development of the mounds, as well as key details such as the creation of vernal pools, small intermound basins that provide habitat for endemic species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the modeled mound fields is similar to actual mound fields and provides an example of self-organized topographic features. We conclude that, scaled by body mass, Mima mounds are the largest structures built by non-human mammals, and may provide a rare example of an evolutionary coupling between landforms and the organisms that create them.

  12. Biotic origin for Mima mounds supported by numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.; Perron, J. Taylor; Johnson, Donald L.

    2014-02-01

    Mima mounds are ~ 1-m-high hillocks found on every continent except Antarctica. Despite often numbering in the millions within a single field, their origin has been a mystery, with proposed explanations ranging from glacial processes to seismic shaking. One hypothesis proposes that mounds in North America are built by burrowing mammals to provide refuge from seasonally saturated soils. We test this hypothesis with a numerical model, parameterized with measurements of soil transport by gophers from a California mound field, that couples animal behavior with geomorphic processes. The model successfully simulates the development of the mounds as well as key details such as the creation of vernal pools, small intermound basins that provide habitat for endemic species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the modeled mound fields is similar to actual mound fields and provides an example of self-organized topographic features. We conclude that, scaled by body mass, Mima mounds are the largest structures built by nonhuman mammals and may provide a rare example of an evolutionary coupling between landforms and the organisms that create them.

  13. Hanford Tanks 241-C-202 and 241-C-203 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.

    2007-09-13

    As directed by Congress, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of River Protection in 1998 to manage DOE's largest, most complex environmental cleanup project – retrieval of radioactive waste from Hanford tanks for treatment and eventual disposal. Sixty percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste is stored at Hanford in aging deteriorating tanks. If not cleaned up, this waste is a threat to the Columbia River and the Pacific Northwest. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., is the Office of River Protection's prime contractor responsible for the storage, retrieval, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. As part of this effort, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop release models for key contaminants that are present in residual sludge remaining after closure of Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 (C-203) and 241-C-204 (C-204). The release models were developed from data generated by laboratory characterization and testing of samples from these two tanks. These release models are being developed to support the tank closure risk assessments performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., for DOE.

  14. Gold nanoparticle-catalyzed reduction in a model system: Quantitative determination of reactive heterogeneity of a supported nanoparticle surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nigra, Michael M.; Arslan, Ilke; Katz, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Kinetic poisoning experiments employing organic ligands were conducted using a gold nanoparticle–catalyzed reaction consisting of the reduction of resazurin to resorufin. The kinetic contributions of three distinct types of sites along with the number density of each of these site types during reaction were determined. The calculated number densities of each of the three types of sites, hypothesized to be corners, edges, and terraces, correlates well with atomic-resolution micrographs of the supported gold nanoparticles, obtained using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and with predictions based on geometric models of idealized gold nanoparticles. The most active sites comprising 1% of the surface atoms exhibit at least 30% of the total activity of the catalyst for resazurin reduction. The selective mechanical blocking of surface sites on nanoparticles, particularly undercoordinated sites, paves the way for novel approaches utilizing organic ligands to quantify the activity of different active sites and control catalysis on metal surfaces. This work was supported in part by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The aberration-corrected electron microscopy was performed in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at PNNL and funded by BER. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  15. Implementing a Technology-Supported Model for Cross-Organisational Learning and Knowledge Building for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tammets, Kairit; Pata, Kai; Laanpere, Mart

    2012-01-01

    This study proposed using the elaborated learning and knowledge building model (LKB model) derived from Nonaka and Takeuchi's knowledge management model for supporting cross-organisational teacher development in the temporarily extended organisations composed of universities and schools. It investigated the main LKB model components in the context…

  16. Representative Model of the Learning Process in Virtual Spaces Supported by ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capacho, José

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the results of research activities for building the representative model of the learning process in virtual spaces (e-Learning). The formal basis of the model are supported in the analysis of models of learning assessment in virtual spaces and specifically in Dembo´s teaching learning model, the systemic approach to evaluating…

  17. A human performance modelling approach to intelligent decision support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, Michael S.; Boys, Randy M.

    1987-01-01

    Manned space operations require that the many automated subsystems of a space platform be controllable by a limited number of personnel. To minimize the interaction required of these operators, artificial intelligence techniques may be applied to embed a human performance model within the automated, or semi-automated, systems, thereby allowing the derivation of operator intent. A similar application has previously been proposed in the domain of fighter piloting, where the demand for pilot intent derivation is primarily a function of limited time and high workload rather than limited operators. The derivation and propagation of pilot intent is presented as it might be applied to some programs.

  18. Experimental support for a predictive osmotic model of clay membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, S.J.; Marine, I.W.

    1983-01-01

    Osmosis has been cited as a mechanism for explaining anomalously high fluid pressures in the subsurface. Clays and shales act as membranes, and osmotic flux across these units may result in pressures sufficiently high to explain these anomalies. The theoretical osmotic pressures as calculated solely from solution properties can be quite large; however, it is not yet resolved whether these geologic membranes are sufficiently ideal to generate such pressures. Osmotic efficiencies of a Na-bentonite membrane were measured by a series of hyperfiltration experiments using various molarities of NaCl at two different porosities. The highest osmotic efficiency (0.8912) occurred at the lower porosity and the lowest NaCl input solution. The lowest measured osmotic efficiency (0.0423) occurred at the high porosity and the highest NaCl input concentration. The osmotic efficiencies obtained from the hyperfiltration experiments correlate very favorably with the Fritz-Marine Membrane Model. This model predicts that the maximum osmotically-induced hydraulic pressures in the subsurface should occur across shales having low porosities and high cation exchange capacities in which the unit separates solutions of brackish waters. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Assembling Tools and Data for Climate Model Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batcheller, A. L.; VanWijngaarden, F.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) effort has identified nine areas in which society benefits from appropriate environmental information. We have targeted specific issues within these societal benefit areas by determining appropriate data sets needed and transforming these data into information useable by decision makers. Here we describe the service-oriented architecture that allows us to ingest real-time or static data into a database with a spatial data engine, make appropriate manipulations to the data using domain knowledge relevant to the problem, and expose the data as services. We then build custom portals using a library of common widgets to display and overlay the data for users to analyze. By using portals and a service-oriented architecture we can reuse services and widgets to rapidly assemble a view of geographic data, and assist decision-makers in applying and interpreting the latest scientific results. As a case study with our system, we have integrated data from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) climate models, crop yields, and environmental thresholds for crops to present a first level analysis of the impact of climate change on key crops grown in Mexico. Knowledge about changes in the regions that are favorable for crop growth is important for many stakeholders, ranging from individual farmers, to governments, to scientists working to create new seed varieties. Our work also highlights research opportunities in climate science by identifying the types and resolution of parameters modeled.

  20. ATMOSPHERIC MODELING IN SUPPORT OF A ROADWAY ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.; Hunter, C.

    2010-10-21

    The United States Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS) routinely performs prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. This facility covers {approx}800 square kilometers and is mainly wooded except for scattered industrial areas containing facilities used in managing nuclear materials for national defense and waste processing. Prescribed fires of forest undergrowth are necessary to reduce the risk of inadvertent wild fires which have the potential to destroy large areas and threaten nuclear facility operations. This paper discusses meteorological observations and numerical model simulations from a period in early 2002 of an incident involving an early-morning multicar accident caused by poor visibility along a major roadway on the northern border of the SRS. At the time of the accident, it was not clear if the limited visibility was due solely to fog or whether smoke from a prescribed burn conducted the previous day just to the northwest of the crash site had contributed to the visibility. Through use of available meteorological information and detailed modeling, it was determined that the primary reason for the low visibility on this night was fog induced by meteorological conditions.

  1. Numerical Modeling to Support Floodplain Mapping in Coastal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cydzik, K.; Shrestha, P. L.; Hamilton, D.; Rezakhani, M.; Scheffner, N.; Lenaburg, R.

    2009-12-01

    A hurricane-induced flood mapping study was conducted for the State of Hawaii encompassing the six major Hawaiian Islands: Hawaii, Kauai, Lanai, Maui, Molokai, and Oahu. The objective of the study was to use numerical methods to compute storm surge frequency relationships using the Empirical Simulation Technique (EST). This paper describes the EST methodology. Ultimately, the storm surge frequency data and water surface elevations determined through the modeling effort define coastal inundation areas to revise Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FRIMs). Such information guides coastal development and highlights flood risks in coastal areas. To perform a realistic storm surge analysis, historical events impacting the islands in the study area were selected from the National Hurricane Center’s Eastern and Central North Pacific Basin Hurricane database. The database consists of hurricanes, tropical storms, and tropical depressions impacting the Hawaiian Islands from 1949 through 2005 and includes records of the latitude, longitude, maximum wind speed, and, often, the central pressure of the eye of the storm. For this study, candidate events were selected based on two criteria. Storms were required to pass within 200 nautical miles of at least two of the islands with maximum winds at that point of at least tropical storm-strength (39 mph.) Of the 794 storm events in the database, 11 events met these criteria and were used to generate wind and pressure fields for the modeling effort. An assumption of the EST analysis is that each of the 11 events has an equal probability of impacting the islands within the 200 nautical mile ellipse. Therefore, the 11events were translated by one Radius-to-Maximum winds across the ellipse so that each event impacted each island, generating 102 impacting events. The hypothetical events were used to generate wind and pressure fields for input to the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) long-wave hydrodynamic model to compute storm surge at defined

  2. Spatiotemporal Organization of Spin-Coated Supported Model Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    All cells of living organisms are separated from their surroundings and organized internally by means of flexible lipid membranes. In fact, there is consensus that the minimal requirements for self-replicating life processes include the following three features: (1) information carriers (DNA, RNA), (2) a metabolic system, and (3) encapsulation in a container structure [1]. Therefore, encapsulation can be regarded as an essential part of life itself. In nature, membranes are highly diverse interfacial structures that compartmentalize cells [2]. While prokaryotic cells only have an outer plasma membrane and a less-well-developed internal membrane structure, eukaryotic cells have a number of internal membranes associated with the organelles and the nucleus. Many of these membrane structures, including the plasma membrane, are complex layered systems, but with the basic structure of a lipid bilayer. Biomembranes contain hundreds of different lipid species in addition to embedded or peripherally associated membrane proteins and connections to scaffolds such as the cytoskeleton. In vitro, lipid bilayers are spontaneously self-organized structures formed by a large group of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous suspensions. Bilayer formation is driven by the entropic properties of the hydrogen bond network in water in combination with the amphiphilic nature of the lipids. The molecular shapes of the lipid constituents play a crucial role in bilayer formation, and only lipids with approximately cylindrical shapes are able to form extended bilayers. The bilayer structure of biomembranes was discovered by Gorter and Grendel in 1925 [3] using monolayer studies of lipid extracts from red blood cells. Later, a number of conceptual models were developed to rationalize the organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes. One of the most celebrated is the fluid-mosaic model by Singer and Nicolson (1972) [4]. According to this model, the lipid bilayer component of

  3. Experiences Supporting the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera: the Devops Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, A.; Estes, N. M.; Bowman-Cisnesros, E.; Hanger, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Science Operations Center (SOC) is responsible for instrument targeting, product processing, and archiving [1]. The LROC SOC maintains over 1,000,000 observations with over 300 TB of released data. Processing challenges compound with the acquisition of over 400 Gbits of observations daily creating the need for a robust, efficient, and reliable suite of specialized software. Development Environment: The LROC SOC's software development methodology has evolved over time. Today, the development team operates in close cooperation with the systems administration team in a model known in the IT industry as DevOps. The DevOps model enables a highly productive development environment that facilitates accomplishment of key goals within tight schedules[2]. The LROC SOC DevOps model incorporates industry best practices including prototyping, continuous integration, unit testing, code coverage analysis, version control, and utilizing existing open source software. Scientists and researchers at LROC often prototype algorithms and scripts in a high-level language such as MATLAB or IDL. After the prototype is functionally complete the solution is implemented as production ready software by the developers. Following this process ensures that all controls and requirements set by the LROC SOC DevOps team are met. The LROC SOC also strives to enhance the efficiency of the operations staff by way of weekly presentations and informal mentoring. Many small scripting tasks are assigned to the cognizant operations personnel (end users), allowing for the DevOps team to focus on more complex and mission critical tasks. In addition to leveraging open source software the LROC SOC has also contributed to the open source community by releasing Lunaserv [3]. Findings: The DevOps software model very efficiently provides smooth software releases and maintains team momentum. Scientists prototyping their work has proven to be very efficient

  4. Suicide prevention by online support groups: an action theory-based model of emotional first aid.

    PubMed

    Gilat, Itzhak; Shahar, Golan

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, online support groups have become a valuable source of help for individuals in suicidal crisis. Their attractiveness is attributed to features that enhance help-seeking and self-disclosure such as availability, anonymity, and use of written communication. However, online support groups also suffer from limitations and potential risks as agents of suicide prevention. The Israeli Association for Emotional First Aid (ERAN) has developed a practical model that seeks to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of online suicide prevention. The model applies the Action Theory concepts whereby individuals shape their own environment. The present paper presents the model, which is based on an online support group combined with personal chat and a telephonic help line. The online support group is moderated by paraprofessionals who function as both process regulators and support providers. The principles and practice of the model are described, the theoretical rationale is presented, and directions for future research are suggested.

  5. An approach to the mathematical modelling of a controlled ecological life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    An approach to the design of a computer based model of a closed ecological life-support system suitable for use in extraterrestrial habitats is presented. The model is based on elemental mass balance and contains representations of the metabolic activities of biological components. The model can be used as a tool in evaluating preliminary designs for closed regenerative life support systems and as a method for predicting the behavior of such systems.

  6. Impacts of the IBM Cell Processor to Support Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Tom; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milt

    2008-01-01

    NASA is interested in the performance and cost benefits for adapting its applications to the IBM Cell processor. However, its 256KB local memory per SPE and the new communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. We selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics (approximately 50% computational time), (2) has a high computational load relative to transferring data from and to main memory, (3) performs independent calculations across multiple columns. We converted the baseline code (single-precision, Fortran) to C and ported it with manually SIMDizing 4 independent columns and found that a Cell with 8 SPEs can process 2274 columns per second. Compared with the baseline results, the Cell is approximately 5.2X, approximately 8.2X, approximately 15.1X faster than a core on Intel Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, respectively. We believe this dramatic performance improvement makes a hybrid cluster with Cell and traditional nodes competitive.

  7. Planar oxide supported rhodium nanoparticles as model catalysts

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Sean M.; Lundwall, M. J.; Goodman, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    C2H4/CO/H2 reaction is investigated on Rh/SiO2 model catalyst surfaces. Kinetic reactivity and infrared spectroscopic measurements are investigated as a function of Rh particle size under near atmospheric reaction conditions. Results show that propionaldehyde turnover frequency (TOF) (CO insertion pathway) exhibits a maximum activity near 〈dp〉 = 2.5 nm. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy under CO and reaction (C2H4/CO/H2) conditions indicate the presence of Rh carbonyl species (Rh(CO)2, Rh(CO)H) on small Rh particles, whereas larger particles appear resistant to dispersion and carbonyl formation. Combined these observations suggest the observed particle size dependence for propionaldehyde production via CO insertion is driven by two factors: (i) an increase in propionaldehyde formation on undercoordinated Rh sites and (ii) creation of carbonyl hydride species (Rh(CO)H)) on smaller Rh particles, whose presence correlates with the lower activity for propionaldehyde formation for 〈dp〉 < 2.5 nm. PMID:20947802

  8. Efficiency of muscle contraction. The chemimechanic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E. W.

    1991-10-01

    Although muscle contraction is one of the principal themes of biological research, the exact mechanism whereby the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis is converted into mechanical work remains elusive. The high thermodynamic efficiency of the process, above all, is difficult to explain on the basis of present theories. A model of the elementary effect in muscle contraction is proposed which aims at high thermodynamic efficiency based on an approximate equilibrium between chemical and mechanical forces throughout the transfer of free energy. The experimental results described in the literature support the assumption that chemimechanic equilibrium is approximated by a free energy transfer system based on the binding of divalent metal ions to the myosin light chains. Muscle contraction demonstrated without light chains is expected to proceed with a considerably lower efficiency. Free energy transfer systems based on the binding of ions to proteins seem to be widespread in the cell. By establishing an approximate chemimechanic equilibrium, they could facilitate biological reactions considerably and save large amounts of free energy. The concept of chemimechanic equilibrium is seen as a supplementation to the concept of chemiosmotic equilibrium introduced for the membrane transport by P. Mitchell.

  9. The ASCA Model and a Multi-Tiered System of Supports: A Framework to Support Students of Color with Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belser, Christopher T.; Shillingford, M. Ann; Joe, J. Richelle

    2016-01-01

    The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model and a multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS) both provide frameworks for systematically solving problems in schools, including student behavior concerns. The authors outline a model that integrates overlapping elements of the National Model and MTSS as a support for marginalized…

  10. Higher plant modelling for life support applications: first results of a simple mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezard, Pauline; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Sasidharan L, Swathy

    2012-07-01

    In the case of closed ecological life support systems, the air and water regeneration and food production are performed using microorganisms and higher plants. Wheat, rice, soybean, lettuce, tomato or other types of eatable annual plants produce fresh food while recycling CO2 into breathable oxygen. Additionally, they evaporate a large quantity of water, which can be condensed and used as potable water. This shows that recycling functions of air revitalization and food production are completely linked. Consequently, the control of a growth chamber for higher plant production has to be performed with efficient mechanistic models, in order to ensure a realistic prediction of plant behaviour, water and gas recycling whatever the environmental conditions. Purely mechanistic models of plant production in controlled environments are not available yet. This is the reason why new models must be developed and validated. This work concerns the design and test of a simplified version of a mathematical model coupling plant architecture and mass balance purposes in order to compare its results with available data of lettuce grown in closed and controlled chambers. The carbon exchange rate, water absorption and evaporation rate, biomass fresh weight as well as leaf surface are modelled and compared with available data. The model consists of four modules. The first one evaluates plant architecture, like total leaf surface, leaf area index and stem length data. The second one calculates the rate of matter and energy exchange depending on architectural and environmental data: light absorption in the canopy, CO2 uptake or release, water uptake and evapotranspiration. The third module evaluates which of the previous rates is limiting overall biomass growth; and the last one calculates biomass growth rate depending on matter exchange rates, using a global stoichiometric equation. All these rates are a set of differential equations, which are integrated with time in order to provide

  11. Nutritional models for a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS): Linear mathematical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Rose C.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program is involved in developing a biogenerative life support system that will supply food, air, and water to space crews on long-duration missions. An important part of this effort is in development of the knowledge and technological capability of producing and processing foods to provide optimal diets for space crews. This involves such interrelated factors as determination of the diet, based on knowledge of nutrient needs of humans and adjustments in those needs that may be required as a result of the conditions of long-duration space flight; determination of the optimal mixture of crops required to provide nutrients at levels that are sufficient but not excessive or toxic; and consideration of the critical issues of spacecraft space and power limitations, which impose a phytomass minimization requirement. The complex interactions among these factors are examined with the goal of supplying a diet that will satisfy human needs while minimizing the total phytomass requirement. The approach taken was to collect plant nutritional composition and phytomass production data, identify human nutritional needs and estimate the adjustments to the nutrient requirements likely to result from space flight, and then to generate mathematical models from these data.

  12. Divergent effects of active coping on psychological distress in the context of the job demands-control-support model: the roles of job control and social support.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Akihito; Shimazu, Miyuki; Odara, Tsutomu

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of active coping on psychological distress in the context of the job demands-control-support model. Participants were 726 male nonmanagers in a large electrical company in Japan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine whether active coping and coping resources (job control, supervisor support, and coworker support) have interaction effects on psychological distress. Active coping had an interaction effect with coworker support, whereas it did not with job control and supervisor support. Results suggest that coworker support can facilitate the effectiveness of active coping, whereas job control or supervisor support cannot.

  13. Characterisation of mixing in the proximal duodenum of the rat during longitudinal contractions and comparison with a fluid mechanical model based on spatiotemporal motility data.

    PubMed

    de Loubens, Clément; Lentle, Roger G; Hulls, Corrin; Janssen, Patrick W M; Love, Richard J; Chambers, J Paul

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of mixing and mass transfers of nutrients and drugs in the small intestine is of prime importance in creating formulations that manipulate absorption and digestibility. We characterised mixing using a dye tracer methodology during spontaneous longitudinal contractions, i.e. pendular activity, in 10 cm segments of living proximal duodenum of the rat maintained ex-vivo. The residence time distribution (RTD) of the tracer was equivalent to that generated by a small number (8) of continuous stirred tank reactors in series. Fluid mechanical modelling, that was based on real sequences of longitudinal contractions, predicted that dispersion should occur mainly in the periphery of the lumen. Comparison with the experimental RTD showed that centriluminal dispersion was accurately simulated whilst peripheral dispersion was underestimated. The results therefore highlighted the potential importance of micro-phenomena such as microfolding of the intestinal mucosa in peripheral mixing. We conclude that macro-scale modeling of intestinal flow is useful in simulating centriluminal mixing, whereas multi-scales strategies must be developed to accurately model mixing and mass transfers at the periphery of the lumen. PMID:24747714

  14. Characterisation of Mixing in the Proximal Duodenum of the Rat during Longitudinal Contractions and Comparison with a Fluid Mechanical Model Based on Spatiotemporal Motility Data

    PubMed Central

    de Loubens, Clément; Lentle, Roger G.; Hulls, Corrin; Janssen, Patrick W. M.; Love, Richard J.; Chambers, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of mixing and mass transfers of nutrients and drugs in the small intestine is of prime importance in creating formulations that manipulate absorption and digestibility. We characterised mixing using a dye tracer methodology during spontaneous longitudinal contractions, i.e. pendular activity, in 10 cm segments of living proximal duodenum of the rat maintained ex-vivo. The residence time distribution (RTD) of the tracer was equivalent to that generated by a small number (8) of continuous stirred tank reactors in series. Fluid mechanical modelling, that was based on real sequences of longitudinal contractions, predicted that dispersion should occur mainly in the periphery of the lumen. Comparison with the experimental RTD showed that centriluminal dispersion was accurately simulated whilst peripheral dispersion was underestimated. The results therefore highlighted the potential importance of micro-phenomena such as microfolding of the intestinal mucosa in peripheral mixing. We conclude that macro-scale modeling of intestinal flow is useful in simulating centriluminal mixing, whereas multi-scales strategies must be developed to accurately model mixing and mass transfers at the periphery of the lumen. PMID:24747714

  15. A risk assessment modeling technique based on knowledge extraction and information diffusion with support specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Peng, Peng; Xu, Zhisheng; Li, Jiaxun; Niu, Shengjie

    2013-11-01

    For the difficulties of lacking (even no) samples and cases in actual risk evaluation and support decision-making, it was much trouble for risk assessment modeling by general statistic methods and data mining technique. A kind of idea and technique of knowledge extraction and risk assessment was presented based on support specification, and the basic operation steps and modeling route were expounded. Based on an example of aviation weather supporting, a risk evaluation model of weather influencing aircraft taking off and landing safety was established, and the corresponding evaluation experiments were carried out.

  16. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C.

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C, fluid- and rock-derived {sup 2343}U/{sup 238}U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature.

  17. Paediatric models in motion: requirements for model-based decision support at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Optimal paediatric pharmacotherapy is reliant on a detailed understanding of the individual patient including their developmental status and disease state as well as the pharmaceutical agents he/she is receiving for treatment or management of side effects. Our appreciation for size and maturation effects on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) phenomenon has improved to the point that we can develop predictive models that permit us to individualize therapy, especially in the situation where we are monitoring drug effects or therapeutic concentrations. The growth of efforts to guide paediatric pharmacotherapy via model-based decision support necessitates a coordinated and systematic approach to ensuring reliable and robust output to caregivers that represents the current standard of care and adheres to governance imposed by the host institution or coalition responsible. Model-based systems which guide caregivers on dosing paediatric patients in a more comprehensive manner are in development at several institutions. Care must be taken that these systems provide robust guidance with the current best practice. These systems must evolve as new information becomes available and ultimately are best constructed from diverse data representing global input on demographics, ethnic / racial diversity, diet and other lifestyle factors. Multidisciplinary involvement at the project team level is key to the ultimate clinical valuation. Likewise, early engagement of clinical champions is also critical for the success of model-based tools. Adherence to regulatory requirements as well as best practices with respect to software development and testing are essential if these tools are to be used as part of the routine standard of care.

  18. Paediatric models in motion: requirements for model-based decision support at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Optimal paediatric pharmacotherapy is reliant on a detailed understanding of the individual patient including their developmental status and disease state as well as the pharmaceutical agents he/she is receiving for treatment or management of side effects. Our appreciation for size and maturation effects on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) phenomenon has improved to the point that we can develop predictive models that permit us to individualize therapy, especially in the situation where we are monitoring drug effects or therapeutic concentrations. The growth of efforts to guide paediatric pharmacotherapy via model-based decision support necessitates a coordinated and systematic approach to ensuring reliable and robust output to caregivers that represents the current standard of care and adheres to governance imposed by the host institution or coalition responsible. Model-based systems which guide caregivers on dosing paediatric patients in a more comprehensive manner are in development at several institutions. Care must be taken that these systems provide robust guidance with the current best practice. These systems must evolve as new information becomes available and ultimately are best constructed from diverse data representing global input on demographics, ethnic / racial diversity, diet and other lifestyle factors. Multidisciplinary involvement at the project team level is key to the ultimate clinical valuation. Likewise, early engagement of clinical champions is also critical for the success of model-based tools. Adherence to regulatory requirements as well as best practices with respect to software development and testing are essential if these tools are to be used as part of the routine standard of care. PMID:24251868

  19. Paediatric models in motion: requirements for model-based decision support at the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Optimal paediatric pharmacotherapy is reliant on a detailed understanding of the individual patient including their developmental status and disease state as well as the pharmaceutical agents he/she is receiving for treatment or management of side effects. Our appreciation for size and maturation effects on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) phenomenon has improved to the point that we can develop predictive models that permit us to individualize therapy, especially in the situation where we are monitoring drug effects or therapeutic concentrations. The growth of efforts to guide paediatric pharmacotherapy via model-based decision support necessitates a coordinated and systematic approach to ensuring reliable and robust output to caregivers that represents the current standard of care and adheres to governance imposed by the host institution or coalition responsible. Model-based systems which guide caregivers on dosing paediatric patients in a more comprehensive manner are in development at several institutions. Care must be taken that these systems provide robust guidance with the current best practice. These systems must evolve as new information becomes available and ultimately are best constructed from diverse data representing global input on demographics, ethnic / racial diversity, diet and other lifestyle factors. Multidisciplinary involvement at the project team level is key to the ultimate clinical valuation. Likewise, early engagement of clinical champions is also critical for the success of model-based tools. Adherence to regulatory requirements as well as best practices with respect to software development and testing are essential if these tools are to be used as part of the routine standard of care. PMID:24251868

  20. Cluster-support interactions and morphology of MoS2 nanoclusters in a graphite-supported hydrotreating model catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kibsgaard, Jakob; Lauritsen, Jeppe V; Laegsgaard, Erik; Clausen, Bjerne S; Topsøe, Henrik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2006-10-25

    Supported MoS(2) nanoparticles constitute the active component of the important hydrotreating catalysts used for industrial upgrading and purification of the oil feedstock for the production of fossil fuels with a low environmental load. We have synthesized and studied a model system of the hydrotreating catalyst consisting of MoS(2) nanoclusters supported on a graphite surface in order to resolve a number of very fundamental questions related to the atomic-scale structure and morphology of the active clusters and in particular the effect of a substrate used in some types of hydrotreating catalysts. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is used to image the atomic-scale structure of graphite-supported MoS(2) nanoclusters in real space. It is found that the pristine graphite (0001) surface does not support a high dispersion of MoS(2), but by introducing a small density of defects in the surface, highly dispersed MoS(2) nanoclusters could be synthesized on the graphite. From high-resolution STM images it is found that MoS(2) nanoclusters synthesized at low temperature in a sulfiding atmosphere preferentially grow as single-layer clusters, whereas clusters synthesized at 1200 K grow as multilayer slabs oriented with the MoS(2)(0001) basal plane parallel to the graphite surface. The morphology of both single-layer and multilayer MoS(2) nanoclusters is found to be preferentially hexagonal, and atom-resolved images of the top facet of the clusters provide new atomic-scale information on the MoS(2)-HOPG bonding. The structure of the two types of catalytically interesting edges terminating the hexagonal MoS(2) nanoclusters is also resolved in atomic detail in STM images, and from these images it is possible to reveal the atomic structure of both edges and the location and coverage of sulfur and hydrogen adsorbates.

  1. A Consistent Information Criterion for Support Vector Machines in Diverging Model Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Wu, Yichao; Wang, Lan; Li, Runze

    2015-01-01

    Information criteria have been popularly used in model selection and proved to possess nice theoretical properties. For classification, Claeskens et al. (2008) proposed support vector machine information criterion for feature selection and provided encouraging numerical evidence. Yet no theoretical justification was given there. This work aims to fill the gap and to provide some theoretical justifications for support vector machine information criterion in both fixed and diverging model spaces. We first derive a uniform convergence rate for the support vector machine solution and then show that a modification of the support vector machine information criterion achieves model selection consistency even when the number of features diverges at an exponential rate of the sample size. This consistency result can be further applied to selecting the optimal tuning parameter for various penalized support vector machine methods. Finite-sample performance of the proposed information criterion is investigated using Monte Carlo studies and one real-world gene selection problem. PMID:27239164

  2. Designing a Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment to Support Scientific Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hsu, Ying-Shao; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of a natural phenomenon is of value in science learning and increasingly emphasized as an important component of science education. However, previous research has shown that secondary school students encounter difficulties when engaging in modeling activities and need substantial support in order to create meaningful scientific models.…

  3. Promoting and Supporting Scientific Argumentation in the Classroom: The Evaluate-Alternatives Instructional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an instructional model that science teachers can use to promote and support student engagement in scientific argumentation. This model is called the evaluate-alternatives instructional model and it is grounded in current research on argumentation in science education (e.g., Berland and Reiser 2009; McNeill and Krajcik 2006;…

  4. A Research on the Generative Learning Model Supported by Context-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulusoy, Fatma Merve; Onen, Aysem Seda

    2014-01-01

    This study is based on the generative learning model which involves context-based learning. Using the generative learning model, we taught the topic of Halogens. This topic is covered in the grade 10 chemistry curriculum using activities which are designed in accordance with the generative learning model supported by context-based learning. The…

  5. Teachers' Temporary Support and Worked-Out Examples as Elements of Scaffolding in Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tropper, Natalie; Leiss, Dominik; Hänze, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Empirical findings show that students have manifold difficulties when dealing with mathematical modeling problems. Accordingly, approaches for supporting students in modeling-based learning environments have to be investigated. In the research presented here, we adopted a scaffolding perspective on teaching modeling with the aim of both providing…

  6. Reviving Ulysses contracts.

    PubMed

    Spellecy, Ryan

    2003-12-01

    Ulysses contracts have faced paternalism objections since they first were proposed. Since the contracts are designed to override a present request from a legally competent patient in favor of a past request made by that patient, enforcement of these contracts was argued to be unjustifiable strong paternalism. Recent legal developments and new theories of practical reasoning suggest that the discussion of Ulysses contracts should be revived. This paper argues that with a proper understanding of the future-directed planning embodied in Ulysses contracts, the charge of strong paternalism can be answered, and the enforcement of some Ulysses contracts may be justified under the rubric of weak paternalism.

  7. The Path to Graduation: A Model Interactive Web Site Design Supporting Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons-Johnson, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This 2-phase mixed method study assessed 2nd-year doctoral students' and dissertation students' perceptions of the current Graduate School of Education dissertation support Web site, with implications for designing a model dissertation support Web site. Methods. Phase 1 collected quantitative and qualitative data through an…

  8. Library Support for Academic Program Review--From an Evolving Local Model to What's Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Ming-Ming Shen

    A local model for support of periodic academic program reviews by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education (ICHE) has developed and evolved at the Ball State University library. The process of devising a format to systematically report library holdings statistics to support program reviews and other collections development duties began in 1975;…

  9. The Self-Esteem, Perceived Social Support and Hopelessness in Adolescents: The Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savi Cakar, Firdevs; Karatas, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a developed model to explain a causal relationship between adolescent's self-esteem, perceived social support and hopelessness is tested. The purpose of the study is to explore the relationship between self-esteem, perceived social support and hopelessness in adolescents. A total of 257 adolescents, including 143 female and 114…

  10. Predictive Modeling of Student Performances for Retention and Academic Support in a Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borghese, Peter; Lacey, Sandi

    2014-01-01

    As part of a retention and academic support program, data was collected to develop a predictive model of student performances in core classes in a Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) program. The research goal was to identify students likely to have difficulty with coursework and provide supplemental tutorial support. The focus was on the…

  11. A Threshold Model of Social Support, Adjustment, and Distress after Breast Cancer Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; Armer, Jane M.; Heppner, P. Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a threshold model that proposes that social support exhibits a curvilinear association with adjustment and distress, such that support in excess of a critical threshold level has decreasing incremental benefits. Women diagnosed with a first occurrence of breast cancer (N = 154) completed survey measures of perceived support…

  12. Integration into Big Data: First Steps to Support Reuse of Comprehensive Toxicity Model Modules (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data surrounding the needs of human disease and toxicity modeling are largely siloed limiting the ability to extend and reuse modules across knowledge domains. Using an infrastructure that supports integration across knowledge domains (animal toxicology, high-throughput screening...

  13. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial: Installation of Software for Watershed Modeling in Support of QMRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This tutorial provides instructions for accessing, retrieving, and downloading the following software to install on a host computer in support of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) modeling:• SDMProjectBuilder (which includes the Microbial Source Module as part...

  14. The Integrated Medical Model: A Decision Support Tool for In-flight Crew Health Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Doug

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of an Integrated Medical Model (IMM) decision support tool for in-flight crew health care safety. Clinical methods, resources, and case scenarios are also addressed.

  15. Modeling to Support the Development of Habitat Targets for Piping Plovers on the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect

    Buenau, Kate E.

    2015-05-05

    Report on modeling and analyses done in support of developing quantative sandbar habitat targets for piping plovers, including assessment of reference, historical, dams present but not operated, and habitat construction calibrated to meet population viability targets.

  16. Composition and analysis of a model waste for a CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    A model waste based on a modest vegetarian diet is given, including composition and elemental analysis. Its use is recommended for evaluation of candidate waste treatment processes for a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS).

  17. Assisting Secondary Support Teachers to Work in the Recommended Service Delivery Model: Introducing the Concept of a Subculture of Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Nicole Ann

    2012-01-01

    The original concept of a subculture of learning support in secondary schools developed from a study of "Support Teachers, Learning Difficulties" in New South Wales, Australia. The study examined the influence of school culture on the service delivery model used by these support teachers in three case studies, one of which is reported in this…

  18. Decision support models for solid waste management: Review and game-theoretic approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.; Sotirchos, Anastasios

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► The mainly used decision support frameworks for solid waste management are reviewed. ► The LCA, CBA and MCDM models are presented and their strengths, weaknesses, similarities and possible combinations are analyzed. ► The game-theoretic approach in a solid waste management context is presented. ► The waste management bargaining game is introduced as a specific decision support framework. ► Cooperative and non-cooperative game-theoretic approaches to decision support for solid waste management are discussed. - Abstract: This paper surveys decision support models that are commonly used in the solid waste management area. Most models are mainly developed within three decision support frameworks, which are the life-cycle assessment, the cost–benefit analysis and the multi-criteria decision-making. These frameworks are reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses as well as their critical issues are analyzed, while their possible combinations and extensions are also discussed. Furthermore, the paper presents how cooperative and non-cooperative game-theoretic approaches can be used for the purpose of modeling and analyzing decision-making in situations with multiple stakeholders. Specifically, since a waste management model is sustainable when considering not only environmental and economic but also social aspects, the waste management bargaining game is introduced as a specific decision support framework in which future models can be developed.

  19. A qualitative study of parental modeling and social support for physical activity in underserved adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wright, Marcie S; Wilson, Dawn K; Griffin, Sarah; Evans, Alexandra

    2010-04-01

    This study obtained qualitative data to assess how parental role modeling and parental social support influence physical activity in underserved (minority, low-income) adolescents. Fifty-two adolescents (22 males, 30 females; ages 10-14 years, 85% African-American) participated in a focus group (6-10 per group, same gender). Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed and coded by independent raters. Inter-rater reliabilities indicated adequate agreement [inter-rater reliability (r) = 0.84]. Themes were identified for parental role modeling and parental social support. Regarding parental role modeling, adolescents reported that parents engaged in a variety of different types of physical activities with their children such as walking, cycling and playing basketball; however, activity was infrequent. Sex differences were noted in parental social support indicating that female adolescents reported receiving more emotional and negative support for physical activity (being required to play outside with a sibling), while boys reported receiving more tangible types of support for physical activity. Adolescents also generated ideas on how to increase parental social support and in particular tangible support was highlighted as important by both males and females. This study suggests that future interventions should focus on improving parental engagement and tangible support that involve direct participation from parents in physical activities with their adolescents.

  20. Advanced space transportation system support contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The general focus is on a phase 2 lunar base, or a lunar base during the period after the first return of a crew to the Moon, but before permanent occupancy. The software effort produced a series of trajectory programs covering low earth orbit (LEO) to various node locations, the node locations to the lunar surface, and then back to LEO. The surface operations study took a lunar scenario in the civil needs data base (CNDB) and attempted to estimate the amount of space-suit work or extravehicular activity (EVA) required to set up the base. The maintenance and supply options study was a first look at the problems of supplying and maintaining the base. A lunar surface launch and landing facility was conceptually designed. The lunar storm shelter study examined the problems of radiation protection. The lunar surface construction and equipment assembly study defined twenty surface construction and assembly tasks in detail.

  1. The Lanthanide Contraction Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Oliver, Allen G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-04-19

    A complete, isostructural series of lanthanide complexes (except Pm) with the ligand TREN-1,2-HOIQO has been synthesized and structurally characterized by means of single-crystal X-ray analysis. All complexes are 1D-polymeric species in the solid state, with the lanthanide being in an eight-coordinate, distorted trigonal-dodecahedral environment with a donor set of eight unique oxygen atoms. This series constitutes the first complete set of isostructural lanthanide complexes with a ligand of denticity greater than two. The geometric arrangement of the chelating moieties slightly deviates across the lanthanide series, as analyzed by a shape parameter metric based on the comparison of the dihedral angles along all edges of the coordination polyhedron. The apparent lanthanide contraction in the individual Ln-O bond lengths deviates considerably from the expected quadratic decrease that was found previously in a number of complexes with ligands of low denticity. The sum of all bond lengths around the trivalent metal cation, however, is more regular, showing an almost ideal quadratic behavior across the entire series. The quadratic nature of the lanthanide contraction is derived theoretically from Slater's model for the calculation of ionic radii. In addition, the sum of all distances along the edges of the coordination polyhedron show exactly the same quadratic dependency as the Ln-X bond lengths. The universal validity of this coordination sphere contraction, concomitant with the quadratic decrease in Ln-X bond lengths, was confirmed by reexamination of four other, previously published, almost complete series of lanthanide complexes. Due to the importance of multidentate ligands for the chelation of rare-earth metals, this result provides a significant advance for the prediction and rationalization of the geometric features of the corresponding lanthanide complexes, with great potential impact for all aspects of lanthanide coordination.

  2. 12 CFR 704.16 - Contracts/written agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contracts/written agreements. 704.16 Section... CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.16 Contracts/written agreements. Services, facilities, personnel, or equipment shared with any party shall be supported by a written contract, with the duties and responsibilities...

  3. 48 CFR 333.211 - Contracting Officer's decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the legal sufficiency and format before sending the final decision to the contractor. The Contracting... appealed the final decision to the CBCA, the Contracting Officer shall forward the recommended action to OGC-GLD with a supplement to the contract file that supports the recommended correction or amendment....

  4. 48 CFR 333.211 - Contracting Officer's decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the legal sufficiency and format before sending the final decision to the contractor. The Contracting... appealed the final decision to the CBCA, the Contracting Officer shall forward the recommended action to OGC-GLD with a supplement to the contract file that supports the recommended correction or amendment....

  5. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for weapon systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... weapon systems. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for weapon systems. As authorized by 10 U.S.C. 2306b(h... contract for— (a) A weapon system and associated items, services, and logistics support for a weapon...

  6. 46 CFR 154.432 - Expansion and contraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Expansion and contraction. 154.432 Section 154.432... Membrane Tanks § 154.432 Expansion and contraction. The support system of a membrane tank must allow for thermal and physical expansion and contraction of the tank. Semi-Membrane Tanks...

  7. 46 CFR 154.432 - Expansion and contraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Expansion and contraction. 154.432 Section 154.432... Membrane Tanks § 154.432 Expansion and contraction. The support system of a membrane tank must allow for thermal and physical expansion and contraction of the tank. Semi-Membrane Tanks...

  8. 46 CFR 154.432 - Expansion and contraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Expansion and contraction. 154.432 Section 154.432... Membrane Tanks § 154.432 Expansion and contraction. The support system of a membrane tank must allow for thermal and physical expansion and contraction of the tank. Semi-Membrane Tanks...

  9. 46 CFR 154.432 - Expansion and contraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Expansion and contraction. 154.432 Section 154.432... Membrane Tanks § 154.432 Expansion and contraction. The support system of a membrane tank must allow for thermal and physical expansion and contraction of the tank. Semi-Membrane Tanks...

  10. 46 CFR 154.432 - Expansion and contraction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expansion and contraction. 154.432 Section 154.432... Membrane Tanks § 154.432 Expansion and contraction. The support system of a membrane tank must allow for thermal and physical expansion and contraction of the tank. Semi-Membrane Tanks...

  11. Resource modelling for control: how hydrogeological modelling can support a water quality monitoring infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzari, Andrea; Doveri, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the physical/chemical processes implied with the exploitation of water bodies for human consumption is an essential tool for the optimisation of the monitoring infrastructure. Due to their increasing importance in the context of human consumption (at least in the EU), this work focuses on groundwater resources. In the framework of drinkable water networks, the physical and data-driven modelling of transport phenomena in groundwater can help optimising the sensor network and validating the acquired data. This work proposes the combined usage of physical and data-driven modelling as a support to the design and maximisation of results from a network of distributed sensors. In particular, the validation of physico-chemical measurements and the detection of eventual anomalies by a set of continuous measurements take benefit from the knowledge of the domain from which water is abstracted, and its expected characteristics. Change-detection techniques based on non-specific sensors (presented by quite a large literature during the last two decades) have to deal with the classical issues of maximising correct detections and minimising false alarms, the latter of the two being the most typical problem to be faced, in the view of designing truly applicable monitoring systems. In this context, the definition of "anomaly" in terms of distance from an expected value or feature characterising the quality of water implies the definition of a suitable metric and the knowledge of the physical and chemical peculiarities of the natural domain from which water is exploited, with its implications in terms of characteristics of the water resource.

  12. Service Contract Compliance Management in Business Process Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbili, Marwane; Pulvermueller, Elke

    Compliance management is a critical concern for corporations, required to respect contracts. This concern is particularly relevant in the context of business process management (BPM) as this paradigm is getting adopted more widely for-designing and building IT systems. Enforcing contractual compliance needs to be modeled at different levels of a BPM framework, which also includes the service layer. In this paper, we discuss requirements and methods for modeling contractual compliance for an SOA-supported BPM. We also show how business rule management integrated into an industry BPM tool allows modeling and processing functional and non-functional-property constraints which may be extracted from business process contracts. This work proposes a framework that responds to the requirements identified and proposes an architecture implementing it. Our approach is also illustrated by an example.

  13. Actin Depolymerization Drives Actomyosin Ring Contraction during Budding Yeast Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Inês Mendes; Rubinstein, Boris; Kucharavy, Andrei; Unruh, Jay R.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Actin filaments and myosin-II are evolutionarily conserved force generating components of the contractile ring during cytokinesis. Here we show that in budding yeast actin filament depolymerization plays a major role in actomyosin ring constriction. Cofilin mutation or chemically stabilizing actin filaments attenuates actomyosin ring constriction. Deletion of myosin-II motor domain or the myosin regulatory light chain reduced the contraction rate and also the rate of actin depolymerization in the ring. We constructed a quantitative microscopic model of actomyosin ring constriction via filament sliding driven by both actin depolymerization and myosin-II motor activity. Model simulations based on experimental measurements supports the notion that actin depolymerization is the predominant mechanism for ring constriction. The model predicts invariability of total contraction time irrespective of the initial ring size as originally reported for C elegans embryonic cells. This prediction was validated in yeast cells of different sizes due to having different ploidies. PMID:22698284

  14. Teaching about Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Michael; Kosnoff, Kathy

    1978-01-01

    Presents teaching strategies for introducing high school students to contract law. Offers as a case study a contract agreement between pro football players and team owners. Stresses basic elements of contracts (offer, acceptance, consideration, and understanding the bargaining process). Journal available from the American Bar Association, 1155…

  15. The Joy of Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Kevin

    This paper is a practical guide that explains and illustrates contracts between libraries and vendors for computerized circulation systems. It describes the elements of a typical contract to include the equipment and services that should be specified in the contract and establishes scheduling and acceptance testing needs. Included in a contract…

  16. Contracting for Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Robin E.; Nord, Roy

    1982-01-01

    The major steps a college should undertake in contracting for services, including the initial determination as to whether or not contracting is the best way to provide a particular service, are described. Three general activities that apply to decisions about contracting in most circumstances are: investigating service characteristics; identifying…

  17. Russian Teaching Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Betsy

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes two Russian teaching contracts, rhetorically comparing purpose and audience, culture, gender, and the role of the individual versus the state. Uses anecdotal episodes as a framework for examining Russian culture and analyzing university teaching contracts, concluding that the contracts are not only brief and factual but also reflect a…

  18. Application of land surface hydrology measurements to enhance modeling for decision support in the New York City water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakauer, N.; Chaouch, N.; Lakhankar, T.; Matonse, A. H.; McDonald, K. C.; Pierson, D. C.; Schneiderman, E.; Temimi, M.

    2012-12-01

    used. This project will directly benefit the SMAP mission through development of of new applications of SMAP freeze/thaw and soil moisture products supported under SMAP's Early Adopters program. Our hypothesis is that the use of remote sensing and in situ land surface data will result in significant improvements in model simulation of low-flow water quantity and quality. Portions of this work were carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Ecological models in support of regulatory risk assessments of pesticides: developing a strategy for the future.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Valery E; Hommen, Udo; Thorbek, Pernille; Heimbach, Fred; Van den Brink, Paul J; Wogram, Jörn; Thulke, Hans-Hermann; Grimm, Volker

    2009-01-01

    This brief communication reports on the main findings of the LEMTOX workshop, held from 9 to 12 September 2007, at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in Leipzig, Germany. The workshop brought together a diverse group of stakeholders from academia, regulatory authorities, contract research organizations, and industry, representing Europe, the United States, and Asia, to discuss the role of ecological modeling in risk assessments of pesticides, particularly under the European regulatory framework. The following questions were addressed: What are the potential benefits of using ecological models in pesticide registration and risk assessment? What obstacles prevent ecological modeling from being used routinely in regulatory submissions? What actions are needed to overcome the identified obstacles? What recommendations should be made to ensure good modeling practice in this context? The workshop focused exclusively on population models, and discussion was focused on those categories of population models that link effects on individuals (e.g., survival, growth, reproduction, behavior) to effects on population dynamics. The workshop participants concluded that the overall benefits of ecological modeling are that it could bring more ecology into ecological risk assessment, and it could provide an excellent tool for exploring the importance of, and interactions among, ecological complexities. However, there are a number of challenges that need to be overcome before such models will receive wide acceptance for pesticide risk assessment, despite having been used extensively in other contexts (e.g., conservation biology). The need for guidance on Good Modeling Practice (on model development, analysis, interpretation, evaluation, documentation, and communication), as well as the need for case studies that can be used to explore the added value of ecological models for risk assessment, were identified as top priorities. Assessing recovery potential of exposed

  20. A new model describing the metal-support interaction in noble metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mojet, B.L.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Ramaker, D.E.

    1999-09-10

    The catalytic activity and spectroscopic properties of supported noble metal catalysts are strongly influenced by the acidity/alkalinity of the support but are relatively independent of the metal (Pd or Pt) or the type of support (zeolite LTL or SiO{sub 2}). As the alkalinity of the support increases, the TOF of the metal particles for neopentane hydrogenolysis decreases. At the same time, there is a decrease in the XPS binding energy and a shift from linear to bridge bonded CO in the IR spectra. Analysis of the shape resonance in XANES spectra indicates that in the presence of chemisorbed hydrogen the difference in energy between the Pt-H antibonding orbital and the Fermi level decreases as the alkalinity of the support increases. Based on the results from the IR, XPS, and shape resonance data a new model is proposed in which the interaction between the metal and support leads to a shift in the energy of the metal valence orbitals. The EXAFS structural analysis indicates that the small metal particles are in contact only with the oxide ions of the support. Finally, a new spectroscopic characterization, Atomic XAFS, is presented which provides new insights into the origin of the electronic changes in the metal. As the alkalinity of the support increases, there is decrease in the metal ionization potential. The primary interaction is a Coulomb attraction between metal particle and support oxygen ions, which affects the metal interatomic potential. This model for the metal-support interaction explicitly excludes the need for electron transfer, and it can account for all observed changes in the catalytic, electronic, and structural properties of the supported metal particles induced by support acidity ranging from acidic to neutral to alkaline.

  1. Social-support moderated stress: a nonlinear dynamical model and the stress-buffering hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Field, Richard J; Schuldberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Health psychology has studied the cross-sectional, stationary relationships linking stress, social support, and health. Levels of stress-related illness are generally modeled by including a nonlinear multiplicative or 'buffering' effect, corresponding to the interaction of stressor levels with social support from family and friends. The motivation of the present research is to extend an iterative, dynamic model of this well-investigated psychological process using a dynamical systems model expressed as a set of continuous, nonlinear differential equations similar to those of the 'Oregonator,' a model of a nonlinear dynamic chemical system. This model of the behavior of an individual is amenable to numerical investigation of its stationary-state stability properties, temporal evolution, and cause-effect relationships. The continuous variables in this new approach refer to varying states of an individual; they are Perceived stress (X), Symptoms (Y), and Social support (Z). It is expected that poor health in this model, represented by Symptoms (Y), is directly related to Perceived stress, as well as being tied in more complicated ways to Social support. A number of such models may be envisioned, some including a multiplicative, 'buffering' (- X x Z) effect of social support dependent on stress levels. We explore the behavior of this model over ranges of parameter values and initial conditions and relate these results to how an individual reacts to environmental challenges at various levels of stressors and social-support recruitment. Data generated by the model are in turn analyzed with a traditional cross-sectional statistical technique. Similarities and differences between chemical and psychological systems are discussed.

  2. Client satisfaction with a new group-based model of case management for supported housing services.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Reddy, Navin; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Supportive housing typically offers rental subsidies and individual intensive community-based case management and has become a predominant service model for homeless adults. Alternative case management models have not been adequately explored. This study evaluates satisfaction with a novel group-intensive peer support (GIPS) model of case management for the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program. A total of 95 HUD-VASH clients rated their satisfaction with services and responded to open-ended questions about what they liked best and least about the program. Quantitative and qualitative analyses compared clients who attended groups as part of the GIPS model and those who did not. No significant difference in satisfaction between group and non-group attenders were found. Clients reported what they liked best about the program was the staff; those who attended groups reported what they liked best was the social interaction and peer support. These findings suggest clients who attend groups for their primary source of case management may be as satisfied as those who receive only individual case management. GIPS offers a feasible and acceptable service model and should be further explored along with other alternative models of care in supportive housing services. PMID:24413143

  3. Wind Tunnel Model Support Cart with Telescoping Mast and Cable Yaw Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Monroe, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    The 14-by-22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center uses model carts to support and position models in the test section. The carts are portable through the use of air bearings and can be moved from the test to the Model Prep Area (MPA) to change models in preparation for a new test. This paper describes the design of a new model cart that is three feet shorter than existing carts. This will eliminate clearance problems when moving the model and cart from the MPA to the test section.

  4. Hanford Tank 241-C-103 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.

    2008-01-15

    This report tabulates data generated by laboratory characterization and testing of three samples collected from tank C-103. The data presented here will form the basis for a release model that will be developed for tank C-103. These release models are being developed to support the tank risk assessments performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. for DOE.

  5. SITE CHARACTERIZATION TO SUPPORT MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of conceptual and predictive models is an important tool to guide site characterization in support of monitoring contaminants in ground water. The accuracy of predictive models is limited by the adequacy of the input data and the assumptions made to constrain mod...

  6. A Model Supported Interactive Virtual Environment for Natural Resource Sharing in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbalios, N.; Ioannidou, I.; Tzionas, P.; Paraskeuopoulos, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a realistic 3D model supported virtual environment for environmental education, that highlights the importance of water resource sharing by focusing on the tragedy of the commons dilemma. The proposed virtual environment entails simulations that are controlled by a multi-agent simulation model of a real ecosystem consisting…

  7. Analysing Students' Shared Activity while Modeling a Biological Process in a Computer-Supported Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergazaki, M.; Zogza, V.; Komis, V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study with three dyads of high school students (age 14 years) each collaborating on a plant growth modeling task in the computer-supported educational environment "ModelsCreator". Following a qualitative line of research, the present study aims at highlighting the ways in which the collaborating students as well as the…

  8. Comparing Computer-Supported Dynamic Modeling and "Paper & Pencil" Concept Mapping Technique in Students' Collaborative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komis, Vassilis; Ergazaki, Marida; Zogza, Vassiliki

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at highlighting the collaborative activity of two high school students (age 14) in the cases of modeling the complex biological process of plant growth with two different tools: the "paper & pencil" concept mapping technique and the computer-supported educational environment "ModelsCreator". Students' shared activity in both cases…

  9. The virtual machine (VM) scaler: an infrastructure manager supporting environmental modeling on IaaS clouds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) clouds provide a new medium for deployment of environmental modeling applications. Harnessing advancements in virtualization, IaaS clouds can provide dynamic scalable infrastructure to better support scientific modeling computational demands. Providing scientific m...

  10. A Decision Support Model and Tool to Assist Financial Decision-Making in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhayat, Imtiaz; Manuguerra, Maurizio; Baldock, Clive

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a model and tool is proposed to assist universities and other mission-based organisations to ascertain systematically the optimal portfolio of projects, in any year, meeting the organisations risk tolerances and available funds. The model and tool presented build on previous work on university operations and decision support systems…

  11. Supporting the Development of Conceptions of Statistics by Engaging Students in Measuring and Modeling Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Richard; Kim, Min-joung; Schauble, Leona

    2007-01-01

    New capabilities in "TinkerPlots 2.0" supported the conceptual development of fifth- and sixth-grade students as they pursued several weeks of instruction that emphasized data modeling. The instruction highlighted links between data analysis, chance, and modeling in the context of describing and explaining the distributions of measures that result…

  12. Reliability and Maintainability Model (RAM): User and Maintenance Manual. Part 2; Improved Supportability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the procedures for utilizing and maintaining the Reliability & Maintainability Model (RAM) developed by the University of Dayton for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose of the grant is to provide support to NASA in establishing operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems. As part of this research objective, the model described here was developed. This Manual updates and supersedes the 1995 RAM User and Maintenance Manual. Changes and enhancements from the 1995 version of the model are primarily a result of the addition of more recent aircraft and shuttle R&M data.

  13. Support plane method applied to ground objects recognition using modelled SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherdev, Denis A.; Fursov, Vladimir A.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the object recognition problem was solved using support plane method. The modelled SAR images were used as features vectors in the recognition algorithm. Radar signal backscattering of objects in different observing poses is presented in SAR images. For real time simulation, we used simple mixture model of Lambertian-specular reflectivity. To this end, an algorithm of ray tracing is extended for simulating SAR images of 3D man-made models. The suggested algorithm of support plane is very effective in objects recognition using SAR images and RCS diagrams.

  14. A confidant support and problem solving model of divorced fathers' parenting.

    PubMed

    Degarmo, David S; Forgatch, Marion S

    2012-03-01

    This study tested a hypothesized social interaction learning (SIL) model of confidant support and paternal parenting. The latent growth curve analysis employed 230 recently divorced fathers, of which 177 enrolled support confidants, to test confidant support as a predictor of problem solving outcomes and problem solving outcomes as predictors of change in fathers' parenting. Fathers' parenting was hypothesized to predict growth in child behavior. Observational measures of support behaviors and problem solving outcomes were obtained from structured discussions of personal and parenting issues faced by the fathers. Findings replicated and extended prior cross-sectional studies with divorced mothers and their confidants. Confidant support predicted better problem solving outcomes, problem solving predicted more effective parenting, and parenting in turn predicted growth in children's reduced total problem behavior T scores over 18 months. Supporting a homophily perspective, fathers' antisociality was associated with confidant antisociality but only fathers' antisociality influenced the support process model. Intervention implications are discussed regarding SIL parent training and social support.

  15. Chemerin connects fat to arterial contraction

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Stephanie W.; Dorrance, Anne M.; Penfold, Mark E.; Rourke, Jillian L.; Sinal, Christopher J.; Seitz, Bridget; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Charvat, Trevor T.; Thompson, Janice M.; Burnett, Robert; Fink, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity and hypertension are comorbid in epidemic proportion, yet their biological connection is largely a mystery. The peptide chemerin is a candidate for connecting fat deposits around the blood vessel (perivascular adipose tissue, PVAT) to arterial contraction. We presently test the hypothesis that chemerin is expressed in PVAT and is vasoactive, supporting the existence of a chemerin axis in the vasculature. Approach and Results RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western analyses supported the synthesis and expression of chemerin in PVAT, while the primary chemerin receptor ChemR23 was expressed both in the tunica media and endothelial layer. The ChemR23 agonist chemerin-9 caused receptor-, concentration-dependent contraction in the isolated rat thoracic aorta, superior mesenteric artery, and mesenteric resistance artery, and contraction was significantly amplified (over 100%) when nitric oxide synthase was inhibited, the endothelial cell mechanically removed or tone was placed on the arteries. The novel ChemR23 antagonist CCX832 inhibited phenylephrine- and PGF2α-induced contraction (+PVAT) suggesting that endogenous chemerin contributes to contraction. Arteries from animals with dysfunctional endothelium (obese or hypertensive) demonstrated a pronounced contraction to chemerin-9. Finally, mesenteric arteries from obese humans demonstrate amplified contraction to chemerin-9. Conclusions These data support a new role for chemerin as an endogenous vasoconstrictor that operates through a receptor typically attributed to function only in immune cells. PMID:23559624

  16. Progress in the Development of an Integrated Modeling Tool to Support DIII-D and EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Q.; Lao, L. L.; Chu, M. S.; St. John, H. E.; Abla, G.; Collier, A.; Prater, R.; Park, J. M.; Li, G.; Guo, W.; Pan, C.; Srinivasan, R.; Worrall, M.

    2009-11-01

    Recent progress in the development of the IMFIT Integrated modeling tool is presented. The goal of IMFIT is to develop a modern and efficient integrated modeling platform to support DIII-D and EAST research, including the capability to simulate the behavior of tokamak discharges. Recent progress includes user-friendly and Python-based GUIs with multi-links to equilibrium, transport, and stability codes to facilitate modeling and analysis, and EFIT F90 upgrade with dynamic memory allocation and MPI option to support multiple devices and grid sizes. Through the GUI, straightforward analysis for kinetic EFIT reconstruction is made available. Ongoing developments include design of efficient algorithms to support interactions among physics modules such as EFIT/ONETWO/TGLF coupling for scenario development and transport flux analysis and EFIT/PEST3/TORAY coupling for modeling of tearing mode stability. Details will be presented.

  17. The biobehavioral family model: testing social support as an additional exogenous variable.

    PubMed

    Woods, Sarah B; Priest, Jacob B; Roush, Tara

    2014-12-01

    This study tests the inclusion of social support as a distinct exogenous variable in the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM). The BBFM is a biopsychosocial approach to health that proposes that biobehavioral reactivity (anxiety and depression) mediates the relationship between family emotional climate and disease activity. Data for this study included married, English-speaking adult participants (n = 1,321; 55% female; M age = 45.2 years) from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative epidemiological study of the frequency of mental disorders in the United States. Participants reported their demographics, marital functioning, social support from friends and relatives, anxiety and depression (biobehavioral reactivity), number of chronic health conditions, and number of prescription medications. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the items used in the measures of negative marital interactions, social support, and biobehavioral reactivity, as well as the use of negative marital interactions, friends' social support, and relatives' social support as distinct factors in the model. Structural equation modeling indicated a good fit of the data to the hypothesized model (χ(2)  = 846.04, p = .000, SRMR = .039, CFI = .924, TLI = .914, RMSEA = .043). Negative marital interactions predicted biobehavioral reactivity (β = .38, p < .001), as did relatives' social support, inversely (β = -.16, p < .001). Biobehavioral reactivity predicted disease activity (β = .40, p < .001) and was demonstrated to be a significant mediator through tests of indirect effects. Findings are consistent with previous tests of the BBFM with adult samples, and suggest the important addition of family social support as a predicting factor in the model. PMID:24981970

  18. The biobehavioral family model: testing social support as an additional exogenous variable.

    PubMed

    Woods, Sarah B; Priest, Jacob B; Roush, Tara

    2014-12-01

    This study tests the inclusion of social support as a distinct exogenous variable in the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM). The BBFM is a biopsychosocial approach to health that proposes that biobehavioral reactivity (anxiety and depression) mediates the relationship between family emotional climate and disease activity. Data for this study included married, English-speaking adult participants (n = 1,321; 55% female; M age = 45.2 years) from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative epidemiological study of the frequency of mental disorders in the United States. Participants reported their demographics, marital functioning, social support from friends and relatives, anxiety and depression (biobehavioral reactivity), number of chronic health conditions, and number of prescription medications. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the items used in the measures of negative marital interactions, social support, and biobehavioral reactivity, as well as the use of negative marital interactions, friends' social support, and relatives' social support as distinct factors in the model. Structural equation modeling indicated a good fit of the data to the hypothesized model (χ(2)  = 846.04, p = .000, SRMR = .039, CFI = .924, TLI = .914, RMSEA = .043). Negative marital interactions predicted biobehavioral reactivity (β = .38, p < .001), as did relatives' social support, inversely (β = -.16, p < .001). Biobehavioral reactivity predicted disease activity (β = .40, p < .001) and was demonstrated to be a significant mediator through tests of indirect effects. Findings are consistent with previous tests of the BBFM with adult samples, and suggest the important addition of family social support as a predicting factor in the model.

  19. SITE CHARACTERIZATION TO SUPPORT DEVELOPMENT OF CONCEPTUAL SITE MODELS AND TRANSPORT MODELS FOR MONITORING CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of conceptual and predictive models is an important tool to guide site characterization in support of monitoring contaminants in ground water. The accuracy of predictive models is limited by the adequacy of the input data and the assumptions made to constrain mod...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AGGREGATION AND EPISODE SELECTION SCHEME TO SUPPORT THE MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of an episode selection and aggregation approach, designed to support distributional estimation of use with the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, is described. The approach utilized cluster analysis of the 700-hPa east-west and north-south...

  1. Communication competence, social support, and depression among college students: a model of facebook and face-to-face support network influence.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin B; Rosenberg, Jenny; Egbert, Nicole; Ploeger, Nicole A; Bernard, Daniel R; King, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of the social networking site Facebook and face-to-face support networks on depression among (N = 361) college students. The authors used the Relational Health Communication Competence Model as a framework for examining the influence of communication competence on social support network satisfaction and depression. Moreover, they examined the influence of interpersonal and social integrative motives as exogenous variables. On the basis of previous work, the authors propose and test a theoretical model using structural equation modeling. The results indicated empirical support for the model, with interpersonal motives predicting increased face-to-face and computer-mediated competence, increased social support satisfaction with face-to-face and Facebook support, and lower depression scores. The implications of the findings for theory, key limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

  2. Communication competence, social support, and depression among college students: a model of facebook and face-to-face support network influence.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin B; Rosenberg, Jenny; Egbert, Nicole; Ploeger, Nicole A; Bernard, Daniel R; King, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of the social networking site Facebook and face-to-face support networks on depression among (N = 361) college students. The authors used the Relational Health Communication Competence Model as a framework for examining the influence of communication competence on social support network satisfaction and depression. Moreover, they examined the influence of interpersonal and social integrative motives as exogenous variables. On the basis of previous work, the authors propose and test a theoretical model using structural equation modeling. The results indicated empirical support for the model, with interpersonal motives predicting increased face-to-face and computer-mediated competence, increased social support satisfaction with face-to-face and Facebook support, and lower depression scores. The implications of the findings for theory, key limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23030518

  3. Verification and validation of the comprehensive operational support evaluation model for space. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.A.

    1991-12-01

    This study details the verification and validation (V and V) of the Comprehensive Operational Support Evaluation Model for Space (COSEMS). COSEMS is an Ada-based simulation which models spacecraft constellation support concepts such as support from the ground and on-orbit support. While the model is intended for use in analyzing Strategic Defense System concepts, it can easily evaluate non-military satellite constellations. The VV was confined to a subset of the over 200 subprograms which comprise COSEMS. This subset covered random number generation, reliability, orbital mechanics, and mission planning functions. The study used traces and comparison to other models to perform the VV. An input/output analysis was also performed to ascertain the ease of use of COSEMS and the utility of its output. The analysis showed that the areas under investigation performed according to the model and that the model approximated real-world behavior except for orbital motion. The part of the model governing orbital perturbations due to the non-spherical earth omitted rotation of the line-of-apsides. The analysis also revealed that the Ada code and the input/output format are highly machine dependent, which restricts the program from coming into widespread use and limits the usefulness of the output.

  4. Educational tool for modeling and simulation of a closed regenerative life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Tatsuya; Fanchiang, Christine; Aoki, Hirofumi; Newman, Dava J.

    For long term missions on the moon and Mars, regenerative life support systems emerge as a promising key technology for sustaining successful explorations with reduced re-supply logistics and cost. The purpose of this study was to create a simple model of a regenerative life support system which allows preliminary investigation of system responses. A simplified regenerative life support system was made with MATLAB Simulink ™. Mass flows in the system were simplified to carbon, water, oxygen and carbon dioxide. The subsystems included crew members, animals, a plant module, and a waste processor, which exchanged mass into and out of mass reservoirs. Preliminary numerical simulations were carried out to observe system responses. The simplified life support system model allowed preliminary investigation of the system response to perturbations such as increased or decreased number of crew members. The model is simple and flexible enough to add new components, and also possible to numerically predict non-linear subsystem functions and responses. Future work includes practical issues such as energy efficiency, air leakage, nutrition, and plant growth modeling. The model functions as an effective teaching tool about how a regenerative advanced life support system works.

  5. Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kieran T; Pasch, Lauri A; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels whereas positive support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and divorce status. These findings emphasize the need to look beyond conflict when explaining how aggression affects relationships and when working with couples with a history of physical aggression who are seeking to improve their relationships.

  6. Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kieran T; Pasch, Lauri A; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels whereas positive support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and divorce status. These findings emphasize the need to look beyond conflict when explaining how aggression affects relationships and when working with couples with a history of physical aggression who are seeking to improve their relationships. PMID:26168263

  7. Teaching Activities for the Construction of a Precursor Model in 5- to 6-Year-Old Children's Thinking: The Case of Thermal Expansion and Contraction of Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravanis, Konstantinos; Papandreou, Maria; Kampeza, Maria; Vellopoulou, Angeliki

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of empirical research on the construction of a precursor model of the phenomenon of thermal expansion and contraction of metals in preschool children's thinking, which is compatible with the model used in science education. The research included 87 children aged 5-6. It was conducted at four stages, during…

  8. Providing Real-time Sea Ice Modeling Support to the U.S. Coast Guard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Richard; Dykes, James; Hebert, David; Posey, Pamela; Rogers, Erick; Wallcraft, Alan; Phelps, Michael; Smedstad, Ole Martin; Wang, Shouping; Geiszler, Dan

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) supported the U.S. Coast Guard Research Development Center (RDC) through a demonstration project during the summer and autumn of 2015. Specifically, a modeling system composed of a mesoscale atmospheric model, regional sea ice model, and regional wave model were loosely coupled to provide real-time 72-hr forecasts of environmental conditions for the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas. The system components included a 2-km regional Community Ice CodE (CICE) sea ice model, 15-km Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric model, and a 5-km regional WAVEWATCH III wave model. The wave model utilized modeled sea ice concentration fields to incorporate the effects of sea ice on waves. The other modeling components assimilated atmosphere, ocean, and ice observations available from satellite and in situ sources. The modeling system generated daily 72-hr forecasts of synoptic weather (including visibility), ice drift, ice thickness, ice concentration and ice strength for missions within the economic exclusion zone off the coast of Alaska and a transit to the North Pole in support of the National Science Foundation GEOTRACES cruise. Model forecasts graphics were shared on a common web page with selected graphical products made available via ftp for bandwidth limited users. Model ice thickness and ice drift show very good agreement compared with Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Ice Mass Balance buoys. This demonstration served as a precursor to a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave-ice modeling system under development. National Ice Center (NIC) analysts used these model data products (CICE and COAMPS) along with other existing model and satellite data to produce the predicted 48-hr position of the ice edge. The NIC served as a liaison with the RDC and NRL to provide feedback on the model predictions. This evaluation provides a baseline analysis of the current models for future comparison studies

  9. Post-emplacement cooling and contraction of lava flows: InSAR observations and thermal model for lava fields at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Werner; Dumont, Stephanie; Lavallee, Yan; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2016-04-01

    Gradual post-emplacement subsidence of lava flows has been observed at various volcanoes, e.g. Okmok volcano in Alaska, Kilauea volcano on Hawaii and Etna volcano on Sicily. In Iceland, this effect has been observed at Krafla volcano and Hekla volcano. The latter was chosen as a case study for investigating subsidence mechanisms, specifically thermal contraction. Effects like gravitational loading, clast repacking or creeping of a hot and liquid core can contribute to subsidence of emplaced lava flows, but thermal contraction is considered being a crucial effect. The extent to which it contributes to lava flow subsidence is investigated by mapping the relative movement of emplaced lava flows and flow substrate, and modeling the observed signal. The slow vegetation in Iceland is advantageous for Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and offers great coherence over long periods after lava emplacement, expanding beyond the outlines of lava flows. Due to this reason, InSAR observations over volcanoes in Iceland have taken place for more than 20 years. By combining InSAR tracks from ERS, Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites we gain six time series with a total of 99 interferograms. Making use of the high spatial resolution, a temporal trend of vertical lava movements was investigated over a course of over 23 years over the 1991 lava flow of Hekla volcano, Iceland. From these time series, temporal trends of accumulated subsidence and subsidence velocities were determined in line of sight of the satellites. However, the deformation signal of lava fields after emplacement is vertically dominated. Subsidence on this lava field is still ongoing and subsidence rates vary from 14.8 mm/year in 1995 to about 1.0 mm/year in 2014. Fitting a simple exponential function suggests a exponential decay constant of 5.95 years. Additionally, a one-dimensional, semi-analytical model was fitted to these data. While subsidence due to phase change is calculated analytically

  10. When supervisors perceive non-work support: test of a trickle-down model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Yu; Lee, Shao-Jen; Hu, Changya; Yang, Chun-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Using the trickle-down model as the theoretical foundation, we explored whether subordinates' perceived supervisory non-work support (subordinates' PSNS) mediates the relationship between supervisors' perception of higher-level managers' non-work support (supervisors' PSNS) and subordinates' organizational citizenship behaviors. Using dyadic data collected from 132 employees and their immediate supervisors, we found support for the aforementioned mediation process. Furthermore, supervisors' perceived in-group/out-group membership of subordinates moderated the aforementioned supervisors' PSNS-subordinates' PSNS relationship, such that this relationship is stronger for out-group subordinates. Theoretical and practical implications and future research directions are discussed.

  11. Body weight support by virtual model control of an impedance controlled exoskeleton (LOPES) for gait training.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Herman; Koopman, Bram; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of an alternative method to support body weight in a powered exoskeleton is demonstrated. Instead of using an overhead suspension system, body weight is supported by augmenting the joint moments through virtual model control. The advantages of this novel method is that it allows for independent support of the left and right leg, and does not interfere with the excitation of cutanous afferents and balance of the body or trunk. Results show that after a short familiarization period the activity of muscles during initial stance reduces and kinematics become close to normal. PMID:19163077

  12. Effect of 2,4,6-trimethyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]benzene-sulfonamide on calcium influx in three contraction models

    PubMed Central

    GRZEŚK, ELŻBIETA; SZADUJKIS-SZADURSKA, KATARZYNA; WICIŃSKI, MICHAŁ; MALINOWSKI, BARTOSZ; SINJAB, THABIT A.; TEJZA, BARBARA; PUJANEK, MACIEJ; JANISZEWSKA, EWA; KOPCZYŃSKA, ANNA; GRZEŚK, GRZEGORZ

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Trimethyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]benzenesulfonamide (m-3M3FBS) activates phospholipase C and stimulates apoptosis; however, in smooth muscle cells it may increase the perfusion pressure. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the physiological effect of direct stimulation of phospholipase C on vascular smooth muscle reactivity using three contraction models. Experiments were performed on the isolated and perfused tail artery of Wistar rats. The contraction force in the present model was measured by an increased level of perfusion pressure with a constant flow. Concentration-response curves (CRCs) obtained for phenylephrine, arg-vasopressin, mastoparan-7 and Bay K8644 presented a sigmoidal association. In comparison to the control curves, CRCs in the presence of m-3M3FBS were significantly shifted to the left except for Bay K8644. Analyses of calcium influx suggest that in the presence of m-3M3FBS the calcium influx from intra- and extracellular calcium stores was significantly higher. The results of the present experiments suggest that m-3M3FBS significantly increases the reactivity of vascular smooth muscle stimulated with metabotropic receptors or G-protein by an increase in calcium influx from intra- and extracellular calcium stores. The current knowledge regarding the apoptotic pathway shows the significance of calcium ions involved in this process, thus, m-3M3FBS may induce apoptosis by an increase of cytoplasmic calcium concentration; however, simultaneously, the use of this mechanism in therapy must be preceded by a molecular modification that eliminates a possible vasoconstriction effect. PMID:26870347

  13. Designing and operationalizing a customized internal evaluation model for cancer treatment support programs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Heather K; Preussler, Jaime; Denzen, Ellen M; Payton, Tammy J; Thao, Viengneesee; Murphy, Elizabeth A; Harwood, Eileen

    2014-09-01

    Be The Match® Patient and Health Professional Services (PHPS) supports patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and caregivers by providing educational programs and resources. HCT is a potentially curative therapy for blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma. To help meet the increasing demand for support services, PHPS implemented a multipronged plan to build and sustain the organization's capacity to conduct evaluation of its programs and resources. To do so, PHPS created and operationalized an internal evaluation model, developed customized resources to help stakeholders incorporate evaluation in program planning, and implemented utilization-focused evaluation for quality improvement. Formal mentorship was also critical in the development of an evidence-based, customized model and navigating inherent challenges throughout the process. Our model can serve as a guide for evaluators on establishing and operationalizing an internal evaluation program. Ultimately, we seek to improve support and education services from the time of diagnosis through survivorship.

  14. Conceptual design study of a solar concentrator/support structure: A three dimensional finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purasinghe, R.; Laug, K. K.

    1993-11-01

    Under the space environment the paraboloid solar concentrators and support structures can deform and hence the focal point of the concentrators can diffuse. If this diffusion is large, energy will not concentrate on the thruster as desired. This paper addresses this aspect of pointing and accuracy analysis of solar concentrators, due to equivalent thrust loads. The previous studies were limited to the concentrator system being modeled with a simplified finite element model that includes only the support struts and torus. The torus model was made up of several equal length beams. The simple model did not contain the paraboloid reflector, and assumes the reflector does not effect the deformation of the torus. In the present study the inflated parabolic reflector is included in the model. The results demonstrate the nonuniform displacements on the reflector that confirms the reflector's potato chipping effect.

  15. Conceptual Design Study of a Solar Concentrator/Support Structure: A Three Dimensional Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purasinghe, R.

    1993-01-01

    Under the space environment the paraboloid solar concentrators and support structures can deform and hence the focal point of the concentrators can diffuse. If this diffusion is large, energy will not concentrate on the thruster as desired. This paper addresses this aspect of pointing and accuracy analysis of solar concentrators, due to equivalent thrust loads. The previous studies were limited to the concentrator system being modeled with a simplified finite element model that includes only the support struts and torus. The torus model was made up of several equal length beams. The simple model did not contain the paraboloid reflector, and assumes the reflector does not affect the deformation of the torus. In the present study the inflated parabolic reflector is included in the model. The results demonstrate the non uniform displacements on the reflector that confirms the reflector's potato chipping effect.

  16. Family support and acceptance, gay male identity formation, and psychological adjustment: a path model.

    PubMed

    Elizur, Y; Ziv, M

    2001-01-01

    While heterosexist family undermining has been demonstrated to be a developmental risk factor in the life of persons with same-gender orientation, the issue of protective family factors is both controversial and relatively neglected. In this study of Israeli gay males (N = 114), we focused on the interrelations of family support, family acceptance and family knowledge of gay orientation, and gay male identity formation, and their effects on mental health and self-esteem. A path model was proposed based on the hypotheses that family support, family acceptance, family knowledge, and gay identity formation have an impact on psychological adjustment, and that family support has an effect on gay identity formation that is mediated by family acceptance. The assessment of gay identity formation was based on an established stage model that was streamlined for cross-cultural practice by defining three basic processes of same-gender identity formation: self-definition, self-acceptance, and disclosure (Elizur & Mintzer, 2001). The testing of our conceptual path model demonstrated an excellent fit with the data. An alternative model that hypothesized effects of gay male identity on family acceptance and family knowledge did not fit the data. Interpreting these results, we propose that the main effect of family support/acceptance on gay identity is related to the process of disclosure, and that both general family support and family acceptance of same-gender orientation play a significant role in the psychological adjustment of gay men.

  17. A simulation based optimization approach to model and design life support systems for manned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Selen

    This dissertation considers the problem of process synthesis and design of life-support systems for manned space missions. A life-support system is a set of technologies to support human life for short and long-term spaceflights, via providing the basic life-support elements, such as oxygen, potable water, and food. The design of the system needs to meet the crewmember demand for the basic life-support elements (products of the system) and it must process the loads generated by the crewmembers. The system is subject to a myriad of uncertainties because most of the technologies involved are still under development. The result is high levels of uncertainties in the estimates of the model parameters, such as recovery rates or process efficiencies. Moreover, due to the high recycle rates within the system, the uncertainties are amplified and propagated within the system, resulting in a complex problem. In this dissertation, two algorithms have been successfully developed to help making design decisions for life-support systems. The algorithms utilize a simulation-based optimization approach that combines a stochastic discrete-event simulation and a deterministic mathematical programming approach to generate multiple, unique realizations of the controlled evolution of the system. The timelines are analyzed using time series data mining techniques and statistical tools to determine the necessary technologies, their deployment schedules and capacities, and the necessary basic life-support element amounts to support crew life and activities for the mission duration.

  18. Large-scale ligand-based predictive modelling using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Alvarsson, Jonathan; Lampa, Samuel; Schaal, Wesley; Andersson, Claes; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Spjuth, Ola

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size of datasets in drug discovery makes it challenging to build robust and accurate predictive models within a reasonable amount of time. In order to investigate the effect of dataset sizes on predictive performance and modelling time, ligand-based regression models were trained on open datasets of varying sizes of up to 1.2 million chemical structures. For modelling, two implementations of support vector machines (SVM) were used. Chemical structures were described by the signatures molecular descriptor. Results showed that for the larger datasets, the LIBLINEAR SVM implementation performed on par with the well-established libsvm with a radial basis function kernel, but with dramatically less time for model building even on modest computer resources. Using a non-linear kernel proved to be infeasible for large data sizes, even with substantial computational resources on a computer cluster. To deploy the resulting models, we extended the Bioclipse decision support framework to support models from LIBLINEAR and made our models of logD and solubility available from within Bioclipse. PMID:27516811

  19. Definition of common support equipment and space station interface requirements for IOC model technology experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Waiss, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the common support equipment and Space Station interface requirements for the IOC (initial operating capabilities) model technology experiments. In particular, each principal investigator for the proposed model technology experiment was contacted and visited for technical understanding and support for the generation of the detailed technical backup data required for completion of this study. Based on the data generated, a strong case can be made for a dedicated technology experiment command and control work station consisting of a command keyboard, cathode ray tube, data processing and storage, and an alert/annunciator panel located in the pressurized laboratory.

  20. Practical support aids addiction recovery: the positive identity model of change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a need for studies that can highlight principles of addiction recovery. Because social relationships are involved in all change processes, understanding how social motivations affect the recovery process is vital to guide support programs. Methods The objective was to develop a model of recovery by examining addicted individuals’ social motivations through longitudinal assessment of non-professional support dyads. A qualitative, longitudinal study design was used, combining focus groups and in-depth interviews with addicted individuals and their sponsors. Data were analyzed using the principles of grounded theory: open coding and memos for conceptual labelling, axial coding for category building, and selective coding for theory building. The setting was an addiction recovery social support program in Oslo, Norway. The informants included nine adults affected by addiction, six sponsors, and the program coordinator. The participants were addicted to either alcohol (2), benzodiazepines (1), pain killers (1) or polydrug-use (5). The sponsors were unpaid, and had no history of addiction problems. Results Support perceived to be ineffective emerged in dyads with no operationalized goal, and high emotional availability with low degree of practical support. Support perceived to be effective was signified by the sponsor attending to power imbalance and the addict coming into position to help others and feel useful. Conclusions The findings appear best understood as a positive identity-model of recovery, indicated by the pursuit of skill building relevant to a non-drug using identity, and enabled by the on-going availability of instrumental support. This produced situations where role reversals were made possible, leading to increased self-esteem. Social support programs should be based on a positive identity-model of recovery that enable the building of a life-sustainable identity. PMID:23898827

  1. Developing a workplace breast feeding support model for employed lactating mothers.

    PubMed

    Yimyam, Susanha; Hanpa, Wasana

    2014-06-01

    Resuming work is often considered an obstacle for continued breast feeding. The objectives of this participatory action research study were to develop a breast feeding support model in the workplace and to compare breast feeding rates before and after implementation of the breast feeding support campaign. Twenty-four women participated before the implementation of the breast feeding support campaign, whereas 31 women participated after the campaign. Data were collected by interviewing employed women about their breast feeding practices within six months post partum. Additional data were collected through interviews with the workplace administrator and head of work sections as well as observation of the breast feeding support campaigns. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis, whereas quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and χ(2) test. The workplace breast feeding support model was developed based on the concept of Mother-Friendly Workplace Initiatives by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) and the Thai government׳s promotion of a workplace breast feeding corner. Within this model, a committee for breast feeding support was created for working with the research team to develop breast feeding activities and media for breast feeding education and breast feeding support campaigns in the workplace. Breast feeding rates at six months after implementation of the breast feeding support campaign were significantly higher than rates before, both for exclusive breast feeding and any breast feeding at levels .004 and .033, respectively. These results suggest that breast feeding should be encouraged in every workplace depending on context. Individual advice and help for employed mothers should be provided from pregnancy through weaning in the postpartum period.

  2. Automatically updating predictive modeling workflows support decision-making in drug design.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo; Bentzien, Jörg; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Hughes, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    Using predictive models for early decision-making in drug discovery has become standard practice. We suggest that model building needs to be automated with minimum input and low technical maintenance requirements. Models perform best when tailored to answering specific compound optimization related questions. If qualitative answers are required, 2-bin classification models are preferred. Integrating predictive modeling results with structural information stimulates better decision making. For in silico models supporting rapid structure-activity relationship cycles the performance deteriorates within weeks. Frequent automated updates of predictive models ensure best predictions. Consensus between multiple modeling approaches increases the prediction confidence. Combining qualified and nonqualified data optimally uses all available information. Dose predictions provide a holistic alternative to multiple individual property predictions for reaching complex decisions.

  3. Automatically updating predictive modeling workflows support decision-making in drug design.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo; Bentzien, Jörg; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Hughes, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    Using predictive models for early decision-making in drug discovery has become standard practice. We suggest that model building needs to be automated with minimum input and low technical maintenance requirements. Models perform best when tailored to answering specific compound optimization related questions. If qualitative answers are required, 2-bin classification models are preferred. Integrating predictive modeling results with structural information stimulates better decision making. For in silico models supporting rapid structure-activity relationship cycles the performance deteriorates within weeks. Frequent automated updates of predictive models ensure best predictions. Consensus between multiple modeling approaches increases the prediction confidence. Combining qualified and nonqualified data optimally uses all available information. Dose predictions provide a holistic alternative to multiple individual property predictions for reaching complex decisions. PMID:27584594

  4. Ecological models supporting environmental decision making: a strategy for the future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmolke, Amelie; Thorbek, Pernille; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Grimm, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Ecological models are important for environmental decision support because they allow the consequences of alternative policies and management scenarios to be explored. However, current modeling practice is unsatisfactory. A literature review shows that the elements of good modeling practice have long been identified but are widely ignored. The reasons for this might include lack of involvement of decision makers, lack of incentives for modelers to follow good practice, and the use of inconsistent terminologies. As a strategy for the future, we propose a standard format for documenting models and their analyses: transparent and comprehensive ecological modeling (TRACE) documentation. This standard format will disclose all parts of the modeling process to scrutiny and make modeling itself more efficient and coherent.

  5. Collaborative modelling and integrated decision support system analysis of a developed terminal lake basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, Richard; Allander, Kip K.; Jeton, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    A terminal lake basin in west-central Nevada, Walker Lake, has undergone drastic change over the past 90 yrs due to upstream water use for agriculture. Decreased inflows to the lake have resulted in 100 km2 decrease in lake surface area and a total loss of fisheries due to salinization. The ecologic health of Walker Lake is of great concern as the lake is a stopover point on the Pacific route for migratory birds from within and outside the United States. Stakeholders, water institutions, and scientists have engaged in collaborative modeling and the development of a decision support system that is being used to develop and analyze management change options to restore the lake. Here we use an integrated management and hydrologic model that relies on state-of-the-art simulation capabilities to evaluate the benefits of using integrated hydrologic models as components of a decision support system. Nonlinear feedbacks among climate, surface-water and groundwater exchanges, and water use present challenges for simulating realistic outcomes associated with management change. Integrated management and hydrologic modeling provides a means of simulating benefits associated with management change in the Walker River basin where drastic changes in the hydrologic landscape have taken place over the last century. Through the collaborative modeling process, stakeholder support is increasing and possibly leading to management change options that result in reductions in Walker Lake salt concentrations, as simulated by the decision support system.

  6. Collaborative modelling and integrated decision support system analysis of a developed terminal lake basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niswonger, Richard G.; Allander, Kip K.; Jeton, Anne E.

    2014-09-01

    A terminal lake basin in west-central Nevada, Walker Lake, has undergone drastic change over the past 90 yrs due to upstream water use for agriculture. Decreased inflows to the lake have resulted in 100 km2 decrease in lake surface area and a total loss of fisheries due to salinization. The ecologic health of Walker Lake is of great concern as the lake is a stopover point on the Pacific route for migratory birds from within and outside the United States. Stakeholders, water institutions, and scientists have engaged in collaborative modeling and the development of a decision support system that is being used to develop and analyze management change options to restore the lake. Here we use an integrated management and hydrologic model that relies on state-of-the-art simulation capabilities to evaluate the benefits of using integrated hydrologic models as components of a decision support system. Nonlinear feedbacks among climate, surface-water and groundwater exchanges, and water use present challenges for simulating realistic outcomes associated with management change. Integrated management and hydrologic modeling provides a means of simulating benefits associated with management change in the Walker River basin where drastic changes in the hydrologic landscape have taken place over the last century. Through the collaborative modeling process, stakeholder support is increasing and possibly leading to management change options that result in reductions in Walker Lake salt concentrations, as simulated by the decision support system.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Food Supply for Long Term Space Missions Using Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruthirds, John E.

    2003-01-01

    A habitat for long duration missions which utilizes Advanced Life Support (ALS), the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex), is currently being built at JSC. In this system all consumables will be recycled and reused. In support of this effort, a menu is being planned utilizing ALS crops that will meet nutritional and psychological requirements. The need exists in the food system to identify specific physical quantities that define life support systems from an analysis and modeling perspective. Once these quantities are defined, they need to be fed into a mathematical model that takes into consideration other systems in the BIO-Plex. This model, if successful, will be used to understand the impacts of changes in the food system on the other systems and vice versa. The Equivalent System Mass (ESM) metric has been used to describe systems and subsystems, including the food system options, in terms of the single parameter, mass. There is concern that this approach might not adequately address the important issues of food quality and psychological impact on crew morale of a supply of fiesh food items. In fact, the mass of food can also depend on the quality of the food. This summer faculty fellow project will involve creating an appropriate mathematical model for the food plan developed by the Food Processing System for BIO-Plex. The desired outcome of this work will be a quantitative model that can be applied to the various options of supplying food on long-term space missions.

  8. Gender and contraction mode on perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, D M; Polen, R R; Byrd, B N

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived exertion responses during concentric and eccentric elbow flexor contractions between young adult men and women. Thirty healthy young adults participated in two experimental sessions. During the first session, subjects performed five concentric isokinetic maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of elbow flexion, followed by nine, randomly-ordered sub-maximal contractions (10-90% MVC). The same procedures were repeated during the second session, with the exception that eccentric contractions were performed. Subjects rated their perceived exertion following the sub-maximal contractions with the Borg category-ratio scale. Perceived exertion was significantly (p<0.05) less than equivalent values on the CR-10 scale at intensities greater than, and equal to, 30% MVC. A three-factor interaction between 30-40% MVC indicated that perceived exertion increased more during the eccentric, than concentric, contractions in women, while the opposite pattern was evident for the men. There were no significant contraction mode or gender differences. Power function modeling revealed that perceived exertion increased in a negatively accelerating manner, except for the men performing eccentric exercise. Perceived exertion increases in a similar non-linear manner between men and women during concentric contractions, while men exhibited a statistically linear pattern during eccentric contractions. PMID:20148376

  9. A flexible and efficient multi-model framework in support of water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfs, Vincent; Tran Quoc, Quan; Willems, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible, fast and accurate water quantity models are essential tools in support of water management. Adjustable levels of model detail and the ability to handle varying spatial and temporal resolutions are requisite model characteristics to ensure that such models can be employed efficiently in various applications. This paper uses a newly developed flexible modelling framework that aims to generate such models. The framework incorporates several approaches to model catchment hydrology, rivers and floodplains, and the urban drainage system by lumping processes on different levels. To illustrate this framework, a case study of integrated hydrological-hydraulic modelling is elaborated for the Grote Nete catchment in Belgium. Three conceptual rainfall-runoff models (NAM, PDM and VHM) were implemented in a generalized model structure, allowing flexibility in the spatial resolution by means of an innovative disaggregation/aggregation procedure. They were linked to conceptual hydraulic models of the rivers in the catchment, which were developed by means of an advanced model structure identification and calibration procedure. The conceptual models manage to emulate the simulation results of a detailed full hydrodynamic model accurately. The models configured using the approaches of this framework are well-suited for many applications in water management due to their very short calculation time, interfacing possibilities and adjustable level of detail.

  10. 24 CFR 881.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

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  11. 24 CFR 883.602 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  12. 24 CFR 881.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

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  13. 24 CFR 880.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

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  14. 24 CFR 883.602 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

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  15. 24 CFR 880.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  16. 24 CFR 881.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The contract. 881.501 Section 881...) OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND... SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH...

  17. 24 CFR 881.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  18. 24 CFR 880.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

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  19. 24 CFR 880.501 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  20. 24 CFR 883.602 - The contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The contract. 883.602 Section 883...) OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND... SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH...