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Sample records for moderate muscle strain

  1. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  2. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  3. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  4. Skeletal muscle tensile strain dependence: hyperviscoelastic nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin B; Morrow, Duane A; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Computational modeling of skeletal muscle requires characterization at the tissue level. While most skeletal muscle studies focus on hyperelasticity, the goal of this study was to examine and model the nonlinear behavior of both time-independent and time-dependent properties of skeletal muscle as a function of strain. Materials and Methods Nine tibialis anterior muscles from New Zealand White rabbits were subject to five consecutive stress relaxation cycles of roughly 3% strain. Individual relaxation steps were fit with a three-term linear Prony series. Prony series coefficients and relaxation ratio were assessed for strain dependence using a general linear statistical model. A fully nonlinear constitutive model was employed to capture the strain dependence of both the viscoelastic and instantaneous components. Results Instantaneous modulus (p<0.0005) and mid-range relaxation (p<0.0005) increased significantly with strain level, while relaxation at longer time periods decreased with strain (p<0.0005). Time constants and overall relaxation ratio did not change with strain level (p>0.1). Additionally, the fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic constitutive model provided an excellent fit to experimental data, while other models which included linear components failed to capture muscle function as accurately. Conclusions Material properties of skeletal muscle are strain-dependent at the tissue level. This strain dependence can be included in computational models of skeletal muscle performance with a fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic model. PMID:26409235

  5. Molecular responses to moderate endurance exercise in skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined alterations in skeletal-muscle growth and atrophy-related molecular events after a single bout of moderate-intensity endurance exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from 10 men (23 +/- 1 yr, body mass 80 +/- 2 kg, and VO(2peak) 45 +/- 1 ml x kg'¹ x min'¹) immediately (0 hr) and...

  6. Skeletal muscle transverse strain during isometric contraction at different lengths.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, C C; Willems, P J; Muijtjens, A M; Drost, M R

    1999-08-01

    An important assumption in 2D numerical models of skeletal muscle contraction involves deformation in the third dimension of the included muscle section. The present paper studies the often used plane strain description. Therefore, 3D muscle surface deformation is measured from marker displacements during isometric contractions at various muscle lengths. Longitudinal strains at superficial muscle fibers ( - 14 +/- 2.6% at L0, n = 57) and aponeurosis (0.8 +/- 0.9% at L0) decrease with increasing muscle length. The same holds for transverse muscle surface strains in superficial muscle fibers and aponeurosis, which are comparable at intermediate muscle length, but differ at long and short muscle length. Because transverse strains during isometric contraction change with initial muscle length, it is concluded that the effect of muscle length on muscle deformation cannot be studied in plane strain models. These results do not counteract the use of these models to study deformation in contractions with approximately - 9 % longitudinal muscle fiber strain, as transverse strain in superficial muscle fibers and in aponeurosis tissue is minimal in that case. Aponeurosis surface area change decreases with increasing initial muscle length, but muscle fiber surface area change is - 11%, independent of muscle length. Assuming incompressible muscle material, this means that strain perpendicular to the muscle surface equals 11%. Taking the relationship between transverse and longitudinal muscle fiber strain into account, it is hypothesized that superficial muscle fibers flatten during isometric contractions.

  7. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-01-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non‐dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis‐specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences. PMID:17957025

  8. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-11-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non-dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis-specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences.

  9. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  10. Grounding after moderate eccentric contractions reduces muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard; Chevalier, Gaétan; Hill, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Grounding a human to the earth has resulted in changes in the physiology of the body. A pilot study on grounding and eccentric contractions demonstrated shortened duration of pain, reduced creatine kinase (CK), and differences in blood parameters. This follow-up study was conducted to investigate the effects of grounding after moderate eccentric contractions on pain, CK, and complete blood counts. Thirty-two healthy young men were randomly divided into grounded (n=16) and sham-grounded (n=16) groups. On days 1 through 4, visual analog scale for pain evaluations and blood draws were accomplished. On day 1, the participants performed eccentric contractions of 200 half-knee bends. They were then grounded or sham-grounded to the earth for 4 hours on days 1 and 2. Both groups experienced pain on all posttest days. On day 2, the sham-grounded group experienced significant CK increase (P<0.01) while the CK of the grounded group did not increase significantly; the between-group difference was significant (P=0.04). There was also an increase in the neutrophils of the grounded group on day 3 (P=0.05) compared to the sham-grounded group. There was a significant increase in platelets in the grounded group on days 2 through 4. Grounding produced changes in CK and complete blood counts that were not shared by the sham-grounded group. Grounding significantly reduced the loss of CK from the injured muscles indicating reduced muscle damage. These results warrant further study on the effects of earthing on delayed onset muscle damage. PMID:26443876

  11. Proteasome inhibition alleviates prolonged moderate compression-induced muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism initiating deep pressure ulcer remains to be elucidated. The present study tested the hypothesis that the ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in the signalling mechanism in pressure-induced deep tissue injury. Methods Adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to an experimental compression model to induce deep tissue injury. The tibialis region of the right hind limb was subjected to 100 mmHg of static pressure for six hours on each of two consecutive days. The compression pressure was continuously monitored by a three-axial force transducer within the compression indentor. The left hind limb served as the intra-animal control. Muscle tissues underneath the compressed region were collected and used for analyses. Results Our results demonstrated that the activity of 20S proteasome and the protein abundance of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 were elevated in conjunction with pathohistological changes in the compressed muscle, as compared to control muscle. The administration of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 was found to be effective in ameliorating the development of pathological histology in compressed muscle. Furthermore, 20S proteasome activity and protein content of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 showed no apparent increase in the MG132-treated muscle following compression. Conclusion Our data suggest that the ubiquitin proteasome system may play a role in the pathogenesis of pressure-induced deep tissue injury. PMID:21385343

  12. Angiogenesis is induced by airway smooth muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Lin, Richard Z; Vaday, Gayle G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2007-10-01

    Angiogenesis is an important feature of airway remodeling in both chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airways in those conditions are exposed to excessive mechanical strain during periods of acute exacerbations. We recently reported that mechanical strain of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) led to an increase in their proliferation and migration. Sustained growth in airway smooth muscle in vivo requires an increase in the nutritional supply to these muscles, hence angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical strain of HASM produces factors promoting angiogenic events in the surrounding vascular endothelial cells. Our results show: 1) a significant increase in human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) proliferation, migration, and tube formation following incubation in conditioned media (CM) from HASM cells exposed to mechanical strain; 2) mechanical strain of HASM cells induced VEGF expression and release; 3) VEGF neutralizing antibodies inhibited the proliferation, migration, and tube formations of HMVEC-L induced by the strained airway smooth muscle CM; 4) mechanical strain of HASM induced a significant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) mRNA and protein, a transcription factor required for VEGF gene transcription; and 5) mechanical strain of HASM induced HIF-1alpha/VEGF through dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ERK pathways. In conclusion, exposing HASM cells to mechanical strain induces signal transduction pathway through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK pathways that lead to an increase in HIF-1alpha, a transcription factor required for VEGF expression. VEGF release by mechanical strain of HASM may contribute to the angiogenesis seen with repeated exacerbation of asthma and COPD.

  13. Strain and elongation of the human semitendinosus muscle - tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Patsika, Glykeria; Karagiannidis, Evaggelos

    2013-12-01

    The semitendinosus (ST) consists of a long distal tendon and it is divided in two parts by a tendinous inscription (TI). The purpose of this study was to quantify strain and elongation of the TI and the distal tendon of ST. Fourteen subjects performed ramp isometric contractions of the knee flexors at 0°, 45° and 90° of knee flexion. Two ultrasound probes were used to visualize the displacement of the distal tendon and selected points across the TI and aponeuroses. Three-way analysis of variance designs indicated that: (a) strain and elongation of the ST distal muscle-tendon junction were higher than that of the aponeurosis - TI junction points (p < 0.05) (b) the long arm of the TI reach strain of 49.86 ± 7.77% which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that displayed by the short arm (28.35 ± 0.59%) (c) Strain of tendinous and TI-aponeuroses segments significantly increased from 90° to 0° of knee flexion while the inverse was observed for the TI arm length (p < 0.05). (d) Tendon strain was significantly higher than strain of the TI-aponeuroses segments at 45° and 90° of knee flexion while the opposite was observed at 0° of knee flexion. The arrangement of TI along ST length results in differential local strains, indicating that the mechanical properties of the ST muscle are affected by tendon, aponeuroses and tendinous inscription interactions.

  14. The trapezius muscle uniquely lacks adaptive process in response to a repeated moderate cognitive stressor.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Magali; Bolmont, Benoît

    2012-01-06

    The aim of this study was to examine the adaptive process of muscular responses in healthy subjects over two repeated exposures to the same moderate cognitive stressor. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor pollicis brevis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, trapezius, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was recorded in 35 males during video-recorded Stroop color-word interference tests. The results showed lower EMG activity in all muscles during the second exposure to the stressful task, but not in the trapezius muscle. These findings could help to the understanding of the role of stressful situations in the development of musculoskeletal disorders.

  15. The effect of muscle fatigue on in vivo tibial strains.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Radeva-Petrova, Denitsa R; Finestone, Aharon; Nyska, Meir; Mendelson, Stephen; Benjuya, Nisim; Simkin, Ariel; Burr, David

    2007-01-01

    Stress fracture is a common musculoskeletal problem affecting athletes and soldiers. Repetitive high bone strains and strain rates are considered to be its etiology. The strain level necessary to cause fatigue failure of bone ex vivo is higher than the strains recorded in humans during vigorous physical activity. We hypothesized that during fatiguing exercises, bone strains may increase and reach levels exceeding those measured in the non-fatigued state. To test this hypothesis, we measured in vivo tibial strains, the maximum gastrocnemius isokinetic torque and ground reaction forces in four subjects before and after two fatiguing levels of exercise: a 2km run and a 30km desert march. Strains were measured using strain-gauged staples inserted percutaneously in the medial aspect of their mid-tibial diaphysis. There was a decrease in the peak gastrocnemius isokinetic torque of all four subjects' post-march as compared to pre-run (p=0.0001), indicating the presence of gastrocnemius muscle fatigue. Tension strains increased 26% post-run (p=0.002, 95 % confidence interval (CI) and 29% post-march (p=0.0002, 95% CI) as compared to the pre-run phase. Tension strain rates increased 13% post-run (p=0.001, 95% CI) and 11% post-march (p=0.009, 95% CI) and the compression strain rates increased 9% post-run (p=0.0004, 95% CI) and 17% post-march (p=0.0001, 95% CI). The fatigue state increases bone strains well above those recorded in rested individuals and may be a major factor in the stress fracture etiology.

  16. The Physiological Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Supply and Oxidation During Moderate-Intensity Exercise.

    PubMed

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2015-11-01

    Energy substrates that are important to the working muscle at moderate intensities are the non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) taken up from the circulation and NEFAs originating from lipolysis of the intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTAG). Moreover, NEFA from lipolysis via lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the muscle of the very-low-density lipoproteins and in the (semi) post-prandial state chylomicrons may also contribute. In this review, the NEFA fluxes and oxidation by skeletal muscle during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise are described in terms of the integration of physiological systems. Steps involved in the regulation of the active muscle NEFA uptake include (1) increased energy demand; (2) delivery of NEFA to the muscle; (3) transport of NEFA into the muscle by NEFA transporters; and (4) activation of the NEFAs and either oxidation or re-esterification into IMTAG. The increased metabolic demand of the exercising muscle is the main driving force for all physiological regulatory processes. It elicits functional hyperemia, increasing the recruitment of capillaries and muscle blood flow resulting in increased NEFA delivery and accessibility to NEFA transporters and LPL. It also releases epinephrine that augments adipose tissue NEFA release and thereby NEFA delivery to the active muscle. Moreover, NEFA transporters translocate to the plasma membrane, further increasing the NEFA uptake. The majority of the NEFAs taken up by the active muscle is oxidized and a minor portion is re-esterified to IMTAG. Net IMTAG lipolysis occurs; however, the IMTAG contribution to total fat oxidation is rather limited compared to plasma-derived NEFA oxidation, suggesting a complex role and regulation of IMTAG utilization.

  17. Three-dimensional ultrasound strain imaging of skeletal muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gijsbertse, K.; Sprengers, A. M. J.; Nillesen, M. M.; Hansen, H. H. G.; Lopata, R. G. P.; Verdonschot, N.; de Korte, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a multi-dimensional strain estimation method is presented to assess local relative deformation in three orthogonal directions in 3D space of skeletal muscles during voluntary contractions. A rigid translation and compressive deformation of a block phantom, that mimics muscle contraction, is used as experimental validation of the 3D technique and to compare its performance with respect to a 2D based technique. Axial, lateral and (in case of 3D) elevational displacements are estimated using a cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm. After transformation of the displacements to a Cartesian coordinate system, strain is derived using a least-squares strain estimator. The performance of both methods is compared by calculating the root-mean-squared error of the estimated displacements with the calculated theoretical displacements of the phantom experiments. We observe that the 3D technique delivers more accurate displacement estimations compared to the 2D technique, especially in the translation experiment where out-of-plane motion hampers the 2D technique. In vivo application of the 3D technique in the musculus vastus intermedius shows good resemblance between measured strain and the force pattern. Similarity of the strain curves of repetitive measurements indicates the reproducibility of voluntary contractions. These results indicate that 3D ultrasound is a valuable imaging tool to quantify complex tissue motion, especially when there is motion in three directions, which results in out-of-plane errors for 2D techniques.

  18. Effects of moderate heart failure and functional overload on rat plantaris muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, Espen E.; Lees, Simon J.; Otis, Jeff S.; Musch, Timothy I.; Talmadge, Robert J.; Williams, Jay H.

    2002-01-01

    It is thought that changes in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) of skeletal muscle contribute to alterations in skeletal muscle function during congestive heart failure (CHF). It is well established that exercise training can improve muscle function. However, it is unclear whether similar adaptations will result from exercise training in a CHF patient. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle during moderate CHF adapts to increased activity, utilizing the functional overload (FO) model. Significant increases in plantaris mass of the CHF-FO and sham-FO groups compared with the CHF and control (sham) groups were observed. Ca(2+) uptake rates were significantly elevated in the CHF group compared with all other groups. No differences were detected in Ca(2+) uptake rates between the CHF-FO, sham, and sham-FO groups. Increases in Ca(2+) uptake rates in moderate-CHF rats were not due to changes in SERCA isoform proportions; however, FO may have attenuated the CHF-induced increases through alterations in SERCA isoform expression. Therefore, changes in skeletal muscle Ca(2+) handling during moderate CHF may be due to alterations in regulatory mechanisms, which exercise may override, by possibly altering SERCA isoform expression.

  19. Changes in masseter muscle trigger points following strain-counterstrain or neuro-muscular technique.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-García, Jordi; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Girao, Didac; Atienza-Meseguer, Albert; Planella-Abella, Sergi; Fernández-de-Las Peñas, César

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immediate effects, on pressure pain sensitivity and active mouth opening, following the application of neuromuscular or strain/counter-strain technique in latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the masseter muscle. Seventy-one subjects, 34 men and 37 women, aged 20-65 years old, participated in this study. Subjects underwent a screening process to establish the presence of MTrPs in the masseter muscle. Subjects were divided randomly into three groups: group A which was treated with a neuromuscular intervention, group B treated with the strain/counter-strain technique, and group C as control group. Each treatment group received a weekly treatment session during 3 consecutive weeks. Outcomes measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), active mouth opening and local pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) elicited by the application of 2.5kg/cm(2) of pressure over the MTrP. They were captured at baseline and 1 week after discharge by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation of the subject. The ANOVA found a significant groupxtime interaction (F=25.3; p<0.001) for changes in PPT, changes in active mouth opening (F=10.5; p<0.001), and local pain evoked by 2.5kg/cm(2) of pressure (F=10.1; p<0.001). Within-group effect sizes were large (d>1) for PPT and mouth opening, and moderate for local pain (d<0.7, 0.5) in both intervention groups; but small (d<0.2) for the control group in all outcomes. No significant differences between both intervention groups were found for any outcome (p>0.8). Our results suggest that neuromuscular or strain/counter-strain technique might be employed in the management of latent MTrPs in the masseter muscle.

  20. Effect of blood volume in resting muscle on heart rate upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takehide; Matsuura, Ryouta; Arimitsu, Takuma; Yunoki, Takahiro; Yano, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the increase in blood volume in resting muscle during moderately prolonged exercise is related to heart rate (HR) upward drift. Eight healthy men completed both arm-cranking moderately prolonged exercise (APE) and leg-pedaling moderately prolonged exercise (LPE) for 30 min. Exercise intensity was 120 bpm of HR that was determined by ramp incremental exercise. During both APE and LPE, HR significantly increased from 3 to 30 min (from 108±9.3 to 119±12 bpm and from 112±8.9 to 122±11 bpm, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between HR in APE and that in LPE. Oxygen uptake was maintained throughout the two exercises. Skin blood flow, deep temperature, and total Hb (blood volume) in resting muscle continuously increased for 30 min of exercise during both APE and LPE. During both APE and LPE, there was a significant positive correlation between total Hb and deep temperature in all subjects. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between HR and total Hb (in seven out of eight subjects) during LPE. However, during APE, there was no positive correlation between HR and total Hb (r=0.391). These findings suggest that an increase of blood pooling in resting muscle could be proposed as one of the mechanisms underlying HR upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

  1. Assessment of Muscle Contractile Properties at Acute Moderate Altitude Through Tensiomyography.

    PubMed

    Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Padial, Paulino; Rodríguez-Matoso, Dario; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; García-Ramos, Amador; García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Calderón, Carmen; Feriche, Belén

    2015-12-01

    Under hypoxia, alterations in muscle contractile properties and faster fatigue development have been reported. This study investigated the efficacy of tensiomyography (TMG) in assessing muscle contractile function at acute moderate altitude. Biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of 18 athletes (age 20.1 ± 6.1 years; body mass 65.4 ± 13.9 kg; height 174.6 ± 9.5 cm) were assessed at sea level and moderate altitude using electrically evoked contractions on two consecutive days. Maximum radial displacement (Dm), time of contraction (Tc), reaction time (Td), sustained contraction time (Ts), and relaxation time (Tr) were recorded at 40, 60, 80, and 100 mA. At altitude, VL showed lower Dm values at 40 mA (p = 0.008; ES = -0.237). Biceps femoris showed Dm decrements in all electrical stimulations (p < 0.001, ES > 0.61). In VL, Tc was longer at altitude at 40 (p = 0.031, ES = 0.56), and 100 mA (p = 0.03, ES = 0.51). Regarding Td, VL showed significant increases in all electrical intensities under hypoxia (p ≤ 0.03, ES ≥ 0.33). TMG appears effective at detecting slight changes in the muscle contractile properties at moderate altitude. Further research involving TMG along with other muscle function assessment methods is needed to provide additional insight into peripheral neuromuscular alterations at moderate altitude.

  2. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-03-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P < 0.05) in DB compared with Con. Leg oxygen extraction (arteriovenous O(2) difference) was higher (P < 0.05) in DB than in Con (5 s: 127 +/- 3 vs. 56 +/- 4 ml/l), and leg oxygen uptake was not different between Con and DB during exercise. The difference between leg oxygen delivery and leg oxygen uptake was smaller (P < 0.05) during exercise in DB than in Con (5 s: 59 +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.

  3. Adrenaline increases skeletal muscle glycogenolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase activation and carbohydrate oxidation during moderate exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Matthew J; Howlett, Kirsten F; Febbraio, Mark A; Spriet, Lawrence L; Hargreaves, Mark

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of adrenaline in regulating carbohydrate metabolism during moderate exercise, 10 moderately trained men completed two 20 min exercise bouts at 58 ± 2 % peak pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2,peak). On one occasion saline was infused (CON), and on the other adrenaline was infused intravenously for 5 min prior to and throughout exercise (ADR). Glucose kinetics were measured by a primed, continuous infusion of 6,6-[2H]glucose and muscle samples were obtained prior to and at 1 and 20 min of exercise. The infusion of adrenaline elevated (P < 0.01) plasma adrenaline concentrations at rest (pre-infusion, 0.28 ± 0.09; post-infusion, 1.70 ± 0.45 nmol l−1; means ±s.e.m.) and this effect was maintained throughout exercise. Total carbohydrate oxidation increased by 18 % and this effect was due to greater skeletal muscle glycogenolysis (P < 0.05) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation (P < 0.05, treatment effect). Glucose rate of appearance was not different between trials, but the infusion of adrenaline decreased (P < 0.05, treatment effect) skeletal muscle glucose uptake in ADR. During exercise muscle glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) (P = 0.055, treatment effect) and lactate (P < 0.05) were elevated in ADR compared with CON and no changes were observed for pyruvate, creatine, phosphocreatine, ATP and the calculated free concentrations of ADP and AMP. The data demonstrate that elevated plasma adrenaline levels during moderate exercise in untrained men increase skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown and PDH activation, which results in greater carbohydrate oxidation. The greater muscle glycogenolysis appears to be due to increased glycogen phosphorylase transformation whilst the increased PDH activity cannot be readily explained. Finally, the decreased glucose uptake observed during exercise in ADR is likely to be due to the increased intracellular G-6-P and a subsequent decrease in glucose phosphorylation. PMID:11433007

  4. Moderate bending strain induced semiconductor to metal transition in Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, M. Golam; Patil, Sunil R.; Anantram, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    A moderate amount of bending strains, ∼3% is found to be enough to induce the semiconductor-metal transition in Si nanowires of ∼4 nm diameter. The influence of bending on silicon nanowires of 1 nm to 4.3 nm diameter is investigated using molecular dynamics and quantum transport simulations. Local strains in nanowires are analyzed along with the effect of bending strain and nanowire diameter on electronic transport and the transmission energy gap. Interestingly, relatively wider nanowires are found to undergo semiconductor-metal transition at relatively lower bending strains. The effect of bending strain on electronic properties is then compared with the conventional way of straining, i.e. uniaxial, which shows that bending is a much more efficient way of straining to enhance the electronic transport and also to induce the semiconductor-metal transition in experimentally realizable Si nanowires.

  5. Moderate exercise training induces ROS-related adaptations to skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Abruzzo, P M; Esposito, F; Marchionni, C; di Tullio, S; Belia, S; Fulle, S; Veicsteinas, A; Marini, M

    2013-08-01

    Aim of the present work was the evaluation of the effects of moderate exercise training on 2 skeletal muscles differing in fibre-type composition, Tibialis Anterior (TA) and Soleus (SOL). Fibre adaptations, including their metabolic shift and mechanisms underlying proliferation and differentiation, oxidative stress markers, antioxidant and cytoprotective molecules, activity of Ca2+-handling molecules were examined. 6 male 2-month-old rats trained on a treadmill for 1 h/day, 3 days/week, for 14 weeks, reaching 30 m/min at the end of training. 6 age-matched sedentary rats served as controls. Rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last training session. Muscle regulatory factors increased in both muscles, activating satellite cell proliferation, which led to moderate hypertrophy in SOL and to moderate hyperplasia in TA, where the upregulation of desmin and TNFR2 expression suggests that myotube formation by proliferating myoblasts is somehow delayed. Changes leading to a more oxidative metabolism together with the upregulation of a number of antioxidant enzymes occurred in TA. HSP70i protein was upregulated in both SOL and TA, while oxidative stress markers increased in SOL alone. The status of ionic channels and pumps was preserved. We suggest that the increase in ROS, known to be associated with exercise, underlies most observed results.

  6. Hyperplasia of smooth muscle in mild to moderate asthma without changes in cell size or gene expression.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Prescott G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Ferrando, Ronald E; Donnelly, Samantha; Hays, Steven R; Solberg, Owen D; Carter, Roderick; Wong, Hofer H; Cadbury, Peggy S; Fahy, John V

    2004-05-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in mild to moderate asthma may result from airway smooth muscle cell proliferation or acquisition of a hypercontractile phenotype. Because these cells have not been well characterized in mild to moderate asthma, we examined the morphometric and gene expression characteristics of smooth muscle cells in this subgroup of patients with asthma. Using bronchial biopsies from 14 subjects with mild to moderate asthma and 15 control subjects, we quantified smooth muscle cell morphology by stereology and the expression of a panel of genes related to a hypercontractile phenotype of airway smooth muscle, using laser microdissection and two-step real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that airway smooth muscle cell size was similar in both groups, but cell number was nearly twofold higher in subjects with asthma (p = 0.03), and the amount of smooth muscle in the submucosa was increased 50-83% (p < 0.005). Gene expression profiling in smooth muscle cells showed no difference in the expression of genes encoding phenotypic markers in cells from healthy subjects and subjects with asthma (all p > 0.1). We conclude that airway smooth muscle proliferation is a pathologic characteristic of subjects with mild to moderate asthma. However, smooth muscle cells in mild to moderate asthma do not show hypertrophy or gene expression changes of a hypercontractile phenotype observed in vitro.

  7. Mechanistic role of movement and strain sensitivity in muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Julien S.; Epstein, Neal D.

    2009-01-01

    Tension generation can be studied by applying step perturbations to contracting muscle fibers and subdividing the mechanical response into exponential phases. The de novo tension-generating isomerization is associated with one of these phases. Earlier work has shown that a temperature jump perturbs the equilibrium constant directly to increase tension. Here, we show that a length jump functions quite differently. A step release (relative movement of thick and thin filaments) appears to release a steric constraint on an ensemble of noncompetent postphosphate release actomyosin cross-bridges, enabling them to generate tension, a concentration jump in effect. Structural studies [Taylor KA, et al. (1999) Tomographic 3D reconstruction of quick-frozen, Ca2+-activated contracting insect flight muscle. Cell 99:421–431] that map to these kinetics indicate that both catalytic and lever arm domains of noncompetent myosin heads change angle on actin, whereas lever arm movement alone mediates the power stroke. Together, these kinetic and structural observations show a 13-nm overall interaction distance of myosin with actin, including a final 4- to 6-nm power stroke when the catalytic domain is fixed on actin. Raising fiber temperature with both perturbation techniques accelerates the forward, but slows the reverse rate constant of tension generation, kinetics akin to the unfolding/folding of small proteins. Decreasing strain, however, causes both forward and reverse rate constants to increase. Despite these changes in rate, the equilibrium constant is strain-insensitive. Activation enthalpy and entropy data show this invariance to be the result of enthalpy–entropy compensation. Reaction amplitudes confirm a strain-invariant equilibrium constant and thus a strain-insensitive ratio of pretension- to tension-generating states as work is done. PMID:19325123

  8. Isolation of moderately penicillin-susceptible strains of Neisseria meningitidis in Argentina.

    PubMed Central

    Lopardo, H A; Santander, C; Ceinos, M C; Rubeglio, E A

    1993-01-01

    Four strains that were moderately susceptible to penicillin and/or ampicillin were found among 54 consecutive isolates of meningococci recovered from patients in one pediatric hospital in Argentina from October 1991 to December 1992. Disk diffusion tests performed with 2 U of penicillin failed to detect one strain. These findings suggest that attention should be paid to changes in the susceptibility patterns of meningococci in order to anticipate therapeutic failures in the future. PMID:8215295

  9. The magnitude of muscle strain does not influence serial sarcomere number adaptations following eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-02-01

    It is generally accepted that eccentric exercise, when performed by a muscle that is unaccustomed to that type of contraction, results in a delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). A prolonged exposure to eccentric exercise leads to the disappearance of the signs and symptoms associated with DOMS, which has been referred to as the repeated bout effect (RBE). Although the mechanisms underlying the RBE remain unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed, including the serial sarcomere number addition following exercise induced muscle damage. In the traditional DOMS and RBE protocols, muscle injury has been treated as a global parameter, with muscle force and strain assumed to be uniform throughout the muscle. To assess the effects of muscle-tendon unit strain, fiber strain, torque and injury on serial sarcomere number adaptations, three groups of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to chronic repetitive eccentric exercise bouts of the ankle dorsiflexors for 6 weeks. These eccentric exercise protocols consisted of identical muscle tendon unit (MTU) strain, but other mechanical factors were systematically altered. Following chronic eccentric exercise, serial sarcomere number adaptations were not identical between the three eccentric exercise protocols, and serial sarcomere number adaptations were not uniform across all regions of the muscle. Peak torque and relaxation fiber strain were the best predictors of serial sarcomere number across all three protocols. Therefore, MTU strain does not appear to be the primary cause for sarcomerogenesis, and differential adaptations within the muscle may be explained by the nonuniform architecture of the muscle, resulting in differential local fiber strains.

  10. Regional heterogeneity in muscle fiber strain: the role of fiber architecture

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, E.; Deslauriers, Amber R.

    2014-01-01

    The force, mechanical work and power produced by muscle fibers are profoundly affected by the length changes they undergo during a contraction. These length changes are in turn affected by the spatial orientation of muscle fibers within a muscle (fiber architecture). Therefore any heterogeneity in fiber architecture within a single muscle has the potential to cause spatial variation in fiber strain. Here we examine how the architectural variation within a pennate muscle and within a fusiform muscle can result in regional fiber strain heterogeneity. We combine simple geometric models with empirical measures of fiber strain to better understand the effect of architecture on fiber strain heterogeneity. We show that variation in pennation angle throughout a muscle can result in differences in fiber strain with higher strains being observed at lower angles of pennation. We also show that in fusiform muscles, the outer/superficial fibers of the muscle experience lower strains than central fibers. These results show that regional variation in mechanical output of muscle fibers can arise solely from architectural features of the muscle without the presence of any spatial variation in motor recruitment. PMID:25161626

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Methanotroph Methylohalobius crimeensis Strain 10Ki

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Christine E.; Smirnova, Angela V.; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Bringel, Françoise; Hirayama, Hisako; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Khmelenina, Valentina N.; Klotz, Martin G.; Knief, Claudia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Reshetnikov, Alexander S.; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Shapiro, Nicole; Trotsenko, Yuri A.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Methylohalobius crimeensis strain 10Ki is a moderately halophilic aerobic methanotroph isolated from a hypersaline lake in the Crimean Peninsula, Ukraine. This organism has the highest salt tolerance of any cultured methanotroph. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:26067976

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes).

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Ramaley, Robert F; Schuster, Stephan C; Steinke, Laurey; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-08-28

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons.

  13. On-call work and physicians' turnover intention: the moderating effect of job strain.

    PubMed

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Presseau, Justin; Elovainio, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Physician shortage and turnover are major problems worldwide. On-call duties may be among the risk factors of high turnover rates among physicians. We investigated whether having on-call duties is associated with physicians' turnover intention and whether job strain variables moderate this association. The present study was a cross-sectional questionnaire study among 3324 (61.6% women) Finnish physicians. The analyses were conducted using analyses of covariance adjusted for age, gender, response format, specialization status and employment sector. The results showed that job strain moderated the association between being on-call and turnover intention. The highest levels of turnover intention were among those who had on-call duties and high level of job strain characterized by high demands and low control opportunities. The lowest levels of turnover intention were among those who were not on-call and who had low strain involving low demands and high control. Also, job demands moderated the association between being on-call and turnover intention; turnover intention levels were higher among those with on-call duties and high demands than those being on-call and low demands. To conclude, working on-call was related to physicians' turnover intention particularly in those with high job strain. Health care organizations should focus more attention on working arrangements and scheduling of on-call work, provide a suitable working pace and implement means to increase physicians' participation and control over their job.

  14. Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The effects of essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation during moderate steady state (ie, endurance) exercise on postexercise skeletal muscle metabolism are not well described, and the potential role of supplemental leucine on muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and associated molecular re...

  15. Quantification of muscle fiber strain during in vivo repetitive stretch-shortening cycles.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2005-08-01

    Muscles subjected to lengthening contractions exhibit evidence of subcellular disruption, arguably a result of fiber strain magnitude. Due to the difficulty associated with measuring fiber strains during lengthening contractions, fiber length estimates have been used to formulate relationships between the magnitude of injury and mechanical measures such as fiber strain. In such protocols, the series compliance is typically minimized by removing the distal tendon and/or preactivating the muscle. These in vitro and in situ experiments do not represent physiological contractions well where fiber strain and muscle strain may be disassociated; thus the mechanisms of in vivo muscle injury remain elusive. The purpose of this paper was to quantify fiber strains during lengthening contractions in vivo and assess the potential role of fiber strain in muscle injury following repetitive stretch-shortening cycles. Using intact New Zealand White rabbit dorsiflexors, fiber strain and joint torque were measured during 50 stretch-shortening cycles. We were able to show that fiber length changes are disassociated from muscle tendon unit length changes and that complex fiber dynamics during these cycles prevent easy estimates of fiber strains. In addition, fiber strains vary, depending on how they are defined, and vary from repetition to repetition, thereby further complicating the potential relationship between muscle injury and fiber strain. We conclude from this study that, during in vivo stretch-shortening cycles, the relationship between fiber strain and muscle injury is complex. This is due, in part, to temporal effects of repeated loading on fiber strain magnitude that may be explained by an increasing compliance of the contractile element as exercise progresses.

  16. Moderation of skeletal muscle reperfusion injury by a sLe(x)-glycosylated complement inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Kyriakides, C; Wang, Y; Austen, W G; Favuzza, J; Kobzik, L; Moore, F D; Hechtman, H B

    2001-07-01

    The role of the sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x))-decorated version of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) in moderating skeletal muscle reperfusion injury, by antagonizing neutrophil endothelial selectin interaction and complement activation, is examined. Mice underwent 2 h of hindlimb ischemia and 3 h of reperfusion. Permeability index (PI) was assessed by extravasation of 125I-labeled albumin. Neutrophil depletion and complement inhibition with sCR1 reduced permeability by 72% (PI 0.81 +/- 0.10) compared with a 42% decrease (PI 1.53 +/- 0.08) observed in neutropenic mice, indicating that part of the complement-mediated injury is neutrophil independent. sCR1sLe(x) treatment reduced PI by 70% (PI 0.86 +/- 0.06), an additional 20% decrease compared with sCR1 treatment (PI 1.32 +/- 0.08). Treatment with sCR1sLe(x) 0.5 and 1 h after reperfusion reduced permeability by 63% (PI 0.09 +/- 0.07) and 52% (PI 1.24 +/- 0.09), respectively, compared with the respective decreases of 41% (PI 1.41 +/- 0.10) and 32% (PI 1.61 +/- 0.07) after sCR1 treatment. Muscle immunohistochemistry stained for sCR1 only on the vascular endothelium of sCR1sLe(x)-treated mice. In conclusion, sCR1sLe(x) is more effective than sCR1 in moderating skeletal muscle reperfusion injury.

  17. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise.

  18. Muscle strain histories in swimming milkfish in steady and sprinting gaits

    PubMed

    Katz; Shadwick; Rapoport

    1999-03-01

    Adult milkfish (Chanos chanos) swam in a water-tunnel flume over a wide range of speeds. Fish were instrumented with sonomicrometers to measure shortening of red and white myotomal muscle. Muscle strain was also calculated from simultaneous overhead views of the swimming fish. This allowed us to test the hypothesis that the muscle shortens in phase with local body bending. The fish swam at slow speeds [U<2.6 fork lengths s-1 (=FL s-1)] where only peripheral red muscle was powering body movements, and also at higher speeds (2. 6>U>4.6 FL s-1) where they adopted a sprinting gait in which the white muscle is believed to power the body movements. For all combinations of speeds and body locations where we had simultaneous measurements of muscle strain and body bending (0.5 and 0.7FL), both techniques were equivalent predictors of muscle strain histories. Cross-correlation coefficients for comparisons between these techniques exceeded 0.95 in all cases and had temporal separations of less than 7 ms on average. Muscle strain measured using sonomicrometry within the speed range 0.9-2.6 FL s-1 showed that muscle strain did not increase substantially over that speed range, while tail-beat frequency increased by 140 %. While using a sprinting gait, muscle strains became bimodal, with strains within bursts being approximately double those between bursts. Muscle strain calculated from local body bending for a range of locations on the body indicated that muscle strain increases rostrally to caudally, but only by less than 4 %. These results suggest that swimming muscle, which forms a large fraction of the body volume in a fish, undergoes a history of strain that is similar to that expected for a homogeneous, continuous beam. This has been an implicit assumption for many studies of muscle function in many fish, but has not been tested explicitly until now. This result is achieved in spite of the presence of complex and inhomogeneous geometry in the folding of myotomes

  19. A comparison of inspiratory muscle fatigue following maximal exercise in moderately trained males and females.

    PubMed

    Ozkaplan, Atila; Rhodes, Edward C; Sheel, A William; Taunton, Jack E

    2005-09-01

    Exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been reported in males but there are few reports of IMF in females. It is not known if a gender difference exists for inspiratory muscle strength following heavy exercise, as is reported in locomotor muscles. Therefore, the relationship between fatigue and subsequent recovery of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) following exercise to maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was examined in a group of moderately trained males and females. Eighteen males (23+/-3 years; mean +/- SD) and 16 females (23+/-2 years) completed ten MIP and ten maximal handgrip (HG) strength maneuvers to establish baseline. Post-exercise MIP and HG were assessed successively immediately following a progressive intensity VO2max test on a cycle ergometer and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, and 15 min. VO2max, relative to fat-free mass was not statistically different between males (62+/-7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and females (60+/-8 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). Males had higher absolute MIP values than females at all time intervals (P<0.05). Immediately following exercise, MIP was significantly reduced in both genders (M=83+/-16%; F=78+/-15% of baseline) but HG values were not different than resting values. MIP values remained depressed for both males and females throughout the 15 min (P<0.05). Differences for MIP between males and females were not statistically significant at any measurement time (P>0.05). The findings in this study conclude that IMF, observed immediately following maximal exercise, demonstrated the same pattern of recovery for both genders.

  20. Static strain and vibration characteristics of a metal semimonocoque helicopter tail cone of moderate size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.; Hefner, Rachel E.; Castagna, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of an analytic and experimental research program involving a Sikorsky S-55 helicopter tail cone directed ultimately to the improved structural analysis of airframe substructures typical of moderate sized helicopters of metal semimonocoque construction. Experimental static strain and dynamic shake-testing measurements are presented. Correlation studies of each of these tests with a PC-based finite element analysis (COSMOS/M) are described. The tests included static loadings at the end of the tail cone supported in the cantilever configuration as well as vibrational shake-testing in both the cantilever and free-free configurations.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus succinus Strain CSM-77, a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Triassic Salt Mine

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus succinus strain CSM-77. This moderately halophilic bacterium was isolated from the surface of a halite sample obtained from a Triassic salt mine. PMID:27284152

  2. Factors involved in strain-induced injury in skeletal muscles and outcomes of prolonged exposures.

    PubMed

    Stauber, William T

    2004-02-01

    Repetitive motion disorders can involve lengthening of skeletal muscles to perform braking actions to decelerate limbs under load often resulting in muscle strains and injury. Injury is a loss of isometric force (weakness) requiring days to recover. The capacity of skeletal muscle to tolerate repeated strains is dependent on multiple factors including individual variation. The most important factors producing muscle strain injury are the magnitude of the resisting force (peak-stretch force) and the number of strains. Other factors such as muscle length and fiber type contribute to the susceptibility to injury as well, but to a lesser degree. Strain injury can also lead to inflammation and pain. Chronic exposure to repeated strains can result in fibrosis that is not completely reversed after months of rest. Long rest times appear to be the only factor reported to prevent inflammation in rats following repeated strain injury. Further understanding of the mechanism for prevention of histopathologic changes by long rest times should provide a rationale for prevention of negative outcomes.

  3. Combined diffusion and strain tensor MRI reveals a heterogeneous, planar pattern of strain development during isometric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Englund, Erin K; Elder, Christopher P; Xu, Qing; Ding, Zhaohua; Damon, Bruce M

    2011-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to create a three-dimensional representation of strain during isometric contraction in vivo and to interpret it with respect to the muscle fiber direction. Diffusion tensor MRI was used to measure the muscle fiber direction of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of seven healthy volunteers. Spatial-tagging MRI was used to measure linear strains in six directions during separate 50% maximal isometric contractions of the TA. The strain tensor (E) was computed in the TA's deep and superficial compartments and compared with the respective diffusion tensors. Diagonalization of E revealed a planar strain pattern, with one nonzero negative strain (ε(N)) and one nonzero positive strain (ε(P)); both strains were larger in magnitude (P < 0.05) in the deep compartment [ε(N) = -40.4 ± 4.3%, ε(P) = 35.1 ± 3.5% (means ± SE)] than in the superficial compartment (ε(N) = -24.3 ± 3.9%, ε(P) = 6.3 ± 4.9%). The principal shortening direction deviated from the fiber direction by 24.0 ± 1.3° and 39.8 ± 6.1° in the deep and superficial compartments, respectively (P < 0.05, deep vs. superficial). The deviation of the shortening direction from the fiber direction was due primarily to the lower angle of elevation of the shortening direction over the axial plane than that of the fiber direction. It is concluded that three-dimensional analyses of strain interpreted with respect to the fiber architecture are necessary to characterize skeletal muscle contraction in vivo. The deviation of the principal shortening direction from the fiber direction may relate to intramuscle variations in fiber length and pennation angle.

  4. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions.

  5. Adaptation of rat soleus muscles to 4 wk of intermittent strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Miller, G. R.; Grimmett, J. G.; Knack, K. K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated strains on rat soleus muscles was investigated by stretching active muscles 3 times/wk for 4 wk with two different methods of stretching. The adaptation of myofibers and noncontractile tissue was followed by histochemical techniques and computer-assisted image analysis. Muscle hypertrophy was seen in the slow-stretched muscles, which increased in mass by 13% and increased in myofiber cross-sectional area by 30%. In the fast-stretched muscle, mass increased by 10% but myofiber cross-sectional area actually decreased. This decrease in mean fiber area was the result of a population of very small fibers (population A) that coexisted with slightly smaller normal-sized fibers (population B). Fibers in population A did not have the distribution expected from atrophy compared with atrophic fibers from unloaded muscles; they were much smaller. In addition, there was a 44% increase in noncontractile tissue in the fast-stretched muscles. Thus, soleus muscles subjected to repeated strains respond differently to slow and fast stretching. Slow stretching results in typical muscle hypertrophy, whereas fast stretching produces somewhat larger muscles but with a mixture of small and normal-sized myofibers accompanied by a marked proliferation of noncontractile tissue.

  6. Eccentric exercise in vivo: strain-induced muscle damage and adaptation in a stable system.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A

    2010-04-01

    The muscle tendon unit is a stable system, designed to operate eccentrically with efficiency and resiliency. Fiber strains, although minimized by tendon compliance during exercise, are essential components to decoding the mechanical and chemical signals during exercise. Subsequent cellular adaptations minimize the subsequent "dose" of stress and strain and serve to limit the exacerbation of damage into injury.

  7. Effects of muscle contraction on the load-strain properties of frog aponeurosis and tendon.

    PubMed

    Lieber, R L; Leonard, M E; Brown-Maupin, C G

    2000-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) tendon and aponeurosis were measured during passive tensile loading to a force equal to ST maximum tetanic tension and during active isometric muscle contraction. During active contraction, both the tendon and aponeurosis regions initially strained at rates exceeding 400%/s while near the end of the muscle contraction, strain rates were nearly zero. At this point, the strain in the tendon region was equal to that observed during slow passive loading to the same tension level. However, for the aponeurosis, even near the zero strain rate, strain at the end of the active contraction was significantly below that observed during slow passive loading (p < 0. 001). Specifically, when aponeurosis strain rate was almost zero, aponeurosis strain was 13.8 +/- 3% (means +/- SEM, n = 10), which was significantly below that measured during passive loading (23.7 +/- 5%) suggesting that active contraction actually altered aponeurosis material properties. These data demonstrate that, while the tendon and aponeurosis regions have different passive biomechanical properties and both demonstrate viscosity typical of other connective tissues, the aponeurosis region of the frog ST actually changed its intrinsic properties during muscle contraction. Thus, extrapolation of biomechanical data obtained at nonphysiological strain rates or under conditions where the muscle-tendon junction has been interrupted should be made with caution.

  8. Giant pseudocyst of the rectus femoris muscle--repetitive strain injury in recreational soccer player.

    PubMed

    Cicvarić, Tedi; Lucin, Ksenija; Roth, Sandor; Ivancić, Aldo; Marinović, Marin; Santić, Veljko

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of a traumatic pseudocyst, in a recreational soccer player, after rupture of rectus femoris muscle. 37-year-old male, with history of repetitive painful accidents, was examined because of a double fist-sized mass in the anterior thigh. Ultrasound examination revealed a cystic mass in the rectus femoris muscle. Surgical removal of the mass and proximal remnant of muscle was done. Primary healing and functional recovery was achieved. Histological analysis revealed pseudocyst filled with degenerating clot and surrounded with thick fibrous capsule. The repetitive strain muscle injury, with prolonged period of healing, can occur like pseudocyst.

  9. Characterising skeletal muscle under large strain using eccentric and Fourier Transform-rheology.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kristy; Cheng, Shaokoon; Jugé, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E

    2015-11-05

    Characterising the passive anisotropic properties of soft tissues has been largely limited to the linear viscoelastic regime and shear loading is rarely done in the large deformation regime, despite the physiological significance of such properties. This paper demonstrates the use of eccentric rheology, which allows the anisotropy of skeletal muscle to be investigated. The large amplitude oscillatory strain properties of skeletal muscle were also investigated using Fourier Transform-rheology. Histology was used to qualitatively assess the microstructure changes induced by large strain. Results showed that skeletal muscle was strongly anisotropic in the linear regime. The storage and loss moduli were found to be significantly different (p<0.05) between the three fibre alignment groups; for the group tested with fibres perpendicular to plane of shear was 12.3±1.3 kPa and 3.0±0.35 kPa, parallel to shear direction was 10.6±1.2 kPa and 2.4±0.23 kPa, and perpendicular to shear direction was 5.5±0.90 kPa and 1.3±0.21 kPa. The appearance and growth of higher order harmonics at large strain was different in the three testing directions indicating that the anisotropy of muscle affects skeletal muscle behaviour in the nonlinear regime. Histological analysis showed an increasing destruction of extracellular matrix and the rearrangement of fibres with increasing strain indicating mechanical damage at strains of larger than 10%. These microstructural changes could contribute to the complex nonlinear behaviour in skeletal muscle. This paper demonstrates a method of characterising the anisotropic properties in skeletal muscle under large strain whilst giving meaningful information on the physical response of tissue at various strains.

  10. Activation and aponeurosis morphology affect in vivo muscle tissue strains near the myotendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Epstein, Frederick H; Blemker, Silvia S

    2012-02-23

    Hamstring strain injury is one of the most common injuries in athletes, particularly for sports that involve high speed running. The aims of this study were to determine whether muscle activation and internal morphology influence in vivo muscle behavior and strain injury susceptibility. We measured tissue displacement and strains in the hamstring muscle injured most often, the biceps femoris long head muscle (BFLH), using cine DENSE dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. Strain measurements were used to test whether strain magnitudes are (i) larger during active lengthening than during passive lengthening and (ii) larger for subjects with a relatively narrow proximal aponeurosis than a wide proximal aponeurosis. Displacement color maps showed higher tissue displacement with increasing lateral distance from the proximal aponeurosis for both active lengthening and passive lengthening, and higher tissue displacement for active lengthening than passive lengthening. First principal strain magnitudes were averaged in a 1cm region near the myotendinous junction, where injury is most frequently observed. It was found that strains are significantly larger during active lengthening (0.19 SD 0.09) than passive lengthening (0.13 SD 0.06) (p<0.05), which suggests that elevated localized strains may be a mechanism for increased injury risk during active as opposed to passive lengthening. First principal strains were higher for subjects with a relatively narrow aponeurosis width (0.26 SD 0.15) than wide (0.14 SD 0.04) (p<0.05). This result suggests that athletes who have BFLH muscles with narrow proximal aponeuroses may have an increased risk for BFLH strain injuries.

  11. The effect of transient, moderate dietary phosphorus deprivation on phosphorus metabolism, muscle content of different phosphorus-containing compounds, and muscle function in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Grünberg, W; Scherpenisse, P; Dobbelaar, P; Idink, M J; Wijnberg, I D

    2015-08-01

    decline in muscle tissue P content. Electromyographic examination revealed increased occurrence of pathological spontaneous activity in striated muscles after 2 wk of dietary P depletion in several cows, which could be suggestive of neuromuscular membrane instability. No effect on heart muscle activity was identified electrocardiographically. These results suggest that counter-regulatory mechanisms were sufficient to maintain normal muscle tissue P content during transient and moderate P deprivation. Muscle function was not grossly affected, although the increased occurrence of pathological spontaneous activity suggests that subclinical neuropathy or myopathy, or both, may have occurred with ongoing P deprivation. The results presented here indicate that plasma [Pi] is unsuitable for assessing muscle tissue P content in cattle.

  12. Heterogeneous recruitment of quadriceps muscle portions and fibre types during moderate intensity knee-extensor exercise: effect of thigh occlusion.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, P; Söderlund, K; Relu, M U; Ferguson, R A; Bangsbo, J

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of quadriceps femoris muscle portions and fibre type recruitment was studied during submaximal knee-extensor exercise without and with thigh occlusion (OCC) and compared with responses during intense exercise. Six healthy male subjects performed 90-s of moderate exercise without (MOD; 29+/-4 W) and with thigh OCC, and moderate exercise followed by 90-s of intense exercise (HI; 65+/-8 W). Temperatures were continuously measured in m. vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) and successive muscle biopsies were obtained from VL. During MOD, muscle temperature increase (DeltaT(m)) in RF was 0.52+/-0.09 degrees C, which was 57% and 73% higher (P<0.05) than in VL and VM, respectively. During OCC, DeltaT(m) in RF was 0.39+/-0.05 degrees C, which was not different from VM but 54% higher (P<0.05) than in VL. After MOD, muscle CP in slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) fibres was 81% and 91% of resting levels, respectively, with lower (P<0.05) values after OCC (15% and 22%) and HI (24% and 13%). After MOD, OCC and HI, a total of 48%, 93% and 96% of the ST fibres had CP levels below mean-1 SD, respectively, with corresponding values for FT fibres being 41%, 89% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, a heterogeneous recruitment of the quadriceps muscle portions and muscle fibres was observed during submaximal knee-extensor exercise, whereas recruitment pattern was homogenous during intense exercise. Thigh OCC caused an altered recruitment of fibres and muscle portions, suggesting a significant afferent response affecting the activation of fibres in the contracting muscles.

  13. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Anderson F.; Valle, Roberta S.; Pacheco, Clarissa A.; Alvarez, Vanessa M.; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L.S.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties. PMID:24688526

  14. Use of Autologous Platelet-rich Plasma to Treat Muscle Strain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jason W.; Hinton, Richard Y.; Ann Curl, Leigh; Muriel, Joaquin M.; Lovering, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Muscle strains are one of the most common injuries treated by physicians. Standard conservative therapy for acute muscle strains usually involves short-term rest, ice, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, but there is no clear consensus on how to accelerate recovery. Hypothesis Local delivery of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to injured muscles hastens recovery of function. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. We used an established animal model of injury to test the effects of autologous platelet-rich plasma PRP on recovery of contractile function. Methods In vivo, the tibialis anterior muscles (TA) of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were injured by a single (large strain) lengthening contraction or multiple (small strain) lengthening contractions, both of which result in a significant injury. The TA was injected with either PRP, PPP (platelet-poor plasma, as a sham treatment), or received no treatment. Results Both injury protocols yield a similar loss of force. The PRP only had a beneficial effect at one time point after the single contraction injury protocol. However, PRP had a beneficial effect at several time points after the multiple contraction injury protocol, and resulted in a faster recovery time to full contractile function. The sham injections had no effect compared to no treatment. Conclusion Local delivery of PRP can shorten recovery time after a muscle strain injury. Recovery of muscle from the high repetition protocol has already been shown to require myogenesis, whereas recovery from a single strain does not. This difference in mechanism of recovery may explain why PRP was more effective in the high repetition protocol, as PRP is rich in growth factors that can stimulate myogenesis. Since autologous blood products are safe, PRP may be a useful product to use in clinical treatment of muscle injuries. PMID:19282509

  15. A mouse muscle-adapted enterovirus 71 strain with increased virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Duo, Jianying; Liu, Jiangning; Ma, Chunmei; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wei, Qiang; Qin, Chuan

    2011-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections can usually cause epidemic hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), and occasionally lead to aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, and polio-like illness. Skeletal muscles have been thought to be crucial for the pathogenesis of EV71-related diseases. However, little is known about the virulence of mouse muscle-adapted EV71. The EV71 0805 were subjected to four passages in the mouse muscle to generate a mouse-adapted EV71 strain of 0805a. In comparison with the parental EV71 0805, the mouse muscle-adapted EV71 0805a displayed stronger cytotoxicity against Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells and more efficient replication in RD cells. Furthermore, infection with the EV71 0805a significantly inhibited the gain of body weight, accompanied by increased muscle virus load and multiple tissue distribution in the infected mouse. Histological examinations indicated that infection with the EV71 0805 did not cause obvious pathogenic lesions in mice, while infection with the muscle-adapted 0805a resulted in severe necrotizing myositis in the skeletal and cardio muscles, and intestinitis in mice on day 5 post infection. Further analysis revealed many mutations in different regions of the genome of mouse muscle-adapted virus. Collectively, these data demonstrated the mouse muscle-adapted EV71 0805a with increased virulence in mice.

  16. Stress-induced muscle effort as a cause of repetitive strain injury?

    PubMed

    Rietveld, S; van Beest, I; Kamphuis, J H

    2007-12-01

    The influence of stress-induced muscle effort during computer utilization was tested in patients with repetitive strain injury (RSI). Twenty academic researchers with a formal medical diagnosis of RSI and 20 matched controls, randomly selected from a sample of 71 colleagues with and without RSI, typed after stress (induced via an intelligence/skill task under social pressure) and after relaxation. Results indicated that both groups had more electromyography (EMG) activity in the shoulder muscles during typing after stress than after relaxation, but that patients started with higher baseline muscle activity. Furthermore, EMG activity of different muscle groups during typing after stress correlated among controls, but not among patients. Finally, analysis of intake forms showed that patients scored higher than controls on neuroticism and alexithymia, but not on extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. It was concluded that deviations in muscle activity during computer utilization, as well as neuroticism and alexithymia, may be risk factors for RSI.

  17. Inducible Cre transgenic mouse strain for skeletal muscle-specific gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of the Cre/loxP system for gene targeting has been proven to be a powerful tool for understanding gene function. The purpose of this study was to create and characterize an inducible, skeletal muscle-specific Cre transgenic mouse strain. Methods To achieve skeletal muscle-specific expression, the human α-skeletal actin promoter was used to drive expression of a chimeric Cre recombinase containing two mutated estrogen receptor ligand-binding domains. Results Western blot analysis, PCR and β-galactosidase staining confirmed that Cre-mediated recombination was restricted to limb and craniofacial skeletal muscles only after tamoxifen administration. Conclusions A transgenic mouse was created that allows inducible, gene targeting of floxed genes in adult skeletal muscle of different developmental origins. This new mouse will be of great utility to the skeletal muscle community. PMID:22564549

  18. Constitutive Modeling of Skeletal Muscle Tissue with an Explicit Strain-Energy Function

    PubMed Central

    Odegard, G.M.; Donahue, T.L. Haut; Morrow, D.A.; Kaufman, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    While much work has previously been done in the modeling of skeletal muscle, no model has, to date, been developed that describes the mechanical behavior with an explicit strain-energy function associated with the active response of skeletal muscle tissue. A model is presented herein that has been developed to accommodate this design consideration using a robust dynamical approach. The model shows excellent agreement with a previously published model of both the active and passive length-tension properties of skeletal muscle. PMID:19045546

  19. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  20. Carnosine, taurine and enzyme activities of human skeletal muscle fibres from elderly subjects with osteoarthritis and young moderately active subjects.

    PubMed

    Tallon, Mark J; Harris, Roger C; Maffulli, Nicola; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    Ageing is associated with a reduction in muscle carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine), but there are no data on the changes specifically in type I and type II muscle fibres. Given the higher carnosine content of type II fibers, changes observed in whole muscle may be secondary to a shift in fibre composition. Carnosine, beta-alanine, histidine, taurine, and citrate synthase (CS) and glycogen phosphorylase (Phos), were measured in pools of single muscle fibres from freeze-dried muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis of nine elderly sedentary subjects (65-80 years) with osteoarthritis of the knee and undergoing total knee replacement, and nine young moderately active healthy subjects (20-35 years). Fibres were characterised as type I or II by myosin ATPase activity. Carnosine was 53.2% lower in type II fibres of older subjects resulting in an estimated 7% (and most probably still higher) decline in intracellular physico-chemical buffering capacity. Younger subjects showed higher CS activities in type I and higher Phos activities in type II fibres. These differences were less apparent in elderly subjects. Possible causes for the change in the carnosine content are reduced physical activity, reduced meat intake, or the result of progressive denervation.

  1. Fluid and electrolyte supplementation after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis in Standardbred horses.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Geor, Raymond J; Spriet, Lawrence L; Lindinger, Michael I

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that postexercise rehydration using a hypotonic electrolyte solution will increase the rate of recovery of whole body hydration, and that this is associated with increased muscle glycogen and electrolyte recovery in horses. Gluteus medius biopsies and jugular venous blood were sampled from six exercise-conditioned Standardbreds on two separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competitive exercise test (CET) designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of a 3-day event. After the CETs, horses were given water ad libitum, and either a hypotonic commercial electrolyte solution (electrolyte) via nasogastric tube, followed by a typical hay/grain meal, or a hay/grain meal alone (control). The CET resulted in decreased total body water and muscle glycogen concentration of 8.4 +/- 0.3 liters and 22.6%, respectively, in the control treatment, and 8.2 +/- 0.4 liters and 21.9% in the electrolyte treatment. Electrolyte resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis and faster restoration of hydration (as evidenced by faster recovery of plasma protein concentration, maintenance of plasma osmolality, and greater muscle intracellular fluid volume) during the recovery period compared with control. There were no differences in muscle Na, K, Cl, or Mg contents between the two treatments. It is concluded that oral administration of a hypotonic electrolyte solution after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhanced the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis during the recovery period compared with control. It is speculated that postexercise dehydration may be one key contributor to the slow muscle glycogen replenishment in horses.

  2. Age-related changes in motor unit firing pattern of vastus lateralis muscle during low-moderate contraction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Holobar, Aleš; Kouzaki, Motoki; Ogawa, Madoka; Akima, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Age-related changes in motor unit activation properties remain unclear for locomotor muscles such as quadriceps muscles, although these muscles are preferentially atrophied with aging and play important roles in daily living movements. The present study investigated and compared detailed motor unit firing characteristics for the vastus lateralis muscle during isometric contraction at low to moderate force levels in the elderly and young. Fourteen healthy elderly men and 15 healthy young men performed isometric ramp-up contraction to 70 % of the maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) during knee extension. Multichannel surface electromyograms were recorded from the vastus lateralis muscle using a two-dimensional grid of 64 electrodes and decomposed with the convolution kernel compensation technique to extract individual motor units. Motor unit firing rates in the young were significantly higher (~+29.7 %) than in the elderly (p < 0.05). There were significant differences in firing rates among motor units with different recruitment thresholds at each force level in the young (p < 0.05) but not in the elderly (p > 0.05). Firing rates at 60 % of the MVC force level for the motor units recruited at <20 % of MVC were significantly correlated with MVC force in the elderly (r = 0.885, p < 0.0001) but not in the young (r = 0.127, p > 0.05). These results suggest that the motor unit firing rate in the vastus lateralis muscle is affected by aging and muscle strength in the elderly and/or age-related strength loss is related to motor unit firing/recruitment properties.

  3. Finite element modeling reveals complex strain mechanics in the aponeuroses of contracting skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chi, Sheng-Wei; Hodgson, John; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Reggie Edgerton, V; Shin, David D; Roiz, Ronald A; Sinha, Shantanu

    2010-05-07

    A finite element model was used to investigate the counter-intuitive experimental observation that some regions of the aponeuroses of a loaded and contracting muscle may shorten rather than undergo an expected lengthening. The model confirms the experimental findings and suggests that pennation angle plays a significant role in determining whether regions of the aponeuroses stretch or shorten. A smaller pennation angles (25 degrees ) was accompanied by aponeurosis lengthening whereas a larger pennation angle (47 degrees ) was accompanied by mixed strain effects depending upon location along the length of the aponeurosis. This can be explained by the Poisson effect during muscle contraction and a Mohr's circle analogy. Constant volume constraint requires that fiber cross sectional dimensions increase when a fiber shortens. The opposing influences of these two strains upon the aponeurosis combine in proportion to the pennation angle. Lower pennation angles emphasize the influence of fiber shortening upon the aponeurosis and thus favor aponeurosis compression, whereas higher pennation angles increase the influence of cross sectional changes and therefore favor aponeurosis stretch. The distance separating the aponeuroses was also found to depend upon pennation angle during simulated contractions. Smaller pennation angles favored increased aponeurosis separation larger pennation angles favored decreased separation. These findings caution that measures of the mechanical properties of aponeuroses in intact muscle may be affected by contributions from adjacent muscle fibers and that the influence of muscle fibers on aponeurosis strain will depend upon the fiber pennation angle.

  4. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  5. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K.; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B.; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. Methods DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Conclusion Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating. PMID:27315243

  6. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  7. The effects of aponeurosis geometry on strain injury susceptibility explored with a 3D muscle model.

    PubMed

    Rehorn, Michael R; Blemker, Silvia S

    2010-09-17

    In the musculoskeletal system, some muscles are injured more frequently than others. For example, the biceps femoris longhead (BFLH) is the most commonly injured hamstring muscle. It is thought that acute injuries result from large strains within the muscle tissue, but the mechanism behind this type of strain injury is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to build computational models to analyze the stretch distributions within the BFLH muscle and to explore the effects of aponeurosis geometry on the magnitude and location of peak stretches within the model. We created a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of the BFLH based on magnetic resonance (MR) images. We also created a series of simplified models with a similar geometry to the MR-based model. We analyzed the stretches predicted by the MR-based model during lengthening contractions to determine the region of peak local fiber stretch. The peak along-fiber stretch was 1.64 and was located adjacent to the proximal myotendinous junction (MTJ). In contrast, the average along-fiber stretch across all the muscle tissue was 0.95. By analyzing the simple models, we found that varying the dimensions of the aponeuroses (width, length, and thickness) had a substantial impact on the location and magnitude of peak stretches within the muscle. Specifically, the difference in widths between the proximal and distal aponeurosis in the BFLH contributed most to the location and magnitude of peak stretch, as decreasing the proximal aponeurosis width by 80% increased peak average stretches along the proximal MTJ by greater than 60% while slightly decreasing stretches along the distal MTJ. These results suggest that the aponeurosis morphology of the BFLH plays a significant role in determining stretch distributions throughout the muscle. Furthermore, this study introduces the new hypothesis that aponeurosis widths may be important in determining muscle injury susceptibility.

  8. Scaling skeletal muscle function to mass in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Carla; Nery, Luiz E; Dal Corso, Simone; Nápolis, Lara; De Fuccio, Marcelo Bicalho; Castro, Marise; Neder, J Alberto

    2006-11-01

    Skeletal muscle performance and muscle mass are commonly reduced in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is currently unclear, however, whether negative changes in muscle structure and function are proportionately related to each other in these patients. In a cross-sectional study, 39 patients (post-bronchodilator FEV1=49.7+/-15.5% pred) and 17 controls were submitted to knee isokinetic dynamometry [peak torque (PT), isometric strength (IS), and total work (TW)] and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for the evaluation of leg muscle mass (LMM). Muscle function (F) was normalised for LMM by using ratio standards (F.LMM-1), power function ratios (F.LMM-b, where b is usually not equal 1), and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Patients with COPD presented with reduced PT, IS, TW, and LMM as compared to controls: there were significant linear correlations among these variables in both groups (P<0.05). Ratio standards of PT.LMM-1 and TW.LMM-1 were, on average, 14% lower in patients than controls (P<0.01). The coefficients for allometric correction of IS and TW were significantly higher in patients as compared to controls (0.975 vs. 0.603 and 1.471 vs. 0.824, respectively, P<0.05), i.e. more LMM was needed to generate a given functional output in patients than normal subjects. In addition, adjusted means of muscle function variables by ANCOVA were 11-18% lower for patients than controls with LMM as the covariate (P<0.05). We conclude that factors other than simple atrophy (i.e. mass-independent mechanisms) might play a role in explaining the COPD-related skeletal muscle dysfunction.

  9. Differential segmental strain during active lengthening in a large biarticular thigh muscle during running

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer A.; Ellerby, David J.; Marsh, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO) is the largest muscle in the hindlimb of the guinea fowl and is thought to play an important role during the stance phase of running, both absorbing and producing work. Using sonomicrometry and electromyography, we examined whether the ILPO experiences differential strain between proximal, central and distal portions of the posterior fascicles. When the ILPO is being lengthened while active, the distal portion was found to lengthen significantly more than either the proximal or central portions of the muscle. Our data support the hypothesis that the distal segment lengthened farther and faster because it began activity at shorter sarcomere lengths on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve. Probably because of the self-stabilizing effects of operating on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve, all segments reached the end of lengthening and started shortening at the same sarcomere length. During shortening, this similarity in sarcomere length among the segments was maintained, as predicted from force–velocity effects, and shortening strain was similar in all segments. The differential active strain during active lengthening is thus ultimately determined by differences in strain during the passive portion of the cycle. The sarcomere lengths of all segments of the fascicles were similar at the end of active shortening, but after the passive portion of the cycle the distal segment was shorter. Differential strain in the segments during the passive portion of the cycle may be caused by differential joint excursions at the knee and hip acting on the ends of the muscle and being transmitted differentially by the passive visco-elastic properties of the muscle. Alternatively, the differential passive strain could be due to the action of active or passive muscles in the thigh that transmit force to the IPLO in shear. Based on basic sarcomere dynamics we predict that differential strain is

  10. Musculotendon variability influences tissue strains experienced by the biceps femoris long head muscle during high-speed running.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Blemker, Silvia S

    2014-10-17

    The hamstring muscles frequently suffer injury during high-speed running, though the factors that make an individual more susceptible to injury remain poorly understood. The goals of this study were to measure the musculotendon dimensions of the biceps femoris long head (BFlh) muscle, the hamstring muscle injured most often, and to use computational models to assess the influence of variability in the BFlh's dimensions on internal tissue strains during high-speed running. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired over the thigh in 12 collegiate athletes, and musculotendon dimensions were measured in the proximal free tendon/aponeurosis, muscle and distal free tendon/aponeurosis. Finite element meshes were generated based on the average, standard deviation and range of BFlh dimensions. Simulation boundary conditions were defined to match muscle activation and musculotendon length change in the BFlh during high-speed running. Muscle and connective tissue dimensions were found to vary between subjects, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 17±6% across all dimensions. For all simulations peak local strain was highest along the proximal myotendinous junction, which is where injury typically occurs. Model variations showed that peak local tissue strain increased as the proximal aponeurosis width narrowed and the muscle width widened. The aponeurosis width and muscle width variation models showed that the relative dimensions of these structures influence internal muscle tissue strains. The results of this study indicate that a musculotendon unit's architecture influences its strain injury susceptibility during high-speed running.

  11. A Novel Fiber Bragg Grating Based Sensing Methodology for Direct Measurement of Surface Strain on Body Muscles during Physical Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Arudi Subbarao, Guru; Subbaramajois Narasipur, Omkar; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2012-07-01

    The present work proposes a new sensing methodology, which uses Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) to measure in vivo the surface strain and strain rate on calf muscles while performing certain exercises. Two simple exercises, namely ankle dorsi-flexion and ankle plantar-flexion, have been considered and the strain induced on the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle while performing these exercises has been monitored. The real time strain generated has been recorded and the results are compared with those obtained using a commercial Color Doppler Ultrasound (CDU) system. It is found that the proposed sensing methodology is promising for surface strain measurements in biomechanical applications.

  12. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of passive skeletal muscle tissue subjected to large tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Takaza, Michael; Moerman, Kevin M; Gindre, Juliette; Lyons, Garry; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-01-01

    The passive mechanical properties of muscle tissue are important for many biomechanics applications. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the three-dimensional tensile response of passive skeletal muscle tissue to applied loading. In particular, the nature of the anisotropy remains unclear and the response to loading at intermediate fibre directions and the Poisson's ratios in tension have not been reported. Accordingly, tensile tests were performed along and perpendicular to the muscle fibre direction as well as at 30°, 45° and 60° to the muscle fibre direction in samples of Longissimus dorsi muscle taken from freshly slaughtered pigs. Strain was measured using an optical non-contact method. The results show the transverse or cross fibre (TT') direction is broadly linear and is the stiffest (77 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1), but that failure occurs at low stretches (approximately λ=1.15). In contrast the longitudinal or fibre direction (L) is nonlinear and much less stiff (10 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1) but failure occurs at higher stretches (approximatelyλ=1.65). An almost sinusoidal variation in stress response was observed at intermediate angles. The following Poisson's ratios were measured: VLT=VLT'=0.47, VTT'=0.28 and VTL=0.74. These observations have not been previously reported and they contribute significantly to our understanding of the three dimensional deformation response of skeletal muscle tissue.

  13. Islamic Personal Religiosity as a Moderator of Job Strain and Employee's Well-Being: The Case of Malaysian Academic and Administrative Staff.

    PubMed

    Achour, Meguellati; Mohd Nor, Mohd Roslan; MohdYusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli

    2016-08-01

    Presently, there is increased in research on job strain and the effects of religiosity on employee well-being. Despite increased recognition of religiosity as a moderator of well-being, limited research has focused on Islamic perspective of moderating job strain. This study examines the moderating effects of Islamic personal religiosity on the relationship between job strain and employee well-being in Malaysian universities. One hundred and seventeen (117) Muslim academic and administrative staff from four public universities were sampled. Data were collected via questionnaires, and our findings show that the effect of job strain on well-being is significant for employees and that personal religiosity of employees contributed to alleviating job strain and enhancing well-being. Thus, the study concludes that Islamic personal religiosity moderates the relationship between job strain and employee well-being.

  14. Concurrent speed endurance and resistance training improves performance, running economy, and muscle NHE1 in moderately trained runners.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christensen, Peter M; Larsen, Sonni; Andersen, Thomas Rostgaard; Thomassen, Martin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether speed endurance training (SET, repeated 30-s sprints) and heavy resistance training (HRT, 80-90% of 1 repetition maximum) performed in succession are compatible and lead to performance improvements in moderately trained endurance runners. For an 8-wk intervention period (INT) 23 male runners [maximum oxygen uptake (V̇O(2max)) 59 ± 1 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1); values are means ± SE] either maintained their training (CON, n = 11) or performed high-intensity concurrent training (HICT, n = 12) consisting of two weekly sessions of SET followed by HRT and two weekly sessions of aerobic training with an average reduction in running distance of 42%. After 4 wk of HICT, performance was improved (P < 0.05) in a 10-km run (42:30 ± 1:07 vs. 44:11 ± 1:08 min:s) with no further improvement during the last 4 wk. Performance in a 1,500-m run (5:10 ± 0:05 vs. 5:27 ± 0:08 min:s) and in the Yo-Yo IR2 test (706 ± 97 vs. 491 ± 65 m) improved (P < 0.001) only following 8 wk of INT. In HICT, running economy (189 ± 4 vs. 195 ± 4 ml·kg(-1)·km(-1)), muscle content of NHE1 (35%) and dynamic muscle strength was augmented (P < 0.01) after compared with before INT, whereas V̇O(2max), muscle morphology, capillarization, content of muscle Na(+)/K(+) pump subunits, and MCT4 were unaltered. No changes were observed in CON. The present study demonstrates that SET and HRT, when performed in succession, lead to improvements in both short- and long-term running performance together with improved running economy as well as increased dynamic muscle strength and capacity for muscular H(+) transport in moderately trained endurance runners.

  15. Stress and strain in the flight muscles as constraints on the evolution of flying animals.

    PubMed

    Pennycuick, C J

    1996-05-01

    The minimum mechanical power needed for an animal to maintain level flight can be estimated, as can the wingbeat frequency, from measurements of the animal's mass, wing span and wing area, and of the strength of gravity and the air density. Dividing the power by the frequency gives the work done per cycle, and dividing this by the muscle mass gives the specific work, meaning the work done in each contraction by unit mass of muscle. This in turn is the product of the average stress during shortening and the strain, divided by the muscle density. The minimum specific work for level flight is strongly size dependent. To account for even minimum performance in the largest species known to be capable of prolonged, aerobic flight (whooper swan), the specific work of the myofibrils needs to be 57 J kg-1, which could be achieved, for example, by a stress of 240 kN m-2 combined with a strain of 0.25. The upper limits of stress and strain for sustained exercise are not known, but are not likely to be much higher than these figures. Much larger birds, such as the Miocene fossil Argentavis, would require improbably high values of stress and strain for level flight, unless the air density were much higher in Miocene times than at present, and/or the strength of gravity were much less. Birds of small and medium size have more than the minimum amount of muscle required for level flight. This opens a wide range of possibilities for different species to be specialised for different types of activity. The potential diversity for evolution in large species is less than for medium-sized or small ones, and dwindles to zero above a body mass of about 14 kg. There is also a strong positive trend in the aerobic scope, from about 3 in small, long-winged passerines such as swallows, to 47 in the whooper swan.

  16. Effect of Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster on patients with lumbar muscle strain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tao; Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei; Zhang, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: observe the effect of Tai Chi exercise on the patients with the chronic lumbar muscle strain under the intervention treatment of auricular plaster. Methods: 74 middle-aged and elderly patients, suffering from the chronic lumbar muscle strain, are randomly and equally divided into an observation group and a control group, with 37 patients in each group. The patients in the control group do Tai Chi exercise, while those in the observation group are treated by the auricular plaster therapy in addition to Tai Chi exercise. Evaluate and compare the disease conditions of the patients in the two groups before the treatment and after 12 weeks’ treatment. Results: after 12 weeks’ treatment, the patients in the two groups have been improved differently in comparison with those before the treatment (P < 0.05). However, the cure rate, the excellence rate and total effective rate of the observation group are superior to those of the control group, respectively P < 0.05 or P < 0.01, thus their difference shows statistic significance. Conclusion: after 12 weeks’ Tai Chi exercise, it exercises an obvious curative effect on the patients with lumbar muscle strain but the curative effect is more remarkable if it is combined with auricular plaster therapy. PMID:25932261

  17. Combined effects of microtopography and cyclic strain on vascular smooth muscle cell orientation.

    PubMed

    Houtchens, Graham R; Foster, Michael D; Desai, Tejal A; Morgan, Elise F; Wong, Joyce Y

    2008-01-01

    Cellular alignment studies have shown that cell orientation has a large effect on the expression and behavior of cells. Cyclic strain and substrate microtopography have each been shown to regulate cellular alignment. This study examined the combined effects of these two stimuli on the alignment of bovine vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cells were cultured on substrates with microgrooves of varying widths oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of an applied cyclic tensile strain. We found that microgrooves oriented parallel to the direction of the applied strain limited the orientation response of VSMCs to the mechanical stimulus, while grooves perpendicular to the applied strain enhanced cellular alignment. Further, the extent to which parallel grooves limited cell alignment was found to be dependent on the groove width. It was found that for both a small (15microm) and a large (70microm) groove width, cells were better able to reorient in response to the applied strain than for an intermediate groove width (40microm). This study indicates that microtopographical cues modulate the orientation response of VSMCs to cyclic strain. The results suggest that there is a range of microgroove dimensions that is most effective at maintaining the orientation of the cells in the presence of an opposing stimulus induced by cyclic strain.

  18. Strengthening of back muscles using a module of flexible strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Chun; Lin, Hwai-Ting; Chen, Wei-Long

    2015-02-09

    This research aims at developing a flexible strain module applied to the strengthening of back muscles. Silver films were sputtered onto flexible substrates to produce a flexible sensor. Assuming that back muscle elongation is positively correlated with the variations in skin surface length, real-time resistance changes exhibited by the sensor during simulated training sessions were measured. The results were used to identify the relationship between resistance change of sensors and skin surface stretch. In addition, muscle length changes from ultrasound images were used to determine the feasibility of a proof of concept sensor. Furthermore, this module is capable of detecting large muscle contractions, some of which may be undesirable for the prescribed training strategy. Therefore, the developed module can facilitate real-time assessments of the movement accuracy of users during training, and the results are instantly displayed on a screen. People using the developed training system can immediately adjust their posture to the appropriate position. Thus, the training mechanism can be constructed to help user improve the efficiency of back muscle strengthening.

  19. ‘Serious thigh muscle strains’: beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-01-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in ‘muscle strain’. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh ‘muscle strain’. PMID:26519522

  20. Branched-chain amino acids and arginine supplementation attenuates skeletal muscle proteolysis induced by moderate exercise in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Mizuno, M; Mizuno, T; Dilling-Hansen, B; Lahoz, A; Bertelsen, V; Münster, H; Jordening, H; Hamada, K; Doi, T

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of a single oral intake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) with Arg on skeletal muscle protein metabolism during moderate exercise in young individuals. Eight healthy volunteers (4 males and 4 females, means +/- SEM, 26 +/- 1 yrs, 177.8 +/- 3.7 cm, 72.6 +/- 3.9 kg) were studied in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The subjects performed 3 bouts of 20-min cycling exercise (5-min break between each bout) at 126 +/- 13 W corresponding to 50 % of the maximal work intensity. A single oral supplement of either a BCAA drink containing 2 g of BCAA and 0.5 g of Arg or an isocaloric placebo drink was given at 10 min of the 1st exercise bout. Both arterial and venous blood samples were simultaneously taken from the radial artery and the femoral vein, respectively. Blood flow in the femoral artery was determined using the ultrasound Doppler technique. The blood sampling and blood flow measurements were performed at rest, every 10 min during each exercise bout. Net balance of BCAA and Phe across the leg muscles were measured by the arteriovenous difference method. The BCAA ingestion resulted in increases in both the plasma BCAA concentration and BCAA uptake into the working leg. The Phe release from the leg during exercise significantly increased as compared to the basal level in the placebo trial (0.97 +/- 0.28 vs. 0.23 +/- 0.22 micromol/min, p < 0.05). In the BCAA trial, the cumulative Phe release from the leg during the 3rd exercise bout was significantly lower than that in the placebo trial (5.0 +/- 7.4 vs. 35.9 +/- 13.2 micromol/25 min, p < 0.05). These results suggest that endurance exercise at moderate intensity enhances proteolysis in working muscles, and a single oral intake of 2 g of BCAA with Arg at onset of exercise effectively suppresses exercise-induced skeletal muscle proteolysis.

  1. Quantification of classical swine fever virus in aerosols originating from pigs infected with strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2009-03-30

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), the route of virus introduction into a farm is often unclear. One of the suggested routes is via the air. Under experimental conditions, airborne transmission over a short distance seems possible, but analysis of outbreak data is still inconclusive. For a better understanding of the role of airborne transmission, quantitative information is needed on concentrations of virus emitted by infected pigs. This was studied in four groups of 10 pigs in which three pigs were inoculated with either a low virulent strain (Zoelen), a low or high dose of a moderately virulent strain (Paderborn), or a highly virulent strain (Brescia). The other seven pigs in each group served as contact pigs. At several moments after infection, air samples were obtained using gelatine filters. Infectious virus and viral RNA were detected in the air of rooms housing the pigs infected with the moderately and highly virulent strains with titres of 10(1.2) to 10(3.0)TCID(50)/m(3) of infectious virus, and 10(1.6) to 10(3.8)TCID(50)equiv./m(3) of viral RNA. It was observed that the higher the dose or virulence of the virus strain used for inoculation of the pigs, the sooner virus could be detected in the air samples. This is the first study describing the quantification of (infectious) CSFV in air samples of rooms housing infected pigs, enabling to quantify the contribution of individual infected pigs to virus concentrations in aerosols. This can be used as input for quantitative models of airborne spread over large distances.

  2. Mechanical strain and collagen potentiate mitogenic activity of angiotensin II in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, K; Wilson, E; Chatterjee, K; Ives, H E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of extracellular matrix proteins and mechanical strain on the mitogenic activity of angiotensins I and II (AI and AII) were examined in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. VSM cells on various extracellular matrices were exposed to AII (1 microM) for 48 h. On plastic, AII induced only a 1.6-fold increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, but on fibronectin- or type I collagen-coated plastic, the response to AII was enhanced from two- to fourfold. On a type I collagen-coated silicone elastomer, to which mechanical strain was applied, [3H]thymidine incorporation dramatically increased to a maximum of 53-fold. Dup 753 (10(-5) M) blocked the AII-induced increase in DNA synthesis. AI also increased DNA synthesis in VSM cells, and this response was also enhanced by mechanical strain. Mitogenic activity of AI was blocked by ramiprilat (10(-5) M), indicating that its mitogenic activity was via conversion to AII. The synergy between AII and strain was completely eliminated by neutralizing antibodies to PDGF AB (3 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, the mitogenic effect of AII in unstrained cells was also synergistic with submaximal concentrations of PDGF AB (1 ng/ml). Thus, the synergy between AII and mechanical strain probably results from synergism between AII and PDGF secreted in response to strain. PMID:8254054

  3. Effect of Acute Exposure to Moderate Altitude on Muscle Power: Hypobaric Hypoxia vs. Normobaric Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch- Góngora, Juan G.; Galilea, Pedro A.; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest Pmean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to Pmax (∼3%) and maximal strength (1RM) (∼6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on Pmean and Ppeak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  4. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean) and P(peak) in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  5. Genome sequence of the moderately halophilic bacterium Salinicoccus carnicancri type strain Crm(T) (= DSM 23852(T)).

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Whon, Tae Woong; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Joon-Yong; Kim, Pil Soo; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jina; Oh, Sei Joon; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Salinicoccus carnicancri Jung et al. 2010 belongs to the genus Salinicoccus in the family Staphylococcaceae. Members of the Salinicoccus are moderately halophilic and originate from various salty environments. The halophilic features of the Salinicoccus suggest their possible uses in biotechnological applications, such as biodegradation and fermented food production. However, the genus Salinicoccus is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. This study presents the draft genome sequence of S. carnicancri strain Crm(T) and its annotation. The 2,673,309 base pair genome contained 2,700 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 47.93 mol%. It was notable that the strain carried 72 predicted genes associated with osmoregulation, which suggests the presence of beneficial functions that facilitate growth in high-salt environments.

  6. Intramedullary Pressure and Matrix Strain Induced by Oscillatory Skeletal Muscle Stimulation and its Potential in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lam, Hoyan

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by oscillatory muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia, i.e., hindlimb suspension (HLS). To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a) MS induced ImP and bone strain as function of stimulation frequency, and b) the adaptive responses to functional disuse, and disuse plus 1Hz and 20Hz stimulation in vivo. Femoral ImP and bone strain generated by MS were measured in the frequencies of 1Hz-100Hz in four rats. Forty retired breeder rats were used for the in vivo HLS study. The quadriceps muscle was stimulated at frequencies of 1 Hz and 20 Hz, 10min/d for 4 weeks. The metaphyseal trabecular bone quantity and microstructure at the distal femur were evaluated using μCT, while bone formation indices were analyzed using histomorphometric techniques. Oscillatory MS generated a maximum ImP of 45±9 mmHg at 20 Hz and produced a maximum matrix strain of 128±19 με at 10 Hz. Our analyses from the in vivo study showed that MS at 20 Hz was able to attenuate trabecular bone loss and partially maintain the microstructure induced by HLS. Conversely, there was no evidence of an adaptive effect of stimulation at 1 Hz on disused skeleton. The results suggested that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics and mechanical strain in bone, which serves as a critical mediator of adaptation. These results clearly demonstrated the ability of MS in attenuating bone loss from the disuse osteopenia and could hold potential in mitigating skeletal degradation imposed by conditions of disuse, which may serve as a biomechanical intervention in clinic application. PMID:19081096

  7. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus

    PubMed Central

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-01-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1). PMID:24031699

  8. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-07-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1).

  9. The Influence of Neck Muscle Tonus and Posture on Brain Tissue Strain in Pedestrian Head Impacts.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Victor S; Halldin, Peter; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-11-01

    Pedestrians are one of the least protected groups in urban traffic and frequently suffer fatal head injuries. An important boundary condition for the head is the cervical spine, and it has previously been demonstrated that neck muscle activation is important for head kinematics during inertial loading. It has also been shown in a recent numerical study that a tensed neck musculature also has some influence on head kinematics during a pedestrian impact situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence on head kinematics and injury metrics during the isolated time of head impact by comparing a pedestrian with relaxed neck and a pedestrian with increased tonus. The human body Finite Element model THUMS Version 1.4 was connected to head and neck models developed at KTH and used in pedestrian-to-vehicle impact simulations with a generalized hood, so that the head would impact a surface with an identical impact response in all simulations. In order to isolate the influence of muscle tonus, the model was activated shortly before head impact so the head would have the same initial position prior to impact among different tonus. A symmetric and asymmetric muscle activation scheme that used high level of activation was used in order to create two extremes to investigate. It was found that for the muscle tones used in this study, the influence on the strain in the brain was very minor, in general about 1-14% change. A relatively large increase was observed in a secondary peak in maximum strains in only one of the simulated cases.

  10. Changes in crossbridge and non-crossbridge energetics during moderate fatigue of frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, C J; Curtin, N A; Woledge, R C

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of sarcomere length (SL) during a fatiguing series of isometric tetani of frog muscle fibres was investigated. Tetani at 2.3 microns SL were more fatiguing than tetani at 3.2 microns SL, in that force declined twice as much as relaxation became much slower. 2. In a second set of experiments the force and heat production were measured during a series of fatiguing tetani. Heat was separated into two components: (a) crossbridge heat which is dependent on filament overlap and interaction, and (b) non-crossbridge heat which is independent of filament overlap and due to Ca2+ turnover. 3. In a series of fifty tetani, force, crossbridge heat and non-crossbridge heat each declined by 25-30% of its initial value. 4. The 25% reduction in non-crossbridge heat occurred completely during the first few tetani of the fatiguing series while force declined by less than 3%. This may be due to a reduction in Ca2+ binding to parvalbumin and to Ca2+ remaining bound during the remainder of the fatigue series. 5. After the first few tetani of the fatigue series the non-crossbridge heat hardly changed as force declined by a further 25% of its initial value. Continuing reduction of force with constant Ca2+ turnover indicates a reduction in the Ca2+ sensitivity of the filaments, and/or a reduction in the average force per attached crossbridge. 6. At the start of the fatiguing series, as force declines by about 7.5% there is a much larger decline of crossbridge heat (17%). The reason for this is unknown. Later in the series, force declined more rapidly than heat. This is probably due to a progressive accumulation of inorganic phosphate which acts by depressing force more than it depresses ATP breakdown. PMID:8254523

  11. Exacerbated skeletal muscle inflammation and calcification in the acute phase of infection by Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi DTUI strain.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno-Castillo, Andrea; Jiménez-Marín, Andrea; Espinoza, Bertha

    2014-01-01

    A murine model was used to study the histopathological aspects and cytokine expression levels in skeletal muscle provoked by the infection with Mexican TcI strains. BALB/c mice were inoculated with the virulent Querétaro strain and the nonvirulent Ninoa strain. Parasite numbers were counted in blood and skeletal muscle at different times post-infection, and real time-PCR expression levels of the cytokines IL-12, IL-4, IL-10, IFN- γ , and TNF- α were evaluated. In the acute phase of infection, a high parasitic load, both in blood and skeletal muscle, was detected. The histopathological analyses showed an exacerbated inflammation and granulomatous-like infiltrate with the Querétaro strain. Interestingly, extensive calcification areas were observed in the skeletal muscle surrounded by inflammatory infiltrates. TNF- α and IL-10 expression exhibited a significant increase at the peak of infection. In summary, Querétaro strain, a Mexican TcI strain, is virulent enough to induce high inflammation and calcification in skeletal muscle of the hind limbs, which could be related to high expression levels of TNF- α .

  12. Knitted Carbon-Nanotube-Sheath/Spandex-Core Elastomeric Yarns for Artificial Muscles and Strain Sensing.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Aziz, Shazed; Mirabedini, Azadeh; Jeiranikhameneh, Ali; Wallace, Gordon G; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-09-08

    Highly stretchable, actuatable, electrically conductive knitted textiles based on Spandex (SPX)/CNT (carbon nanotube) composite yarns were prepared by an integrated knitting procedure. SPX filaments were continuously wrapped with CNT aerogel sheets and supplied directly to an interlocking circular knitting machine to form the three-dimensional electrically conductive and stretchable textiles. By adjusting the SPX/CNT feed ratio, the fabric electrical conductivities could be tailored in the range of 870 to 7092 S/m. The electrical conductivity depended on tensile strain, with a linear and largely hysteresis-free resistance change occurring on loading and unloading between 0 and 80% strain. Electrothermal heating of the stretched fabric caused large tensile contractions of up to 33%, and generated a gravimetric mechanical work capacity during contraction of up to 0.64 kJ/kg and a maximum specific power output of 1.28 kW/kg, which far exceeds that of mammalian skeletal muscle. The knitted textile provides the combination of strain sensing and the ability to control dimensions required for smart clothing that simultaneously monitors the wearer's movements and adjusts the garment fit or exerts forces or pressures on the wearer, according to needs. The developed processing method is scalable for the fabrication of industrial quantities of strain sensing and actuating smart textiles.

  13. Dynamic properties of a locomotory muscle of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta during strain cycling and simulated natural crawling.

    PubMed

    Woods, William A; Fusillo, Steven J; Trimmer, Barry A

    2008-03-01

    Caterpillars are soft-bodied terrestrial climbers that perform a wide variety of complex movements with several hundred muscles and a relatively small number of neurons. Control of movements is therefore expected to place unusual demands on the mechanical properties of the muscles. The muscles develop force slowly (1-6 s to peak) yet over a strain range extending from under 60% to more than 160% of resting length, with a length-tension relationship resembling that of supercontracting or cross-striated muscle. In passive and active sinusoidal strain cycling, muscles displayed viscoelastic qualities, with very low and stretch-velocity dependent resilience; there was a positive linear relationship between stretch velocity and the fraction of work dissipation attributable to passive muscle properties (20-80%). In linear stretches of unstimulated muscles at velocities bracketing those encountered in natural crawling, the rise in tension showed a distinct transition to a lower rate of increase, with transition tension dependent upon stretch velocity; peak force was exponentially related to stretch velocity. When stretching ceased, force decayed exponentially, with slower decay associated with lower stretch velocities; the decay time constant was exponentially related to stretch velocity. From the kinematics of caterpillars crawling horizontally we determined that the ventral interior lateral muscle (VIL) of the third abdominal segment (A3) is at or near resting length for most of the crawl cycle, with a fairly linear shortening by 25-30% and re-lengthening occupying about 45% of cycle duration. Synchronized kinematic and EMG recordings showed that during horizontal crawling A3 VIL is stimulated as the muscle shortens from about 95% to 75% of its resting length. We subjected in vitro VIL preparations to strain cycling and stimulus phase and duration similar to that of natural crawling. The resulting work loops were figure-eight shaped, with the muscle performing work

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cardiac Strain Pattern Following Transplantation of Human Tissue Engineered Heart Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Riegler, Johannes; Tiburcy, Malte; Zhao, Xin; Chour, Tony; Ndoye, Babacar; Nguyen, Michael; Adams, Jackson; Ameen, Mohamed; Denney, Thomas S.; Yang, Phillip C.; Nguyen, Patricia; Zimmermann, Wolfram H.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of tissue engineering approaches in combination with exogenously produced cardiomyocytes offers the potential to restore contractile function after myocardial injury. However, current techniques assessing changes in global cardiac performance following such treatments are plagued by relatively low detection ability. As the treatment is locally performed, this detection could be improved by myocardial strain imaging that measures regional contractility. Methods and Results Tissue engineered heart muscles (EHMs) were generated by casting human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes with collagen in preformed molds. EHMs were transplanted (n=12) to cover infarct and border zones of recipient rat hearts one month after ischemia reperfusion injury. A control group (n=10) received only sham placement of sutures without EHMs. To assess the efficacy of EHMs, MRI and ultrasound-based strain imaging were performed prior to and four weeks after transplantation. In addition to strain imaging, global cardiac performance was estimated from cardiac MRI. Although no significant differences were found with global changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (Control −9.6±1.3% vs. EHM −6.2±1.9%, P=0.17), regional myocardial strain from tagged MRI was able to detect preserved systolic function in EHM-treated animals compared to control (Control 4.4±1.0% vs. EHM 1.0±0.6%, P=0.04). However, ultrasound-based strain failed to detect any significant change (Control 2.1±3.0% vs. EHM 6.3±2.9%, P=0.46). Conclusions This study highlights the feasibility of using cardiac strain from tagged MRI to assess functional changes in rat models due to localized regenerative therapies, which may not be detected by conventional measures of global systolic performance. PMID:27903535

  15. Airway smooth muscle cell tone amplifies contractile function in the presence of chronic cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Nigel J; Connolly, Sarah C; Mackinnon, James D; Wehry, Kathrin; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2008-09-01

    Chronic contractile activation, or tone, in asthma coupled with continuous stretching due to breathing may be involved in altering the contractile function of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Previously, we (11) showed that cytoskeletal remodeling and stiffening responses to acute (2 h) localized stresses were modulated by the level of contractile activation of ASM. Here, we investigated if altered contractility in response to chronic mechanical strain was dependent on repeated modulation of contractile tone. Cultured human ASM cells received 5% cyclic (0.3 Hz), predominantly uniaxial strain for 5 days, with once-daily dosing of either sham, forskolin, carbachol, or histamine to alter tone. Stiffness, contractility (KCl), and "relaxability" (forskolin) were then measured as was cell alignment, myosin light-chain phosphorylation (pMLC), and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) content. Cells became aligned and baseline stiffness increased with strain, but repeated lowering of tone inhibited both effects (P < 0.05). Strain also reversed a negative tone-modulation dependence of MLCK, observed in static conditions in agreement with previous reports, with strain and tone together increasing both MLCK and pMLC. Furthermore, contractility increased 176% (SE 59) with repeated tone elevation. These findings indicate that with strain, and not without, repeated tone elevation promoted contractile function through changes in cytoskeletal organization and increased contractile protein. The ability of repeated contractile activation to increase contractility, but only with mechanical stretching, suggests a novel mechanism for increased ASM contractility in asthma and for the role of continuous bronchodilator and corticosteroid therapy in reversing airway hyperresponsiveness.

  16. Characterization of Lignocellulolytic Activities from a Moderate Halophile Strain of Aspergillus caesiellus Isolated from a Sugarcane Bagasse Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Miranda, Estefan; Sánchez-Reyes, Ayixón; Cuervo-Soto, Laura; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise; Atriztán-Hernández, Karina; Morales-Herrera, Catalina; Rodríguez-Hernández, Rocío; Folch-Mallol, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    A moderate halophile and thermotolerant fungal strain was isolated from a sugarcane bagasse fermentation in the presence of 2 M NaCl that was set in the laboratory. This strain was identified by polyphasic criteria as Aspergillus caesiellus. The fungus showed an optimal growth rate in media containing 1 M NaCl at 28°C and could grow in media added with up to 2 M NaCl. This strain was able to grow at 37 and 42°C, with or without NaCl. A. caesiellus H1 produced cellulases, xylanases, manganese peroxidase (MnP) and esterases. No laccase activity was detected in the conditions we tested. The cellulase activity was thermostable, halostable, and no differential expression of cellulases was observed in media with different salt concentrations. However, differential band patterns for cellulase and xylanase activities were detected in zymograms when the fungus was grown in different lignocellulosic substrates such as wheat straw, maize stover, agave fibres, sugarcane bagasse and sawdust. Optimal temperature and pH were similar to other cellulases previously described. These results support the potential of this fungus to degrade lignocellulosic materials and its possible use in biotechnological applications. PMID:25162614

  17. Menstrual cycle phase and sex influence muscle glycogen utilization and glucose turnover during moderate-intensity endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Devries, Michaela C; Hamadeh, Mazen J; Phillips, Stuart M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2006-10-01

    Numerous studies from our and other laboratories have shown that women have a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during exercise than equally trained men, indicating a greater reliance on fat oxidation. Differences in estrogen concentration between men and women likely play a role in this sex difference. Differing estrogen and progesterone concentrations during the follicular (FP) and luteal (LP) phases of the female menstrual cycle suggest that fuel use may also vary between phases. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of menstrual cycle phase and sex upon glucose turnover and muscle glycogen utilization during endurance exercise. Healthy, recreationally active young women (n = 13) and men (n = 11) underwent a primed constant infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose with muscle biopsies taken before and after a 90-min cycling bout at 65% peak O2 consumption. LP women had lower glucose rate of appearance (Ra, P = 0.03), rate of disappearance (Rd, P = 0.03), and metabolic clearance rate (MCR, P = 0.04) at 90 min of exercise and lower proglycogen (P = 0.04), macroglycogen (P = 0.04), and total glycogen (P = 0.02) utilization during exercise compared with FP women. Men had a higher RER (P = 0.02), glucose Ra (P = 0.03), Rd (P = 0.03), and MCR (P = 0.01) during exercise compared with FP women, and men had a higher RER at 75 and 90 min of exercise (P = 0.04), glucose Ra (P = 0.01), Rd (P = 0.01), and MCR (P = 0.001) and a greater PG utilization (P = 0.05) compared with LP women. We conclude that sex, and to a lesser extent menstrual cycle, influence glucose turnover and glycogen utilization during moderate-intensity endurance exercise.

  18. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the fami- ly Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Alla; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the family Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180813

  20. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  1. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Norton, Joanna L.; Bright, Jen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  2. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  3. Muscle strain is modulated more with running slope than speed in wild turkey knee and hip extensors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas J; Higginson, Brian K; Nelson, Frank E; Gabaldón, Annette M

    2007-07-01

    We examined the length changes and electromyographic (EMG) activity of two hindlimb muscles in wild turkeys, to determine how these muscles modulate mechanical function with changes in running speed and slope. The muscles studied were the iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO), a biarticular knee and hip extensor, and the femorotibialis lateralis (FT), a knee extensor. Muscle length changes were recorded using sonomicrometry, and EMG activity was recorded from indwelling bipolar electrodes as the animals walked and ran at a range of speeds (1-3.5 m s(-1)). Treadmill slope was also varied, from a 12 degrees uphill slope to a downhill slope of -12 degrees. To test the hypothesis that the strain pattern in active muscles reflects the demand for mechanical work, we compared strain in the ILPO and FT across the range of slopes. Both muscles underwent active lengthen-shorten cycles during stance. We analyzed the lengthening and shortening part of the strain pattern separately to determine the response of muscle strain to surface slope. In both muscles stance phase shortening strain increased over the range of slopes studied, from 7.8+/-3.5% (ILPO) and 1.9+/-2.2% (FT) during downhill running at -12 degrees, to 30.3+/-3.9% (ILPO) and 8.2+/-5.6% (FT) during uphill running at 12 degrees. Stance-phase lengthening strain was also modulated with slope, from -15.6+/-3.2% (ILPO) and -22.1+/-9.6% (FT) during downhill running at -12 degrees, to -4.2+/-2.5% (ILPO) and -9.0+/-5.6% (FT) during uphill running at 12 degrees. The results suggest that for the ILPO and FT a change in net mechanical work output with running slope is likely mediated by a change in both the lengthening, energy absorbing portion of the contraction and the shortening, energy producing part of the contraction. We also found changes in the timing of EMG activity, and the relative portion of the stance period spent lengthening, which were consistent with a shift in muscle function from energy

  4. Method of Quantifying Three Dimensional Strain Distribution in Skeletal Muscle Using Cine Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elisabeth R.; Morrow, Duane A.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Murthy, Naveen S.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular pressure (IMP), a correlate of muscle tension, may fill an important clinical testing void. A barrier to implementing this measure clinically is its non-uniform distribution, which is not fully understood. Pressure is generated by changes in fluid mass and volume, therefore 3D volumetric strain distribution may affect IMP distribution. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for quantifying 3D volumetric strain distribution in the human tibialis anterior (TA) during passive tension using cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI and to assess its accuracy and precision. Five healthy subjects each participated in three data collections. A custom MRI-compatible apparatus repeatedly rotated the subjects’ ankle between 0 and 26 degrees plantarflexion while CPC MRI data were collected. Additionally, T2-weighted images of the lower leg were collected both before and after the CPC data collection with the ankle stationary at both 0 and 26 degrees plantarflexion for TA muscle segmentation. A 3D hexahedral mesh was generated based on the TA surface before CPC data collection with the ankle at 0 degrees plantarflexion and the node trajectories were tracked using the CPC data. The volumetric strain of each element was quantified. Three tests were employed to assess the measure accuracy and precision. First, to quantify leg position drift, the TA segmentations were compared before and after CPC data collection. This error was 1.5±0.7 mm. Second, to assess the surface node trajectory accuracy, the deformed mesh surface was compared to the TA segmented at 26 degrees of ankle plantarflexion. This error was 0.6±0.2 mm. Third, the standard deviation of volumetric strain across the three data collections was calculated for each element and subject. The median between-day variability across subjects and mesh elements was 0.06 mm3/mm3 (95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.18 mm3/mm3). Overall the results demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision. PMID:26595686

  5. Moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation after postero-lateral myocardial infarction in sheep alters left ventricular shear but not normal strain in the infarct and infarct borderzone

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Wu, Yife; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Khazalpour, Michael; Takaba, Kiyoaki; Tartibi, Mehrzad; Zhang, Zhihong; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Saloner, David A.; Wallace, Arthur W.; Mishra, Rakesh; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR: MR) is associated with poor outcome. Left ventricular (LV) strain after postero-lateral myocardial infarction (MI) may drive LV remodeling. Although moderate CIMR has been previously shown to effect LV remodeling, the effect of CIMR on LV strain after postero-lateral MI remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that moderate CIMR alters LV strain after postero-lateral MI. Methods/Results Postero-lateral MI was created in 10 sheep. Cardiac MRI with tags was performed 2 weeks before and 2, 8 and 16 weeks after MI. LV and right ventricular (RV) volumes were measured and regurgitant volume indexed to body surface area (BSA; RegurgVolume Index) calculated as the difference between LV and RV stroke volumes / BSA. Three-dimensional strain was calculated. Circumferential (Ecc)and longitudinal (Ell) strains were reduced in the infarct proper, MI borderzone (BZ) and remote myocardium 16 weeks after MI. In addition, radial circumferential (Erc) and radial longitudinal (Erl) shear strains were reduced in remote myocardium but increased in the infarct and BZ 16 weeks after MI. Of all strain components, however, only Erc was effected by RegurgVolume Index (p=0.0005). There was no statistically significant effect of RegurgVolume Index on Ecc, Ell, Erl, or circumferential longitudinal shear strain (Ecl). Conclusions Moderate CIMR alters radial circumferential shear strain after postero-lateral MI in the sheep. Further studies are needed to determine the effect of shear strain on myocyte hypertrophy and the effect of mitral repair on myocardial strain. PMID:26857634

  6. Transverse Strains in Muscle Fascicles during Voluntary Contraction: A 2D Frequency Decomposition of B-Mode Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibres shorten, they must increase in their transverse dimensions in order to maintain a constant volume. In pennate muscle, this transverse expansion results in the fibres rotating to greater pennation angle, with a consequent reduction in their contractile velocity in a process known as gearing. Understanding the nature and extent of this transverse expansion is necessary to understand the mechanisms driving the changes in internal geometry of whole muscles during contraction. Current methodologies allow the fascicle lengths, orientations, and curvatures to be quantified, but not the transverse expansion. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate techniques for quantifying transverse strain in skeletal muscle fascicles during contraction from B-mode ultrasound images. Images were acquired from the medial and lateral gastrocnemii during cyclic contractions, enhanced using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering and the spatial frequencies resolved using 2D discrete Fourier transforms. The frequency information was resolved into the fascicle orientations that were validated against manually digitized values. The transverse fascicle strains were calculated from their wavelengths within the images. These methods showed that the transverse strain increases while the longitudinal fascicle length decreases; however, the extent of these strains was smaller than expected. PMID:25328509

  7. Effects of nutritional supplementation with l-arginine on repair of injuries due to muscle strain: experimental study on rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Lauren Izabel Medeiros; Wuicik, William Luiz; Kuhn, Ivan; Capriotti, Juan Rodolfo Vilela; Repka, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of oral supplementation with arginine on regeneration of injuries due to straining of the anterior tibial muscle of rats. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats of weight 492.5 ± 50.45 g were used. Injuries were induced through straining the anterior tibial muscles. The rats were separated into three groups of eight rats each. In the untreated group (UTG), after induction of injuries, the rats were observed for 24 h. In the simulation group (SG) and the arginine group (AG) respectively, the rats received isotonic saline solution and arginine solution via direct gavage, over a seven-day period. At the end of the period, blood samples were collected for serum evaluations of creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The right and left anterior tibial muscles were resected for histopathological evaluations on the muscle injuries, investigating edema, hemorrhage and disorganization or morphometric alteration of the muscle fibers. The tissue repair was investigated in terms of proliferation of adipose tissue, angiogenesis and collagen fibers. The ANOVA and Student's t methods were used and p ≤ 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. Results In the serum evaluations, the AG showed lower CK assay values and higher AST values. In the histopathological evaluation, the UTG presented edema and hemorrhage compatible with injuries due to strain; the SG presented edema and hemorrhage with proliferation of adipose tissue and collagen fibers; and the AG presented not only the findings of the SG but also, especially, intense angiogenesis. Conclusion Oral supplementation with arginine did not cause any significant metabolic alterations that would contraindicate its use and it induced angiogenesis during the repair of muscles injured due to strain. PMID:26401505

  8. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women

    PubMed Central

    Csapo, R.; Malis, V.; Hodgson, J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4–5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11–12% vs. SW: 6–8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction. PMID:24505104

  9. Strains

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled muscle ... can include: Pain and difficulty moving the injured muscle Discolored and bruised skin Swelling ... if you still have pain. Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep ...

  10. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  11. Increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both leg and arm muscles after sprint interval and moderate intensity training in subjects with Type 2 Diabetes or Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Sjöros, Tanja J; Heiskanen, Marja A; Motiani, Kumail K; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Eskelinen, Jari-Joonas; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Savisto, Nina J; Solin, Olof; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2017-03-13

    We investigated the effects of sprint interval (SIT) and moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) on glucose uptake (GU) during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and fatty acid uptake (FAU) at fasting state in thigh and arm muscles in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or prediabetes. Twenty-six patients (age 49, SD 4; 10 women) were randomly assigned into two groups: SIT (n=13), and MICT (n=13). The exercise in the SIT group consisted of 4-6 x 30 s of all-out cycling with 4 min recovery and in the MICT group 40-60 min cycling at 60% of VO2peak . Both groups completed six training sessions within two weeks. GU and FAU were measured before and after the intervention with positron emission tomography in thigh (quadriceps femoris, QF; and hamstrings) and upper arm (biceps and triceps brachii) muscles. Whole-body insulin-stimulated GU increased significantly by 25% in both groups and this was accompanied with significantly increased insulin-stimulated GU in all thigh and upper arm muscles and significantly increased FAU in QF. Within QF, insulin-stimulated GU improved more by SIT than MICT in rectus femoris (p=0.01), but not differently between the training modes in the other QF muscles. In individuals with T2D or prediabetes, both SIT and MICT training rapidly improve insulin-stimulated GU in whole body and in the thigh and arm muscles as well as FAU in the main working muscle QF. These findings highlight the underused potential of exercise in rapidly restoring the impaired skeletal muscle metabolism in subjects with impaired glucose metabolism. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose-volume relationships for moderate or severe neck muscle atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-12-18

    This study aimed to identify the dosimetric parameters and radiation dose tolerances associated with moderate or severe sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We retrospectively analysed 138 patients treated with IMRT between 2011 and 2012 for whom IMRT treatment plans and pretreatment and 3-year post-IMRT MRI scans were available. The association between mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), VX (% SCM volume that received more than X Gy), DX (dose to X% of the SCM volume) at X values of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and SCM atrophy at 3 years after IMRT were analyzed. All dosimetric parameters, except V40, V50 and V80, were significantly associated with moderate or severe SCM atrophy. Multivariate analysis showed that V65 was an independent predictor of moderate or severe SCM atrophy (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated a V65 of 21.47% (area under ROC curves, 0.732; P < 0.001) was the tolerated dose for moderate or severe SCM atrophy. We suggest a limit of 21.47% for V65 to optimize NPC treatment planning, whilst minimizing the risk of moderate or severe SCM atrophy.

  13. Strain activation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and alignment: study of strain dependency and the role of protein kinase A and C signaling pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, I.; Cohen, C. R.; Kamal, K.; Li, G.; Shin, T.; Du, W.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype can be altered by physical forces as demonstrated by cyclic strain-induced changes in proliferation, orientation, and secretion of macromolecules. However, the magnitude of strain required and the intracellular coupling pathways remain ill defined. To examine the strain requirements for SMC proliferation, we selectively seeded bovine aortic SMC either on the center or periphery of silastic membranes which were deformed with 150 mm Hg vacuum (0-7% center; 7-24% periphery). SMC located in either the center or peripheral regions showed enhanced proliferation compared to cells grown under the absence of cyclic strain. Moreover, SMC located in the center region demonstrated significantly (P < 0.005) greater proliferation as compared to those in the periphery. In contrast, SMC exposed to high strain (7-24%) demonstrated alignment perpendicular to the strain gradient, whereas SMC in the center (0-7%) remained aligned randomly. To determine the mechanisms of these phenomena, we examined the effect of cyclic strain on bovine aortic SMC signaling pathways. We observed strain-induced stimulation of the cyclic AMP pathway including adenylate cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulation. In addition, exposure of SMC to cyclic strain caused a significant increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity and enzyme translocation from the cytosol to a particulate fraction. Further study was conducted to examine the effect of strain magnitude on signaling, particularly protein kinase A (PKA) activity as well as cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein levels. We observed significantly (P < 0.05) greater PKA activity and CRE binding protein levels in SMC located in the center as compared to the peripheral region. However, inhibition of PKA (with 10 microM Rp-cAMP) or PKC (with 5-20 ng/ml staurosporine) failed to alter either the strain-induced increase in SMC proliferation or alignment. These data characterize the strain determinants for activation of

  14. Cyclic mechanical strain-induced proliferation and migration of human airway smooth muscle cells: role of EMMPRIN and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian; Chiarelli, Christian; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2005-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and migration are major components of airway remodeling in asthma. Asthmatic airways are exposed to mechanical strain, which contributes to their remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in remodeling. In the present study, we examined if the mechanical strain of human ASM (HASM) cells contributes to their proliferation and migration and the role of MMPs in this process. HASM were exposed to mechanical strain using the FlexCell system. HASM cell proliferation, migration and MMP release, activation, and expression were assessed. Our results show that cyclic strain increased the proliferation and migration of HASM; cyclic strain increased release and activation of MMP-1, -2, and -3 and membrane type 1-MMP; MMP release was preceded by an increase in extracellular MMP inducer; Prinomastat [a MMP inhibitor (MMPI)] significantly decreased cyclic strain-induced proliferation and migration of HASM; and the strain-induced increase in the release of MMPs was accompanied by an increase in tenascin-C release. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical strain plays an important role in HASM cell proliferation and migration. This increase in proliferation and migration is through an increase in MMP release and activation. Pharmacological MMPIs should be considered in the pursuit of therapeutic options for airway remodeling in asthma.

  15. Effects of priming exercise on the speed of adjustment of muscle oxidative metabolism at the onset of moderate-intensity step transitions in older adults.

    PubMed

    De Roia, Gabriela; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; Papadopoulou, Christina; Capelli, Carlo

    2012-05-15

    Aging is associated with a functional decline of the oxidative metabolism due to progressive limitations of both O(2) delivery and utilization. Priming exercise (PE) increases the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism during successive moderate-intensity transitions. We tested the hypothesis that such improvement is due to a better matching of O(2) delivery to utilization within the working muscles. In 21 healthy older adults (65.7 ± 5 yr), we measured contemporaneously noninvasive indexes of the overall speed of adjustment of the oxidative metabolism (i.e., pulmonary Vo(2) kinetics), of the bulk O(2) delivery (i.e., cardiac output), and of the rate of muscle deoxygenation (i.e., deoxygenated hemoglobin, HHb) during moderate-intensity step transitions, either with (ModB) or without (ModA) prior PE. The local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization was evaluated by the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio index. The overall speed of adjustment of the Vo(2) kinetics was significantly increased in ModB compared with ModA (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the kinetics of cardiac output was unaffected by PE. At the muscle level, ModB was associated with a significant reduction of the "overshoot" in the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio compared with ModA (P < 0.05), suggesting an improved O(2) delivery. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that, in older adults, PE, prior to moderate-intensity exercise, beneficially affects the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism due to an acute improvement of the local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization.

  16. Strain of passive elements during force enhancement by stretch in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, K A; Tsuchiya, T

    1996-01-01

    1. The force enhancement during and after stretch (0.15 micron per sarcomere) was studied during fused tetani of single fibres isolated from the anterior tibialis muscle of Rana temporaria (0.5-3.6 degrees C; sarcomere length, 2.05-2.65 microns). Changes in length were recorded simultaneously from the fibre as a whole (puller movement) and from marked segments (approximately 0.5 mm in length) of the same fibre. 2. The residual force enhancement after stretch (recorded at the end of a long tetanus) was found to be linearly related to the slow component of tension rise during the stretch ramp. 3. The fibres were released to shorten against a very small load at different times after stretch (load clamp). The shortening records derived after a preceding stretch exhibited a larger and steeper initial transient than that recorded in an isometric tetanus without stretch. The excess length change (LS; nanometres per half-sarcomere) recorded during the initial transient increased with the amplitude of stretch and was linearly related to the force enhancement produced by the stretch (FE; % of maximum tetanic tension) according to the following regression: LS = 0.200 FE + 8.65 (P < 0.001). The length changes recorded from the whole fibre agreed well with measurements from individual segments. 4. Slack-test measurements confirmed the existence of a large initial transient phase when the fibre was released to shorten after a preceding stretch. The excess length change determined from the slack tests agreed closely with the values derived from load-clamp recordings. 5. The results support the view that stretching a muscle fibre during tetanus leads to strain of elastic elements and, presumably, to variation of filament overlap due to non-uniform distribution of the length change within the fibre volume. Regions with greater filament overlap are likely to generate the long-lasting extra force referred to as 'residual force enhancement after stretch'. The elastic elements

  17. Distinguishing the effects of convective and diffusive O2 delivery on V̇o2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle contracting at moderate intensity

    PubMed Central

    Spires, Jessica; Gladden, L. Bruce; Grassi, Bruno; Goodwin, Matthew L.; Saidel, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    With current techniques, experimental measurements alone cannot characterize the effects of oxygen blood-tissue diffusion on muscle oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics in contracting skeletal muscle. To complement experimental studies, a computational model is used to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of convective oxygen delivery, diffusion into cells, and oxygen utilization to V̇o2 kinetics. The model is validated using previously published experimental V̇o2 kinetics in response to slowed blood flow (Q) on-kinetics in canine muscle (τQ = 20 s, 46 s, and 64 s) [Goodwin ML, Hernández A, Lai N, Cabrera ME, Gladden LB. J Appl Physiol. 112:9–19, 2012]. Distinctive effects of permeability-surface area or diffusive conductance (PS) and Q on V̇o2 kinetics are investigated. Model simulations quantify the relationship between PS and Q, as well as the effects of diffusion associated with PS and Q dynamics on the mean response time of V̇o2. The model indicates that PS and Q are linearly related and that PS increases more with Q when convective delivery is limited by slower Q dynamics. Simulations predict that neither oxygen convective nor diffusive delivery are limiting V̇o2 kinetics in the isolated canine gastrocnemius preparation under normal spontaneous conditions during transitions from rest to moderate (submaximal) energy demand, although both operate close to the tipping point. PMID:23761640

  18. Numerical simulations of rubber networks at moderate to high tensile strains using a purely enthalpic force extension curve for individual chains

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David Edward

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of numerical simulations of random, three-dimensional, periodic, tetrafunctional networks in response to a volume-preserving tensile strain. For the intranode force, we use a polynomial fit to a purely enthalpic ab initio force extension curve for extended polyisoprene. The simulation includes a relaxation procedure to minimize the node forces and enforces chain rupture when the extension of a network chain reaches the ab initio rupture strain. For the reasonable assumption that the distribution of network chain lengths is Gaussian, we find that the calculated snap-back velocity, temperature increase due to chain ruptures and predicted tensile stress versus strain curve are consistent with experimental data in the moderate to high extension regime. Our results show that a perfect tetrafunctional polyisoprene network is extremely robust, capable of supporting tensile stresses at least a factor of 10 greater than what is observed experimentally.

  19. Dynamic behavior and microstructural evolution during moderate to high strain rate hot deformation of a Fe-Ni-Cr alloy (alloy 800H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Di, Hongshuang; Zhang, Jiecen; Yang, Yaohua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to fundamentally understand the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H at moderate to high strain rate using hot compression tests and propose nucleation mechanism associated with dynamic crystallization (DRX). We firstly investigated the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H with industrial scale strain rates using hot compression tests and adiabatic correction was performed to correct as-measured flow curves. Secondly, a Johnson-Cook model was established by using the corrected data and could give a precise prediction of elevated temperature flow stress for the studied alloy. Finally, the nucleation mechanism of DRX grains at high strain rates was studied. The results showed that the predominant nucleation mechanism for DRX is the formation of "bulge" at parent grain boundary. Additionally, the fragmentation of original grain at low deformation temperatures and the twinning near the bulged regions at high deformation temperatures also accelerate the DRX process.

  20. Effects of moderate-velocity strength training on peak muscle power and movement velocity: do women respond differently than men?

    PubMed

    Delmonico, Matthew J; Kostek, Matthew C; Doldo, Neil A; Hand, Brian D; Bailey, Jason A; Rabon-Stith, Karma M; Conway, Joan M; Carignan, Craig R; Lang, Jesse; Hurley, Ben F

    2005-11-01

    The effects of a 10-wk unilateral knee extension strength training (ST) program on peak power (PP) and peak movement velocity (PV), at given absolute (force load) and relative (same % of 1 repetition maximum) resistances (loads), were examined in 30 older men [64 yr (7 SD)] and 32 older women [62 yr (6 SD)]. PP increased significantly in both men and women at the same absolute (P < 0.001) and relative loads (P < 0.01) with ST. Men had a significantly greater increase in relative PP than women with ST at 60% (P < 0.01) and 70% (P < 0.001) of 1 repetition maximum when covarying for baseline differences and age. However, when each subject was tested at the same absolute load and when PP was normalized for the muscle volume of the trained knee extensors (i.e., absolute muscle power quality), women increased by 9% (P < 0.05), whereas men did not change. Both men and women increased their absolute PV (P < 0.001) but decreased their relative PV significantly with ST (P < 0.05). However, when baseline values and age were covaried, women had significantly less of a decrease in relative PV quality with ST than men (P < 0.01), although the difference was small. These normalized data suggest that ST-induced increases in PP depend on muscular hypertrophy in men, but not in women, providing further support for the hypothesis developed from our previous report (Ivey FM, Tracy BL, Lemmer JT, NessAiver M, Metter EJ, Fozard JL and Hurley BF. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 55: B152-B157, 2000) that improvements in muscle function with ST result from nonmuscle mass adaptations to a greater extent in women than men.

  1. Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain Cutipay enhances chalcopyrite bioleaching under moderate thermophilic conditions in the presence of chloride ion.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cortés, Maria Paz; Maass, Alejandro; Parada, Pilar

    2014-12-01

    Currently more than 90% of the world's copper is obtained through sulfide mineral processing. Among the copper sulfides, chalcopyrite is the most abundant and therefore economically relevant. However, primary copper sulfide bioleaching is restricted due to high ionic strength raffinate solutions and particularly chloride coming from the dissolution of ores. In this work we describe the chalcopyrite bioleaching capacity of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain Cutipay (DSM 27601) previously described at the genomic level (Travisany et al. (2012) Draft genome sequence of the Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay strain, an indigenous bacterium isolated from a naturally extreme mining environment in Northern Chile. J Bacteriol 194:6327-6328). Bioleaching assays with the mixotrophic strain Cutipay showed a strong increase in copper recovery from chalcopyrite concentrate at 50°C in the presence of chloride ion, a relevant inhibitory element present in copper bioleaching processes. Compared to the abiotic control and a test with Sulfobacillus acidophilus DSM 10332, strain Cutipay showed an increase of 42 and 69% in copper recovery, respectively, demonstrating its high potential for chalcopyrite bioleaching. Moreover, a genomic comparison highlights the presence of the 2-Haloacid dehalogenase predicted-protein related to a potential new mechanism of chloride resistance in acidophiles. This novel and industrially applicable strain is under patent application CL 2013-03335.

  2. Can a wearable strain sensor based on a carbon nanotube network be an alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlikaya, Ruhan; Ege, Yavuz; Pündük, Zekine; Slobodian, Petr; Meriç, Gökhan

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to find out whether a wearable strain sensor including thermoplastic polyurethane composite with a multi-walled carbon nanotube network could be a viable alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength. For the first time, the voltage-torque and angle–time relations of the sensor were determined to allow a comparison between the angle-dependent torque changes of the dynamometer and the sensor. This comparison suggested that the torque–angle relations of the dynamometer and the sensor did not have the same characteristics. In this regard, the sensor may be used in the torque measurements due to the moderate correlation between the torque values determined via the isokinetic dynamometer and the sensor and due to the significant difference between low and high torque values of the sensor. By the same token, the torque-angle graph of the sensor may be more informative than that of the dynamometer in evaluation of knee problems.

  3. Moderate Thermal Strain in Healthcare Workers Wearing Personal Protective Equipment During Treatment and Care Activities in the Context of the 2014 Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Grélot, Laurent; Koulibaly, Fassou; Maugey, Nancy; Janvier, Frédéric; Foissaud, Vincent; Aletti, Marc; Savini, Hélène; Cotte, Jean; Dampierre, Henry; Granier, Hervé; Carmoi, Thierry; Sagui, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    The extent of thermal strain while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during care activities for Ebola virus disease patients has not yet been characterized. From January to March 2015, 25 French healthcare workers (HCWs) in Conakry, Guinea, volunteered to be monitored while wearing PPE using an ingestible thermal sensor. The mean (standard deviation) working ambient temperature and relative humidity were 29.6 °C (2.0 °C) and 65.4% (10.3%), respectively; the mean time wearing PPE was 65.7 (13.5) minutes; and the mean core body temperature increased by 0.46 °C (0.20 °C). Four HCWs reached or exceeded a mean core body temperature of ≥ 38.5 °C. HCWs wearing PPE for approximately 1 hour exhibited moderate but safe thermal strain.

  4. The molecular kink paradigm for rubber elasticity: numerical simulations of explicit polyisoprene networks at low to moderate tensile strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E

    2011-08-07

    Based on recent molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of small isoprene molecules, we propose a new ansatz for rubber elasticity. We envision a network chain as a series of independent molecular kinks, each comprised of a small number of backbone units, and the strain as being imposed along the contour of the chain. We treat chain extension in three distinct force regimes: (Ia) near zero strain, where we assume that the chain is extended within a well defined tube, with all of the kinks participating simultaneously as entropic elastic springs, (II) when the chain becomes sensibly straight, giving rise to a purely enthalpic stretching force (until bond rupture occurs) and, (Ib) a linear entropic regime, between regimes Ia and II, in which a force limit is imposed by tube deformation. In this intermediate regime, the molecular kinks are assumed to be gradually straightened until the chain becomes a series of straight segments between entanglements. We assume that there exists a tube deformation tension limit that is inversely proportional to the chain path tortuosity. Here we report the results of numerical simulations of explicit three-dimensional, periodic, polyisoprene networks, using these extension-only force models. At low strain, crosslink nodes are moved affinely, up to an arbitrary node force limit. Above this limit, non-affine motion of the nodes is allowed to relax unbalanced chain forces. Our simulation results are in good agreement with tensile stress vs. strain experiments.

  5. Randomized trial comparing exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot therapy, and low intensity laser therapy for chronic lumbar muscle strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Liu, Timon Chengyi; Yuan, Jianqin; Luo, Qingming

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot (ACH) therapy and low intensity laser (LIL) therapy in patients with chronic lumbar muscle strain (CLMS). Thirty-two patients were randomly allocated to four groups: exercise group, ACH group, LIL group, and combination group of exercise, ACH and LIL, eight in each group. Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 4 weeks. Lumbar muscle endurance, flexion and lateral flexion measures, visual analogue scale (VAS) and lumbar disability questionnaire (LDQ) were used in the clinical and functional evaluations before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after treatment. It was found that the values of endurance, VAS and LDQ in all groups were significantly improved from before to after treatment (P < 0.01). The combination group showed significantly larger reduction on pain level and functional disability than the other groups immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01). Pain level reduced significantly more in the ACH group than in the exercise group or the LIL group immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Lumbar muscle endurance and spinal ranges of motion in all groups were improved after treatment but there was no significant difference between any therapy groups. In conclusion, exercise therapy, ACH therapy and LIL therapy were effective in the treatment of CLMS. ACH therapy was more effective than exercise therapy or LIL therapy. The combination therapy of exercise, ACH and LIL had still better rehabilitative effects on CLMS.

  6. Externally applied cyclic strain regulates localization of focal contact components in cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, James J; Linderman, Jennifer J; Mooney, David J

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical signals are critical regulators of cellular gene expression, yet little is understood of the mechanism whereby cells sense mechanical forces. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain applied to populations of cells via their adhesion substrate rapidly alters the cellular distribution of focal contact proteins. Focal contact-associated components (vinculin, a-actinin, paxillin) were assayed by immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative western blotting. Application of a single step increase in strain in multiple experiments caused overall a small change in focal contact-associated vinculin. In contrast, cyclic strain induced a large and very reproducible increase in detergent-insoluble vinculin (52% relative to static) after just 1 min of strain. Insoluble paxillin was transiently enriched with a similar time course, whereas insoluble a-actinin did not change significantly in response to cyclic strain. Rhodamine-labeled chicken vinculin added to permeabilized cells preferentially localized to focal contacts in response to cyclic strain, but not a single step increase in strain. These findings establish that insoluble levels of focal contact components are altered rapidly following application of an appropriate number of mechanical perturbations, and suggest that at least one component of the mechanism does not involve soluble intermediates.

  7. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic mineral-sulfide-oxidizing firmicute Sulfobacillus acidophilus type strain (NALT)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Chertkov, Olga; Chen, Amy; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, K

    2012-01-01

    Sulfobacillus acidophilus Norris et al. 1996 is a member of the genus Sulfobacillus which comprises five species of the order Clostridiales. Sulfobacillus species are of interest for comparison to other sulfur and iron oxidizers and also have biomining applications. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Sulfobacillus, and the second published genome of a member of the species S. acidophilus. The genome, which consists of one chromosome and one plasmid with a total size of 3,557,831 bp, harbors 3,626 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. An unusual variety of the extensor digiti muscles: report with notes on repetition strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt Pires, Maria Alexandre; Casal, Diogo; Mascarenhas de Lemos, Luís; Godinho, Carlos Eduardo; Pais, Diogo; Goyri-O'Neill, João

    2013-01-01

    In over 500 human cadaveric dissections of arms and forearms, performed to the present date, we find frequent anatomical variations, corresponding to classic descriptions. Last year, we found a singular anatomic variation of the extensor muscles of the forearm, which seems previously undescribed. It is our strong belief that gross anatomy studies, and gross dissection should be updated and reintroduced in modern anatomical studies, for teaching, research, or surgical training purposes. We detected a peculiar anatomical variant of the Superficial Extensor Digiti Muscles in the forearm of a human 73 year old male Caucasian cadaver. We clearly identified a thick bundle of muscular fibres, connecting the main muscular shafts of the Extensor Digiti Minimi, and the Extensor Digitorum Communis Muscles, in a perfectly defined muscular expansion, bridging obliquely downwards and outwards, between the two main muscular shafts. In our series, this is the first occurrence of such anatomical disposition. Anatomical variations of the extensor tendons to the fingers are frequently detected in the wrist, hand and fingers compartments. The careful analysis of the variants of muscular shafts in the forearm compartment, as commonly reported in the earliest anatomical descriptions will bring renewed light to the functional assessment of the extensor mechanism of the human fingers. In this sense, we reviewed the oldest anatomical descriptions, from the 16th century to the present date.

  10. A Novel System for Studying Mechanical Strain Waveform-Dependent Responses in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason; Wong, Mitchell; Smith, Quentin; Baker, Aaron B.

    2013-01-01

    While many studies have examined the effects mechanical forces on vSMCs, there is a limited understanding of how the different arterial strain waveforms that occur in disease and different vascular beds alter vSMC mechanotransduction and phenotype. Here, we present a novel system for applying complex, time-varying strain waveforms to cultured cells and use this system to understand how these waveforms can alter vSMC phenotype and signaling. We have developed a highly adaptable cell culture system that allows the application of mechanical strain to cells in culture and can reproduce the complex dynamic mechanical environment experienced by arterial cells in the body. Using this system, we examined whether the type of applied strain waveform altered phenotypic modulation of vSMCs by mechanical forces. Cells exposed to the brachial waveform had increased phosphorylation of AKT, EGR-1, c-Fos expression and cytoskeletal remodeling in comparison to cells treated with the aortic waveform. In addition, vSMCs exposed to physiological waveforms had adopted a more differentiated phenotype in comparison to those treated with static or sinusoidal cyclic strain, with increased expression of vSMC markers desmin, calponin and SM-22 as well as increased expression of regulatory miRNAs including miR-143, -145 and -221. Taken together, our studies demonstrate the development of a novel system for applying complex, timevarying mechanical forces to cells in culture. In addition, we have shown that physiological strain waveforms have powerful effects on vSMC phenotype. PMID:24096612

  11. Recruitment of faster motor units is associated with greater rates of fascicle strain and rapid changes in muscle force during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sabrina S. M.; de Boef Miara, Maria; Arnold, Allison S.; Biewener, Andrew A.; Wakeling, James M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Animals modulate the power output needed for different locomotor tasks by changing muscle forces and fascicle strain rates. To generate the necessary forces, appropriate motor units must be recruited. Faster motor units have faster activation–deactivation rates than slower motor units, and they contract at higher strain rates; therefore, recruitment of faster motor units may be advantageous for tasks that involve rapid movements or high rates of work. This study identified motor unit recruitment patterns in the gastrocnemii muscles of goats and examined whether faster motor units are recruited when locomotor speed is increased. The study also examined whether locomotor tasks that elicit faster (or slower) motor units are associated with increased (or decreased) in vivo tendon forces, force rise and relaxation rates, fascicle strains and/or strain rates. Electromyography (EMG), sonomicrometry and muscle-tendon force data were collected from the lateral and medial gastrocnemius muscles of goats during level walking, trotting and galloping and during inclined walking and trotting. EMG signals were analyzed using wavelet and principal component analyses to quantify changes in the EMG frequency spectra across the different locomotor conditions. Fascicle strain and strain rate were calculated from the sonomicrometric data, and force rise and relaxation rates were determined from the tendon force data. The results of this study showed that faster motor units were recruited as goats increased their locomotor speeds from level walking to galloping. Slow inclined walking elicited EMG intensities similar to those of fast level galloping but different EMG frequency spectra, indicating that recruitment of the different motor unit types depended, in part, on characteristics of the task. For the locomotor tasks and muscles analyzed here, recruitment patterns were generally associated with in vivo fascicle strain rates, EMG intensity and tendon force. Together, these

  12. Reduction of selenite to red elemental selenium by moderately halotolerant Bacillus megaterium strains isolated from Bhitarkanika mangrove soil and characterization of reduced product.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rashmi Ranjan; Prajapati, Sunita; Das, Jyotirmayee; Dangar, Tushar Kanti; Das, Nigamananda; Thatoi, Hrudayanath

    2011-08-01

    Two Gram (+) bacterial strains, BSB6 and BSB12, showing resistance and potential for Se(IV) reduction among 26 moderately halotolerant isolates from the Bhitarkanika mangrove soil were characterized by biochemical and 16S rDNA sequence analyses. Both of them were strictly aerobic and able to grow in a wide range of pH (4-11), temperature (4-40°C) and salt concentration (4-12%) having an optimum growth at 37°C, pH ∼7.5 and 7% salt (NaCl). The biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis of BSB6 and BSB12 showed the closest phylogenetic similarity with the species Bacillus megaterium. Both the strains effectively reduced Se(IV) and complete reduction of selenite (up to 0.25 mM) was achieved within 40 h. SEM with energy dispersive X-ray and TEM analyses revealed the formation of nano size spherical selenium particles in and around the bacterial cells which were also supported by the confocal micrograph study. The UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra and XRD of selenium precipitates revealed that the selenium particles are in the nanometric range and crystalline in nature. These bacterial strains may be exploited further for bioremediation process of Se(IV) at relatively high salt concentrations and green synthesis of selenium nanoparticles.

  13. Chemotaxis and degradation of organophosphate compound by a novel moderately thermo-halo tolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain BUR11: evidence for possible existence of two pathways for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pailan, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    An organophosphate (OP) degrading chemotactic bacterial strain BUR11 isolated from an agricultural field was identified as a member of Pseudomonas genus on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain could utilize parathion, chlorpyrifos and their major hydrolytic intermediates as sole source of carbon for its growth and exhibited positive chemotactic response towards most of them. Optimum concentration of parathion for its growth was recorded to be 200 ppm and 62% of which was degraded within 96 h at 37 °C. Growth studies indicated the strain to be moderately thermo-halo tolerant in nature. Investigation based on identification of intermediates of parathion degradation by thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provided evidence for possible existence of two pathways. The first pathway proceeds via 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) while the second proceeds through formation of 4-aminoparathion (4-APar), 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and parabenzoquinone (PBQ). This is the first report of chemotaxis towards organophosphate compound by a thermo-halo tolerant bacterium. PMID:26587344

  14. Single myosin cross-bridge orientation in cardiac papillary muscle detects lever-arm shear strain in transduction.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Josephson, Matthew P; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-09-13

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley-Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons ( 1971 ) Nature 233 , 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution.

  15. Single Myosin Cross-Bridge Orientation in Cardiac Papillary Muscle Detects Lever-Arm Shear Strain in Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Josephson, Matthew P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley–Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons (1971) Nature 233, 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution. PMID:21819137

  16. Fast-folding α-helices as reversible strain absorbers in the muscle protein myomesin

    PubMed Central

    Berkemeier, Felix; Bertz, Morten; Xiao, Senbo; Pinotsis, Nikos; Wilmanns, Matthias; Gräter, Frauke; Rief, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The highly oriented filamentous protein network of muscle constantly experiences significant mechanical load during muscle operation. The dimeric protein myomesin has been identified as an important M-band component supporting the mechanical integrity of the entire sarcomere. Recent structural studies have revealed a long α-helical linker between the C-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) domains My12 and My13 of myomesin. In this paper, we have used single-molecule force spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the mechanics of the myomesin dimer comprising immunoglobulin domains My12–My13. We find that at forces of approximately 30 pN the α-helical linker reversibly elongates allowing the molecule to extend by more than the folded extension of a full domain. High-resolution measurements directly reveal the equilibrium folding/unfolding kinetics of the individual helix. We show that α-helix unfolding mechanically protects the molecule homodimerization from dissociation at physiologically relevant forces. As fast and reversible molecular springs the myomesin α-helical linkers are an essential component for the structural integrity of the M band. PMID:21825161

  17. Effects of high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training on glycaemic control and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Chavanelle, Vivien; Boisseau, Nathalie; Otero, Yolanda F; Combaret, Lydie; Dardevet, Dominique; Montaurier, Christophe; Delcros, Geoffrey; Peltier, Sébastien L; Sirvent, Pascal

    2017-03-16

    Physical activity is known as an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of Type 2 Diabetes. The aim of this work was to compare the effects of a traditional Moderate Intensity Continuous Training (MICT) with a High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in diabetic mice. Diabetic db/db male mice (N = 25) aged 6 weeks were subdivided into MICT, HIIT or control (CON) group. Animals in the training groups ran on a treadmill 5 days/week during 10 weeks. MICT group ran for 80 min (0° slope) at 50-60% of maximal speed (Vmax) reached during an incremental test. HIIT group ran thirteen times 4 minutes (20° slope) at 85-90% of Vmax separated by 2-min-rest periods. HIIT lowered fasting glycaemia and HbA1c compared with CON group (p < 0.05). In all mitochondrial function markers assessed, no differences were noted between the three groups except for total amount of electron transport chain proteins, slightly increased in the HIIT group vs CON. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase of muscle Glut4 content (about 2 fold) and higher insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation ratios in HIIT group. HIIT seems to improve glucose metabolism more efficiently than MICT in diabetic mice by mechanisms independent of mitochondrial adaptations.

  18. Strain and load thresholds for cervical muscle recruitment in response to quasi-static tensile stretch of the caprine C5-C6 facet joint capsule.

    PubMed

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Lu, Ying; Cavanaugh, John M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of cervical muscles to physiologic tensile stretch of cervical facet joint capsule (FJC) at a quasi-static displacement rate of 0.5mm/s. In vivo caprine left C5-C6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile displacement paradigm. EMG activity was recorded during FJC stretch from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels and bilaterally from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups at the C5-C6 level. Onset of muscular activity was later analyzed using visual and computer-based methods. Capsule load and strain at the time of onset were recorded and compared between the muscle groups. Results indicated capsule load was a better indicator of the tensile stretch thresholds for muscular recruitment than capsule strain. MF responded at significantly smaller capsule loads than TR and LC, while TR and LC activation loads were not significantly different. SM did not respond to physiologic FJC stretch. Muscle group recruitment order reflected the muscles' fiber type compositions and functional roles in the spine. This study provides the first evidence that the cervical ligamento-muscular reflex pathways are activated via tensile FJC stretch and extend to superficial and deep musculature on the anterior and posterior aspects of the neck, ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of FJC stretch.

  19. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E; Barber, John L; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-14

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  20. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-01

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  1. Effects of strain on contractile force and number of sarcomeres in series of Xenopus laevis single muscle fibres during long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, R T; Feenstra, H M; Verheyen, A K; van der Laarse, W J; Huijing, P A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to test whether mechanical strain uniquely regulates muscle fibre atrophy/hypertrophy and adaptation of the number of sarcomeres in series within mature muscle fibres in vitro . Mature single muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis illiofibularis muscle were cultured (4-97 days) while kept at negative strain ( approximately 20% below passive slack length, 'short fibres') or at positive strain ( approximately 5% over passive slack length, 'long fibres'). Before and after culture the number of sarcomeres in series was determined using laser diffraction. During culture, twitch and tetanic force characteristics were measured every day. Survival time of long fibres was substantially less than that of short fibres. Of the long fibres 40% died or became inexcitable within 1 week, whereas this did not occur for short fibres. During culture, twitch and tetanic force of all short fibres increased substantially. Regression analysis showed that the post-culture number of sarcomeres in series was not significantly changed compared to the number before culture. It is concluded that culture at negative strain does not result in atrophy or a reduction of the number of sarcomeres in series, even after 97 days. For the long fibres we did not detect any hypertrophy as tetanic force remained stable or decreased slowly, while twitch force varied. Regression analysis of the change of the number of sarcomeres in series as a function of the culture time showed a positive slope ( P=0.054). Two out of four long fibres that were cultured for at least 2 weeks showed an increase in the number of sarcomeres of 4-5%. Compared with in vivo adaptation to mechanical stimuli this is much less than would be expected. The data suggest that strain may not be the only factor that regulates hypertrophy and the number of sarcomeres in series.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Unified scaling law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: I. Separability postulate, raw scaling data and parameterization at moderate strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekin, J. W.

    2010-08-01

    of these separable functions serves as an effective 'Rosetta Stone' table for translating among the various parameterizations. An accurate, simple parameterization of the USL is given in separable form for Nb3Sn for the less complex and less controversial moderate strain regime (-0.5% < ɛ0 < ɛ0irr), where many magnets are designed: \\[F_{\\mathrm {P}} \\equiv I_{\\mathrm {c}}(B,T, \\varepsilon) B=C [(1-a|\\varepsilon_{0}|^{1.7})^{s}] [(1-t^{ 2})^{\\mu }(1-t^{ 1.52})^{\\eta-\\mu }] [b^{p}(1-b)^{q}] \\] \\[b_{\\mathrm {c}2}(t, \\varepsilon_{0})=(1-a|\\varepsilon_{0}|^{1.7}) (1-t^{ 1.52}), \\] with free scaling parameters as follows: strain parameters ɛm, s, a - (for ɛ0 < 0) and a + (for ɛ0 > 0); temperature parameters Tc*(0) and η magnetic field parameters Bc2*(0, 0), p and q; and C is a proportionality constant. With this parameterization, the scaling parameters themselves are also separable, an important feature for practical engineering purposes, because the parameter values can be built up from separate strain and temperature measurements. The only non-separable parameter, w, is fixed at 3.0, as described above. The parameter μ is fixed at 0, 1 or 2, corresponding to the three parameterization models in present use for the temperature function h(t), all of which are effectively equivalent in fitting accuracy at T >= 4 K (the simplest being the original parameterization μ = 0). At high compressive strains (ɛ0 < - 0.5%), a consensus for the best parameterizations has not yet been achieved. In Part II of this review, raw scaling data will be used to assess the most commonly used parameterizations in this regime, especially bc2(ɛ0) and g(ɛ0) at high compressive strains, and h(t) over a wide temperature range. This article is based in part on the presentation 'Unified strain-and-temperature scaling law: separable parameter set' given at the Mechanical and Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors Conference (Princeton, NJ, Aug. 2007). Trade

  3. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  4. Self-Esteem and Negative Affect as Moderators of Sociocultural Influences on Body Dissatisfaction, Strategies To Decrease Weight, and Strategies To Increase Muscles among Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardelli, Lina A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the impact of sociocultural influences and the moderating role of self-esteem and negative affect on body dissatisfaction and body change strategies for adolescent boys and girls. Surveys indicated that sociocultural pressures significantly predicted body dissatisfaction and body change strategies among both sexes. Both boys and girls…

  5. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Typically, people with a strain experience pain, limited motion, muscle spasms, and possibly muscle weakness. They also ... program designed to prevent stiffness, improve range of motion, and restore the joint's normal flexibility and strength. ...

  6. Adjustments of pulmonary O2 uptake and muscle deoxygenation during ramp incremental exercise and constant-load moderate-intensity exercise in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Gravelle, Braden M. R.; Murias, Juan M.; Spencer, Matthew D.; Paterson, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    The matching of muscle O2 delivery to O2 utilization can be inferred from the adjustments in muscle deoxygenation (Δ[HHb]) and pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p). This study examined the adjustments of V̇o2p and Δ[HHb] during ramp incremental (RI) and constant-load (CL) exercise in adult males. Ten young adults (YA; age: 25 ± 5 yr) and nine older adults (OA; age: 70 ± 3 yr) completed two RI tests and six CL step transitions to a work rate (WR) corresponding to 1) 80% of the estimated lactate threshold (same relative WR) and 2) 50 W (same absolute WR). V̇o2p was measured breath by breath, and Δ[HHb] of the vastus lateralis was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. Δ[HHb]-WR profiles were normalized from baseline (0%) to peak Δ[HHb] (100%) and fit using a sigmoid function. The sigmoid slope (d) was greater (P < 0.05) in OA (0.027 ± 0.01%/W) compared with YA (0.017 ± 0.01%/W), and the c/d value (a value corresponding to 50% of the amplitude) was smaller (P < 0.05) for OA (133 ± 40 W) than for YA (195 ± 51 W). No age-related differences in the sigmoid parameters were reported when WR was expressed as a percentage of peak WR. V̇o2p kinetics compared with Δ[HHb] kinetics for the 50-W transition were similar between YA and OA; however, Δ[HHb] kinetics during the transition to 80% of the lactate threshold were faster than V̇o2p kinetics in both groups. The greater reliance on O2 extraction displayed in OA during RI exercise suggests a lower O2 delivery-to-O2 utilization relationship at a given absolute WR compared with YA. PMID:22961268

  7. The effect of moderate-intensity exercise on the expression of HO-1 mRNA and activity of HO in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cailing; Qi, Jie; Li, Wanwei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effects of moderate-intensity training on the activity of heme oxygenase (HO) and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the aorta and the cardiac muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). After 9 weeks of swimming exercise, the activity of HO and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the SHRs were measured. The resting blood pressure in the exercise group was increased by 1.7% (P > 0.05), whereas it was significantly elevated by 10.3% (P < 0.01) in the SHR rats. Compared with animals in the control and sedentary groups, the expression level of HO-1 mRNA of aorta and cardiac muscle in the exercise group was significantly enhanced (P < 0.01). The HO activity and the content of plasma carbon monoxide (CO) in the sedentary group were dramatically decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) compared with the control group. HO activity and content of plasma CO in the exercise group were significantly higher compared with those in the sedentary group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). The HO/CO metabolic pathway might be involved in the regulation of blood pressure of the SHR models.

  8. The Effects of Positive and Negative Feedback on Maximal Voluntary Contraction Level of the Biceps Brachii Muscle: Moderating Roles of Gender and Conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    Sarıkabak, Murat; Yaman, Çetin; Tok, Serdar; Binboga, Erdal

    2016-11-02

    We investigated the effect of positive and negative feedback on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the biceps brachii muscle and explored the mediating effects of gender and conscientiousness. During elbow flexion, MVCs were measured in positive, negative, and no-feedback conditions. Participants were divided into high- and low-conscientiousness groups based on the median split of their scores on Tatar's five-factor personality inventory. Considering all participants 46 college student athletes (21 female, 28 male), positive feedback led to a greater MVC percentage change (-5.76%) than did negative feedback (2.2%). MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition differed significantly by gender, but the negative feedback condition did not. Thus, positive feedback increased female athletes' MVC level by 3.49%, but decreased male athletes' MVC level by 15.6%. For conscientiousness, MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition did not differ according to high and low conscientiousness. However, conscientiousness interacted with gender in the positive feedback condition, increasing MVC in high-conscientiousness female athletes and decreasing MVC in low-conscientiousness female athletes. Positive feedback decreased MVC in both high- and low-conscientiousness male athletes.

  9. The hybrid personal cooling system (PCS) could effectively reduce the heat strain while exercising in a hot and moderate humid environment.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenfang; Wang, Faming

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a hybrid personal cooling system (PCS) in mitigating body heat stain while exercising in a hot environment. Eight subjects underwent two trials: PCS and CON (i.e. no cooling). All trials were conducted at an air temperature of 36 ± 0.5 °C and RH = 59 ± 5%. The key findings demonstrated that the PCS could significantly reduce the core temperature, mean skin temperature, heart rate and physiological strain index during both exercise and recovery periods (p < 0.05). Subjective perceptions were also significantly alleviated in PCS at the end of the exercise and during the recovery (p < 0.05). Besides, the PCS could also bring remarkable benefits in lowering local skin temperatures and in improving perceptual sensations in both upper and lower body during both exercise and recovery periods (p < 0.05). It was thus concluded that the hybrid PCS is effective in mitigating body heat strain while exercising in a hot environment. Practitioner Summary: In hot and humid environments, body heat dissipation through sweating is greatly restricted. Our newly developed hybrid PCS could effectively alleviate heat strain while exercising in hot environments. The findings contribute to the body of knowledge in improving the health and well-being of sportsmen while exercising in hot environments.

  10. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 5321Group XXI. Function: Respiration. Muscles of respiration: Thoracic muscle group Severe or Moderately...; respiration; deglutition. Muscles of the front of the neck: (Lateral, supra-, and infrahyoid group.)...

  11. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 5321Group XXI. Function: Respiration. Muscles of respiration: Thoracic muscle group Severe or Moderately...; respiration; deglutition. Muscles of the front of the neck: (Lateral, supra-, and infrahyoid group.)...

  12. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 5321Group XXI. Function: Respiration. Muscles of respiration: Thoracic muscle group Severe or Moderately...; respiration; deglutition. Muscles of the front of the neck: (Lateral, supra-, and infrahyoid group.)...

  13. AGE RELATED DIFFERENCES IN STRAIN RATE TENSOR OF THE MEDIAL GASTROCNEMIUS MUSCLE DURING PASSIVE PLANTARFLEXION AND ACTIVE ISOMETRIC CONTRACTION USING VELOCITY ENCODED MR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Usha; Malis, Vadim; Csapo, Robert; Moghadasi, Ali; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The strain rate (SR) tensor measures the principal directions and magnitude of the instantaneous deformation; this study aims to track age related changes in the 2D SR tensor in the medial gastrocnemius during passive joint rotation and active isometric contraction. Methods SR tensors were derived from velocity encoded magnetic resonance phase-contrast images in nine young (28 yrs) and eight senior (78 yrs) women. Strain rates along and in the cross-section of the fiber were calculated from the SR tensor and used to derive the out-plane SR. Age related and regional differences in the SR eigenvalues, orientation, and the angle between the SR and muscle fiber (SR-fiber angle) were statistically analyzed. Results SR along the fiber was significantly different between the cohorts during isometric contraction with higher values in the young (P<0.05). The SR-fiber angle was larger in the young for both motion types but this difference was not statistically significant. Significant regional differences in the SR indices was seen in passive joint rotation (P<0.05) for both cohorts. Conclusion SR mapping reflects age related and regional differences during active and passive motion respectively; this may arise from differences in contractility (active motion) and elastic properties (active and passive motion). PMID:25046255

  14. Oxygen transport and intracellular bioenergetics on stimulated cat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nioka, S; McCully, K; McClellan, G; Park, Jane; Chance, B

    2003-01-01

    A unique multiparameter recording of skeletal muscle bioenergetics, biochemistry and biomechanics has permitted determination of novel relationships among hemodynamics, cellular high-energy metabolites and mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline skeletal muscle. The study utilizes 31P NMR, NIR, and NADH fluorescence spectrophotometry, biochemical assays and muscle performance. Seven cats were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Calf muscles were stimulated through sciatic nerve electrical stimulation and tension was monitored by a strain gauge connected to the Achilles tendon. We stimulated the muscle to produce several workloads up to Vmax. We also changed FiO2 from normoxia to hypoxia for each %Vmax. From these results, the most sensitive indicators of cellular hypoxia leading to a reduction in muscle performance can be determined. Hemoglobin deoxygenation generally does not correlate with cellular hypoxia, although when the HbO2 drops below 30% saturation there is an increased incidence of cellular hypoxia. The [ADP], which is known to regulate mitochondrial function, has a close relation to the work, not to the hypoxia. On the other hand, the mitochondrial NADH does respond to cellular PO2. The degree of oxidation (NADH decrease) due to the ATP flux shifts with oxygen availability in mild to moderate hypoxia (at FiO2 down to 9%). As cellular hypoxia causes decreases in muscle performance (moderate to severe hypoxia), NADH is being reduced rather than oxidized with increasing workloads.

  15. Moderating strain without sacrificing reactivity: design of fast and tunable noncatalyzed alkyne-azide cycloadditions via stereoelectronically controlled transition state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Gold, Brian; Dudley, Gregory B; Alabugin, Igor V

    2013-01-30

    Recently, we have identified two strategies for selective transition state (TS) stabilization in catalyst-free azide/alkyne cycloadditions. In particular, the transition states for the formation of both 1,4- and 1,5-isomers can be stabilized via hyperconjugative assistance for the C···N bond formation, whereas the 1,5-TS can be stabilized via C-H···X H-bonding interactions. When the hyperconjugative assistance is maximized by the antiperiplanar arrangement of propargylic σ-acceptors relative to the forming bonds, the combination of these TS-stabilizing effects was predicted to lead to ~1 million fold acceleration of the cycloaddition with methyl azide. The present work investigated whether hyperconjugative assistance and H-bonding can be combined with strain activation for the design of even more reactive alkynes and whether reactivity can be turned "on demand." When stereoelectronic amplification is achieved by optimal positioning of σ-acceptors at the endocyclic bonds antiperiplanar to the breaking alkyne π-bonds, the stabilization of the bent alkyne geometry leads to a significant decrease in strain in cyclic alkynes without compromising their reactivity in alkyne-azide cycloadditions. The approach can be used in a modular fashion where the TS stabilizing effects are introduced sequentially until the desired level of reactivity is achieved. A significant increase in reactivity upon the protonation of an endocyclic NH-group suggests a new strategy for the design of click reactions triggered by a pH-change or introduction of an external Lewis acid.

  16. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles A A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  17. Age-associated NF-κB signaling in myofibers alters the satellite cell niche and re-strains muscle stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kah Yong; Rosner, Bernard; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Gjata, Ornela; Tran, Peter; Shoelson, Steven E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly regenerative tissue, but muscle repair potential is increasingly compromised with advancing age. In this study, we demonstrate that increased NF-κB activity in aged muscle fibers contributes to diminished myogenic potential of their associated satellite cells. We further examine the impact of genetic modulation of NF-κB signaling in muscle satellite cells or myofibers on recovery after damage. These studies reveal that NF-κB activity in differentiated myofibers is sufficient to drive dysfunction of muscle regenerative cells via cell-non-autonomous mechanisms. Inhibition of NF-κB, or its downstream target Phospholipase A2, in myofibers rescued muscle regenerative potential in aged muscle. Moreover, systemic administration of sodium salicylate, an FDA-approved NF-κB inhibitor, decreased inflammatory gene expression and improved repair in aged muscle. Together, these studies identify a unique NF-κB regulated, non-cell autonomous mechanism by which stem cell function is linked to lipid signaling and homeostasis, and provide important new targets to stimulate muscle repair in aged individuals. PMID:27852976

  18. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stakeholders Info Guidance for Four-Year Training Programs Governance FAQs Single GME Accreditation System Newsletter Archive Events ... prevention, tuning into how a patient’s lifestyle and environment can impact their wellbeing. DOs strive to help ...

  19. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the joint or muscle swelling and bruising warmth and redness of the injured area difficulty moving ... looks "bent" or misshapen signs of infection (increased warmth, redness, streaks, swelling, and pain) a strain or ...

  20. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  1. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  2. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  3. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  4. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  5. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  6. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  7. Muscle disorders and rehabilitation in canine athletes.

    PubMed

    Steiss, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Muscle disorders associated with physical exertion in human athletes include delayed-onset muscle soreness, muscle strain, muscle tears, rhabdomyolysis, and acute and chronic compartment syndromes. Given that the structure of muscle is similar among different species, it is reasonable to expect that dogs experience the same phenomena. This article focuses on several of the muscle disorders of bird dogs, namely, coccygeal muscle injury and infraspinatus muscle contracture, and on those of dogs involved in tracking-obedience-protection training, namely, fibrotic myopathy, with an additional discussion of muscle strain. For injury prevention, one important area that can be adapted to canine athletes is the incorporation of warm-up and cool-down into the training program.

  8. Knitting and weaving artificial muscles

    PubMed Central

    Maziz, Ali; Concas, Alessandro; Khaldi, Alexandre; Stålhand, Jonas; Persson, Nils-Krister; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2017-01-01

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind’s oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices. PMID:28138542

  9. Knitting and weaving artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Maziz, Ali; Concas, Alessandro; Khaldi, Alexandre; Stålhand, Jonas; Persson, Nils-Krister; Jager, Edwin W H

    2017-01-01

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind's oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices.

  10. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  11. Soluble CD4 blocks the infectivity of diverse strains of HIV and SIV for T cells and monocytes but not for brain and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Clapham, P R; Weber, J N; Whitby, D; McIntosh, K; Dalgleish, A G; Maddon, P J; Deen, K C; Sweet, R W; Weiss, R A

    1989-01-26

    The CD4 antigen has been subverted as a receptor by the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV). Several groups have reported that recombinant, soluble forms of the CD4 molecule (sCD4) block the infection of T lymphocytes by HIV-1, as CD4 binds the HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, with high affinity. We now report that sCD4 blocks diverse strains of HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV, but is less effective for HIV-2. The blocking effect is apparent even after adsorption of virions to CD4 cells. Soluble CD4 prevents HIV infection of T-lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cell lines, but neither sCD4 nor anti-CD4 antibodies inhibit infection of glioma and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence for the Type Strain Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BR, a Strictly Anaerobic, Moderately Thermophilic, and Nitrate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Abin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BRT was isolated from calcite-rich, metalliferous core samples collected at the Rainbow deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we report the 2.2-Mb draft genome sequence for this strain, consisting of 100 contigs with a G+C content of 33.6% and 2,227 protein-coding sequences. PMID:27834704

  13. Draft Genome Sequence for the Type Strain Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BR, a Strictly Anaerobic, Moderately Thermophilic, and Nitrate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Abin, Christopher A; Hollibaugh, James T

    2016-11-10

    Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BR(T) was isolated from calcite-rich, metalliferous core samples collected at the Rainbow deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we report the 2.2-Mb draft genome sequence for this strain, consisting of 100 contigs with a G+C content of 33.6% and 2,227 protein-coding sequences.

  14. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  15. Morphology of moderator bands (septomarginal trabecula) in porcine heart ventricles.

    PubMed

    Gulyaeva, A S; Roshchevskaya, I M

    2012-10-01

    The morphology of moderator bands in both heart ventricular cavities was examined on macro- and microscopic levels in 14 six-month-old Landrace pigs. One transverse moderator band, measuring 2.9 ± 0.6 mm in diameter, was located between the septum and the free wall of the right ventricular cavity. On cross-section, clumps of conductive cells were found at the periphery of the moderator band and in its central part around the blood vessels. Large amounts of muscle fibres were identified. The left ventricular cavity contained moderator bands in the form of thin cords, measuring 1.05 ± 0.09 mm in diameter and located mostly between the interventricular septum and the papillary muscles. Conductive tissue was represented by clumps of Purkinje cells, surrounded by myocardial fibres. The proportion of conductive cells and muscle fibres in the moderator bands was approximately the same. Owing to different amounts of conductive cells and muscle fibres in the bands, we assume that moderator bands in the right and left ventricles play different primary functional roles. Our results were compared with previous data on pigs and other ungulate animal species.

  16. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  17. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  18. Moderate Load Eccentric Exercise; A Distinct Novel Training Modality

    PubMed Central

    Hoppeler, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years a number of studies have been published using progressive eccentric exercise protocols on motorized ergometers or similar devices that allow for controlled application of eccentric loads. Exercise protocols ramp eccentric loads over an initial 3 weeks period in order to prevent muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness. Final training loads reach 400–500 W in rehabilitative settings and over 1200 W in elite athletes. Training is typically carried out three times per week for durations of 20–30 min. This type of training has been characterizes as moderate load eccentric exercise. It has also been denoted RENEW (Resistance Exercise via Negative Eccentric Work by LaStayo et al., 2014). It is distinct from plyometric exercises (i.e., drop jumps) that impose muscle loads of several thousand Watts on muscles and tendons. It is also distinct from eccentric overload training whereby loads in a conventional strength training setting are increased in the eccentric phase of the movement to match concentric loads. Moderate load eccentric exercise (or RENEW) has been shown to be similarly effective as conventional strength training in increasing muscle strength and muscle volume. However, as carried out at higher angular velocities of joint movement, it reduces joint loads. A hallmark of moderate load eccentric exercise is the fact that the energy requirements are typically 4-fold smaller than in concentric exercise of the same load. This makes moderate load eccentric exercise training the tool of choice in medical conditions with limitations in muscle energy supply. The use and effectiveness of moderate load eccentric exercise has been demonstrated mostly in small scale studies for cardiorespiratory conditions, sarcopenia of old age, cancer, diabetes type 2, and neurological conditions. It has also been used effectively in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries of the locomotor system in particular the rehabilitation after anterior

  19. Moderate Load Eccentric Exercise; A Distinct Novel Training Modality.

    PubMed

    Hoppeler, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years a number of studies have been published using progressive eccentric exercise protocols on motorized ergometers or similar devices that allow for controlled application of eccentric loads. Exercise protocols ramp eccentric loads over an initial 3 weeks period in order to prevent muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness. Final training loads reach 400-500 W in rehabilitative settings and over 1200 W in elite athletes. Training is typically carried out three times per week for durations of 20-30 min. This type of training has been characterizes as moderate load eccentric exercise. It has also been denoted RENEW (Resistance Exercise via Negative Eccentric Work by LaStayo et al., 2014). It is distinct from plyometric exercises (i.e., drop jumps) that impose muscle loads of several thousand Watts on muscles and tendons. It is also distinct from eccentric overload training whereby loads in a conventional strength training setting are increased in the eccentric phase of the movement to match concentric loads. Moderate load eccentric exercise (or RENEW) has been shown to be similarly effective as conventional strength training in increasing muscle strength and muscle volume. However, as carried out at higher angular velocities of joint movement, it reduces joint loads. A hallmark of moderate load eccentric exercise is the fact that the energy requirements are typically 4-fold smaller than in concentric exercise of the same load. This makes moderate load eccentric exercise training the tool of choice in medical conditions with limitations in muscle energy supply. The use and effectiveness of moderate load eccentric exercise has been demonstrated mostly in small scale studies for cardiorespiratory conditions, sarcopenia of old age, cancer, diabetes type 2, and neurological conditions. It has also been used effectively in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries of the locomotor system in particular the rehabilitation after anterior cruciate

  20. Viscoelastic properties of laryngeal posturing muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo

    2003-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of canine laryngeal muscles were measured in a series of in vitro experiments. Laryngeal posturing that controls vocal fold length and adduction/abduction is an essential component of the voice production. The dynamics of posturing depends on the viscoelastic and physiological properties of the laryngeal muscles. The time-dependent and nonlinear behaviors of these tissues are also crucial in the voice production and pitch control theories. The lack of information on some of these muscles such as posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA), lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA), and intraarytenoid muscle (IA) was the major incentive for this study. Samples of PCA and LCA muscles were made from canine larynges and mounted on a dual-servo system (Ergometer) as described in our previous works. Two sets of experiments were conducted on each muscle, a 1-Hz stretch and release experiment that provides stress-strain data and a stress relaxation test. Data from these muscles were fitted to viscoelastic models and Young's modulus and viscoelastic constants are obtained for each muscle. Preliminary data indicates that elastics properties of these muscles are similar to those of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. The relaxation response of these muscles also shows some similarity to other laryngeal muscles in terms of time constants.

  1. Generalized Model of a Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shil'ko, S. V.; Chernous, D. A.; Bondarenko, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    A new phenomenological model of a skeletal muscle consisting of a contractile and two nonlinear viscoelastic elements is proposed. The corresponding system of differential equations of the model is obtained, which allows one to derive time-dependent relations between the axial stress and the longitudinal strain in passive and activated states of the muscle. Methods for determining the viscoelastic and functional characteristics of the muscle as input parameters of the equations mentioned above are developed. These methods are based on the joint application of known experimental relations for a single muscle fiber and the results of muscle indentation in vivo on a "Miometer UT 98-01" device.

  2. Moderate views of abortion.

    PubMed

    Sumner, L W

    1997-01-01

    This essay offers a moderate view of abortion that imposes a time limit for unrestricted abortion and specific indications for later abortions. The introduction notes that the discussion will provide a defense for this policy based on a moral analysis but that other options for moderates, especially options provided by freestanding views (the defense of which does not rest on any prior commitment about the morality of abortion), will also be considered. The next section considers the moral status of the fetus grounded in a criterion of moral standing that stipulates the necessary characteristics to achieve moral standing. This discussion concludes that a fetus acquires moral standing only when it becomes sentient. Section 3 moves the argument from ethics to politics to prove that a moderate policy must place no limitations on abortion before the time the fetus becomes sentient because before that time the fetus has no interest for the state to protect. The final section notes that some pro-choice advocates may be happier with the moderate policy proposed than with its controversial defense based on the moral status of the fetus and that another defense of a moderate policy could be based on a finding that the ethical issue can not be decided and that no view about abortion ethics is more reasonable than any other. The essay concludes that the ethical debate is ultimately unavoidable.

  3. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Tudor, J.J.

    1963-08-01

    An improved moderator structure for nuclear reactors consists of moderator blocks arranged in horizontal layers to form a multiplicity of vertically stacked columns of blocks. The blocks in each vertical column are keyed together, and a ceramic grid is disposed between each horizontal layer of blocks. Pressure plates cover- the lateral surface of the moderator structure in abutting relationship with the peripheral terminal lengths of the ceramic grids. Tubular springs are disposed between the pressure plates and a rigid external support. The tubular springs have their axes vertically disposed to facilitate passage of coolant gas through the springs and are spaced apart a selected distance such that at sonae preselected point of spring deflection, the sides of the springs will contact adjacent springs thereby causing a large increase in resistance to further spring deflection. (AEC)

  4. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  5. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  6. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  7. Moderators and Subgroups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, William A.

    1978-01-01

    The author suggests that it is more efficient to cluster subjects on the basis of their profiles across several dimensions of significance and to seek "between" subgroup correlates, than to search for a moderator variable "within" levels of which criterion relationships may vary in nonrandom fashion. (Author/RK)

  8. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogeneis imperfecta mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J. Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J.; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (Po, Po/mg and Po/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased Po and an inability to sustain Po for the 300 ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. PMID:20619344

  9. Factors in delayed muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Abraham, W M

    1977-01-01

    The possible causes of delayed muscle soreness which occur 24 to 48 hr after exercise were examined from three different approaches, each designed to test an existing hypothesis. Surface electromyograms were used to evaluate the muscle spasm theory; the possibility of actual muscle cell damage was monitored by the presence of myoglobinuria, while the ratio of hydroxyproline/creatinine (OHP/Cr) in 24 hr urine collection was used as a marker for connective tissue involvement. In the first study, although all volunteers developed muscle soreness 24 and 48 hr after exercise, no change in the EMG activity of the sore muscles was observed. Myoglobin excretion was found in 88% of the subjects who developed soreness. However, in a second study, 92% of the subject who performed both moderate and heavy exercise but did not develop muscle soreness had myoglobinuria. In contrast, during a third experiment subjects on gelatin-free diets showed an increase (P less than .1) in the OHP/Cr between control (.020+/-.001) and 48 hr post-exercise (.002+/-.001, X+/-SE). Soreness resulted in all cases. When the OHP/Cr value is taken for the day of maximal soreness, the post-exercise mean increases to .024+/-.001 and the level of significance rises (P less than .005). These observations support the concept that exercise induced soreness may be related to disruption of the connective tissue elements in the muscle and/or their attachments.

  10. Structural alterations of skeletal muscle in copd

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sunita; Brooks, Dina; Carvalho, Celso R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease associated with a systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral muscle dysfunction has been well characterized in individuals with COPD and results from a complex interaction between systemic and local factors. Objective: In this narrative review, we will describe muscle wasting in people with COPD, the associated structural changes, muscle regenerative capacity and possible mechanisms for muscle wasting. We will also discuss how structural changes relate to impaired muscle function and mobility in people with COPD. Key Observations: Approximately 30–40% of individuals with COPD experience muscle mass depletion. Furthermore, muscle atrophy is a predictor of physical function and mortality in this population. Associated structural changes include a decreased proportion and size of type-I fibers, reduced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial density mainly in the quadriceps. Observations related to impaired muscle regenerative capacity in individuals with COPD include a lower proportion of central nuclei in the presence or absence of muscle atrophy and decreased maximal telomere length, which has been correlated with reduced muscle cross-sectional area. Potential mechanisms for muscle wasting in COPD may include excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered amino acid metabolism and lower expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma-coactivator 1-alpha mRNA. Despite a moderate relationship between muscle atrophy and function, impairments in oxidative metabolism only seems weakly related to muscle function. Conclusion: This review article demonstrates the cellular modifications in the peripheral muscle of people with COPD and describes the evidence of its relationship to muscle function. Future research will focus on rehabilitation strategies to improve muscle wasting and maximize function. PMID:24678302

  11. Muscle fibre recruitment can respond to the mechanics of the muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M; Uehli, Katrin; Rozitis, Antra I

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the motor unit recruitment patterns between and within muscles of the triceps surae during cycling on a stationary ergometer at a range of pedal speeds and resistances. Muscle activity was measured from the soleus (SOL), medial gastrocnemius (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) using surface electromyography (EMG) and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. Muscle fascicle strain rates were quantified using ultrasonography, and the muscle–tendon unit lengths were calculated from the segmental kinematics. The EMG intensities showed that the body uses the SOL relatively more for the higher-force, lower-velocity contractions than the MG and LG. The EMG spectra showed a shift to higher frequencies at faster muscle fascicle strain rates for MG: these shifts were independent of the level of muscle activity, the locomotor load and the muscle fascicle strain. These results indicated that a selective recruitment of the faster motor units occurred within the MG muscle in response to the increasing muscle fascicle strain rates. This preferential recruitment of the faster fibres for the faster tasks indicates that in some circumstances motor unit recruitment during locomotion can match the contractile properties of the muscle fibres to the mechanical demands of the contraction. PMID:16849250

  12. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage caused by injury, diabetes, toxins, or alcohol Polio ( poliomyelitis ) Spinal cord injury Although people can adapt to ... Guillain-Barré syndrome Hypotonia Muscle cramps Muscular dystrophy Polio Review Date 1/5/2016 Updated by: Joseph ...

  13. Getting Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscular as a superhero or your favorite professional athlete? Well, the big muscles you're thinking about ... Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes are grownups, whose bodies are different from kids' ...

  14. Muscle twitching

    MedlinePlus

    ... patient with neurologic disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Selcen D. Muscle diseases. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  15. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  16. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects.

  17. Ultrasound strain zero-crossing elasticity measurement in assessment of renal allograft cortical hardness: a preliminary observation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether ultrasound strain zero-crossing elasticity measurement can be used to discriminate moderate cortical fibrosis or inflammation in renal allografts, we prospectively assessed cortical hardness with quasi-static ultrasound elastography in 38 renal transplant patients who underwent kidney biopsy from January 2013 to June 2013. With the Banff score criteria for renal cortical fibrosis as gold standard, 38 subjects were divided into two groups: group 1 (n = 18) with ≤25% cortical fibrosis and group 2 (n = 20) with >26% cortical fibrosis. We then divided this population again into group 3 (n = 20) with ≤ 25% inflammation and group 4 (n = 18) with >26% inflammation based on the Banff score for renal parenchyma inflammation. To estimate renal cortical hardness in both population divisions, we propose an ultrasound strain relative zero-crossing elasticity measurement (ZC) method. In this technique, the relative return to baseline, that is zero strain, of strain in the renal cortex is compared with that of strain in reference soft tissue (between the abdominal wall and pelvic muscles). Using the ZC point on the reference strain decompression slope as standard, we determined when cortical strain crossed zero during decompression. ZC was negative when cortical strain did not return or returned after the reference, whereas ZC was positive when cortical strain returned ahead of the reference. Fisher's exact test was used to examine the significance of differences in ZC between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4. The accuracy of ZC in determining moderate cortical fibrosis and moderate inflammation was examined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The intra-class correlation coefficient and analysis of variance were used to test inter-rater reliability and reproducibility. ZC had good inter-observer agreement (ICC = 0.912) and reproducibility (p = 0.979). ZCs were negative in 18 of 18 cases in group 1 and positive in 19 of 20 cases in

  18. Passive mechanical properties of human gastrocnemius muscle tendon units, muscle fascicles and tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoang, P D; Herbert, R D; Todd, G; Gorman, R B; Gandevia, S C

    2007-12-01

    This study provides the first in vivo measures of the passive length-tension properties of relaxed human muscle fascicles and their tendons. A new method was used to derive passive length-tension properties of human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon units from measures of ankle stiffness obtained at a range of knee angles. Passive length-tension curves of the muscle-tendon unit were then combined with ultrasonographic measures of muscle fascicle length and pennation to determine passive length-tension curves of the muscle fascicles and tendons. Mean slack lengths of the fascicles, tendons and whole muscle-tendon units were 3.3+/-0.5 cm, 39.5+/-1.6 cm and 42.3+/-1.5 cm, respectively (means +/- s.d., N=6). On average, the muscle-tendon units were slack (i.e. their passive tension was zero) over the shortest 2.3+/-1.2 cm of their range. With combined changes of knee and ankle angles, the maximal increase in length of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit above slack length was 6.7+/-1.9 cm, of which 52.4+/-11.7% was due to elongation of the tendon. Muscle fascicles and tendons underwent strains of 86.4+/-26.8% and 9.2+/-4.1%, respectively, across the physiological range of lengths. We conclude that the relaxed human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit falls slack over about one-quarter of its in vivo length and that muscle fascicle strains are much greater than tendon strains. Nonetheless, because the tendons are much longer than the muscle fascicles, tendons contribute more than half of the total compliance of the muscle-tendon unit.

  19. Traumatic injuries: office treatment of strain.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A J

    1977-03-01

    Strain, defined as trauma to a musculotendinous unit, is characterized by pain, muscle spasm, swelling, and loss of range of motion. Conservative treatment consists of rest and elevation of the affected muscle, application of ice and compression, active and passive stretching, and resisted motion exercises. If rupture of muscle and fascia is extensive, surgery may be required. Chronic strain may result from repeated injuries. It is usually treated with rest and administration of an anti-inflammatory agent, such as oxyphenbutazone or a corticosteroid preparation. In the event that this regimen does not provide relief from pain and disability, surgery may be necessary.

  20. FLUID MODERATED REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-10-22

    A reactor which utilizes fissionable fuel elements in rod form immersed in a moderator or heavy water and a means of circulating the heavy water so that it may also function as a coolant to remove the heat generated by the fission of the fuel are described. In this design, the clad fuel elements are held in vertical tubes immersed in heavy water in a tank. The water is circulated in a closed system by entering near the tops of the tubes, passing downward through the tubes over the fuel elements and out into the tank, where it is drawn off at the bottom, passed through heat exchangers to give up its heat and then returned to the tops of the tubes for recirculation.

  1. Sex Differences in Exercise-Induced Muscle Pain and Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Liu, Ying; Rector, R. Scott; Thomas, Tom R.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    There is uncertainty about sex differences in exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage due to several methodological weaknesses in the literature. This investigation tested the hypothesis that higher levels of exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage indicators would be found in women than men when several methodological improvements were executed in the same study. Participants (N = 33; 42% women) with an average age of 23 years (SD = 2.82) consented to participate. After a familiarization session, participants visited the laboratory before and across four days after eccentric exercise was completed to induce arm muscle pain and muscle damage. Our primary outcomes were arm pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds. However, we also measured the following indicators of muscle damage: arm girth; resting elbow extension; isometric elbow flexor strength; myoglobin (Mb); tumor necrosis factor (TNFa); interleukin 1beta (IL1b); and total nitric oxide (NO). Temporary induction of muscle damage was indicated by changes in all outcome measures except TNFa, and IL1b. In contrast to our hypotheses, women reported moderately lower and less frequent muscle pain than men. Also, women’s arm girth and Mb levels increased moderately less than men’s, but the differences were not significant. Few large sex differences were detected. PMID:23182229

  2. Artificial muscles versus natural actuators from frogs to flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Full, Robert J.; Meijer, Kenneth

    2000-06-01

    When is a human-made actuator an artificial muscle. Natural actuators in the animal kingdom vary greatly in their capacity and role. Maximum stress variety by 100-fold as does the velocity at which muscles contract. Some muscles generate near maximum force over broad strain ranges, while others function over only the narrowest ranges. Frequencies of operation range from less than 1 Hz to 1000 Hz. Mass- specific power output can reach over 250 W/kg muscle. Muscles function not simply as force generators, but as springs and dampers. Our isolated muscle experiments on insects show that some muscles function primarily as energy absorber sand have a role in control, while others are effective at power generation. At present, we are evaluating EAPs to see where these actuators fit in the functional space of nature's muscles. EAPs appear particularly promising as artificial muscles for insect-sized robots.

  3. Muscle force recovery in relation to muscle oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ufland, Pierre; Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Buchheit, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of human muscle reoxygenation on force recovery following a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Ten athletes (22·9 ± 4·0 years) executed a plantar-flexion sequence including two repeated MVCs [i.e. a 30-s MVC (MVC(30)) followed by a 10-s MVC (MVC(10))] separated by 10, 30, 60, 120 or 300 s of passive recovery. A 10-min passive recovery period was allowed between each MVC sequence. This procedure was randomly repeated with two different recovery conditions: without (CON) or with (OCC) arterial occlusion of the medial gastrocnemius. During OCC, the occlusion was maintained from the end of MVC(30) to the end of MVC(10). Muscle oxygenation (Near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS, [Hb(diff) ]) was continuously measured during all MVC sequences and expressed as a percentage of the maximal changes in optical density observed during MVC(30). Maximal Torque was analysed at the start of each contraction. Torque during each MVC(10) was expressed as a percentage of the Torque during the previous MVC(30). Torque recovery was complete within 300 s after MVC(30) during CON (MVC(10) = 101·8 ± 5·0%); 88·6 ± 8·9% of the Torque was recovered during OCC (P = 0·005). There was also a moderate correlation between absolute level of muscle oxygenation and Torque (r = 0·32 (90% CI, 0·09;0·52), P = 0·02). Present findings confirm the role of human muscle oxygenation in muscular force recovery during repeated-maximal efforts. However, the correlation between absolute muscle oxygenation and force level during recovery is only moderate, suggesting that other mechanisms are likely involved in the force recovery process.

  4. Distinct muscle fascicle length changes in feline medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles during slope walking.

    PubMed

    Maas, Huub; Gregor, Robert J; Hodson-Tole, Emma F; Farrell, Brad J; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2009-04-01

    On the basis of differences in physiology, e.g., histochemical properties and spindle density, and the structural design of the cat soleus (SO) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, we hypothesized that 1) fascicle length changes during overground walking would be both muscle and slope dependent, which would have implications for the muscles' force output as well as sensory function, and that 2) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) and fascicle length changes would be different, in which case MTU length could not be used as an indicator of muscle spindle strain. To test these hypotheses, we quantified muscle fascicle length changes and compared them with length changes of the whole MTU in the SO and MG during overground walking at various slopes (0, +/- 25, +/- 50, +75, and +100%). The SO and MG were surgically instrumented with sonomicrometry crystals and fine-wire electromyogram electrodes to measure changes in muscle fascicle length and muscle activity, respectively. MTU lengths were calculated using recorded ankle and knee joint angles and a geometric model of the hindlimb. The resultant joint moments were calculated using inverse dynamics analysis to infer muscle loading. It was found that although MTU length and velocity profiles of the SO and MG appeared similar, length changes and velocities of muscle fascicles were substantially different between the two muscles. Fascicle length changes of both SO and MG were significantly affected by slope intensity acting eccentrically in downslope walking (-25 to -50%) and concentrically in upslope walking (+25 to +100%). The differences in MTU and fascicle behaviors in both the SO and MG muscles during slope walking were explained by the three distinct features of these muscles: 1) the number of joints spanned, 2) the pennation angle, and 3) the in-series elastic component. It was further suggested that the potential role of length feedback from muscle spindles is both task and muscle dependent.

  5. Electromyography of the pubococcygeus muscles in patients with obstructed defaecation.

    PubMed

    Lubowski, D Z; King, D W; Finlay, I G

    1992-12-01

    The function of the pubococcygeus muscles during defaecation straining was compared in 10 women with obstructed defaecation and 12 age-matched control subjects. Video-proctography in each patient showed failure to evacuate the rectum and sagging of the pelvic floor during attempted defaecation. Trans-perineal concentric needle electromyography in the puborectalis muscle and transvaginal electromyography in the pubococcygeus muscle was carried out during defaecation straining and during attempted rectal balloon expulsion. Contraction of the pubococcygeus muscle was observed in 10 of the 12 control subjects and in 2 of the 10 patients with obstructed defaecation (P < 0.005). Virtually equal proportions of subjects in each group showed relaxation or contraction of the puborectalis muscle during straining. There was significant perineal descent on straining in the patient group (P = 0.005). This group of patients with obstructed defaecation showed failure of the pubococcygeus muscles to contract, perhaps due to neuropathic weakness of the muscles. The puborectalis muscle did not cause obstructed defaecation in these patients, and the concept of "paradoxical" contraction of this muscle is questioned.

  6. Neuromuscular alterations during walking in persons with moderate knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hubley-Kozey, C L; Deluzio, K J; Landry, S C; McNutt, J S; Stanish, W D

    2006-08-01

    This paper compared the neuromuscular responses during walking between those with early-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) to asymptomatic controls. The rationale for studying those with mild to moderate knee OA was to determine the alterations in response to dynamic loading that might be expected before severe pain, joint space narrowing and joint surface changes occur. We used pattern recognition techniques to explore both amplitude and shape changes of the surface electromyograms recorded from seven muscles crossing the knee joint of 40 subjects with knee OA and 38 asymptomatic controls during a walking task. The principal patterns for each muscle grouping explained over 83% of the variance in the waveforms. This result supported the notion that the main neuromuscular patterns were similar between asymptomatic controls and those with OA, reflecting the specific roles of the major muscles during walking. ANOVA revealed significant (p<0.05) differences in the principal pattern scores reflecting both amplitude and shape alterations in the OA group and among muscles. These differences captured subtle changes in the neuromuscular responses of the subjects with OA throughout different phases of the gait cycle and most likely reflected changes in the mechanical environment (joint loading, instability) and pain. The subjects with OA attempted to increase activity of the lateral sites and reduce activity in the medial sites, having minimal but prolonged activity during late stance. Therefore, alterations in neuromuscular responses were found even in this high functioning group with moderate knee OA.

  7. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  8. Classification of the intrafusal muscle fibres in the frog muscle spindle: histochemical and immunofluorescent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, A; Fujitsuka, N; Sokabe, M; Naruse, K; Nomura, K; Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1990-01-01

    Intrafusal muscle fibres from bull-frog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were classified into three types using the histochemical, immunofluorescent and morphological characteristics, with reference to the extrafusal muscle fibres, which were classified into five types in accordance with Rowlerson & Spurway (1988). Immunofluorescent reactions with antibodies against slow or fast myosins obtained from anterior or posterior latissimus dorsi muscles (ALD or PLD), respectively, of chicken were used as the primary criterion. Histochemical profiles of muscle fibres were classified into nine types of myosin ATPase activity as the secondary criterion. Anti-PLD intrafusal fibres (polar zone) with ATPase profiles of moderate to high acid and alkaline stabilities correspond to large nuclear bag fibres in the classification of Diwan & Ito (1989), whereas anti-ALD fibres (polar zone) with alkaline-labile ATPase profiles correspond to medium nuclear bag fibres. On the basis of diameter, anti-PLD fibres (polar zone) with ATPase profiles of moderate to low acid stability and moderate to high alkaline stability seem to correspond to two types of small nuclear chain fibre. Variations between muscles, between intra- and extrafusal fibres and also between zones along intrafusal fibres are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:2148748

  9. Classification of the intrafusal muscle fibres in the frog muscle spindle: histochemical and immunofluorescent studies.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, A; Fujitsuka, N; Sokabe, M; Naruse, K; Nomura, K; Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1990-10-01

    Intrafusal muscle fibres from bull-frog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were classified into three types using the histochemical, immunofluorescent and morphological characteristics, with reference to the extrafusal muscle fibres, which were classified into five types in accordance with Rowlerson & Spurway (1988). Immunofluorescent reactions with antibodies against slow or fast myosins obtained from anterior or posterior latissimus dorsi muscles (ALD or PLD), respectively, of chicken were used as the primary criterion. Histochemical profiles of muscle fibres were classified into nine types of myosin ATPase activity as the secondary criterion. Anti-PLD intrafusal fibres (polar zone) with ATPase profiles of moderate to high acid and alkaline stabilities correspond to large nuclear bag fibres in the classification of Diwan & Ito (1989), whereas anti-ALD fibres (polar zone) with alkaline-labile ATPase profiles correspond to medium nuclear bag fibres. On the basis of diameter, anti-PLD fibres (polar zone) with ATPase profiles of moderate to low acid stability and moderate to high alkaline stability seem to correspond to two types of small nuclear chain fibre. Variations between muscles, between intra- and extrafusal fibres and also between zones along intrafusal fibres are discussed.

  10. Biophysical Stimulation for Engineering Functional Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Somers, Sarah; Spector, Alexander; DiGirolamo, Douglas; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-04-12

    Tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic strategy to regenerate skeletal muscle. However, ex vivo cultivation methods typically result in a low differentiation efficiency of stem cells as well as grafts that resemble the native tissues morphologically, but lack contractile function. The application of biomimetic tensile strain provides a potent stimulus for enhancing myogenic differentiation and engineering functional skeletal muscle grafts. We reviewed integrin-dependent mechanisms that potentially link mechanotransduction pathways to the upregulation of myogenic genes. Yet, gaps in our understanding make it challenging to use these pathways to theoretically determine optimal ex vivo strain regimens. A multitude of strain protocols have been applied to in vitro cultures for the cultivation of myogenic progenitors (adipose- and bone marrow-derived stem cells & satellite cells) and transformed murine myoblasts, C2C12s. Strain regimen are characterized by orientation, amplitude, and time-dependent factors (effective frequency, duration, and the rest period between successive strain cycles). Analysis of published data has identified possible minimum/maximum values for these parameters and suggests that uniaxial strains may be more potent than biaxial strains possibly because they more closely mimic physiologic strain profiles. The application of these biophysical stimuli for engineering 3D skeletal muscle grafts is non-trivial and typically requires custom-designed bioreactors used in combination with biomaterial scaffolds. Consideration of the physical properties of these scaffolds is critical for effective transmission of the applied strains to encapsulated cells. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that biomimetic tensile strain generally results in improved myogenic outcomes in myogenic progenitors and differentiated myoblasts. However, for 3D systems, the optimization of the strain regimen may require the entire system - cells, biomaterials, and

  11. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  12. Facilitating Moderate Drinking on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBrien, Robert J.

    1980-01-01

    By identifying the environmental conditions associated with alcohol abuse and alcohol use in moderation, staff can help students develop effective strategies for change. Stimulus control methods are recommended as effective behavioral change strategies. (RC)

  13. POPLITEUS STRAIN WITH CONCURRENT DELTOID LIGAMENT SPRAIN IN AN ELITE SOCCER ATHLETE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Josh; Tarnay, Lorena; Silvers, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report (Differential diagnosis) Background and Purpose: Differential diagnosis of knee pathology after trauma may be difficult when diagnosing an isolated popliteus strain and concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain. Upon a thorough search of the published literature, the authors found no reports delineating a popliteus strain in professional soccer in the United States. The joints most affected by injury in soccer players are the knee and ankle joints. The purpose of this case report is to describe the presentation of and difficulties encountered in diagnosing a popliteus strain in a Major League Soccer athlete. Case Description: During an in-season away game, an outside defender was slide-tackled from behind when his right shank was caught in an externally rotated position underneath himself and the opposing player. The initial point of contact was made to the proximal third of the posterior right shank with an anteromedially directed force. The medial longitudinal arch of the foot was forced into a more midfoot pronated position and the subtalar joint was forced into eversion. Diagnosis: The athlete was diagnosed with a moderate strain of the right popliteus muscle with a concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain of the right ankle. This mechanism of injury, pain with passive knee flexion and internal rotation during McMurray's test, pain with Garrick's Test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study confirmed the diagnosis. The athlete returned to full ninety-minute game participation after an intensive 15-day rehabilitation program. Discussion: This case is unique because the injury manifested itself at multiple joints and specifically involved the popliteus muscle. The mechanism of injury can be associated with many other soft tissue injuries to the knee, and thus, may not lead the clinician initially to consider the diagnosis of a popliteus strain. Diagnosis of this entity may be difficult due to the possible shared attachment of the

  14. Muscle shortening velocity depends on tissue inertia and level of activation during submaximal contractions.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephanie A; Wakeling, James M

    2016-06-01

    In order to perform external work, muscles must do additional internal work to deform their tissue, and in particular, to overcome the inertia due to their internal mass. However, the contribution of the internal mass within a muscle to the mechanical output of that muscle has only rarely been studied. Here, we use a dynamic, multi-element Hill-type muscle model to examine the effects of the inertial mass within muscle on its contractile performance. We find that the maximum strain-rate of muscle is slower for lower activations and larger muscle sizes. As muscle size increases, the ability of the muscle to overcome its inertial load will decrease, as muscle tension is proportional to cross-sectional area and inertial load is proportional to mass. Thus, muscles that are larger in size will have a higher inertial cost to contraction. Similarly, when muscle size and inertial load are held constant, decreasing muscle activation will increase inertial cost to contraction by reducing muscle tension. These results show that inertial loads within muscle contribute to a slowing of muscle contractile velocities (strain-rates), particularly at the submaximal activations that are typical during animal locomotion.

  15. Assessment of skeletal muscle fatigue of road maintenance workers based on heart rate monitoring and myotonometry

    PubMed Central

    Roja, Zenija; Kalkis, Valdis; Vain, Arved; Kalkis, Henrijs; Eglite, Maija

    2006-01-01

    Objective This research work is dedicated to occupational health problems caused by ergonomic risks. The research object was road building industry, where workers have to work very intensively, have long work hours, are working in forced/constrained work postures and overstrain during the work specific parts of their bodies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the work heaviness degree and to estimate the muscle fatigue of workers after one week work cycle. The study group consisted of 10 road construction and maintenance workers and 10 pavers aged between 20 and 60 years. Methods Physical load were analyzed by measuring heart rate (HR), work postures (OWAS) and perceived exertion (RPE). Assessments of the muscles strain and functional state (tone) were carried out using myotonometric (MYO) measurements. The reliability of the statistical processing of heart rate monitoring and myotonometry data was determined using correlating analysis. Results This study showed that that road construction and repairing works should be considered as a hard work according to average metabolic energy consumption 8.1 ± 1.5 kcal/min; paving, in its turn, was a moderately hard work according to 7.2 ± 1.1 kcal/min. Several muscle tone levels were identified allowing subdivision of workers into three conditional categories basing on muscle tone and fatigue: I – absolute muscle relaxation and ability to relax; II – a state of equilibrium, when muscles are able to adapt to the work load and are partly able to relax; and III – muscle fatigue and increased tone. It was also found out that the increase of muscle tone and fatigue mainly depend on workers physical preparedness and length of service, and less – on their age. Conclusion We have concluded that a complex ergonomic analysis consisting of heart rate monitoring, assessment of compulsive working postures and myotonometry is appropriate to assess the work heaviness degree and can provide prognosis of occupational pathology

  16. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  17. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    MedlinePlus

    ... delay you from getting osteoporosis later in life. Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) . RSIs are a group of injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally is from ...

  18. Focal adhesion kinase and its role in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Zachary A.; Gallagher, Philip M.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a remarkable ability to respond to different physical stresses. Loading muscle through exercise, either anaerobic or aerobic, can lead to increases in muscle size and function while, conversely, the absence of muscle loading stimulates rapid decreases in size and function. A principal mediator of this load-induced change is focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a downstream non-receptor tyrosine kinase that translates the cytoskeletal stress and strain signals transmitted across the cytoplasmic membrane by integrins to activate multiple anti-apoptotic and cell growth pathways. Changes in FAK expression and phosphorylation have been found to correlate to specific developmental states in myoblast differentiation, muscle fiber formation and muscle size in response to loading and unloading. With the capability to regulate costamere formation, hypertrophy and glucose metabolism, FAK is a molecule with diverse functions that are important in regulating muscle cell health. PMID:26142360

  19. Focal adhesion kinase and its role in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Graham, Zachary A; Gallagher, Philip M; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal muscle has a remarkable ability to respond to different physical stresses. Loading muscle through exercise, either anaerobic or aerobic, can lead to increases in muscle size and function while, conversely, the absence of muscle loading stimulates rapid decreases in size and function. A principal mediator of this load-induced change is focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a downstream non-receptor tyrosine kinase that translates the cytoskeletal stress and strain signals transmitted across the cytoplasmic membrane by integrins to activate multiple anti-apoptotic and cell growth pathways. Changes in FAK expression and phosphorylation have been found to correlate to specific developmental states in myoblast differentiation, muscle fiber formation and muscle size in response to loading and unloading. With the capability to regulate costamere formation, hypertrophy and glucose metabolism, FAK is a molecule with diverse functions that are important in regulating muscle cell health.

  20. Estimation of genetic parameters for growth, carcass and overfeeding traits in a white geese strain

    PubMed Central

    Larzul, Catherine; Rouvier, Roger; Rousselot-Pailley, Daniel; Guy, Gérard

    2000-01-01

    In an experimental strain of white plumage geese created in 1989, two experiments were carried out from 1993 to 1995 in order to estimate genetic parameters for growth, and carcass composition traits in non-overfed animals, and genetic parameters for growth and fatty liver formation in overfed animals. Four hundred and thirty-one non-overfed animals were bred and slaughtered at 11 weeks of age; they were measured for forearm length, keel bone length, chest circumference and breast depth before and after slaughtering. The carcasses were partly dissected in order weigh breast, breast muscle and skin + fat, and abdominal fat. Four hundred and seventy-seven overfed animals were slaughtered at 20 weeks of age; they were measured for "paletot" (breast meat, bone and meat from wings, bone and meat from thigh and legs) weight and liver weight. In these two experiments, the weights had moderate to high heritability values. Breast depth measured on live animals showed a low heritability value. In overfed animals, liver weight showed a high heritability value. Liver weight could be increased by selection without a great effect on "paletot" weight. Thus, obtaining a white plumage geese strain for fatty liver production by selection would be difficult because only 20% of overfed animals had fatty liver. The results did not allow to conclude on the influence of selection on liver weight on carcass traits such as muscle or fatty tissue weight. PMID:14736387

  1. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  2. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  3. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  4. Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  5. Graphite moderated (252)Cf source.

    PubMed

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Barros, Haydn; Greaves, Eduardo D; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    The Thorium molten-salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid-fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a (252)Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the (252)Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator.

  6. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    PubMed

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  7. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  8. Finite element modeling of passive material influence on the deformation and force output of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, John A; Chi, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Judy P; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Edgerton, Victor R; Sinha, Shantanu

    2012-05-01

    The pattern of deformation of different structural components of a muscle-tendon complex when it is activated provides important information about the internal mechanics of the muscle. Recent experimental observations of deformations in contracting muscle have presented inconsistencies with current widely held assumption about muscle behavior. These include negative strain in aponeuroses, non-uniform strain changes in sarcomeres, even of individual muscle fibers and evidence that muscle fiber cross sectional deformations are asymmetrical suggesting a need to readjust current models of contracting muscle. We report here our use of finite element modeling techniques to simulate a simple muscle-tendon complex and investigate the influence of passive intramuscular material properties upon the deformation patterns under isometric and shortening conditions. While phenomenological force-displacement relationships described the muscle fiber properties, the material properties of the passive matrix were varied to simulate a hydrostatic model, compliant and stiff isotropically hyperelastic models and an anisotropic elastic model. The numerical results demonstrate that passive elastic material properties significantly influence the magnitude, heterogeneity and distribution pattern of many measures of deformation in a contracting muscle. Measures included aponeurosis strain, aponeurosis separation, muscle fiber strain and fiber cross-sectional deformation. The force output of our simulations was strongly influenced by passive material properties, changing by as much as ~80% under some conditions. The maximum output was accomplished by introducing anisotropy along axes which were not strained significantly during a muscle length change, suggesting that correct costamere orientation may be a critical factor in the optimal muscle function. Such a model not only fits known physiological data, but also maintains the relatively constant aponeurosis separation observed during in vivo

  9. The universe at moderate redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Report on the universe at moderate redshift covering the period from 1 Mar. 1988 to 28 Feb. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included: galaxy formation and large-scale structure; intergalactic medium and background radiation fields; quasar statistics and evolution; and gravitational lenses.

  10. Strain in the Braincase and Its Sutures During Function

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Susan W.; Teng, Shengyi

    2010-01-01

    The skull is distinguished from other parts of the skeleton by its composite construction. The sutures between bony elements provide for interstitial growth of the cranium, but at the same time they alter the transmission of stress and strain through the skull. Strain gages were bonded to the frontal and parietal bones of miniature pigs and across the interfrontal, interparietal and coronal sutures. Strains were recorded 1) during natural mastication in conjunction with electromyographic activity from the jaw muscles and 2) during stimulation of various cranial muscles in anesthetized animals. Vault sutures exhibited vastly higher strains than did the adjoining bones. Further, bone strain primarily reflected torsion of the braincase set up by asymmetrical muscle contraction; the tensile axis alternated between +45° and −45° depending on which diagonal masseter/temporalis pair was most active. However, suture strains were not related to overall torsion but instead were responses to local muscle actions. Only the coronal suture showed significant strain (tension) during jaw opening; this was caused by the contraction of neck muscles. All sutures showed strain during jaw closing, but polarity depended on the pattern of muscle usage. For example, masseter contraction tensed the coronal suture and the anterior part of the interfrontal suture, whereas the temporalis caused compression in these locations. Peak tensile strains were larger than peak compressive strains. Histology suggested that the skull is bent at the sutures, with the ectocranial surface tensed and the endocranial surface predominantly compressed. Collectively, these results indicate that skulls with patent sutures should be analyzed as complexes of independent parts rather than solid structures. PMID:10918130

  11. Monolayer graphene oxide as a building block for artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Geoffrey W.; Liu, Jefferson Z.

    2013-01-01

    The electromechanical actuation of a highly ordered compound of graphene oxide (GO) is shown via ab initio simulations to produce high-performance quantum-mechanical responses, which mimic the behaviour of mammalian skeletal muscle. In addition to large expansive strains (˜10%), this GO compound (asymmetrically unzipped C4O) exhibits large contractive strains of -4.8% upon -0.15 e/C-atom electron injection. Furthermore, as these contractive strains are coupled with equally high stresses (˜100 GPa) and short response times (˜1 ns), we show that this GO material meets all of the functional requirements of an artificial muscle building block.

  12. Effects of the homeopathic remedy arnica on attenuating symptoms of exercise-induced muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Plezbert, Julie A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency (200c), on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Methods Twenty subjects completed a maximal eccentric exercise protocol with the non-dominate elbow flexors to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Either Arnica or placebo tablets were administered in a random, double- blinded fashion immediately after exercise and at 24 hours and 72 hours after exercise. Before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post-exercise, assessments of delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle function included: 1) muscle soreness and functional impairment; 2) maximum voluntary contraction torque; 3) muscle swelling; and 4) range of motion tests to document spontaneous muscle shortening and muscle shortening ability. Blood samples drawn before exercise and at 24, 48, and 96 hours after exercise were used to measure muscle enzymes as indirect indices of muscle damage. Results Regardless of the intervention, the extent of delayed onset muscle soreness and elevations in muscle enzymes were similar on the days following the eccentric exercise protocol. The post-exercise time profiles of decreases in maximum voluntary contraction torque and muscle shortening ability and increases in muscle swelling and spontaneous muscle shortening were similar for each treatment intervention. Conclusions The results of this study did not substantiate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Despite the findings of this study, future investigations on the clinical efficacy of homeopathic interventions should consider incorporating research strategies that emphasize differential therapeutics for each patient rather than treating a specific disease or symptom complex, such as DOMS, with a single homeopathic remedy. PMID:19674657

  13. Thymoma Metastasis to the Semimembranosus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kenta; Susa, Michiro; Ogata, Sho; Ozeki, Yuichi; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common thymic epithelial tumor whose classification was first introduced in 1999. Type B2 thymoma is considered a moderate/high-risk tumor; however, extrathoracic metastases are extremely rare with limited reports to date. In this report, we present a rare thymoma metastasis to the semimembranosus muscle, which was resected with a wide margin after confirmation by open biopsy. At the final follow-up after 1 year, no local recurrence has been observed. PMID:28203162

  14. Causal Moderation Analysis Using Propensity Score Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on previous studies in applying propensity score methods to study multiple treatment variables to examine the causal moderator effect. The propensity score methods will be demonstrated in a case study to examine the causal moderator effect, where the moderators are categorical and continuous variables. Moderation analysis is an…

  15. Muscle silent period in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Higgins, D C; Haidri, N H; Wilbourn, A J

    1971-10-01

    The muscle silent period was measured in 11 patients with moderate to severe rigidity associated with Parkinson's disease. The determinations were made under conditions of maximum disability for each patient, since all medications had been withdrawn before testing. The duration of the EMG silence, produced by small and large electrical twitch contractions of the adductor pollicis muscle, fell within a range of values previously determined for normal individuals. Major alleviation of the rigidity and bradykinesia with chronic oral l-dopa therapy was not accompanied by any change in the silent period. It was concluded that in untreated Parkinsonism, and also after its treatment with l-dopa, the functioning of the muscle spindles and local inhibitory reflexes remains normal.

  16. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  17. The moderators of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jessie L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which Department of Defense (DOD) active duty patient sociodemographic, health status, geographic location, and utilization factors, predict overall patient satisfaction with health care in military facilities. A theoretical framework developed from patient satisfaction and social identity theories and from previous empirical findings was used to develop a model to predict patient satisfaction and delineate moderating variables. The major finding indicated in this study was the significance of patients' characteristics in moderating their satisfaction. Principal components factor analysis and hierarchical linear regression revealed that patient specific factors predicted patients' satisfaction after controlling for factors depicting patients' evaluations of health system characteristics. Patient specific factors provided added, although very minimal, explanatory value to the determination of patients' satisfaction. The study findings can aid in the development of targeted, objectively prioritized programs of improvement and marketing by ranking variables using patients' passively derived importance schema.

  18. HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1958-04-29

    A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

  19. Cryogenic moderator simulations : confronting reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-06

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities.

  20. Curvature reduces bending strains in the quokka femur

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kyle; Henderson, Keith; Pantinople, Jess; Milne, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how curvature in the quokka femur may help to reduce bending strain during locomotion. The quokka is a small wallaby, but the curvature of the femur and the muscles active during stance phase are similar to most quadrupedal mammals. Our hypothesis is that the action of hip extensor and ankle plantarflexor muscles during stance phase place cranial bending strains that act to reduce the caudal curvature of the femur. Knee extensors and biarticular muscles that span the femur longitudinally create caudal bending strains in the caudally curved (concave caudal side) bone. These opposing strains can balance each other and result in less strain on the bone. We test this idea by comparing the performance of a normally curved finite element model of the quokka femur to a digitally straightened version of the same bone. The normally curved model is indeed less strained than the straightened version. To further examine the relationship between curvature and the strains in the femoral models, we also tested an extra-curved and a reverse-curved version with the same loads. There appears to be a linear relationship between the curvature and the strains experienced by the models. These results demonstrate that longitudinal curvature in bones may be a manipulable mechanism whereby bone can induce a strain gradient to oppose strains induced by habitual loading. PMID:28348929

  1. Lower extremity muscle activation during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Brian M; Stodden, David F; Nixon, Megan K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation levels of select lower extremity muscles during the pitching motion. Bilateral surface electromyography data on 5 lower extremity muscles (biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius) were collected on 11 highly skilled baseball pitchers and compared with individual maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) data. The pitching motion was divided into 4 distinct phases: phase 1, initiation of pitching motion to maximum stride leg knee height; phase 2, maximum stride leg knee height to stride foot contact (SFC); phase 3, SFC to ball release; and phase 4, ball release to 0.5 seconds after ball release (follow-through). Results indicated that trail leg musculature elicited moderate to high activity levels during phases 2 and 3 (38-172% of MVIC). Muscle activity levels of the stride leg were moderate to high during phases 2-4 (23-170% of MVIC). These data indicate a high demand for lower extremity strength and endurance. Specifically, coaches should incorporate unilateral and bilateral lower extremity exercises for strength improvement or maintenance and to facilitate dynamic stabilization of the lower extremities during the pitching motion.

  2. [The role of the psoas muscle: apropos of the dissection of the muscles from 10 adults and 10 newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Le Floch-Prigent, P

    1983-06-01

    The action of the iliopsoas muscle (Musculus iliopsoas) on movements of the hip is studied by direct traction on fresh cadavers (10 still-born and 10 adults). The psoas muscle is a powerful flexor of the hip but also an external rotator. The action of external rotation is moderate but obvious in every position of the femur (Os femoris) and more important if previously in abduction and internal rotation.

  3. Botox induced muscle paralysis rapidly degrades bone

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Sarah E.; Sanford, David A.; Becker, Blair A.; Bain, Steven D.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gross, Ted S.

    2006-01-01

    The means by which muscle function modulates bone homeostasis is poorly understood. To begin to address this issue, we have developed a novel murine model of unilateral transient hindlimb muscle paralysis using botulinum toxin A (Botox). Female C57BL/6 mice (16 weeks) received IM injections of either saline or Botox (n = 10 each) in both the quadriceps and calf muscles of the right hindleg. Gait dysfunction was assessed by multi-observer inventory, muscle alterations were determined by wet mass, and bone alterations were assessed by micro-CT imaging at the distal femur, proximal tibia, and tibia mid-diaphysis. Profound degradation of both muscle and bone was observed within 21 days despite significant restoration of weight bearing function by 14 days. The muscle mass of the injected quadriceps and calf muscles was diminished −47.3% and −59.7%, respectively, vs. saline mice (both P < 0.001). The ratio of bone volume to tissue volume (BV/TV) within the distal femoral epiphysis and proximal tibial metaphysis of Botox injected limbs was reduced −43.2% and −54.3%, respectively, while tibia cortical bone volume was reduced −14.6% (all P < 0.001). Comparison of the contralateral non-injected limbs indicated the presence of moderate systemic effects in the model that were most probably associated with diminished activity following muscle paralysis. Taken as a whole, the micro-CT data implied that trabecular and cortical bone loss was primarily achieved by bone resorption. These data confirm the decisive role of neuromuscular function in mediating bone homeostasis and establish a model with unique potential to explore the mechanisms underlying this relation. Given the rapidly expanding use of neuromuscular inhibitors for indications such as pain reduction, these data also raise the critical need to monitor bone loss in these patients. PMID:16185943

  4. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G; Thompson, Joseph T

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 mum across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form 'dyads' along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of 'myofibrils' approximately 0.25-0.5 microm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are approximately 25 nm in diameter and approximately 2.8 microm long. 'Dense bodies' are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17 degrees C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low V(max) (2.15 +/-0.26 L(0) s(-1), where L(0) was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270+/-20 mN mm(-2) physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg(-1)), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/V(max) of 0.33+/-0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to -0.15 relative to resting length, L(R)) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 L(R) s(-1) ), corresponding to a range of V/V(max) from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of

  5. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G.; Thompson, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 μm across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form ‘dyads’ along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of ‘myofibrils’ ~0.25–0.5 μm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are ~25 nm in diameter and ~2.8 μm long. ‘Dense bodies’ are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17°C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low Vmax (2.15 ±0.26 L0 s−1, where L0 was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270±20 mN mm−2 physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg−1), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/Vmax of 0.33±0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to −0.15 relative to resting length, LR) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 LR s−1 ), corresponding to a range of V/Vmax from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of strains was even narrower: maximum range less than ±0

  6. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  7. Respiratory muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Katharine L; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2005-07-28

    Plasticity of respiratory muscles must be considered in the context of their unique physiological demands. The continuous rhythmic activation of respiratory muscles makes them among the most active in the body. Respiratory muscles, especially the diaphragm, are non-weight-bearing, and thus, in contrast to limb muscles, are not exposed to gravitational effects. Perturbations in normal activation and load known to induce plasticity in limb muscles may not cause similar adaptations in respiratory muscles. In this review, we explore the structural and functional properties of the diaphragm muscle and their response to alterations in load and activity. Overall, relatively modest changes in diaphragm structural and functional properties occur in response to perturbations in load or activity. However, disruptions in the normal influence of phrenic innervation by frank denervation, tetrodotoxin nerve block and spinal hemisection, induce profound changes in the diaphragm, indicating the substantial trophic influence of phrenic motoneurons on diaphragm muscle.

  8. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  9. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  10. The series elastic shock absorber: tendon elasticity modulates energy dissipation by muscle during burst deceleration.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-04-07

    During downhill running, manoeuvring, negotiation of obstacles and landings from a jump, mechanical energy is dissipated via active lengthening of limb muscles. Tendon compliance provides a 'shock-absorber' mechanism that rapidly absorbs mechanical energy and releases it more slowly as the recoil of the tendon does work to stretch muscle fascicles. By lowering the rate of muscular energy dissipation, tendon compliance likely reduces the risk of muscle injury that can result from rapid and forceful muscle lengthening. Here, we examine how muscle-tendon mechanics are modulated in response to changes in demand for energy dissipation. We measured lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle activity, force and fascicle length, as well as leg joint kinematics and ground-reaction force, as turkeys performed drop-landings from three heights (0.5-1.5 m centre-of-mass elevation). Negative work by the LG muscle-tendon unit during landing increased with drop height, mainly owing to greater muscle recruitment and force as drop height increased. Although muscle strain did not increase with landing height, ankle flexion increased owing to increased tendon strain at higher muscle forces. Measurements of the length-tension relationship of the muscle indicated that the muscle reached peak force at shorter and likely safer operating lengths as drop height increased. Our results indicate that tendon compliance is important to the modulation of energy dissipation by active muscle with changes in demand and may provide a mechanism for rapid adjustment of function during deceleration tasks of unpredictable intensity.

  11. Predictability of jaw muscle pains from surface electromyograms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T

    1996-04-01

    In seven (88%) of eight healthy subjects, weak to moderate pains were elicited in the masseter muscles through the isometric contractions of maximum voluntary teeth clenching. Integrated surface electromyograms of the right and left masseter muscles were used to quantify the absolute and relative contractile activities of the two muscles. The risk (relative probability) of inducing pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the larger amount of isometric activity was 2.5 times the risk of eliciting pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the lesser amount of isometric activity. However, as an aid in the diagnosis of pain onset, the method of masseteric surface electromyography had a false diagnostic ratio of 0.67.

  12. Muscle power output limits fast-start performance in fish.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, J M; Johnston, I A

    1998-05-01

    Fast-starts associated with escape responses were filmed at the median habitat temperatures of six teleost fish: Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii (Antarctica), Myoxocephalus scorpius (North Sea), Scorpaena notata and Serranus cabrilla (Mediterranean) and Paracirrhites forsteri (Indo-West-Pacific Ocean). Methods are presented for estimating the spine positions for silhouettes of swimming fish. These methods were used to validate techniques for calculating kinematics and muscle dynamics during fast-starts. The starts from all species show common patterns, with waves of body curvature travelling from head to tail and increasing in amplitude. Cross-validation with sonomicrometry studies allowed gearing ratios between the red and white muscle to be calculated. Gearing ratios must decrease towards the tail with a corresponding change in muscle geometry, resulting in similar white muscle fibre strains in all the myotomes during the start. A work-loop technique was used to measure mean muscle power output at similar strain and shortening durations to those found in vivo. The fast Sc. notata myotomal fibres produced a mean muscle-mass-specific power of 142.7 W kg-1 at 20 degrees C. Velocity, acceleration and hydrodynamic power output increased both with the travelling rate of the wave of body curvature and with the habitat temperature. At all temperatures, the predicted mean muscle-mass-specific power outputs, as calculated from swimming sequences, were similar to the muscle power outputs measured from work-loop experiments.

  13. Oxidative Metabolism in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantages and problems of near-infrared spectroscopy measurements, in resting and exercising skeletal muscles studies, are discussed through some representative examples.

  14. Regeneration and Maintenance of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthers, Christopher M.

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical engineering that involves growing artificial organs to replace those lost to disease or injury. Within tissue engineering, there is a demand for artificial smooth muscle to repair tissues of the digestive tract, bladder, and vascular systems. Attempts to develop engineered smooth muscle tissues capable of contracting with sufficient strength to be clinically relevant have so far proven unsatisfactory. The goal of this research was to develop and sustain mature, contractile smooth muscle. Survival of implanted SMCs is critical to sustain the benefits of engineered smooth muscle. Survival of implanted smooth muscle cells was studied with layered, electrospun polycaprolactone implants with lasercut holes ranging from 0--25% porosity. It was found that greater angiogenesis was associated with increased survival of implanted cells, with a large increase at a threshold between 20% and 25% porosity. Heparan sulfate coatings improved the speed of blood vessel infiltration after 14 days of implantation. With these considerations, thicker engineered tissues may be possible. An improved smooth muscle tissue culture technique was utilized. Contracting smooth muscle was produced in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle tissue organization, specifically by sustaining intact smooth muscle strips rather than dissociating tissue in to isolated smooth muscle cells. Isolated cells showed a decrease in maturity and contained fewer enteric neural and glial cells. Muscle strips also exhibited periodic contraction and regular fluctuation of intracellular calclium. The muscle strip maturity persisted after implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds. A low-cost, disposable bioreactor was developed to further improve maturity of cultured smooth muscle cells in an environment of controlled cyclical stress.The bioreactor consistently applied repeated mechanical strain with controllable inputs for strain

  15. Truncated dystrophins reduce muscle stiffness in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle stiffness is a major clinical feature in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is the most common lethal inherited muscle-wasting disease in boys, and it is caused by the lack of the dystrophin protein. We recently showed that the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of mdx mice (a DMD mouse model) exhibits disease-associated muscle stiffness. Truncated micro- and mini-dystrophins are the leading candidates for DMD gene therapy. Unfortunately, it has never been clear whether these truncated genes can mitigate muscle stiffness. To address this question, we examined the passive properties of the EDL muscle in transgenic mdx mice that expressed a representative mini- or micro-gene (ΔH2-R15, ΔR2-15/ΔR18-23/ΔC, or ΔR4-23/ΔC). The passive properties were measured at the ages of 6 and 20 mo and compared with those of age-matched wild-type and mdx mice. Despite significant truncation of the gene, surprisingly, the elastic and viscous properties were completely restored to the wild-type level in every transgenic strain we examined. Our results demonstrated for the first time that truncated dystrophin genes may effectively treat muscle stiffness in DMD. PMID:23221959

  16. Shared muscle synergies in human walking and cycling.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Filipe O; Torricelli, Diego; Moreno, Juan C; Taylor, Julian; Gomez-Soriano, Julio; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Piazza, Stefano; Santos, Cristina; Pons, José L

    2014-10-15

    The motor system may rely on a modular organization (muscle synergies activated in time) to execute different tasks. We investigated the common control features of walking and cycling in healthy humans from the perspective of muscle synergies. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) muscle synergies extracted from walking trials are similar to those extracted during cycling; 2) muscle synergies extracted from one of these motor tasks can be used to mathematically reconstruct the electromyographic (EMG) patterns of the other task; 3) muscle synergies of cycling can result from merging synergies of walking. A secondary objective was to identify the speed (and cadence) at which higher similarities emerged. EMG activity from eight muscles of the dominant leg was recorded in eight healthy subjects during walking and cycling at four matched cadences. A factorization technique [nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF)] was applied to extract individual muscle synergy vectors and the respective activation coefficients behind the global muscular activity of each condition. Results corroborated hypotheses 2 and 3, showing that 1) four synergies from walking and cycling can successfully explain most of the EMG variability of cycling and walking, respectively, and 2) two of four synergies from walking appear to merge together to reconstruct one individual synergy of cycling, with best reconstruction values found for higher speeds. Direct comparison of the muscle synergy vectors of walking and the muscle synergy vectors of cycling (hypothesis 1) produced moderated values of similarity. This study provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that cycling and walking share common neuromuscular mechanisms.

  17. [Clinical consequences of muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sauleda Roig, J

    2006-05-01

    The function of respiratory muscles, and mainly inspiratory muscles, is impaired in COPD patients. Most of these impairments are essentially due to pulmonary hyperinflation that puts these muscles in a disadvantageous situation. The main consequence of this dysfunction is respiratory muscle fatigue that may cause shortness of breath, exertion intolerance, and hypoventilation with onset of hypercapnic respiratory failure. This function may be measured at the pulmonary function laboratory by means of unspecific (spirometry, pulmonary volumes) or specific tests (maxim respiratory pressures [MIP - M], transdiaphragmatic pressure, tension-time index of the diaphragm, electromyography, or endura tests). Therapy should aim at improving hyperinflation with bronchodilator therapy, improving muscular strength with rehabilitation, and in severe cases muscle rest with mechanical ventilation. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is a common complication in moderate-severe COPD, and it may be the result of chronic inactivity, hypoxemia, electrolytic impairments, under nutrition, steroids, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Besides, it may contribute to patients' quality of life worsening, disability, and even an increase in morbimortality. It may tested by impedanciometry, muscle strength tests (dynamometry), imaging tests, and even muscle biopsy in research studies. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is potentially manageable with rehabilitation, nutritional supplementation, and anabolic drugs. However, therapeutic success is often incomplete, so that further studies with new therapeutic strategies are needed.

  18. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  19. Muscle activation patterns when passively stretching spastic lower limb muscles of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8 ± 3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =  32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I-IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental position

  20. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-05-02

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1(®) mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown.

  1. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1® mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown. PMID:27144582

  2. Muscle function in avian flight: achieving power and control

    PubMed Central

    Biewener, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    Flapping flight places strenuous requirements on the physiological performance of an animal. Bird flight muscles, particularly at smaller body sizes, generally contract at high frequencies and do substantial work in order to produce the aerodynamic power needed to support the animal's weight in the air and to overcome drag. This is in contrast to terrestrial locomotion, which offers mechanisms for minimizing energy losses associated with body movement combined with elastic energy savings to reduce the skeletal muscles' work requirements. Muscles also produce substantial power during swimming, but this is mainly to overcome body drag rather than to support the animal's weight. Here, I review the function and architecture of key flight muscles related to how these muscles contribute to producing the power required for flapping flight, how the muscles are recruited to control wing motion and how they are used in manoeuvring. An emergent property of the primary flight muscles, consistent with their need to produce considerable work by moving the wings through large excursions during each wing stroke, is that the pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscles shorten over a large fraction of their resting fibre length (33–42%). Both muscles are activated while being lengthened or undergoing nearly isometric force development, enhancing the work they perform during subsequent shortening. Two smaller muscles, the triceps and biceps, operate over a smaller range of contractile strains (12–23%), reflecting their role in controlling wing shape through elbow flexion and extension. Remarkably, pigeons adjust their wing stroke plane mainly via changes in whole-body pitch during take-off and landing, relative to level flight, allowing their wing muscles to operate with little change in activation timing, strain magnitude and pattern. PMID:21502121

  3. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  4. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  5. Neck and shoulder muscle activity during standardized work-related postural tasks.

    PubMed

    Ng, D; McNee, C; Kieser, J; Farella, M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the activity levels of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and upper trapezius muscle during static postures under controlled and standardized conditions, and to determine whether the muscle activity differed between sexes. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded unilaterally from the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius muscle in 17 participants whilst they were performing various postural tasks. EMG amplitude was measured by the root mean square values of the raw signals and normalized to peak maximum contractile values for each muscle (%MVC). The intensity of muscle activity was ranked as light (<3%MVC), moderate (3%MVC ≤ EMG ≤ 8%MVC), and substantial (>8%MVC). During most tasks the two muscles contracted light to moderately. Head leaning and shoulder shrugging postures yielded substantial muscle activity in both muscles. Muscle activity did not differ significantly between male and female participants (F = 3.1; p = 0.078). Our findings provided normative values, which will enhance future studies of muscle activity during work in a natural, unrestrained environment.

  6. Differential Effects of Heavy Versus Moderate Loads on Measures of Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Brad J.; Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D.; Peterson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate muscular adaptations between heavy- and moderate-load resistance training (RT) with all other variables controlled between conditions. Nineteen resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a strength-type RT routine (HEAVY) that trained in a loading range of 2-4 repetitions per set (n = 10) or a hypertrophy-type RT routine (MODERATE) that trained in a loading range of 8-12 repetitions per set (n = 9). Training was carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Both groups performed 3 sets of 7 exercises for the major muscle groups of the upper and lower body. Subjects were tested pre- and post-study for: 1 repetition maximum (RM) strength in the bench press and squat, upper body muscle endurance, and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, elbow extensors, and lateral thigh. Results showed statistically greater increases in 1RM squat strength favoring HEAVY compared to MODERATE. Alternatively, statistically greater increases in lateral thigh muscle thickness were noted for MODERATE versus HEAVY. These findings indicate that heavy load training is superior for maximal strength goals while moderate load training is more suited to hypertrophy-related goals when an equal number of sets are performed between conditions. Key points Heavy loads maximize muscular strength when the numbers of sets are equated. Moderate loads maximize muscle hypertrophy when the number of sets are equated Volume load appears to be more important to increases in muscle hypertrophy compared to absolute strength PMID:27928218

  7. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  8. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, J Del [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Hau-Riege, Stefan [Fremont, CA; Walton, Chris [Oakland, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  9. Molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a truncated dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Banks, Glen B; Combs, Ariana C; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2008-12-15

    Myotendinous strain injury is the most common injury of human skeletal muscles because the majority of muscle forces are transmitted through this region. Although the immediate response to strain injury is well characterized, the chronic response to myotendinous strain injury is less clear. Here we examined the molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a microdystrophin transgene (microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23)). We found that muscles with myotendinous strain injury had an increased expression of utrophin and alpha7-integrin together with the dramatic restructuring of peripheral myofibrils into concentric rings. The sarcolemma of the microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23)/mdx gastrocnemius muscles was highly protected from experimental lengthening contractions, better than wild-type muscles. We also found a positive correlation between myotendinous strain injury and ringed fibers in the HSA(LR) (human skeletal actin, long repeat) mouse model of myotonic dystrophy. We suggest that changes in protein expression and the formation of rings are adaptations to myotendinous strain injury that help to prevent muscle necrosis and retain the function of necessary muscles during injury, ageing and disease.

  10. Muscle injuries: optimising recovery.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Tero A H; Järvinen, Teppo L N; Kääriäinen, Minna; Aärimaa, Ville; Vaittinen, Samuli; Kalimo, Hannu; Järvinen, Markku

    2007-04-01

    Muscle injuries are one of the most common traumas occurring in sports. Despite their clinical importance, there are only a few clinical studies on the treatment of muscle injuries. Lack of clinical studies is most probably attributable to the fact that there is not only a high heterogeneity in the severity of injuries, but also the injuries take place in different muscles, making it very demanding to carry out clinical trials. Accordingly, the current treatment principles of muscle injuries have either been derived from experimental studies or been tested empirically only. Clinically, first aid for muscle injuries follows the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation) principle. The objective of RICE is to stop the injury-induced bleeding into the muscle tissue and thereby minimise the extent of the injury. Clinical examination should be carried out immediately after the injury and 5-7 days after the initial trauma, at which point the severity of the injury can be assessed more reliably. At that time, a more detailed characterisation of the injury can be made using imaging diagnostic modalities (ultrasound or MRI) if desired. The treatment of injured skeletal muscle should be carried out by immediate immobilisation of the injured muscle (clinically, relative immobility/avoidance of muscle contractions). However, the duration of immobilisation should be limited to a period sufficient to produce a scar of sufficient strength to bear the forces induced by remobilisation without re-rupture and the return to activity (mobilisation) should then be started gradually within the limits of pain. Early return to activity is needed to optimise the regeneration of healing muscle and recovery of the flexibility and strength of the injured skeletal muscle to pre-injury levels. The rehabilitation programme should be built around progressive agility and trunk stabilisation exercises, as these exercises seem to yield better outcome for injured skeletal muscle than programmes based

  11. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  12. Exercise-Associated Muscle Cramps

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kevin C.; Stone, Marcus S.; Huxel, Kellie C.; Edwards, Jeffrey E.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMC) are a common condition experienced by recreational and competitive athletes. Despite their commonality and prevalence, their cause remains unknown. Theories for the cause of EAMC are primarily based on anecdotal and observational studies rather than sound experimental evidence. Without a clear cause, treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are often unsuccessful. Evidence Acquisition: A search of Medline (EBSCO), SPORTDiscus, and Silverplatter (CINHAL) was undertaken for journal articles written in English between the years 1955 and 2008. Additional references were collected by a careful analysis of the citations of others’ research and textbooks. Results: Dehydration/electrolyte and neuromuscular causes are the most widely discussed theories for the cause of EAMC; however, strong experimental evidence for either theory is lacking. Conclusions: EAMC are likely due to several factors coalescing to cause EAMC. The variety of treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are evidence of the uncertainty in their cause. Acute EAMC treatment should focus on moderate static stretching of the affected muscle followed by a proper medical history to determine any predisposing conditions that may have triggered the onset of EAMC. Based on physical findings, prevention programs should be implemented to include fluid and electrolyte balance strategies and/or neuromuscular training. PMID:23015948

  13. Standards for moderate thermal environments.

    PubMed

    Christensen, N K; Olesen, B W

    1985-06-01

    Recently two Draft International Standards dealing with specifications of the conditions for thermal comfort (ISO DIS 7730) and measurement procedures (ISO DIS 7726) have been approved by the International Stadardisation Organisation (ISO). The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has made a standard with similar requirements for the thermal environment (ASHRAE, 1981). To verify the requirements, measurements of different thermal parameters have to be performed. Guidelines as to how and where to measure are also given in the standards. The present paper deals mainly with the requirements and measurements that are relevant for moderate thermal environments in places of residence, offices, hospitals and light industry. For evaluation of very hot or very cold surroundings, other methods are required. Only measurements of parameters that influence the perception of the thermal surroundings are included.

  14. In vitro quantification of strain patterns in the craniofacial skeleton due to masseter and temporalis activities.

    PubMed

    Maloul, Asmaa; Regev, Eran; Whyne, Cari M; Beek, Marteen; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2012-09-01

    Many complications in craniofacial surgery can be attributed to a lack of characterization of facial skeletal strain patterns. This study aimed to delineate human midfacial strain patterns under uniform muscle loading. The left sides of 5 fresh-frozen human cadaveric heads were dissected of all soft tissues except the temporalis and masseter muscles. Tensile forces were applied to the free mandibular ends of the muscles. Maxillary alveolar arches were used to restrain the skulls. Eight strain gauges were bonded to the surface of the midface to measure the strain under single muscle loading conditions (100 N). Maxillary strain gauges revealed a biaxial load state for both muscles. Thin antral bone experienced high maximum principal tensile strains (maximum of 685.5 με) and high minimum principal compressive strains (maximum of -722.44 με). Similar biaxial patterns of lower magnitude were measured on the zygoma (maximum of 208.59 με for maximum principal strains and -78.11 με for minimum principal strains). Results, consistent for all specimens and counter to previously accepted concepts of biomechanical behavior of the midface under masticatory muscle loading, included high strain in the thin maxillary antral wall, rotational bending through the maxilla and zygoma, and a previously underestimated contribution of the temporalis muscle. This experimental model produced repeatable strain patterns quantifying the mechanics of the facial skeleton. These new counterintuitive findings underscore the need for accurate characterization of craniofacial strain patterns to address problems in the current treatment methods and develop robust design criteria.

  15. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  16. Differential Effects of Heavy Versus Moderate Loads on Measures of Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Peterson, Mark

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate muscular adaptations between heavy- and moderate-load resistance training (RT) with all other variables controlled between conditions. Nineteen resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a strength-type RT routine (HEAVY) that trained in a loading range of 2-4 repetitions per set (n = 10) or a hypertrophy-type RT routine (MODERATE) that trained in a loading range of 8-12 repetitions per set (n = 9). Training was carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Both groups performed 3 sets of 7 exercises for the major muscle groups of the upper and lower body. Subjects were tested pre- and post-study for: 1 repetition maximum (RM) strength in the bench press and squat, upper body muscle endurance, and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, elbow extensors, and lateral thigh. Results showed statistically greater increases in 1RM squat strength favoring HEAVY compared to MODERATE. Alternatively, statistically greater increases in lateral thigh muscle thickness were noted for MODERATE versus HEAVY. These findings indicate that heavy load training is superior for maximal strength goals while moderate load training is more suited to hypertrophy-related goals when an equal number of sets are performed between conditions.

  17. Progression of inflammation during immunodeficient mouse skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Iwona; Mazur, Magdalena A; Kowalski, K; Helinska, A; Moraczewski, Jerzy; Stremińska, Władysława; Hoser, Grażyna; Kawiak, Jerzy; Ciemerych, Maria A; Brzoska, Edyta

    2015-12-01

    The skeletal muscle injury triggers the inflammatory response which is crucial for damaged muscle fiber degradation and satellite cell activation. Immunodeficient mice are often used as a model to study the myogenic potential of transplanted human stem cells. Therefore, it is crucial to elucidate whether such model truly reflects processes occurring under physiological conditions. To answer this question we compared skeletal muscle regeneration of BALB/c, i.e. animals producing all types of inflammatory cells, and SCID mice. Results of our study documented that initial stages of muscles regeneration in both strains of mice were comparable. However, lower number of mononucleated cells was noticed in regenerating SCID mouse muscles. Significant differences in the number of CD14-/CD45+ and CD14+/CD45+ cells between BALB/c and SCID muscles were also observed. In addition, we found important differences in M1 and M2 macrophage levels of BALB/c and SCID mouse muscles identified by CD68 and CD163 markers. Thus, our data show that differences in inflammatory response during muscle regeneration, were not translated into significant modifications in muscle regeneration.

  18. Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced by Simulated Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kuo-Cheng; Mooney, Brian; DeLancey, John O. L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a three-dimensional computer model to predict levator ani muscle stretch during vaginal birth. METHODS: Serial magnetic resonance images from a healthy nulliparous 34-year-old woman, published anatomic data, and engineering graphics software were used to construct a structural model of the levator ani muscles along with related passive tissues. The model was used to quantify pelvic floor muscle stretch induced during the second stage of labor as a model fetal head progressively engaged and then stretched the iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles. RESULTS: The largest tissue strain reached a stretch ratio (tissue length under stretch/original tissue length) of 3.26 in medial pubococcygeus muscle, the shortest, most medial and ventral levator ani muscle. Regions of the ileococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles reached maximal stretch ratios of 2.73, 2.50, and 2.28, respectively. Tissue stretch ratios were proportional to fetal head size: For example, increasing fetal head diameter by 9% increased medial pubococcygeus stretch by the same amount. CONCLUSION: The medial pubococcygeus muscles undergo the largest stretch of any levator ani muscles during vaginal birth. They are therefore at the greatest risk for stretch-related injury. PMID:14704241

  19. Transcriptome-scale similarities between mouse and human skeletal muscles with normal and myopathic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Alvin T; Kang, Peter B; Kohane, Isaac S; Kunkel, Louis M

    2006-01-01

    Background Mouse and human skeletal muscle transcriptome profiles vary by muscle type, raising the question of which mouse muscle groups have the greatest molecular similarities to human skeletal muscle. Methods Orthologous (whole, sub-) transcriptome profiles were compared among four mouse-human transcriptome datasets: (M) six muscle groups obtained from three mouse strains (wildtype, mdx, mdx5cv); (H1) biopsied human quadriceps from controls and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients; (H2) four different control human muscle types obtained at autopsy; and (H3) 12 different control human tissues (ten non-muscle). Results Of the six mouse muscles examined, mouse soleus bore the greatest molecular similarities to human skeletal muscles, independent of the latters' anatomic location/muscle type, disease state, age and sampling method (autopsy versus biopsy). Significant similarity to any one mouse muscle group was not observed for non-muscle human tissues (dataset H3), indicating this finding to be muscle specific. Conclusion This observation may be partly explained by the higher type I fiber content of soleus relative to the other mouse muscles sampled. PMID:16522209

  20. Muscle development and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of skeletal muscle from the epithelial somites involves a series of events triggered by temporally and spatially discrete signals resulting in the generation of muscle fibers which vary in their contractile and metabolic nature. The fiber type composition of muscles varies between individuals and it has now been found that there are differences in fiber type proportions between lean and obese animals and humans. Amongst the possible causes of obesity, it has been suggested that inappropriate prenatal environments may ‘program’ the fetus and may lead to increased risks for disease in adult life. The characteristics of muscle are both heritable and plastic, giving the tissue some ability to adapt to signals and stimuli both pre and postnatally. Given that muscle is a site of fatty acid oxidation and carbohydrate metabolism and that its development can be changed by prenatal events, it is interesting to examine the possible relationship between muscle development and the risk of obesity. PMID:19279728

  1. Quantifying the history dependency of muscle recovery from a fatiguing intermittent task.

    PubMed

    Rashedi, Ehsan; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2017-01-25

    Muscle fatigue and recovery are complex processes influencing muscle force generation capacity. While fatigue reduces this capacity, recovery acts to restore the unfatigued muscle state. Many factors can potentially affect muscle recovery, and among these may be a task dependency of recovery following an exercise. However, little has been reported regarding the history dependency of recovery after fatiguing contractions. We examined the dependency of muscle recovery subsequent to four different histories of fatiguing muscle contractions, imposed using two cycle times (30 and 60s) during low to moderate levels (15% and 25% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)) of intermittent static exertions involving index finger abduction. MVC and low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFES) measures (i.e., magnitude, rise and relaxation rates) of muscle capacity were used, all of which indicated a dependency of muscle recovery on the muscle capacity state existing immediately after fatiguing exercise. This dependency did not appear to be modified by either the cycle time or exertion level leading to that state. These results imply that the post-exercise rate of recovery is primarily influenced by the immediate post-exercise muscle contractile status (estimated by MVC and LFES measures). Such results may help improve existing models of muscle recovery, facilitating more accurate predictions of localized muscle fatigue development and thereby helping to enhance muscle performance and reduce the risk of injury.

  2. Advances in dielectric elastomers for actuators and artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Paul; Pei, Qibing

    2010-01-04

    A number of materials have been explored for their use as artificial muscles. Among these, dielectric elastomers (DEs) appear to provide the best combination of properties for true muscle-like actuation. DEs behave as compliant capacitors, expanding in area and shrinking in thickness when a voltage is applied. Materials combining very high energy densities, strains, and efficiencies have been known for some time. To date, however, the widespread adoption of DEs has been hindered by premature breakdown and the requirement for high voltages and bulky support frames. Recent advances seem poised to remove these restrictions and allow for the production of highly reliable, high-performance transducers for artificial muscle applications.

  3. Study of cervical muscle response and injury of driver during a frontal vehicle collision.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenhai; Li, Chuzhao; Hu, Hongyu; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Chaoyang; Yu, Huili

    2015-01-01

    Frontal vehicle collisions can cause injury to a driver's cervical muscles resulting from intense changes in muscle strain and muscle load. This study investigated the influence of collision forces in a sled test environment using a modified Hybrid III 50th percentile dummy equipped with simulated spring-type muscles. Cervical muscle responses including strain and load of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), splenius capitis (SPL), and trapezius (TRP) were analyzed, and muscle injury was assessed. The SCM, SPL, and TRP suffered average peak muscle strains of 21%, 40%, and 23%, respectively, exceeding the injury threshold. The average peak muscle loads of the SCM, SPL and TRP were 11 N, 25 N, and 25 N, respectively, lower than the ultimate failure load. The SPL endured the largest injury, while the injuries to the SCM and TRP were relatively small. This is a preliminary study to assess the cervical muscle of driver during a frontal vehicle collision. This study provides a foundation for investigating the muscle response and injury in sled test environments, which can lead to the improvement of occupant protections.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Boron-Tolerant and Moderately Halotolerant Bacterium Gracilibacillus boraciitolerans JCM 21714T

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Kitamura, Keiko; Iida, Toshiya; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Toru; Hattori, Masahira

    2014-01-01

    Gracilibacillus boraciitolerans JCM 21714T has been characterized as a highly boron-tolerant and moderately halotolerant bacterium. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain. The genome sequence facilitates an understanding of the biochemical functions of boron and provides a base to identify the gene(s) involved in the boron tolerance mechanism of the strain. PMID:24558242

  5. Muscle Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Siparsky, Patrick N.; Kirkendall, Donald T.; Garrett, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle physiology in the aging athlete is complex. Sarcopenia, the age-related decrease in lean muscle mass, can alter activity level and affect quality of life. This review addresses the microscopic and macroscopic changes in muscle with age, recognizes contributing factors including nutrition and changes in hormone levels, and identifies potential pharmacologic agents in clinical trial that may aid in the battle of this complex, costly, and disabling problem. Level of Evidence: Level 5. PMID:24427440

  6. Muscle-driven finite element simulation of human foot movements.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, L A; Aravas, N

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a finite element scheme for realistic muscle-driven simulation of human foot movements. The scheme is used to simulate human ankle plantar flexion. A three-dimensional anatomically detailed finite element model of human foot and lower leg is developed and the idea of generating natural foot movement based entirely on the contraction of the plantar flexor muscles is used. The bones, ligaments, articular cartilage, muscles, tendons, as well as the rest soft tissues of human foot and lower leg are included in the model. A realistic three-dimensional continuum constitutive model that describes the biomechanical behaviour of muscles and tendons is used. Both the active and passive properties of muscle tissue are accounted for. The materials for bones and ligaments are considered as homogeneous, isotropic and linearly elastic, whereas the articular cartilage and the rest soft tissues (mainly fat) are defined as hyperelastic materials. The model is used to estimate muscle tissue deformations as well as stresses and strains that develop in the lower leg muscles during plantar flexion of the ankle. Stresses and strains that develop in Achilles tendon during such a movement are also investigated.

  7. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  8. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2011-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best "treatment".

  9. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're also more likely to succumb to forces that could stress a joint or overextend a muscle. Improper warm-up. Properly warming up before vigorous physical activity loosens your muscles and increases joint range of motion, making the muscles less tight and less prone ...

  10. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  11. Fault failure with moderate earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.S.; Linde, A.T.; Gladwin, M.T.; Borcherdt, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution strain and tilt recordings were made in the near-field of, and prior to, the May 1983 Coalinga earthquake (ML = 6.7, ?? = 51 km), the August 4, 1985, Kettleman Hills earthquake (ML = 5.5, ?? = 34 km), the April 1984 Morgan Hill earthquake (ML = 6.1, ?? = 55 km), the November 1984 Round Valley earthquake (ML = 5.8, ?? = 54 km), the January 14, 1978, Izu, Japan earthquake (ML = 7.0, ?? = 28 km), and several other smaller magnitude earthquakes. These recordings were made with near-surface instruments (resolution 10-8), with borehole dilatometers (resolution 10-10) and a 3-component borehole strainmeter (resolution 10-9). While observed coseismic offsets are generally in good agreement with expectations from elastic dislocation theory, and while post-seismic deformation continued, in some cases, with a moment comparable to that of the main shock, preseismic strain or tilt perturbations from hours to seconds (or less) before the main shock are not apparent above the present resolution. Precursory slip for these events, if any occurred, must have had a moment less than a few percent of that of the main event. To the extent that these records reflect general fault behavior, the strong constraint on the size and amount of slip triggering major rupture makes prediction of the onset times and final magnitudes of the rupture zones a difficult task unless the instruments are fortuitously installed near the rupture initiation point. These data are best explained by an inhomogeneous failure model for which various areas of the fault plane have either different stress-slip constitutive laws or spatially varying constitutive parameters. Other work on seismic waveform analysis and synthetic waveforms indicates that the rupturing process is inhomogeneous and controlled by points of higher strength. These models indicate that rupture initiation occurs at smaller regions of higher strength which, when broken, allow runaway catastrophic failure. ?? 1987.

  12. Soft conductive elastomer materials for stretchable electronics and voltage controlled artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Hristiyan; Kollosche, Matthias; Risse, Sebastian; Waché, Rémi; Kofod, Guggi

    2013-01-25

    Block copolymer elastomer conductors (BEC) are mixtures of block copolymers grafted with conducting polymers, which are found to support very large strains, while retaining a high level of conductivity. These novel materials may find use in stretchable electronics. The use of BEC is demonstrated in a capacitive strain sensor and in an artificial muscle of the dielectric elastomer actuator type, supporting more than 100% actuation strain and capacity strain sensitivity up to 300%.

  13. Correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle thickness in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Kurozumi, Chiharu; Ono, Koji; Ando, Suguru; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle thickness in healthy subjects. Forty-two healthy male (20.7 ± 2.6 years old) participated in this study. Neck slope angle was measured in a relaxed sitting posture. The deep cervical flexor muscle thickness was measured in a relaxed supine posture. The correlations between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness relative to body mass index were determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was a moderate positive correlation between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness (r = 0.414, P = 0.006). The result demonstrated that participants with lower neck slope angles had smaller muscle thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor muscles. It appears that the deep cervical flexor muscle thickness might be associated with neck slope angle in a relaxed sitting posture.

  14. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  15. Relating speech production to tongue muscle compressions using tagged and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangxu; Ye, Chuyang; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    The human tongue is composed of multiple internal muscles that work collaboratively during the production of speech. Assessment of muscle mechanics can help understand the creation of tongue motion, interpret clinical observations, and predict surgical outcomes. Although various methods have been proposed for computing the tongue's motion, associating motion with muscle activity in an interdigitated fiber framework has not been studied. In this work, we aim to develop a method that reveals different tongue muscles' activities in different time phases during speech. We use fourdimensional tagged magnetic resonance (MR) images and static high-resolution MR images to obtain tongue motion and muscle anatomy, respectively. Then we compute strain tensors and local tissue compression along the muscle fiber directions in order to reveal their shortening pattern. This process relies on the support from multiple image analysis methods, including super-resolution volume reconstruction from MR image slices, segmentation of internal muscles, tracking the incompressible motion of tissue points using tagged images, propagation of muscle fiber directions over time, and calculation of strain in the line of action, etc. We evaluated the method on a control subject and two postglossectomy patients in a controlled speech task. The normal subject's tongue muscle activity shows high correspondence with the production of speech in different time instants, while both patients' muscle activities show different patterns from the control due to their resected tongues. This method shows potential for relating overall tongue motion to particular muscle activity, which may provide novel information for future clinical and scientific studies.

  16. The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory and Limb Locomotor Muscle Deoxygenation During Exercise with Resistive Inspiratory Loading.

    PubMed

    Turner, L A; Tecklenburg-Lund, S L; Chapman, R; Shei, R-J; Wilhite, D P; Mickleborough, T

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how inspiratory muscle training impacted respiratory and locomotor muscle deoxygenation during submaximal exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. 16 male cyclists completed 6 weeks of either true (n=8) or sham (n=8) inspiratory muscle training. Pre- and post-training, subjects completed 3, 6-min experimental trials performed at ~80%  ˙VO2peak with interventions of either moderate inspiratory loading, heavy inspiratory loading, or maximal exercise imposed in the final 3 min. Locomotor and respiratory muscle oxy-, deoxy-, and total-haemoglobin and myoglobin concentration was continuously monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. Locomotor muscle deoxygenation changes from 80%  ˙VO2peak to heavy inspiratory loading were significantly reduced pre- to post-training from 4.3±5.6 µM to 2.7±4.7 µM. Respiratory muscle deoxygenation was also significantly reduced during the heavy inspiratory loading trial (4.6±3.5 µM to 1.9±1.5 µM) post-training. There was no significant difference in oxy-, deoxy-, or total-haemoglobin and myoglobin during any of the other loading trials, from pre- to post-training, in either group. After inspiratory muscle training, highly-trained cyclists exhibited decreased locomotor and respiratory muscle deoxygenation during exercise with heavy inspiratory loading. These data suggest that inspiratory muscle training reduces oxygen extraction by the active respiratory and limb muscles, which may reflect changes in respiratory and locomotor muscle oxygen delivery.

  17. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  18. Respiratory muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gransee, Heather M; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2012-04-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle's plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles.

  19. Moderately luminous Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Pastorello, A.; Turatto, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Botticella, M. T.; Bufano, F.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Harutyunyan, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.; Zampieri, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Core-collapse Supernovae (CC-SNe) descend from progenitors more massive than about 8 M⊙. Because of the young age of the progenitors, the ejecta may eventually interact with the circumstellar medium (CSM) via highly energetic processes detectable in the radio, X-ray, ultraviolet (UV) and, sometimes, in the optical domains. Aims: In this paper we present ultraviolet, optical and near infrared observations of five Type II SNe, namely SNe 2009dd, 2007pk, 2010aj, 1995ad, and 1996W. Together with few other SNe they form a group of moderately luminous Type II events. We investigate the photometric similarities and differences among these bright objects. We also attempt to characterise them by analysing the spectral evolutions, in order to find some traces of CSM-ejecta interaction. Methods: We collected photometry and spectroscopy with several telescopes in order to construct well-sampled light curves and spectral evolutions from the photospheric to the nebular phases. Both photometry and spectroscopy indicate a degree of heterogeneity in this sample. Modelling the data of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad allows us to constrain the explosion parameters and the properties of the progenitor stars. Results: The light curves have luminous peak magnitudes (-16.95 < MB < -18.70). The ejected masses of 56Ni for three SNe span a wide range of values (2.8 × 10-2 M⊙ < M(56Ni)< 1.4 × 10-1 M⊙), while for a fourth (SN 2010aj) we could determine a stringent upper limit (7 × 10-3 M⊙). Clues of interaction, such as the presence of high velocity (HV) features of the Balmer lines, are visible in the photospheric spectra of SNe 2009dd and 1996W. For SN 2007pk we observe a spectral transition from a Type IIn to a standard Type II SN. Modelling the observations of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad with radiation hydrodynamics codes, we infer kinetic plus thermal energies of about 0.2-0.5 foe, initial radii of 2-5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of ~5.0-9.5 M⊙. Conclusions: These

  20. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  1. Stressors, Resources, and Strain at Work: A Longitudinal Test of the Triple-Match Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jonge, Jan; Dormann, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Two longitudinal studies investigated the issue of match between job stressors and job resources in the prediction of job-related strain. On the basis of the triple-match principle (TMP), it was hypothesized that resources are most likely to moderate the relation between stressors and strains if resources, stressors, and strains all match.…

  2. Insulin and IGF-1 receptors regulate FoxO-mediated signaling in muscle proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Brian T.; Lee, Kevin Y.; Klaus, Katherine; Softic, Samir; Krumpoch, Megan T.; Stanford, Kristin I.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Cai, Weikang; Kleinridders, Andre; Pereira, Renata O.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Accili, Domenico; Goodyear, Laurie J.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes strongly impacts protein metabolism, particularly in skeletal muscle. Insulin and IGF-1 enhance muscle protein synthesis through their receptors, but the relative roles of each in muscle proteostasis have not been fully elucidated. Using mice with muscle-specific deletion of the insulin receptor (M-IR–/– mice), the IGF-1 receptor (M-IGF1R–/– mice), or both (MIGIRKO mice), we assessed the relative contributions of IR and IGF1R signaling to muscle proteostasis. In differentiated muscle, IR expression predominated over IGF1R expression, and correspondingly, M-IR–/– mice displayed a moderate reduction in muscle mass whereas M-IGF1R–/– mice did not. However, these receptors serve complementary roles, such that double-knockout MIGIRKO mice displayed a marked reduction in muscle mass that was linked to increases in proteasomal and autophagy-lysosomal degradation, accompanied by a high-protein-turnover state. Combined muscle-specific deletion of FoxO1, FoxO3, and FoxO4 in MIGIRKO mice reversed increased autophagy and completely rescued muscle mass without changing proteasomal activity. These data indicate that signaling via IR is more important than IGF1R in controlling proteostasis in differentiated muscle. Nonetheless, the overlap of IR and IGF1R signaling is critical to the regulation of muscle protein turnover, and this regulation depends on suppression of FoxO-regulated, autophagy-mediated protein degradation. PMID:27525440

  3. The Association between Cyber Victimization and Subsequent Cyber Aggression: The Moderating Effect of Peer Rejection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michelle F.; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents experience various forms of strain in their lives that may contribute jointly to their engagement in cyber aggression. However, little attention has been given to this idea. To address this gap in the literature, the present longitudinal study examined the moderating influence of peer rejection on the relationship between cyber…

  4. Family Roles as Moderators of the Relationship between Schedule Flexibility and Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Soo Jung; Zippay, Allison; Park, Rhokeun

    2012-01-01

    Employer initiatives that address the spillover of work strain onto family life include flexible work schedules. This study explored the mediating role of negative work-family spillover in the relationship between schedule flexibility and employee stress and the moderating roles of gender, family workload, and single-parent status. Data were drawn…

  5. Neck muscle activity in skydivers during parachute opening shock.

    PubMed

    Lo Martire, R; Gladh, K; Westman, A; Lindholm, P; Nilsson, J; Äng, B O

    2016-03-01

    This observational study investigated skydiver neck muscle activity during parachute opening shock (POS), as epidemiological data recently suggested neck pain in skydivers to be related to POS. Twenty experienced skydivers performed two terminal velocity skydives each. Surface electromyography quantified muscle activity bilaterally from the anterior neck, the upper and lower posterior neck, and the upper shoulders; and two triaxial accelerometers sampled deceleration. Muscle activity was normalized as the percentage of reference maximum voluntary electrical activity (% MVE); and temporal muscle activity onset was related to POS onset. Our results showed that neck muscle activity during POS reached mean magnitudes of 53-104% MVE, often exceeding reference activity in the lower posterior neck and upper shoulders. All investigated muscle areas' mean temporal onsets occurred <50 ms after POS onset (9-34 ms latencies), which is consistent with anticipatory motor control. The high muscle activity observed supports that the neck is under substantial strain during POS, while temporal muscle activation suggests anticipatory motor control to be a strategy used by skydivers to protect the cervical spine from POS. This study's findings contribute to understanding the high rates of POS-related neck pain, and further support the need for evaluation of neck pain preventative strategies.

  6. Patient moderator interaction in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients' visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients' information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care.

  7. Patient Moderator Interaction in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W.; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients’ visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients’ information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care. PMID:24551364

  8. Noninvasive assessment of the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles using ultrasound real-time tissue elastography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Muraki, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Ishijima, Takahiro; Morise, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles could be estimated by measuring the elasticity of these muscles under several levels of muscle contraction through ultrasound real-time tissue elastography (RTE). Ten healthy men performed submaximal voluntary contractions (MVC) in each manual muscle testing position for the middle deltoid, upper trapezius, supraspinatus, levator scapulae, and rhomboid major. The elasticity of these muscles was measured using ultrasound RTE during the task. The strain ratio of the muscle to an acoustic coupler was calculated as an assessment index of the muscle elasticity. Higher strain ratio values imply lower elasticity. In addition, the electromyographic activity was recorded from surface electrodes attached only to the middle deltoid and upper trapezius. The strain ratios were negatively correlated with the normalized root mean square values for the middle deltoid (r=-0.659, p<0.001) and upper trapezius (r=-0.554, p<0.001). The strain ratios of all the muscles decreased with an increase from 10% MVC force to 30% MVC force. Ultrasound RTE may be useful for noninvasively assessing the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles at certain shoulder positions with low levels of muscle contraction.

  9. A program of moderate physical training for Wistar rats based on maximal oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Carol Góis; Levada, Adriana Cristina; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; De-Castro, Célia Barbosa; Curi, Rui; Pithon-Curi, Tânia Cristina

    2007-08-01

    Moderate physical training is often associated with improved cardiorespiratory fitness in athletes and the general population. In animals, studies are designed to investigate basic physiology that could be invasive and uncomfortable for humans. The standardization of an exercise training protocol for rats based on maximal consumption of oxygen (VO(2)max) is needed. This study validated a program of moderate physical training for Wistar rats based on VO(2)max determined once a week. A 10-stage treadmill running test was developed to measure VO(2)max through an indirect, open circuit calorimeter. Thirty male Wistar rats (210-226 g) were randomly assigned to either a nontrained group or a trained group. The animals were evaluated weekly to follow their VO(2)max during 8 weeks of moderate training and to adjust the intensity of the protocol of training. The soleus muscle was removed for determination of citrate synthase activity. Trained animals maintained their values of VO(2)max during a moderate running training and showed a significant less body weight gain. An increase of 42% in citrate synthase activity of the soleus muscle from trained rats was found after the training program. Our study presents a protocol of moderate physical training for Wistar rats based on VO(2)max. Peripheral adaptations such as the values of citrate synthase activity also responded to the moderate training program imposed as observed for VO(2)max. Other studies can use our protocol of moderate training to study the physiologic adaptations underlying this specific intensity of training. It will provide support for study with humans.

  10. The integration of lateral gastrocnemius muscle function and kinematics in running turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Nelson, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Animals commonly move over a range of speeds, and encounter considerable variation in habitat structure, such as inclines. Hindlimb kinematics and muscle function in diverse groups of vertebrates are affected by these changes in behavior and habitat structure, providing a fruitful source of variation for studying the integration of kinematics and muscle function. While it has been observed in a variety of vertebrates that muscle length change can be minimal during locomotion, it is unclear how, and to what degree, in vivo muscle length change patterns are integrated with kinematics. We tested the hypothesis that the length of the turkey lateral gastrocnemius (LG), a biarticular muscle that has moments at the ankle and knee, is not solely affected by changes in joint kinematics. We recorded in vivo muscle length changes (using sonomicrometry) and hindlimb movements (using high-speed video) of wild turkeys running on various inclines, and at different speeds. We quantified the relationship between joint angle (knee and ankle separately) and muscle length in freshly euthanized specimens, and then applied an empirically derived correction for changes in pennation angle and tendon strain during locomotion to improve the accuracy of our predicted lengths. We estimated muscle length at four points during each stride and then compared these values with those measured directly. Other than during swing, the predicted changes in muscle length calculated from the changes in joint kinematics did not correspond with our measured values of LG length. Therefore, the lengths at which the LG operates inturkeys are not determined entirely by kinematics. In addition to strain in series elastic components, we hypothesize that heterogeneous strain within muscles, interactions between muscles and muscle pennation angle all contribute to the non-linear relationship between muscle length changes and kinematics. PMID:18657958

  11. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John J; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S; Esser, Karyn A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2011-09-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca(2+) sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells.

  12. Sports related hamstring strains--two cases with different etiologies and injury sites.

    PubMed

    Askling, C; Tengvar, M; Saartok, T; Thorstensson, A

    2000-10-01

    Hamstring strains are common injuries in sports. Knowledge about their etiology and localization is, however, limited. The two cases described here both had acute hamstring strains, but the etiologies were entirely different. The sprinter was injured when running at maximal speed, whereas the hamstring strain in the dancer occurred during slow stretching. Also the anatomical localizations of the injuries clearly differed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed pathological changes in the distal semitendinosus muscle in the sprinter and the proximal tendon of the semimembranosus muscle in the dancer. Subjectively, both athletes severely underestimated the recovery time. These case observations suggest a possible link between etiology and localization of hamstring strains.

  13. Variable gearing in pennate muscles.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Emanuel; Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Roberts, Thomas J

    2008-02-05

    Muscle fiber architecture, i.e., the physical arrangement of fibers within a muscle, is an important determinant of a muscle's mechanical function. In pennate muscles, fibers are oriented at an angle to the muscle's line of action and rotate as they shorten, becoming more oblique such that the fraction of force directed along the muscle's line of action decreases throughout a contraction. Fiber rotation decreases a muscle's output force but increases output velocity by allowing the muscle to function at a higher gear ratio (muscle velocity/fiber velocity). The magnitude of fiber rotation, and therefore gear ratio, depends on how the muscle changes shape in the dimensions orthogonal to the muscle's line of action. Here, we show that gear ratio is not fixed for a given muscle but decreases significantly with the force of contraction (P < 0.0001). We find that dynamic muscle-shape changes promote fiber rotation at low forces and resist fiber rotation at high forces. As a result, gearing varies automatically with the load, to favor velocity output during low-load contractions and force output for contractions against high loads. Therefore, muscle-shape changes act as an automatic transmission system allowing a pennate muscle to shift from a high gear during rapid contractions to low gear during forceful contractions. These results suggest that variable gearing in pennate muscles provides a mechanism to modulate muscle performance during mechanically diverse functions.

  14. [Effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on their function during exercise].

    PubMed

    Sliwiński, P; Yan, S; Gauthier, A P; Macklem, P T

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of global inspiratory muscle fatigue (GF) on respiratory muscle control during exercise at 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximal power output in normal subjects. Fatigue was induced by breathing against a high inspiratory resistance until exhaustion. Respiratory pressures, breathing pattern, and perceived breathlessness were measured. Induction of GF had no effect on the ventilatory parameters during mild and moderate exercise. It altered, however, ventilatory response to heavy exercise by increasing breathing frequency and minute ventilation, with minor changes in tidal volume. This was accompanied by an increase in perceived breathlessness. GF significantly increased both the tonic and phasic activities of abdominal muscles that allowed 1) the diaphragm to maintain its function while developing less pressure, 2) the same tidal volume with lesser shortening of the rib cage inspiratory muscles, and 3) relaxation of the abdominal muscles to contribute to lung inflation. The increased work performed by the abdominal muscles may, however, lead to a reduction in their strength. GF may impair exercise performance in some healthy subjects that is probably not related to excessive breathlessness or other ventilatory factors. The respiratory system is remarkably adaptable in maintaining ventilation during exercise even with impaired inspiratory muscle contractility.

  15. Multiple Serotypes of the Moderate Thermophile Thiobacillus caldus, a Limitation of Immunological Assays for Biomining Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, K. B.; Lindstrom, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Phylogenetic and phenotypic analysis indicates that a moderately thermophilic isolate, C-SH12, from Australia belongs to the species Thiobacillus caldus. Antiserum generated against whole cells of T. caldus KU recognized protein antigens common to cell lysates of the three T. caldus strains KU, BC13, and C-SH12 but did not recognize whole cells of isolate C-SH12. Differences in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of strain C-SH12 and those of the other two T. caldus strains were found, and the anti-KU antiserum did not recognize the LPS from strain C-SH12. These data indicate that this T. caldus isolate belongs to a serotype different from that of strains KU and BC13. PMID:16535449

  16. Food poisoning potential of Bacillus cereus strains from Norwegian dairies.

    PubMed

    Stenfors Arnesen, Lotte P; O'sullivan, Kristin; Granum, Per Einar

    2007-05-10

    Characteristics concerning diarrhoeal potential were investigated in B. cereus dairy strains. The thirty-nine strains, isolated from whipping cream, were tested for cytotoxicity after culturing at human body temperature as well as 25 degrees C and 32 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, none of the strains were highly cytotoxic. This observation suggests that those strains should be considered to pose a minor risk with regard to diarrhoeal food poisoning. However, some strains were moderately or highly cytotoxic when grown at 25 degrees C and 32 degrees C. While the majority of the strains were able to grow at refrigeration temperatures, only four B. weihenstephanensis strains were identified among them when subjected to discriminative PCR assays and growth temperatures which delimit this species.

  17. Effect of muscle acidity on muscle metabolism and fatigue during intense exercise in man.

    PubMed

    Bangsbo, J; Madsen, K; Kiens, B; Richter, E A

    1996-09-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of muscle pH on muscle metabolism and development of fatigue during intense exercise. 2. Seven subjects performed intense exhaustive leg exercise on two occasions: with and without preceding intense intermittent arm exercise leading to high or moderate (control) blood lactate concentrations (HL and C, respectively). Prior to and immediately after each exercise bout, a muscle biopsy was taken from m. vastus lateralis of the active leg. Leg blood flow was measured and femoral arterial and venous blood samples were collected before and frequently during the exhaustive exercises. 3. The duration of the exercise was shorter in HL than in C (3.46 +/- 0.28 vs. 4.67 +/- 0.55 min; means +/- S.E.M.; P < 0.05). Before exercise muscle pH was the same in C and HL (7.17 vs. 7.10), but at the end of exercise muscle pH was lower in HL than in C (6.82 vs. 6.65; P < 0.05). The release of potassium during exercise was higher (P < 0.05) in HL compared with C, but the arterial and femoral venous plasma potassium concentrations were the same at exhaustion in HL and C. 4. Muscle lactate concentration was higher in HL compared with C (3.7 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.2 mmol (kg wet weight)-1; P < 0.05), but the same at exhaustion (26.5 +/- 2.7 vs. 25.4 +/- 2.4 mmol (kg wet weight)-1). Total release of lactate in HL was lower than in C (18.7 +/- 4.5 vs. 50.4 +/- 11.0 mmol; P < 0.05), but rate of lactate production was not different (9.0 +/- 1.0 vs. 10.2 +/- 1.3 mmol (kg wet weight)-1 min-1). The rate of muscle glycogen breakdown was the same in C and HL (8.1 +/- 1.2 vs. 8.2 +/- 1.0 mmol (kg wet weight)-1 min-1). 5. The present data suggest that elevated muscle acidity does not reduce muscle glycogenolysis/glycolysis and is not the only cause of fatigue during intense exercise in man. Instead, accumulation of potassium in muscle interstitium may be an important factor in the development of fatigue.

  18. Correlation between Limb Muscle Endurance, Strength, and Functional Capacity in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Törnberg, Anna; Wadell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the correlation between limb muscle function (endurance and strength) and functional capacity in upper limbs (ULs) and lower limbs (LLs) of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Method: This article describes a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial. A stationary dynamometer was used to measure isokinetic muscle strength and endurance; the 6-minute walk test, the 6-minute pegboard and ring test, and the unsupported UL exercise test were used to measure functional capacity. Results: Participants were 44 adults with COPD. Muscle strength and endurance in ULs and LLs demonstrated a moderate to strong correlation with functional capacity. When controlling for muscle strength, muscle endurance was moderately correlated with functional capacity in ULs and LLs, but when controlling for muscle endurance, there was no positive and significant correlation between muscle strength and functional capacity for the ULs or LLs. Conclusions: Functional capacity seems to be more closely related to limb muscle endurance than to limb muscle strength in people with COPD. PMID:27504047

  19. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  20. Assessing Moderator Variables: Two Computer Simulation Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Craig A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for conceptualizing moderating relationships based on their type (strictly correlational and classically correlational) and form, whether continuous, noncontinuous, logistic, or quantum. Results of computer simulations comparing three statistical approaches for assessing moderator variables are presented, and advantages of…

  1. Best Practices in Online Conference Moderation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Schutter, Adrienne; Fahrni, Patricia; Rudolph, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Facilitation by a moderator is crucial to a purposeful and productive conference. The moderator keeps the session focused, and ensures that all participants receive feedback regarding their contributions to the discussion. These functions are particularly important in the otherwise impersonal context of online discussion. The current report…

  2. Integrating Mediators and Moderators in Research Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, David P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe mediating variables and moderating variables and provide reasons for integrating them in outcome studies. Separate sections describe examples of moderating and mediating variables and the simplest statistical model for investigating each variable. The strengths and limitations of incorporating mediating…

  3. How well can levator ani muscle morphology on 3D pelvic floor ultrasound predict the levator ani muscle function?

    PubMed Central

    Rostaminia, G.; Peck, J. D.; Quiroz, L. H.; Shobeiri, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis The aim of our study was to assess the performance of levator ani muscle deficiency (LAD) evaluated by 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) to detect pelvic floor muscle function as assessed by digital examination. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among 77 patients referred to our urogynecology clinic for pelvic floor dysfunction symptoms. Patients underwent physical examinations including digital pelvic muscle strength assessment using the Modified Oxford scale (MOS). EVUS volumes were evaluated and levator ani muscles were scored according to a validated LAD scoring system. MOS scores were categorized as nonfunctional (scores 0–1) and functional (scores 2–5). Results Mean age of participants was 56 (SD± 12.5) and 71% were menopausal. Overall, 32.5% had nonfunctional muscle strength and 44.2% were classified as having significant LAD. LAD identified by ultrasound had a sensitivity of 60% (95% CI 41%–79%) for detecting nonfunctional muscle and a specificity of 63% (95% CI 50%–77%) for detecting functional muscle. Overall, LAD demonstrated fair ability to discriminate between patient with and without poor muscle function (area under the ROC curve = 0.70 (95% CI 0.58–0.83). Among patients with an LAD score of 16–18, representing almost total muscle avulsion, 70% had nonfunctional MOS scores. Whereas, in patients with normal/minimal LAD (scores of 0–4), 89.5% had functional MOS scores Conclusions LAD and MOS scales were moderately negatively correlated Among patients with normal morphology or the most severe muscle deficiency, LAD scores can identify the majority of patients with functional or non-functional MOS scores, respectively. PMID:25246297

  4. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P < 0.05) as was force (40.3 ± 12.8% vs. 57.1 ± 13.8% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Likewise, after a 2-min AP MVC, elbow flexion voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (88.3 ± 7.5% vs. 93.6 ± 3.9%; P < 0.05) as was torque (80.2 ± 4.6% vs. 86.6 ± 1.0% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Pain during ischemia was reported as Moderate to Very Strong. Postfatigue firing of group III/IV muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb.

  5. The Distributed Lambda (?) Model (DLM): A 3-D, Finite-Element Muscle Model Based on Feldman's ? Model; Assessment of Orofacial Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. Method: A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the ? model along the muscle fibers, together…

  6. Skeletal muscle-smooth muscle interaction: an unusual myoelastic system.

    PubMed

    Hikida, R S; Peterson, W J

    1983-09-01

    The serratus superficialis metapatagialis (SSM) of pigeons is a skeletal muscle with unusual properties. It lies between the ribs and the trailing edge of the wing, where it is attached to the skin by a system of smooth muscles having elastic tendons. Wing movements during flight induce marked changes in this muscle's length. The SSM inserts onto the deep fascia, and at its termination the skeletal muscle contains large numbers of microtubules. Many myofibrils attach to leptomeric organelles, which then attach to the terminal end of the skeletal muscle fiber. The deep fascia next connects to the dermis of the skin by bundles of smooth muscles that have elastic tendons at both ends. This system allows large movements of the muscle while preventing its fibers from overstretching. The movements and presumed forces acting at this muscle make the presence of sensory receptors such as muscle spindles unlikely. Spindles are absent in this muscle.

  7. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  8. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  9. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  10. Tendon biomechanical properties enhance human wrist muscle specialization.

    PubMed

    Loren, G J; Lieber, R L

    1995-07-01

    Biomechanical properties of human wrist tendons were measured under loads predicted to be experienced by those tendons under physiological conditions. This was accomplished by measuring the architectural properties of the five prime wrist movers--extensors carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU), flexor carpi radials (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU)--and predicting their maximum tension (P0) using a specific tension value (22.5 N cm-2. Loading the corresponding tendons to P0 resulted in significantly different strain among tendons (p < 0.01) with the largest strain observed in the FCU (3.68 +/- 0.31%) and the smallest strain observed in the ECRL (1.78 +/- 0.14%). Further, strain magnitude was significantly positively correlated with the tendon length-to-fiber length ratio of the muscle-tendon unit, a measure of the intrinsic compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Theoretical modeling of the magnitude of muscle sarcomere shortening expected based on the measured biomechanical properties revealed a maximum sarcomere length decrease of about 0.6 micron for the FCU to a minimum of about 0.2 micron for the ECRB at P0. Thus, tendon compliance may, but does not necessarily, result in significant modification of muscle force generation. The significant variation in tendon biomechanical properties was not observed using traditional elongation-to-failure methods on the same specimens. Thus, the use of elongation-to-failure experiments for determination of tendon properties may not be reasonable when the purpose of such studies is to infer physiological function. These data indicate that muscle-tendon units show remarkable specialization and that tendon intrinsic properties accentuate the muscle architectural specialization already present.

  11. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  12. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  13. Muscle function loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paralytic shellfish poisoning Periodic paralysis Focal nerve injury Polio Spinal cord injury Stroke Home Care Sudden loss ... Barré syndrome Muscle cramps Poisoning - fish and shellfish Polio Stroke Review Date 2/27/2016 Updated by: ...

  14. Muscle biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  15. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  16. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels of fats, which are the major muscle energy fuels for those with the disorder. A partial deficiency ... genetic defect ( ) interferes with the processing of specific fuels, energy shortages can occur and toxic byproducts may build ...

  17. Buccinator muscle repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Baghele, Om N.

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical aberrations and abnormalities are frequently associated with functional, psychosocial, and emotional problems. One such aberration is crestal attachment of frenum or muscle on the alveolar processes of the jaws. Crestal attachment of buccinator muscle is a rare phenomenon, which may pose various problems in routine oral exercises/functions or restoring the edentulous area. A case of abnormal buccinator muscle attachment is presented here, which was relocated apically by surgical means using an acrylic stent. The healing was uneventful and significant apical repositioning was observed. A fixed bridge was fabricated and the long-term results of the restorative therapy were assured because the patient could maintain the oral hygiene well after the muscle repositioning operation. PMID:23162347

  18. Hamstring Muscle Injuries, a Rehabilitation Protocol Purpose

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Xavier; L.Tol, Johannes; Hamilton, Bruce; Rodas, Gil; Malliaras, Peter; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Rizo, Vicenc; Moreno, Marcel; Jardi, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Context: Hamstring acute muscle injuries are prevalent in several sports including AFL football (Australian Football League), sprinting and soccer, and are often associated with prolonged time away from sport. Evidence Acquisition: In response to this, research into prevention and management of hamstring injury has increased, but epidemiological data shows no decline in injury and re-injury rates, suggesting that rehabilitation programs and return to play (RTP) criteria have to be improved. There continues to be a lack of consensus regarding how to assess performance, recovery and readiness to RTP, following hamstring strain injury. Results: The aim of this paper was to propose rehabilitation protocol for hamstring muscle injuries based on current basic science and research knowledge regarding injury demographics and management options. Conclusions: Criteria-based (subjective and objective) progression through the rehabilitation program will be outlined along with exercises for each phase, from initial injury to RTP. PMID:26715969

  19. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  20. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components.

  1. Muscle as a secretory organ.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise.

  2. Assessment of palatability attributes of the major beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, L E; Gibson, L L; Aalhus, J L; Dugan, M E R

    2003-11-01

    One kilogram roasts from 33 muscles or muscle groups from 25 Canada AA steer carcasses were evaluated for palatability after roasting to 72 °C internal temperature in an electric convection oven preheated to 177 °C. Initial tenderness ranged from moderately tough to tender. All butt tender and tenderloin samples were tender on the first bite, but less than 10% of the rib cap (top and lower portions), deckle point, brisket, and eye of round samples were rated tender on the first bite. Overall tenderness also ranged from moderately tough to tender. All of the tenderloin, butt tender, rib-eye cap, and cross rib samples were rated tender overall, but none of the deckle point samples were rated tender overall. Perceptible connective tissue ranged from slight to moderately abundant. Juiciness ranged from slightly dry to moderately juicy. All of the tenderloin, cross rib cap, rib-eye cap, tri tip, flap meat, short rib, and skirt samples were rated juicy, but 40% or less of the shoulder, eye of round, and loss side samples were rated juicy. Beef flavor intensity ranged from slightly to moderately intense, and flavor desirability ranged from slightly undesirable to moderately desirable. All tenderloin, butt tender, striploin, rib-eye, and cross rib cap samples were rated desirable in overall palatability, but 25% or less of the rib cap (top and lower portions), shank meat, eye of round, brisket, and deckle point samples were rated desirable in overall palatability. To the extent desirability to the panel utilized is representative of consumer acceptance, only the tenderloin, butt tender, rib-eye cap, cross rib, cross rib cap, and rib-eye either met or came close to meeting the Canadian Cattlemen's Association's goal of 95% acceptance based upon palatability. Consequently, effective postmortem intervention techniques or alternative cooking methods must be developed and applied to improve the palatability of most beef muscles, if the aforementioned goal is to be achieved.

  3. Botulinum toxin in masticatory muscles: short- and long-term effects on muscle, bone, and craniofacial function in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Katherine L; Liu, Zi Jun; Ye, Wenmin; Navarrete, Alfonso L; Nguyen, Thao Tuong; Salamati, Atriya; Herring, Susan W

    2012-03-01

    Paralysis of the masticatory muscles using botulinum toxin (BTX) is a common treatment for cosmetic reduction of the masseters as well as for conditions involving muscle spasm and pain. The effects of this treatment on mastication have not been evaluated, and claims that the treatment unloads the jaw joint and mandible have not been validated. If BTX treatment does decrease mandibular loading, osteopenia might ensue as an adverse result. Rabbits received a single dose of BTX or saline into one randomly chosen masseter muscle and were followed for 4 or 12 weeks. Masticatory muscle activity was assessed weekly, and incisor bite force elicited by stimulation of each masseter was measured periodically. At the endpoint, strain gages were installed on the neck of the mandibular condyle and on the molar area of the mandible for in vivo bone strain recording during mastication and muscle stimulation. After termination, muscles were weighed and mandibular segments were scanned with micro CT. BTX paralysis of one masseter did not alter chewing side or rate, in part because of compensation by the medial pterygoid muscle. Masseter-induced bite force was dramatically decreased. Analysis of bone strain data suggested that at 4 weeks, the mandibular condyle of the BTX-injected side was underloaded, as were both sides of the molar area. Bone quantity and quality were severely decreased specifically at these underloaded locations, especially the injection-side condylar head. At 12 weeks, most functional parameters were near their pre-injection levels, but the injected masseter still exhibited atrophy and percent bone area was still low in the condylar head. In conclusion, although the performance of mastication was only minimally harmed by BTX paralysis of the masseter, the resulting underloading was sufficient to cause notable and persistent bone loss, particularly at the temporomandibular joint.

  4. Changes in T2-weighted MRI of supinator muscle, pronator teres muscle, and extensor indicis muscle with manual muscle testing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Akiyama, Sumikazu; Takamori, Masayoshi; Otsuka, D. Eng, Hiroshi; Seo, Yoshiteru

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] In order to detect muscle activity with manual muscle testing, T2-weighted magnetic resonance (T2w-MR) images were detected by a 0.2 T compact MRI system. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 3 adult males. Transverse T2-weighted multi-slice spin-echo images of the left forearm were measured by a 39 ms echo-time with a 2,000 ms repetition time, a 9.5 mm slice thickness, 1 accumulation and a total image acquisition time of 4 min 16 s. First, T2w-MR images in the resting condition were measured. Then, manipulative isometric contraction exercise (5 sec duration) to the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle or the extensor indicis muscle was performed using Borg’s rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale of 15–17. The T2w-MR images were measured immediately after the exercise. [Results] T2w-MR image intensities increased significantly in the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle and the extensor indicis muscle after the exercise. However, the image intensities in the rest of the muscle did not change. [Conclusion] Using T2w-MR images, we could detect muscle activity in a deep muscle, the supinator muscle, and a small muscle, the extensor indicis muscle. These results also support the reliability of the manual muscle testing method. PMID:28356621

  5. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation.

  6. In situ muscle power differs without varying in vitro mechanical properties in two insect leg muscles innervated by the same motor neuron.

    PubMed

    Ahn, A N; Meijer, K; Full, R J

    2006-09-01

    The mechanical behavior of muscle during locomotion is often predicted by its anatomy, kinematics, activation pattern and contractile properties. The neuromuscular design of the cockroach leg provides a model system to examine these assumptions, because a single motor neuron innervates two extensor muscles operating at a single joint. Comparisons of the in situ measurements under in vivo running conditions of muscle 178 to a previously examined muscle (179) demonstrate that the same inputs (e.g. neural signal and kinematics) can result in different mechanical outputs. The same neural signal and kinematics, as determined during running, can result in different mechanical functions, even when the two anatomically similar muscles possess the same contraction kinetics, force-velocity properties and tetanic force-length properties. Although active shortening greatly depressed force under in vivo-like strain and stimulation conditions, force depression was similarly proportional to strain, similarly inversely proportional to stimulation level, and similarly independent of initial length and shortening velocity between the two muscles. Lastly, passive pre-stretch enhanced force similarly between the two muscles. The forces generated by the two muscles when stimulated with their in vivo pattern at lengths equal to or shorter than rest length differed, however. Overall, differences between the two muscles in their submaximal force-length relationships can account for up to 75% of the difference between the two muscles in peak force generated at short lengths observed during oscillatory contractions. Despite the fact that these muscles act at the same joint, are stimulated by the same motor neuron with an identical pattern, and possess many of the same in vitro mechanical properties, the mechanical outputs of two leg extensor muscles can be vastly different.

  7. JACKETED FUEL ELEMENTS FOR GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.; Wigner, E.P.; Creutz, E.C.

    1959-05-12

    Fuel elements for a heterogeneous, fluid cooled, graphite moderated reactor are described. The fuel elements are comprised of a body of natural uranium hermetically sealed in a jacket of corrosion resistant material. The jacket, which may be aluminum or some other material which is non-fissionable and of a type having a low neutron capture cross-section, acts as a barrier between the fissioning isotope and the coolant or moderator or both. The jacket minimizes the tendency of the moderator and coolant to become radioactive and/or contaminated by fission fragments from the fissioning isotope.

  8. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-12-15

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM.

  9. Return to Play After Soleus Muscle Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Pedret, Carles; Rodas, Gil; Balius, Ramon; Capdevila, Lluis; Bossy, Mireia; Vernooij, Robin W.M.; Alomar, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Soleus muscle injuries are common in different sports disciplines. The time required for recovery is often difficult to predict, and reinjury is common. The length of recovery time might be influenced by different variables, such as the involved part of the muscle. Hypothesis Injuries in the central aponeurosis have a worse prognosis than injuries of the lateral or medial aponeurosis as well as myofascial injuries. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A total of 61 high-level or professional athletes from several sports disciplines (soccer, tennis, track and field, basketball, triathlon, and field hockey) were reviewed prospectively to determine the recovery time for soleus muscle injuries. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation was performed on 44 soleus muscle injuries. The association between the different characteristics of the 5 typical muscle sites, including the anterior and posterior myofascial and the lateral, central, and medial aponeurosis disruption, as well as the injury recovery time, were determined. Recovery time was correlated with age, sport, extent of edema, volume, cross-sectional area, and retraction extension or gap. Results Of the 44 patients with muscle injuries who were analyzed, there were 32 (72.7%) strains affecting the myotendinous junction (MT) and 12 (23.7%) strains of the myofascial junction. There were 13 injuries involving the myotendinous medial (MTM), 7 affecting the MT central (MTC), 12 the MT lateral (MTL), 8 the myofascial anterior (MFA), and 4 the myofascial posterior (MFP). The median recovery time (±SD) for all injuries was 29.1 ± 18.8 days. There were no statistically significant differences between the myotendinous and myofascial injuries regarding recovery time. The site with the worst prognosis was the MTC aponeurosis, with a mean recovery time of 44.3 ± 23.0 days. The site with the best prognosis was the MTL, with a mean recovery time of 19.2 ± 13.5 days (P < .05). There

  10. A different role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor in the development and hypertrophy of plantaris muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Ogawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Ryo; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-02-01

    The role of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors in muscle development and hypertrophy remains unclear. This study was designed to reveal the effects that a loss of AT1 receptors has on skeletal muscle development and hypertrophy in mice. Eight-week-old male AT1a receptor knockout (AT1a(-/-)) mice were used for this experiment. The plantaris muscle to body weight ratio, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, and number of muscle fibers of AT1a(-/-) mice was significantly greater than wild type (WT) mice in the non-intervention condition. Next, the functional overload (OL) model was used to induce plantaris muscle hypertrophy by surgically removing the two triceps muscles consisting of the calf, soleus, and gastrocnemius muscles in mice. After 14 days of OL intervention, the plantaris muscle weight, the amount of fiber, and the fiber area increased. However, the magnitude of the increment of plantaris weight was not different between the two strains. Agtr1a mRNA expression did not change after OL in WT muscle. Actually, the Agt mRNA expression level of WT-OL was lower than WT-Control (C) muscle. An atrophy-related gene, atrogin-1 mRNA expression levels of AT1a(-/-)-C, WT-OL, and AT1a(-/-)-OL muscle were lower than that of WT-C muscle. Our findings suggest that AT1 receptor contributes to plantaris muscle development via atrogin-1 in mice.

  11. TMD Evolution at Moderate Hard Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Ted; Collins, John C.

    2016-01-01

    We summarize some of our recent work on non-perturbative transverse momentum dependent (TMD) evolution, emphasizing aspects that are necessary for dealing with moderately low scale processes like semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  12. Do Golgi tendon organs really inhibit muscle activity at high force levels to save muscles from injury, and adapt with strength training?

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Gordon

    2002-07-01

    Introductory textbooks commonly state that Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) are responsible for a reflex response that inhibits a muscle producing dangerously high tension (autogenic inhibition). Review of the relevant data from animal studies demonstrates that there is wide variability in the magnitude of, and even the presence of, GTO autogenic effects among locomotor hindlimb muscles, and that data on GTO effects under conditions of voluntary maximal muscle activation are lacking. A single available study on GTO function in humans, during a moderate contraction, surprisingly shows a reduction in autogenic inhibition during muscle-force production. Further, it is not possible to find experimental evidence supporting the idea that strength training may produce a decrease in GTO mediated autogenic inhibition, allowing greater muscle activation levels and hence greater force production.

  13. Artificial muscles based on synthetic dielectric elastomers.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qibing

    2009-01-01

    Acrylic copolymers, silicone, and thermoplastic block copolymers have been investigated as artificial muscles. These dielectric elastomers exhibit high actuation strain, pressure, and specific energy density when a high driving voltage is applied across the thin polymer films. I will discuss the chemical and processing aspects that are critical to achieving high actuation performance. One successful example is the highly prestrained acrylic elastomer. We have developed interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) in which the acrylic network is under high tension balanced by the compression of an additive network were investigated to further enhanced actuation performance. The IPN films at zero or nominal prestrain showed up to 300% actuation strain. The calculated values of maximum actuation energy density and electromechanical coupling factor are 3.5 J/g and 93.7%, respectively. Important actuators enabled by the IPN films and prestrained acrylic films will also be presented.

  14. Myopathic changes in murine skeletal muscle lacking synemin

    PubMed Central

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Muriel, Joaquin; O'Neill, Andrea; Desmond, Patrick F.; Lovering, Richard M.; Lund, Linda; Bond, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of striated muscle linked to intermediate filament (IF) proteins are associated with defects in the organization of the contractile apparatus and its links to costameres, which connect the sarcomeres to the cell membrane. Here we study the role in skeletal muscle of synemin, a type IV IF protein, by examining mice null for synemin (synm-null). Synm-null mice have a mild skeletal muscle phenotype. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscles show a significant decrease in mean fiber diameter, a decrease in twitch and tetanic force, and an increase in susceptibility to injury caused by lengthening contractions. Organization of proteins associated with the contractile apparatus and costameres is not significantly altered in the synm-null. Elastimetry of the sarcolemma and associated contractile apparatus in extensor digitorum longus myofibers reveals a reduction in tension consistent with an increase in sarcolemmal deformability. Although fatigue after repeated isometric contractions is more marked in TA muscles of synm-null mice, the ability of the mice to run uphill on a treadmill is similar to controls. Our results suggest that synemin contributes to linkage between costameres and the contractile apparatus and that the absence of synemin results in decreased fiber size and increased sarcolemmal deformability and susceptibility to injury. Thus synemin plays a moderate but distinct role in fast twitch skeletal muscle. PMID:25567810

  15. Muscle wasting in cancer.

    PubMed

    Johns, N; Stephens, N A; Fearon, K C H

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscle loss appears to be the most significant clinical event in cancer cachexia and is associated with a poor outcome. With regard to such muscle loss, despite extensive study in a range of models, there is ongoing debate as to whether a reduction in protein synthesis, an increase in degradation or a combination of both is the more relevant. Each model differs in terms of key mediators and the pathways activated in skeletal muscle. Certain models do suggest that decreased synthesis accompanied by enhanced protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) is important. Murine models tend to involve rapid development of cachexia and may represent more acute muscle atrophy rather than the chronic wasting observed in humans. There is a paucity of human data both at a basic descriptive level and at a molecular/mechanism level. Progress in treating the human form of cancer cachexia can only move forwards through carefully designed large randomised controlled clinical trials of specific therapies with validated biomarkers of relevance to underlying mechanisms. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  16. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  17. Mechanical properties of tendon and aponeurosis of human gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, T; Muraoka, T; Takeshita, D; Kawakami, Y; Hirano, Y; Fukunaga, T

    2001-05-01

    Load-strain characteristics of tendinous tissues (Achilles tendon and aponeurosis) were determined in vivo for human medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle. Seven male subjects exerted isometric plantar flexion torque while the elongation of tendinous tissues of MG was determined from the tendinous movements by using ultrasonography. The maximal strain of the Achilles tendon and aponeurosis, estimated separately from the elongation data, was 5.1 +/- 1.1 and 5.9 +/- 1.6%, respectively. There was no significant difference in strain between the Achilles tendon and aponeurosis. In addition, no significant difference in strain was observed between the proximal and distal regions of the aponeurosis. The results indicate that tendinous tissues of the MG are homogeneously stretched along their lengths by muscle contraction, which has functional implications for the operation of the human MG muscle-tendon unit in vivo.

  18. Moderators of Sexual Behavior in Gay Men

    PubMed Central

    Roloff, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated factors that might moderate the association between sexual behavior desires and sexual behavior enactments in gay men. Condom eschewal, number of STIs, HIV serostatus, age, and relationship status were each hypothesized to moderate this association. An Internet survey collected data from 219 self-identifying gay men. Results indicated that sexual behavior desires and enactments were highly correlated, and of the five moderators tested, four varied this association. Condom eschewers had a stronger association between desires and enactments than condom users. Gay men with fewer STIs/STDs (excluding HIV) also had a stronger association between the two variables. HIV serostatus did not exclusively moderate the association. Rather, a three-way interaction was produced such that HIV-positive men with STIs had a stronger association between sexual behavior desires and enactments than HIV-negative men with STIs. Finally, gay men in monogamous relationships were least likely to have their desires associated with enactments. Age was not found to be a significant moderator. Overall, we concluded the moderators representing sexual health and sexual health behaviors were most influential over the enactment of sexual behavior desires. PMID:18719988

  19. Elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittain, J. O.; Geslin, D.; Lei, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Materials were evaluated that could be used in manufacturing electrical resistance strain gages for static strain measurements at temperatures at or above 1273 K. Strain gage materials must have a characteristic response to strain, temperature and time that is reproducible or that varies in a predictable manner within specified limits. Several metallic alloys were evaluated, as well as a series of transition metal carbides, nitrides and silicides.

  20. The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Shane Q.

    2015-03-01

    Robotic orthoses have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. These orthoses must be characterized by the naturally safe, reliable, and controlled motion of a human therapist's muscles. Such characteristics are only possible in the natural kingdom through the pain sensing realized by the interaction of an intelligent nervous system and muscles' embedded sensing organs. McKibben fluidic muscles or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) are a popular orthosis actuator because of their inherent compliance, high force, and muscle-like load-displacement characteristics. However, the circular cross-section of PMA increases their profile. PMA are also notoriously unreliable and difficult to control, lacking the intelligent pain sensing systems of their biological muscle counterparts. Here the Peano fluidic muscle, a new low profile yet high-force soft actuator is introduced. This muscle is smart, featuring bioinspired embedded pressure and soft capacitive strain sensors. Given this pressure and strain feedback, experimental validation shows that a lumped parameter model based on the muscle geometry and material parameters can be used to predict its force for quasistatic motion with an average error of 10 - 15N. Combining this with a force threshold pain sensing algorithm sets a precedent for flexible orthosis actuation that uses embedded sensors to prevent damage to the actuator and its environment.

  1. Bioleaching of multiple metals from contaminated sediment by moderate thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Gan, Min; Jie, Shiqi; Li, Mingming; Zhu, Jianyu; Liu, Xinxing

    2015-08-15

    A moderately thermophilic consortium was applied in bioleaching multiple metals from contaminated sediment. The consortium got higher acidification and metals soubilization efficiency than that of the pure strains. The synergistic effect of the thermophilic consortium accelerated substrates utilization. The utilization of substrate started with sulfur in the early stage, and then the pH declined, giving rise to making use of the pyrite. Community dynamic showed that A. caldus was the predominant bacteria during the whole bioleaching process while the abundance of S. thermotolerans increased together with pyrite utilization. Solubilization efficiency of Zn, Cu, Mn and Cd reached 98%, 94%, 95%, and 89% respectively, while As, Hg, Pb was only 45%, 34%, 22%. Logistic model was used to simulate the bioleaching process, whose fitting degree was higher than 90%. Correlation analysis revealed that metal leaching was mainly an acid solubilization process. Fraction analysis revealed that metals decreased in mobility and bioavailability.

  2. Cross-Sectional Nakagami Images in Passive Stretches Reveal Damage of Injured Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Shung, K. Kirk; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strain is still awanting a noninvasive quantitatively diagnosis tool. High frequency ultrasound (HFU) improves image resolution for monitoring changes of tissue structures, but the biomechanical factors may influence ultrasonography during injury detection. We aim to illustrate the ultrasonic parameters to present the histological damage of overstretched muscle with the consideration of biomechanical factors. Gastrocnemius muscles from mice were assembled and ex vivo passive stretching was performed before or after injury. After injury, the muscle significantly decreased mechanical strength. Ultrasonic images were obtained by HFU at different deformations to scan in cross and longitudinal orientations of muscle. The ultrasonography was quantified by echogenicity and Nakagami parameters (NP) for structural evaluation and correlated with histological results. The injured muscle at its original length exhibited decreased echogenicity and NP from HFU images. Cross-sectional ultrasonography revealed a loss of correlation between NP and passive muscle stretching that suggested a special scatterer pattern in the cross section of injured muscle. The independence of NP during passive stretching of injured muscle was confirmed by histological findings in ruptured collagen fibers, decreased muscle density, and increased intermuscular fiber space. Thus, HFU analysis of NP in cross section represents muscle injury that may benefit the clinical diagnosis. PMID:27034946

  3. Cross-Sectional Nakagami Images in Passive Stretches Reveal Damage of Injured Muscles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Shung, K Kirk; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strain is still awanting a noninvasive quantitatively diagnosis tool. High frequency ultrasound (HFU) improves image resolution for monitoring changes of tissue structures, but the biomechanical factors may influence ultrasonography during injury detection. We aim to illustrate the ultrasonic parameters to present the histological damage of overstretched muscle with the consideration of biomechanical factors. Gastrocnemius muscles from mice were assembled and ex vivo passive stretching was performed before or after injury. After injury, the muscle significantly decreased mechanical strength. Ultrasonic images were obtained by HFU at different deformations to scan in cross and longitudinal orientations of muscle. The ultrasonography was quantified by echogenicity and Nakagami parameters (NP) for structural evaluation and correlated with histological results. The injured muscle at its original length exhibited decreased echogenicity and NP from HFU images. Cross-sectional ultrasonography revealed a loss of correlation between NP and passive muscle stretching that suggested a special scatterer pattern in the cross section of injured muscle. The independence of NP during passive stretching of injured muscle was confirmed by histological findings in ruptured collagen fibers, decreased muscle density, and increased intermuscular fiber space. Thus, HFU analysis of NP in cross section represents muscle injury that may benefit the clinical diagnosis.

  4. Computational Modelling and Movement Analysis of Hip Joint with Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswanto, W. A.; Yoon, C. C.; Salleh, S. Md.; Ngali, M. Z.; Yusup, Eliza M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the model of hip joint and the main muscles are modelled by finite elements. The parts included in the model are hip joint, hemi pelvis, gluteus maximus, quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior. The materials that used in these model are isotropic elastic, Mooney Rivlin and Neo-hookean. The hip resultant force of the normal gait and stair climbing are applied on the model of hip joint. The responses of displacement, stress and strain of the muscles are then recorded. FEBio non-linear solver for biomechanics is employed to conduct the simulation of the model of hip joint with muscles. The contact interfaces that used in this model are sliding contact and tied contact. From the analysis results, the gluteus maximus has the maximum displacement, stress and strain in the stair climbing. Quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior has the maximum displacement and strain in the normal gait however the maximum stress in the stair climbing. Besides that, the computational model of hip joint with muscles is produced for research and investigation platform. The model can be used as a visualization platform of hip joint.

  5. Which is the best indicator of muscle oxygen extraction during exercise using NIRS?: Evidence that HHb is not the candidate.

    PubMed

    Kime, Ryotaro; Fujioka, Masako; Osawa, Takuya; Takagi, Shun; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Osada, Takuya; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    Recently, deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb) has been used as one of the most popular indicators of muscle O2 extraction during exercise in the field of exercise physiology. However, HHb may not sufficiently represent muscle O2 extraction, as total hemoglobin (tHb) is not stable during exercise. The purpose of this study was to measure various muscle oxygenation signals during cycle exercise and clarify which is the best indicator of muscle O2 extraction during exercise using NIRS. Ten healthy men performed 6-min cycle exercise at both moderate and heavy work rates. Oxygenated hemoglobin (O2-Hb), HHb, tHb, and muscle tissue oxygen saturation (SmO2) were measured with near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy from the vastus lateralis muscle. Skin blood flow (sBF) was also monitored at a site close to the NIRS probe. During moderate exercise, tHb, O2-Hb, and SmO2 displayed progressive increases until the end of exercise. In contrast, HHb remained stable during moderate work rate. sBF remained stable during moderate exercise but showed a progressive decrease at heavy work rate. These results provide evidence that HHb may not sufficiently represent muscle O2 extraction since tHb is not stable during exercise and HHb is insensitive to exercise-induced hyperaemia.

  6. Probiotic Streptococcus thermophilus FP4 and Bifidobacterium breve BR03 Supplementation Attenuates Performance and Range-of-Motion Decrements Following Muscle Damaging Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Ralf; Purpura, Martin; Stone, Jason D.; Turner, Stephanie M.; Anzalone, Anthony J.; Eimerbrink, Micah J.; Pane, Marco; Amoruso, Angela; Rowlands, David S.; Oliver, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have immunomodulatory effects. However, little is known about the potential benefit of probiotics on the inflammation subsequent to strenuous exercise. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, crossover design separated by a 21-day washout, 15 healthy resistance-trained men ingested an encapsulated probiotic Streptococcus (S.) thermophilus FP4 and Bifidobacterium (B.) breve BR03 at 5 bn live cells (AFU) concentration each, or a placebo, daily for 3 weeks prior to muscle-damaging exercise (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02520583). Isometric strength, muscle soreness, range of motion and girth, and blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations were measured from pre- to 72 h post-exercise. Statistical analysis was via mixed models and magnitude-based inference to the standardized difference. Probiotic supplementation resulted in an overall decrease in circulating IL-6, which was sustained to 48 h post-exercise. In addition, probiotic supplementation likely enhanced isometric average peak torque production at 24 to 72 h into the recovery period following exercise (probiotic–placebo point effect ±90% CI: 24 h, 11% ± 7%; 48 h, 12% ± 18%; 72 h, 8% ± 8%). Probiotics also likely moderately increased resting arm angle at 24 h (2.4% ± 2.0%) and 48 h (1.9% ± 1.9%) following exercise, but effects on soreness and flexed arm angle and CK were unclear. These data suggest that dietary supplementation with probiotic strains S. thermophilus FP4 and B. breve BR03 attenuates performance decrements and muscle tension in the days following muscle-damaging exercise. PMID:27754427

  7. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Andrew G.; Lichtwark, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  8. Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Stager, Joel M; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    It is known that ambulatory exercises such as brisk walking and jogging are potent stimuli for improving aerobic capacity, but it is less understood whether ambulatory exercise can increase leg muscle size and function. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss whether or not ambulatory exercise elicits leg muscle hypertrophy in older adults. Daily ambulatory activity with moderate (>3 metabolic equivalents [METs], which is defined as the ratio of the work metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate) intensity estimated by accelerometer is positively correlated with lower body muscle size and function in older adults. Although there is conflicting data on the effects of short-term training, it is possible that relatively long periods of walking, jogging, or intermittent running for over half a year can increase leg muscle size among older adults. In addition, slow-walk training with a combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the blood flow restricted leg muscles. Competitive marathon running and regular high intensity distance running in young and middle-aged adults may not produce leg muscle hypertrophy due to insufficient recovery from the damaging running bout, although there have been no studies that have investigated the effects of running on leg muscle morphology in older subjects. It is clear that skeletal muscle hypertrophy can occur independently of exercise mode and load.

  9. Distribution of fibre types and fibre sizes in the tibialis cranialis muscle of beagle dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Newsholme, S J; Lexell, J; Downham, D Y

    1988-01-01

    The percentages of Type I muscle fibres were measured systematically in ATPase-stained, transverse cryostat sections of whole tibialis cranialis muscles from 8 young, adult beagles. The distance of the section from the origin of the muscle does not significantly affect the mean percentage. There are no identifiable differences in mean percentages between right and left muscles. Differences in mean percentages between individuals are significant when sexes are combined (P less than 0.01) and within sexes (males: P less than 0.01; females: P less than 0.05). Within sections, the percentage tends to be lowest at the superficial (craniolateral) border and to vary less from site to site deeper within the muscle. Fibre cross sectional areas were measured systematically in the same sections of the right muscle from 3 males and 3 females. Mean areas for each section were greater for Type II than for Type I fibres. Mean areas for each fibre-type varied moderately and non-systematically between the sample sites within sections. A needle biopsy taken from deep within this muscle should provide a more consistent and reliable estimate of fibre-type proportion in the whole muscle than a superficial specimen. Proportions are not affected by the distance of the sample site from the muscle origin, and left or right muscles are suitable for sequential samples. PMID:3253248

  10. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa.

  11. [Isolation and characteristic of a moderately halophilic bacterium accumulated ectoine as main compatible solute].

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Wang, Ting; Sun, Ji-Quan; Gu, Li-Feng; Li, Shun-Peng

    2005-12-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium(designated strain I15) was isolated from lawn soil. Based on the analysis of 16S rDNA (GenBank accession number DQ010162), morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain I15 was identified as Virgibacillus marismortuii. This strain was capable of growing under 0% approximately 25% NaCl, and exhibited an optimum NaCl concentration of 10% and an optimum temperature of 30 degrees C and an optimum pH of 7.5 - 8.0 for its growth, respectively. Under hyperosmotic stress, strain 115 accumulated ectoine as the main compatible solute. Under 15% NaCl conditions the intracellar ectoine can reach to 1.608 mmol/(g x cdw), accounted for 89.6% of the total compatible solutes. The biosynthesis of ectoine was under the control of osmotic, and the accumulated ectoine synthesized intraceilularly can released under hypoosmotic shocks and resynthesis under hyperosmotic shock rapidly.

  12. Hysteresis in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Jorgelina; Lynch, Stephen; Jones, David; Degens, Hans

    This paper presents examples of hysteresis from a broad range of scientific disciplines and demonstrates a variety of forms including clockwise, counterclockwise, butterfly, pinched and kiss-and-go, respectively. These examples include mechanical systems made up of springs and dampers which have been the main components of muscle models for nearly one hundred years. For the first time, as far as the authors are aware, hysteresis is demonstrated in single fibre muscle when subjected to both lengthening and shortening periodic contractions. The hysteresis observed in the experiments is of two forms. Without any relaxation at the end of lengthening or shortening, the hysteresis loop is a convex clockwise loop, whereas a concave clockwise hysteresis loop (labeled as kiss-and-go) is formed when the muscle is relaxed at the end of lengthening and shortening. This paper also presents a mathematical model which reproduces the hysteresis curves in the same form as the experimental data.

  13. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  14. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  15. Evaluation of a combination of continuum and truss finite elements in a model of passive and active muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, S; Halldin, P; Brolin, K

    2008-12-01

    The numerical method of finite elements (FE) is a powerful tool for analysing stresses and strains in the human body. One area of increasing interest is the skeletal musculature. This study evaluated modelling of skeletal muscle tissue using a combination of passive non-linear, viscoelastic solid elements and active Hill-type truss elements, the super-positioned muscle finite element (SMFE). The performance of the combined materials and elements was evaluated for eccentric motions by simulating a tensile experiment from a published study on a stimulated rabbit muscle including three different strain rates. It was also evaluated for isometric and concentric contractions. The resulting stress-strain curves had the same overall pattern as the experiments, with the main limitation being sensitivity to the active force-length relation. It was concluded that the SMFE could model active and passive muscle tissue at constant rate elongations for strains below failure, as well as isometric and concentric contractions.

  16. Smooth muscle BK channel activity influences blood pressure independent of vascular tone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Gregor; Faulhaber, Jörg; Seniuk, Anika; Ehmke, Heimo; Pongs, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is an important determinant of vascular tone and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Both activities depend on the ancillary BKβ1 subunit. To determine the significance of smooth muscle BK channel activity for blood pressure regulation, we investigated the potential link between changes in arterial tone and altered blood pressure in BKβ1 knockout (BKβ1−/−) mice from three different genetically defined strains. While vascular tone was consistently increased in all BKβ1−/− mice independent of genetic background, BKβ1−/− strains exhibited increased (strain A), unaltered (strain B) or decreased (strain C) mean arterial blood pressures compared to their corresponding BKβ1+/+ controls. In agreement with previous data on aldosterone regulation by renal/adrenal BK channel function, BKβ1−/− strain A mice have increased plasma aldosterone and increased blood pressure. Consistently, blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors by spironolactone treatment reversibly restored the elevated blood pressure to the BKβ1+/+ strain A level. In contrast, loss of BKβ1 did not affect plasma aldosterone in strain C mice. Smooth muscle-restricted restoration of BKβ1 expression increased blood pressure in BKβ1−/− strain C mice, implying that impaired smooth muscle BK channel activity lowers blood pressure in these animals. We conclude that BK channel activity directly affects vascular tone but influences blood pressure independent of this effect via different pathways. PMID:24687584

  17. Low Intensity Exercise Training Improves Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Potential

    PubMed Central

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Di Filippo, Ester S.; Mancinelli, Rosa; Doria, Christian; Rotini, Alessio; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether 12 days of low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude (598 m a.s.l.) improves skeletal muscle regeneration in sedentary adult women. Methods: Satellite cells were obtained from the vastus lateralis skeletal muscle of seven women before and after this exercise training at low altitude. They were investigated for differentiation aspects, superoxide anion production, antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial potential variation after a depolarizing insult, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, and micro (mi)RNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206). Results: In these myogenic populations of adult stem cells, those obtained after exercise training, showed increased Fusion Index and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. This exercise training also generally reduced superoxide anion production in cells (by 12–67%), although not in two women, where there was an increase of ~15% along with a reduced superoxide dismutase activity. miRNA expression showed an exercise-induced epigenetic transcription profile that was specific according to the reduced or increased superoxide anion production of the cells. Conclusions: The present study shows that low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude improves the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult women. The differentiation of cells was favored by increased intracellular calcium concentration and increased the fusion index. This low-to-moderate training at low altitude also depicted the epigenetic signature of cells. PMID:26733888

  18. MUSCLE INJURY – PHYSIOPATHOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Pedrinelli, André; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue has the largest mass in the human body, accounting for 45% of the total weight. Muscle injuries can be caused by bruising, stretching or laceration. The current classification divides such injuries into mild, moderate and severe. The signs and symptoms of grade I lesions are edema and discomfort; grade II, loss of function, gaps and possible ecchymosis; and grade III, complete rupture, severe pain and extensive hematoma. The diagnosis can be confirmed by: ultrasound, which is dynamic and cheap, but examiner dependent; and tomography or magnetic resonance, which gives better anatomical definition, but is static. Initial phase of the treatment can be summarized as the “PRICE” protocol. NSAIDs, ultrasound therapy, strengthening and stretching after the initial phase and range of motion without pain are used in clinical treatment. On the other hand, surgery has precise indications: hematoma drainage and muscle-tendon reinsertion and reinforcement. PMID:27047816

  19. [Bioelectric activity of paravertebral muscles in experimental scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, G I; Popov, S V

    1976-12-01

    The paper is concerned with a study of the bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles in 2 groups of rabbits with differently expressed degrees of experimental scoliosis and in a control group of intact animals. The results demonstrated an asymmetry in the tonic bioelectric activity in the paravertebral muscles in scoliosis, unlike the reactions of the control group of animals. The character of asymmetry depends upon the degree of deformation: in cases of moderately expressed scoliosis there is a prevalence of the tonic bioelectric activity on the level of the basic arc of distortion on the side of the concavity; in severely expressed scoliosis the tonic bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles on the concave side appears to be less than on the convex side. An asymmetry of the tonic activity takes place on the level of compensatory arcs as well. The authors come to the conclusion on the pathogenetical role of the muscular dysbalance in the genesis of scoliotic deformation.

  20. Imaging of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Douglas W

    2011-05-01

    Various diagnostic imaging techniques such as sonography, computed tomography, scintigraphy, radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have made possible the noninvasive evaluation of skeletal muscle injury and disease. Although these different modalities have roles to play, MRI is especially sensitive in the diagnosis of muscle disorders and injury and has proved to be useful in determining the extent of disease, in directing interventions, and in monitoring the response to therapies. This article describes how magnetic resonance images are formed and how the signal intensities in T1- and T2-weighted images may be used for diagnosis of the above-mentioned conditions and injuries.

  1. Physical Rehabilitation Improves Muscle Function Following Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    diabetes ) conditions [17,18]. For acute muscle injuries, it has been shown to accelerate muscle healing/ regeneration by modulating the immune response...The foot of the animal was strapped to a footplate attached to a dual-mode muscle lever system (Aurora Scientific Inc., ON, Canada), and the knee and...Combination of exercise training and diet restriction normalizes limited exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function in diet-induced diabetic mice

  2. Role of the pelvic floor in bladder neck opening and closure I: muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Petros, P E; Ulmsten, U

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the striated muscle forces hypothesized to assist bladder neck opening and closure in females. Cadaveric dissection was used to identify the levator plate (LP), the anterior portion of pubococcygeus muscle (PCM), the longitudinal muscle of the anus (LMA), and their relation to the bladder, vagina and rectum. X-ray video recordings were made during coughing, straining, squeezing and micturition in a group of 20 incontinent patients and 4 controls, along with surface EMG, urethral pressure and digital palpation studies. During effort, urethral closure appeared to be activated by a forward muscle force corresponding to PCM, and bladder neck closure by backward muscle forces corresponding to LP and LMA. During micturition the PCM force appeared to relax, allowing LP and LMA to pull open the outflow tract. The data appear to support the hypothesis of specific directional muscle forces stretching the vagina to assist bladder neck opening and closure.

  3. Electroactive Polymers (EAP) as Artificial Muscles: Reality and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2003-04-30

    Human with bionic muscles is synonymous with science fiction or a superhuman actor in a TV series. With bionic muscles, the character is portrayed as capable of strength and speeds that are far superior to human. Recent development in EAP with large electrically induced strain may one day be used to make such bionics possible. Meanwhile, as this technology evolves novel mechanisms that are biologically inspired are starting to emerge, where EAP materials are providing actuation with lifelike response and more flexible configurations. Even though the actuation force and robustness require further improvement, there have been already several reported successes. In this seminar the current and future efforts will be reviewed.

  4. Strain powered antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, John P.; Carman, Greg P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of strain powered antennas that radiate electromagnetic energy by mechanically vibrating a piezoelectric or piezomagnetic material. A closed form analytic model of electromagnetic radiation from a strain powered electrically small antenna is derived and analyzed. Fundamental scaling laws and the frequency dependence of strain powered antennas are discussed. The radiation efficiency of strain powered electrically small antennas is contrasted with a conventional electric dipole. Analytical results show that operating at the first mechanical resonance produces the most efficient strain powered radiation relative to electric dipole antennas. A resonant analysis is exploited to determine the material property space that produces efficient strain powered antennas. These results show how a properly designed strain powered antenna can radiate more efficiently than an equally sized electric dipole antenna.

  5. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Designed biomaterials to mimic the mechanical properties of muscles.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shanshan; Dudek, Daniel M; Cao, Yi; Balamurali, M M; Gosline, John; Li, Hongbin

    2010-05-06

    The passive elasticity of muscle is largely governed by the I-band part of the giant muscle protein titin, a complex molecular spring composed of a series of individually folded immunoglobulin-like domains as well as largely unstructured unique sequences. These mechanical elements have distinct mechanical properties, and when combined, they provide the desired passive elastic properties of muscle, which are a unique combination of strength, extensibility and resilience. Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies demonstrated that the macroscopic behaviour of titin in intact myofibrils can be reconstituted by combining the mechanical properties of these mechanical elements measured at the single-molecule level. Here we report artificial elastomeric proteins that mimic the molecular architecture of titin through the combination of well-characterized protein domains GB1 and resilin. We show that these artificial elastomeric proteins can be photochemically crosslinked and cast into solid biomaterials. These biomaterials behave as rubber-like materials showing high resilience at low strain and as shock-absorber-like materials at high strain by effectively dissipating energy. These properties are comparable to the passive elastic properties of muscles within the physiological range of sarcomere length and so these materials represent a new muscle-mimetic biomaterial. The mechanical properties of these biomaterials can be fine-tuned by adjusting the composition of the elastomeric proteins, providing the opportunity to develop biomaterials that are mimetic of different types of muscles. We anticipate that these biomaterials will find applications in tissue engineering as scaffold and matrix for artificial muscles.

  7. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

    PubMed Central

    Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-01-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood. PMID:25121012

  8. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).

    PubMed

    Veqar, Zubia; Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-06-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood.

  9. Complete genome analysis of Sulfobacillus acidophilus strain TPY, isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Chen, Yaping; Liu, Qian; Hu, Songnian; Chen, Xinhua

    2011-10-01

    Sulfobacillus acidophilus strain TPY is a moderately thermoacidophilic bacterium originally isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean. Ferrous iron and sulfur oxidation in acidic environments in strain TPY have been confirmed. Here we report the genome sequence and annotation of the strain TPY, which is the first complete genome of Sulfobacillus acidophilus.

  10. Preferential Type II Muscle Fiber Damage From Plyometric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W.; Myburgh, Kathryn H.

    2012-01-01

    Context Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. Objective To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Intervention(s) Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Main Outcome Measure(s) Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Results Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). Conclusions We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle

  11. Morphological adaptation and protein modulation of myotendinous junction following moderate aerobic training.

    PubMed

    Curzi, Davide; Baldassarri, Valentina; De Matteis, Rita; Salamanna, Francesca; Bolotta, Alessandra; Frizziero, Antonio; Fini, Milena; Marini, Marina; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Myotendinous junction is the muscle-tendon interface through which the contractile force can be transferred from myofibrils to the tendon extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, aerobic training can modify the distal myotendinous junction of rat gastrocnemius, increasing the contact area between tissues. The aim of this work is to investigate the correlation between morphological changes and protein modulation of the myotendinous junction following moderate training. For this reason, talin, vinculin and type IV collagen amount and spatial distribution were investigated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The images were then digitally analyzed by evaluating fluorescence intensity. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increased thickening of muscle basal lamina in the trained group (53.1 ± 0.4 nm) with respect to the control group (43.9 ± 0.3 nm), and morphological observation showed the presence of an electron-dense area in the exercised muscles, close to the myotendinous junction. Protein concentrations appeared significantly increased in the trained group (talin +22.2%; vinculin +22.8% and type IV collagen +11.8%) with respect to the control group. Therefore, our findings suggest that moderate aerobic training induces/causes morphological changes at the myotendinous junction, correlated to the synthesis of structural proteins of the muscular basal lamina and of the cytoskeleton.

  12. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  13. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Sabongi, João José; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Moraes, Daniel Vinhais

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found in 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series . PMID:27069404

  14. Active vs. inactive muscle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may lose 20 to 40 percent of their muscle -- and, along with it, their strength -- as they ... have found that a major reason people lose muscle is because they stop doing everyday activities that ...

  15. Food reinforcement and obesity. Psychological moderators.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Leonard H; Lin, Henry; Carr, Katelyn A; Fletcher, Kelly D

    2012-02-01

    The relative reinforcing value of food (RRV(food)) provides an index of the motivation to eat. Research has shown that RRV(food) is higher in obese individuals than their non-obese peers, is associated with greater energy intake, predicts weight gain and interacts with impulsivity to predict energy intake. This study was designed to determine whether dietary restraint, dietary disinhibition or hunger moderate the effect of RRV(food) on the weight status and energy intake in 273 adults of various body mass index (BMI) levels. Hierarchical regression was used to assess the independent effects of RRV(food) on BMI and energy intake, controlling for age, sex, income, education, minority status, and RRV(reading). Results showed that greater RRV(food), but not RRV(reading), was associated with greater BMI and energy intake. Dietary disinhibition and dietary restraint moderated the relationship between RRV(food) and BMI, with dietary disinhibition being a stronger moderator of this relationship (r(2)=0.20) than dietary restraint (r(2)=0.095). In addition, dietary disinhibition moderated the effect of RRV(food) on energy intake. These results replicate the importance of RRV(food) as a predictor of obesity, and show that psychological factors moderate the effect of food reinforcement on body weight and energy intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00962117.

  16. Muscle residual force enhancement: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Minozzo, Fábio Carderelli; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Muscle residual force enhancement has been observed in different muscle preparations for more than half a century. Nonetheless, its mechanism remains unclear; to date, there are three generally accepted hypotheses: 1) sarcomere length non-uniformity, 2) engagement of passive elements, and 3) an increased number of cross-bridges. The first hypothesis uses sarcomere non-homogeneity and instability to explain how “weak” sarcomeres would convey the higher tension generated by an enhanced overlap from “stronger” sarcomeres, allowing the whole system to produce higher forces than predicted by the force-length relationship; non-uniformity provides theoretical support for a large amount of the experimental data. The second hypothesis suggests that passive elements within the sarcomeres (i.e., titin) could gain strain upon calcium activation followed by stretch. Finally, the third hypothesis suggests that muscle stretch after activation would alter cross-bridge kinetics to increase the number of attached cross-bridges. Presently, we cannot completely rule out any of the three hypotheses. Different experimental results suggest that the mechanisms on which these three hypotheses are based could all coexist. PMID:23525326

  17. Moderately haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes in salt-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    It was found that the population density of actinomycetes in solonchaks and saline desert soils varied from hundreds to tens of thousands of colony-forming units (CFUs) per 1 g of soil depending on soil type and was by 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the number of mycelial bacteria in main soil types. Actinomycetes grow actively in saline soils, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m per 1 g of soil. Domination of moderately halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes, which grow well under 5% NaCl and pH 8-9, is a specific feature of actinomycetal complexes in saline soils. Representatives of Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera were found among the haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes. Micromonospores demonstrated lower (than streptomycetes) adaptability to high salt concentrations. Investigation of the phylogenetic position of isolated dominant haloalkaliphilic strains of streptomycetes performed on the basis of sequencing of the gene 16S rRNA enabled identifying these strains as Streptomyces pluricolorescens and S. prunicolor.

  18. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Sprains? Muscles contract and relax (almost like rubber bands) to help your body move. So a ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: rippling muscle disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... C. Mutations in CAV3 cause mechanical hyperirritability of skeletal muscle in rippling muscle disease. Nat Genet. 2001 Jul; ... silent" action potentials in the tubular system of skeletal muscle fibers. Muscle Nerve. 2005 May;31(5):652- ...

  20. Effects of Acute Fatigue of the Hip Flexor Muscles on Hamstring Muscle Extensibility

    PubMed Central

    Arrabal-Campos, Francisco M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of acute fatigue of the hip flexor muscles on scores attained in tests frequently used in literature to measure hamstring muscle extensibility, namely the passive straight leg raise (PSLR), active straight leg raise (ASLR), passive knee extension (PKE), active knee extension (AKE), sit-and-reach (SR) and toe-touch (TT) tests. A total of seventy-five healthy and recreationally active adults voluntarily participated in this study. To reach fatigue, the participants actively lifted their legs alternately as many times as possible. In the passive tests, the results were 7.10 ± 5.21° and 5.68 ± 4.54° higher (p < 0.01) for PSLR and PKE tests, respectively, after acute fatigue. However, in the ASLR test, the results were lower post-fatigue than pre-fatigue (mean difference = -5.30° ± 9.51°; p < 0.01). The AKE, SR and TT tests did not show significant differences between pre- and post-fatigue (p > 0.05). Moderate (r = 0.40) to high (r = 0.97) correlation coefficients were found, which were statistically significant among all the measured flexibility tests both pre- and post-fatigue. In conclusion, the active implication of the hip flexor muscles until reaching fatigue had acute influences on the results of the PSLR, PKE and ASLR tests, but not on the results of the AKE, SR and TT tests. It is recommended to use the AKE test to assess hamstring muscle extensibility in situations where athletes show fatigue in their hip flexor muscles. PMID:28149407

  1. Volumetric muscle loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    muscles. Videos facilitate gait analysis and the evaluation of other functional movements.6 These im- ages can be added to the electronic medical record to...FL, August 16-19, 2010. 6. Brunnekreef JJ, van Uden CJ, van Moorsel S, Kooloos JG: Reliability of videotaped observational gait analysis in patients

  2. Sculpturing new muscle phenotypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babij, P.; Booth, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the pattern of muscle activity are followed by new patterns of protein synthesis, both in the contractile elements and in the enzymes of energy metabolism. Although the signal transducers have not been identified, techniques of molecular biology have clearly shown that the adaptive responses are the regulated consequence of differential gene expression.

  3. Baseline Muscle Mass Is a Poor Predictor of Functional Overload-Induced Gain in the Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Kilikevicius, Audrius; Bunger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas

    2016-01-01

    Genetic background contributes substantially to individual variability in muscle mass. Muscle hypertrophy in response to resistance training can also vary extensively. However, it is less clear if muscle mass at baseline is predictive of the hypertrophic response. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of genetic background on variability in muscle mass at baseline and in the adaptive response of the mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscles to overload. Males of eight laboratory mouse strains: C57BL/6J (B6, n = 17), BALB/cByJ (n = 7), DBA/2J (D2, n = 12), B6.A-(rs3676616-D10Utsw1)/Kjn (B6.A, n = 9), C57BL/6J-Chr10(A/J)/NaJ (B6.A10, n = 8), BEH+/+ (n = 11), BEH (n = 12), and DUHi (n = 12), were studied. Compensatory growth of soleus and plantaris muscles was triggered by a 4-week overload induced by synergist unilateral ablation. Muscle weight in the control leg (baseline) varied from 5.2 ± 07 mg soleus and 11.4 ± 1.3 mg plantaris in D2 mice to 18.0 ± 1.7 mg soleus in DUHi and 43.7 ± 2.6 mg plantaris in BEH (p < 0.001 for both muscles). In addition, soleus in the B6.A10 strain was ~40% larger (p < 0.001) compared to the B6. Functional overload increased muscle weight, however, the extent of gain was strain-dependent for both soleus (p < 0.01) and plantaris (p < 0.02) even after accounting for the baseline differences. For the soleus muscle, the BEH strain emerged as the least responsive, with a 1.3-fold increase, compared to a 1.7-fold gain in the most responsive D2 strain, and there was no difference in the gain between the B6.A10 and B6 strains. The BEH strain appeared the least responsive in the gain of plantaris as well, 1.3-fold, compared to ~1.5-fold gain in the remaining strains. We conclude that variation in muscle mass at baseline is not a reliable predictor of that in the overload-induced gain. This suggests that a different set of genes influence variability in muscle mass acquired in the process of normal development, growth, and maintenance, and

  4. Baseline Muscle Mass Is a Poor Predictor of Functional Overload-Induced Gain in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kilikevicius, Audrius; Bunger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas

    2016-01-01

    Genetic background contributes substantially to individual variability in muscle mass. Muscle hypertrophy in response to resistance training can also vary extensively. However, it is less clear if muscle mass at baseline is predictive of the hypertrophic response. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of genetic background on variability in muscle mass at baseline and in the adaptive response of the mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscles to overload. Males of eight laboratory mouse strains: C57BL/6J (B6, n = 17), BALB/cByJ (n = 7), DBA/2J (D2, n = 12), B6.A-(rs3676616-D10Utsw1)/Kjn (B6.A, n = 9), C57BL/6J-Chr10A/J/NaJ (B6.A10, n = 8), BEH+/+ (n = 11), BEH (n = 12), and DUHi (n = 12), were studied. Compensatory growth of soleus and plantaris muscles was triggered by a 4-week overload induced by synergist unilateral ablation. Muscle weight in the control leg (baseline) varied from 5.2 ± 07 mg soleus and 11.4 ± 1.3 mg plantaris in D2 mice to 18.0 ± 1.7 mg soleus in DUHi and 43.7 ± 2.6 mg plantaris in BEH (p < 0.001 for both muscles). In addition, soleus in the B6.A10 strain was ~40% larger (p < 0.001) compared to the B6. Functional overload increased muscle weight, however, the extent of gain was strain-dependent for both soleus (p < 0.01) and plantaris (p < 0.02) even after accounting for the baseline differences. For the soleus muscle, the BEH strain emerged as the least responsive, with a 1.3-fold increase, compared to a 1.7-fold gain in the most responsive D2 strain, and there was no difference in the gain between the B6.A10 and B6 strains. The BEH strain appeared the least responsive in the gain of plantaris as well, 1.3-fold, compared to ~1.5-fold gain in the remaining strains. We conclude that variation in muscle mass at baseline is not a reliable predictor of that in the overload-induced gain. This suggests that a different set of genes influence variability in muscle mass acquired in the process of normal development, growth, and maintenance, and

  5. Function of the medial red muscle during sustained swimming in common thresher sharks: contrast and convergence with thunniform swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Diego; Donley, Jeanine M; McGillivray, David G; Aalbers, Scott A; Syme, Douglas A; Sepulveda, Chugey

    2010-04-01

    Through convergent evolution tunas and lamnid sharks share thunniform swimming and a medial position of the red, aerobic swimming musculature. During continuous cruise swimming these muscles move uniformly out of phase with local body curvature and the surrounding white muscle tissue. This design results in thrust production primarily from the caudal fin rather than causing whole-body undulations. The common thresher shark (Family Alopiidae) is the only other fish known to share the same medial red muscle anatomy as the thunniform swimmers. However, the overall body shape and extremely heterocercal caudal fin of the common thresher is not shared with the thunniform swimmers, which have both fusiform bodies and high aspect-ratio, lunate caudal fins. Our study used sonomicrometry to measure the dynamics of red and white muscle movement in common thresher sharks swimming in the ocean to test whether the medial position of red muscle is associated with uncoupling of muscle shortening and local body bending as characteristic of thunniform swimmers. Common threshers ( approximately 60-100kg) instrumented with sonomicrometric and electromyographic (EMG) leads swam alongside of the vessel with a tail-beat frequency of approximately 0.5Hz. EMG signals confirmed that only the red muscle was active during sustained swimming. Despite the more medial position of the red muscle relative to the white muscle, its strain was approximately 1.5-times greater than that of the overlying white muscle, and there was a notable phase shift between strain trajectories in the red muscle and adjacent white muscle. These results suggest an uncoupling (shearing) of the red muscle from the adjacent white muscle. Although the magnitude of the phase shift between red and white muscle strain was relatively constant within individuals, it varied among sharks, ranging from near zero (red and white in phase) to almost 180 degrees out of phase. This extent in variability has not been documented

  6. The case for moderate gun control.

    PubMed

    DeGrazia, David

    2014-03-01

    In addressing the shape of appropriate gun policy, this essay assumes for the sake of discussion that there is a legal and moral right to private gun ownership. My thesis is that, against the background of this right, the most defensible policy approach in the United States would feature moderate gun control. The first section summarizes the American gun control status quo and characterizes what I call "moderate gun control." The next section states and rebuts six leading arguments against this general approach to gun policy. The section that follows presents a positive case for moderate gun control that emphasizes safety in the home and society as well as rights whose enforcement entails some limits or qualifications on the right to bear arms. A final section shows how the recommended gun regulations address legitimate purposes, rather than imposing arbitrary restrictions on gun rights, and offers concluding reflections.

  7. Bioreactors for guiding muscle tissue growth and development.

    PubMed

    Dennis, R G; Smith, B; Philp, A; Donnelly, K; Baar, K

    2009-01-01

    Muscle tissue bioreactors are devices which are employed to guide and monitor the development of engineered muscle tissue. These devices have a modern history that can be traced back more than a century, because the key elements of muscle tissue bioreactors have been studied for a very long time. These include barrier isolation and culture of cells, tissues and organs after isolation from a host organism; the provision of various stimuli intended to promote growth and maintain the muscle, such as electrical and mechanical stimulation; and the provision of a perfusate such as culture media or blood derived substances. An accurate appraisal of our current progress in the development of muscle bioreactors can only be made in the context of the history of this endeavor. Modern efforts tend to focus more upon the use of computer control and the application of mechanical strain as a stimulus, as well as substrate surface modifications to induce cellular organization at the early stages of culture of isolated muscle cells.

  8. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  9. Muscle MRI in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Evidence of a distinctive pattern.

    PubMed

    Polavarapu, Kiran; Manjunath, Mahadevappa; Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Sekar, Deepha; Vengalil, Seena; Thomas, PriyaTreesa; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of muscle involvement using MRI findings and correlate with functional as well as muscle strength measurements. Fifty genetically confirmed DMD children with a mean age of 7.6 ± 2.8 (4-15 years) underwent muscle MRI and qualitative assessment was done for muscle changes using Mercuri staging for fibro-fatty replacement on T1 sequence and Borsato score for myoedema on STIR sequence. Detailed phenotypic characterisation was done with Manual muscle testing (modified MRC grading) and Muscular Dystrophy Functional Rating Scale (MDFRS). Mercuri scoring showed severe fibro-fatty changes in Gluteus medius, minimus and Adductor magnus followed by moderate to severe changes in Gluteus maximus and Quadriceps muscles. Total sparing of Gracilis, Sartorius and Semimembranosus muscles was observed. Superficial posterior and lateral leg muscles were preferentially involved with sparing of deep posterior and anterior leg muscles. Myoedema showed significant inverse correlation with fatty infiltration in thigh muscles. Similarly, significant inverse correlation was observed between Mercuri scores and MRC grading as well as MDFRS scores. A direct linear correlation was observed between duration of illness and fibro-fatty changes in piriformis, quadriceps and superficial posterior leg muscles. There was no correlation between MRI findings and genotypic characteristics. However, this specific pattern of muscle involvement in MRI could aid in proceeding for genetic testing when clinical suspicion is high, thus reducing the need for muscle biopsy. Fibro fatty infiltration as measured by Mercuri scoring can be a useful marker for assessing the disease severity and progression.

  10. Nerve-muscle interactions during flight muscle development in Drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, J. J.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    During Drosophila pupal metamorphosis, the motoneurons and muscles differentiate synchronously, providing an opportunity for extensive intercellular regulation during synapse formation. We examined the existence of such interactions by developmentally delaying or permanently eliminating synaptic partners during the formation of indirect flight muscles. When we experimentally delayed muscle development, we found that although adult-specific primary motoneuron branching still occurred, the higher order (synaptic) branching was suspended until the delayed muscle fibers reached a favourable developmental state. In reciprocal experiments we found that denervation caused a decrease in the myoblast pool. Furthermore, the formation of certain muscle fibers (dorsoventral muscles) was specifically blocked. Exceptions were the adult muscles that use larval muscle fibers as myoblast fusion targets (dorsal longitudinal muscles). However, when these muscles were experimentally compelled to develop without their larval precursors, they showed an absolute dependence on the motoneurons for their formation. These data show that the size of the myoblast pool and early events in fiber formation depend on the presence of the nerve, and that, conversely, peripheral arbor development and synaptogenesis is closely synchronized with the developmental state of the muscle.

  11. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  12. Requirement of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion for skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Qingnian; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-02-10

    Fusion of skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells is required for proper development and regeneration, however the significance of this process during adult muscle hypertrophy has not been explored. In response to muscle overload after synergist ablation in mice, we show that myomaker, a muscle specific membrane protein essential for myoblast fusion, is activated mainly in muscle progenitors and not myofibers. We rendered muscle progenitors fusion-incompetent through genetic deletion of myomaker in muscle stem cells and observed a complete reduction of overload-induced hypertrophy. This blunted hypertrophic response was associated with a reduction in Akt and p70s6k signaling and protein synthesis, suggesting a link between myonuclear accretion and activation of pro-hypertrophic pathways. Furthermore, fusion-incompetent muscle exhibited increased fibrosis after muscle overload, indicating a protective role for normal stem cell activity in reducing myofiber strain associated with hypertrophy. These findings reveal an essential contribution of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion during physiological adult muscle hypertrophy.

  13. Requirement of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion for skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Qingnian; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Fusion of skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells is required for proper development and regeneration, however the significance of this process during adult muscle hypertrophy has not been explored. In response to muscle overload after synergist ablation in mice, we show that myomaker, a muscle specific membrane protein essential for myoblast fusion, is activated mainly in muscle progenitors and not myofibers. We rendered muscle progenitors fusion-incompetent through genetic deletion of myomaker in muscle stem cells and observed a complete reduction of overload-induced hypertrophy. This blunted hypertrophic response was associated with a reduction in Akt and p70s6k signaling and protein synthesis, suggesting a link between myonuclear accretion and activation of pro-hypertrophic pathways. Furthermore, fusion-incompetent muscle exhibited increased fibrosis after muscle overload, indicating a protective role for normal stem cell activity in reducing myofiber strain associated with hypertrophy. These findings reveal an essential contribution of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion during physiological adult muscle hypertrophy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20007.001 PMID:28186492

  14. What's the Point of Moderation? A Discussion of the Purposes Achieved through Contemporary Moderation Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Sue; Hughes, Clair; Adie, Lenore

    2016-01-01

    An increasingly regulated higher education sector is renewing its attention to those activities referred to as "moderation" in its efforts to ensure that judgements of student achievement are based on appropriate standards. Moderation practices conducted throughout the assessment process can result in purposes identified as equity,…

  15. Microarray analysis reveals novel features of the muscle aging process in men and women.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Sartor, Maureen A; Nader, Gustavo A; Pistilli, Emidio E; Tanton, Leah; Lilly, Charles; Gutmann, Laurie; IglayReger, Heidi B; Visich, Paul S; Hoffman, Eric P; Gordon, Paul M

    2013-09-01

    To develop a global view of muscle transcriptional differences between older men and women and sex-specific aging, we obtained muscle biopsies from the biceps brachii of young and older men and women and profiled the whole-genome gene expression using microarray. A logistic regression-based method in combination with an intensity-based Bayesian moderated t test was used to identify significant sex- and aging-related gene functional groups. Our analysis revealed extensive sex differences in the muscle transcriptome of older individuals and different patterns of transcriptional changes with aging in men and women. In older women, we observed a coordinated transcriptional upregulation of immune activation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and lipids storage; and a downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function and muscle regeneration. The effect of aging results in sexual dimorphic alterations in the skeletal muscle transcriptome, which may modify the risk for developing musculoskeletal and metabolic diseases in men and women.

  16. Microarray Analysis Reveals Novel Features of the Muscle Aging Process in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    To develop a global view of muscle transcriptional differences between older men and women and sex-specific aging, we obtained muscle biopsies from the biceps brachii of young and older men and women and profiled the whole-genome gene expression using microarray. A logistic regression-based method in combination with an intensity-based Bayesian moderated t test was used to identify significant sex- and aging-related gene functional groups. Our analysis revealed extensive sex differences in the muscle transcriptome of older individuals and different patterns of transcriptional changes with aging in men and women. In older women, we observed a coordinated transcriptional upregulation of immune activation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and lipids storage; and a downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function and muscle regeneration. The effect of aging results in sexual dimorphic alterations in the skeletal muscle transcriptome, which may modify the risk for developing musculoskeletal and metabolic diseases in men and women. PMID:23418191

  17. Moderate alcohol consumption and cognitive risk

    PubMed Central

    Neafsey, Edward J; Collins, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed 143 papers that described the relationship between moderate drinking of alcohol and some aspect of cognition. Two types of papers were found: (1) those that provided ratios of risk between drinkers and nondrinkers (74 papers in total) and (2) those that, although they did not provide such ratios, allowed cognition in drinkers to be rated as “better,” “no different,” or “worse” than cognition in nondrinkers (69 papers in total). The history of research on moderate drinking and cognition can be divided into two eras: 1977–1997 and 1998–present. Phase I (1977–1997) was the era of neuropsychological evaluation involving mostly young to middle-aged (18–50 years old) subjects. Although initial studies indicated moderate drinking impaired cognition, many later studies failed to confirm this, instead finding no difference in cognition between drinkers and nondrinkers. Phase II (1998–present) was and is the era of mental status exam evaluation involving mostly older (≥55 years old) subjects. These studies overwhelmingly found that moderate drinking either reduced or had no effect on the risk of dementia or cognitive impairment. When all the ratios of risk from all the studies in phase II providing such ratios are entered into a comprehensive meta-analysis, the average ratio of risk for cognitive risk (dementia or cognitive impairment/decline) associated with moderate “social” (not alcoholic) drinking of alcohol is 0.77, with nondrinkers as the reference group. The benefit of moderate drinking applied to all forms of dementia (dementia unspecified, Alzheimer’s disease, and vascular dementia) and to cognitive impairment (low test scores), but no significant benefit against cognitive decline (rate of decline in test scores) was found. Both light and moderate drinking provided a similar benefit, but heavy drinking was associated with nonsignificantly higher cognitive risk for dementia and cognitive impairment. Although the meta

  18. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  19. Differentiation rather than aging of muscle stem cells abolishes their telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Matthew S.; Carlson, Morgan E.; Conboy, Irina M.

    2009-01-01

    A general feature of stem cells is the ability to routinely proliferate in order to build, maintain, and repair organ systems. Accordingly, embryonic and germline, as well as some adult stem cells, produce the telomerase enzyme at various levels of expression. Our results show that, while muscle is a largely post-mitotic tissue, the muscle stem cells (satellite cells) that maintain this biological system throughout adult life do indeed display robust telomerase activity. Conversely, primary myoblasts (the immediate progeny of satellite cells) quickly and dramatically down-regulate telomerase activity. This work thus suggests that satellite cells, and early transient myoblasts, may be more promising therapeutic candidates for regenerative medicine than traditionally utilized myoblast cultures. Muscle atrophy accompanies human aging, and satellite cells endogenous to aged muscle can be triggered to regenerate old tissue by exogenous molecular cues. Therefore, we also examined whether these aged muscle stem cells would produce tissue that is “young” with respect to telomere maintenance. Interestingly, this work shows that the telomerase activity in muscle stem cells is largely retained into old age wintin inbred “long” telomere mice and in wild-derived short telomere mouse strains, and that age-specific telomere shortening is undetectable in the old differentiated muscle fibers of either strain. Summarily, this work establishes that young and old muscle stem cells, but not necessarily their progeny, myoblasts, are likely to produce tissue with normal telomere maintenance when used in molecular and regenerative medicine approaches for tissue repair. PMID:19455648

  20. Congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    We report two patients, one with congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles and one with absence of the medial rectus muscles; in addition, one of them had absence of the lateral rectus muscles. While absence of the superior oblique and superior rectus has been more commonly reported in literature, especially with craniofacial syndromes, our patients were nonsyndromic. Considering the risk of anterior segment ischemia, correction of the large-angle exotropia was performed by horizontal rectus muscle surgery where possible, along with transfer of the superior oblique tendon to the superior part of the normal medial rectus muscle insertion area to create a tethering effect with a good outcome. PMID:28300745

  1. Iliopsoas muscle injury in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cabon, Quentin; Bolliger, Christian

    2013-05-01

    The iliopsoas muscle is formed by the psoas major and iliacus muscles. Due to its length and diameter, the iliopsoas muscle is an important flexor and stabilizer of the hip joint and the vertebral column. Traumatic acute and chronic myopathies of the iliopsoas muscle are commonly diagnosed by digital palpation during the orthopedic examination. Clinical presentations range from gait abnormalities, lameness, and decreased hip joint extension to irreversible fibrotic contracture of the muscle. Rehabilitation of canine patients has to take into account the inciting cause, the severity of pathology and the presence of muscular imbalances.

  2. Strain sensor comprising a strain sensitive, two-mode optical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strain sensor uses an optical fiber including a strain sensitive portion and at least one strain insensitive portion. The strain sensitive portion is mounted on the surface of a structure at a location where a strain is desired to be measured. The strain insensitive portion(s) may be fused to the strain sensitive portion to transmit light therethrough, so that the resulting pattern may be detected to determine the amount of strain by comparison with a similar fiber not subjected to strain, or with the light pattern produced when the fiber is not under strain.

  3. Correlation between architectural variables and torque in the erector spinae muscle during maximal isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study analysed whether a significant relationship exists between the torque and muscle thickness and pennation angle of the erector spinae muscle during a maximal isometric lumbar extension with the lumbar spine in neutral position. This was a cross-sectional study in which 46 healthy adults performed three repetitions for 5 s of maximal isometric lumbar extension with rests of 90 s. During the lumbar extensions, bilateral ultrasound images of the erector spinae muscle (to measure pennation angle and muscle thickness) and torque were acquired. Reliability test analysis calculating the internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the measure, correlation between pennation angle, muscle thickness and torque extensions were examined. Through a linear regression the contribution of each independent variable (muscle thickness and pennation angle) to the variation of the dependent variable (torque) was calculated. The results of the reliability test were: 0.976-0.979 (pennation angle), 0.980-0.980 (muscle thickness) and 0.994 (torque). The results show that pennation angle and muscle thickness were significantly related to each other with a range between 0.295 and 0.762. In addition, multiple regression analysis showed that the two variables considered in this study explained 68% of the variance in the torque. Pennation angle and muscle thickness have a moderate impact on the variance exerted on the torque during a maximal isometric lumbar extension with the lumbar spine in neutral position.

  4. Differential RNA Expression Profile of Skeletal Muscle Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Henry J.; Himuro, Keiichi; Alshaikh, Jumana; Gong, Bendi; Cheng, Georgiana; Kusner, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    The differential susceptibility of skeletal muscle by myasthenia gravis (MG) is not well understood. We utilized RNA expression profiling of extraocular muscle (EOM), diaphragm (DIA), and extensor digitorum (EDL) of rats with experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) to evaluate the hypothesis that muscles respond differentially to injury produced by EAMG. EAMG was induced in female Lewis rats by immunization with acetylcholine receptor purified from the electric organ of the Torpedo. Six weeks later after rats had developed weakness and serum antibodies directed against the AChR, animals underwent euthanasia and RNA profiling performed on DIA, EDL, and EOM. Profiling results were validated by qPCR. Across the three muscles between the experiment and control groups, 359 probes (1.16%) with greater than 2-fold changes in expression in 7 of 9 series pairwise comparisons from 31,090 probes were identified with approximately two-thirds being increased. The three muscles shared 16 genes with increased expression and 6 reduced expression. Functional annotation demonstrated that these common expression changes fell predominantly into categories of metabolism, stress response, and signaling. Evaluation of specific gene function indicated that EAMG led to a change to oxidative metabolism. Genes related to muscle regeneration and suppression of immune response were activated. Evidence of a differential immune response among muscles was not evident. Each muscle had a distinct RNA profile but with commonality in gene categories expressed that are focused on muscle repair, moderation of inflammation, and oxidative metabolism. PMID:27891095

  5. An Embryonic Myosin Isoform Enables Stretch Activation and Cyclical Power in Drosophila Jump Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cuiping; Swank, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism behind stretch activation (SA), a mechanical property that increases muscle force and oscillatory power generation, is not known. We used Drosophila transgenic techniques and our new muscle preparation, the jump muscle, to determine if myosin heavy chain isoforms influence the magnitude and rate of SA force generation. We found that Drosophila jump muscles show very low SA force and cannot produce positive power under oscillatory conditions at pCa 5.0. However, we transformed the jump muscle to be moderately stretch-activatable by replacing its myosin isoform with an embryonic isoform (EMB). Expressing EMB, jump muscle SA force increased by 163% and it generated net positive power. The rate of SA force development decreased by 58% with EMB expression. Power generation is Pi dependent as >4 mM Pi was required for positive power from EMB. Pi increased EMB SA force, but not wild-type SA force. Our data suggest that when muscle expressing EMB is stretched, EMB is more easily driven backward to a weakly bound state than wild-type jump muscle. This increases the number of myosin heads available to rapidly bind to actin and contribute to SA force generation. We conclude that myosin heavy chain isoforms influence both SA kinetics and SA force, which can determine if a muscle is capable of generating oscillatory power at a fixed calcium concentration. PMID:23790374

  6. Work and women's well-being: religion and age as moderators.

    PubMed

    Noor, Noraini M

    2008-12-01

    Religion has been found to moderate the stress-strain relationship. This moderator role, however, may be dependent on age. The present study tested for the three-way interaction between work experience, age, and religiosity in the prediction of women's well-being, and predicted that work experience and religiosity will combine additively in older women, while in younger women religiosity is predicted to moderate the relationship between work experience and well-being. In a sample of 389 married Malay Muslim women, results of the regression analyses showed significant three-way interactions between work experience, age, and religiosity in the prediction of well-being (measured by distress symptoms and life satisfaction). While in younger women the results were in line with the predictions made, in the older women, both additive and moderator effects of religiosity were observed, depending on the well-being measures used. These results are discussed in relation to the literature on work and family, with specific reference to women's age, religion, as well as the issue of stress-strain specificity.

  7. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A strain transducer system and process for making the same is disclosed. A beryllium copper ring having four strain gages is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to the output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with strain on the surface causing bending of a ring which provides an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface strain. A photographic pattern of a one half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium copper for chem-mill etch formation is illustrated.

  8. Peak power of muscles injured by lengthening contractions.

    PubMed

    Widrick, Jeffrey J; Barker, Tyler

    2006-10-01

    Excessive or extreme lengthening contractions have a well-characterized depressive effect on skeletal muscle isometric force. In addition to producing force, active muscles must often shorten in order to meet the power requirements of locomotion and other physical activities. However, the impact of lengthening contractions on muscle power is poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of 20 isometric contractions or 20 lengthening contractions (20% strain at 1.5 fiber lengths/s) on the force-velocity-power relationships of mouse soleus muscles in vitro at 35 degrees C. Pre- and posttreatment data were obtained as the muscles shortened through their optimal length (Lo). The isometric treatment did not alter Lo, the curvature of the force-velocity relationship (a/Po), or soleus maximal shortening velocity (Vmax), whereas peak force (Po) displayed a slow, time-dependent decline of 10% across the experiments. Following the lengthening treatment, Lo increased by 6%, a/Po increased by 22%, and Vmax and Po fell by 24% and 26%, respectively. Under optimal conditions for producing power, muscles damaged by lengthening contractions attained 22% less force and shortened 20% more slowly than before damage. Consequently, soleus peak power fell 37% after lengthening, a 2.5-fold greater decline than noted for the isometric treatment. Under the conditions studied here, the excessive power loss following lengthening contractions was due to force and velocity deficits of approximately equal relative magnitude. Because power represents the ability of the muscle to perform work, reductions in both force and shortening velocity should be considered when evaluating and treating lengthening-induced skeletal muscle injuries.

  9. Children's Appraisal of Moderately Stressful Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Brianne; Power, Thomas; Hill, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated 2 questions: (1) do children show consistent styles of appraisal across a range of moderately stressful events?, and (2) what are the adjustment and parenting correlates of individual differences in children's appraisal style? Ninety-nine 3rd though 5th grade children and their mothers participated. For each of 6 vignettes…

  10. Detecting radiation reaction at moderate laser intensities.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Thomas; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Bulanov, Stepan S; Rykovanov, Sergey; Schroeder, Carl B; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new method of detecting radiation reaction effects in the motion of particles subjected to laser pulses of moderate intensity and long duration. The effect becomes sizable for particles that gain almost no energy through the interaction with the laser pulse. Hence, there are regions of parameter space in which radiation reaction is actually the dominant influence on charged particle motion.

  11. Subtle Cognitive Effects of Moderate Hypoxia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    difference in word fluency, word association, or lateralized lexical decision performances. In addition, Schlaepfer, Bartsch, and Fisch (1992...12,000 and 15,000 feet. Schlaepfer, T. E., Bartsch, P., & Fisch , H. U. 1992. Paradoxical effects of mild hypoxia and moderate altitude on human

  12. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  13. English Teachers' Moderating and Participating in OCPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan; Mayora, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Online Communities of Practice (OCPs) are among the most accessible tools for EFL/ESL teachers' co-construction of knowledge and self-directed learning. Despite the welcomed proliferation of EFL/ESL teachers' OCPs, concomitant research on collaboration is noticeably lagging behind. The present paper is just a preliminary look at moderation and…

  14. INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dale D.

    2008-01-01

    The intermediate filament (IF) network is one of the three cytoskeletal systems in smooth muscle. The type III IF proteins vimentin and desmin are major constituents of the network in smooth muscle cells and tissues. Lack of vimentin or desmin impairs contractile ability of various smooth muscle preparations, implying their important role for smooth muscle force development. The IF framework has long been viewed as a fixed cytostructure that solely provides mechanical integrity for the cell. However, recent studies suggest that the IF cytoskeleton is dynamic in mammalian cells in response to various external stimulation. In this review, the structure and biological properties of IF proteins in smooth muscle are summarized. The role of IF proteins in the modulation of smooth muscle force development and redistribution/translocation of signaling partners (such as p130 Crk-associated substrate, CAS) is depicted. This review also summarizes our latest understanding on how the IF network may be regulated in smooth muscle. PMID:18256275

  15. [Global therapeutic approach of muscle dysfunction in COPD].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Hernández, J

    2006-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive condition characterized by the presence of chronic obstruction and incomplete airflow reversibility. It is a disease with increasing prevalence and high sociosanitary cost. Hyponutrition and muscle dysfunction are two determinant factors of clinical severity and disease prognosis. The close relationship between weight loss or hyponutrition and mortality has been known for several years. Today we know that muscle mass is better predictor than weight of survival in patients with moderate to severe COPD. Several factors are implicated in the development of hyponutrition and deterioration of muscle structure and function. Slowing "muscle wasting" in COPD patients requires designing new integrated therapeutic strategies. Health care programs for COPD patients include multidisciplinary care of the main areas involved in the course of the disease. The main lines address: cigarette smoking cessation, pharmacotherapy, oxygen therapy, rehabilitation, nutritional support, surgery, travels, intercurrent periods, and palliative care. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) should be seen as part of a multidisciplinary program in individualized care of each COPD patient, aiming at optimizing his/her physical and social autonomy. Physical training, psychosocial intervention, patient education, and support groups for patients and relatives and friends, smoking cessation, oxygen therapy, appropriate oral feeding, and nutritional support are part of that therapeutic strategy allowing for an integral approach of muscle dysfunction in COPD patients.

  16. Muscle Activity During Unilateral vs. Bilateral Battle Rope Exercises.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Martin, Fernando; Colado, Juan C; Benítez, Josep C; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-10-01

    High training intensity is important for efficient strength gains. Although battle rope training is metabolically demanding, no studies have quantified intensity of muscle activity during this type of training. This study analyzes muscle activity during unilateral alternating waves vs. bilateral waves of battle rope training. Twenty-one volunteers participated in a repeated-measures study on 2 different occasions. Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from the anterior deltoid (AD), external oblique (OBLIQ), lumbar erector spinae (LUMB), and gluteus medius (GM) during bilateral waves and unilateral waves and were normalized to the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Results showed that muscle activity ranged from 51%MVIC to 73%MVIC for AD, OBLIQ, and LUMB, whereas GM muscle activity was only 14-18%MVIC. OBLIQ activation was significantly greater (20%MVIC; p = 0.02) with the unilateral waves compared with the bilateral waves, whereas LUMB signal was significantly higher (16%MVIC; p = 0.001) with the bilateral waves compared with the unilateral waves. In conclusion, both wave movements can be used to provide moderate to high levels of muscle activity in the AD, OBLIQ, and LUMB. Fitness practitioners aiming for higher OBLIQ activity should perform unilateral waves, whereas the bilateral variation of the movement can be used for higher LUMB activity.

  17. Muscle Pathology Grade for Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Shah, Bharati; Henderson, Don; van der Maarel, Silvere; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi

    2015-01-01

    Background As we move towards planning for clinical trials in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD), a better understanding of the clinical relationship with morphological changes in FSHD muscle biopsies will be important for stratifying patients and understanding post-therapeutic changes in muscle. Methods We performed a prospective cross-sectional study of quadriceps muscle biopsies in 74 genetically confirmed FSHD participants (64 FSHD1, 10 FSHD2). We compared a 12-point muscle pathology grade to genetic mutation, disease severity score, and quantitative myometry. Results Pathology grade had moderate correlations with genetic mutation (rho=−0.45, P<0.001), clinical severity score (rho=0.53, P<0.001), disease duration (rho=0.31, P=0.03), and quantitative myometry (rho=−0.47, P<0.001). We found no difference in the frequency of inflammation between FSHD types 1 and 2. Conclusions The pathology grade of quadriceps muscle may be a useful marker of disease activity in FSHD, and it may have a role in stratification for future clinical trials. PMID:25704033

  18. Immunomodulatory effects of massage on nonperturbed skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Waters-Banker, Christine; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2013-01-01

    Massage is an ancient manual therapy widely utilized by individuals seeking relief from various musculoskeletal maladies. Despite its popularity, the majority of evidence associated with massage benefits is anecdotal. Recent investigations have uncovered physiological evidence supporting its beneficial use following muscle injury; however, the effects of massage on healthy, unperturbed skeletal muscle are unknown. Utilizing a custom-fabricated massage mimetic device, the purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of various loading magnitudes on healthy skeletal muscle with particular interest in the gene expression profile and modulation of key immune cells involved in the inflammatory response. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (200 g) were subjected to cyclic compressive loading (CCL) over the right tibialis anterior muscle for 30 min, once a day, for 4 consecutive days using four loading conditions: control (0N), low load (1.4N), moderate load (4.5N), and high load (11N). Microarray analysis showed that genes involved with the immune response were the most significantly affected by application of CCL. Load-dependent changes in cellular abundance were seen in the CCL limb for CD68+ cells, CD163+ cells, and CD43+cells. Surprisingly, load-independent changes were also discovered in the non-CCL contralateral limb, suggesting a systemic response. These results show that massage in the form of CCL exerts an immunomodulatory response to uninjured skeletal muscle, which is dependent upon the applied load. PMID:24201707

  19. A comparative study of live attenuated F strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  20. Near complete genome sequence of Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Andrew; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Poole, Farris; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Elias, Dwayne A.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-05-05

    Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 is a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile isolated from the municipal sewage treatment plant in Athens, GA. We report the near-complete genome sequence of C. paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 obtained by using PacBio DNA sequencing and Pilon for sequence assembly refinement with Illumina data.

  1. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  2. Cold-moderator scattering kernel methods

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    An accurate representation of the scattering of neutrons by the materials used to build cold sources at neutron scattering facilities is important for the initial design and optimization of a cold source, and for the analysis of experimental results obtained using the cold source. In practice, this requires a good representation of the physics of scattering from the material, a method to convert this into observable quantities (such as scattering cross sections), and a method to use the results in a neutron transport code (such as the MCNP Monte Carlo code). At Los Alamos, the authors have been developing these capabilities over the last ten years. The final set of cold-moderator evaluations, together with evaluations for conventional moderator materials, was released in 1994. These materials have been processed into MCNP data files using the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Over the course of this work, they were able to develop a new module for NJOY called LEAPR based on the LEAP + ADDELT code from the UK as modified by D.J. Picton for cold-moderator calculations. Much of the physics for methane came from Picton`s work. The liquid hydrogen work was originally based on a code using the Young-Koppel approach that went through a number of hands in Europe (including Rolf Neef and Guy Robert). It was generalized and extended for LEAPR, and depends strongly on work by Keinert and Sax of the University of Stuttgart. Thus, their collection of cold-moderator scattering kernels is truly an international effort, and they are glad to be able to return the enhanced evaluations and processing techniques to the international community. In this paper, they give sections on the major cold moderator materials (namely, solid methane, liquid methane, and liquid hydrogen) using each section to introduce the relevant physics for that material and to show typical results.

  3. The effect of muscle activation on neck response.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Karin; Halldin, Peter; Leijonhufvud, Ingrid

    2005-03-01

    Prevention of neck injuries due to complex loading, such as occurs in traffic accidents, requires knowledge of neck injury mechanisms and tolerances. The influence of muscle activation on outcome of the injuries is not clearly understood. Numerical simulations of neck injury accidents can contribute to increase the understanding of injury tolerances. The finite element (FE) method is suitable because it gives data on stress and strain of individual tissues that can be used to predict injuries based on tissue level criteria. The aim of this study was to improve and validate an anatomically detailed FE model of the human cervical spine by implement neck musculature with passive and active material properties. Further, the effect of activation time and force on the stresses and strains in the cervical tissues were studied for dynamic loading due to frontal and lateral impacts. The FE model used includes the seven cervical vertebrae, the spinal ligaments, the facet joints with cartilage, the intervertebral disc, the skull base connected to a rigid head, and a spring element representation of the neck musculature. The passive muscle properties were defined with bilinear force-deformation curves and the active properties were defined using a material model based on the Hill equation. The FE model's responses were compared to volunteer experiments for frontal and lateral impacts of 15 and 7 g. Then, the active muscle properties where varied to study their effect on the motion of the skull, the stress level of the cortical and trabecular bone, and the strain of the ligaments. The FE model had a good correlation to the experimental motion corridors when the muscles activation was implemented. For the frontal impact a suitable peak muscle force was 40 N/cm2 whereas 20 N/cm2 was appropriate for the side impact. The stress levels in the cortical and trabecular bone were influenced by the point forces introduced by the muscle spring elements; therefore a more detailed model of

  4. Skeletal muscle adaptations and muscle genomics of performance horses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, José-Luis L; Hill, Emmeline W

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscles in horses are characterised by specific adaptations, which are the result of the natural evolution of the horse as a grazing animal, centuries of selective breeding and the adaptability of this tissue in response to training. These adaptations include an increased muscle mass relative to body weight, a great locomotor efficiency based upon an admirable muscle-tendon architectural design and an adaptable fibre-type composition with intrinsic shortening velocities greater than would be predicted from an animal of comparable body size. Furthermore, equine skeletal muscles have a high mitochondrial volume that permits a higher whole animal aerobic capacity, as well as large intramuscular stores of energy substrates (glycogen in particular). Finally, high buffer and lactate transport capacities preserve muscles against fatigue during anaerobic exercise. Many of these adaptations can improve with training. The publication of the equine genome sequence in 2009 has provided a major advance towards an improved understanding of equine muscle physiology. Equine muscle genomics studies have revealed a number of genes associated with elite physical performance and have also identified changes in structural and metabolic genes following exercise and training. Genes involved in muscle growth, muscle contraction and specific metabolic pathways have been found to be functionally relevant for the early performance evaluation of elite athletic horses. The candidate genes discussed in this review are important for a healthy individual to improve performance. However, muscle performance limiting conditions are widespread in horses and many of these conditions are also genetically influenced.

  5. Intense intermittent exercise provides weak stimulus for vascular endothelial growth factor secretion and capillary growth in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hoier, B; Passos, M; Bangsbo, J; Hellsten, Y

    2013-02-01

    The effect of acute intense intermittent exercise compared with moderate-intensity exercise on angiogenic factors and the effect of 4 weeks of intense intermittent training on capillary growth were examined in nine healthy young men, preconditioned by moderate-intensity endurance training. The intense training consisted of 24 bouts of 1 min cycling at an initial work rate of 316 ± 19 W (~117% of pretraining maximal oxygen uptake), performed three times per week. Skeletal muscle biopsies and muscle microdialysates were obtained from the vastus lateralis before, during and after acute exercise performed at either moderate or high intensity. Comparison of the response in angiogenic factors to acute moderate- versus high-intensity exercise, performed prior to the intense training intervention, revealed that intense exercise resulted in a markedly lower (~60%; P < 0.05) increase in interstitial vascular endothelial growth factor than did moderate-intensity exercise. Muscle interstitial fluid obtained during moderate-intensity exercise increased endothelial cell proliferation in vitro more than interstitial fluid obtained during intense exercise (sixfold versus 2.5-fold, respectively; P < 0.05). The 4 weeks of high-intensity training did not lead to an increased capillarization in the muscle but abolished the exercise-induced increase in mRNA for several angiogenic factors, increased the protein levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, lowered the protein levels of thrombospondin-1 in muscle but increased the interstitial protein levels of thrombospondin-1. We conclude that intense intermittent exercise provides a weak stimulus for vascular endothelial growth factor secretion and endothelial cell proliferation and that intense intermittent training does not induce a sufficient angiogenic stimulus to induce capillary growth in muscle previously conditioned by moderate-intensity exercise.

  6. Mechanotransduction in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical signals are critical to the development and maintenance of skeletal muscle, but the mechanisms that convert these shape changes to biochemical signals is not known. When a deformation is imposed on a muscle, changes in cellular and molecular conformations link the mechanical forces with biochemical signals, and the close integration of mechanical signals with electrical, metabolic, and hormonal signaling may disguise the aspect of the response that is specific to the mechanical forces. The mechanically induced conformational change may directly activate downstream signaling and may trigger messenger systems to activate signaling indirectly. Major effectors of mechanotransduction include the ubiquitous mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP) and phosphatidylinositol-3’ kinase (PI-3K), which have well described receptor dependent cascades, but the chain of events leading from mechanical stimulation to biochemical cascade is not clear. This review will discuss the mechanics of biological deformation, loading of cellular and molecular structures, and some of the principal signaling mechanisms associated with mechanotransduction. PMID:17127292

  7. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects.

  8. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  9. Reciprocal Relations among Job Demands, Job Control, and Social Support Are Moderated by Neuroticism: A Cross-Lagged Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cieslak, Roman; Knoll, Nina; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether neuroticism moderates the relations among social support (from coworkers and supervisors) and work strain characteristics (i.e. job demands and job control). A full cross-lagged panel analysis was used to test whether social support predicts job demands and control or whether job demands and job control predict…

  10. Complete genome sequence of the moderate thermophile Anaerobaculum mobile type strain (NGAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Stackebrandt, Erko; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobaculum mobile Menes and Muxi 2002 is one of three described species of the genus Anaerobaculum, family Synergistaceae, phylum Synergistetes. This anaerobic and motile bac- terium ferments a range of carbohydrates and mono- and dicarboxylic acids with acetate, hy- drogen and CO2 as end products. A. mobile NGAT is the first member of the genus Anaerobaculum and the sixth member of the phylum Synergistetes with a completely se- quenced genome. Here we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the com- plete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,160,700 bp long single replicon genome with its 2,053 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Self-Determination as a Moderator of Demands and Control: Implications for Employee Strain and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Stacey L.; Jimmieson, Nerina L.; Amiot, Catherine E.

    2010-01-01

    Does job control act as a stress-buffer when employees' type and level of work self-determination is taken into account? It was anticipated that job control would only be stress-buffering for employees high in self-determined and low in non-self-determined work motivation. In contrast, job control would be stress-exacerbating for employees who…

  12. Linear artificial molecular muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Flood, Amar H; Bonvallet, Paul A; Vignon, Scott A; Northrop, Brian H; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Jeppesen, Jan O; Huang, Tony J; Brough, Branden; Baller, Marko; Magonov, Sergei; Solares, Santiago D; Goddard, William A; Ho, Chih-Ming; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2005-07-13

    Two switchable, palindromically constituted bistable [3]rotaxanes have been designed and synthesized with a pair of mechanically mobile rings encircling a single dumbbell. These designs are reminiscent of a "molecular muscle" for the purposes of amplifying and harnessing molecular mechanical motions. The location of the two cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings can be controlled to be on either tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) or naphthalene (NP) stations, either chemically ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) or electrochemically (cyclic voltammetry), such that switching of inter-ring distances from 4.2 to 1.4 nm mimics the contraction and extension of skeletal muscle, albeit on a shorter length scale. Fast scan-rate cyclic voltammetry at low temperatures reveals stepwise oxidations and movements of one-half of the [3]rotaxane and then of the other, a process that appears to be concerted at room temperature. The active form of the bistable [3]rotaxane bears disulfide tethers attached covalently to both of the CBPQT(4+) ring components for the purpose of its self-assembly onto a gold surface. An array of flexible microcantilever beams, each coated on one side with a monolayer of 6 billion of the active bistable [3]rotaxane molecules, undergoes controllable and reversible bending up and down when it is exposed to the synchronous addition of aqueous chemical oxidants and reductants. The beam bending is correlated with flexing of the surface-bound molecular muscles, whereas a monolayer of the dumbbell alone is inactive under the same conditions. This observation supports the hypothesis that the cumulative nanoscale movements within surface-bound "molecular muscles" can be harnessed to perform larger-scale mechanical work.

  13. The effects of cutting or of stretching skeletal muscle in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seider, M. J.; Kapp, R.; Chen, C.-P.; Booth, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Skeletal muscle preparations using cut muscle fibers have often been used in studies of protein metabolism. The present paper reports an investigation of the effect of muscle cutting or stretching in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and/or degradation. Protein synthesis and content, and ATP and phosphocreatine levels were monitored in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from the rat with various extents of muscle fiber cuts and following stretching to about 120% the resting length. Rates of protein synthesis are found to be significantly lower and protein degradation higher in the cut muscles than in uncut controls, while ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations decreased. Stretched intact muscles, on the other hand, are observed to have higher concentrations of high-energy phosphates than unstretched muscles, while rates of protein degradation were not affected. Results thus demonstrate that the cutting of skeletal muscle fibers alters many aspects of muscle metabolism, and that moderate decreases in ATP concentration do not alter rates of protein concentration in intact muscles in vitro.

  14. Distribution of slow muscle fiber of muscle spindle in postnatal rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Iwao; Imura, Kosuke; Miwa, Yoko; Ide, Yoshiaki; Murata, Megumi; Sunohara, Masataka

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the properties of the muscle spindle in the masseter muscle at an immunohistochemical level in rats fed for 6 weeks. Slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were measured and intrafusal fibers in the muscle spindle were studied to determine the relationship between the superficial and deep regions of rat masseter muscle after alternated feeding pattern. However, muscle spindles were found in both regions, mainly in the deep region of the posterior superficial region of masseter muscle. The total number of the slow fiber in the intrafusal fiber and number of muscle spindle in the deep region were high from 5 to 8 weeks old in spite of various dimensions of data such as diameter and the compositions of the intrafusal fiber. The relationship of the protein expression of slow MyHC in the two regions at 5 weeks old reversed five weeks later (10 weeks old). This period is an important stage because the mastication system in masseter muscle with muscle spindle may be changed during the alternated feeding pattern of suckling to mastication. The changes may be a marker of the feeding system and of the control by the tension receptor of muscle spindle in this stage of masseter muscle after postnatal development.

  15. Differential muscle function between muscle synergists: long and lateral heads of the triceps in jumping and landing goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Lee, David V; Biewener, Andrew A

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how the biarticular long head and monoarticular lateral head of the triceps brachii function in goats (Capra hircus) during jumping and landing. Elbow moment and work were measured from high-speed video and ground reaction force (GRF) recordings. Muscle activation and strain were measured via electromyography and sonomicrometry, and muscle stress was estimated from elbow moment and by partitioning stress based on its relative strain rate. Elbow joint and muscle function were compared among three types of limb usage: jump take-off (lead limb), the step prior to jump take-off (lag limb), and landing. We predicted that the strain and work patterns in the monoarticular lateral head would follow the kinematics and work of the elbow more closely than would those of the biarticular long head. In general this prediction was supported. For instance, the lateral head stretched (5 +/- 2%; mean +/- SE) in the lead and lag limbs to absorb work during elbow flexion and joint work absorption, while the long head shortened (-7 +/- 1%) to produce work. During elbow extension, both muscles shortened by similar amounts (-10 +/- 2% long; -13 +/- 4% lateral) in the lead limb to produce work. Both triceps heads functioned similarly in landing, stretching (13 +/- 3% in the long head and 19 +/- 5% in the lateral) to absorb energy. In general, the long head functioned to produce power at the shoulder and elbow, while the lateral head functioned to resist elbow flexion and absorb work, demonstrating that functional diversification can arise between mono- and biarticular muscle agonists operating at the same joint.

  16. Mechanical strain isolator mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Gordon E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical strain. A mechanical strain isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical strain isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral strain in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the strain by bending in the direction of the strain. An axial strain on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the strain. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.

  17. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  18. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from mono lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, R A; Diaz, M R; Taylor, B F; Roberts, M F

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, Calif., an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress.

  19. MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle are common in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and share features with multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Howe, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction MRI of peripheral nerve and muscle in patients with ALS may be performed to investigate alternative diagnoses including multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). MRI findings of peripheral nerve and muscle are not well described in these conditions, making interpretation of results difficult. Methods We examined systematically the peripheral nerve and muscle MRI findings in patients with ALS (n=60) and MMN (n=8). Results In patients with ALS and MMN, abnormal MRIs were common (85% and 75%, respectively) but did not correlate with disease severity. Peripheral nerve MRI abnormalities were similar in frequency (ALS: 58% vs. MMN: 63%) with most changes being of mild-to-moderate severity. Muscle MRI changes were more common in ALS (57% vs. 33%), and no muscle atrophy was seen in patients with MMN. Discussion MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle in ALS and MMN are common and share some features. PMID:25736373

  20. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  1. Dynamic skeletal muscle stimulation and its potential in bone adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Y-X.; Lam, H.; Ferreri, S.; Rubin, C.

    2016-01-01

    To identify mechanotransductive signals for combating musculoskeletal deterioration, it is essential to determine the components and mechanisms critical to the anabolic processes of musculoskeletal tissues. It is hypothesized that the interaction between bone and muscle may depend on fluid exchange in these tissues by mechanical loading. It has been shown that intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia. Optimized MS signals, i.e., low-intensity and high frequency, may be critical in maintaining bone mass and mitigating muscle atrophy. The objectives for this review are to discuss the potential for MS to induce ImP and strains on bone, to regulate bone adaptation, and to identify optimized stimulation frequency in the loading regimen. The potential for MS to regulate blood and fluid flow will also be discussed. The results suggest that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics with minimal mechanical strain in bone. The response was shown to be dependent on loading frequency, serving as a critical mediator in mitigating bone loss. A specific regimen of dynamic MS may be optimized in vivo to attenuate disuse osteopenia and serve as a biomechanical intervention in the clinical setting. PMID:20190376

  2. [Delayed post effort muscle soreness].

    PubMed

    Coudreuse, J M; Dupont, P; Nicol, C

    2004-08-01

    Muscle intolerance to exercise may result from different processes. Diagnosis involves confirming first the source of pain, then potential pathological myalgia. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), commonly referred as tiredness, occurs frequently in sport. DOMS usually develops 12-48 h after intensive and/or unusual eccentric muscle action. Symptoms usually involve the quadriceps muscle group but may also affect the hamstring and triceps surae groups. The muscles are sensitive to palpation, contraction and passive stretch. Acidosis, muscle spasm and microlesions in both connective and muscle tissues may explain the symptoms. However, inflammation appears to be the most common explanation. Interestingly, there is strong evidence that the progression of the exercise-induced muscle injury proceeds no further in the absence of inflammation. Even though unpleasant, DOMS should not be considered as an indicator of muscle damage but, rather, a sign of the regenerative process, which is well known to contribute to the increased muscle mass. DOMS can be associated with decreased proprioception and range of motion, as well as maximal force and activation. DOMS disappears 2-10 days before complete functional recovery. This painless period is ripe for additional joint injuries. Similarly, if some treatments are well known to attenuate DOMS, none has been demonstrated to accelerate either structural or functional recovery. In terms of the role of the inflammatory process, these treatments might even delay overall recovery.

  3. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  4. Muscle UCP3 overexpression mimics endurance training and reduces circulating biomarkers of incomplete beta-oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise substantially improves metabolic health, making the elicited mechanisms important targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein highly selectively expressed in skeletal muscle. Here we report that only moderate UCP3 overexpre...

  5. Meta-analysis of relations of stress propensity with subjective stress and strain.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Jerry C

    2002-12-01

    Meta-analyses were used to examine relations of three factors of stress propensity, i.e., cognitive-affective connectivity, psychological magnification, and anger-irritability, with three stress criteria, i.e., subjective stress, psychological strain, and physiological strain. Each of the stress propensity factors was significantly related to each criterion. Sex was a significant moderator for two of these nine relations (cognitive-affective connectivity with subjective stress and anger-irritability with psychological strain).

  6. Similarity in Joint Function Limitation in Type 3 Von Willebrand Disease and Moderate Haemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Sood, S.L.; Cuker, A.; Wang, C.; Metjian, A.D.; Chiang, E.Y.; Soucie, J.M.; Konkle, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Type 3 von Willebrand Disease (VWD) is a rare bleeding diathesis with complete or near complete deficiency of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and low factor VIII (FVIII) levels. In contrast, only FVIII is decreased in haemophilia A (HA). Both disorders are complicated by arthropathy. Aim The purpose of this study was to further clarify the roles of FVIII and VWF: Antigen (VWF:Ag) in joint range of motion (ROM) loss over time. Methods We compared joint ROM loss and other bleeding manifestations in 100 Type 3 VWD subjects (FVIII≤5%) and 1814 moderate HA subjects (FVIII 1–5%) within the U.S. Universal Data Collection (UDC) database. Results High rates of bleeding were reported at baseline. During follow up, moderate HA patients reported a joint (46% vs. 34%, p<0.0001) or muscle bleed (27% vs. 16%, p< 0.0001) in a higher proportion of visits than VWD patients. Other bleeds, including mucosal, were reported in a greater proportion of visits among patients with Type 3 VWD than among those with HA (49% vs. 32%, p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed no difference in joint ROM loss over time in the Type 3 VWD versus moderate HA populations. A higher FVIII level was protective in both VWD and HA (p<0.001). Conclusion Our findings support the hypothesis of primacy of the FVIII level in determining risk of joint hemorrhage, and may help target therapy in Type 3 VWD and moderate HA to prevent joint disability. PMID:23534856

  7. Myositis ossificans traumatica of the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Hitoshi; Sumiya, Noriyoshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Kimura, Naohiro; Akizuki, Ayako; Maruyama, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    Myositis ossificans traumatica (MOT) is a disease in which muscular ossification develops following trauma. Almost all cases of MOT are found in skeletal muscle. The authors report in a 39-year-old man MOT involving several muscles in the head and neck, namely, bilateral masseter muscles, the left temporal muscle, the left lateral pterygoid muscle, and the left frontal muscle. Involvement of the lateral pterygoid muscle is especially rare.

  8. Reconceptualising Moderation in Asynchronous Online Discussions Using Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlachopoulos, Panos; Cowan, John

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a grounded theory study of the moderation of asynchronous online discussions, to explore the processes by which tutors in higher education decide when and how to moderate. It aims to construct a theory of e-moderation based on some key factors which appear to influence e-moderation. It discusses previous research on the…

  9. Stretching Skeletal Muscle: Chronic Muscle Lengthening through Sarcomerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Böl, Markus; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to passive overstretch through sarcomerogenesis, the creation and serial deposition of new sarcomere units. Sarcomerogenesis is critical to muscle function: It gradually re-positions the muscle back into its optimal operating regime. Animal models of immobilization, limb lengthening, and tendon transfer have provided significant insight into muscle adaptation in vivo. Yet, to date, there is no mathematical model that allows us to predict how skeletal muscle adapts to mechanical stretch in silico. Here we propose a novel mechanistic model for chronic longitudinal muscle growth in response to passive mechanical stretch. We characterize growth through a single scalar-valued internal variable, the serial sarcomere number. Sarcomerogenesis, the evolution of this variable, is driven by the elastic mechanical stretch. To analyze realistic three-dimensional muscle geometries, we embed our model into a nonlinear finite element framework. In a chronic limb lengthening study with a muscle stretch of 1.14, the model predicts an acute sarcomere lengthening from 3.09m to 3.51m, and a chronic gradual return to the initial sarcomere length within two weeks. Compared to the experiment, the acute model error was 0.00% by design of the model; the chronic model error was 2.13%, which lies within the rage of the experimental standard deviation. Our model explains, from a mechanistic point of view, why gradual multi-step muscle lengthening is less invasive than single-step lengthening. It also explains regional variations in sarcomere length, shorter close to and longer away from the muscle-tendon interface. Once calibrated with a richer data set, our model may help surgeons to prevent muscle overstretch and make informed decisions about optimal stretch increments, stretch timing, and stretch amplitudes. We anticipate our study to open new avenues in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery and enhance treatment for patients with ill proportioned limbs, tendon

  10. Mandibular mechanics following osteotomy and appliance placement. II. Bone strain on the body and condylar neck

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Katherine L.; Sun, Zongyang; Egbert, Mark A.; Baird, Emily E.; Herring, Susan W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the mechanical environment of the mandible is changed by osteotomy and fixation, as assessed by the measurement of bone strain on the condylar neck and mandibular corpus. Materials and Methods Immediately following unilateral mandibular osteotomy and distractor placement, strain gauges were attached directly to the corpus and condylar neck in a sample of domestic pigs. Bone strains were recorded during mastication and muscle stimulation. Comparisons of principal strain magnitudes and orientations were made between sides and between the osteotomy sample and a control database. Results The animals preferred to chew on the non-osteotomy side. Corpus strains were higher for osteotomy-side chewing but were comparable to the control database, regardless of chewing side. For the condyle, compared to the control database and the non-osteotomy side, the osteotomy side was underloaded in compression. Furthermore, the orientation of compressive strain was highly variable and more horizontally oriented than that of control and non-osteotomy condyles. Stimulation of the masseter and medial pterygoid loaded the mandible to normal levels. Conclusions Masticatory behavior was altered, probably as a combined result of disruption to the occlusion, changes in muscle recruitment, and probable loss of sensory feedback. However, neither these changes nor damage to the muscles explain the decrease and reorientation of compressive strain on the condylar neck. Alternatively, the modified strain pattern could have arisen from positional instability of the proximal bone fragment. PMID:16546641

  11. Moderate-power cw fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2004-10-31

    A review of the development and investigation of moderate-power (10{sup -1}-10{sup 2} W) cw fibre lasers is presented. The properties of optical fibres doped with rare-earth ions and methods for fabricating double-clad fibres are considered. The methods for fabrication of fibre Bragg gratings used as selective reflectors are discussed and the grating properties are analysed. The main pump schemes for double-clad fibre lasers are described. The properties of fibre lasers doped with neodymium, ytterbium, erbium, thulium, and holmium ions are also considered. The principles of fabrication of Raman converters of laser radiation based on optical fibres of different compositions are discussed and the main results of their studies are presented. It is concluded that fibre lasers described in the review can produce moderate-power radiation at any wavelength in the spectral range from 0.9 to 2 {mu}m. (review)

  12. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  13. Artificial muscle using nonlinear elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratna, Banahalli

    2002-03-01

    Anisotropic freestanding films or fibers of nematic elastomers from laterally attached side-chain polymers show muscle-like mechanical properties. The orientational order of the liquid crystal side groups imposes a conformational anisotropy in the polymer backbone. When a large change in the order parameter occurs, as at the nematic-isotropic phase transition, there is a concomitant loss of order in the backbone which results in a contraction of the film in the direction of the director orientation. The crosslinked network imposes a symmetry-breaking field on the nematic and drives the nematic-isotropic transition towards a critical point with the application of external stress. Isostrain studies on these nonlinear elastomers, show that there are large deviations from ideal classical rubber elasticity and the contributions from total internal energy to the elastic restoring force cannot be ignored. The liquid crystal elastomers exhibiting anisoptopic contraction/extension coupled with a graded strain response to an applied external stimulus provide an excellent framework for mimicking muscular action. Liquid crystal elastomers by their very chemical nature have a number of ‘handles’ such as the liquid crystalline phase range, density of crosslinking, flexibility of the backbone, coupling between the backbone and the mesogen and the coupling between the mesogen and the external stimulus, that can be tuned to optimize the mechanical properties. We have demonstrated actuation in nematic elastomers under thermal and optical stimuli. We have been able to dope the elastomers with dyes to make them optically active. We have also doped them with carbon nanotubes in order to increase the thermal and electrical conductivity of the elastomer.

  14. Stressful Life Events: Measurement, Moderators, and Adaptation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-10

    tolerance for stimulation, sensation seeking as a personality attribute may well serve as an important moderator of life stress. High sensation seekers...experiencing stressful life events and psychological well -being. A helping spouse seems to be particularly valuable in contributing to self- confidence...7. Crnic, K. A., Greenberg, M. T., Ragozin, A. S., & Robinson, N. M. The effects of life stress and social support on the life satisfaction and

  15. Characterization of muscle alteration in oral submucous fibrosis-seeking new evidence

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Aadithya-Basavaraj; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Kumar, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess the progression of Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSF) by investigating the correlation between clinical mouth opening and muscle-epithelial distance in tissue sections. Characterization of changes involving muscle was ascertained. Material and Methods 50 cases and 10 controls were included in this case-control study. Inter-incisal mouth opening was measured and classified according to Lai et al. as Group A (more than 35mm), Group B (30 to 35mm), Group C (20 to 30mm), Group D (less than 20mm). Histopathological sections were graded as very early, early, moderately advanced, advanced OSF. Muscle-epithelial distance was calculated using image analysis software. The four most common degenerative changes observed in muscles, namely fragmentation, highly eosinophilic areas with loss of striations, nucleus internalization and multiple pyknotic nuclei were also assessed. Results Comparisons of muscle-epithelial distance were made between the clinical and histopathological groups to those of controls. The mean muscle-epithelial distance was: Group A-626.8±309.36 µm, B-827.5±549.72 µm, C-673.2±321.93 µm, D-439.9±173.84µm, Controls-1222.19 ±441.7µm. Post-hoc Bonferroni Test revealed a statistically significant reduction in the muscle-epithelial distance in Group C (p-value = 0.001) and D (p-value = 0.001) as compared to controls. The mean muscle-epithelial distance in very early, early, moderately advanced and advanced OSF was 732.73±232.81µm, 726.54±361.63 µm, 548.36±273.13 and 172.40±58.41 µm respectively. Highly significant difference in muscle-epithelial distance was seen between controls as compared to early (p-value =0.002), moderately advanced (p-value = 0.001) and advanced OSF (p-value = 0.001. Fragmentation and highly eosinophilic areas were invariably noticed in advanced OSF. Multiple pyknotic nuclei were variable with no specificity. Conclusions Reduction in muscle-epithelial distance may prove to be a

  16. Shifts in a single muscle's control potential of body dynamics are determined by mechanical feedback

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, Simon; Libby, Thomas; Mullens, Chris H.; Full, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Muscles are multi-functional structures that interface neural and mechanical systems. Muscle work depends on a large multi-dimensional space of stimulus (neural) and strain (mechanical) parameters. In our companion paper, we rewrote activation to individual muscles in intact, behaving cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis L.), revealing a specific muscle's potential to control body dynamics in different behaviours. Here, we use those results to provide the biologically relevant parameters for in situ work measurements. We test four hypotheses about how muscle function changes to provide mechanisms for the observed control responses. Under isometric conditions, a graded increase in muscle stress underlies its linear actuation during standing behaviours. Despite typically absorbing energy, this muscle can recruit two separate periods of positive work when controlling running. This functional change arises from mechanical feedback filtering a linear increase in neural activation into nonlinear work output. Changing activation phase again led to positive work recruitment, but at different times, consistent with the muscle's ability to also produce a turn. Changes in muscle work required considering the natural sequence of strides and separating swing and stance contributions of work. Both in vivo control potentials and in situ work loops were necessary to discover the neuromechanical coupling enabling control. PMID:21502130

  17. Characterizing the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its geometry properties on its behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we explore the basic static and dynamic behavior of a hydraulically actuated Peano muscle and how its geometry affects key static and dynamic performance metrics. The Peano muscle, or pouch motor is a fluid powered artificial muscle. Similar to McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs), it has the ability to generate the high forces of biological muscles with the low threshold pressure of pleated PAMs, but in a slim, easily distributed form. We found that Peano muscles have similar characteristics to other PAMs, but produce lower free-strains. A test rig capable of measuring high-speed flow rates with a Venturi tube revealed that their efficiency peaks at about 40% during highly dynamic movements. Peano muscles with more tubes and of a greater size do not move faster. Also, their muscle tubes should have an aspect ratio of at least 1:3 and channel width greater than 20% to maximize performance. These findings suggest that finite element modeling be used to optimize more complex Peano muscle geometries.

  18. Non-uniform muscle fat replacement along the proximodistal axis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hooijmans, M T; Niks, E H; Burakiewicz, J; Anastasopoulos, C; van den Berg, S I; van Zwet, E; Webb, A G; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2017-02-21

    The progressive replacement of muscle tissue by fat in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been studied using quantitative MRI between, but not within, individual muscles. We studied fat replacement along the proximodistal muscle axis using the Dixon technique on a 3T MR scanner in 22 DMD patients and 12 healthy controls. Mean fat fractions per muscle per slice for seven lower and upper leg muscles were compared between and within groups assuming a parabolic distribution. Average fat fraction for a small central slice stack and a large coverage slice stack were compared to the value when the stack was shifted one slice (15 mm) up or down. Higher fat fractions were observed in distal and proximal muscle segments compared to the muscle belly in all muscles of the DMD subjects (p <0.001). A shift of 15 mm resulted in a difference in mean fat fraction which was on average 1-2% ranging up to 12% (p <0.01). The muscle end regions are exposed to higher mechanical strain, which points towards mechanical disruption of the sarcolemma as one of the key factors in the pathophysiology. Overall, this non-uniformity in fat replacement needs to be taken into account to prevent sample bias when applying quantitative MRI as biomarker in clinical trials for DMD.

  19. Muscle moment arms of the gibbon hind limb: implications for hylobatid locomotion.

    PubMed

    Channon, Anthony J; Crompton, Robin H; Günther, Michael M; Vereecke, Evie E

    2010-04-01

    Muscles facilitate skeletal movement via the production of a torque or moment about a joint. The magnitude of the moment produced depends on both the force of muscular contraction and the size of the moment arm used to rotate the joint. Hence, larger muscle moment arms generate larger joint torques and forces at the point of application. The moment arms of a number of gibbon hind limb muscles were measured on four cadaveric specimens (one Hylobates lar, one H. moloch and two H. syndactylus). The tendon travel technique was used, utilizing an electro-goniometer and a linear voltage displacement transducer. The data were analysed using a technique based on a differentiated cubic spline and normalized to remove the effect of body size. The data demonstrated a functional differentiation between voluminous muscles with short fascicles having small muscle moment arms and muscles with longer fascicles and comparatively smaller physiological cross-sectional area having longer muscle moment arms. The functional implications of these particular configurations were simulated using a simple geometric fascicle strain model that predicts that the rectus femoris and gastrocnemius muscles are more likely to act primarily at their distal joints (knee and ankle, respectively) because they have short fascicles. The data also show that the main hip and knee extensors maintain a very small moment arm throughout the range of joint angles seen in the locomotion of gibbons, which (coupled to voluminous, short-fascicled muscles) might help facilitate rapid joint rotation during powerful movements.

  20. SNS second target station moderator performance update

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2010-03-08

    In its first years of operations of its first target station, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is working towards a facility upgrade by a megawatt-class second target station operated at 20 Hz repetition rate, which is intended to complement the existing ORNL neutron sources, the first SNS target station and the HFIR reactor, with high-intensity cold neutron beams.The first round of optimization calculations converged on larger-volume cylindrical para-hydrogen moderators placed in wing configuration on top and bottom of a flat mercury target, pre-moderated by layers of ambient water and surrounded by beryllium reflector. The metric of these optimization calculations was time-averaged and energy-integrated neutron brightness below 5 meV with the requirement to be able to serve 20 ports with neutrons. A summary of these calculations will be given including lessons learned from the variety of simulated configurations and detailed neutron performance characteristics like spectral intensities, emission time distributions, local variations of moderator brightness at the viewed areas, and sensitivity of the optimization metric to optimized parameters for the most promising configuration.

  1. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop an appropriate sensor for measuring the stress or strain of high altitude balloons during flight are reviewed as well as the various conditions that must be met by such a device. The design, development and calibration of a transducer which promises to satisfy the necessary design constraints are described. The thin film strain transducer has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the strain that would naturally occur in the balloon. In addition, the transducer has a high sensitivity to longitudinal strain (7.216 mV/V/unit strain) which is constant for all temperature from room temperature to -80 C and all strains from 5 percent compression to 10 percent tensile strain. At the same time, the sensor is relatively insensitive (0.27 percent) to transverse forces. The device has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with available bridge balance, amplification and telemetry instrumentation now available for balloon flight. Recommendations are included for improved coatings to provide passive thermal control as well as model, tethered and full scale flight testing.

  2. A single dose of histamine-receptor antagonists before downhill running alters markers of muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Ely, Matthew R; Romero, Steven A; Sieck, Dylan C; Mangum, Joshua E; Luttrell, Meredith J; Halliwill, John R

    2017-03-01

    Histamine contributes to elevations in skeletal muscle blood flow following exercise, which raises the possibility that histamine is an important mediator of the inflammatory response to exercise. We examined the influence of antihistamines on postexercise blood flow, inflammation, muscle damage, and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in a model of moderate exercise-induced muscle damage. Subjects consumed either a combination of fexofenadine and ranitidine (blockade, n = 12) or nothing (control, n = 12) before 45 min of downhill running (-10% grade). Blood flow to the leg was measured before and throughout 120 min of exercise recovery. Markers of inflammation, muscle damage, and DOMS were obtained before and at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise. At 60 min postexercise, blood flow was reduced ~29% with blockade compared with control (P < 0.05). Markers of inflammation were elevated after exercise (TNF-ɑ, IL-6), but did not differ between control and blockade. Creatine kinase concentrations peaked 12 h after exercise, and the overall response was greater with blockade (18.3 ± 3.2 kU·l(-1)·h(-1)) compared with control (11.6 ± 2.0 kU·l(-1)·h(-1); P < 0.05). Reductions in muscle strength in control (-19.3 ± 4.3% at 24 h) were greater than blockade (-7.8 ± 4.8%; P < 0.05) and corresponded with greater perceptions of pain/discomfort in control compared with blockade. In conclusion, histamine-receptor blockade reduced postexercise blood flow, had no effect on the pattern of inflammatory markers, increased serum creatine kinase concentrations, attenuated muscle strength loss, and reduced pain perception following muscle-damaging exercise.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Histamine appears to be intimately involved with skeletal muscle during and following exercise. Blocking histamine's actions during muscle-damaging exercise, via common over-the-counter antihistamines, resulted in increased serum creatine kinase, an indirect marker of muscle damage. Paradoxically, blocking

  3. Simulation of active skeletal muscle tissue with a transversely isotropic viscohyperelastic continuum material model.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Hamid; Mostofizadeh, Salar; Brolin, Karin; Johansson, Håkan; Osth, Jonas

    2013-05-01

    Human body models with biofidelic kinematics in vehicle pre-crash and crash simulations require a constitutive model of muscle tissue with both passive and active properties. Therefore, a transversely isotropic viscohyperelastic continuum material model with element-local fiber definition and activation capability is suggested for use with explicit finite element codes. Simulations of experiments with New Zealand rabbit's tibialis anterior muscle at three different strain rates were performed. Three different active force-length relations were used, where a robust performance of the material model was observed. The results were compared with the experimental data and the simulation results from a previous study, where the muscle tissue was modeled with a combination of discrete and continuum elements. The proposed material model compared favorably, and integrating the active properties of the muscle into a continuum material model opens for applications with complex muscle geometries.

  4. Morphological and kinematic basis of the hummingbird flight stroke: scaling of flight muscle transmission ratio.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Tyson L; Tobalske, Bret W; Ros, Ivo G; Warrick, Douglas R; Biewener, Andrew A

    2012-05-22

    Hummingbirds (Trochilidae) are widely known for their insect-like flight strokes characterized by high wing beat frequency, small muscle strains and a highly supinated wing orientation during upstroke that allows for lift production in both halves of the stroke cycle. Here, we show that hummingbirds achieve these functional traits within the limits imposed by a vertebrate endoskeleton and muscle physiology by accentuating a wing inversion mechanism found in other birds and using long-axis rotational movement of the humerus. In hummingbirds, long-axis rotation of the humerus creates additional wing translational movement, supplementing that produced by the humeral elevation and depression movements of a typical avian flight stroke. This adaptation increases the wing-to-muscle-transmission ratio, and is emblematic of a widespread scaling trend among flying animals whereby wing-to-muscle-transmission ratio varies inversely with mass, allowing animals of vastly different sizes to accommodate aerodynamic, biomechanical and physiological constraints on muscle-powered flapping flight.

  5. A continuum constitutive model for the active behaviour of skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, Alexander E.; Böl, Markus; Itskov, Mikhail

    2011-03-01

    In the present paper we propose a continuum constitutive model for the passive and active mechanical behaviour of skeletal muscle. Unlike most works in this field, the model is not based on an additive split between passive and active components but considers muscle tissue as one continuous biological material, which alters its properties when activated. This alteration also allows for a kinematic interpretation on the muscle fibre level and is described by a single activation-dependent model parameter. This as well as the other material parameters are obtained from standard experiments on resting and activated muscle or from microstructural information such as fibre type and twitch characteristics. In the passive state, the constitutive equations are governed by a transversely isotropic polyconvex and coercive strain-energy function. The model shows excellent agreement with experimental stress-stretch data of a passive and activated rat tibialis anterior muscle.

  6. Relation of systemic and local muscle exercise capacity to skeletal muscle characteristics in men with congestive heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, B. M.; Simonini, A.; Sahgal, P.; Wells, L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The present study was undertaken to further characterize changes in skeletal muscle morphology and histochemistry in congestive heart failure and to determine the relation of these changes to abnormalities of systemic and local muscle exercise capacity. BACKGROUND. Abnormalities of skeletal muscle appear to play a role in the limitation of exercise capacity in congestive heart failure, but information on the changes in muscle morphology and biochemistry and their relation to alterations in muscle function is limited. METHODS. Eighteen men with predominantly mild to moderate congestive heart failure (mean +/- SEM New York Heart Association functional class 2.6 +/- 0.2, ejection fraction 24 +/- 2%) and eight age- and gender-matched sedentary control subjects underwent measurements of peak systemic oxygen consumption (VO2) during cycle ergometry, resistance to fatigue of the quadriceps femoris muscle group and biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle. RESULTS. Peak VO2 and resistance to fatigue were lower in the patients with heart failure than in control subjects (15.7 +/- 1.2 vs. 25.1 +/- 1.5 ml/min-kg and 63 +/- 2% vs. 85 +/- 3%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Patients had a lower proportion of slow twitch, type I fibers than did control subjects (36 +/- 3% vs. 46 +/- 5%, p = 0.048) and a higher proportion of fast twitch, type IIab fibers (18 +/- 3% vs. 7 +/- 2%, p = 0.004). Fiber cross-sectional area was smaller, and single-fiber succinate dehydrogenase activity, a mitochondrial oxidative marker, was lower in patients (both p < or = 0.034). Likewise, the ratio of average fast twitch to slow twitch fiber cross-sectional area was lower in patients (0.780 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.05 +/- 0.08, p = 0.019). Peak VO2 was strongly related to integrated succinate dehydrogenase activity in patients (r = 0.896, p = 0.001). Peak VO2, resistance to fatigue and strength also correlated significantly with several measures of fiber size, especially of fast twitch fibers, in

  7. Elastic Proteins in the Flight Muscle of Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Ma, Weikang; Schemmel, Peter; Cheng, Yu-Shu; Liu, Jiangmin; Tsaprailis, George; Feldman, Samuel; Southgate, Agnes Ayme; Irving, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    The flight muscles (DLM1) of the Hawkmoth, Manduca sexta are synchronous, requiring a neural spike for each contraction. Stress/strain curves of skinned DLM1 showed hysteresis indicating the presence of titin-like elastic proteins. Projectin and kettin are titin-like proteins previously identified in Lethocerus and Drosophila flight muscles. Analysis of Manduca muscles with 1% SDS-agarose gels and western blots showed two bands near 1 MDa that cross-reacted with antibodies to Drosophila projectin. Antibodies to Drosophila kettin cross-reacted to bands at ~500 and ~700 kDa, but also to bands at ~1.6 and ~2.1 MDa, that had not been previously observed in insect flight muscles. Mass spectrometry identified the 2.1 MDa protein as a product of the Sallimus (sls) gene. Analysis of the gene sequence showed that all 4 putative Sallimus and kettin isoforms could be explained as products of alternative splicing of the single sls gene. Both projectin and Sallimus isoforms were expressed to higher levels in ventrally located DLM1 subunits, primarily responsible for active work production, as compared to dorsally located subunits, which may act as damped springs. The different expression levels of the 2 projectin isoforms and 4 Sallimus/kettin isoforms may be adaptations to the specific requirements of individual muscle subunits. PMID:25602701

  8. Management of morderate-to-severe Marcus-Gunn syndrome by anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Nan; Hu, Wei-Kun; Li, Bin; Liu, Rong

    2010-01-01

    AIM To study the effect of clinical management of moderate-to-severe Marcus-Gunn syndrome (MGS) by anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles. METHODS The medical records of 13 patients with moderate-to-severe MGS who underwent surgeries in our institute between 2000 and 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. They underwent unilateral anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles under local anesthesia. RESULTS Postoperative follow-up periods ranged from 6 to 36 months, with an average of 12 months. All eyelids (100%) showed complete resolution of jaw-winking, ten eyelids (76.9%) had good correction of ptosis, with equal plapebral apertures and symmetrical contours, three (23.1%) showed residual mild ptosis (<2mm). CONCLUSION For moderate-to-severe MGS, unilateral anastomosis of levator and frontal muscles provides satisfied correction of jaw-winking and ptosis. PMID:22553588

  9. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOEpatents

    Conard, Lisa Marie

    1998-01-01

    A tool and a method for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool.

  10. Age-related structural and functional changes of low back muscles.

    PubMed

    Hiepe, Patrick; Gussew, Alexander; Rzanny, Reinhard; Kurz, Eduard; Anders, Christoph; Walther, Mario; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2015-05-01

    During aging declining maximum force capacity with more or less unchanged fatigability is observed with the underlying mechanisms still not fully understood. Therefore, we compared morphology and function of skeletal muscles between different age groups. Changes in high-energy phosphate turnover (PCr, Pi and pH) and muscle functional MRI (mfMRI) parameters, including proton transverse relaxation time (T2), diffusion (D) and vascular volume fraction (f), were investigated in moderately exercised low back muscles of young and late-middle-aged healthy subjects with (31)P-MR spectroscopy, T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI at 3T. In addition, T1-weighted MRI data were acquired to determine muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) and to assess fat infiltration into muscle tissue. Except for pH, both age groups showed similar load-induced MR changes and rates of perceived exertion (RPE), which indicates comparable behavior of muscle activation at moderate loads. Changes of mfMRI parameters were significantly associated with RPE in both cohorts. Age-related differences were observed, with lower pH and higher Pi/ATP ratios as well as lower D and f values in the late-middle-aged subjects. These findings are ascribed to age-related changes of fiber type composition, fiber size and vascularity. Interestingly, post exercise f was negatively associated with fat infiltration with the latter being significantly higher in late-middle-aged subjects. CSA of low back muscles remained unchanged, while CSA of inner back muscle as well as mean T2 at rest were associated with maximum force capacity. Overall, applying the proposed MR approach provides evidence of age-related changes in several muscle tissue characteristics and gives new insights into the physiological processes that take place during aging.

  11. Muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming: Comparison between elite swimmers and beginners.

    PubMed

    Vaz, João R; Olstad, Bjørn Harald; Cabri, Jan; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Hug, François

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to compare muscle coordination strategies of the upper and lower limb muscles between beginners and elite breaststroke swimmers. Surface electromyography (EMG) of eight muscles was recorded in 16 swimmers (8 elite, 8 beginners) during a 25 m swimming breaststroke at 100% of maximal effort. A decomposition algorithm was used to identify the muscle synergies that represent the temporal and spatial organisation of muscle coordination. Between-groups indices of similarity and lag times were calculated. Individual muscle patterns were moderately to highly similar between groups (between-group indices range: 0.61 to 0.84). Significant differences were found in terms of lag time for pectoralis major (P < 0.05), biceps brachii, rectus femoris and tibialis anterior (P < 0.01), indicating an earlier activation for these muscles in beginners compared to elites (range: -13.2 to -3.8% of the swimming cycle). Three muscle synergies were identified for both beginners and elites. Although their composition was similar between populations, the third synergy exhibited a high within-group variability. Moderate to high indices of similarity were found for the shape of synergy activation coefficients (range: 0.63 to 0.88) but there was a significant backward shift (-8.4% of the swimming cycle) in synergy #2 for beginners compared to elites. This time shift suggested differences in the global arm-to-leg coordination. These results indicate that the synergistic organisation of muscle coordination during breaststroke swimming is not profoundly affected by expertise. However, specific timing adjustments were observed between lower and upper limbs.

  12. Morphological and histological adaptation of muscle and bone to loading induced by repetitive activation of muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vickerton, Paula; Jarvis, Jonathan C.; Gallagher, James A.; Akhtar, Riaz; Sutherland, Hazel; Jeffery, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular contraction plays a pivotal role in the mechanical environment of bone, but controlled muscular contractions are rarely used to study the response of bone to mechanical stimuli. Here, we use implantable stimulators to elicit programmed contractions of the rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Miniature stimulators were implanted in Wistar rats (n = 9) to induce contraction of the left TA every 30 s for 28 days. The right limb was used as a contralateral control. Hindlimbs were imaged using microCT. Image data were used for bone measurements, and to construct a finite-element (FE) model simulation of TA forces propagating through the bone. This simulation was used to target subsequent bone histology and measurement of micromechanical properties to areas of high strain. FE mapping of simulated strains revealed peak values in the anterodistal region of the tibia (640 µε ± 30.4 µε). This region showed significant increases in cross-sectional area (28.61%, p < 0.05) and bone volume (30.29%, p < 0.05) in the stimulated limb. Histology revealed a large region of new bone, containing clusters of chondrocytes, indicative of endochondral ossification. The new bone region had a lower elastic modulus (8.8 ± 2.2 GPa) when compared with established bone (20 ± 1.4 GPa). Our study provides compelling new evidence of the interplay between muscle and bone. PMID:24966314

  13. Paraspinal muscle reflex dynamics.

    PubMed

    Granata, K P; Slota, G P; Bennett, B C

    2004-02-01

    Neuromuscular control of spinal stability may be represented as a control system wherein the paraspinal muscle reflex acts as feedback response to kinetic and kinematic disturbances of the trunk. The influence of preparatory muscle recruitment for the control of spinal stability has been previously examined, but there are few reported studies that characterize paraspinal reflex gain as feedback response. In the current study, the input-output dynamics of paraspinal reflexes were quantified by means of the impulse response function (IRF), with trunk perturbation force representing the input signal and EMG the output signal. Surface EMGs were collected from the trunk muscles in response to a brief anteriorly directed impact force applied to the trunk of healthy participants. Reflex behavior was measured in response to three levels of force impulse, 6.1, 9.2 and 12.0 Ns, and two different levels of external trunk flexion preload, 0 and 110 N anterior force. Reflex EMG was quantifiable in response to 91% of the perturbations. Mean reflex onset latency was 30.7+/-21.3 ms and reflex amplitude increased with perturbation amplitude. Impulse response function gain, G(IRF), was defined as the peak amplitude of the measured IRF and provided a consistent measure of response behavior. EMG reflex amplitude and G(IRF) increased with force impulse. Mean G(IRF) was 2.27+/-1.31% MVC/Ns and demonstrated declining trend with flexion preload. Results agree with a simple systems model of the neuromechanical feedback behavior. The relative contribution of the reflex dynamics to spinal stability must be investigated in future research.

  14. Muscle dysmorphia: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Tod, David; Edwards, Christian; Cranswick, Ieuan

    2016-01-01

    Since 1997, there has been increasing research focusing on muscle dysmorphia, a condition underpinned by people’s beliefs that they have insufficient muscularity, in both the Western and non-Western medical and scientific communities. Much of this empirical interest has surveyed nonclinical samples, and there is limited understanding of people with the condition beyond knowledge about their characteristics. Much of the existing knowledge about people with the condition is unsurprising and inherent in the definition of the disorder, such as dissatisfaction with muscularity and adherence to muscle-building activities. Only recently have investigators started to explore questions beyond these limited tautological findings that may give rise to substantial knowledge advances, such as the examination of masculine and feminine norms. There is limited understanding of additional topics such as etiology, prevalence, nosology, prognosis, and treatment. Further, the evidence is largely based on a small number of unstandardized case reports and descriptive studies (involving small samples), which are largely confined to Western (North American, British, and Australian) males. Although much research has been undertaken since the term “muscle dysmorphia” entered the psychiatric lexicon in 1997, there remains tremendous scope for knowledge advancement. A primary task in the short term is for investigators to examine the extent to which the condition exists among well-defined populations to help determine the justification for research funding relative to other public health issues. A greater variety of research questions and designs may contribute to a broader and more robust knowledge base than currently exists. Future work will help clinicians assist a group of people whose quality of life and health are placed at risk by their muscular preoccupation. PMID:27536165

  15. Muscle Power Predicts Adolescent Bone Strength: Iowa Bone Development Study

    PubMed Central

    Janz, Kathleen F.; Letuchy, Elena M.; Burns, Trudy L.; Francis, Shelby L.; Levy, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess association between lower body muscle power and bone strength, as well as the mediating effect of muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) on that association. Methods Participants (N=141 males; 162 females) were approximately 17 years. Muscle power was predicted using vertical jump and the Sayers equation. Using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), bone strength indices were obtained at two locations of the tibia, corresponding to primary stressors acting upon each site: bone strength index for compression (BSI) at the distal 4% site; density-weighted polar section modulus strength-strain index [SSIp] and cortical bone area (CoA) at the 66% mid-shaft site for torsion. Muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) was measured at the 66% site. Pearson bivariate and partial correlation coefficients were estimated to quantify the strength of the associations among variables. Direct and indirect mediation model effects were estimated and 95% bootstrap confidence intervals were constructed to test the causal hypothesis. Height and maturity were examined as covariates. Results Pearson correlation coefficients among muscle power, MCSA, and bone strength were statistically significant (p<0.01) and ranged from r=0.54 to 0.78. After adjustment for covariates, associations were reduced (r=0.37 to 0.69) (p<0.01). Mediation models for males for BSI, SSIp, and CoA accounted for 38%, 66%, and 54% of the variance in bone strength, respectively. Models for females for BSI, SSIp, and CoA accounted for 46%, 77%, and 66% of the variance, respectively. Conclusions We found strong and consistent associations, as well as direct and indirect pathways, among muscle power, MCSA, and tibia strength. These results support the use of muscle power as a component of health-related fitness in bone health interventions for older adolescents. PMID:25751769

  16. New twist on artificial muscles

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Carter S.; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Aliev, Ali E.; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy. PMID:27671626

  17. New twist on artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Haines, Carter S; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Aliev, Ali E; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-10-18

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy.

  18. Strabismus and eye muscle function.

    PubMed

    Lennerstrand, Gunnar

    2007-11-01

    Studies of external eye muscle morphology and physiology are reviewed, with respect to both motor and sensory functions in concomitant strabismus. The eye muscles have a more complex fibre composition than other striated muscle, and they are among the fastest and most fatigue-resistant muscles in the body. However, it is not generally believed that concomitant strabismus is due to a primary abnormality of the eye muscles or the ocular motor system. The gross anatomy of eye muscles, including the shape and position of the eye muscle pulleys, was not changed in strabismus. The histology of the eye muscle fibres was also basically the same, but changes have been observed in the cellular and biochemical machinery of the fibres, most notably in the singly innervated orbital fibres. Functionally, this was seen as slower contractions and reduced fatigue resistance of eye muscles in animals with strabismus and defects of binocular vision. Most likely the changes represented an adaptation to modified visual demands on the ocular motor control, because of the defects of binocular vision in strabismus from an early age. Adaptation of eye muscle function to visual demands could be seen also in the adult human ocular motor system, but here the effects could be reversed with treatment in some conditions. External eye muscles in the human have sensory organs, muscle spindles and tendon organs, responding to changes in muscle force and length. It is not known how these proprioceptors are used more specifically in ocular motor control, and there is no stretch reflex in the external eye muscles. However, a clear influence on space localization and eye position can be demonstrated with vibratory stimulation of the eye muscles, presumably activating muscle spindles. Different effects were observed in normal subjects and in adult patients with strabismus, which would indicate that the proprioceptive input from one eye of strabismic patients could be suppressed by the other eye, similar

  19. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  20. Strain and magnetic remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham John

    1993-05-01

    Experimental data may be compatible with the hypothesis that a single direction of magnetic remanence rotates as a rigid marker with strains up to 40% shortening in coaxial, perfect flattening ( X = Y > Z). Detailed agreement with the passive line model is relatively poor for the specimens in which remanance is carried by magnetite. However, for this range of strains the differences with the passive line model (Wettstein's equation) are so slight that the latter model may be more easily employed to de-strain or restore deformed remanance to its original attitude. In the case of hematite-bearing remanences, the differences between the passive line and rigid marker model are even smaller because of the higher aspect ratios of grains of hematite. Therefore it is suggested that Wettstein's equation may be safely used to restore remanence after even higher strains, where the remanence is carried by hematite.