Science.gov

Sample records for models plasma

  1. Model of detached plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.; Chance, M.

    1986-07-01

    Recently a tokamak plasma was observed in TFTR that was not limited by a limiter or a divertor. A model is proposed to explain this equilibrium, which is called a detached plasma. The model consists of (1) the core plasma where ohmic heating power is lost by anomalous heat conduction and (2) the shell plasma where the heat from the core plasma is radiated away by the atomic processes of impurity ions. A simple scaling law is proposed to test the validity of this model.

  2. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  3. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  4. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  5. Modeling electronegative plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, A.J.; Lieberman, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Macroscopic analytic models for a three-component electronegative gas discharge are developed. Assuming the negative ions to be in Boltzmann equilibrium, a positive ion ambipolar diffusion equation is derived. The discharge consists of an electronegative core and electropositive edges. The electron density in the core is nearly uniform, allowing a parabolic approximation to the plasma profile to be employed. The resulting equilibrium equations are solved analytically and matched to a constant mobility transport model of an electropositive edge plasma. The solutions are compared to a simulation of a parallel-plane r.f. driven oxygen plasma for p = 50 mTorr and n{sub eo}= 2.4 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. The ratio {alpha}{sub o} of central negative ion density to electron density, and the electron temperature T{sub e}, found in the simulation, are in reasonable agreement with the values calculated from the model. The model is extended to: (1) low pressures, where a variable mobility model is used in the electropositive edge region; and (2) high {alpha}{sub o} in which the edge region disappears. The inclusion of a second positive ion species, which can be very important in describing electronegative discharges used for materials processing, is a possible extension of the model.

  6. Plasma Modeling of Electrosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Scott; Friedrichs, Daniel; Gilbert, James; Park, Wounjhang; Maksimovic, Dragan

    2014-10-01

    Electrosurgery is the use of high frequency alternating current (AC) to illicit a clinical response in tissue, such as cutting or cauterization. Power electronics converters have been demonstrated to generate the necessary output voltage and current for electrosurgery. The design goal of the converter is to regulate output power while supplying high frequency AC. The design is complicated by fast current and voltage transients that occur when the current travels through air in the form of an arc. To assist in designing a converter that maintains the desired output power during these transients, we have used the COMSOL Plasma Module to determine the output voltage and current characteristics during an arc. This plasma model, used in conjunction with linear circuit elements, allows the full electrosurgical system to be validated. Two models have been tested with the COMSOL Plasma Module. One is a four-species, four-reaction model based on the local field approximation technique. The second simulates the underlying air chemistry using 30 species, 151 chemical reactions, and a coupled electron energy distribution function. Experimental output voltage and current samples have been collected and compared to both models.

  7. Hybrid plasma modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Pointon, Timothy David

    2009-02-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2007 and FY2008 for the LDRD project ''Hybrid Plasma Modeling''. The goal of this project was to develop hybrid methods to model plasmas across the non-continuum-to-continuum collisionality spectrum. The primary methodology to span these regimes was to couple a kinetic method (e.g., Particle-In-Cell) in the non-continuum regions to a continuum PDE-based method (e.g., finite differences) in continuum regions. The interface between the two would be adjusted dynamically ased on statistical sampling of the kinetic results. Although originally a three-year project, it became clear during the second year (FY2008) that there were not sufficient resources to complete the project and it was terminated mid-year.

  8. Modeling of Photoionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I review the motivation and current status of modeling of plasmas exposed to strong radiation fields, as it applies to the study of cosmic X-ray sources. This includes some of the astrophysical issues which can be addressed, the ingredients for the models, the current computational tools, the limitations imposed by currently available atomic data, and the validity of some of the standard assumptions. I will also discuss ideas for the future: challenges associated with future missions, opportunities presented by improved computers, and goals for atomic data collection.

  9. Strongly magnetized classical plasma models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The class of plasma processes for which the so-called Vlasov approximation is inadequate is investigated. Results from the equilibrium statistical mechanics of two-dimensional plasmas are derived. These results are independent of the presence of an external dc magnetic field. The nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of the electrostatic guiding-center plasma, a two-dimensional plasma model, is discussed. This model is then generalized to three dimensions. The guiding-center model is relaxed to include finite Larmor radius effects for a two-dimensional plasma.

  10. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  11. Helicon plasma thruster discharge model

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.

    2014-04-15

    By considering particle, momentum, and energy balance equations, we develop a semi-empirical quasi one-dimensional analytical discharge model of radio-frequency and helicon plasma thrusters. The model, which includes both the upstream plasma source region as well as the downstream diverging magnetic nozzle region, is compared with experimental measurements and confirms current performance levels. Analysis of the discharge model identifies plasma power losses on the radial and back wall of the thruster as the major performance reduction factors. These losses serve as sinks for the input power which do not contribute to the thrust, and which reduce the maximum plasma density and hence propellant utilization. With significant radial plasma losses eliminated, the discharge model (with argon) predicts specific impulses in excess of 3000 s, propellant utilizations above 90%, and thruster efficiencies of about 30%.

  12. Strongly magnetized classical plasma models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Peyraud, J.; Dewitt, C.

    1974-01-01

    Discrete particle processes in the presence of a strong external magnetic field were investigated. These processes include equations of state and other equilibrium thermodynamic relations, thermal relaxation phenomena, transport properties, and microscopic statistical fluctuations in such quantities as the electric field and the charge density. Results from the equilibrium statistical mechanics of two-dimensional plasmas are discussed, along with nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of the electrostatic guiding-center plasma (a two-dimensional plasma model).

  13. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Jungman, Gerard; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  14. Modeling High Energy Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, J. R.; Liberman, D. A.; Wilson, B. G.

    1999-11-01

    Ultra-short-pulse lasers are being used to form plasmas at near normal/solid density, heating a target in a time shorter than that on which it can expand. Radiative signatures of the dense plasma conditions are a key diagnostic, and typically require the support of modeling for their design and interpretation. Modeling also often serves to guide the experimental program of work. Here we report on our first attempts to use the INFERNO average-atom atomic model to a construct detailed-configuration-accounting description of the plasma equation-of-state, that is, its distribution of ionization and excitation states, and further, its radiative line, edge, and continuum features.

  15. Modelling the Plasma Jet in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Schein, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Möhwald, K.; Lummer, C.

    2016-08-01

    Particle in-flight characteristics in atmospheric plasma spraying process are determined by impulse and heat energy transferred between the plasma jet and injected powder particles. One of the important factors for the quality of the plasma-sprayed coatings is thus the distribution of plasma gas temperatures and velocities in plasma jet. Plasma jets generated by conventional single-arc plasma spraying systems and their interaction with powder particles were subject matter of intensive research. However, this does not apply to plasma jets generated by means of multi-arc plasma spraying systems yet. In this study, a numerical model has been developed which is designated to dealing with the flow characteristics of the plasma jet generated by means of a three-cathode spraying system. The upstream flow conditions, which were calculated using a priori conducted plasma generator simulations, have been coupled to the plasma jet simulations. The significances of the relevant numerical assumptions and aspects of the models are analyzed. The focus is placed on to the turbulence and diffusion/demixing modelling. A critical evaluation of the prediction power of the models is conducted by comparing the numerical results to the experimental results determined by means of emission spectroscopic computed tomography. It is evident that the numerical models exhibit a good accuracy for their intended use.

  16. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    currently have limited our studies to a 2D model corresponding to a detector an infinite distance away, and looking along the magnetic field. Later we...cloud smoothness and detector angle. Then, we plan to generalize to a 3D cloud to study off-angle (of the magnetic field) effects and parallax...THE "STABILIZATION" OF THE LOWER HYBRID- DRIFT INSTABILITY IN FINITE p PLASMAS ..... D-I Appendix E - FINITE WIDTH CURRENTS, MAGNETIC SHEAR AND THE

  17. Plasma Jet Modeling for PLX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Caroline F.; Mason, Rodney J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.

    2011-10-01

    The implicit simulation code ePLAS has been applied to plasma jets generated with mini-rail guns for plasma production and compression aimed at use with PLX. The rails are typically planar, 2.5 cm apart and arranged to transport an initial 1 cm or wider vertical plasma fill some 10 cm into a void. The driving magnetic field is 3.2 T. The plasma singly ionized argon at 1017 cm-3. We use ePLAS in both its traditional implicit/hybrid form where it is restricted by an electron Courant time step, and in a new super-hybrid form that extracts the main electron moments from the E&B-field solutions. This provides numerical stability at ion Courant limits, for at least a 10 times larger time step, thus probing microsecond jet dynamics with computational economy. We examine possible field penetration at the cathode and anode gun electrodes. Cathode erosion and EMHD B - Field penetration are possible at lower jet densities. We examine jet transport beyond the gun, modeling possible ionization with either analytic or tabular EOSs. We study the merger of jets with ions represented as either fluids or particles. Work supported by the USDOE under SBIR GRANT DE-SC0004207.

  18. Kinetic Modeling of Divertor Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Pianpanit, Theerasarn

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation with the Monte Carlo collisions and the cumulative scattering angle coulomb collision can present kinetic dynamics of divertor plasmas. We are developing two types of PIC codes. The first one is the three dimensional bounded PIC code where three dimensional kinetic dynamics of blob is studied and current flow structures related to sheath formation are unveiled. The second one is the one spatial three velocity space dimensional (1D3V) PIC code with the Monte Carlo collisions where formation of detach plasma is studied. First target of our research is to construct self-consistent full kinetic simulation modeling of the linear divertor simulation experiments. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS15KNSS059, NIFS14KNXN279, and NIFS13KNSS038) and the Research Cooperation Program on Hierarchy and Holism in Natural Science at NINS.

  19. ISS Plasma Interaction: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsamian, H.; Mikatarian, R.; Alred, J.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2004-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma interaction effects on the International Space Station are discussed in the following paper. The large structure and high voltage arrays of the ISS represent a complex system interacting with LEO plasma. Discharge current measurements made by the Plasma Contactor Units and potential measurements made by the Floating Potential Probe delineate charging and magnetic induction effects on the ISS. Based on theoretical and physical understanding of the interaction phenomena, a model of ISS plasma interaction has been developed. The model includes magnetic induction effects, interaction of the high voltage solar arrays with ionospheric plasma, and accounts for other conductive areas on the ISS. Based on these phenomena, the Plasma Interaction Model has been developed. Limited verification of the model has been performed by comparison of Floating Potential Probe measurement data to simulations. The ISS plasma interaction model will be further tested and verified as measurements from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit become available, and construction of the ISS continues.

  20. Radiation Belt and Plasma Model Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Radiation belt and plasma model environment. Environment hazards for systems and humans. Need for new models. How models are used. Model requirements. How can space weather community help?

  1. Computer Modeling of a Fusion Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I

    2000-12-15

    Progress in the study of plasma physics and controlled fusion has been profoundly influenced by dramatic increases in computing capability. Computational plasma physics has become an equal partner with experiment and traditional theory. This presentation illustrates some of the progress in computer modeling of plasma physics and controlled fusion.

  2. ITER plasma safety interface models and assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Bartels, H-W.; Honda, T.; Putvinski, S.; Amano, T.; Boucher, D.; Post, D.; Wesley, J.

    1996-12-31

    Physics models and requirements to be used as a basis for safety analysis studies are developed and physics results motivated by safety considerations are presented for the ITER design. Physics specifications are provided for enveloping plasma dynamic events for Category I (operational event), Category II (likely event), and Category III (unlikely event). A safety analysis code SAFALY has been developed to investigate plasma anomaly events. The plasma response to ex-vessel component failure and machine response to plasma transients are considered.

  3. A model of electron collecting plasma contractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    A model of plasma contractors is being developed, which can be used to describe electron collection in a laboratory test tank and in the space environment. To validate the model development, laboratory experiments are conducted in which the source plasma is separated from the background plasma by a double layer. Model calculations show that an increase in ionization rate with potential produces a steep rise in collected current with increasing potential.

  4. A model of electron collecting plasma contractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    A model of plasma contractors is being developed, which can be used to describe electron collection in a laboratory test tank and in the space environment. To validate the model development, laboratory experiments are conducted in which the source plasma is separated from the background plasma by a double layer. Model calculations show that an increase in ionization rate with potential produces a steep rise in collected current with increasing potential.

  5. Plasma Reactor Modeling and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Bose, D.; Hash, D.; Hwang, H.; Cruden, B.; Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma processing is a key processing stop in integrated circuit manufacturing. Low pressure, high density plum reactors are widely used for etching and deposition. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source has become popular recently in many processing applications. In order to accelerate equipment and process design, an understanding of the physics and chemistry, particularly, plasma power coupling, plasma and processing uniformity and mechanism is important. This understanding is facilitated by comprehensive modeling and simulation as well as plasma diagnostics to provide the necessary data for model validation which are addressed in this presentation. We have developed a complete code for simulating an ICP reactor and the model consists of transport of electrons, ions, and neutrals, Poisson's equation, and Maxwell's equation along with gas flow and energy equations. Results will be presented for chlorine and fluorocarbon plasmas and compared with data from Langmuir probe, mass spectrometry and FTIR.

  6. Water bag modeling of a multispecies plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Gravier, E.; Besse, N.; Klein, R.; Ghizzo, A.; Bertrand, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.

    2011-03-15

    We report in the present paper a new modeling method to study multiple species dynamics in magnetized plasmas. Such a method is based on the gyrowater bag modeling, which consists in using a multistep-like distribution function along the velocity direction parallel to the magnetic field. The choice of a water bag representation allows an elegant link between kinetic and fluid descriptions of a plasma. The gyrowater bag model has been recently adapted to the context of strongly magnetized plasmas. We present its extension to the case of multi ion species magnetized plasmas: each ion species being modeled via a multiwater bag distribution function. The water bag modelization will be discussed in details, under the simplification of a cylindrical geometry that is convenient for linear plasma devices. As an illustration, results obtained in the linear framework for ion temperature gradient instabilities are presented, that are shown to agree qualitatively with older works.

  7. A comparison of two plasma models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, Russell

    1992-01-01

    The time dependent behavior of a plasma which surrounds a highly biased conducting sphere is considered. This plasma is treated as either a cold two component fluid or as a warm plasma whose time development can be found by solving the Vlasov equation. Both models demonstrate oscillatory behavior, but the electric fields predicted by the models are quantitatively quite different in regions close to the surface of the sphere and very similar otherwise. A broadening of the electron distribution function with time is observed indicating local heating of the plasma near the surface of the sphere.

  8. Incorporating swarm data into plasma models and plasma surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makabe, Toshiaki

    2009-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, modeling of non-equilibrium plasmas in a collisional region driven at radio frequency has been developed at pressure greater than ˜Pa. The collisional plasma has distinct characteristics induced by a quantum property of each of feed gas molecules through collisions with electrons or heavy particles. That is, there exists a proper function caused by chemically active radicals, negative-ions, and radiations based on a molecular quantum structure through short-range interactions mainly with electrons. This differs from high-density, collisionless plasma controlled by the long-range Coulomb interaction. The quantum property in the form of the collision cross section is the first essential through swarm parameters in order to investigate the collisional plasma structure and to predict the function. These structure and function, of course, appear under a self- organized spatiotemporal distribution of electrons and positive ions subject to electromagnetic theory, i.e., bulk-plasma and ion-sheath. In a plasma interacting with a surface, the flux, energy and angle of particles incident on a surface are basic quantities. It will be helpful to learn the limits of the swarm data in a quasi-equilibrium situation and to find a way out of the difficulty, when we predict the collisional plasma, the function, and related surface processes. In this talk we will discuss some of these experiences in the case of space and time varying radiofrequency plasma and the micro/nano-surface processes. This work is partly supported by Global-COE program in Keio University, granted by MEXT Japan.

  9. Modeling the expansion of a contactor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, E. A.; Delzanno, G.; Camporeale, E.; Borovsky, J. E.; MacDonald, E.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Plasma contactor technology is widely used on board spacecraft to keep spacecraft charging levels under control. On the International Space Station, for instance, it is used to prevent high current discharges between differently charged surfaces. It consists of emitting a neutral plasma to create a plasma reservoir near the spacecraft in order to balance the currents collected by the spacecraft from the magnetospheric environment. One approach to modeling the contactor plasma plume applies a self-similar solution in order to gain insight into the plume dynamics without requiring expensive numerical simulations [1, 2]. Typically, hydrodynamic fluid equations are used to model the plasma behavior. We present a comparison of different self-similar plume models existing in the literature [1, 2] and compare these with our Particle-In-Cell simulations in the near-field to assess their validity. We will consider both the unmagnetized and the magnetized limit, treating the magnitude and angle (relative to the plasma injection velocity) of the magnetic field as a parameter. [1] F. F. Gabdullin, A. G. Korsun, E. M. Tverdokhlebova, 'The plasma plume emitted onboard the international space station under the effect of the geomagnetic field', IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 36(5) 2207 (2008). [2] M. Merino, E. Ahedo, C. Bombardelli, H. Urrutxua, J. Pelaez, 'Hypersonic plasma plume expansion in space', 32nd International Electric Propulsion Conference, IEPC-2011-086, Wiesbaden, Germany, 2011.

  10. RF models for plasma-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, David; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Kruger, Scott; Stoltz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Computational models for DC and oscillatory (RF-driven) sheath potentials, arising at metal or dielectric-coated surfaces in contact with plasma, are developed within the VSim code and applied in parameter regimes characteristic of fusion plasma experiments and plasma processing scenarios. Results from initial studies quantifying the effects of various dielectric wall coating materials and thicknesses on these sheath potentials, as well as on the ensuing flux of plasma particles to the wall, are presented. As well, the developed models are used to model plasma-facing ICRF antenna structures in the ITER device; we present initial assessments of the efficacy of dielectric-coated antenna surfaces in reducing sputtering-induced high-Z impurity contamination of the fusion reaction. Funded by U.S. DoE via a Phase I SBIR grant, award DE-SC0009501.

  11. CO2 conversion by plasma technology: insights from modeling the plasma chemistry and plasma reactor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaerts, A.; Berthelot, A.; Heijkers, S.; Kolev, St.; Snoeckx, R.; Sun, S.; Trenchev, G.; Van Laer, K.; Wang, W.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in the use of plasma technology for CO2 conversion. To improve this application, a good insight into the underlying mechanisms is of great importance. This can be obtained from modeling the detailed plasma chemistry in order to understand the chemical reaction pathways leading to CO2 conversion (either in pure form or mixed with another gas). Moreover, in practice, several plasma reactor types are being investigated for CO2 conversion, so in addition it is essential to be able to model these reactor geometries so that their design can be improved, and the most energy efficient CO2 conversion can be achieved. Modeling the detailed plasma chemistry of CO2 conversion in complex reactors is, however, very time-consuming. This problem can be overcome by using a combination of two different types of model: 0D chemical reaction kinetics models are very suitable for describing the detailed plasma chemistry, while the characteristic features of different reactor geometries can be studied by 2D or 3D fluid models. In the first instance the latter can be developed in argon or helium with a simple chemistry to limit the calculation time; however, the ultimate aim is to implement the more complex CO2 chemistry in these models. In the present paper, examples will be given of both the 0D plasma chemistry models and the 2D and 3D fluid models for the most common plasma reactors used for CO2 conversion in order to emphasize the complementarity of both approaches. Furthermore, based on the modeling insights, the paper discusses the possibilities and limitations of plasma-based CO2 conversion in different types of plasma reactors, as well as what is needed to make further progress in this field.

  12. RF and Plasma Modeling for VASIMR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Moore, R. D.; Ilin, A. V.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.

    2004-11-01

    Present experiments for the VASIMR concept rely exclusively on RF power in an electrode-less system. A helicon discharge in the 10-30 MHz range is used for the plasma source while a lower frequency is used to accelerate the ions in the plasma jet using an ion cyclotron interaction. At both frequencies, the wavelength is comparable with the plasma size, requiring full wave methods to accurately calculate the RF-plasma response. In the plasma source, the generation of the plasma is nonlinear in that plasma transport, neutral gas transport, and RF deposition should be self-consistent. The plasma target for the ion acceleration must also be consistent with the source, and nonlinear wave-particle interactions must be considered. Strong inhomogeneities exist in both the radial and axial directions for all of these processes. In this paper, we present results from a model based on the EMIR4 code, (M. D. Carter et al., Phys. Plasmas 9), 5097 (2002). which has been upgraded to iterate a 3D RF solution with a two-dimensional magnetized diffusive transport model based on frictional ions in an ambipolar potential. We also discuss nonlinear ion orbits in the resulting RF fields.

  13. Dust in fusion plasmas: theory and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Mendis, D. A.; Rosenberg, M.; Rudakov, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soboleva, T. K.; Shukla, P. K.; Bray, B. D.; West, W. P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.

    2008-09-07

    Dust may have a large impact on ITER-scale plasma experiments including both safety and performance issues. However, the physics of dust in fusion plasmas is very complex and multifaceted. Here, we discuss different aspects of dust dynamics including dust-plasma, and dust-surface interactions. We consider the models of dust charging, heating, evaporation/sublimation, dust collision with material walls, etc., which are suitable for the conditions of fusion plasmas. The physical models of all these processes have been incorporated into the DUST Transport (DUSTT) code. Numerical simulations demonstrate that dust particles are very mobile and accelerate to large velocities due to the ion drag force (cruise speed >100 m/s). Deep penetration of dust particles toward the plasma core is predicted. It is shown that DUSTT is capable of reproducing many features of recent dust-related experiments, but much more work is still needed.

  14. Modeling and simulation of plasma processing equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heon Chang

    Currently plasma processing technology is utilized in a wide range of applications including advanced Integrated Circuit (IC) fabrication. Traditionally, plasma processing equipments have been empirically designed and optimized at great expense of development time and cost. This research proposes the development of a first principle based, multidimensional plasma process simulator with the aim of enhancing the equipment design procedure. The proposed simulator accounts for nonlinear interactions among various plasma chemistry and physics, neutral chemistry and transport, and dust transport phenomena. A three moment modeling approach is employed that shows good predictive capabilities at reasonable computational expense. For numerical efficiency, various versions of explicit and implicit Essentially Non- Oscillatory (ENO) algorithms are employed. For the rapid evaluation of time-periodic steady-state solutions, a feedback control approach is employed. Two dimensional simulation results of capacitively coupled rf plasmas show that ion bombardment uniformity can be improved through simulation based design of the plasma process. Through self-consistent simulations of an rf triode, it is also shown that effects of secondary rf voltage and frequency on ion bombardment energy can be accurately captured. These results prove that scaling relations among important process variables can be identified through the three moment modeling and simulation approach. Through coupling of the plasma model with a neutral chemistry and transport model, spatiotemporal distributions of both charged and uncharged species, including metastables, are predicted for an oxygen plasma. Furthermore, simulation results also verify the existence of a double layer in this electronegative plasma. Through Lagrangian simulation of dust in a plasma reactor, it is shown that small particles are accumulate near the center and the radial sheath boundary depending on their initial positions while large

  15. Model of electron collecting plasma contactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, plasma contactors are observed to collect ampere-level electron currents with low impedance. In order to extend the laboratory experience to the low-earth-orbit environment, a model of plasma contactors is being developed. Laboratory results are being used to support and validate the model development. The important physical processes observed in the laboratory are that the source plasma is separated from the background plasma by a double layer and that ionization of the expellant gas by the collected electrons creates the bulk of the ions that leave the source plasma. The model, which uses Poisson's equation with a physical charge density that includes the ion and electron components of both the source and the ambient plasmas, reproduces this phenomenon for typical experimental parameters. The calculations, in agreement with the laboratory results, show little convergence of the accelerated electrons. The angular momentum of the incoming electrons dramatically reduces the peak electron density. These electrons ionize enough gas to generate the source plasma. Calculations show that the increase in ionization rate with potential produces a steep rise in collected current with increasing potential as seen in the laboratory.

  16. Modeling the expansion of a contactor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Erik; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Camporeale, Enrico; Borovsky, Joseph; MacDonald, Elizabeth; Thomsen, Michelle

    2012-10-01

    Plasma contactor technology is widely used on board spacecraft to keep spacecraft charging levels under control. On the International Space Station, for instance, it is used to prevent high current discharges between differently charged surfaces. It consists of emitting a neutral plasma to create a plasma reservoir near the spacecraft in order to balance the currents collected by the spacecraft from the magnetospheric environment. One approach to modeling the contactor plasma plume applies a self-similar solution in order to gain insight into the plume dynamics without requiring expensive numerical simulations [1, 2]. Typically, hydrodynamic fluid equations are used to model the plasma behavior. We present a comparison of different self-similar plume models existing in the literature [1, 2] and compare these with our Particle-In-Cell simulations in the near-field to assess their validity. We will consider both the unmagnetized and the magnetized limit. [4pt] [1] F. F. Gabdullin, A. G. Korsun, E. M. Tverdokhlebova, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 36(5) 2207 (2008). [2] M. Merino, E. Ahedo, C. Bombardelli, H. Urrutxua, J. Pelaez, ``Hypersonic plasma plume expansion in space,'' 32nd International Electric Propulsion Conference, IEPC-2011-086, Wiesbaden, Germany, 2011.

  17. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    0-AIII 639 SCIENCE APLICATIONS INC MCLEAN VA pis 4/1 GEOPHYSICAL. PLASMAS AND ATMOSPHERIC NOOCLIMG. (UI JAN 82 1 HMNh, J1 APIUZESE, S SNECH?. V CHAO...implied by delta functions. The eigenfunc- R 1_c 2 tion is continuous at each boundary and vanishes both at * web 2y V 4 -R1,)1r r<R4 , r -0 and r-R

  18. LHD Plasma Modeling and Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kozo; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yokoyama, Masayuki

    The transport/heating modeling and equilibrium/stability analysis have been carried out for LHD (Large Helical Device) plasmas. A new simulation code TOTAL (TOroidal Transport Analysis Linkage) is developed, which consists of the 3-dimensional equilibrium code VMEC including bootstrap current and 1-dimensional transport code HTRANS including helical-ripple transport determined as well as anomalous transport. This code clarified the favorable effect of bootstrap current on the neoclassical confinement in LHD. The 3-dimensional stability analysis using CAS3D code has been done and clarified the ballooning mode structure peculiar to the LHD high-beta plasmas. The 5-dimensional simulation code has been developed to analyze the NBI or ECH heating power depositions in LHD plasmas, and the particle orbit effects of high-energy particles are clarified. The plasma rotation analysis is also carried out related to the possibility of the electric-field transition and the plasma confinement improvement in LHD.

  19. Qualitative model of a plasma photoelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, N. A.; Flamant, G.

    2009-01-01

    A converter of focused optical radiation into electric current is considered on the basis of the photovoltaic effect in plasmas. The converter model is based on analysis of asymmetric spatial distributions of charge particle number density and ambipolar potential in the photoplasma produced by external optical radiation focused in a heat pipe filled with a mixture of alkali vapor and a heavy inert gas. Energy balance in the plasma photoelectric converter is analyzed. The conditions in which the external radiation energy is effectively absorbed in the converter are indicated. The plasma parameters for which the energy of absorbed optical radiation is mainly spent on sustaining the ambipolar field in the plasma are determined. It is shown that the plasma photoelectric converter makes it possible to attain a high conversion efficiency for focused solar radiation.

  20. Jovian plasma modeling for mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Kim, Wousik; Belland, Brent; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to address uncertainties in the plasma models at Jupiter responsible for surface charging and to update the jovian plasma models using the most recent data available. The updated plasma environment models were then used to evaluate two proposed Europa mission designs for spacecraft charging effects using the Nascap-2k code. The original Divine/Garrett jovian plasma model (or "DG1", T. N. Divine and H. B. Garrett, "Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere," J. Geophys. Res., vol. 88, pp. 6889-6903,1983) has not been updated in 30 years, and there are known errors in the model. As an example, the cold ion plasma temperatures between approx.5 and 10 Jupiter radii (Rj) were found by the experimenters who originally published the data to have been underestimated by approx.2 shortly after publication of the original DG1 model. As knowledge of the plasma environment is critical to any evaluation of the surface charging at Jupiter, the original DG1 model needed to be updated to correct for this and other changes in our interpretation of the data so that charging levels could beproperly estimated using the Nascap-2k charging code. As an additional task, the Nascap-2k spacecraft charging tool has been adapted to incorporate the so-called Kappa plasma distribution function--an important component of the plasma model necessary to compute the particle fluxes between approx.5 keV and 100 keV (at the outset of this study,Nascap-2k did not directly incorporate this common representation of the plasma thus limiting the accuracy of our charging estimates). The updating of the DG1 model and its integration into the Nascap-2k design tool means that charging concerns can now be more efficiently evaluated and mitigated. (We note that, given the subsequent decision by the Europa project to utilize solar arrays for its baseline design, surface charging effects have becomeeven more of an issue for its mission design). The modifications and

  1. Jovian Plasma Modeling for Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Kim, Wousik; Belland, Brent; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to address uncertainties in the plasma models at Jupiter responsible for surface charging and to update the jovian plasma models using the most recent data available. The updated plasma environment models were then used to evaluate two proposed Europa mission designs for spacecraft charging effects using the Nascap-2k code. The original Divine/Garrett jovian plasma model (or "DG1", T. N. Divine and H. B. Garrett, "Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere," J. Geophys. Res., vol. 88, pp. 6889-6903,1983) has not been updated in 30 years, and there are known errors in the model. As an example, the cold ion plasma temperatures between approx.5 and 10 Jupiter radii (Rj) were found by the experimenters who originally published the data to have been underestimated by approx.2 shortly after publication of the original DG1 model. As knowledge of the plasma environment is critical to any evaluation of the surface charging at Jupiter, the original DG1 model needed to be updated to correct for this and other changes in our interpretation of the data so that charging levels could beproperly estimated using the Nascap-2k charging code. As an additional task, the Nascap-2k spacecraft charging tool has been adapted to incorporate the so-called Kappa plasma distribution function--an important component of the plasma model necessary to compute the particle fluxes between approx.5 keV and 100 keV (at the outset of this study,Nascap-2k did not directly incorporate this common representation of the plasma thus limiting the accuracy of our charging estimates). The updating of the DG1 model and its integration into the Nascap-2k design tool means that charging concerns can now be more efficiently evaluated and mitigated. (We note that, given the subsequent decision by the Europa project to utilize solar arrays for its baseline design, surface charging effects have becomeeven more of an issue for its mission design). The modifications and

  2. Jovian plasma modeling for mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Kim, Wousik; Belland, Brent; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to address uncertainties in the plasma models at Jupiter responsible for surface charging and to update the jovian plasma models using the most recent data available. The updated plasma environment models were then used to evaluate two proposed Europa mission designs for spacecraft charging effects using the Nascap-2k code. The original Divine/Garrett jovian plasma model (or "DG1", T. N. Divine and H. B. Garrett, "Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere," J. Geophys. Res., vol. 88, pp. 6889-6903,1983) has not been updated in 30 years, and there are known errors in the model. As an example, the cold ion plasma temperatures between approx.5 and 10 Jupiter radii (Rj) were found by the experimenters who originally published the data to have been underestimated by approx.2 shortly after publication of the original DG1 model. As knowledge of the plasma environment is critical to any evaluation of the surface charging at Jupiter, the original DG1 model needed to be updated to correct for this and other changes in our interpretation of the data so that charging levels could beproperly estimated using the Nascap-2k charging code. As an additional task, the Nascap-2k spacecraft charging tool has been adapted to incorporate the so-called Kappa plasma distribution function--an important component of the plasma model necessary to compute the particle fluxes between approx.5 keV and 100 keV (at the outset of this study,Nascap-2k did not directly incorporate this common representation of the plasma thus limiting the accuracy of our charging estimates). The updating of the DG1 model and its integration into the Nascap-2k design tool means that charging concerns can now be more efficiently evaluated and mitigated. (We note that, given the subsequent decision by the Europa project to utilize solar arrays for its baseline design, surface charging effects have becomeeven more of an issue for its mission design). The modifications and

  3. Cluster model of aluminum dense vapor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomkin, A. L.; Shumikhin, A. S.

    2009-08-01

    The chemical model of aluminum vapor plasma, that take into account the formation of neutral and charged clusters, is suggested. Caloric and thermal equations of state and composition of plasma were received using the available information about properties of metal clusters. It is shown, that aluminum vapors are clusterized with decrease of temperature and with increase of density. Pressure dependence on internal energy is calculated and comparison with experimental data is made. The important role of aluminum clusters, especially in an initial phase of the metals vapor heating, is demonstrated. It is shown, that the region of plasma clusterization in gaseous phase agree with known literature data for binodal of vapor-liquid transition from gaseous region. Suggested cluster model may be used to forecast the location of metal vapors binodal. The conductivity of aluminum vapor plasma was calculated. The satisfactory agreement with available experimental data is received.

  4. Modeling of Imploded Annular Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    accompanying technical report. DD IFA"n 1473 D1TIOO O INOV 65 IS 0SOLETEN sS U 0T02CLFLASF6601 UNCLASSI FIE PDSECURITY CLASIIrCATION OF THIS PAGE...suggestions, aimed at studying processes likely to enhance K-line radiation power by various means, include an experiment to look at the . voltage threshold for...electromagnetic power absorbed and reflected by the moving plasma load in the diode cavity. This is a central question since it measures the coupling efficiency of

  5. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    sharpness of edges, whether the emission is due to plasma recombination or debris, and the direction from which we view the striation. At this stage of ...likely to be moving in any direction in the x-y plane. In a local theory, a wide range of Doppler shifts would be produced, from -k v to +k vs, since the...steepening backside of the cloud, having a grid spacing of 10 v in both directions . The grid stretching allows the boundaries to be placed 4 km away from

  6. A model for transonic plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, Luca; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2014-02-15

    A linear, two-dimensional model of a transonic plasma flow in equilibrium is constructed and given an explicit solution in the form of a complex Laplace integral. The solution indicates that the transonic state can be solved as an elliptic boundary value problem, as is done in the numerical code FLOW [Guazzotto et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)]. Moreover, the presence of a hyperbolic region does not necessarily imply the presence of a discontinuity or any other singularity of the solution.

  7. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. [plasma simulation model applied to electrostatic waves in collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, Y.

    1974-01-01

    A low-noise plasma simulation model is developed and applied to a series of linear and nonlinear problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. It is demonstrated that use of the hybrid simulation model allows economical studies to be carried out in both the linear and nonlinear regimes with better quantitative results, for comparable computing time, than can be obtained by conventional particle simulation models, or direct solution of the Vlasov equation. The characteristics of the hybrid simulation model itself are first investigated, and it is shown to be capable of verifying the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as .000001 of the plasma thermal energy. Having established the validity of the hybrid simulation model, it is then used to study the nonlinear dynamics of monochromatic wave, sideband instability due to trapped particles, and satellite growth.

  8. Gyrokinetic Models for Edge Plasmas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimits, Andris

    2010-11-01

    The use of gyrokinetic equations for the simulation of magnetic fusion edge and scrapeoff-layer plasmas requires that the equations be valid for large relative perturbation amplitudes and, possibly, large flows. The Hamiltonian gyrokinetic theory has therefore been extended to two new orderings [1,2] that are more general than the standard ones in that they allow for potential perturbations or ExB flows of order the thermal levels. These theories both generalize and show that additional terms should have been present some related prior work. Here, full (low-β) electromagnetic toroidal equation sets are presented, and he energy conservation relations are derived using Noether's theorem in a Lagrangian variational approach. Useful subsidiary and reduced orderings are also considered that result in considerable simplification, and methods for the numerical implementation of the new terms in the equations will also be discussed. *This work was performed for US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and is part of the ESL. [4pt] [1] A.M. Dimits et al., Phys. Fluids B4, 274 (1992). [0pt] [2] A.M. Dimits, Phys. Plasmas 17, 055901 (2010).

  9. Turbulence modelling of thermal plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeta, Masaya

    2016-12-01

    This article presents a discussion of the ideas for modelling turbulent thermal plasma flows, reviewing the challenges, efforts, and state-of-the-art simulations. Demonstrative simulations are also performed to present the importance of numerical methods as well as physical models to express turbulent features. A large eddy simulation has been applied to turbulent thermal plasma flows to treat time-dependent and 3D motions of multi-scale eddies. Sub-grid scale models to be used should be able to express not only turbulent but also laminar states because both states co-exist in and around thermal plasmas which have large variations of density as well as transport properties under low Mach-number conditions. Suitable solution algorithms and differencing schemes must be chosen and combined appropriately to capture multi-scale eddies and steep gradients of temperature and chemical species, which are turbulent features of thermal plasma flows with locally variable Reynolds and Mach numbers. Several simulations using different methods under different conditions show commonly that high-temperature plasma regions exhibit less turbulent structures, with only large eddies, whereas low-temperature regions tend to be more turbulent, with numerous small eddies. These numerical results agree with both theoretical insight and photographs that show the characteristics of eddies. Results also show that a turbulence transition of a thermal plasma jet through a generation-breakup process of eddies in a torch is dominated by fluid dynamic instability after ejection rather than non-uniform or unsteady phenomena.

  10. Kinetic modeling of active plasma resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The term ``active plasma resonance spectroscopy'' (APRS) refers to a plasma diagnostic method which employs the natural ability of plasmas to resonate close to the plasma frequency. Essential for this method is an appropriate model to determine the relation between the resonance parameters and demanded plasma parameters. Measurements with these probes in plasmas of a few Pa typically show a broadening of the spectrum that cannot be predicted by a fluid model. Thus, a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model of APRS probes, which can be described in electorstatic approximation, valid for all pressures has been presented. This model is used to analyze the dynamic behavior of such probes by means of functional analytic methods. One of the main results is, that the system response function Y (ω) is given in terms of the matrix elements of the resolvent of the dynamic operator evaluated for values on the imaginary axis. The spectrum of this operator is continuous which implies a new phenomenon related to anomalous or non-collisional dissipation. Based on the scalar product, which is motivated by the kinetic free energy, the non-collisional damping can be interpreted: In a periodic state, the probe constantly emits plasma waves which propagate to ``infinity''. The free energy simply leaves the ``observation range'' of the probe which is recorded as damping. The kinetic damping, which depends on the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, is responsible for the broadening of a resonance peak in the measured spectrum of APRS probes. The ultimate goal is to determine explicit formulas for the relation between the broadening of the resonance peak and the ``equivalent electron temperature'', especially in the case of the spherical Impedance Probe and the Multipole Resonance Probe. Gratitude is expressed to the internal funding of Leuphana University, the BMBF via PluTO+, the DFG via Collaborative Research Center TR 87, and the Ruhr University Research School.

  11. Magneto-hydrodynamical model for plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruikuan; Yang, Jiayan

    2017-10-01

    Based on the Newton's second law and the Maxwell equations for the electromagnetic field, we establish a new 3-D incompressible magneto-hydrodynamics model for the motion of plasma under the standard Coulomb gauge. By using the Galerkin method, we prove the existence of a global weak solution for this new 3-D model.

  12. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    collisionless topside and collisional bottomside ionosphere using a model Fokker - Planck collision operator for ion-ion collisions, (b) Current driven...Report 5656 (1985). Currently a Fokker - Planck model is used to represent the ion-ion collision and applied to study the current driven ion cyclotron...are given in Appendix G (Satyanarayana, P., et. al., Phys. Fluids, 29 (1986)). Currently, the Fokker - Planck model used in 2.1 is being applied to show

  13. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  14. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  15. A model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Anderson, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Brophy, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry based on the observation that xenon ion mobility is diffusion limited due to resonant charge exchange reactions. The model shows that vapor phase barium atoms are ionized almost immediately and electric fields accelerate the ions upstream from the emission zone. We have also applied the model to the orifice region, where the resultant ion generation profile correlates with previously reported orifice erosion.

  16. A model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Anderson, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Brophy, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry based on the observation that xenon ion mobility is diffusion limited due to resonant charge exchange reactions. The model shows that vapor phase barium atoms are ionized almost immediately and electric fields accelerate the ions upstream from the emission zone. We have also applied the model to the orifice region, where the resultant ion generation profile correlates with previously reported orifice erosion.

  17. Modeling Electrothermal Plasma with Boundary Layer Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlMousa, Nouf Mousa A.

    Electrothermal plasma sources produce high-density (1023-10 28 /m3) and high temperature (1-5 eV) plasmas that are of interest for a variety of applications such as hypervelocity launch devices, fusion reactor pellet injectors, and pulsed thrusters for small satellites. Also, the high heat flux (up to 100 GW/m2) and high pressure (100s MPa) of electrothermal (ET) plasmas allow for the use of such facilities as a source of high heat flux to simulate off-normal events in Tokamak fusion reactors. Off-normal events like disruptions, thermal and current quenches, are the perfect recipes for damage of plasma facing components (PFC). Successful operation of a fusion reactor requires comprehensive understanding of material erosion behavior. The extremely high heat fluxes deposited in PFCs melt and evaporate or directly sublime the exposed surfaces, which results in a thick vapor/melt boundary layer adjacent to the solid wall structure. The accumulating boundary layers provide a self-protecting nature by attenuating the radiant energy transport to the PFCs. The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a reliable tool to adequately simulate the effect of the boundary layers on the formation and flow of the energetic ET plasma and its impact on exposed surfaces erosion under disruption like conditions. This dissertation is a series of published journals/conferences papers. The first paper verified the existence of the vapor shield that evolved at the boundary layer under the typical operational conditions of the NC State University ET plasma facilities PIPE and SIRENS. Upon the verification of the vapor shield, the second paper proposed novel model to simulate the evolution of the boundary layer and its effectiveness in providing a self-protecting nature for the exposed plasma facing surfaces. The developed models simulate the radiant heat flux attenuation through an optically thick boundary layer. The models were validated by comparing the simulation results to experimental

  18. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  19. Hybrid Modeling of Plasma Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    govern some critical aspects of the dynamics. • Significant deviations from thermal (Boltzmann) and ionization (Saha) equilibrium. • Significant... thermal non-equilibrium. Otherwise, one must use a particle method such as DSMC or PIC to model its dynamics. Typically, the energetic component is...non- thermal ) electrons, are themselves not treated as particles but are part of the bulk. This is inconsistent because these can have sufficient

  20. Advancements in predictive plasma formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purvis, Michael A.; Schafgans, Alexander; Brown, Daniel J. W.; Fomenkov, Igor; Rafac, Rob; Brown, Josh; Tao, Yezheng; Rokitski, Slava; Abraham, Mathew; Vargas, Mike; Rich, Spencer; Taylor, Ted; Brandt, David; Pirati, Alberto; Fisher, Aaron; Scott, Howard; Koniges, Alice; Eder, David; Wilks, Scott; Link, Anthony; Langer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present highlights from plasma simulations performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Labs. This modeling is performed to advance the rate of learning about optimal EUV generation for laser produced plasmas and to provide insights where experimental results are not currently available. The goal is to identify key physical processes necessary for an accurate and predictive model capable of simulating a wide range of conditions. This modeling will help to drive source performance scaling in support of the EUV Lithography roadmap. The model simulates pre-pulse laser interaction with the tin droplet and follows the droplet expansion into the main pulse target zone. Next, the interaction of the expanded droplet with the main laser pulse is simulated. We demonstrate the predictive nature of the code and provide comparison with experimental results.

  1. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Quiang, Ji

    1997-01-01

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 1020/m3 with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%.

  2. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  3. Plasma Stabilization Based on Model Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikova, Margarita

    The nonlinear model predictive control algorithms for plasma current and shape stabilization are proposed. Such algorithms are quite suitable for the situations when the plant to be controlled has essentially nonlinear dynamics. Besides that, predictive model based control algorithms allow to take into account a lot of requirements and constraints involved both on the controlled and manipulated variables. The significant drawback of the algorithms is that they require a lot of time to compute control input at each sampling instant. In this paper the model predictive control algorithms are demonstrated by the example of plasma vertical stabilization for ITER-FEAT tokamak. The tuning of parameters of algorithms is performed in order to decrease computational load.

  4. Spectroscopic Modeling of Single Element Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.; Saboohi, S.; Chan, L. S.

    2011-03-30

    A strategy for spectroscopic analysis of single element plasmas is through modeling. An experimental investigation or generation of a specified emission spectrum can be attempted based on the modeling results which are currently under investigating by many researchers in the world. In the emission spectroscopy, the K-shell emission is more interesting than emissions from other shells due to their unique EUV and SXR frequencies that can be applied in various scientific and industrial applications. Population information of our model is based on a steady state kinetic code which is calculated for a given electron temperature and an estimated electron density. Thus for each single element plasma it needs large amounts of experimental or theoretical database. Depending on the parameter of the plasma, theories based on local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE are considered. In the non-LTE case, the Corona model is used and the total absolute number densities are calculated based on the ion densities that are related to the electron density corresponds to the mean charge of the ions. The spectra generated by the model can then be compared with spectroscopic data obtained experimentally.

  5. Multidimensional Plasma Sheath Modeling Using The Three Fluid Plasma Model in General Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, Robert; Shumlak, Uri

    2012-10-01

    There has been renewed interest in the use of plasma actuators for high speed flow control applications. In the plasma actuator, current is driven through the surrounding weakly ionized plasma to impart control moments on the hypersonic vehicle. This expanded general geometry study employs the three-fluid (electrons, ions,neutrals) plasma model as it allows the capture of electron inertial effects, as well as energy and momentum transfer between the charged and neutral species. Previous investigations have typically assumed an electrostatic electric field. This work includes the full electrodynamics in general geometries. Past work utilizing the research code WARPX (Washington Approximate Riemann Problem) employed cartesian grids. In this work, the problem is expanded to general geometries with the euler fluid equations employing Braginskii closure. In addition, WARPX general geometry grids are generated from Cubit or CAD files. Comparisons are made against AFRL magnetized plasma actuator experiments.

  6. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji

    1998-11-01

    In this work, we have applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in the next generation machine, ITER. The ignition probability of ITER for engineering design activity (EDA) parameters can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for conceptual design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%. This suggests that EDA parameters for ITER tokamak are very likely to achieve the self- sustained thermonuclear reaction, but CDA parameters are risky for the realization of ignition.

  7. Modeling the Enceladus Plume--Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleshman, B. L.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the chemical interaction between Saturn's corotating plasma and Enceladus' volcanic plumes. The evolution of a parcel of ambient plasma passing through a prescribed H2O plume is estimated using a physical chemistry model based on the Io torus chemistry but adapted for water-group reactions. The flow field is assumed to be that of a plasma around an electrically-conducting obstacle centered on Enceladus and aligned with Saturn's magnetic field, consistent with Cassini magnetometer data. Our results suggest that charge exchange dominates the local chemistry and that H3O+ dominates the water-group composition downstream of the Enceladus plumes. We explore the effects on the physical chemistry of (1) a small population of hot electrons and (2) a flow decelerated in response to the pickup of fresh ions near the plumes. Charge exchange dominates the local interaction, leading to an H3O+-dominated local water-group chemistry. Pickup Rate/(kg s-1) Pickup rate from the plasma--plume interaction. We emphasize: (1) The possibility of hot electron beams at Enceladus, given the contraints on charge exchange + impact ionization pickup [0.2--3 kg s-1, Khurana et al. (2007); Saur et al. (2007); Burger et al. (2008)]. (2) Charge exchange dominates the local chemistry.

  8. Multi-Scale Modeling of Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, Oleg

    2004-11-01

    Plasma thrusters are characterized with multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are due to the intrinsic physical processes such as gas ionization, wall effects and plasma acceleration. Characteristic times for hot plasma and cold gas are differing by 6-7 orders of magnitude. The typical collisional mean-free-paths vary by 3-5 orders along the devices. These make questionable a true self-consistent modeling of the thrusters. The latter is vital to the understanding of complex physics, non-linear dynamics and optimization of the performance. To overcome this problem we propose the following approach. All processes are divided into two groups: fast and slow. The slow ones include gas evolution with known sources and ionization sink. The ionization rate, transport coefficients, energy sources are defined during "fast step". Both processes are linked through external iterations. Multiple spatial scales are handled using moving adaptive mesh. Development and application of this method to the VASIMR helicon plasma source and other thrusters will be discussed. Supported by NASA.

  9. Modeling Detached Plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Gary D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rensink, M. E.; DIII-D Team

    1996-11-01

    The ITER divertor design relies on operation of the machine with a detached divertor plasma as a means of reducing the divertor heat load to manageable levels. This operating mode has been seen on all of the world's diverted tokamaks, and is characterized by very low plate temperatures and ion currents. Experimental results on DIII-D have shown the plate electron temperature is between 1 and 2 eV. We describe the results of modeling these detached plasmas with the UEDGE code in this paper. Plasma detachment can be achieved in a variety of ways in the code as well as in experiment. Simulations indicate the detachment process occurs in two steps: a thermal collapse in which the plate temperature drops to 1 to 2 eV, followed by a decrease in the plate ion current. When the low temperature region extends off the plate, parallel momentum of the plasma is reduced by ion/neutral interactions. The plate ion current decreases when the parallel momentum is reduced sufficiently to permit volume recombination processes to compete with ion flow to the plate.

  10. Modeling of a microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Alvarez, R.; Marques, L.; Rubio, S. J.; Rodero, A.; Quintero, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents simulation results for a microwave plasma torch (MPT, at 2.45 GHz). The particular device under study couples the MPT (connected to a coaxial waveguide) to a cylindrical reactor chamber, where it produces helium plasma at atmospheric pressure. The study gives a 2D description of the MPT-reactor system, based on an electromagnetic model (that solves Maxwell's equations adopting a time-harmonic description, to calculate the distribution of the EM fields and the average power absorbed by the plasma) and a hydrodynamic model (that solves the Navier-Stokes' equations for the flowing neutral gas, to calculate the distribution of velocities, mass density, pressure, and temperature within the reactor). Model results, such as the power transmission coefficient and the gas temperature, are particularly dependent on the reactor dimensions, the electron density and temperature, and the gas input flow. Comparison between simulations and measurements reveals common variation trends, with changes in the reactor height, for the power reflected by the system, and yield a qualitative agreement for the axial profile of the gas rotational temperature.

  11. Development of Plasma Equilibrium Response Model for Optimized Plasma Control of KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Youngmu; Park, Jong-Kyu; Park, Young-Seok; Hwang, Y. S.

    2004-11-01

    Plasma equilibrium response models for an optimized control system design are developed with KSTAR tokamak configurations. In a simple filament model, plasma column is assumed as a single ring filament with rigid displacements, and constitutes circuits with external conductors (coils, passive plate, and vacuum vessel segments). Perturbed equilibrium response model, based on CREATE-L deformable plasma response model [1], assumes that the plasma evolves through a sequence of MHD equilibria. Prediction characteristics of both models are described in terms of open loop characteristics of vertical motion of plasma, and validated by comparison with TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) simulations. Additionally, applications of the plasma equilibrium response models to design of optimal plasma controllers are described. [1] R. Albanese, and F. Villone, Nucl. Fusion 38 723 (1998)

  12. Fluxon modeling of low-beta plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a new, quasi-Lagrangian approach for numerical modeling of magnetohydrodynamics in low to moderate β plasmas such as the solar corona. We introduce the concept of a “fluxon”, a discretized field line. Fluxon models represent the magnetic field as a skeleton of such discrete field lines, and interpolate field values from the geometry of the skeleton where needed, reversing the usual direction of the field line transform. The fluxon skeleton forms the grid for a collection of 1-D Eulerian models of plasma along individual flux tubes. Fluxon models have no numerical resistivity, because they preserve topology explicitly. Our prototype code, FLUX, is currently able to find 3-D nonlinear force-free field solutions with a specified field topology, and work is ongoing to validate and extend the code to full magnetohydrodynamics. FLUX has significant scaling advantages over conventional models: for “magnetic carpet” models, with photospheric line-tied boundary conditions, FLUX simulations scale in complexity like a conventional 2-D grid although the full 3-D field is represented. The code is free software and is available online. In this current paper we introduce fluxons and our prototype code, and describe the course of future work with the code.

  13. Line shape models for magnetized hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Hannachi, I.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2017-02-01

    We report on Stark-Zeeman line shape models for the diagnostic of magnetic fusion plasmas. Computer simulations, which serve as a reference for an evaluation of the ion dynamics effects, are usually CPU time consuming, so that they cannot be used in a real-time diagnostic. In this framework, a database that allows a fast evaluation of Stark-Zeeman line shapes is currently under preparation. We present preliminary results. Analytical models based on ion collision operators and suitable for strong (near-impact) ion dynamics regimes are also discussed.

  14. Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto, Jorge; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2000-05-01

    The conference Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations was aimed at discussing the most recent advances, arid some of the avenues for future work, in the field of cosmical plasmas. It was held (hiring the week of October 25th to 29th 1999, at the Centro Nacional de las Artes (CNA) in Mexico City, Mexico it modern and impressive center of theaters and schools devoted to the performing arts. This was an excellent setting, for reviewing the present status of observational (both on earth and in space) arid theoretical research. as well as some of the recent advances of laboratory research that are relevant, to astrophysics. The demography of the meeting was impressive: 128 participants from 12 countries in 4 continents, a large fraction of them, 29% were women and most of them were young persons (either recent Ph.Ds. or graduate students). This created it very lively and friendly atmosphere that made it easy to move from the ionization of the Universe and high-redshift absorbers, to Active Galactic Nucleotides (AGN)s and X-rays from galaxies, to the gas in the Magellanic Clouds and our Galaxy, to the evolution of H II regions and Planetary Nebulae (PNe), and to the details of plasmas in the Solar System and the lab. All these topics were well covered with 23 invited talks, 43 contributed talks. and 22 posters. Most of them are contained in these proceedings, in the same order of the presentations.

  15. Three-dimensional model of electron beam generated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Agarwal, Ankur; Dorf, Leonid; Collins, Kenneth; Boris, David R.; Walton, Scott G.

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional model for magnetized electron beam generated plasma is described, which includes a coupled fluid simulation of the bulk plasma and a Monte Carlo model for beam electrons. A modified form of the classical expressions for magnetized-plasma electron transport coefficients is used in the fluid plasma model. The plasma model is calibrated and validated using Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical electron beam generated plasma, where the beam is launched parallel to the magnetic field. The electron density (n e ) and temperature (T e ) are measured along and across the beam for several gas pressures and magnetic fields in Ar. The validated plasma model is then used to examine a three-dimensional electron beam generated plasma system. Generally, plasma densities are on the order of 1016 m-3 and, since there is no externally applied electric field in the plasma region, T e is below 1.25 eV in Ar. The chamber in the simulation is slightly asymmetric perpendicular to the axis of the electron beam and the magnetic field. This asymmetry combined with the E × B drift produce non-uniformities in the plasma even if the magnetic field is spatially uniform in the chamber. However, the cross-field plasma uniformity can be controlled by tailoring the magnetic field profile to enhance or reduce plasma production near the periphery of the chamber.

  16. Non-LTE modeling of multifluid plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hai

    2016-10-01

    We present a collisional-radiative model to simulate non-LTE plasmas using the classical multifluid approximation. The effect of non-zero relative drift velocities of the colliding particles is taken into account in the rate formulation. We show that the multifluid collision rates deviate from standard results when the kinetic energy of the relative drift motion is comparable to the average thermal energy. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the impact of this effect on the overall kinetics of the system.

  17. Modeling relativistic plasmas with PIC using VORPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieter, Chet; Cary, John R.

    2002-11-01

    VORPAL, a fully object-oriented, dimension-free plasma simulation code, now has a fully developed PIC model. This PIC model has been applied to studies of Laser Wake Field Acceleration, including the nonlinear structure of the wake field generated in the colliding pulse injection scheme and in the development of a new injection scheme that reduces timing requirements. (See Giacone et al. and Cary et al. at this conference). Since the PIC model was developed using VORPAL's object oriented architecture, it works in any dimension and with both serial and parallel runs. Several different update methods are available, including both relativistic and non-relativistic Boris push and an electrostatic update as well.

  18. Application of the physics of plasma sheaths to the modeling of RF plasma reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metze, A.; Ernie, D. W.; Oskam, H. J.

    1986-11-01

    An equivalent circuit model is presented for a planar RF plasma reactor. The physical properties of the plasma sheath adjacent to the electrodes are incorporated in the model. The sheath capacitances and the conduction currents through the sheaths are time varying and have a highly nonlinear dependence on the potentials across the plasma sheaths. The model shows that the waveforms of the voltage differences across the sheaths are highly nonsinusoidal and agree with reported measurements.

  19. Combined Radiation Belt - Plasma Sheet System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, Nikita; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander; Zhu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Recent years have given rise to numerous mathematical models of the Earth's radiation belt dynamics. Driven by observations at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) where satellites (e.g. GOES and LANL) provide extensive in-situ measurements, radiation belt models usually take into account only diffusion processes in the energetic electron belts (100 keV and greater), leaving aside the dynamics of colder source population (tens of keV). Such models are able to reconstruct the radiation belt state, but they are not capable of predicting the electron dynamics at GEO, where many communication and navigation satellites currently operate. In this work we present combined four-dimensional electron radiation belt - plasma sheet model accounting for adiabatic advective transport, radial diffusion due to interaction with ULF waves, local acceleration of electrons, scattering into the atmosphere, magnetopause shadowing, and adiabatic effects due to contraction and expansion of the magnetic field. The developed model is applicable to energetic, relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons as well as to source electron population. The model provides spatial particle distribution allowing us to compare and validate the model with multiple satellite measurements at different MLT sectors (e.g. Van Allen Probes, GOES, LANL, THEMIS). The model can be helpful for the prediction of crucial for satellite operators geosynchronous electron fluxes and electron radiation belt dynamics including the heart of the outer belt, slot region and inner belt.

  20. Kinetic plasma modeling with quiet Monte Carlo direct simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, B. J.; Jones, M. E.; Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.

    2001-01-01

    The modeling of collisions among particles in space plasma media poses a challenge for computer simulation. Traditional plasma methods are able to model well the extremes of highly collisional plasmas (MHD and Hall-MHD simulations) and collisionless plasmas (particle-in-cell simulations). However, neither is capable of trealing the intermediate, semi-collisional regime. The authors have invented a new approach to particle simulation called Quiet Monte Carlo Direct Simulation (QMCDS) that can, in principle, treat plasmas with arbitrary and arbitrarily varying collisionality. The QMCDS method will be described, and applications of the QMCDS method as 'proof of principle' to diffusion, hydrodynamics, and radiation transport will be presented. Of particular interest to the space plasma simulation community is the application of QMCDS to kinetic plasma modeling. A method for QMCDS simulation of kinetic plasmas will be outlined, and preliminary results of simulations in the limit of weak pitch-angle scattering will be presented.

  1. Modeling Growth of Nanostructures in Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    As semiconductor circuits shrink to CDs below 0.1 nm, it is becoming increasingly critical to replace and/or enhance existing technology with nanoscale structures, such as nanowires for interconnects. Nanowires grown in plasmas are strongly dependent on processing conditions, such as gas composition and substrate temperature. Growth occurs at specific sites, or step-edges, with the bulk growth rate of the nanowires determined from the equation of motion of the nucleating crystalline steps. Traditional front-tracking algorithms, such as string-based or level set methods, suffer either from numerical complications in higher spatial dimensions, or from difficulties in incorporating surface-intense physical and chemical phenomena. Phase field models have the robustness of the level set method, combined with the ability to implement surface-specific chemistry that is required to model crystal growth, although they do not necessarily directly solve for the advancing front location. We have adopted a phase field approach and will present results of the adatom density and step-growth location in time as a function of processing conditions, such as temperature and plasma gas composition.

  2. Modeling Growth of Nanostructures in Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    As semiconductor circuits shrink to CDs below 0.1 nm, it is becoming increasingly critical to replace and/or enhance existing technology with nanoscale structures, such as nanowires for interconnects. Nanowires grown in plasmas are strongly dependent on processing conditions, such as gas composition and substrate temperature. Growth occurs at specific sites, or step-edges, with the bulk growth rate of the nanowires determined from the equation of motion of the nucleating crystalline steps. Traditional front-tracking algorithms, such as string-based or level set methods, suffer either from numerical complications in higher spatial dimensions, or from difficulties in incorporating surface-intense physical and chemical phenomena. Phase field models have the robustness of the level set method, combined with the ability to implement surface-specific chemistry that is required to model crystal growth, although they do not necessarily directly solve for the advancing front location. We have adopted a phase field approach and will present results of the adatom density and step-growth location in time as a function of processing conditions, such as temperature and plasma gas composition.

  3. Modeling of particulate production in the SIRENS plasma disruption simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, J. P.; Merrill, B. J.; Petti, D. A.; Bourham, M. A.; Gilligan, J. G.

    2001-03-01

    Modeling of the complex interplay among plasma physics, fluid mechanics, and aerosol dynamics is critical to providing a detailed understanding of the mechanisms responsible for particulate production from plasma-surface interaction in fusion devices. Plasma/fluid and aerosol models developed for analysis of disruption simulation experiments in the SIRENS high heat flux facility integrate the necessary mechanisms of plasma-material interaction, plasma and fluid flow, and particulate generation and transport. The model successfully predicts the size distribution of primary particulate generated in SIRENS disruption-induced material mobilization experiments.

  4. A More General, Quasineutral Plasma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernsler, Richard

    2003-10-01

    More than seventy-five years ago, Irving Langmuir proposed a quasineutral plasma model still widely used today. The electrostatic field is derived from the electron density using the Boltzmann approximation, while the electron density is obtained from the ion densities using quasineutrality. However, the Boltzmann approximation is not always valid and has no relationship to quasineutrality. Moreover, the solutions thus obtained are usually singular near the ion sound speed, thus necessitating an additional boundary condition known as the Bohm condition. This condition is difficult to use when multiple ion species are present, is ill posed in kinetic treatments, and does not always apply. In this talk, a more general quasineutral model is presented to circumvent these limitations.

  5. Modeling of low pressure plasma sources for microelectronics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Bera, Kallol; Kenney, Jason; Likhanskii, Alexandre; Rauf, Shahid

    2017-10-01

    Chemically reactive plasmas operating in the 1 mTorr–10 Torr pressure range are widely used for thin film processing in the semiconductor industry. Plasma modeling has come to play an important role in the design of these plasma processing systems. A number of 3-dimensional (3D) fluid and hybrid plasma modeling examples are used to illustrate the role of computational investigations in design of plasma processing hardware for applications such as ion implantation, deposition, and etching. A model for a rectangular inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source is described, which is employed as an ion source for ion implantation. It is shown that gas pressure strongly influences ion flux uniformity, which is determined by the balance between the location of plasma production and diffusion. The effect of chamber dimensions on plasma uniformity in a rectangular capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) is examined using an electromagnetic plasma model. Due to high pressure and small gap in this system, plasma uniformity is found to be primarily determined by the electric field profile in the sheath/pre-sheath region. A 3D model is utilized to investigate the confinement properties of a mesh in a cylindrical CCP. Results highlight the role of hole topology and size on the formation of localized hot-spots. A 3D electromagnetic plasma model for a cylindrical ICP is used to study inductive versus capacitive power coupling and how placement of ground return wires influences it. Finally, a 3D hybrid plasma model for an electron beam generated magnetized plasma is used to understand the role of reactor geometry on plasma uniformity in the presence of E  ×  B drift.

  6. DSD - A Particle Simulation Code for Modeling Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Glenn; Lampe, Martin; Ganguli, Gurudas

    1999-11-01

    The NRL Dynamically Shielded Dust code (DSD) is a particle simulation code developed to study the behavior of strongly coupled, dusty plasmas. The model includes the electrostatic wake effects of plasma ions flowing through plasma electrons, collisions of dust and plasma particles with each other and with neutrals. The simulation model contains the short-range strong forces of a shielded Coulomb system, and the long-range forces that are caused by the wake. It also includes other effects of a flowing plasma such as drag forces. In order to model strongly coupled dust in plasmas, we make use of the techniques of molecular dynamics simulation, PIC simulation, and the "particle-particle/particle-mesh" (P3M) technique of Hockney and Eastwood. We also make use of the dressed test particle representation of Rostoker and Rosenbluth. Many of the techniques we use in the model are common to all PIC plasma simulation codes. The unique properties of the code follow from the accurate representation of both the short-range aspects of the interaction between dust grains, and long-range forces mediated by the complete plasma dielectric response. If the streaming velocity is zero, the potential used in the model reduces to the Debye-Huckel potential, and the simulation is identical to molecular dynamics models of the Yukawa potential. The plasma appears only implicitly through the plasma dispersion function, so it is not necessary in the code to resolve the fast plasma time scales.

  7. Implementation of a plasma-neutral model in NIMROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, S.; Shumlak, U.; King, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Interaction between plasma fluid and neutral species is of great importance in the edge region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The presence of neutrals can have beneficial effects such as fueling burning plasmas and quenching the disruptions in tokamaks, as well as deleterious effects like depositing high energy particles on the vessel wall. The behavior of edge plasmas in magnetically confined systems has been investigated using computational approaches that utilize the fluid description for the plasma and Monte Carlo transport for neutrals. In this research a reacting plasma-neutral model is implemented in NIMROD to study the interaction between plasma and neutral fluids. This model, developed by E. T. Meier and U. Shumlak, combines a single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma model with a gas dynamic neutral fluid model which accounts for electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange. Incorporating this model into NIMROD allows the study of the interaction between neutrals and plasma in a variety of plasma science problems. An accelerated plasma moving through a neutral gas background in a coaxial electrode configuration is modeled, and the results are compared with previous calculations from the HiFi code.

  8. Modelling of charging effects in plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, William; Cheung, Nathan W.

    1995-03-01

    The charging effects of plasma immersion ion implantation on several device structures is simulated. The simulations use an analytical model which couples the interaction of the plasma and IC devices during plasma implantation. The plasma model is implemented within the circuit simulator SPICE, which allows the model to uses all of the IC device models existing within SPICE. The model of the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling current through thin gate oxides of MOS devices is demonstrated, and shown how it can be used to quantify the damage induced. Charging damage is shown to be strongly affected by the device structure.

  9. Modeling uc(Pegasus) Plasmas with TSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Kissick, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Garstka, G. D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Jardin, S. C.; Kessel, C. E.

    2003-10-01

    The operational space of the uc(Pegasus) ST will be significantly expanded by recent upgrades: shape and position control, increased and time variable toroidal field, increased ohmic flux, and V_loop control. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC)(S.C. Jardin, J.L. DeLucia, N. Pomphrey, J. Comput. Phys. 66), 481 (1986). is used to model plasma evolution in a number of scenarios in order to determine accessible paths to high toroidal field utilization and beta. Various startup scenarios and fast TF rampdown are under study. The focus of the startup studies is optimization of the V_loop waveform and plasma position during the startup. Fast TF rampdown is a tool that may allow access to high I_p/I_tf and β_t, but which could be destabilizing if overdriven. Initial studies show that a 50% TF rampdown in 3 ms increases βt by a factor of 4 while keeping βp relatively constant, and drives parallel edge current that reduces li and q_95.

  10. Advances in Plasma Process Equipment Development using Plasma and Electromagnetics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur

    2013-10-01

    Plasma processing is widely used in the semiconductor industry for thin film etching and deposition, modification of near-surface material, and cleaning. In particular, the challenges for plasma etching have increased as the critical feature dimensions for advanced semiconductor devices have decreased to 20 nm and below. Critical scaling limitations are increasingly driving the transition to 3D solutions such as multi-gate MOSFETs and 3D NAND structures. These structures create significant challenges for dielectric and conductor etching, especially given the high aspect ratio (HAR) of the features. Plasma etching equipment must therefore be capable of exacting profile control across the entire wafer for feature aspect ratios up to 80:1, high throughput, and exceptionally high selectivity. The multiple challenges for advanced 3D structures are addressed by Applied Material's plasma etching chambers by providing highly sophisticated control of ion energy, wafer temperature and plasma chemistry. Given the costs associated with such complex designs and reduced development time-scales, much of these design innovations have been enabled by utilizing advanced computational plasma modeling tools. We have expended considerable effort to develop 3-dimensional coupled plasma and electromagnetic modeling tools in recent years. In this work, we report on these modeling software and their application to plasma processing system design and evaluation of strategies for hardware and process improvement. Several of these examples deal with process uniformity, which is one of the major challenges facing plasma processing equipment design on large substrates. Three-dimensional plasma modeling is used to understand the sources of plasma non-uniformity, including the radio-frequency (RF) current path, and develop uniformity improvement techniques. Examples from coupled equipment and process models to investigate the dynamics of pulsed plasmas and their impact on plasma chemistry will

  11. Simple model of plasma acceleration in a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel C.

    1990-01-01

    A collisionless, steady-state, cold-plasma model is used to calculate the three-dimensional trajectory of a plasma as it is accelerated through a diverging magnetic field. The magnetic field is assumed to be axisymmetric with nonzero radial and axial components and zero azimuthal component. Although random thermal motion of plasma species is neglected in the cold plasma approximation, an important effect of plasma thermal energy is accounted for in the model as the kinetic energy of electrons in their Larmor motion about magnetic field lines. Calculations based on this model confirm previous studies which suggested that plasma separation from the field of a magnetic nozzle can take place even in the absence of collisional diffusion. It is shown that plasma divergence in a magnetic nozzle can be controlled by tailoring the field geometry.

  12. Modeling Quark Gluon Plasma Using CHIMERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, Betty

    2011-09-01

    We attempt to model Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) evolution from the initial Heavy Ion collision to the final hadronic gas state by combining the Glauber model initial state conditions with eccentricity fluctuations, pre-equilibrium flow, UVH2+1 viscous hydrodynamics with lattice QCD Equation of State (EoS), a modified Cooper-Frye freeze-out and the UrQMD hadronic cascade. We then evaluate the model parameters using a comprehensive analytical framework which together with the described model we call CHIMERA. Within our framework, the initial state parameters, such as the initial temperature (Tinit), presence or absence of initial flow, viscosity over entropy density (η/S) and different Equations of State (EoS), are varied and then compared simultaneously to several experimental data observables: HBT radii, particle spectra and particle flow. χ2/nds values from comparison to the experimental data for each set of initial parameters will then used to find the optimal description of the QGP with parameters that are difficult to obtain experimentally, but are crucial to understanding of the matter produced.

  13. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  14. Characterization of a plasma photonic crystal using the multi-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Whitney; Shumlak, Uri; Miller, Sean

    2016-10-01

    Plasma photonic crystals have great potential to expand the capabilities of current microwave filtering and switching technologies by providing high speed control of energy band-gap/pass characteristics. While there has been considerable research into dielectric, semiconductor, metallic, and even liquid crystal based radiation manipulation, using plasmas is a relatively new field. Concurrently, processing power has reached levels where realistic, computationally expensive, multi-fluid plasma simulations are now possible. Unlike single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, multi-fluid plasma models capture the electron fluid response to electromagnetic waves, a key process responsible for reflecting radiation. In this study, a 5-moment multi-fluid plasma model is implemented in University of Washington's WARPXM computational plasma physics code to examine the energy band-gap characteristics of an array of plasma-filled rods. This configuration permits the thorough analysis of the effect that plasma temperature, density, and array configuration have on energy transmission, absorption, and reflection. Furthermore, high-resolution simulations of the plasma columns gives a detailed window into plasma-radiation interactions. This work is supported by a Grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    Dusty plasmas refer to a broad category of plasmas. Plasmas such as argon-silane plasmas in which particles nucleate and grow are widely used in semiconductor processing and nanoparticle manufacturing. In such dusty plasmas, the plasma and the dust particles are strongly coupled to each other. This means that the presence of dust particles significantly affects the plasma properties and vice versa. Therefore such plasmas are highly complex and they involve several interesting phenomena like nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport. Dusty plasma afterglow is equally complex and important. Especially, residual charge on dust particles carries special significance in several industrial and laboratory situations and it has not been well understood. A 1D numerical model was developed of a low-pressure capacitively-coupled plasma in which nanoparticles nucleate and grow. Polydispersity of particle size distributions can be important in such plasmas. Sectional method, which is well known in aerosol literature, was used to model the evolving particle size and charge distribution. The numerical model is transient and one-dimensional and self consistently accounts for nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport of dust particles and their effect on plasma properties. Nucleation and surface growth rates were treated as input parameters. Results were presented in terms of particle size and charge distribution with an emphasis on importance of polydispersity in particle growth and dynamics. Results of numerical model were compared with experimental measurements of light scattering and light emission from plasma. Reasonable qualitative agreement was found with some discrepancies. Pulsed dusty plasma can be important for controlling particle production and/or unwanted particle deposition. In this case, it is important to understand the behavior of the particle cloud during the afterglow following plasma turn-off. Numerical model was modified to self

  16. Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

  17. Three-dimensional model of magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2009-05-01

    A three-dimensional plasma model is used to understand the characteristics of magnetized capacitively coupled plasma discharges. The simulations consider plasmas generated using high frequency (13.5 MHz) and very high frequency (162 MHz) sources, electropositive (Ar) and electronegative (O2) gases, and spatially uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields. Application of a magnetic field parallel to the electrodes is found to enhance the plasma density due to improved electron confinement and shift the plasma due to the E ×B drift. The plasma is electrically symmetric at 162 MHz so it drifts in opposite directions adjacent to the two electrodes due to the E ×B drift. On the other hand, the 13.5 MHz plasma is electrically asymmetric and it predominantly moves in one direction under the influence of the E ×B drift. The E ×B drift focuses the plasma into a smaller volume in regions with convex magnetic field lines. Conversely, the E ×B drift spreads out the plasma in regions with concave magnetic field lines. In a magnetized O2 plasma, the overall plasma is found to move in one direction due to the E ×B drift while the plasma interior moves in the opposite direction. This behavior is linked to the propensity of negative ions to reside in regions of peak plasma potential, which moves closer to the chamber center opposite to the E ×B drift direction.

  18. Three-dimensional model of magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2009-05-15

    A three-dimensional plasma model is used to understand the characteristics of magnetized capacitively coupled plasma discharges. The simulations consider plasmas generated using high frequency (13.5 MHz) and very high frequency (162 MHz) sources, electropositive (Ar) and electronegative (O{sub 2}) gases, and spatially uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields. Application of a magnetic field parallel to the electrodes is found to enhance the plasma density due to improved electron confinement and shift the plasma due to the ExB drift. The plasma is electrically symmetric at 162 MHz so it drifts in opposite directions adjacent to the two electrodes due to the ExB drift. On the other hand, the 13.5 MHz plasma is electrically asymmetric and it predominantly moves in one direction under the influence of the ExB drift. The ExB drift focuses the plasma into a smaller volume in regions with convex magnetic field lines. Conversely, the ExB drift spreads out the plasma in regions with concave magnetic field lines. In a magnetized O{sub 2} plasma, the overall plasma is found to move in one direction due to the ExB drift while the plasma interior moves in the opposite direction. This behavior is linked to the propensity of negative ions to reside in regions of peak plasma potential, which moves closer to the chamber center opposite to the ExB drift direction.

  19. Circuit Model for Capacitive Coupling in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Shaw, D. M.; Collins, G. J.; Sugai, H.

    1998-10-01

    A crude circuit model has been developed to illustrate and account for capacitive coupling between the rf coil and the bulk plasma in a stove top inductively coupled plasma source. The circuit model is composed of three levels of capacitance: the dielectric window capacitance, sheath capacitance contiguous to the dielectric window, and the chamber to ground sheath capacitance. The model is verified by quantitative comparison with the measured rf plasma potential in the bulk plasma body, plasma feedstock gas (argon) pressures below 2 mTorr. At higher pressures above 5 mTorr, the measured results diverge from the circuit model due to the transition from a spatially uniform electron density throughout the bulk plasma at pressures less than 2 mTorr to a less spatially uniform electron density at pressures above 5 mTorr.

  20. Modelling the plasma plume of an assist source in PIAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauer, Jochen; Harhausen, Jens; Foest, Rüdiger; Loffhagen, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Plasma ion assisted deposition (PIAD) is a technique commonly used to produce high-precision optical interference coatings. Knowledge regarding plasma properties is most often limited to dedicated scenarios without film deposition. Approaches have been made to gather information on the process plasma in situ to detect drifts which are suspected to cause limits in repeatability of resulting layer properties. Present efforts focus on radiance monitoring of the plasma plume of an Advanced Plasma Source (APSpro, Bühler) by optical emission spectroscopy to provide the basis for an advanced plasma control. In this contribution modelling results of the plume region are presented to interpret these experimental data. In the framework of the collisional radiative model used, 15 excited neutral argon states in the plasma are considered. Results of the species densities show good consistency with the measured optical emission of various argon 2 p - 1 s transitions. This work was funded by BMBF under grant 13N13213.

  1. Kinetic effects in edge plasma: kinetic modeling for edge plasma and detached divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, T.

    2017-03-01

    Detached divertor is considered a solution for the heat control in magnetic-confinement fusion reactors. Numerical simulations using the comprehensive divertor codes based on the plasma fluid modeling are indispensable for the design of the detached divertor in future reactors. Since the agreement in the results between detached-divertor experiments and simulations has been rather fair but not satisfactory, further improvement of the modeling is required. The kinetic effect is one of key issues for improving the modeling. Complete kinetic behaviors are able to be simulated by the kinetic modeling. In this paper at first, major kinetic effects in edge plasma and detached divertor are listed. One of the most powerful kinetic models, particle-in-cell (PIC) model, is described in detail. Several results of PIC simulations of edge-plasma kinetic natures are presented. Future works on PIC modeling and simulation for the deeper understanding of edge plasma and detached divertor are discussed.

  2. A quantitative model of plasma in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    1993-07-01

    A model encompassing plasma transport and energy processes is applied to Neptune's magnetosphere. Starting with profiles of the neutral densities and the electron temperature, the model calculates the plasma density and ion temperature profiles. Good agreement between model results and observations is obtained for a neutral source of 5 x 10 exp 25/s if the diffusion coefficient is 10 exp -8 L3R(N)/2s, plasma is lost at a rate 1/3 that of the strong diffusion rate, and plasma subcorotates in the region outside Triton.

  3. Algorithm Development for the Multi-Fluid Plasma Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-30

    advanced plasma thrusters for space propulsion, nuclear weapons effects simulations, radiation production for counter proliferation, and fusion for...Multi-Fluid Plasma Model FA9550-09-1-0135 FA9550-09-1-0135 Uri Shumlak University of Washington Aerospace & Energetics Research Program Box 352250...NL Approved for public release An algorithm is developed based on the multi-fluid plasma model derived from moments of the Boltzmann equation. Large

  4. Algorithm Development for the Two-Fluid Plasma Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-17

    devices, drag reduction for hyper- sonic vehicles, advanced plasma thrusters for space propulsion, nuclear weapons effects simulations, radiation...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-03-2005 to 30-11-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Algorithm Development lor the Two-Fluid Plasma ...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A new algorithm is developed based on the two-fluid plasma model that is more physically accurate and capable than MHD models. The

  5. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Plasma Modeling of Inductively Coupled Plasma Source and Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Agarwal, Ankur; Kenney, Jason; Wu, Ming-Feng; Collins, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are widely used for etching and deposition in the semiconductor industry. As device dimensions shrink with concomitant decreased tolerance for variability, it is critical to improve plasma and process uniformity in all plasma processes. In ICP systems, one of the major sources of non-uniformity is the radio-frequency (RF) antenna used to generate the electromagnetic wave. Discontinuities at current feed and grounding locations as well as electromagnetic field variations along the antenna coils can perturb the azimuthal electric field, resulting in a non-uniform plasma. For plasma modeling of ICP systems, a related problem is how capacitive coupling from the antenna is accounted for. ICP models have generally considered field variation along the antenna and capacitive coupling using simplified circuit models for the antenna structures. Modern ICP antennas are however quite complicated, making circuit approximations of the antenna too crude for system design. A three-dimensional parallel plasma model is described in this paper, where the full set of Maxwell equations are solved in conjunction with plasma transport equations for the plasma and the antenna. Several examples from the use of this model in ICP system design are presented.

  6. Fully implicit kinetic modelling of collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, Vincent Andrew

    1996-05-01

    This dissertation describes a numerical technique, Matrix-Free Newton Krylov, for solving a simplified Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation. This method is both deterministic and fully implicit, and may not have been a viable option before current developments in numerical methods. Results are presented that indicate the efficiency of the Matrix-Free Newton Krylov method for these fully-coupled, nonlinear integro-differential equations. The use and requirement for advanced differencing is also shown. To this end, implementations of Chang-Cooper differencing and flux limited Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) are presented. Results are given for a fully kinetic ion-electron problem with a self consistent electric field calculated from the ion and electron distribution functions. This numerical method, including advanced differencing, provides accurate solutions, which quickly converge on workstation class machines. It is demonstrated that efficient steady-state solutions can be achieved to the non-linear integro-differential equation, obtaining quadratic convergence, without incurring the large memory requirements of an integral operator. Model problems are presented which simulate plasma impinging on a plate with both high and low neutral particle recycling typical of a divertor in a Tokamak device. These model problems demonstrate the performance of the new solution method.

  7. Understanding Plasmas with a High Degree of Correlation Through Modeling: From Rydberg and Fermionic Plasmas to Penning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Ultra cold neutral plasmas have gained attention over the past 15 years as being a unique environment for studying moderately to strongly coupled neutral systems. The first ultra cold neutral plasmas were generated by ionizing a Bose Einstein condensate, generating a plasma with .1K ions and 2-4K electrons. These neutral plasmas have the unique property that the ratio of their potential energy to their kinetic energy, (Γ = PE / KE), can greatly exceed 1, leading to a strongly correlated system. The high degree of correlation means that everything from wave propagation through collision dynamics behaves quite differently from their counterpart in traditional neutral plasmas. Currently, a range of gases and different methods for cooling have been used to generate these plasmas from supersonic expansion, through penning trap configurations (reference Tom, Jake and Ed). These systems have time scales form picoseconds to milliseconds have a particle numbers from 105 to 109. These systems present a unique environment for studying the physics of correlation due to their low particle number and small size. We start by reviewing ultra cold plasmas and the current sate of the art in generating these correlated systems. Then we introduce the methods we will use for exploring these systems through direct simulation of Molecular Dynamics models; Momentum Dependent Potentials, Treecodes and Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh methods. We use these tools to look at two key areas of ultra cold plasmas; development of methods to generate a plasma with a Γ >> 1 and the impact of correlation of collisional relaxation. Our eventual goal is to use what we learn to develop models that can simulate correlation in large plasma systems that are outside of the scope of Molecular Dynamics models. In collaboration with Gautham Dharmuman, Mayur Jain, Michael Murillo and John Verboncoeur. This work it supposed by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  8. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. Computer models for kinetic equations of magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.; Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.; Mirin, A.A.; Horowitz, E.J.; Shumaker, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents four working computer models developed by the computational physics group of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center. All of the models employ a kinetic description of plasma species. Three of the models are collisional, i.e., they include the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in velocity space. The fourth model is collisionless and treats the plasma ions by a fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell method.

  10. A computer model of solar panel-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, D. L.; Freeman, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    High power solar arrays for satellite power systems are presently being planned with dimensions of kilometers, and with tens of kilovolts distributed over their surface. Such systems face many plasma interaction problems, such as power leakage to the plasma, particle focusing, and anomalous arcing. These effects cannot be adequately modeled without detailed knowledge of the plasma sheath structure and space charge effects. Laboratory studies of 1 by 10 meter solar array in a simulated low Earth orbit plasma are discussed. The plasma screening process is discussed, program theory is outlined, and a series of calibration models is presented. These models are designed to demonstrate that PANEL is capable of accurate self consistant space charge calculations. Such models include PANEL predictions for the Child-Langmuir diode problem.

  11. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  12. Global plasma simulations using dynamically generated chemical models

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, James J.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2008-07-15

    Extensive molecular data are a key requirement in understanding modern technical plasmas. A method for coupling molecular data with chemical models in a global plasma simulation to enable rapid testing and evaluation of new plasmas is presented. A global plasma model (GLOBALKIN) is extended using an expert system (Quantemol-P) to enable ad hoc simulations using new plasma recipes. A set of atomic and molecular species to be considered in the plasma simulation is specified by the user. The expert system generates a complete set of reaction pathways for both the gas and surface reactions in a plasma. This set is pruned by discarding unphysical reactions and reaction data not appropriate to technical plasmas (such as autodetachment). The species, gas phase reactions, surface reactions, and plasma properties can be adjusted to control the simulation. The reaction list is populated through a database of molecular parameters and cross sections; missing data can be calculated through molecular cross sections using a further expert system (Quantemol-N) which applies the R-matrix method to electron-molecule collisions. For cases where the R-matrix method is not appropriate, other methods are used to maximize the range of cross-section data available. The Quantemol-P expert system allows rapid creation of new plasma recipes and investigation of their effects allowing a greater level of flexibility than previously achievable.

  13. Multi-fluid simulation models for inductively coupled plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Veitzer, Seth A.; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.; Smith, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    A numerical simulation model for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) sources and its implementation in the USim fluid-plasma software is presented. The electric field from the external antenna is solved using the vector potential equation with a variable dielectric constant. Plasma generation and species transport are solved using a set of collisional multi-fluid equations in diffusion form. USim results are benchmarked with experiments from the literature. Density and temperature distributions show good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with the measurements.

  14. Modeling of plasma jet production from rail and coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner formation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirikpatrick, R. C.; Witherspoon, D.; Cassibry, J.

    2010-11-01

    We study the generation of plasma jets for forming imploding plasma liners using an enhanced version of the ePLAS implicit/hybrid model.^1 Typically, the jets are partially ionized D or Ar gases, in initial 3-10 cm long slugs at 10^16-10^18 electron/cm^3, accelerated for microseconds along 15-30 cm rail or coaxial guns with a 1 cm inter-electrode gap and driven by magnetic fields of a few Tesla. We re-examine the B-field penetration mechanisms that can be active in such wall-connected plasmas,^2 including erosion and EMHD influences, which can subsequently impact plasma liner formation and implosion. For the background and emitted plasma components we discuss optimized PIC and fluid modeling techniques, and the use of implicit fields and hybridized electrons to speed simulation. The plasmas are relatively cold (˜3 eV), so results with fixed atomic Z are compared to those from a simple analytic EOS, and allowing radiative heat loss from the plasma. The use of PIC ions is explored to extract large mean-free-path kinetic effects. 1. R. J. Mason and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986) 2. R. Mason, et al., Phys. Fluids B, 5, 1115 (1993). [4pt] *Research supported in part by USDOE Grant DE-SC0004207.

  15. Divertor plasma studies on DIII-D: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    West, W.P.; Brooks, N.H.; Allen, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    In a magnetically diverted tokamak, the scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor plasma provides separation between the first wall and the core plasma, intercepting impurities generated at the wall before they reach the core plasma. The divertor plasma can also serve to spread the heat and particle flux over a large area of divertor structure wall using impurity radiation and neutral charge exchange, thus reducing peak heat and particle fluxes at the divertor strike plate. Such a reduction will be required in the next generation of tokamaks, for without it, the divertor engineering requirements are very demanding. To successfully demonstrate a radiative divertor, a highly radiative condition with significant volume recombination must be achieved in the divertor, while maintaining a low impurity content in the core plasma. Divertor plasma properties are determined by a complex interaction of classical parallel transport, anomalous perpendicular transport, impurity transport and radiation, and plasma wall interaction. In this paper the authors describe a set of experiments on DIII-D designed to provide detailed two dimensional documentation of the divertor and SOL plasma. Measurements have been made in operating modes where the plasma is attached to the divertor strike plate and in highly radiating cases where the plasma is detached from the divertor strike plate. They also discuss the results of experiments designed to influence the distribution of impurities in the plasma using enhanced SOL plasma flow. Extensive modeling efforts will be described which are successfully reproducing attached plasma conditions and are helping to elucidate the important plasma and atomic physics involved in the detachment process.

  16. Modeling Plasma-to-Interstitium Glucose Kinetics from Multitracer Plasma and Microdialysis Data

    PubMed Central

    Schiavon, Michele; Dalla Man, Chiara; Dube, Simmi; Slama, Michael; Kudva, Yogish C.; Peyser, Thomas; Basu, Ananda; Basu, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Quantitative assessment of the dynamic relationship between plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) glucose and the estimation of the plasma-to-ISF delay are of major importance to determine the accuracy of subcutaneous glucose sensors, an essential component of open- and closed-loop therapeutic systems for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The goal of this work is to develop a model of plasma-to-ISF glucose kinetics from multitracer plasma and interstitium data, obtained by microdialysis, in healthy and T1DM subjects, under fasting conditions. Materials and Methods: A specific experimental design, combining administration of multiple tracers with the microdialysis technique, was used to simultaneously frequently collect plasma and ISF data. Linear time-invariant compartmental modeling was used to describe glucose kinetics from the tracer data because the system is in steady state. Results: A two-compartment model was shown accurate and was identified from both plasma and ISF data. An “equilibration time” between plasma and ISF of 9.1 and 11.0 min (median) in healthy and T1DM subjects, respectively, was calculated. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that, in steady-state condition, the glucose plasma-to-ISF kinetics can be modeled with a linear two-compartment model and that the “equilibration time” between the two compartments can be estimated with precision. Future studies will assess plasma-to-interstitium glucose kinetics during glucose and insulin perturbations in both healthy and T1DM subjects. PMID:26313215

  17. A multi-model plasma simulation of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, I. A. M.; Shumlak, U.; Ho, A.; Miller, S. T.

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is a process relevant to many areas of plasma physics in which energy stored in magnetic fields within highly conductive plasmas is rapidly converted to plasma energy. A full understanding of this phenomenon, however, is currently incomplete as models developed to date have difficulty explaining the fast reconnection rates often seen in nature, such as in the case of solar flares. Therefore, this behavior represents an area of much research in which various plasma models have been tested in order to understand the proper physics explaining the reconnection process. In this research, the WARPXM code developed at the University of Washington is used to study the problem using a hybrid multi-model simulation employing Hall-MHD and two-fluid plasma models. The simulation is performed on a decomposed domain where different plasma models are solved in different regions, depending on a trade-off between each model's physical accuracy and associated computational expense in each region. The code employs a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element spatial discretization coupled with a Runge-Kutta scheme for time advancement and uses boundary conditions to couple the different plasma models. This work is supported by a Grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. Mathematical Model Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process developed for use in predicting characteristics of welds and thus serves as guide for selection of process parameters. Parameters include welding electric currents in, and durations of, straight and reverse polarities; rates of flow of plasma and shielding gases; and sizes and relative positions of welding electrode, welding orifice, and workpiece.

  19. Self-consistent discharge growing model of helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayama, Shogo; Hada, Tohru; Shinohara, Shunjiro; Tanikawa, Takao

    2015-11-01

    Helicon plasma is a high-density and low-temperature plasma generated by the electromagnetic (Helicon) wave excited in the plasma. It is thought to be useful for various applications including electric thrusters. Physics of helicon plasma production involves such fundamental processes as the wave propagation (dispersion relation), collisional and non-collisional wave damping, plasma heating, ionization/recombination of neutral particles, and modification of the dispersion relation by newly ionized plasma. There remain a number of unsolved physical issues such as, how the Helicon and the TG modes influence the plasma density, electron temperature and their spatial profiles. While the Helicon mode is absorbed in the bulk plasma, the TG mode is mostly absorbed near the edge of the plasma. The local power deposition in the helicon plasma is mostly balanced by collisional loss. This local power balance can give rise to the inhomogeneous electron temperature profile that leads to time evolution of density profile and dispersion relation. In our study, we construct a self-consistent model of the discharge evolution that includes the wave excitation, electron heat transfer, and diffusion of charged particles.

  20. A Coupled Plasma-Sheath Model for High Density Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    High density, low pressure plasmas are used for etching and deposition in microelectronics fabrication processes. The process characteristics are strongly determined by the ion energy distribution (IED) and the ion flux arriving at the substrate that are responsible for desorption of etch products and neutral dissociation at the surface. The ion flux and energy are determined by a self- consistent modeling of the bulk plasma, where the ions and the neutral radicals are produced, and the sheath, where the ions are accelerated. Due to their widely different time scales, it is a formidable task to self-consistently resolve non-collisional sheath in a high density bulk plasma model. In this work, we first describe a coupled plasma-sheath model that attempts to resolve the non-collisional sheath in a reactor scale model. Second, we propose a semianalytical radio frequency (RF) sheath model to improve ion dynamics.

  1. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Veitzer, Seth A. Kundrapu, Madhusudhan Stoltz, Peter H. Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-15

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H{sup −} source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H{sup −} ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two

  2. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H- source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H- ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD models

  3. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources.

    PubMed

    Veitzer, Seth A; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H; Beckwith, Kristian R C

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H(-) source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H(-) ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD

  4. Wound healing modeling: investigating ambient gas plasma treatment efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orazov, Marat; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic wounds are thought to be caused, in part, by the presence and persistence of aerobic microbes that deplete the local oxygen concentration and prevent or slow the rate of oxygen-dependent healing. Atmospheric-pressure gas plasmas have been shown to be strong bactericidal agents and there is evidence that plasma treatment can safely kill bacteria in wounds and speed wound healing. In this study, we adapted a six-species reaction-diffusion model of epithelial wound healing and used it to predict the efficacy of various plasma treatment protocols. We assume that the only effect of plasma application to the wound is to reduce the bacterial load and that this in turn reduces the bacterial oxygen consumption in the wound. The model follows the spatial and temporal concentration or density profiles within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts and extracellular matrix material. We highlight the importance of the effects of plasma application on the rate of bacterial regrowth in the wound. Even a relatively large initial reduction in the bacterial wound population may not be sufficient for improved healing if bacterial regrowth is not limited. Although it is clear that current efforts to model wound healing in general and the effects of plasma in particular are in their early stage, the present results suggest several important directions for coupling plasma models with models of tissue biochemical responses.

  5. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  6. An empirical model for the plasma environment along Titan's orbit based on Cassini plasma observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. Todd; Rymer, Abigail M.

    2014-07-01

    Prior to Cassini's arrival at Saturn, the nitrogen-rich dense atmosphere of Titan was considered as a significant, if not dominant, source of heavy ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. While nitrogen was detected in Saturn's magnetosphere based on Cassini observations, Enceladus instead of Titan appears to be the primary source. However, it is difficult to imagine that Titan's dense atmosphere is not a source of nitrogen. In this paper, we apply the Rymer et al.'s (2009) Titan plasma environment categorization model to the plasma environment along Titan's orbit when Titan is not present. We next categorize the Titan encounters that occurred since Rymer et al. (2009). We also produce an empirical model for applying the probabilistic occurrence of each plasma environment as a function of Saturn local time (SLT). Finally, we summarized the electron energy spectra in order to allow one to calculate more accurate electron-impact interaction rates for each plasma environment category. The combination of this full categorization versus SLT and empirical model for the electron spectrum is critical for understanding the magnetospheric plasma and will allow for more accurate modeling of the Titan plasma torus.

  7. A note on antenna models in a warm isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-transparent and electron-reflecting models of antennas in a warm isotropic plasma are reexamined. It is shown that a purely electrical treatment of both the models without an explicit use of the boundary condition on electron velocity yields the same results as those previously obtained through an electromechanical treatment. The essential difference between the two models is that for the electron-reflecting model, fields are nonzero only in the exterior region, while for the electron-transparent model, they are nonzero both in the exterior and interior regions of the antenna. This distinction helps in clarifying some misconceptions about these models of antennas in warm isotropic plasma.

  8. A note on antenna models in a warm isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-transparent and electron-reflecting models of antennas in a warm isotropic plasma are reexamined. It is shown that a purely electrical treatment of both the models without an explicit use of the boundary condition on electron velocity yields the same results as those previously obtained through an electromechanical treatment. The essential difference between the two models is that for the electron-reflecting model, fields are nonzero only in the exterior region, while for the electron-transparent model, they are nonzero both in the exterior and interior regions of the antenna. This distinction helps in clarifying some misconceptions about these models of antennas in warm isotropic plasma.

  9. Modeling the quiet time inner plasma sheet protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Lyons, Larry R.; Chen, Margaret W.; Wolf, Richard A.

    2001-04-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of the quiet time inner plasma sheet protons, we use a modified version of the Magnetospheric Specification Model to simulate the bounce averaged electric and magnetic drift of isotropic plasma sheet protons in an approximately self-consistent magnetic field. Proton differential fluxes are assigned to the model boundary to mimic a mixed tail source consisting of hot plasma from the distant tail and cooler plasma from the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). The source is local time dependent and is based on Geotail observations and the results of the finite tail width convection model. For the purpose of self-consistently simulating plasma motion and a magnetic field, the Tsyganenko 96 magnetic field model is incorporated with additional adjustable ring-current shaped current loops. We obtain equatorial proton flow and midnight and equatorial profiles of proton pressure, number density, and temperature. We find that our results agree well with observations. This indicates that the drift motion dominates the plasma transport in the quiet time inner plasma sheet. Our simulations show that cold plasma from the LLBL enhances the number density and the proton pressure in the inner plasma sheet and decreases the dawn-dusk asymmetry of the equatorial proton pressure. From our approximately force-balanced simulations the magnetic field responds to the increase of pressure gradient force in the inner plasma sheet by changing its configuration to give a stronger magnetic force. At the same time, the plasma dynamics is affected by the changing field configuration and its associated pressure gradient force becomes smaller. Our model predicts a quiet time magnetic field configuration with a local depression in the equatorial magnetic field strength at the inner edge of the plasma sheet and a cross-tail current separated from the ring current, results that are supported by observations. A scale analysis of our results shows that in the

  10. Uncertainty and error in complex plasma chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Miles M.

    2015-06-01

    Chemistry models that include dozens of species and hundreds to thousands of reactions are common in low-temperature plasma physics. The rate constants used in such models are uncertain, because they are obtained from some combination of experiments and approximate theories. Since the predictions of these models are a function of the rate constants, these predictions must also be uncertain. However, systematic investigations of the influence of uncertain rate constants on model predictions are rare to non-existent. In this work we examine a particular chemistry model, for helium-oxygen plasmas. This chemistry is of topical interest because of its relevance to biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas. We trace the primary sources for every rate constant in the model, and hence associate an error bar (or equivalently, an uncertainty) with each. We then use a Monte Carlo procedure to quantify the uncertainty in predicted plasma species densities caused by the uncertainty in the rate constants. Under the conditions investigated, the range of uncertainty in most species densities is a factor of two to five. However, the uncertainty can vary strongly for different species, over time, and with other plasma conditions. There are extreme (pathological) cases where the uncertainty is more than a factor of ten. One should therefore be cautious in drawing any conclusion from plasma chemistry modelling, without first ensuring that the conclusion in question survives an examination of the related uncertainty.

  11. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a global, continuous in value and gradient, representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities and temperatures in the plasmasphere for five ion species. These and other works enable a new more robust empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  12. Computational modeling of process induced damage during plasma clean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, S.; Haggag, A.; Moosa, M.; Ventzek, P. L. G.

    2006-07-01

    When partially completed circuits come in contact with plasmas during integrated circuit fabrication, current from the plasma can potentially damage active devices on the wafer. A suite of computational models is used in this article to investigate damage to ultrathin (1.0-5.5nm) transistor gate dielectric (SiO2) during Ar /O2 based plasma cleaning in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor. This modeling infrastructure includes a two-dimensional plasma equipment model for relating process control parameters to ion and electron currents, a three-dimensional model for flux density calculation within a circular via, an electrostatic model for computing potential across the gate dielectric, and a percolation model to investigate dielectric damage characteristics. Computational results show that when the plasma current comes in contact with the gate dielectric, the gate dielectric rapidly charges up and the potential difference across the dielectric saturates at the level necessary to support the plasma induced current. The steady-state voltage across the dielectric determines the propensity of irreversible damage that can occur under this electrical stress. Gate dielectric damage was found to be most sensitively linked to dielectric thickness. As thin dielectrics (<2.0nm) are leaky, direct tunneling current flow ensures that the potential drop across the gate dielectric remains small. As a consequence, the dielectric is able to withstand the plasma current and the probability of damage is small. However, for thicker dielectrics where Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is dominant, a large voltage builds up across the gate dielectric due to the plasma induced current. The probability of thicker dielectrics getting damaged during the plasma process is therefore high. For given plasma conditions and gate dielectric thickness, current collection area (i.e., antenna size) determines the voltage buildup across the gate dielectric. Damage probability increases with the size of the

  13. Singular perturbation methods and the warm plasma model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Deschamps, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    The application of techniques of the singular perturbation theory to the analysis of warm plasma is discussed. Typically, the cold plasma model can be applied over wide ranges of parameters and only over narrow ranges forming so-called boundary layers is the warm plasma model used. Simplified equations can be used and the solutions matched on both sides of the layer's boundary. Simple examples to illustrate the solution are presented. The analysis confirms that some results are highly sensitive to the values of: (1) wire radius or gap size for an antenna, (2) temperature of the medium, and (3) incident angle of a plane wave.

  14. Modeling the Exhaust of the Pulsed Plasma Thruster.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    8217 AFRPL TR-85-005AD ~h Final Report Il for the period Modeling the Exhaust of iC) 1Junel1980Oto the Pulsed Plasma Thruster 1’ l5August 1980 February 1985...Pulsed Plasma Thruster , was -. prepared by Daniel W. Yannitell, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Louisiana State University, while on...NO. NO. NO 20332 11 tITLE Inctmde Security Clasification) MODELING THE EXHAUST OF THE PULSED PLASMA THRUSTER (U) 62302F WAR 12 TB 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR

  15. Collisional Radiative Models for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartgers, Bart; van Dijk, Jan; van der Mullen, Joost

    1999-10-01

    Collisional Radiative models are a useful tool for studying plasmas. In their simplest form, they are used to calculate an atomic state distribution function (ASDF) from given electron and neutral densities and an electron temperature. Additionally, global ionization and recombination coefficients can be calculated as a function of electron density and temperature. In turn, these coefficients are used as input for the general plasma model

  16. Recent progress in plasma modelling at INFN-LNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Galatà, A.; Mascali, D.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.

    2016-02-01

    At Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), the development of intense ion and proton sources has been supported by a great deal of work on the modelling of microwave generated plasmas for many years. First, a stationary version of the particle-in-cell code was developed for plasma modelling starting from an iterative strategy adopted for the space charge dominated beam transport simulations. Electromagnetic properties of the plasma and full-waves simulations are now affordable for non-homogenous and non-isotropic magnetized plasma via "cold" approximation. The effects of Coulomb collisions on plasma particles dynamics was implemented with the Langevin formalism, instead of simply applying the Spitzer 90° collisions through a Monte Carlo technique. A wide database of different cross sections related to reactions occurring in a hydrogen plasma was implemented. The next step consists of merging such a variety of approaches for retrieving an "as-a-whole" picture of plasma dynamics in ion sources. The preliminary results will be summarized in the paper for a microwave discharge ion source designed for intense and high quality proton beams production, proton source for European Spallation Source project. Even if the realization of a predictive software including the complete processes involved in plasma formation is still rather far, a better comprehension of the source behavior is possible and so the simulations may support the optimization phase.

  17. Modeling plasma/material interactions during a tokamak disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1994-10-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are still of serious concern and present a potential obstacle for successful operation and reliable design. Erosion of plasma-facing materials due to thermal energy dump during a disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components, therefore diminishing the economic feasibility of the reactor. A comprehensive disruption erosion model which takes into account the interplay of major physical processes during plasma-material interaction has been developed. The initial burst of energy delivered to facing-material surfaces from direct impact of plasma particles causes sudden ablation of these materials. As a result, a vapor cloud is formed in front of the incident plasma particles. Shortly thereafter, the plasma particles are stopped in the vapor cloud, heating and ionizing it. The energy transmitted to the material surfaces is then dominated by photon radiation. It is the dynamics and the evolution of this vapor cloud that finally determines the net erosion rate and, consequently, the component lifetime. The model integrates with sufficient detail and in a self-consistent way, material thermal evolution response, plasma-vapor interaction physics, vapor hydrodynamics, and radiation transport in order to realistically simulate the effects of a plasma disruption on plasma-facing components. Candidate materials such as beryllium and carbon have been analyzed. The dependence of the net erosion rate on disruption physics and various parameters was analyzed and is discussed.

  18. Modeling of extinguishing ELMs in detached divertor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, A.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Hollmann, E.; Rognlien, T.

    2015-11-01

    Detached plasmas, the primary operational regime for divertors in next-step fusion devices, should be compatible with both good H-mode confinement and relatively small ELMs providing tolerable heat power loads on divertor targets. Here, dynamics of boundary plasma, impurities and material walls over a sequence of many type-I ELM events under detached divertor plasma conditions is studied with UEGDE-MB-W, the newest version of 2D edge plasma transport code, which incorporates Macro-Blob (MB) approach to simulate non-diffusive filamentary transport and various ``Wall'' (W) models for time-dependent hydrogen wall inventory and recycling. We present the results of multi-parametric analysis on the impact of the size and frequency of ELMs on the divertor plasma parameters where we vary the MB characteristics under different pedestals and divertor configurations. We discuss the conditions, under which small but frequent type-I ELMs (typical for high-power H-mode discharges on current tokamaks with hard deuterium gas puff) are not ``burning through'' the formed detached divertor plasma. In this case, the inner and outer divertors are filled by sub-eV, recombining, highly-impure plasma. Variations of impurity plasma content, radiation pattern, and deuterium wall inventory over the ELM cycle are analyzed. UEDGE-MB-W modeling results are compared to available experimental data.

  19. Recent progress in plasma modelling at INFN-LNS

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, L. Castro, G.; Mascali, D.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Torrisi, G.; Galatà, A.

    2016-02-15

    At Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), the development of intense ion and proton sources has been supported by a great deal of work on the modelling of microwave generated plasmas for many years. First, a stationary version of the particle-in-cell code was developed for plasma modelling starting from an iterative strategy adopted for the space charge dominated beam transport simulations. Electromagnetic properties of the plasma and full-waves simulations are now affordable for non-homogenous and non-isotropic magnetized plasma via “cold” approximation. The effects of Coulomb collisions on plasma particles dynamics was implemented with the Langevin formalism, instead of simply applying the Spitzer 90° collisions through a Monte Carlo technique. A wide database of different cross sections related to reactions occurring in a hydrogen plasma was implemented. The next step consists of merging such a variety of approaches for retrieving an “as-a-whole” picture of plasma dynamics in ion sources. The preliminary results will be summarized in the paper for a microwave discharge ion source designed for intense and high quality proton beams production, proton source for European Spallation Source project. Even if the realization of a predictive software including the complete processes involved in plasma formation is still rather far, a better comprehension of the source behavior is possible and so the simulations may support the optimization phase.

  20. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies.

  1. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies.

  2. Effective dose delivery in atmospheric pressure plasma jets for plasma medicine: a model predictive control approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidon, Dogan; Graves, David B.; Mesbah, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been identified as a promising tool for plasma medicine. This paper aims to demonstrate the importance of using model-based feedback control strategies for safe, reproducible, and therapeutically effective application of APPJs for dose delivery to a target substrate. Key challenges in model-based control of APPJs arise from: (i) the multivariable, nonlinear nature of system dynamics, (ii) the need for constraining the system operation within an operating region that ensures safe plasma treatment, and (iii) the cumulative, nondecreasing nature of dose metrics. To systematically address these challenges, we propose a model predictive control (MPC) strategy for real-time feedback control of a radio-frequency APPJ in argon. To this end, a lumped-parameter, physics-based model is developed for describing the jet dynamics. Cumulative dose metrics are defined for quantifying the thermal and nonthermal energy effects of the plasma on substrate. The closed-loop performance of the MPC strategy is compared to that of a basic proportional-integral control system. Simulation results indicate that the MPC stategy provides a versatile framework for dose delivery in the presence of disturbances, while the safety and practical constraints of the APPJ operation can be systematically handled. Model-based feedback control strategies can lead to unprecedented opportunities for effective dose delivery in plasma medicine.

  3. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  4. Nonlinear lower hybrid modeling in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.

    2014-02-12

    We present here new results concerning the nonlinear mechanism underlying the observed spectral broadening produced by parametric instabilities occurring at the edge of tokamak plasmas in present day LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) experiments. Low frequency (LF) ion-sound evanescent modes (quasi-modes) are the main parametric decay channel which drives a nonlinear mode coupling of lower hybrid (LH) waves. The spectrum of the LF fluctuations is calculated here considering the beating of the launched LH wave at the radiofrequency (RF) operating line frequency (pump wave) with the noisy background of the RF power generator. This spectrum is calculated in the frame of the kinetic theory, following a perturbative approach. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear LH wave equation show the evolution of the nonlinear mode coupling in condition of a finite depletion of the pump power. The role of the presence of heavy ions in a Deuterium plasma in mitigating the nonlinear effects is analyzed.

  5. Modelling of chemical reactions in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktaev, N. E.; Remnev, G. E.; Yalovets, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is devoted to theoretical investigation of interaction of pulsed high current electron beam with gas substance. As a result of the interaction the formation of chemical active plasma can be observed. One of the key parameter for theoretical analyze of the process is the electron distribution function. Within the framework of the Boltzmann approach we obtained the dynamical equation for electron distribution function depending on the electron energy, coordinate and time.

  6. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4 mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23 mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3 km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e}) ∝ v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  7. A Coupled Plasma and Sheath Model for High Density Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Bose; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a coupled plasma and collisionless; sheath model for the simulation of high density plasma processing reactors. Due to inefficiencies in numerical schemes and the resulting computational burden, a coupled multidimensional plasma and sheath simulation has not been possible model for gas mixtures and high density reactors of practical interest. In this work we demonstrate that with a fully implicit algorithm and a refined computational mesh, a self-consistent plasma and sheath simulation is feasible. We discuss the details of the model equations, the importance of ion inertia, and the resulting sheath profiles for argon and chlorine plasmas. We find that at low operating pressures (10-30 mTorr), the charge separation occurs only within a 0.5 mm layer near the surface in a 300 mm inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. A unified model eliminates the use of off-line or loosely coupled sheath models with simplifying assumptions which generally lead to uncertainties in ion flux and sheath electrical properties.

  8. Modeling RF-induced Plasma-Surface Interactions with VSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, David N.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Roark, Christine M.; Stoltz, Peter H.; Zhou, Sean C.-D.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2014-10-01

    An overview of ongoing enhancements to the Plasma Discharge (PD) module of Tech-X's VSim software tool is presented. A sub-grid kinetic sheath model, developed for the accurate computation of sheath potentials near metal and dielectric-coated walls, enables the physical effects of DC and RF sheath dynamics to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not explicitly resolve sheath scale lengths. Sheath potential evolution, together with particle behavior near the sheath (e.g. sputtering), can thus be simulated in complex, experimentally relevant geometries. Simulations of RF sheath-enhanced impurity production near surfaces of the C-Mod field-aligned ICRF antenna are presented to illustrate the model; impurity mitigation techniques are also explored. Model extensions to capture the physics of secondary electron emission and of multispecies plasmas are summarized, together with a discussion of improved tools for plasma chemistry and IEDF/EEDF visualization and modeling. The latter tools are also highly relevant for commercial plasma processing applications. Ultimately, we aim to establish VSimPD as a robust, efficient computational tool for modeling fusion and industrial plasma processes. Supported by U.S. DoE SBIR Phase I/II Award DE-SC0009501.

  9. Modeling of Plasma Irregularities in Expanding Ionospheric Dust Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W.; Mahmoudian, A.; Bordikar, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Natural dust layers occur in the earth’s mesosphere (50km-85km). Plasma irregularities are associated with these natural dust layers that produce radar echoes. Recently, an Ionospheric sounding rocket experiment was performed to investigate the plasma irregularities in upper atmospheric dust layers. The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE) uses a rocket payload injection of particles in the ionosphere to determine the mechanisms for enhanced radar scatter from plasma irregularities embedded in artificial dusty plasma in space. A 2-D hybrid computational model is described that may be used to study a variety of irregularities in dusty space plasmas which may lead to radar echoes. In this model, the dust and ions are both treated with Particle-In-Cell method while the dust charge varies with time based on the standard dust Orbit Motion Limited charging model. A stochastic model is adopted to remove particle ions due to the dust charging process. Electrons are treated with a fluid model including the parallel dynamics of magnetic fields. Fourier spectral methods with a predictor-corrector time advance are used to solve it. This numerical model will be used to investigate the electrodynamics and several possible plasma irregularity generation mechanisms after the creation of an artificial dust layer. The first is the dust ion-acoustic instability due to the drift of dust relative to the plasma. The instability saturates by trapping some ions. The effects of dust radius and dust drift velocity on plasma irregularities will be analyzed further. Also, a shear- driven instability in expanding dusty clouds is investigated.

  10. Modeling the electrode-plasma interaction in the Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluggish, Brian; Ohkawa, Tihiro; Verboncouer, John; Hua, Daniel

    2001-10-01

    The use of concentric ring electrodes to generate a radial electric field perpendicular to an axial magnetic field is a well established technique. It has been used with some success on a number of plasma devices such as magnetic mirrors, Q-machines, and RF discharges. The Archimedes Technology Group is now utilizing this technique in the development of its Plasma Mass Filter. However, only limited theoretical work has been performed to support the design of electrode systems. Furthermore, there is little understanding of how the voltages applied to the discrete electrodes translate into a smooth potential profile in the plasma. To facilitate the design of the electrode system for the Plasma Mass Filter, we have developed a fluid model of the interaction of the electrodes with the plasma. The model provides simple guidelines for determining the required number, size, and spacing of the electrodes. In addition, it shows that discontinuities in the potential profile applied to the electrodes are smoothed out by variations in the potential drop in the sheath. We are currently verifying the model by applying XOOPIC, a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code, to the problem. The results of the model will be compared with the particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Modeling of plasma transport and negative ion extraction in a magnetized radio-frequency plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubiani, G.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G.; Kohen, N.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Negative ion sources for fusion are high densities plasma sources in large discharge volumes. There are many challenges in the modeling of these sources, due to numerical constraints associated with the high plasma density, to the coupling between plasma and neutral transport and chemistry, the presence of a magnetic filter, and the extraction of negative ions. In this paper we present recent results concerning these different aspects. Emphasis is put on the modeling approach and on the methods and approximations. The models are not fully predictive and not complete as would be engineering codes but they are used to identify the basic principles and to better understand the physics of the negative ion sources.

  12. Numerical modeling of deflagration mode in coaxial plasma guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed coaxial plasma guns have been used in several applications in the field of space propulsion, nuclear fusion and materials processing. These devices operate in two modes based on the delay between gas injection and breakdown initiation. Larger delay led to the plasma detonation mode where a compression wave in the form of a luminous front propagates from the breech to the muzzle. Shorter delay led to the more efficient deflagration mode characterized by a relatively diffuse plasma with higher resistivity. The overall physics of the discharge in the two modes of operation and in particular the latter remain relatively unexplored. Here we perform a computational modeling study by solving the non-ideal Magneto-hydrodynamics equations for the quasi-neutral plasma in the coaxial plasma gun. A finite volume formulation on an unstructured mesh framework with an implicit scheme is used to do stable computations. The final work will present details of important species in the plasma, particle energies and Mach number at the muzzle. A comparison of the plasma parameters will be made with the experiments reported in ref. [1]. [4pt] [1] F. R. Poehlmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 123508 (2010)

  13. Computational Implementation of a Coupled Plasma-Neutral Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R. W.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the computational transport of coupled plasma-neutral fluids in the edge region of a toroidally symmetric magnetic confinement device, with applications to the tokamak. The model couples neutral density in a diffusion approximation with a set of transport equations for the plasma including density, classical plasma parallel velocity, anomalous cross-field velocity, and ion and electron temperature equations. The plasma potential, gradient electric fields, drift velocity, and net poloidal velocity are computed as dependent quantities under the assumption of ambipolarity. The implementation is flexible to permit extension in the future to a fully coupled set of non-ambipolar momentum equations. The computational method incorporates sonic flow and particle recycling of ions and neutrals at the vessel boundary. A numerically generated orthogonal grid conforms to the poloidal magnetic flux surfaces. Power law differencing based on the SIMPLE relaxation method is modified to accomodate the compressible reactive plasma flow with a "semi-implicit" diffusion method. Residual corrections are applied to obtain a valid convergence to the steady state solution. Results are presented for a representative divertor tokamak in a high recycling regime, showing strongly peaked neutral and plasma densities near the divertor target. Solutions show large poloidal and radial gradients in the plasma density, potential, and temperatures. These findings may help to understand the strong turbulence experimentally observed in the plasma edge region of the tokamak.

  14. An Extended Magnetohydrodynamics Model for Relativistic Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mani; Gammie, Charles F.; Foucart, Francois; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-09-01

    Black holes that accrete far below the Eddington limit are believed to accrete through a geometrically thick, optically thin, rotationally supported plasma that we will refer to as a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). RIAFs are typically collisionless in the sense that the Coulomb mean free path is large compared to {GM}/{c}2, and relativistically hot near the event horizon. In this paper we develop a phenomenological model for the plasma in RIAFs, motivated by the application to sources such as Sgr A* and M87. The model is derived using Israel-Stewart theory, which considers deviations up to second order from thermal equilibrium, but modified for a magnetized plasma. This leads to thermal conduction along magnetic field lines and a difference in pressure, parallel and perpendicular to the field lines (which is equivalent to anisotropic viscosity). In the non-relativistic limit, our model reduces to the widely used Braginskii theory of magnetized, weakly collisional plasmas. We compare our model to the existing literature on dissipative relativistic fluids, describe the linear theory of the plasma, and elucidate the physical meaning of the free parameters in the model. We also describe limits of the model when the conduction is saturated and when the viscosity implies a large pressure anisotropy. In future work, the formalism developed in this paper will be used in numerical models of RIAFs to assess the importance of non-ideal processes for the dynamics and radiative properties of slowly accreting black holes.

  15. Modeling collisional processes in plasmas using discontinuous numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sean

    Fluid-based plasma models are typically applied to parameter regimes where a local thermal equilibrium is assumed. The applicability of this regime is valid for many plasmas, however, it is limited to plasma dynamics dominated by collisional effects. This study attempts to extend the validity of the collisional fluid regime using an anisotropic 13-moment fluid model derived from the Pearson type-IV probability distribution. The model explicitly evolves the heat flux hyperbolically alongside the density, momentum, and energy in order to capture dynamics usually restricted to costly kinetic models. Each particle species is modeled individually and collectively coupled through electromagnetic and collision operators. To remove electromagnetic divergence errors inherent to numerical representations of Maxwell's equations, both hyperbolic and parabolic cleaning methods are presented. The plasma models are implemented using high-order finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin numerical methods designed for unstructured meshes. The unstructured code framework, numerical methods, and plasma models were developed in the University of Washington's WARPXM code for use on heterogeneous accelerated clusters.

  16. Stochastic modeling of plasma mode forecasting in tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Sh.; Salem, M.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Khorshid, P.

    2012-04-01

    The structure of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes has always been an interesting study in tokamaks. The mode number of tokamak plasma is the most important parameter, which plays a vital role in MHD instabilities. If it could be predicted, then the time of exerting external fields, such as feedback fields and Resonance Helical Field, could be obtained. Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) and Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average are useful models to predict stochastic processes. In this paper, we suggest using ARIMA model to forecast mode number. The ARIMA model shows correct mode number (m = 4) about 0.5 ms in IR-T1 tokamak and equations of Mirnov coil fluctuations are obtained. It is found that the recursive estimates of the ARIMA model parameters change as the plasma mode changes. A discriminator function has been proposed to determine plasma mode based on the recursive estimates of model parameters.

  17. Strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions: Electron drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchuk, P. A.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze enhancement of thermonuclear fusion reactions due to strong plasma screening in dense matter using a simple electron drop model. In the model we assume fusion in a potential that is screened by an effective electron cloud around colliding nuclei (extended Salpeter ion-sphere model). We calculate the mean-field screened Coulomb potentials for atomic nuclei with equal and nonequal charges, appropriate astrophysical S factors, and enhancement factors of reaction rates. As a byproduct, we study the analytic behavior of the screening potential at small separations between the reactants. In this model, astrophysical S factors depend not only on nuclear physics but on plasma screening as well. The enhancement factors are in good agreement with calculations by other methods. This allows us to formulate a combined, pure analytic model of strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions. The results can be useful for simulating nuclear burning in white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  18. Plasma Model V&V of Collisionless Electrostatic Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert; Le, Hai; Bilyeu, David; Gildea, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    A simple 1D electrostatic collisionless shock was selected as an initial validation and verification test case for a new plasma modeling framework under development at the Air Force Research Laboratory's In-Space Propulsion branch (AFRL/RQRS). Cross verification between PIC, Vlasov, and Fluid plasma models within the framework along with expected theoretical results will be shown. The non-equilibrium velocity distributions (VDF) captured by PIC and Vlasov will be compared to each other and the assumed VDF of the fluid model at selected points. Validation against experimental data from the University of California, Los Angeles double-plasma device will also be presented along with current work in progress at AFRL/RQRS towards reproducing the experimental results using higher fidelity diagnostics to help elucidate differences between model results and between the models and original experiment. DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; unlimited distribution; PA (Public Affairs) Clearance Number 14332.

  19. Laser-Plasma Modeling Using PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the use of the PERSEUS extended-MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas in modeling laser-plasma interactions in relativistic and nonrelativistic regimes. By formulating the fluid equations as a relaxation system in which the current is semi-implicitly time-advanced using the Generalized Ohm's Law, PERSEUS enables modeling of two-fluid phenomena in dense plasmas without the need to resolve the smallest electron length and time scales. For relativistic and nonrelativistic laser-target interactions, we have validated a cycle-averaged absorption (CAA) laser driver model against the direct approach of driving the electromagnetic fields. The CAA model refers to driving the radiation energy and flux rather than the fields, and using hyperbolic radiative transport, coupled to the plasma equations via energy source terms, to model absorption and propagation of the radiation. CAA has the advantage of not requiring adequate grid resolution of each laser wavelength, so that the system can span many wavelengths without requiring prohibitive CPU time. For several laser-target problems, we compare existing MHD results to extended-MHD results generated using PERSEUS with the CAA model, and examine effects arising from Hall physics. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  20. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."

  1. Spectral line shapes modeling in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, R.; Boland, D.; Christova, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Marandet, Y.; Mekkaoui, A.; Rosato, J.

    2009-07-01

    An overview of several spectral line shapes studies of common interest in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas is presented. For lines dominated by Stark broadening, approaches taking into account the dynamics of numerous perturbers are sometimes required. We briefly recall ab initio simulation techniques and model microfield methods used for such conditions. Together with the impact approximation, such models may also be used for studying the effects on a line profile of a magnetic field of the order of the tesla, allowing the diagnostic of stellar objects or magnetic fusion devices. The problem of the apparent spectral line emitted in a plasma affected by strong fluctuations of the plasma parameters is discussed for the case of optically thin plasmas.

  2. Efficient Plasma Ion Source Modeling With Adaptive Mesh Refinement (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Vay, J.L.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    2005-03-15

    Ion beam drivers for high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy research require high brightness beams, so there is little margin of error allowed for aberration at the emitter. Thus, accurate plasma ion source computer modeling is required to model the plasma sheath region and time-dependent effects correctly.A computer plasma source simulation module that can be used with a powerful heavy ion fusion code, WARP, or as a standalone code, is being developed. In order to treat the plasma sheath region accurately and efficiently, the module will have the capability of handling multiple spatial scale problems by using Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). We will report on our progress on the project.

  3. Modeling Plasma-Particle Interaction in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of plasma-sprayed coatings are controlled by the heat, momentum, and mass transfer between individual particles and the plasma jet. The particle behavior in conventional single-arc plasma spraying has been the subject of intensive numerical research, whereas multi-arc plasma spraying has not yet received the same attention. We propose herein a numerical model to serve as a scientific tool to investigate particle behavior in multi-arc plasma spraying. In the Lagrangian description of particles in the model, the mathematical formulations describing the heat, momentum, and mass transfer are of great importance for good predictive power, so such formulations proposed by different authors were compared critically, revealing that different mathematical formulations lead to significantly different results. The accuracy of the different formulations was evaluated based on theoretical considerations, and those found to be more accurate were implemented in the final model. Furthermore, a mathematical formulation is proposed to enable simplified calculation of partial particle melting and resolidification.

  4. Modeling Plasma-Particle Interaction in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2017-02-01

    The properties of plasma-sprayed coatings are controlled by the heat, momentum, and mass transfer between individual particles and the plasma jet. The particle behavior in conventional single-arc plasma spraying has been the subject of intensive numerical research, whereas multi-arc plasma spraying has not yet received the same attention. We propose herein a numerical model to serve as a scientific tool to investigate particle behavior in multi-arc plasma spraying. In the Lagrangian description of particles in the model, the mathematical formulations describing the heat, momentum, and mass transfer are of great importance for good predictive power, so such formulations proposed by different authors were compared critically, revealing that different mathematical formulations lead to significantly different results. The accuracy of the different formulations was evaluated based on theoretical considerations, and those found to be more accurate were implemented in the final model. Furthermore, a mathematical formulation is proposed to enable simplified calculation of partial particle melting and resolidification.

  5. Dense hydrogen plasma: Comparison between models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clérouin, J. G.; Bernard, S.

    1997-09-01

    Static and dynamical properties of the dense hydrogen plasma (ρ>=2.6 g cm-3, 0.1

  6. A preliminary model of ion beam neutralization. [in thruster plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, D. E.; Katz, I.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model of neutralized thruster ion beam plasmas has been developed. The basic premise is that the beam forms an electrostatic trap for the neutralizing electrons. A Maxwellian spectrum of electron energies is maintained by collisions between trapped electrons and by collective randomization of velocities of electrons injected from the neutralizer into the surrounding plasma. The theory contains the observed barometric law relationship between electron density and electron temperatures and ion beam spreading in good agreement with measured results.

  7. Database Needs for Modeling and Simulation of Plasma Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    structure codes as well as semiempirical methods, should be encouraged. 2. A spectrum of plasma models should be developed, aimed at a variety of uses...One set of codes should be developed to provide a compact, relatively fast simulation that addresses plasma and surface kinetics and is useful for...process engineers. Convenient user interfaces would be important for this set of codes . A second set of codes would include more sophisticated algorithms

  8. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-15

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. These predictions are contrasted here with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials for an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP. METHODS: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model discrimination was performed, by minimizing the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), maximizing the coefficient of determination (r²) and by comparison of the quality of fit plots. RESULTS: The best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition after INSCOP administration (minimal AIC =907.2) consisted of one compartment for plasma, saliva and urine respectively that were inter-connected with different rate constants. The estimated values of PK parameters were compiled in Table 1. The model fitting exercises revealed a nonlinear PK for scopolamine between plasma and saliva compartments for K21, Vmax and Km. CONCLUSION: PK model for INSCOP was developed and for the first time it satisfactorily predicted the PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after INSCOP administration. Using non-linear PK yielded the best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition between plasma and saliva compartments, and inclusion of non-linear PK resulted in a significant improved model fitting. The model can be utilized to predict scopolamine plasma concentration using saliva and/or urine data that

  10. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-15

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  11. Mathematical model of gas plasma applied to chronic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Zhang, Y. T.

    2013-11-01

    Chronic wounds are a major burden for worldwide health care systems, and patients suffer pain and discomfort from this type of wound. Recently gas plasmas have been shown to safely speed chronic wounds healing. In this paper, we develop a deterministic mathematical model formulated by eight-species reaction-diffusion equations, and use it to analyze the plasma treatment process. The model follows spatial and temporal concentration within the wound of oxygen, chemoattractants, capillary sprouts, blood vessels, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix material, nitric oxide (NO), and inflammatory cell. Two effects of plasma, increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load, are considered in this model. The plasma treatment decreases the complete healing time from 25 days (normal wound healing) to 17 days, and the contributions of increasing NO concentration and reducing bacteria load are about 1/4 and 3/4, respectively. Increasing plasma treatment frequency from twice to three times per day accelerates healing process. Finally, the response of chronic wounds of different etiologies to treatment with gas plasmas is analyzed.

  12. Modeling of gas ionization and plasma flow in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2016-12-01

    A one-dimensional model to study the gas ionization and plasma flow in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters(APPTs) is established in this paper. The discharge process of the APPT used in the LES-6 satellite is simulated to validate the model. The simulation results for the impulse bit and propellant utilization give values of 29.05 μN s and 9.56%, respectively, which are in good agreement with experimental results. To test the new ionization sub-model, the discharge process of a particular APPT, XPPT-1, is simulated, and a numerical result for the propellant utilization of 62.8% is obtained, which also agrees well with experiment. The gas ionization simulation results indicate that an APPT with a lower average propellant ablation rate and higher average electric field intensity between electrodes should have higher propellant utilization. The plasma density distribution between the electrodes of APPTs can also be obtained using the new model, and the numerical results show that the plasma generation and flow are discontinuous, which is in good agreement with past experimental results of high-speed photography. This model provides a new tool with which to study the physical mechanisms of APPTs and a reference for the design of high-performance APPTs.

  13. Modelling the Neutral Atmosphere and Plasma Environment of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.; Jurac, S.; Johnson, R.; McGrath, M.

    2005-01-01

    The first year of this contract has resulted in two publications with the P.I. and co-I Jurac as lead authors and two publications where these team members are co-authors. These papers discuss modeling work undertaken in preparation for Cassini; the goal was to summarize our current best knowledge of the ion and neutrals sources and distributions. One of the major goals of this project is to improve models of the plasma and neutral environment near Saturn. The paper "A self-consistent model of plasma and neutrals at Saturn: Neutral cloud morphology" [Jurac and Richardson, 20051 presents results on the neutral clouds near Saturn using a model which for the first times treats the ions and neutrals self-consistently. We also for the first time include a directly sputtered H source. The Voyager and HST observations are used as model constraints. The neutral source is adjusted to give a good match to the HST observations of OH. For this initial run the ion parameters from Richardson et al. are used; charge exchange with ions is a major neutral loss process. The neutral profile derived from the model is then used in a model of plasma transport and chemistry (with the plasma diffusion rate the only free parameter). This model gives new values of the ion composition which are then fed back into the neutral model. This iteration continues until the values converge.

  14. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Eggeling, Christian; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ever since technologies enabled the characterization of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organization such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasizing on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organization and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure. PMID:27747212

  15. Two-temperature modeling of laser sustained hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertogul, Ayhan E.; Krier, Herman

    1994-10-01

    A kinetic nonequilibrium model of laser sustained hydrogen plasmas has been formulated and solved for the prediction of steady-state energy transport processes. This model is the first of its kind and includes a discretized beam ray-trace with a variable index of refraction based upon plasma electron number density for a 10.6-micron CO2 laser input. Model results for fraction of incident laser power absorbed, and fraction of incident laser power retained by the hydrogen gas have compared favorably with experimental results. The model has been used to provide predictions of laser sustained plasma (LSP) performance well outside the realm of experiments to incident powers as high as 700 kW. At the gas pressures studied, minimal kinetic nonequilibrium was observed in LSP core regions, even for 700-kW laser power.

  16. Plasma model of carrier transportation in photoelectric semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. Q.; Lu, Q. S.; Du, S. J.

    2006-02-01

    A new model, called the plasma model, describing carrier transportation in photoelectric semiconductor detectors is proposed. Semiconductor material under laser irradiation is regarded as a plasma of low temperature with high carrier density, and it is considered that the carrier temperature is different from the lattice temperature when the irradiating laser power is high but lower than the damage threshold of the detectors. Equations for the carrier density, velocity and temperature are established. According to the model, numerical simulations of a photoconductive semiconductor detector were carried out by programming. The instantaneous change behaviors of the photoconductive detector are obtained. The results of the numerical calculation match well with the experimental results.

  17. Numerical modeling of strongly-coupled dusty plasma systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasut, John Anthony

    2001-09-01

    Plasma systems occur in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory environments. Often these systems contain a dust component in addition to the plasma particles. Plasmas are generally regarded as a highly disordered state of matter and dust is often seen as a contaminant to the plasma. However, in ``strongly coupled'' dusty plasmas where the electrical potential energy between the dust particles is higher than the average kinetic energy of the particles, it is possible for the system to exist in a ``liquid'' or ``crystalline'' state. The first such crystalline states were observed experimentally in 1994 and are not yet fully understood. The spacing between the particles is typically around 100 microns, allowing the individual particles to be visually observed and tracked. Several computer models have suggested that the amount of ordering present in the system should depend only upon two dimensionless parameters: the ratio of the electrical energy to the kinetic energy and the ratio of the interparticle separation to the Debye length of the plasma. These models suggest that the method in which these two parameters are reached should have no impact upon the amount of order within the system. The results of computer modeling using a tree code known as Box_Tree, which, unlike most other computer simulations, includes all interparticle interactions, shows that the method by which these parameters are reached does have an affect on the final state of the system. Box_Tree has also been used to study Mach cones caused by particles traveling through or near a dust crystal. In addition, preliminary results on the study of finite dusty plasma systems have been obtained. These results show that particles confined in a finite plasma oscillate with a frequency that depends upon particle mass and charge.

  18. Plasma gun pellet acceleration modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modifications to the electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS have been completed to allow for acceleration experiments using plastic pellets. Modifications have been implemented to the 1-D, time dependent code ODIN to include pellet friction, momentum, and kinetic energy with options of variable barrel length. The code results in the new version, POSEIDON, compare favorably with experimental data and with code results from ODIN. Predicted values show an increased pellet velocity along the barrel length, achieving 2 km/s exit velocity. Measured velocity, at three locations along the barrel length, showed good correlation with predicted values. The code has also been used to investigate the effectiveness of longer pulse length on pellet velocity using simulated ramp up and down currents with flat top, and triangular current pulses with early and late peaking. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  19. A simple model for electron temperature in dilute plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunpei; Cooke, David L.

    2016-10-01

    In this short note, we present some work on investigating electron temperatures and potentials in steady dilute plasma flows. The analysis is based on the detailed fluid model for electrons. Ionizations, normalized electron number density gradients, and magnetic fields are neglected. The transport properties are assumed as local constants. With these treatments, the partial differential equation for electron temperature degenerates as an ordinary differential equation. Along an electron streamline, two simple formulas for electron temperature and plasma potential are obtained. These formulas offer some insights, e.g., the electron temperature and plasma potential distributions along an electron streamline include two exponential functions, and the one for plasma potential includes an extra linear distribution function.

  20. Semianalytical models of sprite formation from plasma inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, V. V.; Hayakawa, M.

    2016-11-01

    A spherical plasma inhomogeneity located at mesospheric altitudes in a thundercloud quasi-electrostatic field is considered as a possible cause of sprite formation. A simple semianalytical model of ionization instability in a quasi-electrostatic field, the value of which is larger than the air breakdown value, is developed on the assumption that plasma ball conductivity is controlled by impact ionization and electron attachment to neutrals. After several simplifications, the problem is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations for the average conductivity and plasma ball radius. The analytical estimates and numerical simulation indicate that the predicted expansion rate and acceleration of the plasma inhomogeneity boundary are close in magnitude to the values observed during high-speed imaging of sprite development.

  1. A new model for plasma transport and chemistry at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    A model of plasma transport and chemistry is described which calculates the evolution of a plasma population in latitude and radial distance. This model is applied to the magnetosphere of Saturn, where it is used to fit the density profile of the heavy ions assuming both satellite and ring sources of plasma. Use of an extended source region is found to significantly alter the resulting plasma profile. Water ions cannot fit the observed density profile inside L = 6 even with a large ring source. Oxygen ions can fit the density profile throughout the region inside L = 12 given a suitable profile of neutral hydrogen; a suitable profile contains up to 5 H/cu cm outside L = 4 with the number increasing inside this. Preferred values of K are 1-3 x 10 exp -10 R(S)2/s, but any value K less than 10 exp -9 R(S)2/s can be accommodated. The temperature profile is shown to favor models invoking in situ plasma formation and loss as opposed to models where transport is important.

  2. Control modeling and regulation of plasma spraying process

    SciTech Connect

    Kankanala, S.V.; Kashani, R.

    1994-12-31

    Feedback control of plasma spraying will enhance the quality and consistency of coatings by increasing, as in any other process, the immunity of the process against uncertainties, such as parametric variations, and external disturbances. To synthesize any model-based controller for feedback control of the plasma spraying, the control model of the process is needed. In the first part of this study, the input/output data needed for system identification of the process, was generated using a one-dimensional model for the transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the plasma spraying process. In this paper, the data is generated from the solution of the thin-layer-Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations. As before, the plasma velocity and temperature at the nozzle exit are randomly perturbed about their respective preset operating points. A multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) model is then developed to represent the relationship between the perturbed nozzle exit plasma velocity and temperature and the particle velocity and temperature before impact on the substrate.

  3. Kinetic models for the VASIMR thruster helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, Oleg; Molvig, Kim

    2001-10-01

    Helicon gas discharge [1] is widely used by industry because of its remarkable efficiency [2]. High energy and fuel efficiencies make it very attractive for space electrical propulsion applications. For example, helicon plasma source is used in the high specific impulse VASIMR [3] plasma thruster, including experimental prototypes VX-3 and upgraded VX-10 [4] configurations, which operate with hydrogen (deuterium) and helium plasmas. We have developed a set of models for the VASIMR helicon discharge. Firstly, we use zero-dimensional energy and mass balance equations to characterize partially ionized gas condition/composition. Next, we couple it to one-dimensional hybrid model [6] for gas flow in the quartz tube of the helicon. We compare hybrid model results to a purely kinetic simulation of propellant flow in gas feed + helicon source subsystem. Some of the experimental data [3-4] are explained. Lastly, we discuss full-scale kinetic modeling of coupled gas and plasmas [5-6] in the helicon discharge. [1] M.A.Lieberman, A.J.Lihtenberg, 'Principles of ..', Wiley, 1994; [2] F.F.Chen, Plas. Phys. Contr. Fus. 33, 339, 1991; [3] F.Chang-Diaz et al, Bull. APS 45 (7) 129, 2000; [4] J.Squire et al., Bull. APS 45 (7) 130, 2000; [5] O.Batishchev et al, J. Plasma Phys. 61, part II, 347, 1999; [6] O.Batishchev, K.Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2000-3754, -14p, 2001.

  4. A new model for plasma transport and chemistry at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    A model of plasma transport and chemistry is described which calculates the evolution of a plasma population in latitude and radial distance. This model is applied to the magnetosphere of Saturn, where it is used to fit the density profile of the heavy ions assuming both satellite and ring sources of plasma. Use of an extended source region is found to significantly alter the resulting plasma profile. Water ions cannot fit the observed density profile inside L = 6 even with a large ring source. Oxygen ions can fit the density profile throughout the region inside L = 12 given a suitable profile of neutral hydrogen; a suitable profile contains up to 5 H/cu cm outside L = 4 with the number increasing inside this. Preferred values of K are 1-3 x 10 exp -10 R(S)2/s, but any value K less than 10 exp -9 R(S)2/s can be accommodated. The temperature profile is shown to favor models invoking in situ plasma formation and loss as opposed to models where transport is important.

  5. Models of Plasma Processes in Electrostatic Ion Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Ira

    2004-11-01

    Under the Project Prometheus Program, NASA is studying the feasibility of large, interplanetary spacecraft using nuclear reactors to provide electricity for multi-kilowatt ion thrusters. For these missions, such as the proposed Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), ion thrusters will be required to operate for as long as 15 years, several times the longest demonstrated ion thruster life. In order to predict thruster life, a team of researchers at JPL is developing a suite of computer models that describe in two and three dimensions the dominant plasma processes that take place in electrostatic ion xenon thrusters. These models are being developed in close coordination with researchers who measure the plasma properties inside the thruster components. This paper reviews the physics contained in models of plasma generation and current flow in the hollow cathode insert region, discharge chamber ionization processes, grid ion optics, and thruster plumes including primary beam ions, ion-neutral scattering, and charge exchange.

  6. A novel local equilibrium model for shaped tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Weihong; Zhou Deng; Xiang Nong

    2012-07-15

    A model is proposed for a local up-down symmetric equilibrium in the vicinity of a specified magnetic surface with given elongation and triangularity. Different from the Miller's model [R. L. Miller et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 973 (1998)], the derivative of the Shafranov shift in the present model is self-consistently determined. The equilibrium accounts for all the essential features, like the elongation, the triangularity, and the Shafranov shift etc., of a shaped cross section. Hence, it can be used for investigation of radially localized plasma modes, like reversed shear Alfvenic eigenmodes and ballooning mode, etc., and it is also suitable for local equilibrium construction used for flux tube plasma simulations.

  7. Self-consistent circuit model for plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Jung, Soon-Wook; Choe, Jae-Myung; Kim, Gon-Ho; Hwang, Y. S.

    2008-02-15

    A self-consistent circuit model which can describe the dynamic behavior of the entire pulsed system for plasma source ion implantation has been developed and verified with experiments. In the circuit model, one-dimensional fluid equations of plasma sheath have been numerically solved with self-consistent boundary conditions from the external circuit model including the pulsed power system. Experiments have been conducted by applying negative, high-voltage pulses up to -10 kV with a capacitor-based pulse modulator to the planar target in contact with low-pressure argon plasma produced by radio-frequency power at 13.56 MHz. The measured pulse voltage and current waveforms as well as the sheath motion have shown good agreements with the simulation results.

  8. Sputtering, Plasma Chemistry, and RF Sheath Effects in Low-Temperature and Fusion Plasma Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; McGugan, James M.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Roark, Christine M.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2016-09-01

    A new sheath boundary condition has been implemented in VSim, a plasma modeling code which makes use of both PIC/MCC and fluid FDTD representations. It enables physics effects associated with DC and RF sheath formation - local sheath potential evolution, heat/particle fluxes, and sputtering effects on complex plasma-facing components - to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not resolve sheath scale lengths. We model these effects in typical ICRF antenna operation scenarios on the Alcator C-Mod fusion device, and present comparisons of our simulation results with experimental data together with detailed 3D animations of antenna operation. Complex low-temperature plasma chemistry modeling in VSim is facilitated by MUNCHKIN, a standalone python/C++/SQL code that identifies possible reaction paths for a given set of input species, solves 1D rate equations for the ensuing system's chemical evolution, and generates VSim input blocks with appropriate cross-sections/reaction rates. These features, as well as principal path analysis (to reduce the number of simulated chemical reactions while retaining accuracy) and reaction rate calculations from user-specified distribution functions, will also be demonstrated. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's SBIR program, Award DE-SC0009501.

  9. The Empowerment of Plasma Modeling by Fundamental Electron Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling of low temperature plasmas addresses at least 3 goals - investigation of fundamental processes, analysis and optimization of current technologies, and prediction of performance of as yet unbuilt systems for new applications. The former modeling may be performed on somewhat idealized systems in simple gases, while the latter will likely address geometrically and electromagnetically intricate systems with complex gas mixtures, and now gases in contact with liquids. The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering data (FSD) required for these activities increases from the former to the latter, while the accuracy required of that data probably decreases. In each case, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSD. Modeling is, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSD in plasma modeling will be discussed from each of these three perspectives using results from multidimensional and global models. The fundamental studies will focus on modeling of inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Ar/Cl2 where the electron scattering from feed gases and their fragments ultimately determine gas temperatures. Examples of the optimization of current technologies will focus on modeling of remote plasma etching of Si and Si3N4 in Ar/NF3/N2/O2 mixtures. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids Work was supported by the US Dept. of Energy (DE-SC0001939), National Science Foundation (CHE-124752), and the Semiconductor Research Corp.

  10. A simple model for plasma temperature in imploded hollow plasma liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloc, D. A.; Roderick, N. F.; Hussey, T. W.

    1982-10-01

    Existing theory for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding hollow plasma liners has assumed a constant electrical resistivity during most of the implosion. While this is qualitatively justified by the competition between joule heating and field-diffusion-driven expansion of the plasma shell, one, nevertheless, expects the temperature and, therefore, electrical conductivity to rise during the implosion. A simple model for plasma temperature as a function of time, based on the neglect of radiative losses and using approximate fits to equation-of-state information, is presented here. The results are used to compute the minimum allowed wavelength, a parameter used to assess instability effects, and agreement with magnetohydrodynamic calculations to well within a factor of 2 is obtained.

  11. Study on resistive wall mode based on plasma response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2006-07-01

    A uniform framework, based on the frequency dependent plasma response model (PRM), is proposed to study the physics and control of the resistive wall mode (RWM). The PRM is constructed, respectively, from the Fitzpatrick-Aydemir model, from a cylindrical theory with multiple RWM, and, finally, from toroidal calculations. Based on the PRM, several important aspects of the RWM physics are studied, including the interplay between active feedback and plasma rotation to stabilize the mode, the efficiency of external versus internal active coils for the mode control and the resonant field amplification effect due to a rotationally damped RWM.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of plasma oscillations modeled by an anharmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Enjieu Kadji, H. G.; Nana Nbendjo, B. R.; Chabi Orou, J. B.; Talla, P. K.

    2008-03-15

    This paper considers nonlinear dynamics of plasma oscillations modeled by an anharmonic oscillator. These plasma oscillations are described by a nonlinear differential equation of the form xe+{epsilon}(1+x{sup 2})x+x+{kappa}x{sup 2}+{delta}x{sup 3}=F cos {omega}t. The amplitudes of the forced harmonic, superharmonic, and subharmonic oscillatory states are obtained using the harmonic balance technique and the multiple time scales method. Admissible values of the amplitude of the external strength are derived. Bifurcation sequences displayed by the model for each type of oscillatory states are performed numerically through the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme.

  13. Verification strategies for fluid-based plasma simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Shankar

    2012-10-01

    Verification is an essential aspect of computational code development for models based on partial differential equations. However, verification of plasma models is often conducted internally by authors of these programs and not openly discussed. Several professional research bodies including the IEEE, AIAA, ASME and others have formulated standards for verification and validation (V&V) of computational software. This work focuses on verification, defined succinctly as determining whether the mathematical model is solved correctly. As plasma fluid models share several aspects with the Navier-Stokes equations used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the CFD verification process is used as a guide. Steps in the verification process: consistency checks, examination of iterative, spatial and temporal convergence, and comparison with exact solutions, are described with examples from plasma modeling. The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS), which has been used to verify complex systems of PDEs in solid and fluid mechanics, is introduced. An example of the application of MMS to a self-consistent plasma fluid model using the local mean energy approximation is presented. The strengths and weaknesses of the techniques presented in this work are discussed.

  14. Physical processes and modeling of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings-switched electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings in modulating the electrical parameters. Mathematical models are based on physical models of gas-dynamic mechanisms more dynamic and thermal processes of the plasma jet. As an example the modeling of dynamic processes of heterogeneous plasma jet, modulated current pulses indirect arc plasma torch.

  15. Comets in the Young Solar System: Hybrid Plasma Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, Markku; Kallio, Esa; Wedlund, Cyril Simon; Lammer, Helmut; Güdel, Manuel; Johnstone, Colin

    2017-04-01

    The observations of the Rosetta mission and, in particular, of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) have provided lengthy in-situ observations of a cometary plasma environment. Building on results of the Rosetta mission, we have taken recent astronomical findings on the evolution of the Sun and the solar wind and employed them to provide the first iteration of an early solar system cometary plasma model. We investigate a 67P-like comet at three heliocentric distances (corresponding to the orbital distances of Venus, Earth and Mars) and at solar system age of approximately 100 My, using EK Draconis as a solar proxy. The strong inferred EUV flux, along with strong solar wind and low solar constant provide harsh conditions for the coma, creating plasma environments considerably smaller than with contemporary conditions. We discuss the differences between modern and young solar system cometary plasma environments, present the first results of the modelling and provide discussion on the planned developments to modelling the young solar system comets.

  16. Non-LTE modeling of radiatively driven dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, H. A.

    2017-03-01

    There are now several experimental facilities that use strong X-ray fields to produce plasmas with densities ranging from ˜1 to ˜103 g/cm3. Large laser facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the Omega laser reach high densities with radiatively driven compression, short-pulse lasers such as XFELs produce solid density plasmas on very short timescales, and the Orion laser facility combines these methods. Despite the high densities, these plasmas can be very far from LTE, due to large radiation fields and/or short timescales, and simulations mostly use collisional-radiative (CR) modeling which has been adapted to handle these conditions. These dense plasmas present challenges to CR modeling. Ionization potential depression (IPD) has received much attention recently as researchers work to understand experimental results from LCLS and Orion [1,2]. However, incorporating IPD into a CR model is only one challenge presented by these conditions. Electron degeneracy and the extent of the state space can also play important roles in the plasma energetics and radiative properties, with effects evident in recent observations [3,4]. We discuss the computational issues associated with these phenomena and methods for handling them.

  17. Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E.

    2011-01-15

    A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

  18. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  19. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma.

    PubMed

    Reale, Fabio

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  20. Anomalous transport modelling of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, J.; Singer, C.; Malone, G.; Tiouririne, N.

    1992-12-31

    Theory based transport simulations of DIII-D, JET, ITER are compared to experimental data using a combination of anamolous transport models. The Multiple-mode Transport Model is calibrated to a give set of L-mode and H-mode discharges with an emphasis on testing the adequacy of anomalous flux contributions from drift/{eta}{sub i} and resistive ballooning mode theories. A survey of possible additions and/or alternatives to the model from recent theories on neoclassical MHD effects, hot ion modes, circulating electron modes, and high-m tearing modes is also included.

  1. Anomalous transport modelling of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, J.; Singer, C.; Malone, G.; Tiouririne, N.

    1992-01-01

    Theory based transport simulations of DIII-D, JET, ITER are compared to experimental data using a combination of anamolous transport models. The Multiple-mode Transport Model is calibrated to a give set of L-mode and H-mode discharges with an emphasis on testing the adequacy of anomalous flux contributions from drift/[eta][sub i] and resistive ballooning mode theories. A survey of possible additions and/or alternatives to the model from recent theories on neoclassical MHD effects, hot ion modes, circulating electron modes, and high-m tearing modes is also included.

  2. Modeling of localized impulsive injection of neutrals and plasma response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2017-05-01

    Neutral particles of hydrogen isotopes, released locally and impulsively into the plasma of fusion devices, can significantly affect local plasma properties. A model, allowing to describe self-consistently the spreading of neutrals from the source and their effect on the local and global plasma conditions is developed. It is based on the separation on each flux surface of two zones, the ‘cold’ cloud, comprising neutral molecules injected and atoms generated in collisions of molecules with electrons and ions, and the ‘hot’ environment affected by flows along the magnetic field of newly produced charged particles outward and heat conduction toward the cloud. Computations are done for the conditions of laser induced desorption spectroscopy applied in Ohmically heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak and foreseen for the ITER fusion reactor. In both cases the local plasma state is strongly changed by the desorption pulse, and this effect is increasing with the growing isotope mass. As a result the total number of photons emitted is reduced noticeably, up to 4 times in the case of tritium injection in ITER, and the necessity to take into account the plasma response by interpreting measurements is demonstrated.

  3. The Modeling of Pickup Ion or Energetic Particle Mediated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Mostafavi, P.; Hunana, P.

    2016-05-01

    Suprathermal energetic particles, such as solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere and pickup ions (PUIs) in the outer heliosphere and the very local interstellar medium, often form a thermodynamically dominant component in their various environments. In the supersonic solar wind beyond > 10 AU, in the inner heliosheath (IHS), and in the very local interstellar medium (VLISM), PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma. Similarly, SEPs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the absence of equilibration between plasma components, a separate coupled plasma description for the energetic particles is necessary. Using a collisionless Chapman-Enskog expansion, we derive a closed system of multi-component equations for a plasma comprised of thermal protons and electrons, and suprathermal particles (SEPs, PUIs). The energetic particles contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to leading order, a collisionless heat flux at the next order, and a collisionless stress tensor at the second-order. The collisionless heat conduction and viscosity in the multi-fluid description results from a nonisotropic energetic particle distribution. A simpler single-fluid MHD-like system of equations with distinct equations of state for both the background plasma and the suprathermal particles is derived. We note briefly potential pitfalls that can emerge in the numerical modeling of collisionless plasma flows that contain a dynamically important energetic particle component.

  4. Modeling of the Plasma Flow and Anode Region Inside a Direct Current Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Rodolphe; Coddet, Christian; Allimant, Alain; Billières, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    This study is devoted to the modeling of the arc formation in a direct current plasma gun newly commercialized by Saint-Gobain Coating Solutions (Avignon, France). The CFD computations were performed using the FLUENT code. The electromagnetic coupling was implemented on the basis of a three-dimensional model using additional scalars for the electromagnetic equations and user-defined functions to set up the problem. Whereas most of earlier models include the arc region only, the CFD domain was extended to the gas injection region (i.e., upstream part of the gun, including the gas diffuser), thus allowing a better description of the swirl injection on the plasma flow. Similarly, whereas numerous earlier works include the fluid domain only, the present model takes the fluid/solid coupling problem in the anode into account. In particular, the thermal and the electromagnetic equations are solved not only in the fluid parts but also in the tungsten and copper parts of the anode. This change was found to be important because the internal surface of the anode is no more a boundary of the domain. Thus, its temperature (and electric potential) becomes variable and is thus not necessarily imposed. Finally, the implemented model provides interesting results describing the arc behavior inside the plasma gun.

  5. Nonstationary model of an axisymmetric mirror trap with nonequilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yurov, D. V. Prikhodko, V. V. Tsidulko, Yu. A.

    2016-03-15

    The DOL nonstationary model intended to describe plasma processes in axisymmetric magnetic mirror traps is considered. The model uses averaging over the bounce period in order to take into account the dependence of plasma parameters on the coordinate along the facility axis. Examples of calculations of trap parameters by means of the DOL code based on this model are presented. Among the features of the DOL model, one can single out two points: first, the capability of calculating the terms of the collision integral with the use of a non-Maxwellian scattering function while evaluating the distribution function of fast ions and, second, concerning the background plasma, the capability of calculating the longitudinal particle and energy fluxes in confinement modes with the particle mean free path being on the order of the trap length. The influence of the scattering function approximation used to calculate the collision integral on the solution to the kinetic equation is analyzed. The dependences of plasma parameters on the power of heating injectors and the length of the fast-ion turning zone are presented as calculation examples. The longitudinal profile of the fusion reaction rate in the case of a trap with a long fast-ion turning zone is shown to depend strongly on the input parameters of the model.

  6. Nonstationary model of an axisymmetric mirror trap with nonequilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, D. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    The DOL nonstationary model intended to describe plasma processes in axisymmetric magnetic mirror traps is considered. The model uses averaging over the bounce period in order to take into account the dependence of plasma parameters on the coordinate along the facility axis. Examples of calculations of trap parameters by means of the DOL code based on this model are presented. Among the features of the DOL model, one can single out two points: first, the capability of calculating the terms of the collision integral with the use of a non-Maxwellian scattering function while evaluating the distribution function of fast ions and, second, concerning the background plasma, the capability of calculating the longitudinal particle and energy fluxes in confinement modes with the particle mean free path being on the order of the trap length. The influence of the scattering function approximation used to calculate the collision integral on the solution to the kinetic equation is analyzed. The dependences of plasma parameters on the power of heating injectors and the length of the fast-ion turning zone are presented as calculation examples. The longitudinal profile of the fusion reaction rate in the case of a trap with a long fast-ion turning zone is shown to depend strongly on the input parameters of the model.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND (Investigational New Drug) guidelines. The aim of the project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationships among plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial protocol with INSCOP. Twelve healthy human subjects were administered at three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. PK compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling time, were established using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL (i.e. log-likelihood ratio test)) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. The results: Predictable correlations among scopolamine concentrations in compartments of plasma, saliva and urine were established, and for the first time the model satisfactorily predicted the population and individual PK of INSCOP in plasma, saliva and urine. The model can be utilized to predict the INSCOP plasma concentration by saliva and urine data, and it will be useful for monitoring the PK of scopolamine in space and other remote environments using non-invasive sampling of saliva and/or urine.

  8. Plasma Modeling Enabled Technology Development Empowered by Fundamental Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Technology development increasingly relies on modeling to speed the innovation cycle. This is particularly true for systems using low temperature plasmas (LTPs) and their role in enabling energy efficient processes with minimal environmental impact. In the innovation cycle, LTP modeling supports investigation of fundamental processes that seed the cycle, optimization of newly developed technologies, and prediction of performance of unbuilt systems for new applications. Although proof-of-principle modeling may be performed for idealized systems in simple gases, technology development must address physically complex systems that use complex gas mixtures that now may be multi-phase (e.g., in contact with liquids). The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering, and radiation transport data (FSRD) required for this modeling increases as the innovation cycle progresses, while the accuracy required of that data depends on the intended outcome. In all cases, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSRD. Modeling and technology development are, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSRD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSRD in the innovation cycle enabled by plasma modeling will be discussed using results from multidimensional and global models. Examples of fundamental studies and technology optimization will focus on microelectronics fabrication and on optically pumped lasers. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  9. Modeling and Simulation for Nanoparticle Plasma Jet Diagnostic Probe for Runaway Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The C60 nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) rapid injection into a tokamak major disruption is followed by C60 gradual fragmentation along plasma-traversing path. The result is abundant C ion concentration in the core plasma enhancing the potential to probe and diagnose the runaway electrons (REs) during different phases of their dynamics. A C60/C NPPJ of 75 mg, high-density (>1023 m-3) , hyper-velocity (>4 km/s), and uniquely fast response-to-delivery time ( 1 ms) has been demonstrated on a test bed. It can rapidly and deeply deliver enough mass to increase electron density to 2.4x1021 m-3, 60 times larger than typical DIII-D pre-disruption value. We will present the results of our on-going work on: 1) self-consistent model for RE current density evolution (by Dreicer mechanism and ``avalanche'') focused on the effect of fast and deep deposition of C ions, 2) improvement of single C60q+ fragmenting ion penetration model through tokamak B(R)-field and post-TQ plasma, and 3) simulation of C60q+ PJ penetration through the DIII-D characteristic 2 T B-field to the RE beam central location by using the Hybrid Electro-Magnetic 2D code (HEM-2D. Work supported by US DOE DE-SC0015776 Grant.

  10. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2010-11-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  11. Modeling plasma pressure anisotropy's effect on Saturn's global magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, M.; Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R.

    2014-12-01

    A 3D multi-fluid, multi-scale plasma model with a complete treatment of plasma pressure anisotropy is employed to study global magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn. Cassini has observed anisotropies in the Saturnian magnetosphere, and analyses have showed correlations between anisotropy and plasma convection, ring current structure and intensity, confinement of plasma to the equatorial plane, as well as mass transport to the outer magnetosphere. The energization and transport of plasma within Saturn's magnetosphere is impactful upon the induced magnetic environments and atmospheres of potentially habitable satellites such as Enceladus and Titan. Recent efforts to couple pressure anisotropy with 3D multi-fluid plasma modeling have shown a significant move towards matching observations for simulations of Earth's magnetosphere. Our approach is used to study the effects of plasma pressure anisotropy on global processes of the Saturnian magnetosphere such as identifying the effect of pressure anisotropy on the centrifugal interchange instability. Previous simulation results have not completely replicated all aspects of the structure and formation of the interchange 'fingers' measured by Cassini at Saturn. The related effects of anisotropy, in addition to those mentioned above, include contribution to formation of MHD waves (e.g. reduction of Alfvén wave speed) and formation of firehose and mirror instabilities. An accurate understanding of processes such as the interchange instability is required if a complete picture of mass and energy transport at Saturn is to be realized. The results presented here will detail how the inclusion of a full treatment of pressure anisotropy for idealized solar wind conditions modifies the interchange structure and shape of the tail current sheet. Simulation results are compared to observations made by Cassini.

  12. Contribution to arc plasma modeling for welding TIG application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, Damien; Delalondre, Clarisse; Carpreau, Jean-Michel; Chéron, B. G.; Boubert, J.-P.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model that simulates transferred energy by a welding thermal plasma to the weld pool. This energy transfer allows materials melting. The originality of our model is to include the modeling of transition zones and the vaporization of the anode. The cathodic and anodic areas are taken into account in the model by means of heat balance at the gas-solid interfaces. We report the heating and cooling effects they induce on the solid (cathode, anode) and plasma. Code_Saturne® the CFD software developed at EDF R&D is used for this work Comparisons between simulations and measurements of temperature and electron density confirm the model assumptions for TIG welding.

  13. Modeling studies of equatorial plasma fountain and equatorial anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Bailey, G. J.

    The importance of diffusion, electrodynamic drift, amd neutral wind on the generation and modulation of the equatorial plasma fountain of the Earth's ionosphere is studied using the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model (SUPIM) for the ionosphere above Jicamarca (77 degW) under magnetically quiet (Ap = 4) equinoctial conditions (day 264) at medium solar activity (F10.7 = 145). The study also investigates the effects of the fountain, which include the equatorial anomaly. The F-region vertical E x B drift velocity measured at the equatorial station Jicamarca is used to represent the electrodynamic drift. The neutral wind is obtained from the HWM90 thermospheric wind model. As expected, the F-region electrodynamic drift generates the plasma fountain and the anomaly, which are symmetric with respect to the equator. The neutral wind makes the fountain and the anomaly asymmetric, with larger plasma flow (towards the hemisphere of stronger poleward wind) and stronger anomaly crest occurring in opposite hemispheres. The paper also addresses many important (some new) features which are related to the fountain. The features are: (1) the possibility of existence of an additional layer (called the G-layer) in the equatorial ionosphere, (2) the reverse plasma fountain, (3) the equatorial anomaly in vertical ionospheric electron content (IEC), (4) the presence (in Nmax) and absence (in IEC) of noon bite-out, (5) the occurrence of nighttime increase in ionization, and (6) plasma bubbles and spread-F.

  14. A generalized model of atomic processes in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Chen, M.; Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S.; Wark, J.; Lee, R. W.

    2015-11-01

    A generalized model of atomic processes in plasmas, FLYCHK, has been developed over a decade to provide experimentalists fast and simple but reasonable predictions of atomic properties of plasmas. For a given plasma condition, it provides charge state distributions and spectroscopic properties, which have been extensively used for experimental design and data analysis and currently available through NIST web site. In recent years, highly transient and non-equilibrium plasmas have been created with X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). As high intensity x-rays interact with matter, the inner-shell electrons are ionized and Auger electrons and photo electrons are generated. With time, electrons participate in the ionization processes and collisional ionization by these electrons dominates photoionization as electron density increases. To study highly complex XFEL produced plasmas, SCFLY, an extended version of FLYCHK code has been used. The code accepts the time-dependent history of x-ray energy and intensity to compute population distribution and ionization distribution self-consistently with electron temperature and density assuming an instantaneous equilibration. The model and its applications to XFEL experiments will be presented as well as its limitations.

  15. Challenges in Modeling of the Plasma-Material Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag; Meyer, Fred; Allain, Jean Paul

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-Material Interface mixes materials of the two worlds, creating a new entity, a dynamical surface, which communicates between the two and represent one of the most challenging areas of multidisciplinary science, with many fundamental processes and synergies. How to build an integrated theoretical-experimental approach? Without mutual validation of experiment and theory chances very slim to have believable results? The outreach of the PMI science modeling at the fusion plasma facilities is illustrated by the significant step forward in understanding achieved recently by the quantum-classical modeling of the lithiated carbon surfaces irradiated by deuterium, showing surprisingly large role of oxygen in the deuterium retention and erosion chemistry. The plasma-facing walls of the next-generation fusion reactors will be exposed to high fluxes of neutrons and plasma-particles and will operate at high temperatures for thermodynamic efficiency. To this end we have been studying the evolution dynamics of vacancies and interstitials to the saturated dpa doses of tungsten surfaces bombarded by self-atoms, as well as the plasma-surface interactions of the damaged surfaces (erosion, hydrogen and helium uptake and fuzz formation). PSK and FWM acknowledge support of the ORNL LDRD program.

  16. Kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of plasma-assisted combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togai, Kuninori

    Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising combustion enhancement technique that shows great potential for applications to a number of different practical combustion systems. In this dissertation, the chemical kinetics associated with PAC are investigated numerically with a newly developed model that describes the chemical processes induced by plasma. To support the model development, experiments were performed using a plasma flow reactor in which the fuel oxidation proceeds with the aid of plasma discharges below and above the self-ignition thermal limit of the reactive mixtures. The mixtures used were heavily diluted with Ar in order to study the reactions with temperature-controlled environments by suppressing the temperature changes due to chemical reactions. The temperature of the reactor was varied from 420 K to 1250 K and the pressure was fixed at 1 atm. Simulations were performed for the conditions corresponding to the experiments and the results are compared against each other. Important reaction paths were identified through path flux and sensitivity analyses. Reaction systems studied in this work are oxidation of hydrogen, ethylene, and methane, as well as the kinetics of NOx in plasma. In the fuel oxidation studies, reaction schemes that control the fuel oxidation are analyzed and discussed. With all the fuels studied, the oxidation reactions were extended to lower temperatures with plasma discharges compared to the cases without plasma. The analyses showed that radicals produced by dissociation of the reactants in plasma plays an important role of initiating the reaction sequence. At low temperatures where the system exhibits a chain-terminating nature, reactions of HO2 were found to play important roles on overall fuel oxidation. The effectiveness of HO2 as a chain terminator was weakened in the ethylene oxidation system, because the reactions of C 2H4 + O that have low activation energies deflects the flux of O atoms away from HO2. For the

  17. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  18. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, make possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented. Specifically shown here are the inner-plasmasphere RIMS measurements, radial fits to densities and temperatures for H(+), He(+), He(++), O(+), and O(+) and the error associated with these initial simple fits. Also shown are more subtle dependencies on the f10.7 P-value (see Richards et al. [1994]).

  19. Mathematical modeling of plasma drifts over equatorial low latitude regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, S.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model to simulate ionospheric plasma drifts at equatorial low latitude regions by coupling of E- and F-regions. The governing non-linear differential equations (of elliptic and parabolic nature) are solved numerically through finite-difference schemes and obtained neutral winds and electric fields. The temperature and electron density profiles are generated utilizing MSIS-86 atmospheric model. The continuity equation is employed to obtain night-time E-region density profile using measured ionograms at Trivandrum (India). The computed vertical and zonal plasma drifts are comparable with measured Jacamarca plasma drifts with little variations during noon and evening times. The plasma drifts at Trivandrum (8.5° N, 76.5° E, dip 0.5° N) are compared with those of Jicamarca (12° S, 76.9° W, dip 2° N). Neutral wind simulations of present model agree well with those of horizontal wind model (HWM-93). The post-sunset enhancement and its reversal are also discussed.

  20. Decay rates of the magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Xueke; Xu, Xiuli

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas. We prove the optimal decay rates for the solution to the constant state in the whole space in the Lp-norm with 2≤ p≤ 6 and its first derivatives in L2-norm. The proof is based on the optimal decay of the linearized equation and nonlinear energy estimates.

  1. RF Models for Plasma-Surface Interactions in VSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, D. N.; Pankin, A. Y.; Roark, C. M.; Zhou, C. D.; Stoltz, P. H.; Kruger, S. E.

    2014-10-01

    An overview of ongoing enhancements to the Plasma Discharge (PD) module of Tech-X's VSim software tool is presented. A sub-grid kinetic sheath model, developed for the accurate computation of sheath potentials near metal and dielectric-coated walls, enables the physical effects of DC and RF sheath physics to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not explicitly resolve sheath scale lengths. Sheath potential evolution, together with particle behavior near the sheath, can thus be simulated in complex geometries. Generalizations of the model to include sputtering, secondary electron emission, and effects from multiple ion species and background magnetic fields are summarized; related numerical results are also presented. In addition, improved tools for plasma chemistry and IEDF/EEDF visualization and modeling are discussed, as well as our initial efforts toward the development of hybrid fluid/kinetic transition capabilities within VSim. Ultimately, we aim to establish VSimPD as a robust, efficient computational tool for modeling industrial plasma processes. Supported by US DoE SBIR-I/II Award DE-SC0009501.

  2. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  3. The Darwin model as a tool for electromagnetic plasma simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. N.; Rostler, P. S.

    1970-01-01

    The Darwin model of electromagnetic interaction is presented as a self-consistent theory, and is shown to be an excellent approximation to the Maxwell theory for slow electromagnetic waves. Since the fast waves of the Maxwell theory are absent, it is convenient for use in the computer simulation of the electromagnetic dynamics of nonrelativistic plasma.

  4. PLASMA NEAR THE HELIOSHEATH: OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Sergey N.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Richardson, John D.

    2011-02-10

    Sound numerical modeling is capable of providing important predictive information about the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. The results of our three-dimensional simulation show a good agreement with Voyager observations from 2007 to 2010. We analyze the termination shock properties at the Voyager crossing points and juxtapose them with the observed data. The heliospheric current sheet structure in the inner heliosheath is examined.

  5. A soliton gas model for astrophysical magnetized plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Sheerin, J. P.

    1982-06-01

    Plasma turbulence is considered as an ensemble of solitons. The derivation of the Alfven soliton by Spangler and Sheering (1981) is reviewed, and expressions are derived for the magnetic irregularity spectrum and the relationship between the magnetic and density irregularity power spectra. A derived expression also provides the answer to the question of the correlation between magnetic field and density enhancements. The properties of the turbulence model are compared with observations of plasma turbulence in the solar wind, and are found to reasonably account for them.

  6. Quark-Gluon Plasma Model and Origin of Magic Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghahramany, N.; Ghanaatian, M.; Hooshmand, M.

    2008-04-21

    Using Boltzman distribution in a quark-gluon plasma sample it is possible to obtain all existing magic numbers and their extensions without applying the spin and spin-orbit couplings. In this model it is assumed that in a quark-gluon thermodynamic plasma, quarks have no interactions and they are trying to form nucleons. Considering a lattice for a central quark and the surrounding quarks, using a statistical approach to find the maximum number of microstates, the origin of magic numbers is explained and a new magic number is obtained.

  7. Modeling aluminum etch chemistry in high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Ho, P.; Buss, R.

    1997-08-01

    The authors have assembled a chemical reaction mechanism that describes the BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasma etch of Al metallization layers. The reaction set for gas-phase and surface processes was derived either from literature data or estimated from data on related systems. A well-mixed reactor model was used to develop the mechanism and test it against experimental measurements of plasma species and etch-rates in processing reactors. Finally, use of reduced chemistry mechanisms are demonstrated in 2-D simulations for a complex reactor geometry.

  8. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasma transport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalous radial transport.

  9. Viscous quark-gluon plasma model through fluid QCD approach

    SciTech Connect

    Djun, T. P.; Soegijono, B.; Mart, T.; Handoko, L. T. E-mail: Laksana.tri.handoko@lipi.go.id

    2014-09-25

    A Lagrangian density for viscous quark-gluon plasma has been constructed within the fluid-like QCD framework. Gauge symmetry is preserved for all terms inside the Lagrangian, except for the viscous term. The transition mechanism from point particle field to fluid field, and vice versa, are discussed. The energy momentum tensor that is relevant to the gluonic plasma having the nature of fluid bulk of gluon sea is derived within the model. By imposing conservation law in the energy momentum tensor, shear viscosity appears as extractable from the equation.

  10. Magnetospheric plasma modeling (0-100 keV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Spitale, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Spacecraft surface charging, which is primarily a current balance phenomenon, is in general a function of the dominant currents to and from the vehicle's surface. Within the near-earth magnetosphere the dominant currents to the surface are the ambient space plasma fluxes between approximately 0 and 100 keV. A major effort to understand the near-earth environment was initiated when spacecraft charging became a major issue. The present paper has the objective to summarize the basic features of the models which have resulted from this effort. A description is given of four categories of models, based primarily on the degree of empirical and theoretical input. Types of quantitative models are discussed, taking into account definitions, statistical models, analytic models, static models, and time-dependent models. Engineering models are also considered, giving attention to baseline models and 'worst-case' models.

  11. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  12. Two-dimensional s-polarized solitary waves in relativistic plasmas. I. The fluid plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Lefebvre, E.

    2011-09-15

    The properties of two-dimensional linearly s-polarized solitary waves are investigated by fluid-Maxwell equations and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. These self-trapped electromagnetic waves appear during laser-plasma interactions, and they have a dominant electric field component E{sub z}, normal to the plane of the wave, that oscillates at a frequency below the electron plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe}. A set of equations that describe the waves are derived from the plasma fluid model in the case of cold or warm plasma and then solved numerically. The main features, including the maximum value of the vector potential amplitude, the total energy, the width, and the cavitation radius are presented as a function of the frequency. The amplitude of the vector potential increases monotonically as the frequency of the wave decreases, whereas the width reaches a minimum value at a frequency of the order of 0.82 {omega}{sub pe}. The results are compared with a set of PIC simulations where the solitary waves are excited by a high-intensity laser pulse.

  13. Hybrid kinetic/fluid modeling of silicon nanoparticles dynamics in silane plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlac'h, J.-M.; Giovangigli, V.; Novikova, T.; Cabarrocas, P. Roca i.

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully coupled self-consistent model for the evolution of nanoparticles in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor. The plasma is treated as a fluid while the nanoparticles are handled kinetically. The plasma fluid model is derived from kinetic theory applied to multicomponent two-temperature chemically reactive polyatomic plasmas. The model has been implemented numerically for a silane-hydrogen plasma in the early stage of nanoparticles generation.

  14. Models of Dilute Relativistic Plasmas Around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    In some regimes, mass flowing onto a central black hole can become sufficiently hot and low density that the collisional mean free path is appreciable compared to the size of the system. I describe new analytical and numerical models of these relativistically hot low collisionality plasmas around black holes. I also describe the application of these models to interpreting observations of the accreting black holes being observed by the Event Horizon Telescope.

  15. Plasma physics modeling and the Cray-2 multiprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of computer modeling in the magnetic fusion energy research program is discussed. The need for the most advanced supercomputers is described. To meet the demand for more powerful scientific computers to solve larger and more complicated problems, the computer industry is developing multiprocessors. The role of the Cray-2 in plasma physics modeling is discussed with some examples. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Advanced modeling techniques in application to plasma pulse treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, A. F.; Pashchenko, F. F.

    2016-06-01

    Different approaches considered for simulation of plasma pulse treatment process. The assumption of a significant non-linearity of processes in the treatment of oil wells has been confirmed. Method of functional transformations and fuzzy logic methods suggested for construction of a mathematical model. It is shown, that models, based on fuzzy logic are able to provide a satisfactory accuracy of simulation and prediction of non-linear processes observed.

  17. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghini, O.; Luna, C. J.; Smith, S. P.; Lao, L. L.

    2014-06-01

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat flux profiles has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest fidelity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport profiles. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat flux profiles are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-defined, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport fluxes. The numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-μs per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  18. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, O.; Luna, C. J.; Smith, S. P.; Lao, L. L.

    2014-06-15

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat flux profiles has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest fidelity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport profiles. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat flux profiles are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-defined, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport fluxes. The numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-μs per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  19. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    DOE PAGES

    Meneghini, Orso; Luna, Christopher J.; Smith, Sterling P.; ...

    2014-06-23

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat ux pro les has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest delity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport pro les. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range ofmore » plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat ux pro les are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-de ned, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport uxes. Finally, the numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-μs per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.« less

  20. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Luna, Christopher J.; Smith, Sterling P.; Lao, Lang L.

    2014-06-23

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat ux pro les has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest delity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport pro les. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat ux pro les are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-de ned, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport uxes. Finally, the numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-μs per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  1. Modeling of far SOL plasma transport in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sergei Krasheninnikov; Alexander Pigarov

    2005-11-02

    For better understanding and characterization of non-diffusive transport occurring in the NSTX tokamak edge plasma, we performed extensive simulations of NSTX edge plasmas with the multi-fluid two-dimensional UEDGE code by using realistic model for impurity sputtering sources and hybrid model for anomalous cross-field transport. Our cross-field transport model incorporates the effects of non-diffusive intermittent transport by introducing anomalous convective velocities whose spatial profile is adjusted for each ion charge state to match available experimental data. The research in 2002-2005 financial years was focused on the following areas: (i) development of capabilities for UEDGE simulation of NSTX spectroscopy data (i.e., the 3D real-geometry postprocessor UEDGE tools for comparison between UEDGE and experimental data), (ii) simulation of multi-diagnostic data from NSTX with UEDGE, (iii) study of anomalous cross-field convective transport of impurity ions, (iv) analysis of divertor plasma opacity to resonance radiation, and (v) study the effects of ballooning-like anomalous cross-field transport and spherical-torus magnetic configuration on parallel plasma flows in the SOL.

  2. ARCJET plasma modeling with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krier, Herman; Burton, Rodney L.; Megli, Thomas W.; Bufton, Scott A.; Tiliakos, Nicholas T.

    1994-09-01

    We report for the first time thermal non-equilibrium (separate electron and gas temperatures) numerical results for a hydrazine arcjet. All viscous flow properties are considered, assuming laminar axisymmetric flow. The model includes anode temperature distribution, and the electrical conductivity is coupled to the flow properties, allowing for a self-consistent current distribution. The numerical solution algorithm employs the compressible form of the PISO algorithm to solve the continuity and momentum equations. Run time is a few hours on a Convex C240 Mainframe with a 44 x 24 grid. Numerical results are presented for low power hydrogen and hydrazine thrusters. Preliminary results of quadruple electrostatic probe measurements at the exit plane of a 1 kW hydrazine arcjet, including ne and Te profiles, are presented. The quadruple probe model includes the effects of Te and Ne gradients across the probe volume to extract Te and Ne radial profiles from the asymmetric raw probe data. A time-of-flight electrostatic probe technique for measuring heavy particle velocities is described which, when coupled with the quadruple probe data can yield radial profiles of Ne(r), Te(r), Ti(r) and Ui(r). Experimental investigations of the energy deposition processes in the nozzle and constrictor regions of a 1-2 kill hydrazine arcjet are being performed. Electron number density and electron temperature measurements, using an array of flush-mounted Langmuir probes, will be made in the boundary layer.

  3. Coulomb collision model for use in nonthermal plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chap, Andrew M.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2017-06-01

    In kinetic simulations of non-Maxwellian plasmas, the calculation of particle scattering due to Coulomb collisions has no simple approximation. In such simulations, the number of collision interactions a particle experiences in a single time step is typically too large for direct calculation. In this work, the cumulative effect of a series of binary collisions is calculated numerically in a stochastic manner, and heuristic trends are produced as functions of the local plasma parameters. The result is a collision model suitable for implementation into a kinetic plasma simulation. The presence of low-probability, high-angle scattering due to close collision encounters is defined and described, and this effect is demonstrated in a test problem simulation of weakly collisional counterstreaming ion beams.

  4. Modelling of intense line radiation from laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yim T.; Gee, M.

    1990-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss modelling of Lyman-{alpha} (i.e. Ly-{alpha}) radiation emitted from laser-produced plasmas. We are interested in the application of one of these line radiations to pump a transition of an ion in a different plasma spatially separated from the emitting source. The interest is in perturbing the plasma rather than just probing it as in some backlighting experiments. As a result of pumping, the populations of certain excited levels are inverted. The resulting gain coefficients depend strongly on the population inversion density which in turn depends on the brightness of the pump radiation. As a result, we must produce an intense bright radiation source. In addition, to pump a transition effectively, we also need a pump line with a width larger than the mismatch of the resonance since the widths of the pumped transitions are rather narrow

  5. Modelling of tritium permeation through beryllium as plasma facing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardinucci, L.

    1998-10-01

    Due to a number of technological properties and, first of all, to a low atomic number, beryllium will be used as plasma facing material in ITER. Tritium control, including both the permeation through and inventory in the beryllium, is of great importance for the safety of the device. Experimental data have shown that, under ITER-like plasma conditions, the plasma facing surfaces of the beryllium develop high porosity (bubbles) and become saturated with bubbles, leading to a strong uptake of tritium and deuterium ions almost independent of the incident flux. At fluxes typical of ITER, surface erosion of beryllium should be also taken into account. A computational model has been used with the computer code TMAP4 to reproduce the available experimental data concerning hydrogen ion implantation in beryllium. The results described in this paper refer to the first wall of the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM-I).

  6. A Global Modeling Framework for Plasma Kinetics: Development and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsey, Guy Morland

    The modern study of plasmas, and applications thereof, has developed synchronously with com- puter capabilities since the mid-1950s. Complexities inherent to these charged-particle, many- body, systems have resulted in the development of multiple simulation methods (particle-in-cell, fluid, global modeling, etc.) in order to both explain observed phenomena and predict outcomes of plasma applications. Recognizing that different algorithms are chosen to best address specific topics of interest, this thesis centers around the development of an open-source global model frame- work for the focused study of non-equilibrium plasma kinetics. After verification and validation of the framework, it was used to study two physical phenomena: plasma-assisted combustion and the recently proposed optically-pumped rare gas metastable laser. Global models permeate chemistry and plasma science, relying on spatial averaging to focus attention on the dynamics of reaction networks. Defined by a set of species continuity and energy conservation equations, the required data and constructed systems are conceptually similar across most applications, providing a light platform for exploratory and result-search parameter scan- ning. Unfortunately, it is common practice for custom code to be developed for each application-- an enormous duplication of effort which negatively affects the quality of the software produced. Presented herein, the Python-based Kinetic Global Modeling framework (KGMf) was designed to support all modeling phases: collection and analysis of reaction data, construction of an exportable system of model ODEs, and a platform for interactive evaluation and post-processing analysis. A symbolic ODE system is constructed for interactive manipulation and generation of a Jacobian, both of which are compiled as operation-optimized C-code. Plasma-assisted combustion and ignition (PAC/PAI) embody the modernization of burning fuel by opening up new avenues of control and optimization

  7. Modeling of Plasma Detachment from a Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesner, Colin; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2015-11-01

    The detachment of plasma from a magnetic nozzle is examined using numerical simulations based on the discontinuous galerkin method. Plasma detachment is of interest for its role in the development of plasma based space propulsion systems. The simulation parameters used, modeled after the computational and experimental work of Winglee et al. result in β ~ 0 . 01 , and Rem ~ 0 . 3 . In this low- β regime perturbation of the initially imposed magnetic field is expected to be small. To more effectively study these perturbations, the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations are modified by linearizing the magnetic field. The perturbative component is then evolved in the simulation rather than the total magnetic field, allowing for a clearer resolution of changes in the magnetic field produced by the plasma. Because of the intermediate range of magnetic Reynolds number present in this plasma configuration, the effect of introducing resistivity in the simulation is also examined. Further work will investigate the effect of varying the configuration of the magnetic field. Supported by a grant from the Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

  8. A model for plasma volume changes during short duration spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John E.

    1989-01-01

    It is well established that plasma volume decreases during spaceflight and simulated weightlessness (bedrest). The decrement in plasma volume is thought to contribute to the orthostatic intolerance that has been observed in some crew members following spaceflight. To date, no studies have evaluated the effectiveness of fluid countermeasures of varying osmolality in the restoration of plasma volume and orthostatic tolerance in a controlled study. The overall objectives of this project were to: (1) provide a model that would rapidly and safely produce a fluid loss comparable to that which occurs during short duration spaceflight; and (2) design a study that would determine the optimal drink solution to restore orthostatic tolerance and describe the mechanism(s) whereby orthostatic tolerance is restored. In summary, Lasix can be used as a way of simulating the plasma volume changes that occur during short duration spaceflight. The total loss of plasma is comparable to spaceflight. Lasix is fast acting, and has relatively few side effects. The present design for evaluating the optimal fluid countermeasures will have important implications in restoring orthostatic tolerance and function in the latter stages of spaceflight when it is essential for safe operation of the spacecraft.

  9. Three-Dimensional Multiscale MHD Model of Cometary Plasma Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas I.; DeZeeuw, Darren L.; Haberli, Roman M.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    First results of a three-dimensional multiscale MHD model of the interaction of an expanding cometary atmosphere with the magnetized solar wind are presented. The model starts with a supersonic and super-Alfvenic solar wind far upstream of the comet (25 Gm upstream of the nucleus) with arbitrary interplanetary magnetic field orientation. The solar wind is continuously mass loaded with cometary ions originating from a 10-km size nucleus. The effects of photoionization, electron impact ionization, recombination, and ion-neutral frictional drag are taken into account in the model. The governing equations are solved on an adaptively refined unstructured Cartesian grid using our new multiscale upwind scalar conservation laws-type numerical technique (MUSCL). We have named this the multiscale adaptive upwind scheme for MHD (MAUS-MHD). The combination of the adaptive refinement with the MUSCL-scheme allows the entire cometary atmosphere to be modeled, while still resolving both the shock and the diamagnetic cavity of the comet. The main findings are the following: (1) Mass loading decelerates the solar wind flow upstream of the weak cometary shock wave (M approximately equals 2, M(sub A) approximately equals 2), which forms at a subsolar standoff distance of about 0.35 Gm. (2) A cometary plasma cavity is formed at around 3 x 10(exp 3) km from the nucleus. Inside this cavity the plasma expands outward due to the frictional interaction between ions and neutrals. On the nightside this plasma cavity considerably narrows and a relatively fast and dense cometary plasma beam is ejected into the tail. (3) Inside the plasma cavity a teardrop-shaped inner shock is formed, which is terminated by a Mach disk on the nightside. Only the region inside the inner shock is the 'true' diamagnetic cavity. (4) The model predicts four distinct current systems in the inner coma: the density peak current, the cavity boundary current, the inner shock current, and finally the cross-tail current

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Plasma and Fluid Turbulence: Theory and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, A.; Itoh, S. I.; Itoh, K.

    2003-03-01

    The area of turbulence has been covered by many books over the years. This has, of course, mainly been fluid turbulence, while the area of plasma turbulence has been treated much less. This book by Yoshizawa et al covers both plasma and fluid turbulence, in a way that does justice to both areas at the same time as cross-disciplinary aspects are illuminated. The book should be useful to physicists working in both areas partly because it examines fundamental aspects in a pedagogical way, partly because it is up to date and partly because of the cross-disciplinary aspects which enrich both areas. It is written as an advanced textbook. The reader should have previous knowledge of at least one of the areas and also some background in statistical physics. The book starts with the very important and highly up to date area of structure formation which is relevant both to fluids and plasmas. Here, pipe flow of fluids is treated as an introduction to the area, then follows discussion of the generation of magnetic fields by turbulent motion in stellar objects and stucture formation in plasmas confined by a magnetic field. Also the concept of bifurcation is introduced. This part builds up knowledge from the simple fluid case to the problems of magnetic confinement of plasmas in a very pedagogical way. It continues by introducing the fundamentals of fluid turbulence. This is done very systematically and concepts useful for industrial applications like the K-e method and several ways of heuristic modelling are introduced. Also the two dimensional vortex equation, which is also relevant to magnetized plasmas is introduced. In chapter 5 the statistical theory of turbulence is treated. It starts with a very nice and easy to understand example of renormalization of a simple nonlinear equation where the exact solution is known. It introduces the method of partial renormalization, Greens functions and the direct interaction approximation (DIA). The book then continues with an

  11. Improved Hypervelocity Plasma Characterization Using Bremsstrahlung Optical Continuum Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hew, Y. M.

    2016-12-01

    Meteoroids and orbital debris, collectively referred to as hypervelocity impactors, travel between 7 and 72 km/s in free space. Upon their impact onto the spacecraft, the energy conversion from kinetic to ionization/vaporization occurs within a very brief timescale and results in a small and dense expanding plasma with a very strong optical flash. The radio frequency emission produced by this plasma can potentially lead to electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. During the impact, a very strong impact flash will be generated. Through the studying of this emission spectrum of the impact, we hope to study the impact generated gas cloud/plasma properties. The impact flash generated during a ground-based hypervelocity impact is long expected by many researchers to contain the characteristics of the impact generated plasma, such as plasma temperature and density. The most common approach in the literature is to use the spectroscopic measurement of the impact flash and assume the impact flash emission to be a perfect blackbody spectrum to estimate the brightness temperature using Plank's law which relies on the assumption of continuum emission and the local thermodynamics equilibrium within the emitter. However, many recent experimental results and literature have shown the emission spectrum of the impact flash to evolve from continuum spectrum to line spectrum within the very first few microseconds after impact, and significant levels of deviation from blackbody emission spectrum even in the continuum emission phase. This presentation use Bremsstrahlung emission model as an augmented approach to characterize the impact plasma. Bremsstrahlung radiation is a generalized thermal radiation where the optical emission is produced by charged particles acceleration. As the plasma optical thickness increases, the Bremsstrahlung spectrum approaches the Blackbody spectrum. Thus, the Bremsstrahlung spectrum provides a better approximation of the measured continuum emission

  12. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind

    PubMed Central

    Howes, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature. PMID:25848075

  13. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Howes, G G

    2015-05-13

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature.

  14. Numerical model of the plasma formation at electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.

    2015-01-07

    The model of plasma formation in the keyhole in liquid metal as well as above the electron beam welding zone is described. The model is based on solution of two equations for the density of electrons and the mean electron energy. The mass transfer of heavy plasma particles (neutral atoms, excited atoms, and ions) is taken into account in the analysis by the diffusion equation for a multicomponent mixture. The electrostatic field is calculated using the Poisson equation. Thermionic electron emission is calculated for the keyhole wall. The ionization intensity of the vapors due to beam electrons and high-energy secondary and backscattered electrons is calibrated using the plasma parameters when there is no polarized collector electrode above the welding zone. The calculated data are in good agreement with experimental data. Results for the plasma parameters for excitation of a non-independent discharge are given. It is shown that there is a need to take into account the effect of a strong electric field near the keyhole walls on electron emission (the Schottky effect) in the calculation of the current for a non-independent discharge (hot cathode gas discharge). The calculated electron drift velocities are much bigger than the velocity at which current instabilities arise. This confirms the hypothesis for ion-acoustic instabilities, observed experimentally in previous research.

  15. Analytic model for coaxial helicity injection in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R. H.

    2011-12-15

    Using a partial differential equation for the time evolution of the mean-field poloidal magnetic flux that incorporates resistivity {eta} and hyper-resistivity {Lambda} terms, an exact analytic solution is obtained for steady-state coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in force-free large aspect ratio tokamaks. The analytic mean-field Ohm's law model allows for calculation of the tokamak CHI current drive efficiency and the plasma inductances at arbitrary levels of magnetic fluctuations, or dynamo activity. The results of the mean-field model suggest that CHI approaching Ohmic efficiency is only possible in tokamaks when the size of the effective current drive boundary layer, {delta}{identical_to}({Lambda}/{eta}){sup 1/2}, becomes greater than half the size of the plasma, {delta}>a/2, with a the plasma minor radius. The electron thermal diffusivity due to magnetic fluctuation induced transport is obtained from the expression {chi}{sub e}={Lambda}/{mu}{sub 0}d{sub e}{sup 2}, with {mu}{sub 0} the permeability of free space and d{sub e} the electron skin depth, which for typical tokamak fusion plasma parameters is on the order of a millimeter. Thus, the ratio of the energy confinement time to the resistive diffusion time in a tokamak plasma driven by steady-state CHI approaching Ohmic efficiency is shown to be constrained by the relation {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub {eta}}<(d{sub e}/a){sup 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -6}. The mean-field model suggests that steady-state CHI can be viewed most simply as a boundary layer of stochastically wandering magnetic field lines.

  16. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  17. A PLASIMO global model for plasma assisted CO2 conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graef, Wouter; Rehman, Tafizur; Mihailova, Diana; van Dijk, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Conversion of CO2 has become a major challenge of our time as it is of interest for the reduction of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, but also to store energy thereby relieving the supply and demand discrepancy of many alternative forms of energy. Plasma assisted CO2 conversion is heavily investigated as an efficient method to achieve this goal. Numerical modeling is an important aspect of this investigation, but is difficult due to the complex chemistry. A global model has been constructed to focus on the CO2 chemistry including its vibrational kinetics. The model has been realized using the global model module of PLASIMO, a highly modular plasma modeling framework. It is based on another model that was constructed using the well-established code Global_kin. The aim of the model is therefore twofold. First, to study the chemistry and identify the most important species and reactions and perform parametric studies. The knowledge gained can be applied to other, spatially resolved models. Second, by implementing the same chemistry in the two different global model codes, a cross validation can be performed, a vital scientific process often overlooked in practice.

  18. Model of the plasma jet originating from a cathode spot

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V.N.; Litvinov, E.A.; Mesyats, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The 2-D NM model of the vacuum-arc plasma jet presented here is in outgrowth of the 1-D hydrodynamic model discussed by us. The computation carried out in 1-D approximation have provided the principal characteristics of a cathode jet being in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Nevertheless, there results cannot be considered completely adequate, since actually the plum parameters of a cathode jet are distributed highly nonuniformly over its cross section. Furthermore, a 1-D model falls to take in to account the effects related to the influence of the self-magnetic field of the cathode jet.

  19. Time dependent modeling of non-LTE plasmas: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    During the period of performance of this contract Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has aided Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the development of an unclassified modeling tool for studying time evolution of high temperature ionizing and recombining plasmas. This report covers the numerical code developed, (D)ynamic (D)etailed (C)onfiguration (A)ccounting (DDCA), which was written to run on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) network as well as the classified Livermore Computer Center (OCTOPUS) network. DDCA is a One-Dimensional (1D) time dependent hydrodynamic model which makes use of the non-LTE detailed atomic physics ionization model DCA. 5 refs.

  20. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  1. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  2. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-05-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  3. Effect of Hydrogen Plasma on Model Corrosion Layers of Bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojtíková, P.; Sázavská, V.; Mika, F.; Krčma, F.

    2016-05-01

    Our work is about plasmachemical reduction of model corrosion layers. The model corrosion layers were produced on bronze samples with size of 10 × 10 × 5 mm3, containing Cu and Sn. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was used as a corrosive environment. The application of reduction process in low-pressure low-temperature hydrogen plasma followed. A quartz cylindrical reactor with two outer copper electrodes was used. Plasma discharge was generated in pure hydrogen by a RF generator. Each corroded sample was treated in different conditions (supplied power and a continual or pulsed regime with a variable duty cycle mode). Process monitoring was ensured by optical emission spectroscopy. After treatment, samples were analyzed by SEM and EDX.

  4. A Self-Consistent Plasma-Sheath Model for the Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindam, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate determination of ion flux on a wafer requires a self-consistent, multidimensional modeling of plasma reactor that adequately resolves the sheath region adjoining the wafer. This level of modeling is difficult to achieve since non-collisional sheath lengths are usually 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than the reactor scale. Also, the drift-diffusion equations used for ion transport becomes invalid in the sheath since the ion frictional force is no longer in equilibrium with drift and diffusion forces. The alternative is to use a full momentum equation for each ionic species. In this work we will present results from a self-consistent reactor scale-sheath scale model for 2D inductively coupled plasmas. The goal of this study is to improve the modeling capabilities and assess the importance of additional physics in determining important reactor performance features, such as the ion flux uniformity, coil frequency and configuration effects, etc. Effect of numerical dissipation on the solution quality will also be discussed.

  5. SIMPLODE: An Imploding Gas Puff Plasma Model. I. Neon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    recent experimental results obtained on GAMBLE II. In addition, the influence of the Plasma Erosion Opening Switch on the K-shell yield is...LTE radiation physics model and is ideal for use with the gas puff experiments at NRL on the GAMBLE II facility. Recently the GAMBLE II pulse power...facility has been upgraded to accomodate gas puff loads. This modification enhances GAMBLE II’s versatility by expanding the types of material loads that

  6. Modeling of Atomic Processes for X-Ray Laser Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    temperatures where models such as Thomas-Fermi or Debye - Huckel are known to be inadequate. The calculations done here show that, with increasing plasma... theory . Comparison of experimental data with the IPA calculations shows that for some simple systems such as a neutral few-electron atom (Lithium, for...linear fashion - unlike Debye -screening, which is known to be inadequate for screening by bound electrons. The two-component DFM is applicable for

  7. Multi-field plasma sandpile model in tokamaks and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X. D.; Xu, J. Q.

    2016-08-01

    A multi-field sandpile model of tokamak plasmas is formulated for the first time to simulate the dynamic process with interaction between avalanche events on the fast/micro time-scale and diffusive transports on the slow/macro time-scale. The main characteristics of the model are that both particle and energy avalanches of sand grains are taken into account simultaneously. New redistribution rules of a sand-relaxing process are defined according to the transport properties of special turbulence which allows the uphill particle transport. Applying the model, we first simulate the steady-state plasma profile self-sustained by drift wave turbulences in the Ohmic discharge of a tokamak. A scaling law as f = a q0 b + c for the relation of both center-density n ( 0 ) and electron (ion) temperatures T e ( 0 ) ( T i ( 0 ) ) with the center-safety-factor q 0 is found. Then interesting work about the nonlocal transport phenomenon observed in tokamak experiments proceeds. It is found that the core electron temperature increases rapidly in response to the edge cold pulse and inversely it decreases in response to the edge heat pulse. The results show that the nonlocal response of core electron temperature depending on the amplitudes of background plasma density and temperature is more remarkable in a range of gas injection rate. Analyses indicate that the avalanche transport caused by plasma drift instabilities with thresholds is a possible physical mechanism for the nonlocal transport in tokamaks. It is believed that the model is capable of being applied to more extensive questions occurring in the transport field.

  8. Developing Models for the DIII-D Boundary Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G D; Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E; Stangeby, P C; Wolf, N S

    2005-05-25

    Development of the comprehensive codes used to study the boundary region of the DIII-D tokamak has been done in parallel with improvement of the diagnostics of this important region of the plasma. These codes have been used to interpret the diagnostic data and assist in design of improved divertor configurations. The development of codes used for analysis on DIII-D is described briefly. Model validation by comparing with the extensive DIII-D boundary region diagnostic data is also discussed.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V.; Chow, Diana S. L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP.

  10. Modelling of microwave-driven micro-plasmas in HCPCF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Debord, B.; Gerome, F.; Jamier, R.; Benabid, F.

    2012-10-01

    New UV sources based on microwave-driven micro-plasmas filling a Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibre (HCPCF) [1], exhibit an unprecedented compactness, flexibility, low-cost and high conversion efficiency. The micro-plasma (>10^14 cm-3 electron density, estimated by electromagnetic calculations) is produced by a surface-wave discharge (2.45 GHz frequency) in argon, at 1000-1400 K gas temperatures (measured by OES diagnostics). Our first approach to simulate this system replaces the cladding structure of the fibre (air-holes region) by a capillary cylindrical quartz tube. Simulations use a one-dimensional (radial) stationary model that solves the fluid transport equations for electrons and positive ions, the electron mean energy transport equations, Poisson's and Maxwell's equations for the fields and the gas energy balance equation, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation for the calculation of the relevant electron parameters [2,3]. We analyze the modification of the plasma with changes in the work conditions, presenting simulations for various HCPCF core radii (50--500 μm) and electron densities (1--5x10^14 cm-3), at 1mbar pressure. [1] B. Debord et al, ECOC conference Mo.2.LeCervin.5. (2011) [2] L.L. Alves et al, Phys. Rev. E 79, 016403 (2009) [3] J. Greg'orio et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 015013 (2012)

  11. Unified Model of the rf Plasma Sheath, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle

    1996-10-01

    By developing an approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation, one can obtain solutions for the current-voltage characteristics of an rf plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current. (M.E.Riley, 1995 GEC, abstract QA5, published in Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 40, 1587 (1995).) The theory has been shown to adequately reproduce current-voltage characteristics of two extreme cases (M.A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988). A. Metze, D.W. Ernie, and H.J.Oskam, J.Appl.Phys., 60, 3081 (1986).) of ion response. In this work I show the effect of different conventions for connecting the sheath model to the bulk plasma. Modifications of the Mach number and a finite electric field at the Bohm point are natural choices. The differences are examined for a sheath in a high density Ar plasma and are found to be insignificant. A theoretical argument favors the electric field modification. *Work performed at Sandia National Labs and supported by US DoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Surface-wave capillary plasmas in helium: modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Noel, C.; Belmonte, T.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we use both simulations and experiments to study helium discharges (99.999% purity) sustained by surface-waves (2.45 GHz frequency), in capillary tubes (3 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. Simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, the He^+ and He2^+ ions, the He(n<7) excited states and the He2* excimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled to the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). Experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density (Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature (ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations), and the populations of different excited states. Model predictions at 1.7x10^13 cm-3 electron density (within the range estimated experimentally) are in good agreement with measurements (deviations < 10%) of (i) the excitation spectrum and the excitation temperatures (2795 ± 115 K, obtained from the Boltzmann-plot of the excited state populations, with energies lying between 22.7 and 24.2 eV), (ii) the power coupled to the plasma (˜ 180 ± 10 W), and (iii) the gas temperature (˜ 1700 ± 100 K). We discuss the extreme dependence of model results (particularly the gas temperature) on the power coupled to the plasma.

  13. Multi-level molecular modelling for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Khosravian, Narjes; Van der Paal, Jonas; Verlackt, Christof C. W.; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Kamaraj, Balu; Neyts, Erik C.

    2016-02-01

    Modelling at the molecular or atomic scale can be very useful for obtaining a better insight in plasma medicine. This paper gives an overview of different atomic/molecular scale modelling approaches that can be used to study the direct interaction of plasma species with biomolecules or the consequences of these interactions for the biomolecules on a somewhat longer time-scale. These approaches include density functional theory (DFT), density functional based tight binding (DFTB), classical reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) and united-atom or coarse-grained MD, as well as hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Specific examples will be given for three important types of biomolecules, present in human cells, i.e. proteins, DNA and phospholipids found in the cell membrane. The results show that each of these modelling approaches has its specific strengths and limitations, and is particularly useful for certain applications. A multi-level approach is therefore most suitable for obtaining a global picture of the plasma-biomolecule interactions.

  14. Modeling of high-explosive driven plasma compression opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, A. E.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Goforth, J. H.

    The initial path of the current through a plasma compression switch is through a thin (500-nm thick) metal foil. The current explodes the foil to form the seed for the conducting plasma. The behavior of the foil at this point is the same as an exploding metal fuse for which we have a simple model. We have, therefore, chosen this model as our starting point. The fuse model assumes that the foil material is homogeneous and is characterized by a single temperature and density. The thickness of the foil is assumed to be much less than the magnetic diffusion skin depth so that the magnetic field varies linearly across the foil. For the present application we assume that the side of the foil away from the channel is fixed in space while the side by the channel is untamped. The foil/plasma will, therefore, cross the channel at the expansion velocity as the foil explodes. Equations for the electrical resistance of the foil, the magnetic fields, the motion of the foil, and the kinetic and internal energies are all solved selfconsistantly. The electrical resistivity, the pressure, and the specific energy of aluminum are taken from the Los Alamos SESAME EOS library. In the case of aluminum we have created a SESAME-style table based on the theory of More and Lee which we have modified to agree with experiment where possible.

  15. 3-Dimensional Modeling of Capacitively and Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid

    2008-10-01

    Low temperature plasmas are widely used for thin film etching during micro and nano-electronic device fabrication. Fluid and hybrid plasma models were developed 15-20 years ago to understand the fundamentals of these plasmas and plasma etching. These models have significantly evolved since then, and are now a major tool used for new plasma hardware design and problem resolution. Plasma etching is a complex physical phenomenon, where inter-coupled plasma, electromagnetic, fluid dynamics, and thermal effects all have a major influence. The next frontier in the evolution of fluid-based plasma models is where these models are able to self-consistently treat the inter-coupling of plasma physics with fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, heat transfer and magnetostatics. We describe one such model in this paper and illustrate its use in solving engineering problems of interest for next generation plasma etcher design. Our 3-dimensional plasma model includes the full set of Maxwell equations, transport equations for all charged and neutral species in the plasma, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, and Kirchhoff's equations for the lumped external circuit. This model also includes Monte Carlo based kinetic models for secondary electrons and stochastic heating, and can take account of plasma chemistry. This modeling formalism allows us to self-consistently treat the dynamics in commercial inductively and capacitively coupled plasma etching reactors with realistic plasma chemistries, magnetic fields, and reactor geometries. We are also able to investigate the influence of the distributed electromagnetic circuit at very high frequencies (VHF) on the plasma dynamics. The model is used to assess the impact of azimuthal asymmetries in plasma reactor design (e.g., off-center pump, 3D magnetic field, slit valve, flow restrictor) on plasma characteristics at frequencies from 2 -- 180 MHz. With Jason Kenney, Ankur Agarwal, Ajit Balakrishna, Kallol Bera, and Ken Collins.

  16. Growth model of binary alloy nanopowders for thermal plasma synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeta, Masaya; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2010-08-15

    A new model is developed for numerical analysis of the entire growth process of binary alloy nanopowders in thermal plasma synthesis. The model can express any nanopowder profile in the particle size-composition distribution (PSCD). Moreover, its numerical solution algorithm is arithmetic and straightforward so that the model is easy to use. By virtue of these features, the model effectively simulates the collective and simultaneous combined process of binary homogeneous nucleation, binary heterogeneous cocondensation, and coagulation among nanoparticles. The effect of the freezing point depression due to nanoscale particle diameters is also considered in the model. In this study, the metal-silicon systems are particularly chosen as representative binary systems involving cocondensation processes. In consequence, the numerical calculation with the present model reveals the growth mechanisms of the Mo-Si and Ti-Si nanopowders by exhibiting their PSCD evolutions. The difference of the materials' saturation pressures strongly affects the growth behaviors and mature states of the binary alloy nanopowder.

  17. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  18. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  19. Modeling of the angular dependence of plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Wei; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2009-11-15

    An understanding of the angular dependence of etching yield is essential to investigate the origins of sidewall roughness during plasma etching. In this article the angular dependence of polysilicon etching in Cl{sub 2} plasma was modeled as a combination of individual angular-dependent etching yields for ion-initiated processes including physical sputtering, ion-induced etching, vacancy generation, and removal. The modeled etching yield exhibited a maximum at {approx}60 degree sign off-normal ion angle at low flux ratio, indicative of physical sputtering. It transformed to the angular dependence of ion-induced etching with the increase in the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiments was achieved for various flux ratios and ion energies. The variation of etching yield in response to the ion angle was incorporated in the three-dimensional profile simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained. The surface composition was calculated and compared to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The modeling indicated a Cl areal density of 3x10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} on the surface that is close to the value determined by the XPS analysis. The response of Cl fraction to ion energy and flux ratio was modeled and correlated with the etching yields. The complete mixing-layer kinetics model with the angular dependence effect will be used for quantitative surface roughening analysis using a profile simulator in future work.

  20. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Solodyankina, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The regularities of nucleation in a model solution of human blood plasma under the conditions similar to physiological have been investigated. The induction order and constants are determined. It is shown that an increase in supersaturation leads to a transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous nucleation of crystallites. The critical nucleus size is estimated for a pure model system and for a system containing a number of additives. The impurities under study are found to form the following descending sequence with respect to their effect on nucleation: alanine > glucose > glycine > citric acid > milky acid > magnesium ions.

  1. EISCAT velocity patterns for theoretical plasma convection models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishbeth, H.; Sojka, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical line-of-sight velocities, as would be observed by the EISCAT radar, are computed for idealized models of plasma convection in the polar ionosphere. The calculations give the velocity as a function of range and Universal Time. For several variants of the Volland and Heelis convection models, how the maxima, minima and reversals of velocity depend on beam azimuth is examined. The analysis is designed to be applied to data from the UK-POLAR experiment, an example of which is shown.

  2. Two-chamber model for divertors with plasma recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, W.D.; Singer, C.E.

    1984-11-01

    To model particle and heat loss terms at the edge of a tokamak with a divertor or pumped limiter, a simple two-chamber formulation of the scrapeoff has been constructed by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along open field lines. The model is then solved for a wide range of density and temperature conditions in the scrapeoff, using geometrical parameters typical of the PDX poloidal divertor. The solutions characterize four divertor operating conditions for beam-heated plasmas: plugged, unplugged, blowthrough, and blowback.

  3. INFERNO - A better model of atoms in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, D. A.

    1982-03-01

    A self-consistent field model of atoms in dense plasmas has been devised and incorporated in a computer program. In the model there is a uniform positive charge distribution with a hole in it and at the center of the hole an atomic nucleus. There are electrons, in both bound and continuum states, in sufficient number to form an electrically neutral system. The Dirac equation is used so that high Z atoms can be dealt with. A finite temperature is assumed, and a mean field (average atom) approximation is used in statistical averages. Applications have been made to equations of states and to photoabsorption.

  4. Modeling laser-plasma interactions in NIF vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Still, C. H.; Langdon, A. B.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J.

    2009-11-01

    In preparation for the NIF ignition campaign, a series of experiments are underway firing 96 and 192 beams of the NIF laser into empty gold hohlraums. The primary purpose of these experiments is to qualify the DANTE filtered x-ray diode radiation temerature diagnostic. We plan to have backscatter diagnostics available, giving us an opportunity to test our LPI modeling on the NIF scale. In addition to scaling with energy, we test the use of a gold-boron coating on the hohlraum wall to reduce SBS via increased ion Landau damping of the ion-acoustic waves. We use Lasnex to simulate the hydrodynamic evolution of the hohlraum plasma. Steady state gains were computed using our diagnostic NEWLIP. These were used to suggest appropriate backscatter simulations to be performed with pF3D, a massivel parallel code that couples paraxial light propagation with fluid models of the stimulated plasma ansd ion waves evolving on a background plasma. We describe the results of these simulations, pre- and post-shot, and compare them with experimental results.

  5. Modeling the Spectra of Dense Hydrogen Plasmas: Beyond Occupation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, T. A.; Montgomery, M. H.; Nagayama, T.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Winget, D. E.

    2017-03-01

    Accurately measuring the masses of white dwarf stars is crucial in many astrophysical contexts (e.g., asteroseismology and cosmochronology). These masses are most commonly determined by fitting a model atmosphere to an observed spectrum; this is known as the spectroscopic method. However, for cases in which more than one method may be employed, there are well known discrepancies between masses determined by the spectroscopic method and those determined by astrometric, dynamical, and/or gravitational-redshift methods. In an effort to resolve these discrepancies, we are developing a new model of hydrogen in a dense plasma that is a significant departure from previous models. Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are currently underway to validate these new models, and we have begun modifications to incorporate these models into stellar-atmosphere codes.

  6. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. PMID:26482650

  7. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  8. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  9. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhir, Dass Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-15

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  10. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  11. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  12. Simulation models for computational plasma physics: Concluding report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.

    1994-03-05

    In this project, the authors enhanced their ability to numerically simulate bounded plasmas that are dominated by low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. They moved towards this goal in several ways; they are now in a position to play significant roles in the modeling of low-frequency electromagnetic plasmas in several new industrial applications. They have significantly increased their facility with the computational methods invented to solve the low frequency limit of Maxwell`s equations (DiPeso, Hewett, accepted, J. Comp. Phys., 1993). This low frequency model is called the Streamlined Darwin Field model (SDF, Hewett, Larson, and Doss, J. Comp. Phys., 1992) has now been implemented in a fully non-neutral SDF code BEAGLE (Larson, Ph.D. dissertation, 1993) and has further extended to the quasi-neutral limit (DiPeso, Hewett, Comp. Phys. Comm., 1993). In addition, they have resurrected the quasi-neutral, zero-electron-inertia model (ZMR) and began the task of incorporating internal boundary conditions into this model that have the flexibility of those in GYMNOS, a magnetostatic code now used in ion source work (Hewett, Chen, ICF Quarterly Report, July--September, 1993). Finally, near the end of this project, they invented a new type of banded matrix solver that can be implemented on a massively parallel computer -- thus opening the door for the use of all their ADI schemes on these new computer architecture`s (Mattor, Williams, Hewett, submitted to Parallel Computing, 1993).

  13. A Warm Fluid Model of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkenton, G. M.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E. H.; Leemans, W. P.

    2001-10-01

    Following up on our previous work on modeling intense laser-plasma interactions with cold fluids,(B.A.Shadwick, G. M. Tarkenton, E.H. Esarey, and W.P. Leemans, ``Fluid Modeling of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions'', in Advanced Accelerator Concepts), P. Colestock and S. Kelley editors, AIP Conf. Proc. 569 (AIP, NY 2001), pg. 154. we are exploring warm fluid models. These models represent the next level in a hierarchy of complexity beyond the cold fluid approximation. With only a modest increase in computation effort, warm fluids incorporate effects that are relevant to a variety of technologically interesting cases. We present a derivation of the warm fluid from a kinetic (i.e. Vlasov) perspective and make a connection with the usual relativistic thermodynamic approach.(S. R. de Groot, W. A. van Leeuwen and Ch. G. van Weert, Relativistic Kinetic Theory: Principles and Applications), North-Holland (1980). We will provide examples where the warm fluids yield physics results not contained in the cold model and discuss experimental parameters where these effects are believed to be important.

  14. Model of magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2013-03-15

    Maxwell's equations imply that exponentially smaller non-ideal effects than commonly assumed can give rapid magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas. In an ideal evolution, magnetic field lines act as stretchable strings, which can become ever more entangled but cannot be cut. High entanglement makes the lines exponentially sensitive to small non-ideal changes in the magnetic field. The cause is well known in popular culture as the butterfly effect and in the theory of deterministic dynamical systems as a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, but the importance to magnetic reconnection is not generally recognized. Two-coordinate models are too constrained geometrically for the required entanglement, but otherwise the effect is general and can be studied in simple models. A simple model is introduced, which is periodic in the x and y Cartesian coordinates and bounded by perfectly conducting planes in z. Starting from a constant magnetic field in the z direction, reconnection is driven by a spatially smooth, bounded force. The model is complete and could be used to study the impulsive transfer of energy between the magnetic field and the ions and electrons using a kinetic plasma model.

  15. Simulation models for computational plasma physics: Concluding report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, D. W.

    1994-03-01

    In this project, the authors enhanced their ability to numerically simulate bounded plasmas that are dominated by low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. They moved towards this goal in several ways; they are now in a position to play significant roles in the modeling of low-frequency electromagnetic plasmas in several new industrial applications. They have significantly increased their facility with the computational methods invented to solve the low frequency limit of Maxwell's equations. This low frequency model, called the streamlined Darwin field model, has now been implemented in a fully non-neutral SDF code BEAGLE and has been further extended to the quasi-neutral limit. In addition, they have resurrected the quasi-neutral, zero electron inertia model (ZMR) and began the task of incorporating internal boundary conditions into this model that have the flexibility of those in GYMNOS, a magnetostatic code now used in ion source work. Finally, near the end of this project, they invented a new type of banded matrix solver that can be implemented on a massively parallel computer, thus opening the door for the use of all their ADI schemes on these new computer architecture's.

  16. Minimal Plasma Response Models for Design of Tokamak Equilibrium Controllers with High Dynamic Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Walker, M. L.; Leuer, J. A.

    1999-11-01

    We describe a model of linearized plasma shape and position response which is based on low poloidal mode number (m<=2, approximately vertical and major radial) displacements of the plasma current distribution. The model introduces minimal plasma degrees of freedom while providing sufficient accuracy for high performance controller design. The effects of significant variation in plasma poloidal beta, internal inductance, and separatrix configuration are taken into account. Models which can predict plasma shape and position variation with reasonable accuracy are particularly important for design of dynamic controllers in devices with significant variation in auxiliary heating input power and plasma shape --- conditions common in the DIII--D tokamak. Model predictions are validated using experimental response data from DIII--D. Application of the plasma response model to design of multivariable dynamic plasma controllers recently implemented on DIII--D is described.

  17. Collision Models for Plasma Simulation of Thermonuclear Burn: Comparison of Models and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winske, Dan; Albright, Brian; Bowers, Kevin; Lemons, Don

    2007-11-01

    There is renewed interest in examining plasma physics issues related to thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and fast ignition (FI): e.g., the rate of temperature equilibration of electrons and ions, the formation and/or depletion of high energy tails of ion velocity distributions of ions, the slowing of energetic ions in dense plasmas, etc. To address these types of questions, we have developed a new particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation capability, embodied in the code VPIC. To model TN-burn problems in dense plasmas, we have developed a new Coulomb collision model, based on the use of stochastic differential equations and well-known Spitzer rates to describe the collision process, which was presented at last year's meeting. Here we extend the model to included arbitrary weighting of individual simulation particles, rather than just separate weights for each plasma species, which is a feature intrinsic to VPIC. We compare test cases for plasma relaxation and slowing of fast beams using the new collision model with results obtained from an extension of standard particle-pairing collision models to weighted particles for parameter regimes of interest to ICF and FI.

  18. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, indicates that there are more-than-two stable points in a given condition, and it has been considered to one of the most important topics in fundamental physics. Recently, the hysteresis of plasma has become a focus of research because stable plasma operation is very important for fusion reactors, bio-medical plasmas, and industrial plasmas for nano-device fabrication process. Interestingly, the bi-stability characteristics of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop have been observed in inductive discharge plasmas Because hysteresis study in such plasmas can provide a universal understanding of plasma physics, many researchers have attempted experimental and theoretical studies. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. This research was partially supported by Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science.

  19. Solar Prominence Modelling and Plasma Diagnostics at ALMA Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, Andrew; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Our aim is to test potential solar prominence plasma diagnostics as obtained with the new solar capability of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We investigate the thermal and plasma diagnostic potential of ALMA for solar prominences through the computation of brightness temperatures at ALMA wavelengths. The brightness temperature, for a chosen line of sight, is calculated using the densities of electrons, hydrogen, and helium obtained from a radiative transfer code under non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) conditions, as well as the input internal parameters of the prominence model in consideration. Two distinct sets of prominence models were used: isothermal-isobaric fine-structure threads, and large-scale structures with radially increasing temperature distributions representing the prominence-to-corona transition region. We compute brightness temperatures over the range of wavelengths in which ALMA is capable of observing (0.32 - 9.6 mm), however, we particularly focus on the bands available to solar observers in ALMA cycles 4 and 5, namely 2.6 - 3.6 mm (Band 3) and 1.1 - 1.4 mm (Band 6). We show how the computed brightness temperatures and optical thicknesses in our models vary with the plasma parameters (temperature and pressure) and the wavelength of observation. We then study how ALMA observables such as the ratio of brightness temperatures at two frequencies can be used to estimate the optical thickness and the emission measure for isothermal and non-isothermal prominences. From this study we conclude that for both sets of models, ALMA presents a strong thermal diagnostic capability, provided that the interpretation of observations is supported by the use of non-LTE simulation results.

  20. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  1. Methodology of modeling and measuring computer architectures for plasma simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. P. T.

    1977-01-01

    A brief introduction to plasma simulation using computers and the difficulties on currently available computers is given. Through the use of an analyzing and measuring methodology - SARA, the control flow and data flow of a particle simulation model REM2-1/2D are exemplified. After recursive refinements the total execution time may be greatly shortened and a fully parallel data flow can be obtained. From this data flow, a matched computer architecture or organization could be configured to achieve the computation bound of an application problem. A sequential type simulation model, an array/pipeline type simulation model, and a fully parallel simulation model of a code REM2-1/2D are proposed and analyzed. This methodology can be applied to other application problems which have implicitly parallel nature.

  2. Methodology of modeling and measuring computer architectures for plasma simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L. P. T.

    1977-01-01

    A brief introduction to plasma simulation using computers and the difficulties on currently available computers is given. Through the use of an analyzing and measuring methodology - SARA, the control flow and data flow of a particle simulation model REM2-1/2D are exemplified. After recursive refinements the total execution time may be greatly shortened and a fully parallel data flow can be obtained. From this data flow, a matched computer architecture or organization could be configured to achieve the computation bound of an application problem. A sequential type simulation model, an array/pipeline type simulation model, and a fully parallel simulation model of a code REM2-1/2D are proposed and analyzed. This methodology can be applied to other application problems which have implicitly parallel nature.

  3. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  4. Modeling production of e+/--pair plasma in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alex; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    Processes around spinning supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to determine how relativistic jets are launched and how the black hole energy is extracted. The key question in these processes is the origin of plasma in black hole magnetospheres. The only reasonable mechanism is believed to be the electron-position cascade - the multistage process involving seed photons from an accretion disk, which are Compton up-scattered by charges accelerated in a gap region of a force-free magnetosphere with subsequent photon-photon pair production. In order to explore the process of the e+/- plasma production, we developed a numerical code which models the dynamics of the cascade along magnetic field lines. We demonstrate that plasma production is sensitive to the spectrum of the ambient photon and magnetic fields, the black hole mass and spin, and other parameters. We discuss the results and observational predictions. Supported by KU CLAS and DOE Grant ID0000225143 (07/01/16).

  5. Approaches to modeling of plasmas containing impurity at arbitrary concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2016-02-01

    A new approximate method to modeling of two-ion-species plasmas with arbitrary concentration of impurity is developed. It based on the usage of equations for the electron density and the ratio of the ion species densities as new dependent variables. In contrast to motion equations for the ion mass velocities used normally, those for the new variables have a singularity at the Debye sheath only, as in the case of a one species plasma. Computations for the most critical situations of weak and intermediate friction between species due to Coulomb collisions reproduce nearly perfectly the results got by solving the original equations, however within a calculation time reduced by a factor of 102-103. In the case of strong friction, where ions’ velocities are very close each other, the normal procedure does not converge at all, but the new one, being precise in this limit, operates very reliably. Calculations are done for conditions typical in the linear device PSI-2, with deuterium plasmas seeded by neon impurity. For fixed electron and ion temperatures a critical density of impurity atoms is found, at which the electron density grows without limits. Such a catastrophic behavior does not occur if the electron and ion heat balances are taken into account to calculate the temperature profiles self-consistently.

  6. PROBABILISTIC MODEL OF BEAM–PLASMA INTERACTION IN RANDOMLY INHOMOGENEOUS PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Voshchepynets, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Artemyev, A.; Volokitin, A.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new model that describes beam–plasma interaction in the presence of random density fluctuations with a known probability distribution. We use the property that, for the given frequency, the probability distribution of the density fluctuations uniquely determines the probability distribution of the phase velocity of waves. We present the system as discrete and consisting of small, equal spatial intervals with a linear density profile. This approach allows one to estimate variations in wave energy density and particle velocity, depending on the density gradient on any small spatial interval. Because the characteristic time for the evolution of the electron distribution function and the wave energy is much longer than the time required for a single wave–particle resonant interaction over a small interval, we determine the description for the relaxation process in terms of averaged quantities. We derive a system of equations, similar to the quasi-linear approximation, with the conventional velocity diffusion coefficient D and the wave growth rate γ replaced by the average in phase space, by making use of the probability distribution for phase velocities and by assuming that the interaction in each interval is independent of previous interactions. Functions D and γ are completely determined by the distribution function for the amplitudes of the fluctuations. For the Gaussian distribution of the density fluctuations, we show that the relaxation process is determined by the ratio of beam velocity to plasma thermal velocity, the dispersion of the fluctuations, and the width of the beam in the velocity space.

  7. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; Hittinger, J.; Cohen, R.

    2016-03-10

    In this study, the first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasmatransport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalous radial transport.

  8. Predictive Modeling in Plasma Reactor and Process Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Research continues toward the improvement and increased understanding of high-density plasma tools. Such reactor systems are lauded for their independent control of ion flux and energy enabling high etch rates with low ion damage and for their improved ion velocity anisotropy resulting from thin collisionless sheaths and low neutral pressures. Still, with the transition to 300 mm processing, achieving etch uniformity and high etch rates concurrently may be a formidable task for such large diameter wafers for which computational modeling can play an important role in successful reactor and process design. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor is the focus of the present investigation. The present work attempts to understand the fundamental physical phenomena of such systems through computational modeling. Simulations will be presented using both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques and the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for argon and chlorine discharges. ICP reactors generally operate at pressures on the order of 1 to 10 mTorr. At such low pressures, rarefaction can be significant to the degree that the constitutive relations used in typical CFD techniques become invalid and a particle simulation must be employed. This work will assess the extent to which CFD can be applied and evaluate the degree to which accuracy is lost in prediction of the phenomenon of interest; i.e., etch rate. If the CFD approach is found reasonably accurate and bench-marked with DSMC and experimental results, it has the potential to serve as a design tool due to the rapid time relative to DSMC. The continuum CFD simulation solves the governing equations for plasma flow using a finite difference technique with an implicit Gauss-Seidel Line Relaxation method for time marching toward a converged solution. The equation set consists of mass conservation for each species, separate energy equations for the electrons and heavy species, and momentum equations for the gas

  9. Plasma interfacial mixing layers: Comparisons of fluid and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, Erik; Yin, Lin; Taitano, William; Albright, B. J.; Chacon, Luis; Simakov, Andrei; Molvig, Kim

    2016-10-01

    We examine plasma transport across an initial discontinuity between two species by comparing fluid and kinetic models. The fluid model employs a kinetic theory approximation for plasma transport in the limit of small Knudsen number. The kinetic simulations include explicit particle-in-cell simulations (VPIC) and a new implicit Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code, iFP. The two kinetic methods are shown to be in close agreement for many aspects of the mixing dynamics at early times (to several hundred collision times). The fluid model captures some of the earliest time dynamic behavior seen in the kinetic results, and also generally agrees with iFP at late times when the total pressure gradient relaxes and the species transport is dominated by slow diffusive processes. The results show three distinct phases of the mixing: a pressure discontinuity forms across the initial interface (on times of a few collisions), the pressure perturbations propagate away from the interfacial mixing region (on time scales of an acoustic transit) and at late times the pressure relaxes in the mix region leaving a non-zero center of mass flow velocity. The center of mass velocity associated with the outward propagating pressure waves is required to conserve momentum in the rest frame. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program.

  10. MHD modeling of dense plasma focus electrode shape variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Harry; Hartman, Charles; Schmidt, Andrea; Tang, Vincent; Link, Anthony; Ellsworth, Jen; Reisman, David

    2013-10-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a very simple device physically, but results to date indicate that very extensive physics is needed to understand the details of operation, especially during the final pinch where kinetic effects become very important. Nevertheless, the overall effects of electrode geometry, electrode size, and drive circuit parameters can be informed efficiently using MHD fluid codes, especially in the run-down phase before the final pinch. These kinds of results can then guide subsequent, more detailed fully kinetic modeling efforts. We report on resistive 2-d MHD modeling results applying the TRAC-II code to the DPF with an emphasis on varying anode and cathode shape. Drive circuit variations are handled in the code using a self-consistent circuit model for the external capacitor bank since the device impedance is strongly coupled to the internal plasma physics. Electrode shape is characterized by the ratio of inner diameter to outer diameter, length to diameter, and various parameterizations for tapering. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Analytic Model for Self-Excited Plasma Series Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf-Peter

    2006-10-01

    Self-excited Plasma Series Resonances (PSR) are observed in capacitve discharges as high frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal RF current. This high-frequency contribution to the current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitve sheath and the inductive and ohmic bulk of the plasma. The non-linearity of the sheath leads to a complex dynamic. The effect is applied e.g. as a diagnostic technique in commercial etch reactors where analysis is performed by a numerical model. Here a simple analytical investigation is introduced. In order to solve the non-linear equations analytically, a series of approximation is necessary. Nevertheless, the basic physics is conserved and excellent agreement with numerical solutions is found. The model provides explicit and simple formula for the current waveform and the spectral range of the oscillations. In particular, the dependence on the discharge parameters is shown. Further, the model gives insight into an additional dissipation channel opened by the high frequency oscillations. With decreasing pressure the ohmic resistance of the bulk is decreasing too, while the amplitude of the PSR oscillations is growing. This results in substantially higher power dissipation.

  12. Artificial plasma membrane models based on lipidomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Essaid, Donia; Rosilio, Véronique; Daghildjian, Katia; Solgadi, Audrey; Vergnaud, Juliette; Kasselouri, Athena; Chaminade, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Phospholipid monolayers are often described as membrane models for analyzing drug-lipid interactions. In many works, a single phosphatidylcholine is chosen, sometimes with one or two additional components. Drug penetration is studied at 30mN/m, a surface pressure considered as corresponding to the pressure in bilayers, independently of the density of lipid molecular packing. In this work, we have extracted, identified, and quantified the major lipids constituting the lipidome of plasma and mitochondrial membranes of retinoblastoma (Y79) and retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19), using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results obtained from this lipidomic analysis were used in an attempt to build an artificial lipid monolayer with a composition mimicking that of the plasma membrane of Y79 cells, better than a single phospholipid. The variety and number of lipid classes and species in cell extracts monolayers exceeding by far those of the phospholipids chosen to mimic them, the π-A isotherms of model monolayers differed from those of lipid extracts in shape and apparent packing density. We propose a model monolayer based on the most abundant species identified in the extracts, with a surface compressional modulus at 30mN/m close to the one of the lipid extracts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multidimensional hydrodynamic plasma-wall model for collisional plasma discharges with and without magnetic-field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Haribalan; Roy, Subrata

    2005-09-15

    A numerical model for two-species plasma involving electrons and ions at pressure of 0.1 torr is presented here. The plasma-wall problem is modeled using one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic equations coupled with Poisson equation. The model utilizes a finite-element algorithm to overcome the stiffness of the resulting plasma-wall equations. The one-dimensional result gives insight into the discharge characteristics including net charge density, electric field, and temporal space-charge sheath evolution. In two dimensions, the plasma formation over a flat plate is investigated for three different cases. The numerical algorithm is first benchmarked with published literature for plasma formed between symmetric electrodes in nitrogen gas. The characteristics of plasma are then analyzed for an infinitesimally thin electrode under dc and rf potentials in the presence of applied magnetic field using argon as a working gas. The magnetic field distorts the streamwise distribution because of a large y-momentum VxB coupling. Finally, the shape effects of the insulator-conductor edge for an electrode with finite thickness have been compared using a 90 degree sign shoulder and a 45 deg. chamfer. The 90 deg. chamfer displays a stronger body force created due to plasma in the downward and forward directions.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Ablation-Controlled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, Madhusudhan N.

    Ablation and plasma formation in high energy laser target interactions and arc discharges are studied numerically. Each of the two processes is modeled separately due to the type of energy source and the resulting flow eld. Ablation of the target material and plasma formation are coupled to obtain evaporation rate, temperature distribution, velocity eld, and species concentration self-consistently. Laser ablation is studied in the perspective of directed energy applications, where beam size varies from few centimeters to tens of centimeters with energies extending up to 10 kW/cm2. Because of this high energy deposition, the evaporated material expands to supersonic speeds into the free space. Due to the large spot sizes and associated supersonic flow, one dimensional Euler equations are considered to be sufficient for modeling the plume. Instead, more emphasis was given to evaporation model, by introducing Knudsen layer kinetics at the plume target interface, and plasma shielding. The evaporation rate is validated with results from the experiments and simulations are carried out to nd the in fluence of laser beam frequency on evaporation rates. The evaporation model used in this work is found to be more accurate than the widely used model based on sonic speed assumption. The optimum beam wavelength for Al surfaces is found to be 850 nm. Attenuation of telemetry data by plasma is a concern for the testing of directed energy systems. Electrostatic approach for the mitigation of communication attenuation is analyzed to obtain the fluency limits up to which the approach can be implemented. It is found from sheath calculations that uninterrupted telemetry can be achieved through Al plasma for fluences below 4 J/cm2 at a background pressure of 1 atm, using a maximum bias voltage of 10 kV . Arc discharge ablation is modeled for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The electric arc generated between the electrodes, placed inside a Helium chamber, evaporates the catalyst

  15. Modeling of plasma etch profiles with ions and reactive neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chungdar Daniel

    1999-11-01

    The simulation of plasma etch profiles of semiconductor trenches in the wafer processing of integrated circuits is developed in a mixed analytic/numerical approach. The main contributions of this study are the derivation and use of explicit analytical expressions for the etch rates and the computation of the etch profiles by standard computer packages. The computation of the etch profiles is efficient, is used as a benchmark for more complex numerical computer codes and illuminates the parameter dependence. The etch rate due to the ions is assumed proportional to the ion energy flux as suggested by experimental evidence. The shadowing due to the mask is included in the simplified derivation of the ion energy flux in cylindrical velocity coordinates for a two-temperature ion drifting Maxwellian. Neutrals with varying sticking coefficients are modeled by interpolation between the etch rate for shadowed neutrals with unity sticking coefficients and isotropic neutrals. The etch profiles are determined by the method of characteristics from the nonlinear evolution equation for the etch profile surface. Standard Matlab packages for the graphics and integration of the ordinary differential equations for the characteristics make the computation of etch profiles more efficient and more transparent than many complicated computer codes. The SEM images for trenches etched in silicon in a SF6 plasma in a RIE reactor are modeled by the simulation method for etch profiles. The etch rate is a linear combination of the etch rates of ions and neutrals in the ion flux-limited regime. Monte Carlo simulation of ion distribution functions in a chlorine plasma are fit by a simulated annealing procedure to a set of two-temperature drifting Maxwellians. The Monte Carlo simulations are noisy due to insufficient numbers of simulation particles. Smoothing of the distribution functions produces the expected bimodal ion distribution functions in the ICP reactor. The resultant etch profiles for

  16. Onion skin model (OSM) analysis of EAST SOL plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Q.; Chen, Y. P.; Hu, L. Q.; Guo, H. Y.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, L.

    2014-09-01

    Two-dimensional maps of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma conditions for ohmic, L-mode and H-mode discharges are reconstructed using an onion skin model (OSM) coupled in DIVIMP together with the Monte Carlo neutral transport code, EIRENE. The boundary conditions for OSM calculation are taken from the measurements of the Langmuir probe built into the divertor targets. The OSM-calculated values of the outboard mid-plane electron density, ne, and temperature, Te, are compared with the mid-plane measurements of ne and Te from a fast reciprocating probe. Some other characteristics of these SOL plasmas are also derived from the OSM solution, reflecting that the upstream plasma conditions are governed by the SOL collisionality to a large degree. Values of \\chi_{\\bot}^{SOL} at the low-field side and the high-field side mid-plane are derived separately as a function of the distance to the separatrix for ohmic, L- and H-mode discharges, showing that \\chi_{\\bot}^{{SOL}} increases with the distance to the separatrix at both sides and that the values of \\chi_{\\bot}^{SOL} at the low-field side tends to be higher than that at the high-field side. \\chi_{\\bot e}^{SOL} is found to be larger than \\chi_{\\bot i}^{SOL} by a factor of 2-3 for all the discharges considered here. In addition, before the use of the OSM method of extracting \\chi_{\\bot}^{SOL} and D_{\\bot}^{SOL} for EAST discharges, the reliability of this method is assessed by taking SOLPS-generated target n, T profiles as boundary conditions and by comparing the OSM-extracted cross-field transport coefficients with those input in the SOLPS modelling.

  17. Modeling Variability of Plasma Conditions in the Io Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2003-01-01

    Telescopic observations an in situ measurements of the Io plasma torus show the density, temperature and composition to vary over time, sometimes up to a factor of 2. While previous models of the physical and chemical processes in the Io plasma torus have reasonably modeled the conditions of the Voyager 1 era, their authors have not addressed the observed variability nor explored the sensitivity of torus conditions to input parameters. In this paper we present a homogeneous torus model parameterized by five variables (transport timescale, neutral source strength, ratio of oxygen sulfur to atoms in the source, fraction of superthermal electrons, temperature of these hot electrons). The model incorporates the most recent data for ionization, recombination, charge exchange and radiative energy losses for the major torus species (S, S(sup +), S(sup ++), S(sup +++), O, O(sup +), O(sup ++). We solve equations of conservation of mass and energy to find equilibrium conditions for a set of input parameters. We compare model plasma conditions with those observed by Voyager 1 Voyager 2, and Cassini. Furthermore, we explore the sensitivity of torus conditions to each parameter. We find that (1) torus conditions are distinctly different for the Voyager 1, Voyager 2 and Cassini eras, (2) unique torus input parameters for any given era are poorly constrained given the wide range of solution space that is consistent with the range of observed torus conditions, (3) ion composition is highly sensitive to the specification of a non-thermal electron distribution, (4) neutral O/S source ratio is highly variable with model values ranging between 1.7 for Cassini to 4.0 for Voyager 1 conditions, (5) transport times range between 23 days for Voyager 2 to 50 days for Voyager 1 and Cassini, (6) neutral source strengths range between 7 to 30 x 10(sup -4) cm (sup -3) s(sup -1) which corresponds to a net production of 0.4 to 1.3 tons/s for a torus volume of 1.4 x 10(sup 31) cm(sup 3), or 38 R

  18. Variational formulation of macroparticle models for electromagnetic plasma simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Stamm, Alexander B.; Shadwick, Bradley A.; Evstatiev, Evstati G.

    2014-06-01

    A variational method is used to derive a self-consistent macroparticle model for relativistic electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations. Extending earlier work, discretization of the electromagnetic Low Lagrangian is performed via a reduction of the phase-space distribution function onto a collection of finite-sized macroparticles of arbitrary shape and discretization of field quantities onto a spatial grid. This approach may be used with lab frame coordinates or moving window coordinates; the latter can greatly improve computational efficiency for studying some types of laser-plasma interactions. The primary advantage of the variational approach is the preservation of Lagrangian symmetries, which in our case leads tomore » energy conservation and thus avoids difficulties with grid heating. In addition, this approach decouples particle size from grid spacing and relaxes restrictions on particle shape, leading to low numerical noise. The variational approach also guarantees consistent approximations in the equations of motion and is amenable to higher order methods in both space and time. We restrict our attention to the 1.5-D case (one coordinate and two momenta). Lastly, simulations are performed with the new models and demonstrate energy conservation and low noise.« less

  19. Variational formulation of macroparticle models for electromagnetic plasma simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, Alexander B.; Shadwick, Bradley A.; Evstatiev, Evstati G.

    2014-06-01

    A variational method is used to derive a self-consistent macroparticle model for relativistic electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations. Extending earlier work, discretization of the electromagnetic Low Lagrangian is performed via a reduction of the phase-space distribution function onto a collection of finite-sized macroparticles of arbitrary shape and discretization of field quantities onto a spatial grid. This approach may be used with lab frame coordinates or moving window coordinates; the latter can greatly improve computational efficiency for studying some types of laser-plasma interactions. The primary advantage of the variational approach is the preservation of Lagrangian symmetries, which in our case leads to energy conservation and thus avoids difficulties with grid heating. In addition, this approach decouples particle size from grid spacing and relaxes restrictions on particle shape, leading to low numerical noise. The variational approach also guarantees consistent approximations in the equations of motion and is amenable to higher order methods in both space and time. We restrict our attention to the 1.5-D case (one coordinate and two momenta). Lastly, simulations are performed with the new models and demonstrate energy conservation and low noise.

  20. Relaxation models for single helical reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a relaxation theory for plasmas where a single dominant mode is present [Bhattacharjee et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 347 (1980)], is revisited. The solutions of a related eigenvalue problem are numerically calculated and discussed. Although these solutions can reproduce well, the magnetic fields measured in experiments, there is no way within the theory to determine the dominant mode, whose pitch is a free parameter in the model. To find the preferred helical perturbation, a procedure is proposed that minimizes the "distance" of the relaxed state from a state which is constructed as a two region generalization of the Taylor's relaxation model [Taylor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 1139 (1974); Rev. Mod. Phys. 58, 751 (1986)] and that allows current discontinuities. It is found that this comparison is able to predict the observed scaling with the aspect ratio and reversal parameter for the dominant mode in the Single Helical states. The aspect ratio scaling alone is discussed in a previous paper [Paccagnella, Nucl. Fusion 56, 046010 (2016)] in terms of the efficient response of a toroidal shell to specific modes (leaving a sign undetermined), showing that the ideal wall boundary condition, a key ingredient in relaxation theories, is particularly well matched for them. Therefore, the present paper altogether [Paccagnella, Nucl. Fusion 56, 046010 (2016)] can give a new and satisfactory explanation of some robust and reproducible experimental facts observed in the Single Helical Reversed Field Pinch plasmas and never explained before.

  1. Microwave N{sub 2}-Ar plasma torch. I. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-01-15

    The spatial structure of a microwave plasma torch driven by an azimuthally symmetric surface wave operating in a N{sub 2}-Ar mixture at atmospheric pressure is investigated. A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent theoretical model is developed to investigate the entire spatial structure of the source, including the discharge zone, sustained by the field of the surface TM{sub 00} mode, and the postdischarge plasma. Maxwell's equations, the rate balance equations for the most important excited species - vibrationally and electronically excited states, ions and nitrogen atoms N({sup 4}S) - and the Boltzmann equation for electrons are consistently solved. Model calculations of the 2D spatial distributions of species of interest such as charged particles (electrons and positive ions), N{sub 2}({Chi} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +},v) vibrationally excited molecules, N{sub 2}(A {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}) metastable molecules, and N({sup 4}S) ground state atoms are presented and discussed.

  2. Vlasov-Fokker-Planck modeling of magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the magnetic fields that can develop in high-power-laser interactions with solid-density plasma is important because such fields significantly modify both the magnitude and direction of electron heat fluxes. The dynamics of such fields evidently have consequences for inertial fusion energy applications, as the coupling of the laser beams with the walls or pellet and the development of temperature inhomogeneities are critical to the uniformity of the implosion and potentially the success of, for example, the National Ignition Facility. To study these effects, we used the code Impacta, a two-dimensional, fully implicit, Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code with self-consistent magnetic fields and a hydrodynamic ion model, designed for nanosecond time-scale laser-plasma interactions. Heat-flux effects in Ohm’s law under non-local conditions was investigated; physics that is not well captured by standard numerical models but is nevertheless important in fusion-related scenarios. Under such conditions there are numerous interesting physical effects, such as collisional magnetic instabilities, amplification of magnetic fields, re-emergence of non-locality through magnetic convection, and reconnection of magnetic field lines and redistribution of thermal energy. In this project highlights included the first full scale kinetic simulations of a magnetized hohlraum [Joglekar 2016] and the discovery of a new magnetic reconnection mechanism [Joglekar 2014] as well as a completed PhD thesis and the production of a new code for Inertial Fusion research.

  3. A unified model of density limit in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, P.; Sattin, F.; Escande, D. F.; Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we identify by analytical and numerical means the conditions for the existence of a magnetic and thermal equilibrium of a cylindrical plasma, in the presence of Ohmic and/or additional power sources, heat conduction and radiation losses by light impurities. The boundary defining the solutions’ space having realistic temperature profile with small edge value takes mathematically the form of a density limit (DL). Compared to previous similar analyses the present work benefits from dealing with a more accurate set of equations. This refinement is elementary, but decisive, since it discloses a tenuous dependence of the DL on the thermal transport for configurations with an applied electric field. Thanks to this property, the DL scaling law is recovered almost identical for two largely different devices such as the ohmic tokamak and the reversed field pinch. In particular, they have in common a Greenwald scaling, linearly depending on the plasma current, quantitatively consistent with experimental results. In the tokamak case the DL dependence on any additional heating approximately follows a 0.5 power law, which is compatible with L-mode experiments. For a purely externally heated configuration, taken as a cylindrical approximation of the stellarator, the DL dependence on transport is found stronger. By adopting suitable transport models, DL takes on a Sudo-like form, in fair agreement with LHD experiments. Overall, the model provides a good zeroth-order quantitative description of the DL, applicable to widely different configurations.

  4. Bursting processes in plasmas and relevant nonlinear model equations

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Coppi, B.

    1995-01-01

    Important intrinsic plasma instabilities manifest themselves in the form of periodic bursts of fluctuations rather than as a state of stationary fluctuations, which a conventional application of quasilinear theory would lead to expect. A set of coupled nonlinear equations for the time evolution of the fluctuation amplitude and of the driving factor of the relevant instability is shown to have the features necessary to reproduce the variety of bursts that are observed experimentally. These are the periodicity, the duration, and the shape of the bursts, special consideration being given to the excitation of modes by high-energy particle populations in thermalized plasmas and to a model for the transition from a bursting state to one of stationary fluctuations. A model is introduced that is relevant to the case where the spatial dependence of the mode amplitude is important. The application of the given analysis to the bursty wave emissions observed in space is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Electrical and kinetic model of an atmospheric rf device for plasma aerodynamics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pinheiro, Mario J.; Martins, Alexandre A.

    2010-08-15

    The asymmetrically mounted flat plasma actuator is investigated using a self-consistent two-dimensional fluid model at atmospheric pressure. The computational model assumes the drift-diffusion approximation and uses a simple plasma kinetic model. It investigated the electrical and kinetic properties of the plasma, calculated the charged species concentrations, surface charge density, electrohydrodynamic forces, and gas speed. The present computational model contributes to understand the main physical mechanisms, and suggests ways to improve its performance.

  6. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  7. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  8. A compact non-differential approach for modeling laser ablation plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimiciuc, S. A.; Gurlui, S.; Nica, P.; Focsa, C.; Agop, M.

    2017-02-01

    Various differentiable physical models are frequently used to describe the dynamics of laser-produced plasma plumes (e.g., kinetic models, two-fluid models, etc.). Given the complexity of all the phenomena involved in the laser-matter interactions, it is required to introduce the laser ablation plasma dynamic variable dependencies both on the space-time coordinates and on the resolution scales. Therefore, an adequate theoretical approach may be the use of non-differentiable physical models (fractal models). Continuing our previous work on the fractal hydrodynamic model for laser ablation plasma dynamics, we propose here a compact version for the analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of some plasma dynamic variables, such as velocities, currents, number densities, or temperatures. Moreover, the influence of external factors on the ablation plasma dynamics is considered. The predictions of this model are compared with the experimental data obtained by using a Langmuir probe on an Aluminum laser-produced plasma.

  9. Radiophysical methods of modeling the electromagnetic waves propagation through a flat plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, V. G.; Bityurin, V. A.; Balakirev, B. A.; Bocharov, A. N.; Vedenin, P. V.; Korneev, V. N.; Pashchina, A. S.; Pervov, A. Yu; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Ryazanskiy, N. M.; Shkatov, O. Yu

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the model variants of plasma layer creating by microwave discharges and plasma jet sources. Methods of creation a model quasi-dynamic plasma antenna on the basis of plasma jet and antenna type plasma structures of microwave range are also considered. Pulsed discharge in a capillary with ablative wall can be used as a method of creating plasma antenna. A microwave discharge is another perspective method for plasma antennas creation in centimeter-decimeter wavelengths range that allows us to apply this approach for modeling different types of plasma antennas (dipole, traveling wave antenna, spiral antenna, and others). Numerical modeling was initiated to analyze the interaction of microwave radiation with plasma layer. It is assumed that 2D consideration will allow investigating the influence of various types of regular spatial plasma structures on the characteristics of the transmission and scattering of EM waves beams. The model allows investigating also the development of MW plasma structures (it is virtually impossible to implement in the framework of 3D modeling).

  10. Multicusp Trap as Model of Plasma Neutralizer for ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V.A.; Dubrovin, M.M.; Kosarev, P.M.; Skovoroda, A.A.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Terent'ev, A.A.; Yanchenkov, S.V.; Zhil'tsov, V.A.; Zubarev, V.F.

    2005-01-15

    Increasing the negative ions beam neutralization efficiency in NBI system is rather attractive. It is known, that neutralization efficiency of negative ion beam on plasma is higher than on gas. The model of plasma neutralizer for ITER NBI system - PNX-U facility is described here. Obtained experimental results give that chosen conception is promising and plasma neutralizer allows essential improvement of NBI system.

  11. Modeling nuclear fusion in dense plasmas using a cryogenic non-neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2008-05-15

    An analogy between the nuclear reaction rate in a dense neutral plasma and the energy equipartition rate in a strongly magnetized non-neutral plasma is discussed. This analogy allows the first detailed measurements of plasma screening enhancements in the strong screening and pycnonuclear regimes. In strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, cyclotron energy, like nuclear energy, is released only through rare close collisions between charges. The probability of such collisions is enhanced by plasma screening, just as for nuclear reactions. Rate enhancements of up to 10{sup 10} are measured in simulations of equipartition, and are compared to theories of screened nuclear reactions.

  12. Modelling of plasma aerodynamic actuation driven by nanosecond SDBD discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yifei; Wu, Yun; Cui, Wei; Li, Yinghong; Jia, Min

    2013-09-01

    A two-dimensional air plasma kinetics model (16 species and 44 processes) for nanosecond discharge under atmospheric pressure was developed to reveal the spatial and temporal distribution of discharge characteristics of a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) actuator. An energy transfer model, including two channels for energy release from external power source to gas, was developed to couple plasma with hydrodynamics directly in the same dimension. The governing equations included the Poisson equation for the electric potential, continuity equations for each species, electron energy equations for electrons taking part in reactions, and Navier-Stokes equations for non-isothermal fluid. The model was validated through current-voltage profile and electron temperature obtained from experiments. Calculations for discharge characteristics as well as the responses of fluid field from tens of nanoseconds to tens of seconds were performed. Results have shown that local air is heated to 1170 K within tens of nanoseconds and then decreases to 310 K at the end of a discharge period. 30% of the total power is transferred from electric field to electrons while only 20% of this energy is then released to gas through quenching processes. 9% of the total energy is released through ion collision. A micro-shock wave is formed and propagates at the speed of sound. High local density gradient and dynamic viscosity induces vortexes which whirl the heated air downstream. The combined effects of heating convection and vortexes in repetitive pulse discharges lead to the formation of a steady jet, in agreement with experimental results.

  13. Modeling Hohlraum-Based Laser Plasma Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.

    2005-10-01

    Laser fusion targets must control laser-plasma instabilities (LPI) in order to perform as designed. We present analyses of recent hohlraum LPI experiments from the Omega laser facility. The targets, gold hohlraums filled with gas or SiO2 foam, are preheated by several 3φ beams before an interaction beam (2φ or 3φ) is fired along the hohlraum axis. The experiments are simulated in 2-D and 3-D using the code hydra. The choice of electron thermal conduction model in hydra strongly affects the simulated plasma conditions. This work is part of a larger effort to systematically explore the usefulness of linear gain as a design tool for fusion targets. We find that the measured Raman and Brillouin backscatter scale monotonically with the peak linear gain calculated for the target; however, linear gain is not sufficient to explain all trends in the data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  14. Observations and Modeling of Plasma Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Downs, C.

    2016-12-01

    The solar atmosphere, especially the extended corona, provides rich observations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and plasma waves in general. Such waves can be used as seismological tools to probe the physical conditions of the medium in which they travel, such as the coronal magnetic field and plasma parameters. Recent high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and in UV by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have opened a new chapter in understanding these waves and in utilizing them for coronal seismology. We will review such new observations of two intimately related phenomena - global EUV waves (so-called "EIT waves") associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and quasi-periodic, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains associated with flares. We will focus on the generation and propagation of global EUV waves and their interaction with coronal structures, as well as the correlation of AIA-detected fast-mode wave trains with flare pulsations seen from radio to hard X-ray wavelengths. We will also present recent MHD modeling efforts in reproducing these waves using realistic, observationally-driven simulations. We will discuss the roles of such waves in energy transport within the solar atmosphere and in their associated CME/flare eruptions.

  15. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2014-02-12

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  16. A model Monte Carlo collision operator for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, Q.; Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.

    2013-10-01

    In order to simulate radio refquency (RF)-heating in toroidal plasmas in the banana regime a model collision operator has been developed, which relaxes the distribution function towards a prescribed local Maxwellian either determined by experiments or transport codes. The pitch angle scattering by Coulomb collisions gives rise to spatial diffusion in toroidal plasmas because of the coupling between spatial and velocity coordinates. The coupling between the spatial and velocity components results in drift terms in the Monte Carlo formulation of the Fokker-Planck equation due to spatial derivatives of the Jacobian, the fraction of the trapped particles, the density and the temperature profiles. A simple RF operator is used to test the collision operator in conjunction with RF heating. The formation of a high-energy tail on the distribution function during RF heating leads to reduction of the density of the thermal ions as the tail builds up. For central heating this reduction can lead to hollow density profiles of thermal ions. The spatial diffusion caused by the relaxation of the thermal ions towards a prescribed density profile then gives rise to an increase of the density of resonant ions in regions with strong heating where the thermal ions diffuse towards higher energies.

  17. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes.

  18. A simulation model of time-dependent plasma-spacecraft interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothwell, P. L.; Rubin, A. G.; Yates, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    A plasma simulation code is presented that models the time-dependent plasma properties in the vicinity of a spherical, charged spacecraft. After showing agreement with analytic, steady-state theories and ATS-6 satellite data, the following three problems are treated: (1) transient pulses from photoemission at various emission temperatures and ambient plasma conditions, (2) spacecharge limited emission, and (3) simulated plasma oscillations in the long wavelength limit.

  19. Transport modeling of the ORNL high intensity linear RF plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, L. W.; Peng, Y. K. M.; Canik, J. M.; Goulding, R. H.; Bonnin, X.

    2010-11-01

    Recent progress in the electrode-less helicon hydrogenic plasma sourceootnotetextR.H. Goulding, et al., Proc. 18th Conf on RF Power in Plasmas, Gent, Belgium, June, 2009. have motivated the development at ORNL of an RF-plasma source that magnetically links a helicon to a mirror cell in which the plasma is heated by EBW, ICH and whistler waves. The <4m long plasma column further includes a parallel transport region connected to a pumped target plate. Such a source is modeled at three levels using: a two-point model, a 1D-parallel Braginski's fluid model in which the plasma sources/sinks are computed using the kinetic Monte Carlo neutrals code DEGAS, and the 2D SOLPS code. The required source plasma parameters to achieve certain target plasma parameters, particularly at high plasma heat and particle fluxes, are found to be sensitive to the plasma and neutrals parameters in the helicon and RF mirror cells, the effective heating via various RF techniques, the plasma and neutrals boundary conditions at the target plates and around the RF-plasma heating zones, and the pumped reservoirs with partial backflow of thermal molecules. New results of this investigation will be reported.

  20. Computational modeling study of the radial line slot antenna microwave plasma source with comparisons to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Mahadevan, Shankar; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Yoshikawa, Jun

    2013-05-15

    The radial line slot antenna plasma source is a high-density microwave plasma source comprising a high electron temperature source region within the plasma skin depth from a coupling window and low electron temperature diffusion region far from the window. The plasma is typically comprised of inert gases like argon and mixtures of halogen or fluorocarbon gases for etching. Following the experimental study of Tian et al.[J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 24, 1421 (2006)], a two-dimensional computational model is used to describe the essential features of the source. A high density argon plasma is described using the quasi-neutral approximation and coupled to a frequency-domain electromagnetic wave solver to describe the plasma-microwave interactions in the source. The plasma is described using a multispecies plasma chemistry mechanism developed specifically for microwave excitation conditions. The plasma is nonlocal by nature with locations of peak power deposition and peak plasma density being very different. The spatial distribution of microwave power coupling depends on whether the plasma is under- or over-dense and is described well by the model. The model predicts the experimentally observed low-order diffusion mode radial plasma profiles. The trends of spatial profiles of electron density and electron temperature over a wide range of power and pressure conditions compare well with experimental results.

  1. 3-D MHD modeling and stability analysis of jet and spheromak plasmas launched into a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Dustin; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward; Arge, C. Nick

    2016-10-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) at the University of New Mexico uses a coaxial plasma gun to launch jet and spheromak magnetic plasma configurations into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) plasma device. Plasma structures launched from the gun drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the background magnetic field of the chamber providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, and shocks. Preliminary modeling is presented using the highly-developed 3-D, MHD, BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets, and is particularly suited to model the parameter regime under investigation. CCD images and magnetic field data from the experiment suggest the stabilization of an m =1 kink mode trailing a plasma jet launched into a background magnetic field. Results from a linear stability code investigating the effect of shear-flow as a cause of this stabilization from magnetic tension forces on the jet will be presented. Initial analyses of a possible magnetic Rayleigh Taylor instability seen at the interface between launched spheromaks and their entraining background magnetic field will also be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  2. Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2009-05-02

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non-thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non-thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators, including bacteria sterilization, cell apoptosis, and blood coagulation, among others. The mechanisms of the plasma-biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: 'What plasma-generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?' Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper, we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then, we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma-biomaterial interaction.

  3. Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B.

    2009-05-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non-thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non-thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators, including bacteria sterilization, cell apoptosis, and blood coagulation, among others. The mechanisms of the plasma-biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: "What plasma-generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?" Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper, we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then, we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma-biomaterial interaction

  4. A General Nonlinear Fluid Model for Reacting Plasma-Neutral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E T; Shumlak, U

    2012-04-06

    A generalized, computationally tractable fluid model for capturing the effects of neutral particles in plasmas is derived. The model derivation begins with Boltzmann equations for singly charged ions, electrons, and a single neutral species. Electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange reactions are included. Moments of the reaction collision terms are detailed. Moments of the Boltzmann equations for electron, ion, and neutral species are combined to yield a two-component plasma-neutral fluid model. Separate density, momentum, and energy equations, each including reaction transfer terms, are produced for the plasma and neutral equations. The required closures for the plasma-neutral model are discussed.

  5. Continuum kinetic modeling of the tokamak plasma edge

    DOE PAGES

    Dorf, M. A.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T.; ...

    2016-03-10

    In this study, the first 4D (axisymmetric) high-order continuum gyrokinetic transport simulations that span the magnetic separatrix of a tokamak are presented. The modeling is performed with the COGENT code, which is distinguished by fourth-order finite-volume discretization combined with mapped multiblock grid technology to handle the strong anisotropy of plasmatransport and the complex X-point divertor geometry with high accuracy. The calculations take into account the effects of fully nonlinear Fokker-Plank collisions, electrostatic potential variations, and anomalous radial transport. Topics discussed include: (a) ion orbit loss and the associated toroidal rotation and (b) edge plasma relaxation in the presence of anomalousmore » radial transport.« less

  6. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    PubMed

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A conservative scheme for Vlasov Poisson Landau modeling collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenglong; Gamba, Irene M.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a deterministic conservative solver for the inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck-Landau equation coupled with the Poisson equation, which is a classical mean-field primary model for collisional plasmas. Two subproblems, i.e. the Vlasov-Poisson problem and homogeneous Landau problem, are obtained through time-splitting methods, and treated separately by the Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin method and a conservative spectral method, respectively. To ensure conservation when projecting between the two different computing grids, a special conservation routine is designed to link the solutions of these two subproblems. This conservation routine accurately enforces conservation of moments in Fourier space. The entire numerical scheme is implemented with parallelization with hybrid MPI and OpenMP. Numerical experiments are provided to study linear and nonlinear Landau Damping problems and two-stream flow problem as well.

  8. Comparison of dust transport modelling codes in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uccello, Andrea; Gervasini, Gabriele; Ghezzi, Francesco; Lazzaro, Enzo; Bacharis, Minas; Flanagan, Joanne; Matthews, Guy; Järvinen, Aaro; Sertoli, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Since the installation on the Joint European Torus of the ITER-like Wall (ILW), intense radiation spikes have been observed, especially in the discharges following a disruption, and have been associated with possible sudden injection of tungsten (W) impurities consequent to full ablation of W dust particles. The problem of dust production, mobilization, and interaction both with the plasma and the vessel tiles is therefore of great concern and requires the setting up of dedicated and validated numerical modeling tools. Among these, a useful role is played by the dust trajectory calculators, which can present in a relatively clear way the qualitative and quantitative description of the mobilization and fate of selected bunches of dust grains.

  9. Analytic model for electromagnetic fields in the bubble regime of plasma wakefield in non-uniform plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanov, A. A.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Thomas, J.; Pukhov, A.

    2017-10-01

    Based on a model of plasma wakefield in the strongly nonlinear (bubble) regime, we develop a lowest-order perturbation theory for the components of electromagnetic fields inside and outside the bubble using the assumption of small thickness of the electron sheath on the boundary of the bubble. Unlike previous models, we derive simple explicit expressions for the components of electromagnetic fields not only in the vicinity of the center of the bubble, but in the whole volume of the bubble (including the areas of driving or accelerated bunches) as well as outside it. Moreover, we apply the results to the case of radially non-uniform plasma and, in particular, to plasma with a hollow channel. The obtained results are verified with 3D particle-in-cell simulations which show a good correspondence to our model.

  10. Surface properties of native human plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein models.

    PubMed Central

    Massey, J B; Pownall, H J

    1998-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein surface properties are important but poorly understood determinants of lipoprotein catabolism. To elucidate the relation between surface properties and surface reactivity, the physical properties of surface monolayers of native lipoproteins and lipoprotein models were investigated by fluorescent probes of surface lipid fluidity, surface lateral diffusion, and interfacial polarity, and by their reactivity to Naja melanoleuca phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Native lipoproteins were human very low, low-, and subclass 3 high-density lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, and HDL3); models were 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) or its ether analog in single-bilayer vesicles, large and small microemulsions of POPC and triolein, and reassembled HDL (apolipoprotein A-I plus phospholipid). Among lipoproteins, surface lipid fluidity increased in the order HDL3 < LDL < VLDL, varying inversely with their (protein + cholesterol)/phospholipid ratios. Models resembled VLDL in fluidity. Both lateral mobility in the surface monolayer and polarity of the interfacial region were lower in native lipoproteins than in models. Among native lipoproteins and models, increased fluidity in the surface monolayer was associated with increased reactivity to PLA2. Addition of cholesterol (up to 20 mol%) to models had little effect on PLA2 activity, whereas the addition of apolipoprotein C-III stimulated it. Single-bilayer vesicles, phospholipid-triolein microemulsions, and VLDL have surface monolayers that are quantitatively similar, and distinct from those of LDL and HDL3. Surface property and enzymatic reactivity differences between lipoproteins and models were associated with differences in surface monolayer protein and cholesterol contents. Thus differences in the surface properties that regulate lipolytic reactivity are a predictable function of surface composition. PMID:9533698

  11. Plasma Simulation Using Gyrokinetic-Gyrofluid Hybrid Models

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Parker

    2009-04-09

    We are developing kinetic ion models for the simulation of extended MHD phenomena. The model they have developed uses full Lorentz force ions, and either drift-kinetic or gyro-kinetic electrons. Quasi-neutrality is assumed and the displacement current is neglected. They are also studying alpha particle driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) in the GEM gyrokinetic code [Chen 07]. The basic kinetic ion MHD model was recently reported in an invited talk given by Dan Barnes at the 2007 American Physical Society - Division of Plasma Physics (APS-DPP) and it has been published [Jones 04, Barnes 08]. The model uses an Ohm's law that includes the Hall term, pressure term and the electron inertia [Jones 04]. These results focused on the ion physics and assumed an isothermal electron closure. It is found in conventional gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that the timestep cannot be made much greater than the ion cyclotron period. However, the kinetic ion MHD model has the compressional mode, which further limits the timestep. They have developed an implicit scheme to avoid this timestep constraint. They have also added drift kinetic electrons. This model has been benchmarked linearly. Waves investigated where shear and compressional Alfven, whisterl, ion acoustic, and drift waves, including the kinetic damping rates. This work is ongoing and was first reported at the 2008 Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference [Chen 08] and they are working on a publication. They have also formulated an integrated gyrokinetic electron model, which is of interest for studying electron gradient instabilities and weak guide-field magnetic reconnection.

  12. On the use of shockwave models in laser produced plasma expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Posada, E.; Arronte, M. A.; Ponce, L.; Rodríguez, E.; Flores, T.; Lunney, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of medium to high peak power laser pulses with solid materials produces a plasma that expands supersonically. Expansions of such plasmas have been studied and several models have been proposed to describe it. This work presents a study of the expansion of laser produced plasmas in both vacuum and gas environment by using Langmuir probe and photography. It compares some of the most used models to identify that which better describes the expansion process. In vacuum, such process is properly described by the Anisimov model. However when expanding in a background gas it is found that the Sedov-Taylor model fits properly the position of generated shockwave but overestimates both kinetic energy and pressure of the expanding plasma. Such problem is solved by using a modification of the Freiwald-Axford model. Finally it is demonstrated that after the plasma stopping distance the plasma inters in a diffusive regime.

  13. Preliminary empirical model of inner boundary of ion plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. B.; Zhang, D.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Fu, H. S.; Wei, X. H.

    2015-09-01

    The penetration of the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere is important to both ring current formation and spacecraft charging at geosynchronous orbit. This paper, using hot ion data recorded by HIA of TC-1/DSP, establishes an empirical model of the inner boundary of ion plasma sheet (IBIPS) on the near equatorial plane. All IBIPS are located inside geocentric radial distance of 9 RE. We divided local times (LT) into eight local time bins and found that during quiet times (Kp ⩽ 2-), the IBIPS is closest to the Earth on the pre-midnight side (LT = 1930-2130) and farthest on the dawn side (LT = 0430-0730), which differs from previous spiral models. The geocentric radius of IBIPS in each local time bin can be described by a linear fitting function: Rps = A + Bkp · Kp. The changing rate Bkp of the radius of IBIPS relative to Kp index on the midnight side (LT = 2230-0130) and post-night side (LT = 0130-0430) are the two largest (0.66 and 0.67), indicating that the IBIPS on the night side (LT = 2230-0430) moves fastest when Kp changes. Since the IBIPSs in different local times bins have different changing rates, both the size and shape of IBIPS change when Kp varies. The correlation coefficients between the radius of IBIPS and the instantaneous Kp increase with the increase of ΔT (the time difference between IBIPS crossing time and preceding Kp interval), which suggests that with the increase of ΔT, the radius of IBIPS is more and more controlled by instantaneous Kp, and the influence of preceding Kp becomes weaker. The response time of IBIPS to Kp is between 80 and 95 min. When ΔT > 95 min, the correlation coefficient basically keeps unchanged and only has a weak increase, suggesting that the IBIPS is mainly determined by the convection electric field represented by instantaneous Kp.

  14. Development of plasma apparatus for plasma irradiation to living cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Ryo; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tero, Ryugo

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been studied for the industrial applications of biotechnology and medical care. For the development of these fields, understanding the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma on living cell and the mechanism of cell death is necessary. We focus on a basic structure of cell membrane, called lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer is composed of lipid molecules with an amphipathic property and can be formed on hydrophilic substrates. In this paper, we report the development of the plasma apparatus for the treatment of lipid bilayer. The plasma apparatus uses a typical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system and employs parallel plate electrodes with a gap distance of 1 mm [1]. Each electrode is covered with a quartz plate and the substrate temperature is kept constant by cooling medium. The lower quartz electrode has a dimple, in which the substrate coated with a lipid bilayer and buffer fluid are mounted. [4pt] [1] Y. Sugioka, et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., in press

  15. A model of plasma heating by large-scale flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Boldyrev, S.; Mason, J.; Perez, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we study the process of energy dissipation triggered by a slow large-scale motion of a magnetized conducting fluid. Our consideration is motivated by the problem of heating the solar corona, which is believed to be governed by fast reconnection events set off by the slow motion of magnetic field lines anchored in the photospheric plasma. To elucidate the physics governing the disruption of the imposed laminar motion and the energy transfer to small scales, we propose a simplified model where the large-scale motion of magnetic field lines is prescribed not at the footpoints but rather imposed volumetrically. As a result, the problem can be treated numerically with an efficient, highly accurate spectral method, allowing us to use a resolution and statistical ensemble exceeding those of the previous work. We find that, even though the large-scale deformations are slow, they eventually lead to reconnection events that drive a turbulent state at smaller scales. The small-scale turbulence displays many of the universal features of field-guided magnetohydrodynamic turbulence like a well-developed inertial range spectrum. Based on these observations, we construct a phenomenological model that gives the scalings of the amplitude of the fluctuations and the energy-dissipation rate as functions of the input parameters. We find good agreement between the numerical results and the predictions of the model.

  16. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Swanekamp, Steve; Richardson, Andrew; Schumer, Joseph; Mosher, David; Ottinger, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory produces 100ns pulse duration, relativistic-electron beams with peak energies on the order of 1MV and peak currents of about 800kA with annular beam areas between 40-80cm2. This gives peak current densities 10 kA/cm2. For many different applications, a nitrogen gas in the 1Torr range is used as a charge- and current-neutralizing background to achieve beam transport. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly-ionized molecular state to a strongly-ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. A detailed gas-chemistry model is presented for a dynamical description of the nitrogen plasmas produced in such experiments. The model is coupled to a 0D circuit model representative of annular beams, and results for 1Torr nitrogen are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line-integrated electron density and the net current. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of the higher-lying optically-allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit. Work is supported by AWE through NNSA.

  17. Time-dependent recycling modeling with edge plasma transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, A.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Rognlien, T.; Taverniers, S.; Hollmann, E.

    2013-10-01

    First,we discuss extensions to Macroblob approach which allow to simulate more accurately dynamics of ELMs, pedestal and edge transport with UEDGE code. Second,we present UEDGE modeling results for H mode discharge with infrequent ELMs and large pedestal losses on DIII-D. In modeled sequence of ELMs this discharge attains a dynamic equilibrium. Temporal evolution of pedestal plasma profiles, spectral line emission, and surface temperature matching experimental data over ELM cycle is discussed. Analysis of dynamic gas balance highlights important role of material surfaces. We quantified the wall outgassing between ELMs as 3X the NBI fueling and the recycling coefficient as 0.8 for wall pumping via macroblob-wall interactions. Third,we also present results from multiphysics version of UEDGE with built-in, reduced, 1-D wall models and analyze the role of various PMI processes. Progress in framework-coupled UEDGE/WALLPSI code is discussed. Finally, implicit coupling schemes are important feature of multiphysics codes and we report on the results of parametric analysis of convergence and performance for Picard and Newton iterations in a system of coupled deterministic-stochastic ODE and proposed modifications enhancing convergence.

  18. Lung Cancer Signatures in Plasma Based on Proteome Profiling of Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Lockwood, William W.; Faça, Vitor M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F.; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Kucherlapati, Raju; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Varmus, Harold E.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was found in plasma of an EGFR mutant model, and a distinct plasma signature related to neuroendocrine development was uncovered in the small-cell lung cancer model. We demonstrate relevance to human lung cancer of the protein signatures identified on the basis of mouse models. PMID:21907921

  19. Nonrigid, Resistive Linear Plasma Response Models Based on Perturbed Equilibria for Axisymmetric Tokamak Control Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Leuer, J. A.; Walker, M. L.; Welander, A. S.

    2003-10-01

    Linear, perturbed equilibrium plasma response models can accurately represent the experimental response of tokamak plasmas to applied fields [A. Coutlis, et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 663 (1999)]. However, agreement between experiment and model is much better when average flux over the plasma, rather than at each fluid element, is conserved [P. Vyas, et al., Nucl. Fusion 38, 1043 (1998)]. The close experimental agreement of average flux-conserving models is consistent with approximating field penetration effects produced by finite plasma resistivity, particularly in the edge region. We report on the development of nonrigid linear plasma response models which include finite local plasma resistivity in order to more accurately represent the dynamic response due to this field penetration. Such response models are expected to be important for designing profile control algorithms in advanced tokamaks. Accounting for finite plasma resistivity is also important in designing multivariable integrated controllers which must simultaneously regulate plasma shape and plasma current. Consequences of including resisitivity will be illustrated and comparisons with DIII-D experimental plasma responses will be made.

  20. Tail plasma sheet models derived from Geotail particle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Mukai, T.

    2003-03-01

    Simple analytical models have been derived for the first time, describing the 2-D distribution (along and across the Earth's magnetotail) of the central plasma sheet (CPS) ion temperature, density, and pressure, as functions of the incoming solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parameters, at distances between 10 and 50 RE. The models are based on a large set of data of the Low-Energy Particle (LEP) and Magnetic Field (MGF) instruments, taken by Geotail spacecraft between 1994 and 1998, comprising 7234 1-min average values of the CPS temperature and density. Concurrent solar wind and IMF data were provided by the Wind and IMP 8 spacecraft. The accuracy of the models was gauged by the correlation coefficient (c.c.) R between the observed and predicted values of a parameter. The CPS ion density N is controlled mostly by the solar wind proton density and by the northward component of the IMF. Being the least stable characteristic of the CPS, it yielded the lowest c.c. RN = 0.57. The CPS temperature T, controlled mainly by the solar wind speed V and the IMF Bz, gave a higher c.c. RT = 0.71. The CPS ion pressure P was best controlled by the solar wind ram pressure Psw and by an IMF-related parameter F = B⟂?, where B⟂ is the perpendicular component of the IMF and θ is its clock angle. In a striking contrast with N and T, the model pressure P revealed a very high c.c. with the data, RP = 0.95, an apparent consequence of the force balance between the CPS and the tail lobe magnetic field. No significant dawn-dusk asymmetry of the CPS was found beyond the distance 10 RE, in line with the observed symmetry of the tail lobe magnetic field. The plasma density N is lowest at midnight and increases toward the tail's flanks. Larger (smaller) solar wind ion densities and northward (southward) IMF Bz result in larger (smaller) N in the CPS. In contrast to the density N, the temperature T peaks at the midnight meridian and falls off toward the dawn/dusk flanks

  1. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Granetz, R. S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Vlainic, M.

    2015-09-01

    Runaway electrons can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force owing to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate runaway electrons mainly through knock-on collisions (Hender et al 2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 S128-202), where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of runaway electrons. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. For this purpose, a bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of runaway electrons from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a solver of the 3D linearized bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker-Planck equation (Decker and Peysson 2004 DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3D drift kinetic equation Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA), through the calculation of the response of the electron distribution function to a constant parallel electric field. The model, which has been successfully benchmarked against the standard Dreicer runaway theory now describes the runaway generation by knock-on collisions as proposed by Rosenbluth (Rosenbluth and Putvinski 1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 1355-62). This paper shows that the avalanche effect can be important even in non-disruptive scenarios. Runaway formation through knock-on collisions is found to be strongly reduced when taking place off the magnetic axis, since trapped electrons can not contribute to the runaway electron population. Finally, the

  2. A two-dimensional model of the hydrogen plasma for a laser powered rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, D.; Crowder, H.; Elkins, R.

    1982-01-01

    A two-dimensional, closed-form model originally developed by Batteh and Keefer (1974) is modified and applied to the absorption of laser radiation by a hydrogen plasma. The model is used to predict the power absorbed by plasmas at one- and ten-atmosphere pressure as a function of laser beam radius. Predicted isotherms are given for one- and ten-atmosphere plasmas, together with thermal loading of the absorption chamber wall. The model is also used in predicting the laser power required to sustain a hydrogen plasma as a function of the absorption coefficient.

  3. MACH2 modeling of LANL plasma-flow-switch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, F.J.

    1994-12-31

    The plasma-flow opening-switch (PFS) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Athena Program. The present goal is to switch 10--20 MA of current into a cylindrical-foil implosion load in 300--400 ns. Primary drivers currently in use include the Pegasus-II capacitor bank which delivers 8--10 MA to the PFS in 3--4 {mu}s and the Procyon explosively-driven flux-compression generator which delivers 15--18 MA in 2--3 {mu}s. A series of experiments using Pegasus-II and Procyon have characterized the PFS performance for a variety of experimental conditions. Issues examined with Pegasus-II include switch-mass (50-mg vs. 100-mg), switch fabrication (wire-array vs. graded-thickness-foil), current level (7 MA vs. 10 MA), presence or absence of a plasma trap, and static load vs. implosion load. Procyon has been used to characterize a PFS with a 1/r aerial-mass-density profile (as opposed to the Pegasus-II 1/r{sup 2} profile). The MACH2 two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code has been used to model these experiments and comparison of simulation data to the experimental data has been made. This includes direct comparison of data from an array of B-dot probes present on all tests (19--23 probes), direct comparison of x-ray yield and power for those tests with implosion loads, and qualitative comparison to framing and streak data. The agreement between simulation data and experimental data is reasonably good.

  4. Modeling of Inelastic Collisions in a Multifluid Plasma: Excitation and Deexcitation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling of Inelastic Collisions in a Multifluid Plasma : Excitation and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES For publication in Physics of Plasma PA Case...include area code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Modeling of Inelastic Collisions in a Multifluid Plasma

  5. Empirical model of plasma convection at latitudes of the main ionization trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V. M.

    1984-06-01

    The proposed empirical model is based on measurements of plasma drift velocity using the short-baseline diversity reception technique at Zhigansk (L = 4) and Iakutsk (L = 3). Results obtained with the model indicate that the principal mechanism for the formation of the main trough is weak plasma convection at subauroral latitudes in conditions of the absence of ionization sources and the 'impoverishment' of F-region plasma due to the usual recombination processes.

  6. Kinetic linear model of the interaction of helical magnetic perturbations with cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ivan B.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried

    2011-02-01

    The linear kinetic model of the interaction of helical rotating magnetic perturbations (resonant and nonresonant) with a tokamak plasma developed in [M. F. Heyn et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S159 (2006)] is extended by a Galilean invariant collision operator and a different finite Larmor radius expansion scheme of particle current density. The model is applied to study the plasma screening effect on resonant magnetic perturbations and the resulting torques acting on the plasma at various orders of Larmor radius expansion.

  7. Reduced-order kinetic plasma models using principal component analysis: Model formulation and manifold sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellemans, Aurélie; Magin, Thierry; Coussement, Axel; Parente, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Plasma flows involve hundreds of species and thousands of reactions at different time scales, resulting in a very large set of governing equations to solve. Simulating large reacting systems in nonequilibrium plasma mixtures remains a challenge with the currently available computational resources. Principal component analysis (PCA) offers a general and rather simple and automated method to reduce large kinetic mechanisms by principal variable selection. This work shows how to adapt and apply the PCA-scores technique, which has its origin in the combustion field, to a collisional-radiative model. We have successfully applied this technique to argon plasmas, reducing the set of governing equations by more than 90%, leading to an important speed-up of the calculation and a reduction of computational cost.

  8. Eulerian and Lagrangian Plasma Jet Modeling for the Plasma Liner Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Richard; Cassibry, Jason; Stanic, Milos; Loverich, John; Hakim, Ammar

    2011-10-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using spherically-convergent plasma jets to from an imploding plasma liner. Our group has modified two hydrodynamic simulation codes to include radiative loss, tabular equations of state (EOS), and thermal transport. Nautilus, created by TechX Corporation, is a finite-difference Eulerian code which solves the MHD equations formulated as systems of hyperbolic conservation laws. The other is SPHC, a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code produced by Stellingwerf Consulting. Use of the Lagrangian fluid particle approach of SPH is motivated by the ability to accurately track jet interfaces, the plasma vacuum boundary, and mixing of various layers, but Eulerian codes have been in development for much longer and have better shock capturing. We validate these codes against experimental measurements of jet propagation, expansion, and merging of two jets. Precursor jets are observed to form at the jet interface. Conditions that govern evolution of two and more merging jets are explored.

  9. Development Of Sputtering Models For Fluids-Based Plasma Simulation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth; Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Rf-driven plasma devices such as ion sources and plasma processing devices for many industrial and research applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling. Simulation of these devices using explicit PIC codes is difficult due to inherent separations of time and spatial scales. One alternative type of model is fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics, that are applicable to modeling higher-density plasmas in the time domain, but can relax time step requirements. To accurately model plasma-surface processes, such as physical sputtering and secondary electron emission, kinetic particle models have been developed, where particles are emitted from a material surface due to plasma ion bombardment. In fluid models plasma properties are defined on a cell-by-cell basis, and distributions for individual particle properties are assumed. This adds a complexity to surface process modeling, which we describe here. We describe the implementation of sputtering models into the hydrodynamic plasma simulation code USim, as well as methods to improve the accuracy of fluids-based simulation of plasmas-surface interactions by better modeling of heat fluxes. This work was performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Award #DE-SC0009585.

  10. Integrated Predictive Models for ICRF-Edge Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel A. D'Ippolito

    2005-07-20

    The coupling of radiofrequency waves to the edge plasma of a fusion device produces strong nonlinear interactions with the plasma and surrounding material walls which must be controlled in order to protect the antenna and to obtain efficient heating of the core plasma. The goal of the STTR project was to develop the first quantitative numerical simulation of this problem. This report describes the results of the Phase I work by Lodestar and ORNL on this project.

  11. Plasma plume diagnostics of low power stationary plasma thruster (SPT-20M8) with collisional radiative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttamsing Rajput, Rajendrasing; Alona, Khaustova; Loyan, Andriy V.

    2017-03-01

    Electric propulsion offers higher specific impulse compared to the chemical propulsion systems. It reduces the overall propellant mass and enables high operational lifetimes. Scientific Technological Center of Space Power and Energy (STC SPE), KhAI is involved in designing, manufacturing and testing of stationary plasma thrusters (SPT). Efforts are made to perform plasma diagnostics with corona and collisional radiative models (C-R model), as expected corona model falls short below 4 eV because of the heavy particle collisions elimination, whereas the C-R model's applicability is confirmed. Several tests are performed to analyze the electron temperature at various operational parameters of thruster like discharge voltage and mass flow rate. SPT-20M8 far and near-field plumes diagnostics are performed. Feasibility of C-R model by comparing its result to optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to investigate the electron temperature is validated with the probe measurements within the 10% of discrepancy.

  12. Global model of an iodine gridded plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grondein, P.; Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-03-01

    Most state-of-the-art electric space propulsion systems such as gridded and Hall effect thrusters use xenon as the propellant gas. However, xenon is very rare, expensive to produce, and used in a number of competing industrial applications. Alternatives to xenon are currently being investigated, and iodine has emerged as a potential candidate. Its lower cost and larger availability, its solid state at standard temperature and pressure, its low vapour pressure and its low ionization potential make it an attractive option. In this work, we compare the performances of a gridded ion thruster operating separately with iodine and xenon, under otherwise identical conditions using a global model. The thruster discharge properties such as neutral, ion, and electron densities and electron temperature are calculated, as well as the thruster performance parameters such as thrust, specific impulse, and system efficiencies. For similar operating conditions, representative of realistic thrusters, the model predicts similar thrust levels and performances for both iodine and xenon. The thruster efficiency is however slightly higher for iodine compared with xenon, due to its lower ionization potential. This demonstrates that iodine could be a viable alternative propellant for gridded plasma thrusters.

  13. Global model of an iodine gridded plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Grondein, P.; Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-03-15

    Most state-of-the-art electric space propulsion systems such as gridded and Hall effect thrusters use xenon as the propellant gas. However, xenon is very rare, expensive to produce, and used in a number of competing industrial applications. Alternatives to xenon are currently being investigated, and iodine has emerged as a potential candidate. Its lower cost and larger availability, its solid state at standard temperature and pressure, its low vapour pressure and its low ionization potential make it an attractive option. In this work, we compare the performances of a gridded ion thruster operating separately with iodine and xenon, under otherwise identical conditions using a global model. The thruster discharge properties such as neutral, ion, and electron densities and electron temperature are calculated, as well as the thruster performance parameters such as thrust, specific impulse, and system efficiencies. For similar operating conditions, representative of realistic thrusters, the model predicts similar thrust levels and performances for both iodine and xenon. The thruster efficiency is however slightly higher for iodine compared with xenon, due to its lower ionization potential. This demonstrates that iodine could be a viable alternative propellant for gridded plasma thrusters.

  14. Transient ejection phase modeling of a Plasma Synthetic Jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurendeau, F.; Chedevergne, F.; Casalis, G.

    2014-12-01

    For several years, a promising Plasma Synthetic Jet actuator for high-speed flow control has been under development at ONERA. So far, its confined geometry and small space-time scales at play have prevented its full experimental characterization. Complementary accurate numerical simulations are then considered in this study in order to provide a complete aerothermodynamic description of the actuator. Two major obstacles have to be overcome with this approach: the modeling of the energy deposited by the electric arc and the accurate computation of the transient response of the cavity generating the pulsed jet. To solve the first problem, an Euler solver coupled with an electric circuit model was used to evaluate the energy deposition in the cavity. Such a coupling is performed by considering the electric field between the two electrodes. The second issue was then addressed by injecting these source terms in large Eddy simulations of the entire actuator. Aerodynamic results were finally compared with Schlieren visualizations. Using the proposed methodology, the temporal evolution of the jet front is remarkably well predicted.

  15. Modeling the generation and propagation of plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J. P.; Yang, L.; Foletto, M.; Pitchford, L. C.; Joly, L.

    2011-10-01

    A 2-D fluid model was used to study plasma jets initiated in a dielectric barrier discharge configuration consisting of a dielectric tube (3 mm inner radius) surrounded by a grounded electrode and propagating in air at atmospheric pressure. A voltage pulse of +5 kV with a rise time of 50 ns is applied to a annular electrode inside the tube. Helium is maintained at atmospheric pressure inside the tube by a gas flow with a velocity of some 10 m/s. Electron impact ionization of ground state atoms is the only ionization process considered, and the secondary electron emission coefficient due to ion impact is supposed to be constant. Dielectric boundary conditions are applied on the tube walls, and electrons and ions at the surface are assumed to recombine instantaneously when a charged particle of opposite sign arrives at the same surface element. The computational volume extends a finite distance past the exit plane of the dielectric tube and the computational boundaries are supposed to be at ground potential. The helium/air density profiles past the exit plane of the tube are assumed to follow scaling laws for laminar flow with parameters adjusted to fit available experimental results. Consistent with experiment, the model predicts the initiation of a streamer during the voltage rise which propagates preferentially in the easily-ionized helium potential core.

  16. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  17. Collisional-Radiative Modeling of Free-Burning Arc Plasma in Argon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    chemistry used in non-equilibrium modelling of free-burning arc in argon. A simple chemistry model based on the approximation of prompt ionization, a...highlight of the model was the unified description of the whole plasma domain avoiding the division into sub-domains in which different models were used ...description. Therefore, the present work is aimed at the analysis of the plasma chemistry in a way that the model enables a deeper look into the polulations

  18. Spectroscopic diagnostics of active screen plasma nitriding processes: on the interplay of active screen and model probe plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-09-01

    In a reactor used for active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) the interplay of two plasma types, (i) the plasma of the cylindrical active screen driven in a pulsed dc mode (f = 1 kHz, 60% duty cycle) and (ii) the plasma at an internal model probe driven in a cw dc mode, ignited in a low pressure H2-N2 gas mixture (p = 3 mbar) containing small amounts of CH4 and CO2 have been studied by tunable diode laser infrared absorption (TDLAS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. Applying in situ TDLAS the evolution of the carbon containing precursors, CH4 and CO2, and of the reaction products, NH3, HCN, CO and H2O, has been monitored. The degree of dissociation of the carbon containing precursor molecules varied between 70% and 92%. The concentrations of the reaction products were found to be in the range 1012…1015 molecules cm-3. By analyzing the development of the molecular concentrations at changes of gas mixtures and plasma power values, it was found that (i) HCN and NH3 are the main products of plasma conversion in the case of methane admixture and (ii) CO, HCN and NH3 in the carbon dioxide case. The fragmentation efficiencies of methane and carbon dioxide (RF(CH4)  ≈  1…2   ×   1015 molecules J-1, RF(CO2)  ≈  0.5…1.0   ×   1016 molecules J-1) and the respective conversion efficiencies to the product molecules (R C(product) ≈ 1013-1015 molecules J-1) have been determined for different gas mixtures and plasma power values, while the influence of probe and screen plasmas, i.e. the phenomena caused by the interplay of both plasma sources, was analyzed. The additional usage of the plasma at the model probe has a sensitive influence on the generation of the reaction products, in particular that of NH3 and HCN. With the help of OES the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined, which increases with power from 770 K to 950 K. Also with power the ionic component of nitrogen molecules, i

  19. CHEMEOS: a new chemical-picture-based model for plasma equation-of-state calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hakel, P.; Kilcrease, D. P.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a new plasma equation-of-state (EOS) model currently under development at the Atomic and Optical Theory Group (T-4) in Los Alamos. This model is based on the chemical picture of the plasma and uses the free-energy-minimization technique and the occupation-probability formalism. The model is constructed as a combination of ideal and non-ideal contributions to the total Helmholtz free energy of the plasma including the effects of plasma microfields, strong coupling, and the hard-sphere description of the finite sizes of atomic species with bound electrons. These types of models have been recognized as a convenient and computationally inexpensive tool for modeling of local-thermal-equilibrium (LIE) plasmas for a broad range of temperatures and densities. We calculate the thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma (such as pressure and internal energy), and populations and occupation probabilities of atomic bound states. In addition to a smooth truncation of partition functions necessary for extracting ion populations from the system of Saha-type equations, the occupation probabilities can also be used for the merging of Rydberg line series into their associated bound-free edges. In the low-density, high-temperature regimes the plasma effects are adequately described by the Debye-Huckel model and its corresponding contribution to the total Helmholtz free energy of the plasma. In strongly-coupled plasmas, however, the Debye-Huckel approximation is no longer appropriate. In order to extend the validity of our EOS model to strongly-coupled plasmas while maintaining the analytic nature of our model, we adopt fits to the plasma free energy based on hypernetted-chain and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results for hydrogen are compared to other theoretical models. Hydrogen has been selected as a test-case on which improvements in EOS physics are benchmarked before analogous upgrades are included for any element in the EOS part of the new Los Alamos

  20. Two-dimensional, three-fluid modeling of capillary plasma discharges in electrothermal mass accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmond, M. J.; Winfrey, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Electrothermal (ET) plasma launchers have a wide array of applications as mass acceleration devices. An ET plasma launcher utilizes an ET plasma discharge to accelerate a projectile. ET plasma discharges are arc-driven capillary discharges that ablate liner materials and form partially ionized plasmas. ET plasma discharges are generated by driving current pulses through a capillary source. Current pulses typically have peak currents on the order of tens of kA with pulse lengths on the order of hundreds of μs. These types of plasma discharges have been explored for their application to military ballistics, electric thrusters, and nuclear fusion power. ET plasma discharges have been studied using 0D, 1D, and semi-2D fluid models. In this work, a three-fluid, fully two-dimensional model of ET plasma discharges is presented. First approximations used in the newly developed model and code are discussed and simulation results are compared with experiment. Simulation results indicate the development of back flow inside ET plasma discharges due to collisional drag forces between individual plasma species. This back flow is observed for simulations of ET plasma discharges receiving current pulses with peak currents of 10, 20, 30, and 40 kA. Simulation results also reveal the development of fluid perturbations near the breech of the plasma source. These perturbations cause variations in the plasma electrical conductivity and ultimately cause changes in the local ablation rate of the source liner. At higher current pulses, these perturbations are more localized in the region of the source closest to the breech. This effect causes a decrease in the ablated mass in this region relative to the region of the source experiencing the highest ablation.

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of laser-plasma interaction: Benchmarking our predictive modeling tools versus experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Divol, L.; Berger, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Froula, D. H.; Dixit, S.; Michel, P.; London, R.; Strozzi, D.; Ross, J.; Williams, E. A.; Still, B.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    New experimental capabilities [Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 085001 (2007)] have been developed to study laser-plasma interaction (LPI) in ignition-relevant condition at the Omega laser facility (LLE/Rochester). By shooting an interaction beam along the axis of a gas-filled hohlraum heated by up to 17 kJ of heater beam energy, a millimeter-scale underdense uniform plasma at electron temperatures above 3 keV was created. Extensive Thomson scattering measurements allowed to benchmark hydrodynamic simulations performed with HYDRA [Meezan et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056304 (2007)]. As a result of this effort, these simulations can be used with much confidence as input parameters for the LPI simulation code PF3D [Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 4337 (1998)]. In this paper, it is shown that by using accurate hydrodynamic profiles and full three-dimensional simulations including a realistic modeling of the laser intensity pattern generated by various smoothing options, whole beam three-dimensional linear kinetic modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) reproduces quantitatively the experimental measurements (SBS thresholds, reflectivity values, and the absence of measurable stimulated Raman scattering). This good agreement was made possible by the recent increase in computing power routinely available for such simulations. These simulations accurately predicted the strong reduction of SBS measured when polarization smoothing is used.

  2. Model of vertical plasma motion during the current quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiramov, D. I.; Breizman, B. N.

    2017-10-01

    Tokamak disruptions impair plasma position control, which allows the plasma column to move and hit the wall. These detrimental events enhance thermal and mechanical loads due to halo currents and runaway electron losses. Their fundamental understanding and prevention is one of the high-priority items for ITER.

  3. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Hu, J.; Tsai, H. L.

    2008-11-01

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  4. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsai, H. L.; Hu, J.

    2008-11-15

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  5. Modeling RF Fields in Hot Plasmas with Parallel Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Andrew; Svidzinski, Vladimir; Zhao, Liangji; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-10-01

    FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a suite of full wave RF plasma codes. It is based on a meshless formulation in configuration space with adapted cloud of computational points (CCP) capability and using the hot plasma conductivity kernel to model the nonlocal plasma dielectric response. The conductivity kernel is calculated by numerically integrating the linearized Vlasov equation along unperturbed particle trajectories. Work has been done on the following calculations: 1) the conductivity kernel in hot plasmas, 2) a monitor function based on analytic solutions of the cold-plasma dispersion relation, 3) an adaptive CCP based on the monitor function, 4) stencils to approximate the wave equations on the CCP, 5) the solution to the full wave equations in the cold-plasma model in tokamak geometry for ECRH and ICRH range of frequencies, and 6) the solution to the wave equations using the calculated hot plasma conductivity kernel. We will present results on using a meshless formulation on adaptive CCP to solve the wave equations and on implementing the non-local hot plasma dielectric response to the wave equations. The presentation will include numerical results of wave propagation and absorption in the cold and hot tokamak plasma RF models, using DIII-D geometry and plasma parameters. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  6. Modeling of transient dust events in fusion edge plasmas with DUSTT-UEDGE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that dust can be produced in fusion devices due to various processes involving structural damage of plasma exposed materials. Recent computational and experimental studies have demonstrated that dust production and associated with it plasma contamination can present serious challenges in achieving sustained fusion reaction in future fusion devices, such as ITER. To analyze the impact, which dust can have on performance of fusion plasmas, modeling of coupled dust and plasma transport with DUSTT-UEDGE code is used by the authors. In past, only steady-state computational studies, presuming continuous source of dust influx, were performed due to iterative nature of DUSTT-UEDGE code coupling. However, experimental observations demonstrate that intermittent injection of large quantities of dust, often associated with transient plasma events, may severely impact fusion plasma conditions and even lead to discharge termination. In this work we report on progress in coupling of DUSTT-UEDGE codes in time-dependent regime, which allows modeling of transient dust-plasma transport processes. The methodology and details of the time-dependent code coupling, as well as examples of simulations of transient dust-plasma transport phenomena will be presented. These include time-dependent modeling of impact of short out-bursts of different quantities of tungsten dust in ITER divertor on the edge plasma parameters. The plasma response to the out-bursts with various duration, location, and ejected dust sizes will be analyzed.

  7. Analytic model and frequency characteristics of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Hao-hua; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Song, Hui-min; Zhang, Zhi-bo; Jia, Min

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a novel analytic model of a plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA), considering both the heat transfer effect and the inertia of the throat gas. Both the whole cycle characteristics and the repetitive working process of PSJA can be predicted with this model. The frequency characteristics of a PSJA with 87 mm3 volume and different orifice diameters are investigated based on the analytic model combined with experiments. In the repetitive working mode, the actuator works initially in the transitional stage with 20 cycles and then in the dynamic balanced stage. During the transitional stage, major performance parameters of PSJA experience stepped growth, while during the dynamic balanced stage, these parameters are characterized by periodic variation. With a constant discharge energy of 6.9 mJ, there exists a saturated frequency of 4 kHz/6 kHz for an orifice diameter of 1 mm/1.5 mm, at which the time-averaged total pressure of the pulsed jet reaches a maximum. Between 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm, a larger orifice diameter leads to a higher saturated frequency due to the reduced jet duration time. As the actuation frequency increases, both the time-averaged cavity temperature and the peak jet velocity initially increase and then remain almost unchanged at 1600 K and 280 m/s, respectively. Besides, with increasing frequency, the mechanical energy incorporated in single pulsed jet, the expelled mass per pulse, and the time-averaged density in the cavity, decline in a stair stepping way, which is caused by the intermittent decrease of refresh stage duration in one period.

  8. Modeling the plasma chemistry of stratospheric Blue Jet streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Holger; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Stratospheric Blue Jets (SBJs) are upward propagating discharges in the altitude range 15-40 km above thunderstorms. The currently most accepted theory associates SBJs to the development of the streamer zone of a leader. The streamers emitted from the leader can travel for a few tens of kilometers predominantly in the vertical direction (Raizer et al., 2007). The strong electric fields at the streamer tips cause ionisation, dissociation, and excitation, and give rise to chemical perturbations. While in recent years the effects of electric discharges occurring in the mesosphere (sprites) have been investigated in a number of model studies, there are only a few studies on the impact of SBJs. However, chemical perturbations due to SBJs are of interest as they might influence the stratospheric ozone layer. We present results of detailed plasma chemistry simulations of SBJ streamers for both day-time and night-time conditions. Any effects of the subsequent leader are not considered. The model accounts for more than 500 reactions and calculates the evolution of the 88 species under the influence of the breakdown electric fields at the streamer tip. As the SBJ dynamics is outside the scope of this study, the streamer parameters are prescribed. For this purpose, electric field parameters based on Raizer et al. (2007) are used. The model is applied to the typical SBJ altitude range 15-40 km. The simulations indicate that SBJ streamers cause significant chemical perturbations. In particular, the liberation of atomic oxygen during the discharge leads to a formation of ozone. At the same time, reactive nitrogen and hydrogen radicals are produced which will cause catalytic ozone destruction. Reference: Raizer et al. (2007), J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 69 (8), 925-938.

  9. Theory and models of material erosion and lifetime during plasma instabilities in a tokamak environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-11-08

    Surface and structural damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) due to the frequent loss of plasma confinement remains a serious problem for the tokamak reactor concept. The deposited plasma energy causes significant surface erosion, possible structural failure, and frequent plasma contamination. Surface damage consists of vaporization, spallation, and liquid splatter of metallic materials. Structural damage includes large temperature increases in structural materials and at the interfaces between surface coatings and structural members. To evaluate the lifetimes of plasma-facing materials and nearby components and to predict the various forms of damage that they experience, comprehensive models (contained in the HEIGHTS computer simulation package) are developed, integrated self-consistently, and enhanced. Splashing mechanisms such as bubble boiling and various liquid magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and brittle destruction mechanisms of nonmelting materials are being examined. The design requirements and implications of plasma-facing and nearby components are discussed, along with recommendations to mitigate and reduce the effects of plasma instabilities on reactor components.

  10. Analytic model of electromagnetic fields around a plasma bubble in the blow-out regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S. A.; Khudik, V.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2013-01-15

    An analytic model of the electric and magnetic fields surrounding the nonlinear plasma 'bubble' formed around the high-current electron bunch in a plasma wakefield accelerator is developed. The model, justified by the results of particle-in-cell simulations, accurately captures the thin high-density plasma sheath and extended return current layer surrounding the bubble. The resulting global fields inside and outside the bubble are used to investigate electron self-injection in a plasma with a smooth density gradient. It is shown that accurate description of the current/density sheaths is crucial for quantitative description of self-injection.

  11. The modeling and simulation of plasma sheath effect on GNSS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhongguo; Liu, Jiangfan; Du, Yongxing; Xi, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Plasma sheath can potentially degrade global navigation satellite system (GNSS) through signal attenuation as well as phase noise when a hypersonic vehicle reenters the Earth's atmosphere. Modeling and simulation method of GNSS system disturbed by plasma sheath is introduced in this paper by means of electromagnetic wave propagation theory combined with the satellite signal simulation technique. The transmission function of the plasma sheath with stratified model is derived utilizing scattering matrix method. The effects of the plasma sheath on GPS signal reception and positioning performance are examined. Experimental results are presented and discussed, partly supporting the validity of the analytical method proposed.

  12. Modeling a Langmuir probe in atmospheric pressure plasma at different EEDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchev, G.; Kolev, St.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we present a computational model of a cylindrical electric probe in atmospheric pressure argon plasma. The plasma properties are varied in terms of density and electron temperature. Furthermore, results for plasmas with Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions are also obtained and compared. The model is based on the fluid description of plasma within the COMSOL software package. The results for the ion saturation current are compared and show good agreement with existing analytical Langmuir probe theories. A strong dependence between the ion saturation current and electron transport properties was observed, and attributed to the effects of ambipolar diffusion.

  13. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part I: Theory and description of model capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffray, A. René; Federici, Gianfranco

    1997-04-01

    RACLETTE (Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation), a comprehensive but relatively simple and versatile model, was developed to help in the design analysis of plasma facing components (PFCs) under 'slow' high power transients, such as those associated with plasma vertical displacement events. The model includes all the key surface heat transfer processes such as evaporation, melting, and radiation, and their interaction with the PFC block thermal response and the coolant behaviour. This paper represents part I of two sister and complementary papers. It covers the model description, calibration and validation, and presents a number of parametric analyses shedding light on and identifying trends in the PFC armour block response to high plasma energy deposition transients. Parameters investigated include the plasma energy density and deposition time, the armour thickness and the presence of vapour shielding effects. Part II of the paper focuses on specific design analyses of ITER plasma facing components (divertor, limiter, primary first wall and baffle), including improvements in the thermal-hydraulic modeling required for better understanding the consequences of high energy deposition transients in particular for the ITER limiter case.

  14. Electron induced inelastic and ionization cross section for plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Pankaj; Mahato, Dibyendu; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2016-09-01

    The present paper reports electron impact total inelastic and ionization cross section for silicon, germanium, and tin tetrahalides at energies varying from ionization threshold of the target to 5000 eV. These cross section data over a wide energy domain are very essential to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in various environments such as plasma modeling, semiconductor etching, atmospheric sciences, biological sciences, and radiation physics. However, the cross section data on the above mentioned molecules are scarce. In the present article, we report the computation of total inelastic cross section using spherical complex optical potential formalism and the estimation of ionization cross section through a semi-empirical method. The present ionization cross section result obtained for SiCl4 shows excellent agreement with previous measurements, while other molecules have not yet been investigated experimentally. Present results show more consistent behaviour than previous theoretical estimates. Besides cross sections, we have also studied the correlation of maximum ionization cross section with the square root of the ratio of polarizability to ionization potential for the molecules with known polarizabilities. A linear relation is observed between these quantities. This correlation is used to obtain approximate polarizability volumes for SiBr4, SiI4, GeCl4, GeBr4, and GeI4 molecules.

  15. Simulating the Sulphur Lamp with PLASIMO, a plasma simulation model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, C. W.; van der Heijden, H.; van Dijk, Jan; van der Mullen Joost

    1999-10-01

    Several electrodeless lamps are currently available on the market. Examples of these are the Philips QL, Osrams Endura and GE's Genura. While these lamps make use of induction as a means of power coupling, the source of their light, namely mercury, remains the same as in older lamps. Another electrodeless configuration is the microwave powered Sulphur Lamp. Sulphur lighting has several advantages over other lamp systems. Firstly, large fluxes (≈100,000 lm) of high quality light are obtained with circuit efficacies of up to 60 percent. Secondly, unlike fluorescent and HID lamps there is no decrease in brightness with time since phospors and electrodes are not needed. Another significant aspect of the sulphur lamp is that it contains no mercury, lessening environmental hazards associated with disposal. In order to simulate the operation of this light source, PLASIMO, a plasma modeling tool which was developed at the Eindhoven University of Technology, was used. Modules were included to describe the transport properties and power in- coupling. Results of the simulations will be shown and compared with experiment.

  16. Detonability of white dwarf plasma: turbulence models at low densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, D.; Plewa, T.

    2017-06-01

    We study the conditions required to produce self-sustained detonations in turbulent, carbon-oxygen degenerate plasma at low densities. We perform a series of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of turbulence driven with various degrees of compressibility. The average conditions in the simulations are representative of models of merging binary white dwarfs. We find that material with very short ignition times is abundant in case turbulence is driven compressively. This material forms contiguous structures that persist over many ignition times, and that we identify as prospective detonation kernels. Detailed analysis of prospective kernels reveals that these objects are centrally condensed and their shape is characterized by low curvature, supportive of self-sustained detonations. The key characteristic of the newly proposed detonation mechanism is thus high degree of compressibility of turbulent drive. The simulated detonation kernels have sizes notably smaller than the spatial resolution of any white dwarf merger simulation performed to date. The resolution required to resolve kernels is 0.1 km. Our results indicate a high probability of detonations in such well-resolved simulations of carbon-oxygen white dwarf mergers. These simulations will likely produce detonations in systems of lower total mass, thus broadening the population of white dwarf binaries capable of producing Type Ia supernovae. Consequently, we expect a downward revision of the lower limit of the total merger mass that is capable of producing a prompt detonation. We review application of the new detonation mechanism to various explosion scenarios of single, Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs.

  17. Discrete Variational Approach for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Paxon; Shadwick, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach for fluid models of laser-plasma interactions begins by approximating fields and derivatives on a grid in space and time, leading to difference equations that are manipulated to create a time-advance algorithm. In contrast, by introducing the spatial discretization at the level of the action, the resulting Euler-Lagrange equations have particular differencing approximations that will exactly satisfy discrete versions of the relevant conservation laws. For example, applying a spatial discretization in the Lagrangian density leads to continuous-time, discrete-space equations and exact energy conservation regardless of the spatial grid resolution. We compare the results of two discrete variational methods using the variational principles from Chen and Sudan and Brizard. Since the fluid system conserves energy and momentum, the relative errors in these conserved quantities are well-motivated physically as figures of merit for a particular method. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY-1104683.

  18. How bead size and dielectric constant affect the plasma behaviour in a packed bed plasma reactor: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laer, Koen; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-08-01

    Packed bed plasma reactors (PBPRs) are gaining increasing interest for use in environmental applications, such as greenhouse gas conversion into value-added chemicals or renewable fuels and volatile pollutant removal (e.g. NOx, VOC, …), as they enhance the conversion and energy efficiency of the process compared to a non-packed reactor. However, the plasma behaviour in a PBPR is not well understood. In this paper we demonstrate, by means of a fluid model, that the discharge behaviour changes considerably when changing the size of the packing beads and their dielectric constant, while keeping the interelectrode spacing constant. At low dielectric constant, the plasma is spread out over the full discharge gap, showing significant density in the voids as well as in the connecting void channels. The electric current profile shows a strong peak during each half cycle. When the dielectric constant increases, the plasma becomes localised in the voids, with a current profile consisting of many smaller peaks during each half cycle. For large bead sizes, the shift from full gap discharge to localised discharges takes place at a higher dielectric constant than for smaller beads. Furthermore, smaller beads or beads with a lower dielectric constant require a higher breakdown voltage to cause plasma formation.

  19. What can we learn about HiPIMS process from the multidimensional plasma modeling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minea, Tiberiu

    2016-09-01

    The modeling of PVD process and especially magnetron plasma is widely reported. The novel way to excite the plasma applying to the cathode very high power pulses brings the temporal dimension to the system together with new phenomena. From the kinetic model of the dense plasma region, so called Ionization Region - IR, one can quantify the global behavior of the plasma parameters during the pulse. The most significant are the plasma composition, especially in the case of reactive gases, the fraction of back-attracted sputtered ions, the rarefaction due to wind effect, but also the discharge heating mechanisms and contribution to the discharge current. From the 2D particle modeling of the plasma new insights are revealed concerning the shape of the dense plasma region, the time evolution of the sheath, the electron energy distribution function, but also the characteristics of the diffusion plasma facing the substrate. Adding the third dimension to the model, the results reveal the complex transport of electrons especially in the azimuthal direction (instabilities and drifts), the formation of spokes and flares, and the strong relation between the secondary emission of electrons from the target and the plasma structuring. Warm thanks to Peter Awakowicz and Ante Hecimovic for inviting me to this GEC edition.

  20. Equivalent circuit of radio frequency-plasma with the transformer model.

    PubMed

    Nishida, K; Mochizuki, S; Ohta, M; Yasumoto, M; Lettry, J; Mattei, S; Hatayama, A

    2014-02-01

    LINAC4 H(-) source is radio frequency (RF) driven type source. In the RF system, it is required to match the load impedance, which includes H(-) source, to that of final amplifier. We model RF plasma inside the H(-) source as circuit elements using transformer model so that characteristics of the load impedance become calculable. It has been shown that the modeling based on the transformer model works well to predict the resistance and inductance of the plasma.

  1. Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas and Comparison to Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas used in the semiconductor manufacturing industry are of a similar nature to the environments often created for submillimeter spectroscopic study of astrophysical species. At the low operating pressures of these plasmas, submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is a method capable of measuring the abundances and temperatures of molecules, radicals, and ions without disturbing any of the properties of the plasma. These measurements provide details and insight into the interactions and reactions occurring within the plasma and their implications for semiconductor manufacturing processes. A continuous wave, 500 to 750 GHz, absorption spectrometer was designed and used to make measurements of species in semiconductor processing plasmas. Comparisons with expectations from theoretical plasma models provide a basis for validating and improving these models, which is a complex and difficult science itself. Furthermore, these comparisons are an evaluation for the use of submillimeter spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in manufacturing processes.

  2. An experimentally constrained MHD model for a collisional, rotating plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. M.; Qu, Z. S.; Caneses, J. F.; Hole, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    A steady-state single fluid MHD model which describes the equilibrium of plasma parameters in a collisional, rotating plasma column with temperature gradients and a non-uniform externally applied magnetic field is developed. Two novel methods of simplifying the governing equations are introduced. Specifically, a ‘radial transport constraint’ and an ordering argument are applied. The reduced system is subsequently solved to yield the equilibrium of macroscopic plasma parameters in the bulk region of the plasma. The model is benchmarked by comparing these solutions to experimental measurements of axial velocity and density for a hydrogen plasma in the converging-field experiment MAGPIE and overall a good agreement is observed. The plasma equilibrium is determined by the interaction of a density gradient, due to a temperature gradient, with an electric field. The magnetic field and temperature gradient are identified as key parameters in determining the flow profile, which may be important considerations in other applications.

  3. Modeling the Solar Wind Plasma Interaction with Gerasimovich Magnetic Anomaly on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, S.; Lue, C.; Holmstrom, M.; Wieser, M.; Barabash, S.

    2014-12-01

    We study the solar wind plasma interaction with Gerasimovich magnetic anomaly on the Moon. We use a three-dimensional hybrid model of plasma and an empirical model of magnetic anomalies. We examine the effects of low and high dynamic pressures on this interaction while the Gerasimovich magnetic anomaly is located at nearly 30o and 60o solar zenith angles. We find that for the low dynamic pressure the crustal fields deflect the solar wind plasma around and form a plasma void at very close distances to the Moon (below 20 km above the surface). This is while during the high dynamic pressure the plasma void disappears and the solar wind plasma is less deflected. The deflection is associated with an electrostatic potential difference of nearly 250 and 150 V on the lunar surface during the low and high dynamic pressures, respectively, which are consistent with the observations.

  4. Simulation study of HL-2A-like plasma using integrated predictive modeling code

    SciTech Connect

    Poolyarat, N.; Onjun, T.; Promping, J.

    2009-11-15

    Self-consistent simulations of HL-2A-like plasma are carried out using 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the core transport is predicted using the combination of Multi-mode (MMM95) anomalous core transport model and NCLASS neoclassical transport model. The evolution of plasma current, temperature and density is carried out. Consequently, the plasma current, temperature and density profiles, as well as other plasma parameters, are obtained as the predictions in each simulation. It is found that temperature and density profiles in these simulations are peak near the plasma center. In addition, the sawtooth period is studied using the Porcilli model and is found that before, during, and after the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) operation the sawtooth period are approximately the same. It is also observed that the mixing radius of sawtooth crashes is reduced during the ECRH operation.

  5. Three dimensional space charge model for large high voltage satellites. [plasma sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooks, D.; Parker, L. W.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    High power solar arrays for satellite power systems with dimensions of kilometers, and with tens of kilovolts distributed over their surface face many plasma interaction problems that must be properly anticipated. In most cases, the effects cannot be adequately modeled without detailed knowledge of the plasma sheath structure and space charge effects. Two computer programs were developed to provide fully self consistent plasma sheath models in three dimensions as a result of efforts to model the experimental plasma sheath studies at NASA/JSC. Preliminary results indicate that for the conditions considered, the Child-Langmuir diode theory can provide a useful estimate of the plasma sheath thickness. The limitations of this conclusion are discussed. Some of the models presented exhibit the strong ion focusing observed in the JSC experiments.

  6. Discontinuous model with semi analytical sheath interface for radio frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. provide many products utilizing plasma. In this study, we focus on the Radio Frequency (RF) plasma source by interior antenna. The plasma source is expected to be high density and low metal contamination. However, the sputtering the antenna cover by high energy ion from sheath voltage still have been problematic. We have developed the new model which can calculate sheath voltage wave form in the RF plasma source for realistic calculation time. This model is discontinuous that electronic fluid equation in plasma connect to usual passion equation in antenna cover and chamber with semi analytical sheath interface. We estimate the sputtering distribution based on calculated sheath voltage waveform by this model, sputtering yield and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) model. The estimated sputtering distribution reproduce the tendency of experimental results.

  7. Atomic and Molecular Collisional Radiative Modeling for Spectroscopy of Low Temperature and Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D.

    2011-05-11

    The quantitative analysis of spectroscopic data from low temperature plasmas is strongly supported from collisional radiative (CR) modeling. Low pressure plasmas for basic research in the lab and for industrial use have several aspects in common with the cold edge of magnetic fusion plasmas. On the basis of applications of CR modeling for atomic and molecular hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and diatomic radicals such as CH and C{sub 2}, the relevance of individual processes for data interpretation is demonstrated for ionizing and recombining plasmas. Examples of such processes are opacity, dissociative excitation, dissociative recombination, mutual neutralization, and energy pooling. It is shown that the benchmark of CR modeling with experimental data can be used to identify problems in the ingoing data set of cross sections and rate coefficients. Using the flexible solver Yacora, the capability of CR modeling of low temperature plasmas is highlighted.

  8. Modeling of free electronic state density in hydrogenic plasmas based on nearest neighbor approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2014-07-15

    Most conventional atomic models in a plasma do not treat the effect of the plasma on the free-electron state density. Using a nearest neighbor approximation, the state densities in hydrogenic plasmas for both bound and free electrons were evaluated and the effect of the plasma on the atomic model (especially for the state density of the free electron) was studied. The model evaluates the electron-state densities using the potential distribution formed by the superposition of the Coulomb potentials of two ions. The potential from one ion perturbs the electronic state density on the other. Using this new model, one can evaluate the free-state density without making any ad-hoc assumptions. The resulting contours of the average ionization degree, given as a function of the plasma temperature and density, are shifted slightly to lower temperatures because of the effect of the increasing free-state density.

  9. Numerical modeling studies of a coaxial plasma accelerator as a standoff driver for magnetized target fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason T.

    The principal objective of the dissertation is to explore the theoretical feasibility of the coaxial plasma accelerator as a candidate driver for magnetized target fusion (MTF) by the use of detailed 2-D magnetohydrodynamics modeling studies. MACH2, a 2-D magnetohydrodynamic code, was the primary computational tool for this study. We found that incorporating the appropriate physics models is critical in getting good agreement with experimental results. We modeled plasma liner formation and implosion of a magnetized plasma by twelve plasma jets to put the remaining study in a magnetized target fusion context. The results show that the magnetic flux is compressed with the target, and the magnetic field suppresses the cross-field thermal conduction losses. Assuming that the working plasma satisfies a proposed set of microphysics conditions that might enhance the likelihood of accelerating the plasma as a "slug," the macrodynamics of accelerating the plasma in a standard, conventional coaxial plasma gun was systematically studied with respect to the driving current, mass distribution, initial plasma temperature, and electrode dimensions with the help of the 2-D MHD MACH2 code. The 2-D MHD modeling identifies a dynamical instability, which we called the "blowby" instability, that limits the performance. Density profile, ratio of electrode radii, initial jet length were found to be important in determining the onset of the instability. Guided by the 2-D modeling results, a plasma accelerator point design was proposed and studied. The modeling study shows that the blowby instability could be suppressed through appropriate shaping of the electrodes and plasma injection to induce a favorable density profile and an initial canting of the current sheet with the leading edge along the outer electrodes. With only four cases investigated, the desired performance objectives were reached. With further adjustments and/or alternate geometries, greater success and better accelerator

  10. Simulations of Temperatures in Burning Tokamak Plasmas using the GLF23 Model in the TRANSP Code

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2002-08-13

    The GLF23 prediction model, incorporated in the TRANSP plasma analysis code, is used to predict temperatures for burning plasmas in the proposed FIRE and ITER-FEAT tokamaks. Flat electron density profiles with various central values are assumed. Scaling of the fusion power P(subscript)dt and gain Q(subscript)dt with density (subscript)and pedestal temperature are given. Helium ash transport and sawtooth effect Pdt in long duration ITER-FEAT plasmas.

  11. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, S. Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  12. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    PubMed

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  13. High-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration and laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Blaclard, Guillaume; Godfrey, Brendan; Kirchen, Manuel; Lee, Patrick; Lehe, Remi; Lobet, Mathieu; Vincenti, Henri

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale numerical simulations are essential to the design of plasma-based accelerators and laser-plasma interations for ultra-high intensity (UHI) physics. The electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations, as it is based on first principles, and captures all kinetic effects, and also scale favorably to many cores on supercomputers. The standard PIC algorithm relies on second-order finite-difference discretization of the Maxwell and Newton-Lorentz equations. We present here novel formulations, based on very high-order pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, which enable near-total elimination of the numerical Cherenkov instability and increased accuracy over the standard PIC method for standard laboratory frame and Lorentz boosted frame simulations. We also present the latest implementations in the PIC modules Warp-PICSAR and FBPIC on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU architectures. Examples of applications will be given on the simulation of laser-plasma accelerators and high-harmonic generation with plasma mirrors. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by the European Commission through the Marie Slowdoska-Curie fellowship PICSSAR Grant Number 624543. Used resources of NERSC.

  14. Modeling Nuclear Fusion in High Energy Density Plasmas Using a Strongly Magnetized Non-neutral Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2005-10-01

    In the hot dense interiors of stars and giant planets, nuclear reactions are predicted to occur at rates that are greatly enhanced compared to those at low densities. The enhancement is caused by plasma screening of the reacting pairs, increasing the probability of close collisions. However, strongly enhanced nuclear reaction rates have never been observed in the laboratory. This poster discusses a method for observing the enhancement using an analogy between nuclear energy and cyclotron energy in a non-neutral plasma in a strong magnetic field. In such a plasma, cyclotron energy is an adiabatic invariant, and is released only through close collisions that break this invariant. It is shown that the rate of release of cyclotron energy is enhanced by precisely the same factor as that for the release of nuclear energy, because both processes rely on close collisions that are enhanced by plasma screening.ootnotetextD. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 025002 (2005). Simulations measuring the screening enhancement will be presented, and the possibility of exciting and studying burn fronts will be discussed.ootnotetextSee also adjacent poster by J. Bollinger.

  15. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  16. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Leung, W. C.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the Polar satellite is studied by using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low-density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 40-50 V, owing to the photoelectron emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, ion-rich xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at approximately 2 V. Accordingly, in our three-dimensional PIC simulation we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2 V as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the xenon plasma in the sheath (10-10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (<1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an 'apple'-shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations it takes only about a couple of tens of electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. After this time the expansion of the sheath in directions transverse to the ambient magnetic field slows down because the electrons are magnetized. Using the quasi steady sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a

  17. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Wing C.; Singh, Nagendra; Moore, Thomas E.; Craven, Paul D.

    2000-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the POLAR satellite is studied by using a 3-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 4050Volts due to the photoelectrons emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, an ion-rich Xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at about 2Volts. Accordingly, in our 3-dimensional PIC simulation, we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2Volts as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the Xenon plasma in the sheath (approx. 10 - 10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (less than 1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations, the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an "Apple" shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission, a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Detection Experiment (TIDE) detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations, it takes about a hundred electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi-steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. Using the steady state sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a highly supersonic polar wind flow. The detected ions' velocity distribution shows significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian in the

  18. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Leung, W. C.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the Polar satellite is studied by using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low-density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 40-50 V, owing to the photoelectron emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, ion-rich xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at approximately 2 V. Accordingly, in our three-dimensional PIC simulation we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2 V as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the xenon plasma in the sheath (10-10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (<1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an 'apple'-shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations it takes only about a couple of tens of electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. After this time the expansion of the sheath in directions transverse to the ambient magnetic field slows down because the electrons are magnetized. Using the quasi steady sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a

  19. Modeling of inductively coupled plasma SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar plasma discharge: Effect of O{sub 2} on the plasma kinetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pateau, Amand; Rhallabi, Ahmed Fernandez, Marie-Claude; Boufnichel, Mohamed; Roqueta, Fabrice

    2014-03-15

    A global model has been developed for low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures. This model is based on a set of mass balance equations for all the considered species, coupled with the discharge power balance equation and the charge neutrality condition. The present study is an extension of the kinetic global model previously developed for SF{sub 6}/Ar ICP plasma discharges [Lallement et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 025001 (2009)]. It is focused on the study of the impact of the O{sub 2} addition to the SF{sub 6}/Ar gas mixture on the plasma kinetic properties. The simulation results show that the electron density increases with the %O{sub 2}, which is due to the decrease of the plasma electronegativity, while the electron temperature is almost constant in our pressure range. The density evolutions of atomic fluorine and oxygen versus %O{sub 2} have been analyzed. Those atomic radicals play an important role in the silicon etching process. The atomic fluorine density increases from 0 up to 40% O{sub 2} where it reaches a maximum. This is due to the enhancement of the SF{sub 6} dissociation processes and the production of fluorine through the reactions between SF{sub x} and O. This trend is experimentally confirmed. On the other hand, the simulation results show that O(3p) is the preponderant atomic oxygen. Its density increases with %O{sub 2} until reaching a maximum at almost 40% O{sub 2}. Over this value, its diminution with O{sub 2}% can be justified by the high increase in the loss frequency of O(3p) by electronic impact in comparison to its production frequency by electronic impact with O{sub 2}.

  20. Theoretical model of fishbone oscillations in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Porcelli, F.

    1986-11-03

    The onset of electromagnetic oscillations that are observed in magnetically confined plasmas where beams of fast neutrals are injected is associated with the excitation of a mode with poloidal wave number m/sup 0/ = 1 and phase velocity equal to the core-ion diamagnetic velocity. The resonant interaction of the mode with the beam ions is viewed as a form of dissipation that allows the release of the mode excitation energy, related to the gradient of the plasma pressure.

  1. Plasma kinetics of complement component C4: comparison of three models

    SciTech Connect

    Wisnieski, J.J.; Nathanson, M.H.

    1989-02-01

    Plasma C4 kinetics were studied in members of a kindred with hereditary incomplete C4 deficiency and in control subjects. Test subjects received iodine /sup 125/-labeled C4 intravenously, and plasma disappearance curves for 125I-C4 were plotted. By nonlinear least-squares analysis, we fit two-, three-, and four-exponential models of plasma disappearance to the plasma curves of each subject. Goodness of fit was significantly better for all subjects with the three-exponential versus the two-exponential model (p less than 0.0005). No further improvement in curve fit was accomplished by using a four-exponential model (p greater than 0.5). Metabolic rates and extravascular/plasma ratios calculated from the two- and three-exponential models were significantly different. As judged by extravascular/plasma ratio, the two-exponential model underestimated the amount of extravascular C4. Furthermore, the two-exponential model significantly over-estimated catabolic and synthetic rates. Hence, our results show that C4 kinetics are not optimally described by a conventional, two-exponential model. A possible explanation for our findings is that in previous studies of C4 metabolism, the analysis of plasma radioactivity disappearance curves was done by inspection, whereas we used least-squares analysis, a method that determines the number of exponentials with greater reliability.

  2. Development of a numerical model to characterize laser-induced plasmas in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehteshami, M. Z.; Salehi, M. R.; Abiri, E.

    2017-09-01

    A spatio-temporal model for investigating the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas in aqueous media is developed by modifying the general form of the well-known rate equation and simultaneously accounting for the influences of multiphoton and cascade ionization on the propagation of short laser pulses. In this model, the nonlinear absorption of laser pulse energy is considered to be time and space dependent inside the computational volume. The model is verified by comparing the results of three-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations with existing experimental data for laser pulses of 30 ps, 1064 nm at focusing angles between 4° and 28° with energies in the wide range between 0.1 to 6000 μJ. This model could reasonably predict the various characteristics of a laser-induced plasma, such as breakdown threshold, size, shape and energy transmitted through the plasma. Also the transmitted energy data obtained from the model is within 10% of the experimental data at the largest focusing angle and 20% at the smallest angle. To compare the calculations with plasma photographs, electron density values are transformed into a gray scale. The simulated plasma shapes correlate well with the existing experimental observations. The outcomes of the model, such as spatial distribution of plasma energy density, could be used as input for a hydrodynamic model to estimate the strength of the mechanical effects associated with plasma formation.

  3. The Main Issues to Address in Modeling Plasma Spray Torch Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazelas, C.; Trelles, J. P.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-01-01

    The modeling of plasma torch operation has advanced greatly in the last 15 years due to a better understanding of the underlying physics, development of commercial, open-source computational fluid dynamics softwares, and access to high performance and cloud computing. However, the operation mode of the electric arc in plasma torches is controlled by dynamic, thermal, electromagnetic, acoustic and chemical phenomena that take place at different scales and whose interactions are not completely understood yet. Even though no single model of plasma torch operation fully addresses these phenomena, most of these models are useful tools for parametric studies, if their use is reinforced by knowledge of torch operation and the model predictions are validated against experimental data. To increase the level of predictability of the current models, several further steps are needed. This study examines the issues remaining to be addressed in the modeling of plasma spray torch operation and the current critical aspects of these.

  4. Modeling of inductively coupled plasma Ar/Cl{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma discharge: Effect of N{sub 2} on the plasma properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chanson, Romain; Rhallabi, Ahmed; Fernandez, Marie Claude; Cardinaud, Christophe; Landesman, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-15

    A global kinetic model of Cl{sub 2}/Ar/N{sub 2} plasma discharge has been developed, which allows calculation of the densities and fluxes of all neutral and charged species considered in the reaction scheme, as well as the electron temperature, as a function of the operating conditions. In this work, the results from the global model are first compared to the calculations given by other models. Our simulation results are focused on the effect of nitrogen adding to the Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasma mixture, which impacts both neutral and charged species transport phenomena. The N{sub 2} percentage is varied to the detriment of Cl{sub 2} by keeping the total flow rates of Cl{sub 2} and N{sub 2} constant. In order to better understand the impact of N{sub 2} addition to the Cl{sub 2}/Ar gas mixture, the authors analyzed the output plasma parameters calculated from the model for different N{sub 2} flow rate percentages. Indeed, the simulation results show a decrease in electron density and an increase in electron temperature with increasing percentage of N{sub 2}. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of electronegativity, Cl{sub 2} and N{sub 2} dissociation, and positive ion to neutral flux ratio evolution by varying percentage of N{sub 2}. Such parameters have a direct effect on the etching anisotropy of the materials during the etching process.

  5. Large Scale Modelling of Glow Discharges or Non - Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Sadasivan

    The Electron Velocity Distribution Function (EVDF) in the cathode fall of a DC helium glow discharge was evaluated from a numerical solution of the Boltzmann Transport Equation(BTE). The numerical technique was based on a Petrov-Galerkin technique and a unique combination of streamline upwinding with self -consistent feedback-based shock-capturing. EVDF for the cathode fall was solved at 1 Torr, as a function of position x, axial velocity v_{rm x}, radial velocity v_{rm r}, and time t. The electron-neutral collisions consisted of elastic, excitation, and ionization processes. The algorithm was optimized and vectorized to speed execution by more than a factor of 10 on CRAY-XMP. Efficient storage schemes were used to save the memory allocation required by the algorithm. The analysis of the solution of BTE was done in terms of the 8-moments that were evaluated. Higher moments were found necessary to study the momentum and energy fluxes. The time and length scales were estimated and used as a basis for the characterization of DC glow discharges. Based on an exhaustive study of Knudsen numbers, it was observed that the electrons in the cathode fall were in the transition or Boltzmann regime. The shortest relaxation time was the momentum relaxation and the longest times were the ionization and energy relaxation times. The other times in the processes were that for plasma reaction, diffusion, convection, transit, entropy relaxation, and that for mean free flight between the collisions. Different models were classified based on the moments, time scales, and length scales in their applicability to glow discharges. These consisted of BTE with different number af phase and configuration dimensions, Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation, moment equations (e.g. Drift-Diffusion, Drift-Diffusion-Inertia), and spherical harmonic expansions.

  6. Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows Briefers: Andrew Ketsdever Sergey Gimelshein PIs: Andrew Ketsdever...number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling ...magnetic field in opposite direction of applied field Extreme pressure tends to drive plasma out of discharge chamber Difficulties in modeling FRCs High

  7. Optimization of Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in an In Vivo Model Organism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Amanda; Lin, Abraham; Shah, Kajol; Singh, Harpreet; Miller, Vandana; Gururaja Rao, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma is increasingly being recognized for a wide range of medical and biological applications. However, the effect of non-thermal plasma on physiological functions is not well characterized in in vivo model systems. Here we use a genetically amenable, widely used model system, Drosophila melanogaster, to develop an in vivo system, and investigate the role of non-thermal plasma in blood cell differentiation. Although the blood system in Drosophila is primitive, it is an efficient system with three types of hemocytes, functioning during different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Blood cell differentiation in Drosophila plays an essential role in tissue modeling during embryogenesis, morphogenesis and also in innate immunity. In this study, we optimized distance and frequency for a direct non-thermal plasma application, and standardized doses to treat larvae and adult flies so that there is no effect on the viability, fertility or locomotion of the organism. We discovered that at optimal distance, time and frequency, application of plasma induced blood cell differentiation in the Drosophila larval lymph gland. We articulate that the augmented differentiation could be due to an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon non-thermal plasma application. Our studies open avenues to use Drosophila as a model system in plasma medicine to study various genetic disorders and biological processes where non-thermal plasma has a possible therapeutic application.

  8. Optimization of Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in an In Vivo Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amanda; Lin, Abraham; Shah, Kajol; Singh, Harpreet; Miller, Vandana; Gururaja Rao, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma is increasingly being recognized for a wide range of medical and biological applications. However, the effect of non-thermal plasma on physiological functions is not well characterized in in vivo model systems. Here we use a genetically amenable, widely used model system, Drosophila melanogaster, to develop an in vivo system, and investigate the role of non-thermal plasma in blood cell differentiation. Although the blood system in Drosophila is primitive, it is an efficient system with three types of hemocytes, functioning during different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Blood cell differentiation in Drosophila plays an essential role in tissue modeling during embryogenesis, morphogenesis and also in innate immunity. In this study, we optimized distance and frequency for a direct non-thermal plasma application, and standardized doses to treat larvae and adult flies so that there is no effect on the viability, fertility or locomotion of the organism. We discovered that at optimal distance, time and frequency, application of plasma induced blood cell differentiation in the Drosophila larval lymph gland. We articulate that the augmented differentiation could be due to an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon non-thermal plasma application. Our studies open avenues to use Drosophila as a model system in plasma medicine to study various genetic disorders and biological processes where non-thermal plasma has a possible therapeutic application. PMID:27505063

  9. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-09-07

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust{sup 2} and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  10. Scrape-off layer plasma modeling for the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Allen, S. L.

    1994-09-01

    The behavior of the scrape-off layer (SOL) region in tokamaks is believed to play an important role determining the overall device performance. In addition, control of the exhaust power has become one of the most important issues in the design of future devices such as ITER and TPX. This paper presents the results of application of 2-D fluid models to the DII-D tokamak, and research into the importance of processes which are inadequately treated in the fluid models. Comparison of measured and simulated profiles of SOL plasma parameters suggest the physics model contained in the UEDGE code is sufficient to simulate plasmas which are attached to the divertor plates. Experimental evidence suggests the presence of enhanced plasma recombination and momentum removal leading to the existence of detached plasma states. UEDGE simulation of these plasmas obtains a bifurcation to a low temperature plasma at the divertor, but the plasma remains attached. Understanding the physics of this detachment is important for the design of future devices. Analytic studies of the behavior of SOL plasmas enhance our understanding beyond that achieved with fluid modeling. Analysis of the effect of drifts on sheath structure suggest these drifts may play a role in the detachment process. Analysis of the turbulent-transport equations indicate a bifurcation which is qualitatively similar to the experimentally different behavior of the L- and H-mode SOL. Electrostatic simulations of conducting wall modes suggest possible control of the SOL width by biasing.

  11. Multi-Organ Contribution to the Metabolic Plasma Profile Using Hierarchical Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Torell, Frida; Bennett, Kate; Cereghini, Silvia; Rännar, Stefan; Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin; Moritz, Thomas; Haumaitre, Cecile; Trygg, Johan; Lundstedt, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical modelling was applied in order to identify the organs that contribute to the levels of metabolites in plasma. Plasma and organ samples from gut, kidney, liver, muscle and pancreas were obtained from mice. The samples were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC TOF-MS) at the Swedish Metabolomics centre, Umeå University, Sweden. The multivariate analysis was performed by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS). The main goal of this study was to investigate how each organ contributes to the metabolic plasma profile. This was performed using hierarchical modelling. Each organ was found to have a unique metabolic profile. The hierarchical modelling showed that the gut, kidney and liver demonstrated the greatest contribution to the metabolic pattern of plasma. For example, we found that metabolites were absorbed in the gut and transported to the plasma. The kidneys excrete branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and fatty acids are transported in the plasma to the muscles and liver. Lactic acid was also found to be transported from the pancreas to plasma. The results indicated that hierarchical modelling can be utilized to identify the organ contribution of unknown metabolites to the metabolic profile of plasma. PMID:26086868

  12. Heuristic modeling of spectral plasma emission for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, Rolf; Noll, Reinhard

    2009-12-15

    A heuristic model was developed to describe the spectral emission of laser-induced plasmas generated for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under the assumption that the composition of the plasma and the plasma state is known. The plasma is described by a stationary spherical shell model surrounded by an ambient gas, which partially absorbs the emitted radiation. The radiation transport equation is used to calculate the spectrum emitted by the plasma. Simulations of a multiline iron spectrum and a self-reversed Al line are compared with experimental spectra. For the iron spectrum, the degree of congruence is moderate to good, which may be attributed to a lack of precise atomic and Stark broadening data as well as a simplified plasma model. The line profile of the Al resonance line with self reversal can be simulated with a high degree of agreement. Simulated spectra of a steel sample in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range demonstrate the strong influence of the ambient atmosphere in the spectral range between 178 and 194 nm. The number of free parameters of the plasma model of 8 can be further reduced down to 3, taking into account the integral parameters of the plasma that are accessible experimentally.

  13. A predictive model for the temperature relaxation rate in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daligault, Jerome; Dimonte, Guy

    2008-01-01

    We present and validate a simple model for the electron-ion temperature relaxation rate in plasmas that applies over a wide range of plasma temperatures and densities, including weakly-coupled, non-degenerate as well as strongly-coupled, degenerate plasmas. Electron degeneracy and static correlation effects between electrons and ions are shown to play a cumulative role that, at low temperature, lead to relaxation rates a few times smaller than when these effects are neglected. We predict the evolution of the relaxation in dense hydrogen plasmas from the fully degenerate to the non-degenerate limit.

  14. Experimental observations and modeling of nanoparticle formation in laser-produced expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lescoute, E.; Hallo, L.; Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Hebert, D.; Chevalier, J.-M.; Etchessahar, B.; Combis, P.

    2008-06-15

    Interaction of a laser beam with a target may generate a high velocity expanding plasma plume, solid debris, and liquid nano- and microparticles. They can be produced from plasma recombination, vapor condensation or by a direct expulsion of the heated liquid phase. Two distinct sizes of particles are observed depending on the temperature achieved in the plasma plume: Micrometer-size fragments for temperatures lower than the critical temperature, and nanometer-size particles for higher temperatures. The paper presents experimental observations of fragments and nanoparticles in plasma plumes created from gold targets. These results are compared with theoretical models of vapor condensation and microparticle formation.

  15. Toroidal modeling of plasma response to RMP fields in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, N.; Kirk, A.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Loarte, A.; Ryan, D.; Zhong, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic numerical study is carried out, computing the resistive plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for ITER plasmas, utilizing the toroidal code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681). A number of factors are taken into account, including the variation of the plasma scenarios (from 15 MA Q = 10 inductive scenario to the 9 MA Q = 5 steady state scenario), the variation of the toroidal spectrum of the applied fields (n = 1, 2, 3, 4, with n being the toroidal mode number), the amplitude and phase variation of the currents in three rows of the RMP coils as designed for ITER, and finally a special case of mixed toroidal spectrum between the n = 3 and n = 4 RMP fields. Two-dimensional parameter scans, for the edge safety factor and the coil phasing between the upper and lower rows of coils, yield ‘optimal’ curves that maximize a set of figures of merit, that are defined in this work to measure the plasma response. Other two-dimensional scans of the relative coil current phasing among three rows of coils, at fixed coil currents amplitude, reveal a single optimum for each coil configuration with a given n number, for the 15 MA ITER inductive plasma. On the other hand, scanning of the coil current amplitude, at fixed coil phasing, shows either synergy or cancellation effect, for the field contributions between the off-middle rows and the middle row of the RMP coils. Finally, the mixed toroidal spectrum, by combining the n = 3 and the n = 4 RMP field, results in a substantial local reduction of the amplitude of the plasma surface displacement.

  16. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  17. Coupling Kinetic and Hydrodynamic Models for Simulations of Gas Flows and Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Arslanbekov, R. R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents adaptive kinetic/fluid models for simulations of gases and weakly ionized plasmas. We first describe a Unified Flow Solver (UFS), which combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement with automatic selection of kinetic or hydrodynamic models for different parts of flows. This Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) technique limits expensive atomistic-scale solutions only to the regions where they are needed. We present examples of plasma simulations with fluid models and describe kinetic solvers for electrons which are currently being incorporated into AMAR techniques for plasma simulations.

  18. Probabilistic model of beam-plasma interaction in randomly inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Voshchepynets, Andrii; Artemyev, Anton

    2014-05-01

    We study beam-plasma interaction in the presence of random density fluctuations. The level of fluctuations is supposed to be high but Langmuir waves generated by the beam instability are supposed to be not trapped inside the density depletions. This system can be considered as a good approximation of beam-plasma interaction in the solar wind. We describe the system in terms of probability density for the density fluctuations that determines the probability density for wave phase velocities during wave propagation. We suppose that at each moment of time an electron can interact only with one single wave having the phase velocity equal to its velocity or do not interact at all. We suppose that the amplitudes and electron distribution functions vary slowly with respect to single wave-particle interaction that allows one to average over a large number of interactions. This allows one to write Smoluhovsky equation for probability for particle having velocity V0 at time t0 to have velocity V at time t. From this description one can obtain Kolmogorov-Feller equation for slow variations of electron distribution function similar to the diffusion equation in quasilinear approximation. This probabilistic approach allows finding out the dependence of diffusion coefficients on statistical distribution of plasma density fluctuations. We use Liouville equation to describe the evolution of the Langmuir wave's spectral power, for each single wave. To describe slow evolution of the wave power we use averaged wave growth rate. It is obtained from the probability for the wave to have the resonant velocity on the interval. The equations obtained are solved numerically. We evaluate the influence of the density inhomogeneities on the beam relaxation time. As a result the length of relaxation of the electron beam in such inhomogeneous plasma is much longer than in homogeneous case and our goal is to determine the dependence of this length on characteristics of the statistical properties

  19. Probabilistic Model of Beam-Plasma Interaction in Randomly Inhomogeneous Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Voshchepynets, A.; Volokitin, A.; Artemyev, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study beam-plasma interaction in the presence of random density fluctuations. The level of fluctuations is supposed to be high but Langmuir waves generated by the beam instability are supposed to be not trapped inside the density depletions. This system can be considered as a good approximation of beam-plasma interaction in the solar wind. We describe the system in terms of probability density for the density fluctuations that determines the probability density for wave phase velocities during wave propagation. We suppose that at each moment of time an electron can interact only with one single wave having the phase velocity equal to its velocity or do not interact at all. We suppose that the amplitudes and electron distribution functions vary slowly with respect to single wave-particle interaction that allows one to average over a large number of interactions. This allows one to write Smoluhovsky equation for probability for particle having velocity V0 at time t0 to have velocity V at time t. From this description one can obtain Kolmogorov-Feller equation for slow variations of electron distribution function similar to the diffusion equation in quasilinear approximation. This probabilistic approach allows finding out the dependence of diffusion coefficients on statistical distribution of plasma density fluctuations. We use Liouville equation to describe the evolution of the Langmuir wave's spectral power, for each single wave. To describe slow evolution of the wave power we use averaged wave growth rate. It is obtained from the probability for the wave to have the resonant velocity on the interval. The equations obtained are solved numerically. We evaluate the influence of the density inhomogeneities on the beam relaxation time. As a result the length of relaxation of the electron beam in such inhomogeneous plasma is much longer than in homogeneous case and our goal is to determine the dependence of this length on characteristics of the statistical properties

  20. Electromagnetic, complex image model of a large area RF resonant antenna as inductive plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittienne, Ph; Jacquier, R.; Howling, A. A.; Furno, I.

    2017-03-01

    A large area antenna generates a plasma by both inductive and capacitive coupling; it is an electromagnetically coupled plasma source. In this work, experiments on a large area planar RF antenna source are interpreted in terms of a multi-conductor transmission line coupled to the plasma. This electromagnetic treatment includes mutual inductive coupling using the complex image method, and capacitive matrix coupling between all elements of the resonant network and the plasma. The model reproduces antenna input impedance measurements, with and without plasma, on a 1.2× 1.2 m2 antenna used for large area plasma processing. Analytic expressions are given, and results are obtained by computation of the matrix solution. This method could be used to design planar inductive sources in general, by applying the termination impedances appropriate to each antenna type.

  1. Inactivation of Microorganisms in Model Biofilms by an Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Non-thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Yuri; Trushkin, N.; Grushin, M.; Petryakov, A.; Karal'nik, V.; Kobzev, E.; Kholodenko, V.; Chugunov, V.; Kireev, G.; Rakitsky, Yu.; Irkhina, I.

    Non-thermal plasma jet formed by self-running pulsed-periodical high-current spark generator (PPSG) was used for atmospheric pressure inactivation of microorganisms including biofilms. A distinctive feature of the PPSG is a formation of transient hot plasma clouds (plasma bullets) periodically flying out to the target. We experimented with model biofilms of E. coli and Bacillus subtilis monocultures which were grown on agar and surfaces of steel and polypropylene coupons. High efficiency of plasma inactivation was demonstrated. This effect is associated primarily with an interaction of transient hot plasma clouds with biofilms. Besides complete or partial degradation of the cell membrane, weakening of the cell wall of E.coli culture by active plasma was found.

  2. Plasma contactor modeling with NASCAP/LEO - Extending laboratory results to space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    In the laboratory, hollow cathode-based plasma contactors have been observed to both emit and collect ampere-level electron currents with low impedance. The laboratory behavior of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and the limited space experience with hollow cathodes suggest that, for many applications, a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is the ideal device to provide electrical connection with the space plasma. In order to confidently extend the laboratory experience to the low-earth-orbit environment, a series of plasma contactor computer models has been developed. Calculations show that a hollow cathode plasma contactor that collects 0.5 A in the laboratory will only collect 2.4 mA in space. The simplest way to boost the collected current is to increase the gas flow. A mole of gas is enough to collect ampere level currents for 5-1/2 hours.

  3. Hollow cathodes as electron emitting plasma contactors Theory and computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the Shuttle Orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiments. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the Shuttle are presented, as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the Orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the Orbiter.

  4. Bacterial Inactivation of Wound Infection in a Human Skin Model by Liquid-Phase Discharge Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Paul Y.; Kim, Yoon-Sun; Koo, Il Gyo; Jung, Jae Chul; Kim, Gon Jun; Choi, Myeong Yeol; Yu, Zengqi; Collins, George J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigate disinfection of a reconstructed human skin model contaminated with biofilm-formative Staphylococcus aureus employing plasma discharge in liquid. Principal Findings We observed statistically significant 3.83-log10 (p<0.001) and 1.59-log10 (p<0.05) decreases in colony forming units of adherent S. aureus bacteria and 24 h S. aureus biofilm culture with plasma treatment. Plasma treatment was associated with minimal changes in histological morphology and tissue viability determined by means of MTT assay. Spectral analysis of the plasma discharge indicated the presence of highly reactive atomic oxygen radicals (777 nm and 844 nm) and OH bands in the UV region. The contribution of these and other plasma-generated agents and physical conditions to the reduction in bacterial load are discussed. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the potential of liquid plasma treatment as a potential adjunct therapy for chronic wounds. PMID:21897870

  5. Doping concentration evaluation using plasma propagation models in plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dushyant; Prasad, B.; George, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a high dose-rate implantation process technique in the area of semiconductor device fabrication used to fabricate various device structures like shallow junction, silicon on insulators and in the processing of flat panel display materials, trench doping, etc. The basic mechanism of ions source and their acceleration in PIII technique is different from that of the conventional ion-implantation. In this, the target is immersed in a plasma source and the implantation is done by accelerating the ions with a negative pulse bias voltage, applied to the target. The dynamics of ion transport and the implantation is different from line-of-sight implantation. In this paper, the doping of individual ions (Ar, He and N), in a collisionless PIII system is studied analytically when a negative pulse of 10 kV is applied to the target. The net ion doping concentration in one pulse duration has also been computed during the propagation of plasma sheaths.

  6. Improvement of Plasma Gun Performance using Comprehensive Fluid Element Modeling: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Felix A.; Molz, Ronald J.; McCullough, Richard; Hawley, Dave

    2007-12-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model the operation of thermal-spray processes has gained interest in the thermal-spray community, able to provide an understanding as to how a process functions, and better how to make a process work better. Advancements to the science of modeling now permits the ability to create a comprehensive model of a plasma gun that not only simulates the dynamics of the gas, but also the mechanics of arcs (plasma), thermodynamics, and entrained particulates to form a nearly complete model of a working thermal-spray process. Work presented includes the methods and procedures used to validate the model to a Sulzer Metco TriplexProTM-200 plasma gun and exploration of the operating regime to give an in depth and insightful look into the physics behind the operation of a triple-arc cascaded plasma gun.

  7. Electrical description of N2 capacitively coupled plasmas with the global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ming-Lu; Lu, Yi-Jia; Cheng, Jia; Ji, Lin-Hong; Engineering Design Team

    2016-10-01

    N2 discharges in a commercial capacitively coupled plasma reactor are modelled by a combination of an equivalent circuit and the global model, for a range of gas pressure at 1 4 Torr. The ohmic and inductive plasma bulk and the capacitive sheath are represented as LCR elements, with electrical characteristics determined by plasma parameters. The electron density and electron temperature are obtained from the global model in which a Maxwellian electron distribution is assumed. Voltages and currents are recorded by a VI probe installed after the match network. Using the measured voltage as an input, the current flowing through the discharge volume is calculated from the electrical model and shows excellent agreement with the measurements. The experimentally verified electrical model provides a simple and accurate description for the relationship between the external electrical parameters and the plasma properties, which can serve as a guideline for process window planning in industrial applications.

  8. Modeling of the Convection and Interaction of Ring Current, Plasmaspheric and Plasma Sheet Plasmas in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Buzulukova, Natalia; Glocer, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive sources of ions reside in the plasmasphere, plasmasheet, and ring current regions at discrete energies constitute the major plasma populations in the inner/middle magnetosphere. They contribute to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere-magnetosphere system as important carriers of the global current system, in triggering; geomagnetic storm and substorms, as well as critical components of plasma instabilities such as reconnection and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetospheric boundaries. Our preliminary analysis of in-situ measurements shoves the complexity of the plasmas pitch angle distributions at particularly the cold and warm plasmas, vary dramatically at different local times and radial distances from the Earth in response to changes in solar wind condition and Dst index. Using an MHD-ring current coupled code, we model the convection and interaction of cold, warm and energetic ions of plasmaspheric, plasmasheet, and ring current origins in the inner magnetosphere. We compare our simulation results with in-situ and remotely sensed measurements from recent instrumentation on Geotail, Cluster, THEMIS, and TWINS spacecraft.

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Plasma-Assisted Ignition and Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    GRI Mech 3.0 has been validated extensively in 1000-2500 K and 25 torr to 10 atm range. • USC Mech has been validated in 900-2500 K and 16 torr to...64 species) GRI Mech 3.0 CH4/N2/O2 plasma NOX reactions C2H4-air (70 species) USC Mech C2H4/N2/O2 plasma NOX reactions Pi = 100 torr...3 -15 kV peak voltage 7 ns FWHM Mdot : 0.00377 kg/m2-s GRI Mech 3.0 + CH4/N2/O2/CO/CO2 plasma + NOX chemistry CH4-air validation of flame

  10. Global model including multistep ionizations in helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-12-01

    Particle and power balance equations including stepwise ionizations are derived and solved in helium plasmas. In the balance equations, two metastable states (21S1 in singlet and 23S1 triplet) are considered and the followings are obtained. The plasma density linearly increases and the electron temperature is relatively in a constant value against the absorbed power. It is also found that the contribution to multi-step ionization with respect to the single-step ionization is in the range of 8%-23%, as the gas pressure increases from 10 mTorr to 100 mTorr. Compared to the results in the argon plasma, there is little variation in the collisional energy loss per electron-ion pair created (ɛc) with absorbed power and gas pressure due to the small collision cross section and higher inelastic collision threshold energy.

  11. The magnetic mirror force in plasma fluid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been several attempts to include the magnetic mirror force in the equation of motion for a plasma in a fluid formalism. In the process, some confusion has been evident regarding when and how this should be done. This problem has been addressed in the literature, but these treatments appear to have been forgotten or misunderstood. The mathematical arguments are summarized so that the physical consequences are readily perceived. It is shown that for an isotropic plasma fluid, in the direction parallel or anti-parallel to a magnetic field, the forces associated with a diverging magnetic field cancel out. Only for anisotropies in the fluid properties does the diverging field influence the plasma dynamics.

  12. The magnetic mirror force in plasma fluid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been several attempts to include the magnetic mirror force in the equation of motion for a plasma in a fluid formalism. In the process, some confusion has been evident regarding when and how this should be done. This problem has been addressed in the literature, but these treatments appear to have been forgotten or misunderstood. The mathematical arguments are summarized so that the physical consequences are readily perceived. It is shown that for an isotropic plasma fluid, in the direction parallel or anti-parallel to a magnetic field, the forces associated with a diverging magnetic field cancel out. Only for anisotropies in the fluid properties does the diverging field influence the plasma dynamics.

  13. Self-consistent computer model for the solar power satellite-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program (PANEL) has been developed to model the solar power satellite (SPS)-plasma interaction by an iterative solution of the coupled Poisson and Vlasov equations. PANEL uses the inside-out method and a finite difference scheme to calculate densities and potentials at selected points on either a two or three dimensional grid. The history of the spacecraft charging problem is reviewed, the theory of the plasma screening process is discussed and extended, program theory is developed, and a series of models is presented. These models are primarily two-dimensionl (2-D) for two reasons; one being that large 3-D models require too much computing time, and the other being that most analytic models suitable for testing PANEL are 1-D and the 3-D capabilities were not required. These models include PANEL's predictions for two variations on the Child-Langmuir diode problem and two models of the interaction of an infinitely long one meter wide solar array with a dense 10 eV plasma. These models are part of an ongoing effort to adapt PANEL to augment the laboratory studies of a 1 x 10 meter solar array in a simulated low Earth orbit plasma. Also included are two 3-D test models. One is a point potential in a hot plasma and is compared to the Debye theory of plasma screening. The other is a flat disc in charge free space. For the Child-Langmuir diode problem, a good agreement is obtained between PANEL results and the classical theory. This is viewed as a confirming test of PANEL. Conversely, in the solar array models, the agreement between the PANEL and Child-Langmuir predictions for the plasma sheath thickness is presented as a numerical confirmation of the use of the Child-Langmuir diode theory to estimate plasma sheath thickness in the spacecraft charging problem.

  14. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-04-15

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  15. Models for Callisto's Plasma Interaction: Implications for the satellite's Atmosphere and Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seufert, M.; Saur, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from a MHD-model for the sub-Alfvénic interaction of Callisto with the surrounding magnetospheric plasma taking into account the influence of Callisto's neutral CO2 and O2 atmosphere on the plasma flow and magnetic fields induced in a possible subsurface liquid water ocean. The existence of a subsurface ocean was proposed e.g. by Neubauer [1998], Kivelson et al. [1999] and Zimmer et al. [2000] based on magnetometer data analysis. However, none of these previous studies included detailed modeling of Callisto's plasma interaction. We present the first 3D-MHD-models for the plasma interaction considering several flybys of Galileo at Callisto. We compare the magnetic signatures predicted by the plasma interaction model including an induced interior dipole with Galileo magnetometer data. We further use our models to investigate the structure of Callisto's atmosphere-ionosphere system for two cases: Static plasma conditions (v0 = 0) with an ionosphere in chemical and radiative equilibrium and for the corresponding dynamic plasma flow conditions. The ionospheric structure is then compared to radio occultation measurements by Kliore et al. [2002]. The final goal of this study is to deduce information about possible temporal variations and the overall structure of Callisto's atmosphere and ionosphere and eventually about the interior ocean layer from the magnetic field data.

  16. Modeling of the Geosynchronous Orbit Plasma Environment. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-14

    Charging by Magnetospheric Plasmas , AJAA+ ~ Progress W• AseMnAut|Ms-a~nd Aerontautics *iries, Vol. •42." 7. Stevens, N.J., Lovell, R. R., and Purvis...2. McPherson , D.A., Cauffman, D.P., and Schober, W. (1975) Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes - The SCATHA Program, AIAA paper. pp.pp. 75-92. 3...Pike, C., and Bunn, M. H. (1976) A correlation study relating spacecraft anomalies to environmental data, Ppacecraft Charging by Magnetoheric Plasma

  17. Molecular dynamical modelling of endohedral fullerenes formation in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. S.; Kovaleva, E. A.; Lubkova, T. A.; Popov, Z. I.; Kuzubov, A. A.; Visotin, M. A.; Irle, S.

    2016-02-01

    The initial stages of fullerene and endohedral metallofullerene (EMF) synthesis in carbon-helium plasma at 1500 K and 2500 K have been simulated with quantum chemical molecular dynamics (MD) based on density-functional tight-binding (DFTB). The cases of formation of large (>100 atoms) sp2-carbon clusters with scandium atoms inside were observed. These clusters are considered as precursors of fullerenes or EMFs, and thus it is shown that formation of EMFs can be explained within the framework of "shrinking hot giant" mechanism. Also, the dependence of formation rates on plasma parameters, including temperature, buffer gas and metal atoms concentrations, has been studied.

  18. A hydrodynamical model for relativistic spin quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Munoz, Victor; Valdivia, J. Alejandro; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2011-01-15

    Based on the one-body particle-antiparticle Dirac theory of electrons, a set of relativistic quantum fluid equations for a spin half plasma is derived. The particle-antiparticle nature of the relativistic particles is explicit in this fluid theory, which also includes quantum effects such as spin. The nonrelativistic limit is shown to be in agreement with previous attempts to develop a spin plasma theory derived from the Pauli Hamiltonian. Harnessing the formalism to the study of electromagnetic mode propagation, conceptually new phenomena are revealed; the particle-antiparticle effects increase the fluid opacity to these waves, while the spin effects tend to make the fluid more transparent.

  19. Incorporation of an energy equation into a pulsed inductive plasma acceleration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneau, Jarred

    Electric propulsion systems utilize electrical energy to produce thrust for spacecraft propulsion. These systems have multiple applications ranging from Earth orbit North-South station keeping to solar system exploratory missions such as NASA's Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship class missions that focus on exploring scientifically interesting targets. In an electromagnetic thruster, a magnetic field interacting with current in an ionized gas (plasma) accelerates the propellant to produce thrust. Pulsed inductive thrusters rely on an electrodeless discharge where both the magnetic field in the plasma and the plasma current are induced by a time-varying current in an external circuit. The multi-dimensional acceleration model for a pulsed inductive plasma thruster consists of a set of circuit equations describing the electrical behavior of the thruster coupled to a one-dimensional momentum equation that allow for estimating thruster performance. Current models lack a method to account for the time-varying energy distribution in an inductive plasma accelerator.

  20. Atomic processes modeling of X-ray free electron laser produced plasmas using SCFLY code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H.-K.; Cho, B. I.; Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Wark, J. S.; Lee, R. W.

    2017-03-01

    With the development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL), a novel state of matter of highly transient and non-equilibrium plasma has been created in laboratories. As high intensity X-ray laser beams interact with a solid density target, electrons are ionized from inner-shell orbitals and these electrons and XFEL photons create dense and finite temperature plasmas. In order to study atomic processes in XFEL driven plasmas, the atomic kinetics model SCFLY containing an extensive set of configurations needed for solid density plasmas was applied to study atomic processes of XFEL driven systems. The code accepts the time-dependent conditions of the XFEL as input parameters, and computes time-dependent population distributions and ionization distributions self-consistently with electron temperatures and densities assuming an instantaneous equilibration of electron energies. The methods and assumptions in the atomic kinetics model and unique aspects of atomic processes in XFEL driven plasmas are described.

  1. Validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen cage plasma nitriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, A.; Khan, A. W.; Jan, F.; Abrar, M.; Khalid, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2013-05-01

    The validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding for nitrogen mass transfer mechanism is investigated. The dominant species including NH, Fe-I, N2+, N-I and N2 along with Hα and Hβ lines are observed in the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) analysis. Active screen cage and dc plasma nitriding of AISI 316 stainless steel as function of treatment time is also investigated. The structure and phases composition of the nitrided layer is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface morphology is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness profile is obtained by Vicker's microhardness tester. Increasing trend in microhardness is observed in both cases but the increase in active screen plasma nitriding is about 3 times greater than that achieved by dc plasma nitriding. On the basis of metallurgical and OES observations the use of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding is tested.

  2. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Kolemen, E.; Taira, K.

    2016-02-19

    A model-based feedback system is presented to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device, to maintain plasma stability for long-pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using two different types of actuation: momentum from injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields. Based on the data-driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed, and predictive simulations using the TRANSP plasma transport code show that the controller is able to attain desired plasma rotation profiles given practical constraints on the actuators and the available measurements of rotation.

  3. A hybrid model of radio frequency biased inductively coupled plasma discharges: description of model and experimental validation in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, De-Qi; Liu, Wei; Gao, Fei; Lieberman, M. A.; Wang, You-Nian

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid model, i.e. a global model coupled bidirectionally with a parallel Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) sheath model, is developed to investigate an inductively coupled discharge with a bias source. This hybrid model can self-consistently reveal the interaction between the bulk plasma and the radio frequency (rf) bias sheath. More specifically, the plasma parameters affecting characteristics of rf bias sheath (sheath length and self-bias) are calculated by a global model and the effect of the rf bias sheath on the bulk plasma is determined by the voltage drop of the rf bias sheath. Moreover, specific numbers of ions are tracked in the rf bias sheath and ultimately the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) incident on the bias electrode is obtained. To validate this model, both bulk plasma density and IEDF on the bias electrode in an argon discharge are compared with experimental measurements, and a good agreement is obtained. The advantage of this model is that it can quickly calculate the bulk plasma density and IEDF on the bias electrode, which are of practical interest in industrial plasma processing, and the model could be easily extended to serve for industrial gases.

  4. The cosmic dust analyzer: Experimental evaluation of an impact ionization model. [considering thermal equilibrium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Roy, N. L.; Becker, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal equilibrium plasma model is used to process data from an impact ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to convert the raw ion data to relative abundances of the elemental constituents of cosmic dust particles.

  5. Two Temperature Modeling and Experimental Measurements of Laser Sustained Hydrogen Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    kinetic temperature model. At this level the species densities may be computed through a thermodynamic analysis using the law of mass action and an equation... Thermodynamic State .................................................................... 10 1.5 Plasma Composition...119 Appendix B. Experimental Data Error Analysis

  6. Modelling multi-ion plasma gun simulations of Tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    The effect of impurity ions in plasma gun ablation tests of various targets is considered. Inclusion of reasonable amounts of impurity ({approximately}10%) is adequate to explain observed energy transmission and erosion measurements. The gun tests and the computer code calculations are relevant to the parameter range expected for major disruptions on large tokamaks.

  7. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-08-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The ion trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3-D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision H-/H+ and of charge exchange H-/H0 are handled at each time step by a Monte-Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided if they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of «volume production» (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  8. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-02-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The H-/D- trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision with H+/D+ and of charge exchange with H0/D0 are handled at each time step by a Monte Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have been allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that, in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of volume production (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  9. Challenges in Modeling of the Plasma-Material Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag

    2014-03-01

    Recent work with lithium coatings deposited on a variety of metallic and graphitic surfaces, in a number of tokamak fusion machines around the world, has provided evidence of the sensitive dependence plasma behavior has on these ultra-thin deposited films. Our computer simulations, validated by recent experiments, have elucidated roles of lithium in carbon walls to the recycling of the plasma hydrogen [1]. We performed quantum-classical atomistic calculations on many thousands of random trajectories to clarify the interplay of lithium and oxygen in amorphous carbon. We show that the presence of oxygen in the surface plays the key role in the increased uptake chemistry and suppression of erosion, while lithium has a decisive role in achieving high concentrations of oxygen in the upper layers of the surface upon bombardment by deuterium. D atoms preferentially bind with O and C-O. The plasma-facing walls of the next-generation fusion reactors will be exposed to high fluxes of neutrons and plasma-particles and will operate at high temperatures for thermodynamic efficiency. To this end we have been studying the evolution dynamics of vacancies and interstitials to high doses of tungsten surfaces bombarded by self-atoms, using classical molecular dynamics. Results show surprising saturation of the defects upon cumulative irradiation of only 1 DPA, as well as the defects clustering at the tungsten surface. These findings are obtaining validation in recent experiments.

  10. D majority heating in JET plasmas: ICRH modelling and experimental RF deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Eester, D. van; Lamalle, P.; Krasilnikov, A.

    2007-09-28

    Recent experiments in JET have provided information on the potential of using majority RF heating schemes in large plasmas. Adopting a wide range of available diagnostics, the plasma behaviour was monitored. The main results of the experiments are that--due to the poor antenna coupling at low frequency, the low (Ohmic) plasma temperature and the reduced RF electric field amplitude near the ion-cyclotron resonance layer of the majority ions--ICRH alone is barely capable of heating the plasma. On the other hand, when preheating the plasma using neutral beam injection, the wave-plasma coupling is noticeably improved and considerable plasma heating, followed by increased neutron yield were observed in several diagnostics. This effect is not only attributed to the lower collisionality of the pre-heated plasma but also to the Doppler-shifted IC absorption of the fast beam ions. By studying the response of the plasma to sudden changes in the RF power level, the experimental power deposition profiles were determined and compared to theoretical predictions. The numerical modelling was done adopting a coupled wave/Fokker-Planck code that enables accounting for the non-Maxwellian distributions of the RF heated particles and the injected beam ions in the wave equation, and for the actual local RF fields in the Fokker-Planck description. The theoretical results confirm the experimental finding that the beam ions do play a crucial role in this heating scheme.

  11. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  12. Kinetic versus ideal magnetohydrodynamic modelling of the resistive wall mode in a reversed field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulec, M.; Ivanov, I. B.; Heyn, M. F.; Kernbichler, W.

    2012-03-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWMs) are studied within the kinetic model proposed by Heyn et al. [Nucl. Fusion 46, S159 (2006); Phys. Plasmas 18, 022501 (2011)], which accounts for Landau damping, transit-time magnetic pumping, and Coulomb collisions in cylindrical geometry. Results for the reversed field pinch plasma are compared to the magnetohydrodynamic results obtained by Guo et al., [Phys. Plasmas 6, 3868 (1999)]. Stabilization of the external kink mode by an ideal wall as well as stabilization of the resistive wall mode by toroidal plasma rotation is obtained. In contrast to MHD modelling, which predicts a stability window for the resistive wall position, kinetic modelling predicts a one sided window only, i.e., the resistive wall must be sufficiently close to plasma to achieve rotational stabilization of the mode but there is no lower limit on the wall position. Stabilizing rotation speeds are found somewhat smaller when compared to MHD results. In addition, for the present plasma configuration, the kinetic model predicts resistive wall mode stabilization only in one direction of toroidal rotation. In the opposite direction, a destabilizing effect is observed. This is in contrast to MHD where mode stabilization is symmetric with respect to the direction of the toroidal plasma rotation.

  13. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  14. A Phenomenological Model for Circadian and Sleep Allostatic Modulation of Plasma Cortisol Concentration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-25

    decreased morning awakening salivary cortisol . Psychoneuroendo- crinology 29: 1184–1191, 2004. 2. Balbo M, Leproult R, Van Cauter E. Impact of sleep and...A phenomenological model for circadian and sleep allostatic modulation of plasma cortisol concentration David Thorsley,1 Rachel Leproult,2,3 Karine...2012 Thorsley D, Leproult R, Spiegel K, Reifman J. A phenomenological model for circadian and sleep allostatic modulation of plasma cortisol

  15. Modelling erosion damage from low-energy plasma gun simulations of disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1993-10-01

    Energy transfer to material surfaces is dominated by photon radiation through low temperature plasma vapors if tokamak disruptions are due to low kinetic energy particles ({approx_lt} 100 eV). Simple models of radiation transport are derived and incorporated into a fast-running computer routine to model this process. The results of simulations are in good agreement with plasma gun erosion tests on several metal targets.

  16. Fundamental Mechanisms, Predictive Modeling, and Novel Aerospace Applications of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    rich low temperature chemistry Pressure: 1 atm DME model: Zhao et al., Int. J. Chem. Kinet ., (40) 2008 37 Flow tube experiments DME : rich low... Kinetic enhancement Fuel fragmentsTemperature increase Transport enhancementThermal enhancement Radicals H2, CO CH4 Understanding: Good poor O, NO O2(a∆g...plasma flame kinetic mechanism Develop numerical methods to achieve efficient modeling of detailed plasma flame chemistry 5 Outline 1. Background 2

  17. A quantitative model for heat pulse propagation across large helical device plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Inagaki, S.

    2015-06-01

    It is known that rapid edge cooling of magnetically confined plasmas can trigger heat pulses that propagate rapidly inward. These can result in large excursion, either positive or negative, in the electron temperature at the core. A set of particularly detailed measurements was obtained in Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas [S. Inagaki et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 52, 075002 (2010)], which are considered here. By applying a travelling wave transformation, we extend the model of Dendy et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 55, 115009 (2013), which successfully describes the local time-evolution of heat pulses in these plasmas, to include also spatial dependence. The new extended model comprises two coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the (x, t) evolution of the deviation from steady state of two independent variables: the excess electron temperature gradient and the excess heat flux, both of which are measured in the LHD experiments. The mathematical structure of the model equations implies a formula for the pulse velocity, defined in terms of plasma quantities, which aligns with empirical expectations and is within a factor of two of the measured values. We thus model spatio-temporal pulse evolution, from first principles, in a way which yields as output the spatiotemporal evolution of the electron temperature, which is also measured in detail in the experiments. We compare the model results against LHD datasets using appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Sensitivity of this nonlinear model with respect to plasma parameters, initial conditions, and boundary conditions is also investigated. We conclude that this model is able to match experimental data for the spatio-temporal evolution of the temperature profiles of these pulses, and their propagation velocities, across a broad radial range from r /a ≃0.5 to the plasma core. The model further implies that the heat pulse may be related mathematically to soliton solutions of the

  18. Modelling Of Generation And Growth Of Nanoparticles In Low-Pressure Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gordiets, B. F.

    2008-09-07

    Theoretical kinetic models of generation and growth of clusters and nanoparticles in low-pressure plasma are briefly rewired. The relatively simple kinetic model is discussed more detail. Simple formulas and equations are given for monomer density; cluster dimension distribution; critical cluster dimension; rate of particle production; particle density and average dimension as well as plasma characteristics. The analytical formula is also obtained for the time delay of the measured LIPEE signal in the 'Laser Induced Particle Explosive Evaporation' experimental method.

  19. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  20. Fusion plasma theory. Task 3: ECRH and transport modeling in tandem mirrors and divertor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, G. A.

    1984-06-01

    The research performed under Tank II of this contact has focused on: (1) the coupling of an ECRH ray tracing and absorption code to a tandem mirror transport code in order to self-consistently model the temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma, and (2) the further development of semi-analytical models for plasma flow in divertors and pumped limiters. Work on these topics is briefly summarized.

  1. Fast multidimensional model for the simulation of Raman amplification in plasma.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J P; Pukhov, A

    2013-12-01

    We present Leap, a simulation model for Raman amplification in plasma, combining an envelope treatment of the laser fields with an electrostatic particle-in-cell solver. The code is fully two dimensional, with the model readily extendible to three dimensions, and includes dispersive and refractive effects. Simulations carried out for Raman amplification in a plasma channel show that guiding of both the pump and the probe contribute to the evolution of the probe, resulting in a shorter, more intense pulse.

  2. Two-fluid modeling of magnetic nozzle and FRC confined plasmas with the NIMROD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso

    2000-10-01

    MHD and two-fluid simulations with the NIMROD code [1] for studying plasma detachment in a magnetic nozzle and field reversed configuration (FRC) confined plasmas are reported. A new version of the code is used, featuring an improved finite element formulation that provides better spatial accuracy for a given grid resolution [2]. The code is also upgraded by adding the density equation, removing this way the assumption of incompressible plasma, and a provision for “open end” boundary conditions. The simulations of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle are performed in cylindrical geometry with an asymmetric magnetic mirror field along the axis, modeling the VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) experiment [3]. The goals are to assess critical problems like exhaust plasma detachment, the temperature spatial dependence in the plasma plume and the magnetic nozzle parameter optimization. The possible application of a FRC as a source for plasma propulsion is considered: FRC runs are first addressing the two-fluid stability against tilt modes [4]. Simulations are also tailored to model the integration of the FRC with a magnetic nozzle. [1] A. H. Glasser, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion , 41, A74 (1999). [2] C. R. Sovinec, Int. Sherwood Fusion Theory Conf., Los Angeles, CA (USA), March 2000. [3] F. R. Chang Diaz, Trans. Fus. Tech., 35, 87 (1999). [4] Ishida, et al., Phys. Fluids, 31, 3024 (1988).

  3. Extension of the Bissell-Johnson plasma-sheath model for application to fusion-relevant and general plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, L.; Jelić, N.; Kuhn, S.; Duhovnik, J.

    2009-09-01

    This article presents an approach to solving a special Fredholm-type integral equation of the first kind with a particular kernel containing a modified Bessel function for applications in plasma physics. From the physical point of view, the problem was defined by Bissell and Johnson (B&J) [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] as a task to find the potential profile and the ion velocity distribution function in a plane-parallel discharge with a Maxwellian ion source. The B&J model is a generalization of the well-known Tonks-Langmuir (T&L) [Phys. Rev. 34, 876 (1929)] discharge model characterized by a "cold" ion source. Unlike the T&L model, which can be readily solved analytically, attempts to solve the B&J model with a "warm" ion source have been done only numerically. However, the validity of numerical solutions up to date remains constrained to a rather limited range of a crucial independent parameter of the B&J integral equation, which mathematically is the width of a Gaussian distribution and physically represents the ion temperature. It was solved only for moderately warm ion sources. This paper presents the exact numerical solution of the B&J model, which is valid without any restriction regarding the above-mentioned parameter. It is shown that the ion temperature is very different from the temperature of the ion source. The new results with high-temperature ion sources are not only of particular importance for understanding and describing the plasma-sheath boundary in fusion plasmas, but are of considerable interest for discharge problems in general. The eigenvalue of the problem, found analytically by Harrison and Thompson [Proc. Phys. Soc. 74, 145 (1959)] for the particular case of a cold ion source, is here extended to arbitrary ion-source temperatures.

  4. Helicon thruster plasma modeling: Two-dimensional fluid-dynamics and propulsive performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Navarro-Cavallé, Jaume

    2013-04-01

    An axisymmetric macroscopic model of the magnetized plasma flow inside the helicon thruster chamber is derived, assuming that the power absorbed from the helicon antenna emission is known. Ionization, confinement, subsonic flows, and production efficiency are discussed in terms of design and operation parameters. Analytical solutions and simple scaling laws for ideal plasma conditions are obtained. The chamber model is then matched with a model of the external magnetic nozzle in order to characterize the whole plasma flow and assess thruster performances. Thermal, electric, and magnetic contributions to thrust are evaluated. The energy balance provides the power conversion between ions and electrons in chamber and nozzle, and the power distribution among beam power, ionization losses, and wall losses. Thruster efficiency is assessed, and the main causes of inefficiency are identified. The thermodynamic behavior of the collisionless electron population in the nozzle is acknowledged to be poorly known and crucial for a complete plasma expansion and good thrust efficiency.

  5. A physical model of radiated enhancement of plasma-surrounded antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiaotian; Wang, Chunsheng Jiang, Binhao; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2014-09-15

    A phenomenon that the radiated power may be enhanced when an antenna is surrounded by a finite plasma shell has been found in numerical and experimental studies. In this paper, a physical model was built to express the mechanism of the radiated enhancement. In this model, the plasma shell is treated as a parallel connection of a capacitance and a conductance whose parameters change with the system parameters (plasma density, collision frequency, and antenna frequency). So, the radiated enhancement can be explained by the resonance between the plasma shell and the infinite free space. Furthermore, the effects of system parameters on the radiated power are given and effects corresponding to mechanisms are performed based on the physical model.

  6. Helicon thruster plasma modeling: Two-dimensional fluid-dynamics and propulsive performances

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Navarro-Cavalle, Jaume

    2013-04-15

    An axisymmetric macroscopic model of the magnetized plasma flow inside the helicon thruster chamber is derived, assuming that the power absorbed from the helicon antenna emission is known. Ionization, confinement, subsonic flows, and production efficiency are discussed in terms of design and operation parameters. Analytical solutions and simple scaling laws for ideal plasma conditions are obtained. The chamber model is then matched with a model of the external magnetic nozzle in order to characterize the whole plasma flow and assess thruster performances. Thermal, electric, and magnetic contributions to thrust are evaluated. The energy balance provides the power conversion between ions and electrons in chamber and nozzle, and the power distribution among beam power, ionization losses, and wall losses. Thruster efficiency is assessed, and the main causes of inefficiency are identified. The thermodynamic behavior of the collisionless electron population in the nozzle is acknowledged to be poorly known and crucial for a complete plasma expansion and good thrust efficiency.

  7. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.

    2009-05-15

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements over a wide range of temperatures. The 150-300 eV temperature range is particularly interesting. The opacity models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate theoretical opacities. Testing these opacities requires well-characterized plasmas at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self-emission. These problems can be overcome with the new generation of high energy density (HED) facilities. For example, recent experiments at Sandia's Z facility [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] measured the transmission of a mixed Mg and Fe plasma heated to 156{+-}6 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other HED plasmas. This tutorial reviews experimental methods for testing opacity models, including experiment design, transmission measurement methods, accuracy evaluation, and plasma diagnostics. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments illustrate the techniques.

  8. A plasma density model for Saturn based on Voyager observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The present combination of ion and electron data sets from both Voyager flybys are to yield the broad view of the Saturn plasma environment indicates that a small, -10 to -20 V spacecraft potential furnishes a plausible basis for reconciliation of differences between observed ion and electron densities. A map of density contours within L = 12 is produced which incorporates all available Voyager thermal plasma data in this region, assuming that the inner mesosphere was stable during the nine months between encounters. The oxygen flux tube content decreases rapidly within L = 5, indicating the occurrence of losses in this region. Neural atom lifetimes in the inner magnetosphere lie in the range of weeks to years, and are a strong function of latitude.

  9. Statistical Models of Power-law Distributions in Homogeneous Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Ilan

    2011-01-04

    A variety of in-situ measurements in space plasmas point out to an intermittent formation of distribution functions with elongated tails and power-law at high energies. Power-laws form ubiquitous signature of many complex systems, plasma being a good example of a non-Boltzmann behavior for distribution functions of energetic particles. Particles, which either undergo mutual collisions or are scattered in phase space by electromagnetic fluctuations, exhibit statistical properties, which are determined by the transition probability density function of a single interaction, while their non-asymptotic evolution may determine the observed high-energy populations. It is shown that relaxation of the Brownian motion assumptions leads to non-analytical characteristic functions and to generalization of the Fokker-Planck equation with fractional derivatives that result in power law solutions parameterized by the probability density function.

  10. In-bore diagnostic and modeling of an electrothermal plasma launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A diagnostic method has been developed to measure the high heat flux produced in the electrothermal plasma launcher SIRENS. The method involves attaching a thermocouple to the back surface of a target to obtain the temperature history of the back surface, which is a direct indication of the heat flux incident on the front surface. The measured temperature history is an input to a developed one dimensional (1-D), time dependent heat conduction code which uses the temperature history of the back surface to determine the incident heat flux on the front surface of the target. A one dimensional time dependent code, ODIN, was developed to model the plasma formation and flow in electrothermal launchers. ODIN models the plasma formation and flow into the source section and the plasma expansion into and through the barrel section. ODIN models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and equation-of-state. The source and barrel sections were broken into a specific number of cells and each cell was considered to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), with the plasma modeled as a viscous fluid. The primary objective of the numerical simulation was to predict the time and axial variation of the plasma flow and to predict the magnitude of the drag forces acting on the plasma. SIRENS has been operated at atmospheric conditions using a fuse placed between the two electrodes in the source section to initiate the discharge. Three different types of fuses were tested, with the best results obtaining using a thin triangular shaped aluminum fuse. SIRENS has also be used to launch projectiles, with projectile masses ranging from 400 mg to 1500 mg. The maximum velocity obtained was 1.74 km/sec at an input energy of 2.5 kJ, using a 540 mg Lexan projectile with an efficiency of 33%.

  11. In-Bore Diagnostic and Modeling of AN Electrothermal Plasma Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jeffery Dale

    A diagnostic method has been developed to measure the high heat flux produced in the electrothermal plasma launcher SIRENS. The method involves attaching a thermocouple to the back surface of a target to obtain the temperature history of the back surface, which is a direct indication of the heat flux incident on the front surface. The measured temperature history is an input to a developed one dimensional (1-D), time dependent heat conduction code which uses the temperature history of the back surface to determine the incident heat flux on the front surface of the target. A one dimensional time dependent code, ODIN, was developed to model the plasma formation and flow in electrothermal launchers. ODIN models the plasma formation and flow in the source section and the plasma expansion into and through the barrel section. ODIN models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and equation-of-state. The source and barrel sections were broken into a specific number of cells and each cell was considered to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), with the plasma modeled as a viscous fluid. The primary objective of the numerical simulation was to predict the time and axial variation of the plasma flow and to predict the magnitude of the drag forces acting on the plasma. SIRENS has been operated at atmospheric conditions using a fuse placed between the two electrodes in the source section to initiate the discharge. Three different types of fuses were tested, with the best results obtained using a thin triangular shaped aluminum fuse. SIRENS has also been used to launch projectiles, with projectile masses ranging from 400 mg to 1500 mg. The maximum velocity obtained was 1.74 km/sec at an input energy of 2.5 kJ, using a 540 mg Lexan projectile with an efficiency of 33%.

  12. CO2 conversion in a gliding arc plasma: 1D cylindrical discharge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizong; Berthelot, Antonin; Kolev, Stanimir; Tu, Xin; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-12-01

    CO2 conversion by a gliding arc plasma is gaining increasing interest, but the underlying mechanisms for an energy-efficient process are still far from understood. Indeed, the chemical complexity of the non-equilibrium plasma poses a challenge for plasma modeling due to the huge computational load. In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) gliding arc model is developed in a cylindrical frame, with a detailed non-equilibrium CO2 plasma chemistry set, including the CO2 vibrational kinetics up to the dissociation limit. The model solves a set of time-dependent continuity equations based on the chemical reactions, as well as the electron energy balance equation, and it assumes quasi-neutrality in the plasma. The loss of plasma species and heat due to convection by the transverse gas flow is accounted for by using a characteristic frequency of convective cooling, which depends on the gliding arc radius, the relative velocity of the gas flow with respect to the arc and on the arc elongation rate. The calculated values for plasma density and plasma temperature within this work are comparable with experimental data on gliding arc plasma reactors in the literature. Our calculation results indicate that excitation to the vibrational levels promotes efficient dissociation in the gliding arc, and this is consistent with experimental investigations of the gliding arc based CO2 conversion in the literature. Additionally, the dissociation of CO2 through collisions with O atoms has the largest contribution to CO2 splitting under the conditions studied. In addition to the above results, we also demonstrate that lumping the CO2 vibrational states can bring a significant reduction of the computational load. The latter opens up the way for 2D or 3D models with an accurate description of the CO2 vibrational kinetics.

  13. A multi-species 13-moment model for moderately collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S. T. Shumlak, U.

    2016-08-15

    Fluid-based models of collisional transport in multi-species plasmas have typically been applied to parameter regimes where a local thermal equilibrium is assumed. While this parameter regime is valid for low temperature and/or high density applications, it begins to fail as plasmas enter the collisionless regime and kinetic effects dominate the physics. A plasma model is presented that lays the foundation for extending the validity of the collisional fluid regime using an anisotropic 13-moment fluid model derived from the Pearson type-IV probability distribution. The model explicitly evolves the pressure tensor and heat flux vector along with the density and flow velocity to capture dynamics usually restricted to kinetic models. Each particle species is modeled individually and collectively coupled through electromagnetic and collisional interactions.

  14. Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equa- tions [2]. In literature, the Local Thermodynamic Equi- librium (LTE) assumption is often used to describe the state of...the gas in the discharge region [4–17]. However, Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) simula- tions of Argon [18, 19] and air plasmas [20], have

  15. Generalized model screening potentials for Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some properties of relativistically degenerate quantum plasmas, such as static ion screening, structure factor, and Thomson scattering cross-section, are studied in the framework of linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory with the newly proposed kinetic γ-correction to Bohm term in low frequency limit. It is found that the correction has a significant effect on the properties of quantum plasmas in all density regimes, ranging from solid-density up to that of white dwarf stars. It is also found that Shukla-Eliasson attractive force exists up to a few times the density of metals, and the ionic correlations are seemingly apparent in the radial distribution function signature. Simplified statically screened attractive and repulsive potentials are presented for zero-temperature Fermi-Dirac plasmas, valid for a wide range of quantum plasma number-density and atomic number values. Moreover, it is observed that crystallization of white dwarfs beyond a critical core number-density persists with this new kinetic correction, but it is shifted to a much higher number-density value of n0 ≃ 1.94 × 1037 cm-3 (1.77 × 1010 gr cm-3), which is nearly four orders of magnitude less than the nuclear density. It is found that the maximal Thomson scattering with the γ-corrected structure factor is a remarkable property of white dwarf stars. However, with the new γ-correction, the maximal scattering shifts to the spectrum region between hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-rays. White dwarfs composed of higher atomic-number ions are observed to maximally Thomson-scatter at slightly higher wavelengths, i.e., they maximally scatter slightly low-energy photons in the presence of correction.

  16. Generalized model screening potentials for Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, some properties of relativistically degenerate quantum plasmas, such as static ion screening, structure factor, and Thomson scattering cross-section, are studied in the framework of linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory with the newly proposed kinetic γ-correction to Bohm term in low frequency limit. It is found that the correction has a significant effect on the properties of quantum plasmas in all density regimes, ranging from solid-density up to that of white dwarf stars. It is also found that Shukla-Eliasson attractive force exists up to a few times the density of metals, and the ionic correlations are seemingly apparent in the radial distribution function signature. Simplified statically screened attractive and repulsive potentials are presented for zero-temperature Fermi-Dirac plasmas, valid for a wide range of quantum plasma number-density and atomic number values. Moreover, it is observed that crystallization of white dwarfs beyond a critical core number-density persists with this new kinetic correction, but it is shifted to a much higher number-density value of n{sub 0} ≃ 1.94 × 10{sup 37} cm{sup −3} (1.77 × 10{sup 10} gr cm{sup −3}), which is nearly four orders of magnitude less than the nuclear density. It is found that the maximal Thomson scattering with the γ-corrected structure factor is a remarkable property of white dwarf stars. However, with the new γ-correction, the maximal scattering shifts to the spectrum region between hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-rays. White dwarfs composed of higher atomic-number ions are observed to maximally Thomson-scatter at slightly higher wavelengths, i.e., they maximally scatter slightly low-energy photons in the presence of correction.

  17. Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-29

    Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

  18. Hydrodynamic Models for Multicomponent Plasmas with Collisional-Radiative Kinetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    problem is the forward step problem, also known as the Emery problem, or the Mach-3 wind tunnel problem. The problem consists of uniform flow of Mach-3...2011. [50] C. K. Birdsall and A. B. Langdon. Plasma physics via computer simulation. Taylor & Francis, 2005. [51] G. Lapenta. Particle simulations of...space weather. Journal of Computa- tional Physics, 231(3):795–821, February 2012. [52] J. O. Hirschfelder, C. F. Curtiss, and R. B. Bird . The Molecular

  19. Ionization Potential Depression in Hot Dense Plasmas Through a Pure Classical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.

    2015-05-01

    The ionization potential of an ion embedded in a plasma, lowered due to the whole of the charged particles (ions and electrons) interacting with this ion, is the so-called plasma effect. A numerical plasma model based on classical molecular dynamics has been developed recently. It is capable to describe a neutral plasma at equilibrium involving ions of various charge states of the same atom together with electrons. This code is used here to investigate the ionization potential depression (IPD). The study of the IPD is illustrated and discussed for aluminum plasmas at mid and solid density and electron temperatures varying from 50eV to 190eV. The method relies on a sampling of the total potential energy of the electron located at an ion being ionized. The potential energy of such electron results from all of the interacting charged particles interacting with it.

  20. Gd plasma source modeling at 6.7 nm for future lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2011-12-05

    Plasmas containing gadolinium have been proposed as sources for next generation lithography at 6.x nm. To determine the optimum plasma conditions, atomic structure calculations have been performed for Gd{sup 11+} to Gd{sup 27+} ions which showed that n = 4 - n = 4 resonance transitions overlap in the 6.5-7.0 nm region. Plasma modeling calculations, assuming collisional-radiative equilibrium, predict that the optimum temperature for an optically thin plasma is close to 110 eV and that maximum intensity occurs at 6.76 nm under these conditions. The close agreement between simulated and experimental spectra from laser and discharge produced plasmas indicates the validity of our approach.