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Sample records for moderate muscle strain

  1. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  2. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  3. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  4. Skeletal muscle tensile strain dependence: hyperviscoelastic nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin B; Morrow, Duane A; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Computational modeling of skeletal muscle requires characterization at the tissue level. While most skeletal muscle studies focus on hyperelasticity, the goal of this study was to examine and model the nonlinear behavior of both time-independent and time-dependent properties of skeletal muscle as a function of strain. Materials and Methods Nine tibialis anterior muscles from New Zealand White rabbits were subject to five consecutive stress relaxation cycles of roughly 3% strain. Individual relaxation steps were fit with a three-term linear Prony series. Prony series coefficients and relaxation ratio were assessed for strain dependence using a general linear statistical model. A fully nonlinear constitutive model was employed to capture the strain dependence of both the viscoelastic and instantaneous components. Results Instantaneous modulus (p<0.0005) and mid-range relaxation (p<0.0005) increased significantly with strain level, while relaxation at longer time periods decreased with strain (p<0.0005). Time constants and overall relaxation ratio did not change with strain level (p>0.1). Additionally, the fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic constitutive model provided an excellent fit to experimental data, while other models which included linear components failed to capture muscle function as accurately. Conclusions Material properties of skeletal muscle are strain-dependent at the tissue level. This strain dependence can be included in computational models of skeletal muscle performance with a fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic model. PMID:26409235

  5. Skeletal muscle transverse strain during isometric contraction at different lengths.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, C C; Willems, P J; Muijtjens, A M; Drost, M R

    1999-08-01

    An important assumption in 2D numerical models of skeletal muscle contraction involves deformation in the third dimension of the included muscle section. The present paper studies the often used plane strain description. Therefore, 3D muscle surface deformation is measured from marker displacements during isometric contractions at various muscle lengths. Longitudinal strains at superficial muscle fibers ( - 14 +/- 2.6% at L0, n = 57) and aponeurosis (0.8 +/- 0.9% at L0) decrease with increasing muscle length. The same holds for transverse muscle surface strains in superficial muscle fibers and aponeurosis, which are comparable at intermediate muscle length, but differ at long and short muscle length. Because transverse strains during isometric contraction change with initial muscle length, it is concluded that the effect of muscle length on muscle deformation cannot be studied in plane strain models. These results do not counteract the use of these models to study deformation in contractions with approximately - 9 % longitudinal muscle fiber strain, as transverse strain in superficial muscle fibers and in aponeurosis tissue is minimal in that case. Aponeurosis surface area change decreases with increasing initial muscle length, but muscle fiber surface area change is - 11%, independent of muscle length. Assuming incompressible muscle material, this means that strain perpendicular to the muscle surface equals 11%. Taking the relationship between transverse and longitudinal muscle fiber strain into account, it is hypothesized that superficial muscle fibers flatten during isometric contractions.

  6. Molecular responses to moderate endurance exercise in skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined alterations in skeletal-muscle growth and atrophy-related molecular events after a single bout of moderate-intensity endurance exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from 10 men (23 +/- 1 yr, body mass 80 +/- 2 kg, and VO(2peak) 45 +/- 1 ml x kg'¹ x min'¹) immediately (0 hr) and...

  7. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-01-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non‐dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis‐specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences. PMID:17957025

  8. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-11-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non-dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis-specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences.

  9. Biomechanical response to hamstring muscle strain injury.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Wrigley, Tim V; Baker, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring strains are common injuries, the majority of which occur whilst sprinting. An understanding of the biomechanical circumstances that cause the hamstrings to fail during sprinting is required to improve rehabilitation specificity. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the biomechanics of an acute hamstring strain. Bilateral kinematic and ground reaction force data were captured from a sprinting athlete prior to and immediately following a right hamstring strain. Ten sprinting trials were collected: nine normal (pre-injury) trials and one injury trial. Joint angles, torques and powers as well as hamstring muscle-tendon unit lengths were computed using a three-dimensional biomechanical model. For the pre-injury trials, the right leg compared to the left displayed greater knee extension and hamstring muscle-tendon unit length during terminal swing, an increased vertical ground reaction force peak and loading rate, and an increased peak hip extensor torque and peak hip power generation during initial stance. For the injury trial, significant biomechanical reactions were evident in response to the right hamstring strain, most notably for the right leg during the proceeding swing phase after the onset of the injury. The earliest kinematic deviations in response to the injury were displayed by the trunk and pelvis during right mid-stance. Taking into account neuromuscular latencies and electromechanical delays, the stimulus for the injury must have occurred prior to right foot-strike during the swing phase of the sprinting cycle. It is concluded that hamstring strains during sprinting most likely occur during terminal swing as a consequence of an eccentric contraction.

  10. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  11. Measurement of muscle architecture concurrently with muscle hardness using ultrasound strain elastography.

    PubMed

    Chino, Kentaro; Akagi, Ryota; Dohi, Michiko; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    The B-mode ultrasound image that can measure muscle architecture is displayed side by side with the ultrasound strain elastogram that can assess muscle hardness. Consequently, muscle architecture can be measured concurrently with muscle hardness using ultrasound strain elastography. To demonstrate the measurement of muscle architecture concurrently with muscle hardness using ultrasound strain elastography. Concurrent measurements of muscle architectural parameters (muscle thickness, pennation angle, and fascicle length) and muscle hardness of the medial gastrocnemius were performed with ultrasound strain elastography. Separate measurements of the muscle architectural parameters were also performed for use as reference values for the concurrent measurements. Both types of measurements were performed twice at 20° dorsiflexion, neutral position, and 30° plantar flexion. Coefficients of variance of the muscle architectural parameters obtained from the concurrent measurements (≤7.6%) were significantly higher than those obtained from the separate measurements (≤2.4%) (all P < 0.05). Intraclass correlation coefficients of the architectural parameters were lower in the concurrent measurements (≥0.74) than in the separate measurements (≥0.97). However, there were no significant differences in any muscle architectural parameters between the concurrent and separate measurements (all P > 0.05). The use of ultrasound strain elastography for the concurrent measurement of muscle architecture and muscle hardness is feasible. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Grounding after moderate eccentric contractions reduces muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard; Chevalier, Gaétan; Hill, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Grounding a human to the earth has resulted in changes in the physiology of the body. A pilot study on grounding and eccentric contractions demonstrated shortened duration of pain, reduced creatine kinase (CK), and differences in blood parameters. This follow-up study was conducted to investigate the effects of grounding after moderate eccentric contractions on pain, CK, and complete blood counts. Thirty-two healthy young men were randomly divided into grounded (n=16) and sham-grounded (n=16) groups. On days 1 through 4, visual analog scale for pain evaluations and blood draws were accomplished. On day 1, the participants performed eccentric contractions of 200 half-knee bends. They were then grounded or sham-grounded to the earth for 4 hours on days 1 and 2. Both groups experienced pain on all posttest days. On day 2, the sham-grounded group experienced significant CK increase (P<0.01) while the CK of the grounded group did not increase significantly; the between-group difference was significant (P=0.04). There was also an increase in the neutrophils of the grounded group on day 3 (P=0.05) compared to the sham-grounded group. There was a significant increase in platelets in the grounded group on days 2 through 4. Grounding produced changes in CK and complete blood counts that were not shared by the sham-grounded group. Grounding significantly reduced the loss of CK from the injured muscles indicating reduced muscle damage. These results warrant further study on the effects of earthing on delayed onset muscle damage. PMID:26443876

  13. Grounding after moderate eccentric contractions reduces muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard; Chevalier, Gaétan; Hill, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Grounding a human to the earth has resulted in changes in the physiology of the body. A pilot study on grounding and eccentric contractions demonstrated shortened duration of pain, reduced creatine kinase (CK), and differences in blood parameters. This follow-up study was conducted to investigate the effects of grounding after moderate eccentric contractions on pain, CK, and complete blood counts. Thirty-two healthy young men were randomly divided into grounded (n=16) and sham-grounded (n=16) groups. On days 1 through 4, visual analog scale for pain evaluations and blood draws were accomplished. On day 1, the participants performed eccentric contractions of 200 half-knee bends. They were then grounded or sham-grounded to the earth for 4 hours on days 1 and 2. Both groups experienced pain on all posttest days. On day 2, the sham-grounded group experienced significant CK increase (P<0.01) while the CK of the grounded group did not increase significantly; the between-group difference was significant (P=0.04). There was also an increase in the neutrophils of the grounded group on day 3 (P=0.05) compared to the sham-grounded group. There was a significant increase in platelets in the grounded group on days 2 through 4. Grounding produced changes in CK and complete blood counts that were not shared by the sham-grounded group. Grounding significantly reduced the loss of CK from the injured muscles indicating reduced muscle damage. These results warrant further study on the effects of earthing on delayed onset muscle damage.

  14. Angiogenesis is induced by airway smooth muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Lin, Richard Z; Vaday, Gayle G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2007-10-01

    Angiogenesis is an important feature of airway remodeling in both chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airways in those conditions are exposed to excessive mechanical strain during periods of acute exacerbations. We recently reported that mechanical strain of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) led to an increase in their proliferation and migration. Sustained growth in airway smooth muscle in vivo requires an increase in the nutritional supply to these muscles, hence angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical strain of HASM produces factors promoting angiogenic events in the surrounding vascular endothelial cells. Our results show: 1) a significant increase in human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) proliferation, migration, and tube formation following incubation in conditioned media (CM) from HASM cells exposed to mechanical strain; 2) mechanical strain of HASM cells induced VEGF expression and release; 3) VEGF neutralizing antibodies inhibited the proliferation, migration, and tube formations of HMVEC-L induced by the strained airway smooth muscle CM; 4) mechanical strain of HASM induced a significant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) mRNA and protein, a transcription factor required for VEGF gene transcription; and 5) mechanical strain of HASM induced HIF-1alpha/VEGF through dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ERK pathways. In conclusion, exposing HASM cells to mechanical strain induces signal transduction pathway through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK pathways that lead to an increase in HIF-1alpha, a transcription factor required for VEGF expression. VEGF release by mechanical strain of HASM may contribute to the angiogenesis seen with repeated exacerbation of asthma and COPD.

  15. Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; O'Connor, Patrick J; Dishman, Rod K

    2003-08-01

    This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effect of ingesting a large dose of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. Low-caffeine-consuming college-aged males (n = 16) ingested either caffeine (10 mg x kg(-1) body weight) or placebo and 1 hour later completed 30 minutes of moderate intensity cycling exercise (60% VO(2peak)). The order of drug administration was counter-balanced. Perceptions of leg muscle pain as well as work rate, heart rate, and oxygen uptake (VO(2)) were recorded during exercise. Leg muscle pain ratings were significantly and moderately reduced after a high dose of caffeine. This observation suggests that prior reports showing caffeine improves endurance exercise performance might be partially explained by caffeine's hypoalgesic properties. It also suggests that moderate intensity cycling exercise has promise as a useful experimental model for the study of naturally occurring muscle pain.

  16. 'Serious thigh muscle strains': beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains.

    PubMed

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-02-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in 'muscle strain'. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh 'muscle strain'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Abdominal muscle strains in professional baseball: 1991-2010.

    PubMed

    Conte, Stan A; Thompson, Matthew M; Marks, Matthew A; Dines, Joshua S

    2012-03-01

    The abdominal core muscles (internal and external oblique, rectus and transversus abdominis) play an important role in the baseball activities of pitching and hitting. Proper abdominal muscle activation during throwing and swinging is crucial for generating optimal ball velocity and bat speed. Abdominal muscle strains can result in substantial loss of playing time, and their incidence has never been reported in baseball. The incidence of abdominal muscle strains in Major League Baseball has been rising over the past 20 years. Injuries contralateral to the dominant arm or batting side are more common and require more time to recover. Descriptive epidemiology study. Abdominal muscle strains in baseball players were determined by retrospective review of the Major League Baseball disabled list from 1991 to 2010. Player age, position, dominant hand, batting side, and recovery time were recorded. There were 393 abdominal muscle strains in Major League Baseball from 1991 to 2010, constituting 5% of all baseball injuries. At least 92% of these injuries were internal/external oblique or intercostal muscle strains, and 44% of injuries were sustained by pitchers. The reinjury rate was 12.1%. An upward trend was seen from 1991 to 2010, especially in early-season injuries, and the overall injury rate was 22% higher in the 2000s than in the 1990s. Pitchers averaged 35.4 days on the disabled list compared with 26.7 days for position players (P < .01); 78.1% of pitcher injuries were contralateral to their dominant arm, and 70.3% of position player injuries were contralateral to their dominant batting side (excluding switch hitters). Position players missed more time for contralateral than for ipsilateral injuries (28.9 vs 21.2 days, P = .03), whereas pitchers missed more time for ipsilateral injuries (44.5 vs 32.8 days, P = .04). The incidence of abdominal muscle strains in baseball has been increasing over the past 20 years, especially early in the season, and there is a

  18. Proteasome inhibition alleviates prolonged moderate compression-induced muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism initiating deep pressure ulcer remains to be elucidated. The present study tested the hypothesis that the ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in the signalling mechanism in pressure-induced deep tissue injury. Methods Adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to an experimental compression model to induce deep tissue injury. The tibialis region of the right hind limb was subjected to 100 mmHg of static pressure for six hours on each of two consecutive days. The compression pressure was continuously monitored by a three-axial force transducer within the compression indentor. The left hind limb served as the intra-animal control. Muscle tissues underneath the compressed region were collected and used for analyses. Results Our results demonstrated that the activity of 20S proteasome and the protein abundance of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 were elevated in conjunction with pathohistological changes in the compressed muscle, as compared to control muscle. The administration of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 was found to be effective in ameliorating the development of pathological histology in compressed muscle. Furthermore, 20S proteasome activity and protein content of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 showed no apparent increase in the MG132-treated muscle following compression. Conclusion Our data suggest that the ubiquitin proteasome system may play a role in the pathogenesis of pressure-induced deep tissue injury. PMID:21385343

  19. Synergy characterization for Enterococcus faecalis strains displaying moderately high-level gentamicin and streptomycin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Bantar, C E; Micucci, M; Fernandez Canigia, L; Smayevsky, J; Bianchini, H M

    1993-01-01

    Synergy of 14 Enterococcus faecalis strains displaying moderately high-level aminoglycoside resistance (MICs, 500 and 256 to 1,000 micrograms/ml for gentamicin and streptomycin, respectively) was characterized by time-kill studies. All strains proved resistant to penicillin plus the respective aminoglycoside. Strains with moderately high-level aminoglycoside resistance should be considered to exhibit high-level resistance in severe infections. PMID:8349776

  20. Strain and elongation of the human semitendinosus muscle - tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Patsika, Glykeria; Karagiannidis, Evaggelos

    2013-12-01

    The semitendinosus (ST) consists of a long distal tendon and it is divided in two parts by a tendinous inscription (TI). The purpose of this study was to quantify strain and elongation of the TI and the distal tendon of ST. Fourteen subjects performed ramp isometric contractions of the knee flexors at 0°, 45° and 90° of knee flexion. Two ultrasound probes were used to visualize the displacement of the distal tendon and selected points across the TI and aponeuroses. Three-way analysis of variance designs indicated that: (a) strain and elongation of the ST distal muscle-tendon junction were higher than that of the aponeurosis - TI junction points (p < 0.05) (b) the long arm of the TI reach strain of 49.86 ± 7.77% which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that displayed by the short arm (28.35 ± 0.59%) (c) Strain of tendinous and TI-aponeuroses segments significantly increased from 90° to 0° of knee flexion while the inverse was observed for the TI arm length (p < 0.05). (d) Tendon strain was significantly higher than strain of the TI-aponeuroses segments at 45° and 90° of knee flexion while the opposite was observed at 0° of knee flexion. The arrangement of TI along ST length results in differential local strains, indicating that the mechanical properties of the ST muscle are affected by tendon, aponeuroses and tendinous inscription interactions.

  1. An anatomical study of the proximal hamstring muscle complex to elucidate muscle strains in this region.

    PubMed

    Battermann, N; Appell, H-J; Dargel, J; Koebke, J

    2011-03-01

    Muscle strain injuries are common in sports, and a high incidence is reported for the hamstring muscles, especially in the proximal region, where the long head of the biceps femoris muscle is most frequently affected. To look for some architectural peculiarities, which would make this muscle vulnerable, 101 legs of embalmed human cadavers were dissected and descriptively examined, morphometric data were obtained in the proximal region, and slices of plastinated specimens were microscopically examined. The 3 muscles composing the proximal hamstring complex are partly twisted around each other and possess common fibrous adhesions. Biceps femoris (BF) and semitendinosus (ST) muscles form a common head, to which the ST contributes the majority of fascicles extending 9 cm down from the ischiac tuberosity, thereby attaching to the common tendon at a remarkable pennation angle. The first BF fascicles origin from the common tendon only at 6 cm distance from the ischiac tuberosity. It is concluded that the high incidence of proximal BF strains may be a misinterpretation due to insufficient imaging and the complex architecture. It is suggested that the pennation angle at which the ST inserts to the common tendon makes this muscle especially vulnerable for strains during forced eccentric contractions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. The effects of high- and moderate-resistance training on muscle function in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kalapotharakos, Vasilios I; Michalopoulou, Maria; Godolias, George; Tokmakidis, Savvas P; Malliou, Paraskevi V; Gourgoulis, Vasilios

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week resistance-training program on muscle strength and mass in older adults. Thirty-three inactive participants (60-74 years old) were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: high-resistance training (HT), moderate-resistance training (MT), and control. After the training period, both HT and MT significantly increased 1-RM body strength, the peak torque of knee extensors and flexors, and the midthigh cross-sectional area of the total muscle. In addition, both HT and MT significantly decreased the abdominal circumference. HT was more effective in increasing 1-RM strength, muscle mass, and peak knee-flexor torque than was MT. These data suggest that muscle strength and mass can be improved in the elderly with both high- and moderate-intensity resistance training, but high-resistance training can lead to greater strength gains and hypertrophy than can moderate-resistance training.

  3. The effect of muscle fatigue on in vivo tibial strains.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Charles; Radeva-Petrova, Denitsa R; Finestone, Aharon; Nyska, Meir; Mendelson, Stephen; Benjuya, Nisim; Simkin, Ariel; Burr, David

    2007-01-01

    Stress fracture is a common musculoskeletal problem affecting athletes and soldiers. Repetitive high bone strains and strain rates are considered to be its etiology. The strain level necessary to cause fatigue failure of bone ex vivo is higher than the strains recorded in humans during vigorous physical activity. We hypothesized that during fatiguing exercises, bone strains may increase and reach levels exceeding those measured in the non-fatigued state. To test this hypothesis, we measured in vivo tibial strains, the maximum gastrocnemius isokinetic torque and ground reaction forces in four subjects before and after two fatiguing levels of exercise: a 2km run and a 30km desert march. Strains were measured using strain-gauged staples inserted percutaneously in the medial aspect of their mid-tibial diaphysis. There was a decrease in the peak gastrocnemius isokinetic torque of all four subjects' post-march as compared to pre-run (p=0.0001), indicating the presence of gastrocnemius muscle fatigue. Tension strains increased 26% post-run (p=0.002, 95 % confidence interval (CI) and 29% post-march (p=0.0002, 95% CI) as compared to the pre-run phase. Tension strain rates increased 13% post-run (p=0.001, 95% CI) and 11% post-march (p=0.009, 95% CI) and the compression strain rates increased 9% post-run (p=0.0004, 95% CI) and 17% post-march (p=0.0001, 95% CI). The fatigue state increases bone strains well above those recorded in rested individuals and may be a major factor in the stress fracture etiology.

  4. Flexible strain sensor for air muscles using polypyrrole coated rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahyono, Arief P.; Aw, Kean C.; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Li, K. C.

    2010-04-01

    A novel flexible large strain sensor was developed to be use with an air muscle. A piece of butyl rubber was coated with the conducting polymer, polypyrrole through bulk solution and chemical vapour deposition method. The strain sensor was able to response to sudden movements represented by the multiple step functions of the applied strain. Consistency of the sensor's output was studied and the average error in the change of resistance was calculated to be 0.32% and 0.72% for elongation and contraction respectively for the sample made using chemical vapour deposition. However, a hysteresis was observed for this sample for a single cycle of elongation and contraction with the highest error calculated to be 3.2% at a 0% applied strain. SEM images showed the propagation of surface micro-cracks as the cause of the variation in surface resistance with applied strain. In addition, slower relaxation rate of the rubber prevented the surface micro-cracks to open and close at the same rate. The idea of utilizing conducting polymer coating can be applied to the inner rubber tube of the air muscle. As such, a complete integration between actuator and sensor can be realized.

  5. Three-dimensional ultrasound strain imaging of skeletal muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gijsbertse, K.; Sprengers, A. M. J.; Nillesen, M. M.; Hansen, H. H. G.; Lopata, R. G. P.; Verdonschot, N.; de Korte, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a multi-dimensional strain estimation method is presented to assess local relative deformation in three orthogonal directions in 3D space of skeletal muscles during voluntary contractions. A rigid translation and compressive deformation of a block phantom, that mimics muscle contraction, is used as experimental validation of the 3D technique and to compare its performance with respect to a 2D based technique. Axial, lateral and (in case of 3D) elevational displacements are estimated using a cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm. After transformation of the displacements to a Cartesian coordinate system, strain is derived using a least-squares strain estimator. The performance of both methods is compared by calculating the root-mean-squared error of the estimated displacements with the calculated theoretical displacements of the phantom experiments. We observe that the 3D technique delivers more accurate displacement estimations compared to the 2D technique, especially in the translation experiment where out-of-plane motion hampers the 2D technique. In vivo application of the 3D technique in the musculus vastus intermedius shows good resemblance between measured strain and the force pattern. Similarity of the strain curves of repetitive measurements indicates the reproducibility of voluntary contractions. These results indicate that 3D ultrasound is a valuable imaging tool to quantify complex tissue motion, especially when there is motion in three directions, which results in out-of-plane errors for 2D techniques.

  6. Computational Model of Cellular Metabolic Dynamics in Skeletal Muscle Fibers during Moderate Intensity Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Lai, Nicola; Kirwan, John P.; Saidel, Gerald M.

    2012-01-01

    Human skeletal muscles have different fiber types with distinct metabolic functions and physiological properties. The quantitative metabolic responses of muscle fibers to exercise provide essential information for understanding and modifying the regulatory mechanisms of skeletal muscle. Since in vivo data from skeletal muscle during exercise is limited, a computational, physiologically based model has been developed to quantify the dynamic metabolic responses of many key chemical species. This model distinguishes type I and II muscle fibers, which share the same blood supply. An underlying hypothesis is that the recruitment and metabolic activation of the two main types of muscle fibers differ depending on the pre-exercise state and exercise protocols. Here, activation measured by metabolic response (or enzymatic activation) in single fibers is considered linked but distinct from fiber recruitment characterized by the number (or mass) of each fiber type involved during a specific exercise. The model incorporates species transport processes between blood and muscle fibers and most of the important reactions/pathways in cytosol and mitochondria within each fiber type. Model simulations describe the dynamics of intracellular species concentrations and fluxes in muscle fibers during moderate intensity exercise according to various experimental protocols and conditions. This model is validated by comparing model simulations with experimental data in single muscle fibers and in whole muscle. Model simulations demonstrate that muscle-fiber recruitment and metabolic activation patterns in response to exercise produce significantly distinctive effects depending on the exercise conditions. PMID:22942911

  7. Changes in masseter muscle trigger points following strain-counterstrain or neuro-muscular technique.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-García, Jordi; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Girao, Didac; Atienza-Meseguer, Albert; Planella-Abella, Sergi; Fernández-de-Las Peñas, César

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immediate effects, on pressure pain sensitivity and active mouth opening, following the application of neuromuscular or strain/counter-strain technique in latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the masseter muscle. Seventy-one subjects, 34 men and 37 women, aged 20-65 years old, participated in this study. Subjects underwent a screening process to establish the presence of MTrPs in the masseter muscle. Subjects were divided randomly into three groups: group A which was treated with a neuromuscular intervention, group B treated with the strain/counter-strain technique, and group C as control group. Each treatment group received a weekly treatment session during 3 consecutive weeks. Outcomes measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), active mouth opening and local pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) elicited by the application of 2.5kg/cm(2) of pressure over the MTrP. They were captured at baseline and 1 week after discharge by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation of the subject. The ANOVA found a significant groupxtime interaction (F=25.3; p<0.001) for changes in PPT, changes in active mouth opening (F=10.5; p<0.001), and local pain evoked by 2.5kg/cm(2) of pressure (F=10.1; p<0.001). Within-group effect sizes were large (d>1) for PPT and mouth opening, and moderate for local pain (d<0.7, 0.5) in both intervention groups; but small (d<0.2) for the control group in all outcomes. No significant differences between both intervention groups were found for any outcome (p>0.8). Our results suggest that neuromuscular or strain/counter-strain technique might be employed in the management of latent MTrPs in the masseter muscle.

  8. Regional Variation in Geniohyoid Muscle Strain During Suckling in the Infant Pig

    PubMed Central

    HOLMAN, SHAINA DEVI; KONOW, NICOLAI; LUKASIK, STACEY L.; GERMAN, REBECCA Z.

    2014-01-01

    The geniohyoid muscle (GH) is a critical suprahyoid muscle in most mammalian oropharyngeal motor activities. We used sonomicrometry to evaluate regional strain (i.e., changes in length) in the muscle origin, belly, and insertion during suckling in infant pigs, and compared the results to existing information on strain heterogeneity in the hyoid musculature. We tested the hypothesis that during rhythmic activity, the GH shows regional variation in muscle strain. We used sonomicrometry transducer pairs to divide the muscle into three regions from anterior to posterior. The results showed differences in strain among the regions within a feeding cycle; however, no region consistently shortened or lengthened over the course of a cycle. Moreover, regional strain patterns were not correlated with timing of the suck cycles, neither (1) relative to a swallow cycle (before or after) nor (2) to the time in feeding sequence (early or late). We also found a tight relationship between muscle activity and muscle strain, however, the relative timing of muscle activity and muscle strain was different in some muscle regions and between individuals. A dissection of the C1 innervations of the geniohyoid showed that there are between one and three branches entering the muscle, possibly explaining the variation seen in regional activity and strain. In combination, our findings suggest that regional heterogeneity in muscle strain during patterned suckling behavior functions to stabilize the hyoid bone, whereas the predictable regional strain differences in reflexive behaviors may be necessary for faster and higher amplitude movements of the hyoid bone. PMID:22549885

  9. The trapezius muscle uniquely lacks adaptive process in response to a repeated moderate cognitive stressor.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Magali; Bolmont, Benoît

    2012-01-06

    The aim of this study was to examine the adaptive process of muscular responses in healthy subjects over two repeated exposures to the same moderate cognitive stressor. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor pollicis brevis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, trapezius, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was recorded in 35 males during video-recorded Stroop color-word interference tests. The results showed lower EMG activity in all muscles during the second exposure to the stressful task, but not in the trapezius muscle. These findings could help to the understanding of the role of stressful situations in the development of musculoskeletal disorders.

  10. Moderate and sustained exercise modulates muscle proteolytic and myogenic markers in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Vélez, Emilio J; Azizi, Sheida; Lutfi, Esmail; Capilla, Encarnación; Moya, Alberto; Navarro, Isabel; Fernández-Borràs, Jaume; Blasco, Josefina; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2017-05-01

    Swimming activity primarily accelerates growth in fish by increasing protein synthesis and energy efficiency. The role of muscle in this process is remarkable and especially important in teleosts, where muscle represents a high percentage of body weight and because many fish species present continuous growth. The aim of this work was to characterize the effects of 5 wk of moderate and sustained swimming in gene and protein expression of myogenic regulatory factors, proliferation markers, and proteolytic molecules in two muscle regions (anterior and caudal) of gilthead sea bream fingerlings. Western blot results showed an increase in the proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), proteolytic system members calpain 1 and cathepsin D, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR data showed that exercise increased the gene expression of proteases (calpains, cathepsins, and members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the anterior muscle region) and the gene expression of the proliferation marker PCNA and the myogenic factor MyoD in the caudal area compared with control fish. Overall, these data suggest a differential response of the two muscle regions during swimming adaptation, with tissue remodeling and new vessel formation occurring in the anterior muscle and enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation occurring in the caudal area. In summary, the present study contributes to improving the knowledge of the role of proteolytic molecules and other myogenic factors in the adaptation of muscle to moderate sustained swimming in gilthead sea bream. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The Physiological Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Supply and Oxidation During Moderate-Intensity Exercise.

    PubMed

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2015-11-01

    Energy substrates that are important to the working muscle at moderate intensities are the non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) taken up from the circulation and NEFAs originating from lipolysis of the intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTAG). Moreover, NEFA from lipolysis via lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the muscle of the very-low-density lipoproteins and in the (semi) post-prandial state chylomicrons may also contribute. In this review, the NEFA fluxes and oxidation by skeletal muscle during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise are described in terms of the integration of physiological systems. Steps involved in the regulation of the active muscle NEFA uptake include (1) increased energy demand; (2) delivery of NEFA to the muscle; (3) transport of NEFA into the muscle by NEFA transporters; and (4) activation of the NEFAs and either oxidation or re-esterification into IMTAG. The increased metabolic demand of the exercising muscle is the main driving force for all physiological regulatory processes. It elicits functional hyperemia, increasing the recruitment of capillaries and muscle blood flow resulting in increased NEFA delivery and accessibility to NEFA transporters and LPL. It also releases epinephrine that augments adipose tissue NEFA release and thereby NEFA delivery to the active muscle. Moreover, NEFA transporters translocate to the plasma membrane, further increasing the NEFA uptake. The majority of the NEFAs taken up by the active muscle is oxidized and a minor portion is re-esterified to IMTAG. Net IMTAG lipolysis occurs; however, the IMTAG contribution to total fat oxidation is rather limited compared to plasma-derived NEFA oxidation, suggesting a complex role and regulation of IMTAG utilization.

  12. Effects of moderate heart failure and functional overload on rat plantaris muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, Espen E.; Lees, Simon J.; Otis, Jeff S.; Musch, Timothy I.; Talmadge, Robert J.; Williams, Jay H.

    2002-01-01

    It is thought that changes in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) of skeletal muscle contribute to alterations in skeletal muscle function during congestive heart failure (CHF). It is well established that exercise training can improve muscle function. However, it is unclear whether similar adaptations will result from exercise training in a CHF patient. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle during moderate CHF adapts to increased activity, utilizing the functional overload (FO) model. Significant increases in plantaris mass of the CHF-FO and sham-FO groups compared with the CHF and control (sham) groups were observed. Ca(2+) uptake rates were significantly elevated in the CHF group compared with all other groups. No differences were detected in Ca(2+) uptake rates between the CHF-FO, sham, and sham-FO groups. Increases in Ca(2+) uptake rates in moderate-CHF rats were not due to changes in SERCA isoform proportions; however, FO may have attenuated the CHF-induced increases through alterations in SERCA isoform expression. Therefore, changes in skeletal muscle Ca(2+) handling during moderate CHF may be due to alterations in regulatory mechanisms, which exercise may override, by possibly altering SERCA isoform expression.

  13. Effects of moderate heart failure and functional overload on rat plantaris muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, Espen E.; Lees, Simon J.; Otis, Jeff S.; Musch, Timothy I.; Talmadge, Robert J.; Williams, Jay H.

    2002-01-01

    It is thought that changes in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) of skeletal muscle contribute to alterations in skeletal muscle function during congestive heart failure (CHF). It is well established that exercise training can improve muscle function. However, it is unclear whether similar adaptations will result from exercise training in a CHF patient. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle during moderate CHF adapts to increased activity, utilizing the functional overload (FO) model. Significant increases in plantaris mass of the CHF-FO and sham-FO groups compared with the CHF and control (sham) groups were observed. Ca(2+) uptake rates were significantly elevated in the CHF group compared with all other groups. No differences were detected in Ca(2+) uptake rates between the CHF-FO, sham, and sham-FO groups. Increases in Ca(2+) uptake rates in moderate-CHF rats were not due to changes in SERCA isoform proportions; however, FO may have attenuated the CHF-induced increases through alterations in SERCA isoform expression. Therefore, changes in skeletal muscle Ca(2+) handling during moderate CHF may be due to alterations in regulatory mechanisms, which exercise may override, by possibly altering SERCA isoform expression.

  14. Moderate alcohol consumption does not impair overload-induced muscle hypertrophy and protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Gordon, Bradley S; Lang, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption leads to muscle weakness and atrophy in part by suppressing protein synthesis and mTORC1-mediated signaling. However, it is unknown whether moderate alcohol consumption also prevents overload-induced muscle growth and related anabolic signaling. Hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle was induced by removal of a section of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles from one leg of C57BL/6 adult male mice while the contralateral leg remained intact as the sham control. A nutritionally complete alcohol-containing liquid diet (EtOH) or isocaloric, alcohol-free liquid diet (Con) was provided for 14 days post-surgery. EtOH intake was increased progressively (day 1–5) before being maintained at ∽20 g/day/kg BW. The plantaris muscle from the sham and OL leg was removed after 14 days at which time there was no difference in body weight between Con and EtOH-fed mice. OL increased muscle weight (90%) and protein synthesis (125%) in both Con and EtOH mice. The overload-induced increase in mTOR (Ser2448), 4E-BP1 (Thr37/46), S6K1 (Thr389), rpS6 (Ser240/244), and eEF2 (Thr56) were comparable in muscle from Con and EtOH mice. Modulation of signaling upstream of mTORC1 including REDD1 protein expression, Akt (Thr308), PRAS40 (Thr246), and ERK (Thr202/Tyr204) also did not differ between Con and EtOH mice. Markers of autophagy (ULK1, p62, and LC3) suggested inhibition of autophagy with overload and activation with alcohol feeding. These data show that moderate alcohol consumption does not impair muscle growth, and therefore imply that resistance exercise may be an effective therapeutic modality for alcoholic-related muscle disease. PMID:25780086

  15. Moderate bending strain induced semiconductor to metal transition in Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, M. Golam; Patil, Sunil R.; Anantram, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    A moderate amount of bending strains, ∼3% is found to be enough to induce the semiconductor-metal transition in Si nanowires of ∼4 nm diameter. The influence of bending on silicon nanowires of 1 nm to 4.3 nm diameter is investigated using molecular dynamics and quantum transport simulations. Local strains in nanowires are analyzed along with the effect of bending strain and nanowire diameter on electronic transport and the transmission energy gap. Interestingly, relatively wider nanowires are found to undergo semiconductor-metal transition at relatively lower bending strains. The effect of bending strain on electronic properties is then compared with the conventional way of straining, i.e. uniaxial, which shows that bending is a much more efficient way of straining to enhance the electronic transport and also to induce the semiconductor-metal transition in experimentally realizable Si nanowires.

  16. Hamstring muscle forces prior to and immediately following an acute sprinting-related muscle strain injury.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Morgan, David L; Pandy, Marcus G

    2010-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the biomechanics of the hamstrings during sprinting is required to optimise injury rehabilitation and prevention strategies. The main aims of this study were to compare hamstrings load across different modes of locomotion as well as before and after an acute sprinting-related muscle strain injury. Bilateral kinematic and ground reaction force data were captured from a single subject whilst walking, jogging and sprinting prior to and immediately following a significant injury involving the right semitendinosis and biceps femoris long head muscles. Experimental data were input into a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model of the body and used, together with optimisation theory, to determine lower-limb muscle forces for each locomotor task. Hamstrings load was found to be greatest during terminal swing for sprinting. The hamstrings contributed the majority of the terminal swing hip extension and knee flexion torques, whilst gluteus maximus contributed most of the stance phase hip extension torque. Gastrocnemius contributed little to the terminal swing knee flexion torque. Peak hamstrings force was also substantially greater during terminal swing compared to stance for sprinting, but not for walking and jogging. Immediately following the muscle strain injury, the hamstrings demonstrated an intolerance to perform an eccentric-type contraction. Whilst peak hamstrings force during terminal swing did not decrease post-injury, both peak hamstrings length and negative work during terminal swing were considerably reduced. These results lend support to the paradigm that the hamstrings are most susceptible to muscle strain injury during the terminal swing phase of sprinting when they are contracting eccentrically. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo muscle function vs speed. I. Muscle strain in relation to length change of the muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Donald F; Wickler, Steven J; Biewener, Andrew A; Cogger, Edward A; De La Paz, Kristin L

    2005-03-01

    The activity of muscles can be concentric (shortening), eccentric (lengthening) or isometric (constant length). When studying muscle function it is important to know what the muscle fascicles are actually doing because the performance of muscle is strongly influenced by the type of activity: force decreases as a function of shortening velocity during concentric contractions; force produced during eccentric contractions can be stronger than maximum isometric force, and force production is enhanced if a concentric contraction follows an eccentric phase. It is well known that length changes of muscle fascicles may be different from length changes of the overall muscle-tendon unit because of the compliance of the series elasticity. Consequently, fascicles of joint extensor muscles may not undergo eccentric activity even when the joint flexes, but the extent to which this occurs may vary with the compliance of the series elasticity and may differ between species: the vastus lateralis, a knee extensor, shortens when active during trotting in dogs and lengthens in rats. Previous studies of kinematics of trotting in horses have shown that during stance, the elbow extends nearly continuously with a brief period of flexion near mid-stance and the knee exhibits two phases of flexion followed by extension. The lateral triceps (an elbow extensor) has no external tendon but the vastus lateralis has a relatively long external tendon and the fascicles insert on an aponeurosis. Thus, one might expect the relation between fascicle strain and overall length change of the muscle-tendon units to be quite different in these two muscles. In the present study in horses, fascicle length changes of the lateral triceps and vastus lateralis were measured with sonomicrometry and length changes of the muscle-tendon units were estimated from muscle architecture and joint kinematics for four horses trotting on a treadmill at nine speeds. Because the focus of this study was the relation between

  18. Mechanistic role of movement and strain sensitivity in muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Julien S.; Epstein, Neal D.

    2009-01-01

    Tension generation can be studied by applying step perturbations to contracting muscle fibers and subdividing the mechanical response into exponential phases. The de novo tension-generating isomerization is associated with one of these phases. Earlier work has shown that a temperature jump perturbs the equilibrium constant directly to increase tension. Here, we show that a length jump functions quite differently. A step release (relative movement of thick and thin filaments) appears to release a steric constraint on an ensemble of noncompetent postphosphate release actomyosin cross-bridges, enabling them to generate tension, a concentration jump in effect. Structural studies [Taylor KA, et al. (1999) Tomographic 3D reconstruction of quick-frozen, Ca2+-activated contracting insect flight muscle. Cell 99:421–431] that map to these kinetics indicate that both catalytic and lever arm domains of noncompetent myosin heads change angle on actin, whereas lever arm movement alone mediates the power stroke. Together, these kinetic and structural observations show a 13-nm overall interaction distance of myosin with actin, including a final 4- to 6-nm power stroke when the catalytic domain is fixed on actin. Raising fiber temperature with both perturbation techniques accelerates the forward, but slows the reverse rate constant of tension generation, kinetics akin to the unfolding/folding of small proteins. Decreasing strain, however, causes both forward and reverse rate constants to increase. Despite these changes in rate, the equilibrium constant is strain-insensitive. Activation enthalpy and entropy data show this invariance to be the result of enthalpy–entropy compensation. Reaction amplitudes confirm a strain-invariant equilibrium constant and thus a strain-insensitive ratio of pretension- to tension-generating states as work is done. PMID:19325123

  19. Intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for muscle strains in Australian football.

    PubMed

    Orchard, J W

    2001-01-01

    Muscle strains are common injuries in Australian football and other sports involving sprinting. Between 1992 and 1999, 83,503 player-matches in the Australian Football League were analyzed for risk of muscle strain injuries using logistic regression analysis. There were 672 hamstring, 163 quadriceps, and 140 calf muscle strain injuries. All three types of muscle strains were associated with significant risk factors. For all injuries, the strongest risk factor was a recent history of that same injury and the next strongest risk factor was a past history of the same injury. History of one type of muscle strain increased the risk for certain types of other muscle strains. Age was a risk factor for hamstring and calf muscle strains (even when adjusted for injury history) but was not a risk factor for quadriceps muscle strains. Quadriceps muscle injuries were more common in shorter players and were more likely when there had been less rainfall at the match venue in the previous week. Quadriceps muscle injuries were significantly more common in the dominant kicking leg, whereas hamstring and calf muscle injuries showed no difference in frequency between the dominant and nondominant legs.

  20. Assessment of Muscle Contractile Properties at Acute Moderate Altitude Through Tensiomyography.

    PubMed

    Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Padial, Paulino; Rodríguez-Matoso, Dario; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; García-Ramos, Amador; García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Calderón, Carmen; Feriche, Belén

    2015-12-01

    Under hypoxia, alterations in muscle contractile properties and faster fatigue development have been reported. This study investigated the efficacy of tensiomyography (TMG) in assessing muscle contractile function at acute moderate altitude. Biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of 18 athletes (age 20.1 ± 6.1 years; body mass 65.4 ± 13.9 kg; height 174.6 ± 9.5 cm) were assessed at sea level and moderate altitude using electrically evoked contractions on two consecutive days. Maximum radial displacement (Dm), time of contraction (Tc), reaction time (Td), sustained contraction time (Ts), and relaxation time (Tr) were recorded at 40, 60, 80, and 100 mA. At altitude, VL showed lower Dm values at 40 mA (p = 0.008; ES = -0.237). Biceps femoris showed Dm decrements in all electrical stimulations (p < 0.001, ES > 0.61). In VL, Tc was longer at altitude at 40 (p = 0.031, ES = 0.56), and 100 mA (p = 0.03, ES = 0.51). Regarding Td, VL showed significant increases in all electrical intensities under hypoxia (p ≤ 0.03, ES ≥ 0.33). TMG appears effective at detecting slight changes in the muscle contractile properties at moderate altitude. Further research involving TMG along with other muscle function assessment methods is needed to provide additional insight into peripheral neuromuscular alterations at moderate altitude.

  1. Effect of blood volume in resting muscle on heart rate upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takehide; Matsuura, Ryouta; Arimitsu, Takuma; Yunoki, Takahiro; Yano, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the increase in blood volume in resting muscle during moderately prolonged exercise is related to heart rate (HR) upward drift. Eight healthy men completed both arm-cranking moderately prolonged exercise (APE) and leg-pedaling moderately prolonged exercise (LPE) for 30 min. Exercise intensity was 120 bpm of HR that was determined by ramp incremental exercise. During both APE and LPE, HR significantly increased from 3 to 30 min (from 108±9.3 to 119±12 bpm and from 112±8.9 to 122±11 bpm, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between HR in APE and that in LPE. Oxygen uptake was maintained throughout the two exercises. Skin blood flow, deep temperature, and total Hb (blood volume) in resting muscle continuously increased for 30 min of exercise during both APE and LPE. During both APE and LPE, there was a significant positive correlation between total Hb and deep temperature in all subjects. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between HR and total Hb (in seven out of eight subjects) during LPE. However, during APE, there was no positive correlation between HR and total Hb (r=0.391). These findings suggest that an increase of blood pooling in resting muscle could be proposed as one of the mechanisms underlying HR upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

  2. Isolation of moderately penicillin-susceptible strains of Neisseria meningitidis in Argentina.

    PubMed Central

    Lopardo, H A; Santander, C; Ceinos, M C; Rubeglio, E A

    1993-01-01

    Four strains that were moderately susceptible to penicillin and/or ampicillin were found among 54 consecutive isolates of meningococci recovered from patients in one pediatric hospital in Argentina from October 1991 to December 1992. Disk diffusion tests performed with 2 U of penicillin failed to detect one strain. These findings suggest that attention should be paid to changes in the susceptibility patterns of meningococci in order to anticipate therapeutic failures in the future. PMID:8215295

  3. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-03-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P < 0.05) in DB compared with Con. Leg oxygen extraction (arteriovenous O(2) difference) was higher (P < 0.05) in DB than in Con (5 s: 127 +/- 3 vs. 56 +/- 4 ml/l), and leg oxygen uptake was not different between Con and DB during exercise. The difference between leg oxygen delivery and leg oxygen uptake was smaller (P < 0.05) during exercise in DB than in Con (5 s: 59 +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.

  4. Adrenaline increases skeletal muscle glycogenolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase activation and carbohydrate oxidation during moderate exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Matthew J; Howlett, Kirsten F; Febbraio, Mark A; Spriet, Lawrence L; Hargreaves, Mark

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of adrenaline in regulating carbohydrate metabolism during moderate exercise, 10 moderately trained men completed two 20 min exercise bouts at 58 ± 2 % peak pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2,peak). On one occasion saline was infused (CON), and on the other adrenaline was infused intravenously for 5 min prior to and throughout exercise (ADR). Glucose kinetics were measured by a primed, continuous infusion of 6,6-[2H]glucose and muscle samples were obtained prior to and at 1 and 20 min of exercise. The infusion of adrenaline elevated (P < 0.01) plasma adrenaline concentrations at rest (pre-infusion, 0.28 ± 0.09; post-infusion, 1.70 ± 0.45 nmol l−1; means ±s.e.m.) and this effect was maintained throughout exercise. Total carbohydrate oxidation increased by 18 % and this effect was due to greater skeletal muscle glycogenolysis (P < 0.05) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation (P < 0.05, treatment effect). Glucose rate of appearance was not different between trials, but the infusion of adrenaline decreased (P < 0.05, treatment effect) skeletal muscle glucose uptake in ADR. During exercise muscle glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) (P = 0.055, treatment effect) and lactate (P < 0.05) were elevated in ADR compared with CON and no changes were observed for pyruvate, creatine, phosphocreatine, ATP and the calculated free concentrations of ADP and AMP. The data demonstrate that elevated plasma adrenaline levels during moderate exercise in untrained men increase skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown and PDH activation, which results in greater carbohydrate oxidation. The greater muscle glycogenolysis appears to be due to increased glycogen phosphorylase transformation whilst the increased PDH activity cannot be readily explained. Finally, the decreased glucose uptake observed during exercise in ADR is likely to be due to the increased intracellular G-6-P and a subsequent decrease in glucose phosphorylation. PMID:11433007

  5. Regional heterogeneity in muscle fiber strain: the role of fiber architecture

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, E.; Deslauriers, Amber R.

    2014-01-01

    The force, mechanical work and power produced by muscle fibers are profoundly affected by the length changes they undergo during a contraction. These length changes are in turn affected by the spatial orientation of muscle fibers within a muscle (fiber architecture). Therefore any heterogeneity in fiber architecture within a single muscle has the potential to cause spatial variation in fiber strain. Here we examine how the architectural variation within a pennate muscle and within a fusiform muscle can result in regional fiber strain heterogeneity. We combine simple geometric models with empirical measures of fiber strain to better understand the effect of architecture on fiber strain heterogeneity. We show that variation in pennation angle throughout a muscle can result in differences in fiber strain with higher strains being observed at lower angles of pennation. We also show that in fusiform muscles, the outer/superficial fibers of the muscle experience lower strains than central fibers. These results show that regional variation in mechanical output of muscle fibers can arise solely from architectural features of the muscle without the presence of any spatial variation in motor recruitment. PMID:25161626

  6. The magnitude of muscle strain does not influence serial sarcomere number adaptations following eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-02-01

    It is generally accepted that eccentric exercise, when performed by a muscle that is unaccustomed to that type of contraction, results in a delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). A prolonged exposure to eccentric exercise leads to the disappearance of the signs and symptoms associated with DOMS, which has been referred to as the repeated bout effect (RBE). Although the mechanisms underlying the RBE remain unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed, including the serial sarcomere number addition following exercise induced muscle damage. In the traditional DOMS and RBE protocols, muscle injury has been treated as a global parameter, with muscle force and strain assumed to be uniform throughout the muscle. To assess the effects of muscle-tendon unit strain, fiber strain, torque and injury on serial sarcomere number adaptations, three groups of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to chronic repetitive eccentric exercise bouts of the ankle dorsiflexors for 6 weeks. These eccentric exercise protocols consisted of identical muscle tendon unit (MTU) strain, but other mechanical factors were systematically altered. Following chronic eccentric exercise, serial sarcomere number adaptations were not identical between the three eccentric exercise protocols, and serial sarcomere number adaptations were not uniform across all regions of the muscle. Peak torque and relaxation fiber strain were the best predictors of serial sarcomere number across all three protocols. Therefore, MTU strain does not appear to be the primary cause for sarcomerogenesis, and differential adaptations within the muscle may be explained by the nonuniform architecture of the muscle, resulting in differential local fiber strains.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes).

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Ramaley, Robert F; Schuster, Stephan C; Steinke, Laurey; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-08-28

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons.

  8. Buffering or Strengthening: The Moderating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Stressor-Strain Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Dong

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the moderating effect of self-efficacy on stressor-strain relationship among 30 telephone interviewers in an academic survey research center. Participants filled out measures of the Skills Confidence Inventory and the Scale of Perceived Social Self-Efficacy. They reported their state anxiety and recorded the number of…

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Methanotroph Methylohalobius crimeensis Strain 10Ki

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Christine E.; Smirnova, Angela V.; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Bringel, Françoise; Hirayama, Hisako; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Khmelenina, Valentina N.; Klotz, Martin G.; Knief, Claudia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Reshetnikov, Alexander S.; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Shapiro, Nicole; Trotsenko, Yuri A.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Methylohalobius crimeensis strain 10Ki is a moderately halophilic aerobic methanotroph isolated from a hypersaline lake in the Crimean Peninsula, Ukraine. This organism has the highest salt tolerance of any cultured methanotroph. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:26067976

  10. On-call work and physicians' turnover intention: the moderating effect of job strain.

    PubMed

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Presseau, Justin; Elovainio, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Physician shortage and turnover are major problems worldwide. On-call duties may be among the risk factors of high turnover rates among physicians. We investigated whether having on-call duties is associated with physicians' turnover intention and whether job strain variables moderate this association. The present study was a cross-sectional questionnaire study among 3324 (61.6% women) Finnish physicians. The analyses were conducted using analyses of covariance adjusted for age, gender, response format, specialization status and employment sector. The results showed that job strain moderated the association between being on-call and turnover intention. The highest levels of turnover intention were among those who had on-call duties and high level of job strain characterized by high demands and low control opportunities. The lowest levels of turnover intention were among those who were not on-call and who had low strain involving low demands and high control. Also, job demands moderated the association between being on-call and turnover intention; turnover intention levels were higher among those with on-call duties and high demands than those being on-call and low demands. To conclude, working on-call was related to physicians' turnover intention particularly in those with high job strain. Health care organizations should focus more attention on working arrangements and scheduling of on-call work, provide a suitable working pace and implement means to increase physicians' participation and control over their job.

  11. Moderate exercise training induces ROS-related adaptations to skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Abruzzo, P M; Esposito, F; Marchionni, C; di Tullio, S; Belia, S; Fulle, S; Veicsteinas, A; Marini, M

    2013-08-01

    Aim of the present work was the evaluation of the effects of moderate exercise training on 2 skeletal muscles differing in fibre-type composition, Tibialis Anterior (TA) and Soleus (SOL). Fibre adaptations, including their metabolic shift and mechanisms underlying proliferation and differentiation, oxidative stress markers, antioxidant and cytoprotective molecules, activity of Ca2+-handling molecules were examined. 6 male 2-month-old rats trained on a treadmill for 1 h/day, 3 days/week, for 14 weeks, reaching 30 m/min at the end of training. 6 age-matched sedentary rats served as controls. Rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last training session. Muscle regulatory factors increased in both muscles, activating satellite cell proliferation, which led to moderate hypertrophy in SOL and to moderate hyperplasia in TA, where the upregulation of desmin and TNFR2 expression suggests that myotube formation by proliferating myoblasts is somehow delayed. Changes leading to a more oxidative metabolism together with the upregulation of a number of antioxidant enzymes occurred in TA. HSP70i protein was upregulated in both SOL and TA, while oxidative stress markers increased in SOL alone. The status of ionic channels and pumps was preserved. We suggest that the increase in ROS, known to be associated with exercise, underlies most observed results.

  12. Hyperplasia of smooth muscle in mild to moderate asthma without changes in cell size or gene expression.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Prescott G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Ferrando, Ronald E; Donnelly, Samantha; Hays, Steven R; Solberg, Owen D; Carter, Roderick; Wong, Hofer H; Cadbury, Peggy S; Fahy, John V

    2004-05-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in mild to moderate asthma may result from airway smooth muscle cell proliferation or acquisition of a hypercontractile phenotype. Because these cells have not been well characterized in mild to moderate asthma, we examined the morphometric and gene expression characteristics of smooth muscle cells in this subgroup of patients with asthma. Using bronchial biopsies from 14 subjects with mild to moderate asthma and 15 control subjects, we quantified smooth muscle cell morphology by stereology and the expression of a panel of genes related to a hypercontractile phenotype of airway smooth muscle, using laser microdissection and two-step real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that airway smooth muscle cell size was similar in both groups, but cell number was nearly twofold higher in subjects with asthma (p = 0.03), and the amount of smooth muscle in the submucosa was increased 50-83% (p < 0.005). Gene expression profiling in smooth muscle cells showed no difference in the expression of genes encoding phenotypic markers in cells from healthy subjects and subjects with asthma (all p > 0.1). We conclude that airway smooth muscle proliferation is a pathologic characteristic of subjects with mild to moderate asthma. However, smooth muscle cells in mild to moderate asthma do not show hypertrophy or gene expression changes of a hypercontractile phenotype observed in vitro.

  13. Quantification of muscle fiber strain during in vivo repetitive stretch-shortening cycles.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2005-08-01

    Muscles subjected to lengthening contractions exhibit evidence of subcellular disruption, arguably a result of fiber strain magnitude. Due to the difficulty associated with measuring fiber strains during lengthening contractions, fiber length estimates have been used to formulate relationships between the magnitude of injury and mechanical measures such as fiber strain. In such protocols, the series compliance is typically minimized by removing the distal tendon and/or preactivating the muscle. These in vitro and in situ experiments do not represent physiological contractions well where fiber strain and muscle strain may be disassociated; thus the mechanisms of in vivo muscle injury remain elusive. The purpose of this paper was to quantify fiber strains during lengthening contractions in vivo and assess the potential role of fiber strain in muscle injury following repetitive stretch-shortening cycles. Using intact New Zealand White rabbit dorsiflexors, fiber strain and joint torque were measured during 50 stretch-shortening cycles. We were able to show that fiber length changes are disassociated from muscle tendon unit length changes and that complex fiber dynamics during these cycles prevent easy estimates of fiber strains. In addition, fiber strains vary, depending on how they are defined, and vary from repetition to repetition, thereby further complicating the potential relationship between muscle injury and fiber strain. We conclude from this study that, during in vivo stretch-shortening cycles, the relationship between fiber strain and muscle injury is complex. This is due, in part, to temporal effects of repeated loading on fiber strain magnitude that may be explained by an increasing compliance of the contractile element as exercise progresses.

  14. Effects of pulse duration on muscle fatigue during electrical stimulation inducing moderate-level contraction.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Woohyoung; Griffin, Lisa

    2017-09-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is used to prevent muscle atrophy. However, the effect of pulse duration modulation for reducing muscle fatigue and pain is unknown. Two 2-minute stimulation protocols were applied to the knee extensors of 10 healthy individuals. In 1 session, a long pulse duration (1,000 μs) and a low current amplitude (LL), set to evoke 25% maximal voluntary contraction at 30 Hz, were applied. The other session was identical except that a short pulse duration (200 μs) and a high current amplitude (SH) were used. Muscle fatigue was lower for LL than for SH (P < 0.01). Force recovery rate was higher for LL than for SH (P < 0.05). Pain scores were also lower for LL than for SH (P < 0.05). The use of 1-ms pulse durations reduces fatigue and pain during NMES for moderate-level contractions compared with 200-μs durations. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: The effects of essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation during moderate steady state (ie, endurance) exercise on postexercise skeletal muscle metabolism are not well described, and the potential role of supplemental leucine on muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and associated molecular re...

  16. Muscle strain histories in swimming milkfish in steady and sprinting gaits

    PubMed

    Katz; Shadwick; Rapoport

    1999-03-01

    Adult milkfish (Chanos chanos) swam in a water-tunnel flume over a wide range of speeds. Fish were instrumented with sonomicrometers to measure shortening of red and white myotomal muscle. Muscle strain was also calculated from simultaneous overhead views of the swimming fish. This allowed us to test the hypothesis that the muscle shortens in phase with local body bending. The fish swam at slow speeds [U<2.6 fork lengths s-1 (=FL s-1)] where only peripheral red muscle was powering body movements, and also at higher speeds (2. 6>U>4.6 FL s-1) where they adopted a sprinting gait in which the white muscle is believed to power the body movements. For all combinations of speeds and body locations where we had simultaneous measurements of muscle strain and body bending (0.5 and 0.7FL), both techniques were equivalent predictors of muscle strain histories. Cross-correlation coefficients for comparisons between these techniques exceeded 0.95 in all cases and had temporal separations of less than 7 ms on average. Muscle strain measured using sonomicrometry within the speed range 0.9-2.6 FL s-1 showed that muscle strain did not increase substantially over that speed range, while tail-beat frequency increased by 140 %. While using a sprinting gait, muscle strains became bimodal, with strains within bursts being approximately double those between bursts. Muscle strain calculated from local body bending for a range of locations on the body indicated that muscle strain increases rostrally to caudally, but only by less than 4 %. These results suggest that swimming muscle, which forms a large fraction of the body volume in a fish, undergoes a history of strain that is similar to that expected for a homogeneous, continuous beam. This has been an implicit assumption for many studies of muscle function in many fish, but has not been tested explicitly until now. This result is achieved in spite of the presence of complex and inhomogeneous geometry in the folding of myotomes

  17. One- vs two-muscle surgery for presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy associated with moderate angle hyperdeviations.

    PubMed

    Nash, David L; Hatt, Sarah R; Leske, David A; May, Laura; Bothun, Erick D; Mohney, Brian G; Brodsky, Michael C; Holmes, Jonathan M

    2017-07-04

    To compare one-muscle versus two-muscle surgery for moderate-angle hyperdeviations due to presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy. Retrospective chart review METHODS: 73 patients (5 to 86 years) underwent either one- or two-muscle surgery at our institution, for moderate hyperdeviation, due to presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy, measuring 14 to 25 PD in straight ahead gaze at distance fixation. Six week and 1-year motor success was defined as zero vertical deviation or 1-4 PD undercorrection at distance, overcorrection as any reversal of hypertropia, and undercorrection as >4 PD. Diplopia success was defined as no diplopia, or only rarely for distance straight ahead and reading. 28 patients underwent one-muscle surgery, and 45 patients underwent two-muscle surgery. Motor success was similar (64% vs 67%, P>0.99 at 6 weeks; 47% vs 55%, P=0.8 at 1 year, n=46), but there were more undercorrections at 6-weeks with one-muscle surgery (36% vs 16%, p=0.09), and more overcorrections at 6-weeks with two-muscle surgery (0% vs 18%, p=0.02). Diplopia success was also somewhat similar between one- and two-muscle surgery at 6 weeks (73% vs 60%, p=0.5) and 1 year (45% vs 59%, P=0.5). For moderate angle hyperdeviations due to presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy, there appears no clear advantage of two-muscle surgery for motor outcomes. Diplopia success at was similar between one- and two-muscle surgery, due to a greater number of less symptomatic undercorrections with one-muscle surgery, and a smaller number of more symptomatic overcorrections with two-muscle surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. When respect deteriorates: incivility as a moderator of the stressor-strain relationship among hospital workers.

    PubMed

    Gilin Oore, Debra; Leblanc, Diane; Day, Arla; Leiter, Michael P; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Price, Sheri L; Latimer, Margot

    2010-11-01

    To test whether incivility at work exacerbates the relationship between stressors and strain for hospital workers. A climate of incivility and disrespect among colleagues was expected to heighten the impact of work stressors on the mental and physical health of care providers. Members of 17 care-providing units from five hospital systems in Canada completed surveys, before and after a civility intervention (eight intervention vs. nine comparison units). Analyses tested whether (1) incivility moderated the stressor-strain relationship at baseline (n=478), and (2) the stressor-strain relationship decreased for the intervention units relative to comparison units 6 months later (n=361). (1) Pre-intervention, individuals reporting more incivility on their unit showed a stronger stressor-strain relationship. (2) The negative relationship between work overload and mental health was mitigated among intervention group staff 6 months after the introduction of a colleague-based civility programme. Besides being a stressor itself, incivility exacerbates the relationship between existing job role stressors and strain among health care workers. Colleague civility and respect have an important ripple effect of buffering inevitable work stressors, helping health care providers respond to stress with greater health and resiliency. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Moderation of skeletal muscle reperfusion injury by a sLe(x)-glycosylated complement inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Kyriakides, C; Wang, Y; Austen, W G; Favuzza, J; Kobzik, L; Moore, F D; Hechtman, H B

    2001-07-01

    The role of the sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x))-decorated version of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) in moderating skeletal muscle reperfusion injury, by antagonizing neutrophil endothelial selectin interaction and complement activation, is examined. Mice underwent 2 h of hindlimb ischemia and 3 h of reperfusion. Permeability index (PI) was assessed by extravasation of 125I-labeled albumin. Neutrophil depletion and complement inhibition with sCR1 reduced permeability by 72% (PI 0.81 +/- 0.10) compared with a 42% decrease (PI 1.53 +/- 0.08) observed in neutropenic mice, indicating that part of the complement-mediated injury is neutrophil independent. sCR1sLe(x) treatment reduced PI by 70% (PI 0.86 +/- 0.06), an additional 20% decrease compared with sCR1 treatment (PI 1.32 +/- 0.08). Treatment with sCR1sLe(x) 0.5 and 1 h after reperfusion reduced permeability by 63% (PI 0.09 +/- 0.07) and 52% (PI 1.24 +/- 0.09), respectively, compared with the respective decreases of 41% (PI 1.41 +/- 0.10) and 32% (PI 1.61 +/- 0.07) after sCR1 treatment. Muscle immunohistochemistry stained for sCR1 only on the vascular endothelium of sCR1sLe(x)-treated mice. In conclusion, sCR1sLe(x) is more effective than sCR1 in moderating skeletal muscle reperfusion injury.

  20. Effects of adenosine, exercise, and moderate acute hypoxia on energy substrate utilization of human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Peltonen, Juha E; Sipilä, Hannu T; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2012-02-01

    Glucose metabolism increases in hypoxia and can be influenced by endogenous adenosine, but the role of adenosine for regulating glucose metabolism at rest or during exercise in hypoxia has not been elucidated in humans. We studied the effects of exogenous adenosine on human skeletal muscle glucose uptake and other blood energy substrates [free fatty acid (FFA) and lactate] by infusing adenosine into the femoral artery in nine healthy young men. The role of endogenous adenosine was studied by intra-arterial adenosine receptor inhibition (aminophylline) during dynamic one-leg knee extension exercise in normoxia and acute hypoxia corresponding to ∼3,400 m of altitude. Extraction and release of energy substrates were studied by arterial-to-venous (A-V) blood samples, and total uptake or release was determined by the product of A-V differences and muscle nutritive perfusion measured by positron emission tomography. The results showed that glucose uptake increased from a baseline value of 0.2 ± 0.2 to 2.0 ± 2.2 μmol·100 g(-1)·min(-1) during adenosine infusion (P < 0.05) at rest. Although acute hypoxia enhanced arterial FFA levels, it did not affect muscle substrate utilization at rest. During exercise, glucose uptake was higher (195%) during acute hypoxia compared with normoxia (P = 0.058), and aminophylline had no effect on energy substrate utilization during exercise, despite that arterial FFA levels were increased. In conclusion, exogenous adenosine at rest and acute moderate hypoxia during low-intensity knee-extension exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, but the increase in hypoxia appears not to be mediated by adenosine.

  1. Static strain and vibration characteristics of a metal semimonocoque helicopter tail cone of moderate size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.; Hefner, Rachel E.; Castagna, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of an analytic and experimental research program involving a Sikorsky S-55 helicopter tail cone directed ultimately to the improved structural analysis of airframe substructures typical of moderate sized helicopters of metal semimonocoque construction. Experimental static strain and dynamic shake-testing measurements are presented. Correlation studies of each of these tests with a PC-based finite element analysis (COSMOS/M) are described. The tests included static loadings at the end of the tail cone supported in the cantilever configuration as well as vibrational shake-testing in both the cantilever and free-free configurations.

  2. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus succinus Strain CSM-77, a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Triassic Salt Mine

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus succinus strain CSM-77. This moderately halophilic bacterium was isolated from the surface of a halite sample obtained from a Triassic salt mine. PMID:27284152

  4. Combined diffusion and strain tensor MRI reveals a heterogeneous, planar pattern of strain development during isometric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Englund, Erin K; Elder, Christopher P; Xu, Qing; Ding, Zhaohua; Damon, Bruce M

    2011-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to create a three-dimensional representation of strain during isometric contraction in vivo and to interpret it with respect to the muscle fiber direction. Diffusion tensor MRI was used to measure the muscle fiber direction of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of seven healthy volunteers. Spatial-tagging MRI was used to measure linear strains in six directions during separate 50% maximal isometric contractions of the TA. The strain tensor (E) was computed in the TA's deep and superficial compartments and compared with the respective diffusion tensors. Diagonalization of E revealed a planar strain pattern, with one nonzero negative strain (ε(N)) and one nonzero positive strain (ε(P)); both strains were larger in magnitude (P < 0.05) in the deep compartment [ε(N) = -40.4 ± 4.3%, ε(P) = 35.1 ± 3.5% (means ± SE)] than in the superficial compartment (ε(N) = -24.3 ± 3.9%, ε(P) = 6.3 ± 4.9%). The principal shortening direction deviated from the fiber direction by 24.0 ± 1.3° and 39.8 ± 6.1° in the deep and superficial compartments, respectively (P < 0.05, deep vs. superficial). The deviation of the shortening direction from the fiber direction was due primarily to the lower angle of elevation of the shortening direction over the axial plane than that of the fiber direction. It is concluded that three-dimensional analyses of strain interpreted with respect to the fiber architecture are necessary to characterize skeletal muscle contraction in vivo. The deviation of the principal shortening direction from the fiber direction may relate to intramuscle variations in fiber length and pennation angle.

  5. Effects of knee joint angle on global and local strains within human triceps surae muscle: MRI analysis indicating in vivo myofascial force transmission between synergistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Huijing, Peter A; Yaman, Alper; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Yucesoy, Can A

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical interactions between muscles have been shown for in situ conditions. In vivo data for humans is unavailable. Global and local length changes of calf muscles were studied to test the hypothesis that local strains may occur also within muscle for which global strain equals zero. For determination of globally induced strain in m. gastrocnemius in dissected human cadavers several knee joint angles were imposed, while keeping ankle joint angle constant and measuring its muscle-tendon complex length changes. In vivo local strains in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were calculated using MRI techniques in healthy human volunteers comparing images taken at static knee angles of 173° and 150°. Imposed global strains on gastrocnemius were much smaller than local strains. High distributions of strains were encountered, e.g. overall lengthened muscle contains locally lengthened, as well as shortened areas within it. Substantial strains were not limited to gastrocnemius, but were found also in synergistic soleus muscle, despite the latter muscle-tendon complex length remaining isometric (constant ankle angle: i.e. global strain = 0), as it does not cross the knee. Based on results of animal experiments this effect is ascribed to myofascial connections between these synergistic muscles. The most likely pathway is the neurovascular tract within the anterior crural compartment (i.e. the collagen reinforcements of blood vessels, lymphatics and nerves). However, direct intermuscular transmission of force may also occur via the perimysium shared between the two muscles. Global strains imposed on muscle (joint movement) are not good estimators of in vivo local strains within it: differing in magnitude, as well as direction of length change. Substantial mechanical interaction occurs between calf muscles, which is mediated by myofascial force transmission between these synergistic muscles. This confirms conclusions of previous in situ studies in experimental animals

  6. Factors involved in strain-induced injury in skeletal muscles and outcomes of prolonged exposures.

    PubMed

    Stauber, William T

    2004-02-01

    Repetitive motion disorders can involve lengthening of skeletal muscles to perform braking actions to decelerate limbs under load often resulting in muscle strains and injury. Injury is a loss of isometric force (weakness) requiring days to recover. The capacity of skeletal muscle to tolerate repeated strains is dependent on multiple factors including individual variation. The most important factors producing muscle strain injury are the magnitude of the resisting force (peak-stretch force) and the number of strains. Other factors such as muscle length and fiber type contribute to the susceptibility to injury as well, but to a lesser degree. Strain injury can also lead to inflammation and pain. Chronic exposure to repeated strains can result in fibrosis that is not completely reversed after months of rest. Long rest times appear to be the only factor reported to prevent inflammation in rats following repeated strain injury. Further understanding of the mechanism for prevention of histopathologic changes by long rest times should provide a rationale for prevention of negative outcomes.

  7. Adaptation of rat soleus muscles to 4 wk of intermittent strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Miller, G. R.; Grimmett, J. G.; Knack, K. K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated strains on rat soleus muscles was investigated by stretching active muscles 3 times/wk for 4 wk with two different methods of stretching. The adaptation of myofibers and noncontractile tissue was followed by histochemical techniques and computer-assisted image analysis. Muscle hypertrophy was seen in the slow-stretched muscles, which increased in mass by 13% and increased in myofiber cross-sectional area by 30%. In the fast-stretched muscle, mass increased by 10% but myofiber cross-sectional area actually decreased. This decrease in mean fiber area was the result of a population of very small fibers (population A) that coexisted with slightly smaller normal-sized fibers (population B). Fibers in population A did not have the distribution expected from atrophy compared with atrophic fibers from unloaded muscles; they were much smaller. In addition, there was a 44% increase in noncontractile tissue in the fast-stretched muscles. Thus, soleus muscles subjected to repeated strains respond differently to slow and fast stretching. Slow stretching results in typical muscle hypertrophy, whereas fast stretching produces somewhat larger muscles but with a mixture of small and normal-sized myofibers accompanied by a marked proliferation of noncontractile tissue.

  8. Adaptation of rat soleus muscles to 4 wk of intermittent strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Miller, G. R.; Grimmett, J. G.; Knack, K. K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated strains on rat soleus muscles was investigated by stretching active muscles 3 times/wk for 4 wk with two different methods of stretching. The adaptation of myofibers and noncontractile tissue was followed by histochemical techniques and computer-assisted image analysis. Muscle hypertrophy was seen in the slow-stretched muscles, which increased in mass by 13% and increased in myofiber cross-sectional area by 30%. In the fast-stretched muscle, mass increased by 10% but myofiber cross-sectional area actually decreased. This decrease in mean fiber area was the result of a population of very small fibers (population A) that coexisted with slightly smaller normal-sized fibers (population B). Fibers in population A did not have the distribution expected from atrophy compared with atrophic fibers from unloaded muscles; they were much smaller. In addition, there was a 44% increase in noncontractile tissue in the fast-stretched muscles. Thus, soleus muscles subjected to repeated strains respond differently to slow and fast stretching. Slow stretching results in typical muscle hypertrophy, whereas fast stretching produces somewhat larger muscles but with a mixture of small and normal-sized myofibers accompanied by a marked proliferation of noncontractile tissue.

  9. A comparison of inspiratory muscle fatigue following maximal exercise in moderately trained males and females.

    PubMed

    Ozkaplan, Atila; Rhodes, Edward C; Sheel, A William; Taunton, Jack E

    2005-09-01

    Exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been reported in males but there are few reports of IMF in females. It is not known if a gender difference exists for inspiratory muscle strength following heavy exercise, as is reported in locomotor muscles. Therefore, the relationship between fatigue and subsequent recovery of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) following exercise to maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was examined in a group of moderately trained males and females. Eighteen males (23+/-3 years; mean +/- SD) and 16 females (23+/-2 years) completed ten MIP and ten maximal handgrip (HG) strength maneuvers to establish baseline. Post-exercise MIP and HG were assessed successively immediately following a progressive intensity VO2max test on a cycle ergometer and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, and 15 min. VO2max, relative to fat-free mass was not statistically different between males (62+/-7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and females (60+/-8 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). Males had higher absolute MIP values than females at all time intervals (P<0.05). Immediately following exercise, MIP was significantly reduced in both genders (M=83+/-16%; F=78+/-15% of baseline) but HG values were not different than resting values. MIP values remained depressed for both males and females throughout the 15 min (P<0.05). Differences for MIP between males and females were not statistically significant at any measurement time (P>0.05). The findings in this study conclude that IMF, observed immediately following maximal exercise, demonstrated the same pattern of recovery for both genders.

  10. Eccentric exercise in vivo: strain-induced muscle damage and adaptation in a stable system.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A

    2010-04-01

    The muscle tendon unit is a stable system, designed to operate eccentrically with efficiency and resiliency. Fiber strains, although minimized by tendon compliance during exercise, are essential components to decoding the mechanical and chemical signals during exercise. Subsequent cellular adaptations minimize the subsequent "dose" of stress and strain and serve to limit the exacerbation of damage into injury.

  11. Effects of muscle contraction on the load-strain properties of frog aponeurosis and tendon.

    PubMed

    Lieber, R L; Leonard, M E; Brown-Maupin, C G

    2000-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) tendon and aponeurosis were measured during passive tensile loading to a force equal to ST maximum tetanic tension and during active isometric muscle contraction. During active contraction, both the tendon and aponeurosis regions initially strained at rates exceeding 400%/s while near the end of the muscle contraction, strain rates were nearly zero. At this point, the strain in the tendon region was equal to that observed during slow passive loading to the same tension level. However, for the aponeurosis, even near the zero strain rate, strain at the end of the active contraction was significantly below that observed during slow passive loading (p < 0. 001). Specifically, when aponeurosis strain rate was almost zero, aponeurosis strain was 13.8 +/- 3% (means +/- SEM, n = 10), which was significantly below that measured during passive loading (23.7 +/- 5%) suggesting that active contraction actually altered aponeurosis material properties. These data demonstrate that, while the tendon and aponeurosis regions have different passive biomechanical properties and both demonstrate viscosity typical of other connective tissues, the aponeurosis region of the frog ST actually changed its intrinsic properties during muscle contraction. Thus, extrapolation of biomechanical data obtained at nonphysiological strain rates or under conditions where the muscle-tendon junction has been interrupted should be made with caution.

  12. The effect of moderate alcohol consumption on adiponectin oligomers and muscle oxidative capacity: a human intervention study.

    PubMed

    Beulens, J W J; van Loon, L J C; Kok, F J; Pelsers, M; Bobbert, T; Spranger, J; Helander, A; Hendriks, H F J

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether moderate alcohol consumption increases plasma high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin and/or muscle oxidative capacity. Eleven lean (BMI 18-25 kg/m(2)) and eight overweight (BMI >or=27 kg/m(2)) men consumed 100 ml whisky ( approximately 32 g alcohol) or water daily for 4 weeks in a randomised, controlled, crossover trial. After each treatment period, muscle biopsies and fasting blood samples were collected. Adiponectin concentrations increased (p < 0.001) by 12.5% after 4 weeks of moderate alcohol consumption. Moderate alcohol consumption tended to increase HMW adiponectin by 57% (p = 0.07) and medium molecular weight adiponectin by 12.5% (p = 0.07), but not low molecular weight (LMW) adiponectin. Skeletal muscle citrate synthase, cytochrome c oxidase and beta-3-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (beta-HAD) activity were not changed after moderate alcohol consumption, but an interaction between alcohol consumption and BMI was observed for cytochrome c oxidase (p = 0.072) and citrate synthase (p = 0.102) activity. Among lean men, moderate alcohol consumption tended to increase cytochrome c oxidase (p = 0.08) and citrate synthase activity (p = 0.12) by 23 and 26%, respectively, but not among overweight men. In particular, plasma HMW adiponectin correlated positively with activities of skeletal muscle citrate synthase (r = 0.64, p = 0.009), cytochrome c oxidase (p = 0.59, p = 0.009) and beta-HAD (r = 0.46, p = 0.056), while such correlation was not present for LMW adiponectin. Whole-body insulin sensitivity and intramyocellular triacylglycerol content were not affected by moderate alcohol consumption. Moderate alcohol consumption increases adiponectin concentrations, and in particular HMW adiponectin. Concentrations of HMW adiponectin in particular were positively associated with skeletal muscle oxidative capacity.

  13. Giant pseudocyst of the rectus femoris muscle--repetitive strain injury in recreational soccer player.

    PubMed

    Cicvarić, Tedi; Lucin, Ksenija; Roth, Sandor; Ivancić, Aldo; Marinović, Marin; Santić, Veljko

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of a traumatic pseudocyst, in a recreational soccer player, after rupture of rectus femoris muscle. 37-year-old male, with history of repetitive painful accidents, was examined because of a double fist-sized mass in the anterior thigh. Ultrasound examination revealed a cystic mass in the rectus femoris muscle. Surgical removal of the mass and proximal remnant of muscle was done. Primary healing and functional recovery was achieved. Histological analysis revealed pseudocyst filled with degenerating clot and surrounded with thick fibrous capsule. The repetitive strain muscle injury, with prolonged period of healing, can occur like pseudocyst.

  14. Non-uniform Distribution of Strain during Stretch of Relaxed Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Rat Soleus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Mark L.; Claflin, Dennis R.; Faulkner, John A.; Panchangam, Appaji

    2011-01-01

    Tension and regional average sarcomere length (Ls) behavior were examined during repeated stretches of single, permeabilized, relaxed muscle fibers isolated from the soleus muscles of rats. We tested the hypothesis that during stretches of single permeabilized fibers, the global fiber strain is distributed non-uniformly along the length of a relaxed fiber in a repeatable pattern. Each fiber was subjected to eight constant-velocity stretch and release cycles with a strain of 32% and strain rate of 54% s−1. Stretch-release cycles were separated by a 4.5 minute interval. Throughout each stretch-release cycle, sarcomere lengths were measured using a laser diffraction technique in which 20 contiguous sectors along the entire length of a fiber segment were scanned within 2 ms. The results revealed that: (1) the imposed length change was not distributed uniformly along the fiber, (2) the first stretch-release cycle differed from subsequent cycles in passive tension and in the distribution of global fiber strain, and (3) a characteristic “signature” for the Ls response emerged after cycle 3. The findings support the conclusions that longitudinal heterogeneity exists in the passive stiffness of individual muscle fibers and that preconditioning of fibers with stretch-release cycles produces a stable pattern of sarcomere strains. PMID:21710358

  15. X-ray diffraction of strained muscle fibers in rigor.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, G R; Podolsky, R J

    1981-01-01

    The effect of strain on the equatorial x-ray diffraction pattern of glycerinated rabbit psoas fibers was studied in the rigor (ATP free) state. Strains between 30 and 100 A per half sarcomere, measured directly by laser diffraction, did not change the intensity ratio, (10)/ . (11). Because the intensity ratio depends on the distribution of mass within the myofilament lattice, the negative result indicates that strain does not change the angle of attachment of the subfragment 1 (S1) moiety of the myosin molecule to the actin filament. The effect of strain on the ordering of the actin filaments also was considered and judged to be negligible. Images PMID:6946493

  16. ACTIVATION AND APONEUROSIS MORPHOLOGY AFFECT IN VIVO MUSCLE TISSUE STRAINS NEAR THE MYOTENDINOUS JUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring strain injury is one of the most common injuries in athletes, particularly for sports that involve high speed running. The aims of this study were to determine whether muscle activation and internal morphology influence in vivo muscle behavior and strain injury susceptibility. We measured tissue displacement and strains in the hamstring muscle injured most often, the biceps femoris long head muscle (BFLH), using cine DENSE dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. Strain measurements were used to test whether strain magnitudes are (i) larger during active lengthening than during passive lengthening and (ii) larger for subjects with a relatively narrow proximal aponeurosis than a wide proximal aponeurosis. Displacement color maps showed higher tissue displacement with increasing lateral distance from the proximal aponeurosis for both active lengthening and passive lengthening, and higher tissue displacement for active lengthening than passive lengthening. First principal strain magnitudes were averaged in a 1 cm region near the myotendinous junction, where injury is most frequently observed. It was found that strains are significantly larger during active lengthening (0.19 SD 0.09) than passive lengthening (0.13 SD 0.06) (p < 0.05), which suggests that elevated localized strains may be a mechanism for increased injury risk during active as opposed to passive lengthening. First principal strains were higher for subjects with a relatively narrow aponeurosis width (0.26 SD 0.15) than wide (0.14 SD 0.04) (p < 0.05). This result suggests that athletes who have BFLH muscles with narrow proximal aponeuroses may have an increased risk for BFLH strain injuries. PMID:22236527

  17. Activation and aponeurosis morphology affect in vivo muscle tissue strains near the myotendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Epstein, Frederick H; Blemker, Silvia S

    2012-02-23

    Hamstring strain injury is one of the most common injuries in athletes, particularly for sports that involve high speed running. The aims of this study were to determine whether muscle activation and internal morphology influence in vivo muscle behavior and strain injury susceptibility. We measured tissue displacement and strains in the hamstring muscle injured most often, the biceps femoris long head muscle (BFLH), using cine DENSE dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. Strain measurements were used to test whether strain magnitudes are (i) larger during active lengthening than during passive lengthening and (ii) larger for subjects with a relatively narrow proximal aponeurosis than a wide proximal aponeurosis. Displacement color maps showed higher tissue displacement with increasing lateral distance from the proximal aponeurosis for both active lengthening and passive lengthening, and higher tissue displacement for active lengthening than passive lengthening. First principal strain magnitudes were averaged in a 1cm region near the myotendinous junction, where injury is most frequently observed. It was found that strains are significantly larger during active lengthening (0.19 SD 0.09) than passive lengthening (0.13 SD 0.06) (p<0.05), which suggests that elevated localized strains may be a mechanism for increased injury risk during active as opposed to passive lengthening. First principal strains were higher for subjects with a relatively narrow aponeurosis width (0.26 SD 0.15) than wide (0.14 SD 0.04) (p<0.05). This result suggests that athletes who have BFLH muscles with narrow proximal aponeuroses may have an increased risk for BFLH strain injuries.

  18. Characterising skeletal muscle under large strain using eccentric and Fourier Transform-rheology.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kristy; Cheng, Shaokoon; Jugé, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E

    2015-11-05

    Characterising the passive anisotropic properties of soft tissues has been largely limited to the linear viscoelastic regime and shear loading is rarely done in the large deformation regime, despite the physiological significance of such properties. This paper demonstrates the use of eccentric rheology, which allows the anisotropy of skeletal muscle to be investigated. The large amplitude oscillatory strain properties of skeletal muscle were also investigated using Fourier Transform-rheology. Histology was used to qualitatively assess the microstructure changes induced by large strain. Results showed that skeletal muscle was strongly anisotropic in the linear regime. The storage and loss moduli were found to be significantly different (p<0.05) between the three fibre alignment groups; for the group tested with fibres perpendicular to plane of shear was 12.3±1.3 kPa and 3.0±0.35 kPa, parallel to shear direction was 10.6±1.2 kPa and 2.4±0.23 kPa, and perpendicular to shear direction was 5.5±0.90 kPa and 1.3±0.21 kPa. The appearance and growth of higher order harmonics at large strain was different in the three testing directions indicating that the anisotropy of muscle affects skeletal muscle behaviour in the nonlinear regime. Histological analysis showed an increasing destruction of extracellular matrix and the rearrangement of fibres with increasing strain indicating mechanical damage at strains of larger than 10%. These microstructural changes could contribute to the complex nonlinear behaviour in skeletal muscle. This paper demonstrates a method of characterising the anisotropic properties in skeletal muscle under large strain whilst giving meaningful information on the physical response of tissue at various strains.

  19. Reduction of cervical and respiratory muscle strength in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability.

    PubMed

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Sollano-Vallez, Ernesto; Del Corral, Tamara

    2017-06-11

    To investigate whether patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability have a greater cervical motor function impairment and respiratory disturbances compared with patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having mild disability and asymptomatic subjects; and the association between these outcomes in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study, 44 patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and 31 healthy subjects participated. The neck disability index was used to divide the patients into 2 groups: 1) mild disability group (scores between 5 and 14 points); and 2) moderate to severe disability group (scores >14 points). Cervical motor function was measured by cervical range of motion, forward head posture, neck flexor, and extensor muscle strength. Respiratory function and maximum respiratory pressures were also measured. Statistically differences were found between the patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having a moderate to severe disability and the asymptomatic subjects for cervical and respiratory muscle strength. Comparisons between chronic nonspecific neck pain and the asymptomatic groups showed differences for all the variables, except for forward head posture. The regression model determined that strength of cervical flexion explained 36.4 and 45.6% of the variance of maximum inspiratory pressures and maximum expiratory pressures, respectively. Only the chronic nonspecific neck pain group with moderate to severe disability showed differences compared with the healthy subjects. Neck muscle strength could be a good predictor of respiratory muscle function. Implications for rehabilitation Neck pain severity could be closely associated with decreased respiratory pressure in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for patients with moderate to severe disability, such as respiratory muscle training. The regression

  20. Moderate-intensity physical activity is independently associated with lower-extremity muscle power in older women.

    PubMed

    Straight, Chad R; Brady, Anne O; Evans, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle power is a salient determinant of physical function in older adults, but its relationship with habitual physical activity has not been well-characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the association between moderate-intensity physical activity and lower-extremity muscle power in community-dwelling older women. Older women (n = 96, mean age = 73.9 ± 5.6 years, mean body mass index = 26.5 ± 4.7 kg/m(2)) underwent assessments for body composition via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and lower-extremity muscle power (watts) using the Nottingham power rig. The Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire was used to estimate weekly caloric expenditure in moderate-intensity physical activity (kcals/wk). Linear regression indicated that moderate-intensity physical activity was independently related to muscle power (standardized β = 0.20, p = .03), and this relationship remained following adjustment for covariates. Analysis of covariance revealed that women in the highest tertile of volume of physical activity had significantly greater muscle power than those with the lowest volume (199.0 vs. 170.7 watts, p < .05). Moderate-intensity physical activity was independently associated with lower-extremity muscle power in older women. Future intervention trials should determine if increasing habitual physical activity is associated with improvements in lower-extremity muscle power in older women.

  1. Type-specific changes in fibre size and satellite cell activation following muscle denervation in two strains of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed Central

    Bakou, S; Cherel, Y; Gabinaud, B; Guigand, L; Wyers, M

    1996-01-01

    Morphological features and the chronology of muscle changes after denervation were studied over a 21 d period in 2 heavy (HW) and light-weight (LW) strains of 6-wk-old male turkeys. The atrophy of tibialis cranialis, gastrocnemius lateralis and plantaris muscles was apparent at d 3 after denervation. By d 21 the weight of these muscles had reached 45-60% of that of nondenervated contralateral muscle. Cellular lesions, such as irregularities in mitochondrial distribution or coagulative necrosis with fragmentation and lysis associated with moderate infiltration of inflammatory cells, were similar in both strains. Ten days after denervation, immunolabelling of a proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expressed during the G1 and S phase of the cell cycle revealed satellite cell activation in denervated muscles. The number of satellite cells activated at d 21 was markedly greater in the HW than LW strain. Morphometric analysis revealed that fast twitch (type II) fibres were atrophied after denervation, whereas slow-twitch (type I) and slow tonic (type III) fibres were hypertrophied from d 10. Hypertrophy occurred more rapidly in the LW than HW strain. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8763485

  2. Characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates accumulated by a moderately halophilic salt pan isolate Bacillus megaterium strain H16.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, B B; Mani, K; Braganca, J M

    2013-05-01

    Characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) accumulated by halophilic bacteria isolated from solar salterns. Twenty-six halophilic isolates were obtained from solar salterns of Goa, India. They were screened for accumulation of PHA by Sudan black B, Nile blue A and Nile red stains. Strains H15, H16 and H26 were selected based on their intensity of Nile blue A/Nile red fluorescence. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characterization, the three isolates were identified as Bacillus megaterium. Growth kinetics and polymer accumulating capacity of strain H16 were studied in E2 mineral media with 2% glucose with/without NaCl. In the absence of NaCl, strain H16 accumulated PHA to 40·0% (w/w) of cell dry weight (CDW) at 42 h of growth, whereas in presence of 5% w/v NaCl, the culture showed longer lag phase of up to 24 h and accumulated a maximum PHA of 39% (w/w) CDW at 54 h of growth. The infrared spectra of both the polymers exhibited peaks at 1733·9 cm(-1) characteristic of C=O. Scans of (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed a doublet at 2·5 ppm corresponding to methylene group (-CH(2)), the signal at 5·3 ppm corresponded to methine group (-CH-), and another signal at 1·3 ppm corresponded to the methyl group (-CH(3)). Scans of (13)C NMR showed prominent peaks at 20, 40, 67-68 and 170 ppm, indicating the polymer to be homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyrates. The polymer is stable up to a temperature of 160°C. Three moderately halophilic isolates (strain H15, H16 and H26) capable of accumulating PHA were isolated from solar salterns of Ribandar Goa, India, and identified as B. megaterium based on phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Strain H16 accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate in the presence and absence of NaCl up to 40% of its CDW. This strain would be better suited for production of PHA at industrial level due to its tolerance to high concentration of NaCl. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Neck Muscle Strain in Air Force Pilots Wearing Night Vision Goggles.

    PubMed

    Pousette, Magnus Wallquist; Lo Martire, Riccardo; Linder, Jan; Kristoffersson, Mats; Äng, Björn O

    Flight-induced neck pain is common in high performance jet pilots, with incidents frequently attributed to high Gz flight maneuvers. The additional load of helmet-mounted night vision goggles (NVG) is believed to increase the risk, possibly from neck muscle strain in counteracting muscles. Hence, the aim was to investigate the effect of NVG on neck muscle strain as well as on the activity level distribution through a simulated flight session in air force pilots. In this post hoc randomized crossover trial, four senior air force pilots each completed two identical 1.5-h dynamic flight simulations in a human centrifuge: one with a standard helmet and NVG, and one with a standard helmet only. Simulations included repeated exposure to 3-7 Gz, during which neck muscle activity was recorded bilaterally from the anterior neck, the upper and lower posterior neck, and the upper shoulders. The number of muscle activities surpassing 50% of maximum voluntary electrical activity (MVE) and total time of activity at each MVE percentile were compared between NVG and control flights. There was no overall effect in number of neck strain activities between NVG and control flights; however, significantly more activities emerged in the anterior neck. In addition, MVE percentile data showed a tendency of higher activity in the lower posterior neck during NVG flights. The results showed that the additional load of helmet-mounted NVG increases neck muscle strain in anterior stabilizing muscles, indicating that the inertia of head-worn NVG elevates the risk of flight-related neck pain. Pousette MW, Lo Martire R, Linder J, Kristoffersson M, Äng BO. Neck muscle strain in air force pilots wearing night vision goggles. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(11):928-932.

  4. Use of Autologous Platelet-rich Plasma to Treat Muscle Strain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jason W.; Hinton, Richard Y.; Ann Curl, Leigh; Muriel, Joaquin M.; Lovering, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Muscle strains are one of the most common injuries treated by physicians. Standard conservative therapy for acute muscle strains usually involves short-term rest, ice, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, but there is no clear consensus on how to accelerate recovery. Hypothesis Local delivery of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to injured muscles hastens recovery of function. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. We used an established animal model of injury to test the effects of autologous platelet-rich plasma PRP on recovery of contractile function. Methods In vivo, the tibialis anterior muscles (TA) of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were injured by a single (large strain) lengthening contraction or multiple (small strain) lengthening contractions, both of which result in a significant injury. The TA was injected with either PRP, PPP (platelet-poor plasma, as a sham treatment), or received no treatment. Results Both injury protocols yield a similar loss of force. The PRP only had a beneficial effect at one time point after the single contraction injury protocol. However, PRP had a beneficial effect at several time points after the multiple contraction injury protocol, and resulted in a faster recovery time to full contractile function. The sham injections had no effect compared to no treatment. Conclusion Local delivery of PRP can shorten recovery time after a muscle strain injury. Recovery of muscle from the high repetition protocol has already been shown to require myogenesis, whereas recovery from a single strain does not. This difference in mechanism of recovery may explain why PRP was more effective in the high repetition protocol, as PRP is rich in growth factors that can stimulate myogenesis. Since autologous blood products are safe, PRP may be a useful product to use in clinical treatment of muscle injuries. PMID:19282509

  5. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions.

  6. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Anderson F.; Valle, Roberta S.; Pacheco, Clarissa A.; Alvarez, Vanessa M.; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L.S.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties. PMID:24688526

  7. Analyses of muscle spindles in the soleus of six inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Lionikas, Arimantas; Smith, Colin J; Smith, Tracey L; Bünger, Lutz; Banks, Robert W; Bewick, Guy S

    2013-01-01

    Adult muscle size and fibre-type composition are heritable traits that vary substantially between individuals. We used inbred mouse strains in which soleus muscle mass varied by an order of magnitude to explore whether properties of muscle spindles can also be influenced by genetic factors. Skip-serial cross-sections of soleus muscles dissected from 15 male mice of BEH, BEL, C57BL/6J, DUH, LG/J and SM/J strains were analysed for number of muscle spindles and characteristics of intrafusal and extrafusal fibres following ATPase staining. The BEL and DUH strains determined the range of: soleus mean size, a 10-fold difference from 2.1 to 22.3 mg, respectively; the mean number of extrafusal fibres, a 2.5-fold difference from 497 to 1249; and mean fibre-cross-sectional area, three-fold difference, e.g. for type 1 fibres, from 678 to 1948 μm2. The range of mean proportion of type 1 fibres was determined by C57BL/6J (31%) and DUH (64%) strains. The mean number of spindles per muscle ranged between nine (LG/J) and 13 (BEL) (strain effect P < 0.02). Genetic correlations between spindle count and muscle weight or properties of extrafusal fibres were weak and not statistically significant. However, there was a strong correlation between the proportion of spindles with more than one bag2 fibre and the proportion of extrafusal fibres that were of type 1, and strain-dependent variation in the numbers of such spindles was statistically significant. The numbers of intrafusal fibres per spindle ranged from 2 to 8, with the most common complement of four found in 75.6% of spindles. There were no significant differences between the strains in the mean numbers of intrafusal fibres; however, the variance of the number was significantly less for the C57BL/6J strain than for any of the others. We conclude that abundance of muscle spindles and their intrafusal-fibre composition are substantially determined by genetic factors, which are different from those affecting muscle size and

  8. The effect of transient, moderate dietary phosphorus deprivation on phosphorus metabolism, muscle content of different phosphorus-containing compounds, and muscle function in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Grünberg, W; Scherpenisse, P; Dobbelaar, P; Idink, M J; Wijnberg, I D

    2015-08-01

    decline in muscle tissue P content. Electromyographic examination revealed increased occurrence of pathological spontaneous activity in striated muscles after 2 wk of dietary P depletion in several cows, which could be suggestive of neuromuscular membrane instability. No effect on heart muscle activity was identified electrocardiographically. These results suggest that counter-regulatory mechanisms were sufficient to maintain normal muscle tissue P content during transient and moderate P deprivation. Muscle function was not grossly affected, although the increased occurrence of pathological spontaneous activity suggests that subclinical neuropathy or myopathy, or both, may have occurred with ongoing P deprivation. The results presented here indicate that plasma [Pi] is unsuitable for assessing muscle tissue P content in cattle.

  9. Heterogeneous recruitment of quadriceps muscle portions and fibre types during moderate intensity knee-extensor exercise: effect of thigh occlusion.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, P; Söderlund, K; Relu, M U; Ferguson, R A; Bangsbo, J

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of quadriceps femoris muscle portions and fibre type recruitment was studied during submaximal knee-extensor exercise without and with thigh occlusion (OCC) and compared with responses during intense exercise. Six healthy male subjects performed 90-s of moderate exercise without (MOD; 29+/-4 W) and with thigh OCC, and moderate exercise followed by 90-s of intense exercise (HI; 65+/-8 W). Temperatures were continuously measured in m. vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) and successive muscle biopsies were obtained from VL. During MOD, muscle temperature increase (DeltaT(m)) in RF was 0.52+/-0.09 degrees C, which was 57% and 73% higher (P<0.05) than in VL and VM, respectively. During OCC, DeltaT(m) in RF was 0.39+/-0.05 degrees C, which was not different from VM but 54% higher (P<0.05) than in VL. After MOD, muscle CP in slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) fibres was 81% and 91% of resting levels, respectively, with lower (P<0.05) values after OCC (15% and 22%) and HI (24% and 13%). After MOD, OCC and HI, a total of 48%, 93% and 96% of the ST fibres had CP levels below mean-1 SD, respectively, with corresponding values for FT fibres being 41%, 89% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, a heterogeneous recruitment of the quadriceps muscle portions and muscle fibres was observed during submaximal knee-extensor exercise, whereas recruitment pattern was homogenous during intense exercise. Thigh OCC caused an altered recruitment of fibres and muscle portions, suggesting a significant afferent response affecting the activation of fibres in the contracting muscles.

  10. A mouse muscle-adapted enterovirus 71 strain with increased virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Duo, Jianying; Liu, Jiangning; Ma, Chunmei; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wei, Qiang; Qin, Chuan

    2011-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections can usually cause epidemic hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), and occasionally lead to aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, and polio-like illness. Skeletal muscles have been thought to be crucial for the pathogenesis of EV71-related diseases. However, little is known about the virulence of mouse muscle-adapted EV71. The EV71 0805 were subjected to four passages in the mouse muscle to generate a mouse-adapted EV71 strain of 0805a. In comparison with the parental EV71 0805, the mouse muscle-adapted EV71 0805a displayed stronger cytotoxicity against Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells and more efficient replication in RD cells. Furthermore, infection with the EV71 0805a significantly inhibited the gain of body weight, accompanied by increased muscle virus load and multiple tissue distribution in the infected mouse. Histological examinations indicated that infection with the EV71 0805 did not cause obvious pathogenic lesions in mice, while infection with the muscle-adapted 0805a resulted in severe necrotizing myositis in the skeletal and cardio muscles, and intestinitis in mice on day 5 post infection. Further analysis revealed many mutations in different regions of the genome of mouse muscle-adapted virus. Collectively, these data demonstrated the mouse muscle-adapted EV71 0805a with increased virulence in mice.

  11. Constitutive Modeling of Skeletal Muscle Tissue with an Explicit Strain-Energy Function

    PubMed Central

    Odegard, G.M.; Donahue, T.L. Haut; Morrow, D.A.; Kaufman, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    While much work has previously been done in the modeling of skeletal muscle, no model has, to date, been developed that describes the mechanical behavior with an explicit strain-energy function associated with the active response of skeletal muscle tissue. A model is presented herein that has been developed to accommodate this design consideration using a robust dynamical approach. The model shows excellent agreement with a previously published model of both the active and passive length-tension properties of skeletal muscle. PMID:19045546

  12. Stress-induced muscle effort as a cause of repetitive strain injury?

    PubMed

    Rietveld, S; van Beest, I; Kamphuis, J H

    2007-12-01

    The influence of stress-induced muscle effort during computer utilization was tested in patients with repetitive strain injury (RSI). Twenty academic researchers with a formal medical diagnosis of RSI and 20 matched controls, randomly selected from a sample of 71 colleagues with and without RSI, typed after stress (induced via an intelligence/skill task under social pressure) and after relaxation. Results indicated that both groups had more electromyography (EMG) activity in the shoulder muscles during typing after stress than after relaxation, but that patients started with higher baseline muscle activity. Furthermore, EMG activity of different muscle groups during typing after stress correlated among controls, but not among patients. Finally, analysis of intake forms showed that patients scored higher than controls on neuroticism and alexithymia, but not on extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. It was concluded that deviations in muscle activity during computer utilization, as well as neuroticism and alexithymia, may be risk factors for RSI.

  13. Inducible Cre transgenic mouse strain for skeletal muscle-specific gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of the Cre/loxP system for gene targeting has been proven to be a powerful tool for understanding gene function. The purpose of this study was to create and characterize an inducible, skeletal muscle-specific Cre transgenic mouse strain. Methods To achieve skeletal muscle-specific expression, the human α-skeletal actin promoter was used to drive expression of a chimeric Cre recombinase containing two mutated estrogen receptor ligand-binding domains. Results Western blot analysis, PCR and β-galactosidase staining confirmed that Cre-mediated recombination was restricted to limb and craniofacial skeletal muscles only after tamoxifen administration. Conclusions A transgenic mouse was created that allows inducible, gene targeting of floxed genes in adult skeletal muscle of different developmental origins. This new mouse will be of great utility to the skeletal muscle community. PMID:22564549

  14. Influence of thigh muscles on the axial strains in a proximal femur during early stance in gait.

    PubMed

    Cristofolini, L; Viceconti, M; Toni, A; Giunti, A

    1995-05-01

    This work is focused on the in vitro simulation of the loads occurring in the femur during early stance in gait, for hip prosthesis stress shielding test purposes. Ten thigh muscles (the three gluteal muscles, the three vasti, rectus femoris, adductor longus and magnus, biceps femoris), simulated by nylon straps, were tested in order to establish their influence on the strains in the proximal femur. Axial and hoop strains were recorded from 16 strain gauges for the effect of each muscle and compared to the strains recorded as a result of the hip joint reaction force only (i.e. without muscle simulation). It appears that the three glutei are the principal muscles in determining the vertical strains, however the rectus femoris, biceps femoris and the adductors were also seen to significantly affect the strain pattern. The inadequacy of increasing the adduction angle and applying the resultant force at the hip joint to simulate the abductors was also confirmed.

  15. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  16. The effect of moderate alcohol consumption on adiponectin oligomers and muscle oxidative capacity: a human intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Beulens, J. W. J.; van Loon, L. J. C.; Kok, F. J.; Pelsers, M.; Bobbert, T.; Spranger, J.; Helander, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The aim of this study was to investigate whether moderate alcohol consumption increases plasma high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin and/or muscle oxidative capacity. Materials and methods Eleven lean (BMI 18–25 kg/m2) and eight overweight (BMI ≥27 kg/m2) men consumed 100 ml whisky (∼32 g alcohol) or water daily for 4 weeks in a randomised, controlled, crossover trial. After each treatment period, muscle biopsies and fasting blood samples were collected. Results Adiponectin concentrations increased (p < 0.001) by 12.5% after 4 weeks of moderate alcohol consumption. Moderate alcohol consumption tended to increase HMW adiponectin by 57% (p = 0.07) and medium molecular weight adiponectin by 12.5% (p = 0.07), but not low molecular weight (LMW) adiponectin. Skeletal muscle citrate synthase, cytochrome c oxidase and β-3-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activity were not changed after moderate alcohol consumption, but an interaction between alcohol consumption and BMI was observed for cytochrome c oxidase (p = 0.072) and citrate synthase (p = 0.102) activity. Among lean men, moderate alcohol consumption tended to increase cytochrome c oxidase (p = 0.08) and citrate synthase activity (p = 0.12) by 23 and 26%, respectively, but not among overweight men. In particular, plasma HMW adiponectin correlated positively with activities of skeletal muscle citrate synthase (r = 0.64, p = 0.009), cytochrome c oxidase (p = 0.59, p = 0.009) and β-HAD (r = 0.46, p = 0.056), while such correlation was not present for LMW adiponectin. Whole-body insulin sensitivity and intramyocellular triacylglycerol content were not affected by moderate alcohol consumption. Conclusions/interpretation Moderate alcohol consumption increases adiponectin concentrations, and in particular HMW adiponectin. Concentrations of HMW adiponectin in particular were positively associated with skeletal muscle oxidative

  17. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  18. Finite element modeling reveals complex strain mechanics in the aponeuroses of contracting skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chi, Sheng-Wei; Hodgson, John; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Reggie Edgerton, V; Shin, David D; Roiz, Ronald A; Sinha, Shantanu

    2010-05-07

    A finite element model was used to investigate the counter-intuitive experimental observation that some regions of the aponeuroses of a loaded and contracting muscle may shorten rather than undergo an expected lengthening. The model confirms the experimental findings and suggests that pennation angle plays a significant role in determining whether regions of the aponeuroses stretch or shorten. A smaller pennation angles (25 degrees ) was accompanied by aponeurosis lengthening whereas a larger pennation angle (47 degrees ) was accompanied by mixed strain effects depending upon location along the length of the aponeurosis. This can be explained by the Poisson effect during muscle contraction and a Mohr's circle analogy. Constant volume constraint requires that fiber cross sectional dimensions increase when a fiber shortens. The opposing influences of these two strains upon the aponeurosis combine in proportion to the pennation angle. Lower pennation angles emphasize the influence of fiber shortening upon the aponeurosis and thus favor aponeurosis compression, whereas higher pennation angles increase the influence of cross sectional changes and therefore favor aponeurosis stretch. The distance separating the aponeuroses was also found to depend upon pennation angle during simulated contractions. Smaller pennation angles favored increased aponeurosis separation larger pennation angles favored decreased separation. These findings caution that measures of the mechanical properties of aponeuroses in intact muscle may be affected by contributions from adjacent muscle fibers and that the influence of muscle fibers on aponeurosis strain will depend upon the fiber pennation angle.

  19. Uncommon abdominal muscle injury in a tennis player: internal oblique strain

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, J; Ghisi, J P

    2006-01-01

    The case of a strain injury of the internal oblique abdominal muscle in a professional tennis player is presented. This uncommon lesion resulted from eccentric, unbalanced trunk rotation. Magnetic resonance imaging helped to confirm the diagnosis. Tennis specific core strengthening is crucial for rehabilitation and recurrence prevention. PMID:16632581

  20. Corticosteroid and Anesthetic Injections for Muscle Strains and Ligament Sprains in the NFL.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Mark; Birmingham, Patrick; Delos, Demetris; Barnes, Ronnie; Murphy, Conor; Weiss, Leigh; Warren, Russell

    2014-07-01

    Administering local anesthetic or corticosteroid injections in professional athletes to allow return to play is common but has traditionally been viewed as suspect and taboo. The skepticism surrounding therapeutic injections stems predominantly from anecdotal experience as opposed to scientific data. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current use of corticosteroid injections for muscle strains and ligaments sprains in the National Football League to document player's ability to return to play and possible adverse effects. Athletes from a single National Football League team who received at least one corticosteroid or anesthetic injection for either a muscle strain or ligament sprain during three consecutive seasons were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-seven injections were given over the three seasons. Injections were either performed blindly or by using ultrasound guidance. Twice as many defensive players were injected than offensive players. The average number of days of conservative treatment before injection was 6.5 days. All players returned to play after injection. There were no complications from any of the injections. Seventeen (55%) players did not miss a single game, and nine (30%) did not miss a single day. Quadriceps strains were associated with the most missed games (four) and the most missed days (36.5). Proximal hamstring strains were second with an average of three missed games and 28 missed days. Corticosteroid injections are a safe and effective therapeutic intervention for treating muscle strains and ligament sprains in order to enable athletes to return to competition earlier.

  1. Gender and General Strain Theory: A Comparison of Strains, Mediating, and Moderating Effects Explaining Three Types of Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry

    2017-01-01

    The present study of 659 Korean adolescents tests General Strain Theory's (GST) utility in explaining gender differences in delinquency causation. It models the effects of key strains, negative emotions, and a composite measure of several conditioning factors separately for boys and girls and for delinquency. Consistent with the theory, males and…

  2. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  3. The effects of aponeurosis geometry on strain injury susceptibility explored with a 3D muscle model.

    PubMed

    Rehorn, Michael R; Blemker, Silvia S

    2010-09-17

    In the musculoskeletal system, some muscles are injured more frequently than others. For example, the biceps femoris longhead (BFLH) is the most commonly injured hamstring muscle. It is thought that acute injuries result from large strains within the muscle tissue, but the mechanism behind this type of strain injury is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to build computational models to analyze the stretch distributions within the BFLH muscle and to explore the effects of aponeurosis geometry on the magnitude and location of peak stretches within the model. We created a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of the BFLH based on magnetic resonance (MR) images. We also created a series of simplified models with a similar geometry to the MR-based model. We analyzed the stretches predicted by the MR-based model during lengthening contractions to determine the region of peak local fiber stretch. The peak along-fiber stretch was 1.64 and was located adjacent to the proximal myotendinous junction (MTJ). In contrast, the average along-fiber stretch across all the muscle tissue was 0.95. By analyzing the simple models, we found that varying the dimensions of the aponeuroses (width, length, and thickness) had a substantial impact on the location and magnitude of peak stretches within the muscle. Specifically, the difference in widths between the proximal and distal aponeurosis in the BFLH contributed most to the location and magnitude of peak stretch, as decreasing the proximal aponeurosis width by 80% increased peak average stretches along the proximal MTJ by greater than 60% while slightly decreasing stretches along the distal MTJ. These results suggest that the aponeurosis morphology of the BFLH plays a significant role in determining stretch distributions throughout the muscle. Furthermore, this study introduces the new hypothesis that aponeurosis widths may be important in determining muscle injury susceptibility.

  4. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K.; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B.; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. Methods DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Conclusion Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating. PMID:27315243

  5. The effects of high fat diet and moderate exercise on TGFβ1 and collagen deposition in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pincu, Yair; Linden, Melissa A; Zou, Kai; Baynard, Tracy; Boppart, Marni D

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a primary cause of muscle insulin resistance and is also associated with morphological and functional changes in the skeletal muscle including fibrosis. Studies suggest that macrophages in obese skeletal muscle may be primed to secrete transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), a factor that can stimulate type I collagen gene expression via Smad3 activation but the extent to which exercise could modulate high fat (HF) diet-induced inflammation and fibrosis in skeletal muscle remains to be determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which moderate intensity exercise training can attenuate pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and markers of fibrosis in skeletal muscle in response to concomitant HF diet. Male C57BL/6J mice (6 wk old) were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: (1) Control diet-No Exercise (CON-No Ex), (2) CON-Ex, (3) HF-No Ex, or (4) HF-Ex. Mice were exercised on a motorized treadmill 40min/day at 12m/min, 5% grade, 5days/wk, for 12weeks. Macrophage (F4/80, CD11c, CD206), inflammatory cytokine (TNFα, IL-6, IL-10), TGFβ1, and collagen (Col1α) gene expression were evaluated in skeletal muscle by qPCR. Frozen muscle sections were stained to assess collagen content and fiber cross sectional area (CSA). F4/80, CD206 and IL-6 gene expression were increased by HF diet, and exercise only attenuated the increase in F4/80 and IL-6 (p<0.05). No differences in CD11c, TNFα and IL-10 gene expression were found between the groups. HF diet increased TGFβ1 protein expression, Smad3 activation, and collagen deposition in skeletal muscle, and exercise attenuated TGFβ1 protein expression and collagen deposition in skeletal muscle (p<0.05). Muscle fiber CSA was not different between the groups. The results from this study suggest that HF diet can increase skeletal muscle macrophage gene expression and fibrosis and that exercise can attenuate these changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carnosine, taurine and enzyme activities of human skeletal muscle fibres from elderly subjects with osteoarthritis and young moderately active subjects.

    PubMed

    Tallon, Mark J; Harris, Roger C; Maffulli, Nicola; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    Ageing is associated with a reduction in muscle carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine), but there are no data on the changes specifically in type I and type II muscle fibres. Given the higher carnosine content of type II fibers, changes observed in whole muscle may be secondary to a shift in fibre composition. Carnosine, beta-alanine, histidine, taurine, and citrate synthase (CS) and glycogen phosphorylase (Phos), were measured in pools of single muscle fibres from freeze-dried muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis of nine elderly sedentary subjects (65-80 years) with osteoarthritis of the knee and undergoing total knee replacement, and nine young moderately active healthy subjects (20-35 years). Fibres were characterised as type I or II by myosin ATPase activity. Carnosine was 53.2% lower in type II fibres of older subjects resulting in an estimated 7% (and most probably still higher) decline in intracellular physico-chemical buffering capacity. Younger subjects showed higher CS activities in type I and higher Phos activities in type II fibres. These differences were less apparent in elderly subjects. Possible causes for the change in the carnosine content are reduced physical activity, reduced meat intake, or the result of progressive denervation.

  7. β-Alanine dose for maintaining moderately elevated muscle carnosine levels.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Sanne; Bex, Tine; Vervaet, Chris; Vanhee, Lander; Achten, Eric; Derave, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Chronic β-alanine (BA) supplementation is an increasingly popular nutritional strategy, because it can elevate muscle carnosine content and thereby enhance high-intensity exercise performance. The current study investigated 1) whether sex and body mass are determinants of BA-induced muscle carnosine loading and 2) the optimal maintenance dose for ensuring constantly elevated muscle carnosine stores. During the loading phase, 34 participants (men and women) were supplemented with 3.2 g (4 × 800 mg) BA per day for 46 d (slightly different loading strategies were applied concerning the effect of meal timing and supplementation form). Thereafter, 19 participants (men and women) continued taking free-powder BA for six more weeks (maintenance phase). The participants were matched and redivided into three groups receiving 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g·d(-1) BA, respectively. Muscle carnosine content was measured in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Body mass and sex had only minimal effect on the absolute increase in muscle carnosine. Given the lower baseline values in women, the relative increase for women was higher, indicating that women required less BA for the same relative increase. In addition, a significant negative correlation was observed between body mass and the relative increase in muscle carnosine (r = -0.45, P = 0.007). A maintenance dose of ∼1.2 g·d(-1) BA was the most effective in keeping muscle carnosine content elevated at the postsupplementation level. Sex and body mass did not markedly affect the absolute increase during muscle carnosine loading, although they are determinants for the relative increase. In addition, we established for the first time an effective maintenance dose of ∼1.2 g·d(-1) BA to keep muscle carnosine content elevated at 30%-50% above baseline for a prolonged period.

  8. The free diffusion of macromolecules in tissue-engineered skeletal muscle subjected to large compression strains.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Amit; Cornelissen, Lisette H; Gawlitta, Debby; Bader, Dan L; Oomens, Cees W J

    2008-01-01

    Pressure-related deep tissue injury (DTI) represents a severe pressure ulcer, which initiates in compressed muscle tissue overlying a bony prominence and progresses to more superficial tissues until penetrating the skin. Individual subjects with impaired motor and/or sensory capacities are at high risk of developing DTI. Impaired diffusion of critical metabolites in compressed muscle tissue may contribute to DTI, and impaired diffusion of tissue damage biomarkers may further impose a problem in developing early detection blood tests. We hypothesize that compression of muscle tissue between a bony prominence and a supporting surface locally influences the diffusion capacity of muscle. The objective of this study was therefore, to determine the effects of large compression strains on free diffusion in a tissue-engineered skeletal muscle model. Diffusion was measured with a range of fluorescently labeled dextran molecules (10, 20, 150kDa) whose sizes were representative of both hormones and damage biomarkers. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to compare diffusion coefficients (D) of the different dextrans between the uncompressed and compressed (48-60% strain) states. In a separate experiment, we simulated the effects of local partial muscle ischemia in vivo, by reducing the temperature of compressed specimens from 37 to 34 degrees C. Compared to the D in the uncompressed model system, values in the compressed state were significantly reduced by 47+/-22% (p<0.02). A 3 degrees C temperature decrease further reduced D in the compressed specimens by 10+/-6% (p<0.05). In vivo, the effects of large strains and ischemia are likely to be summative, and hence, the present findings suggest an important role of impaired diffusion in the etiology of DTI, and should also be considered when developing biochemical screening methods for early detection of DTI.

  9. Fluid and electrolyte supplementation after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis in Standardbred horses.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Geor, Raymond J; Spriet, Lawrence L; Lindinger, Michael I

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that postexercise rehydration using a hypotonic electrolyte solution will increase the rate of recovery of whole body hydration, and that this is associated with increased muscle glycogen and electrolyte recovery in horses. Gluteus medius biopsies and jugular venous blood were sampled from six exercise-conditioned Standardbreds on two separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competitive exercise test (CET) designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of a 3-day event. After the CETs, horses were given water ad libitum, and either a hypotonic commercial electrolyte solution (electrolyte) via nasogastric tube, followed by a typical hay/grain meal, or a hay/grain meal alone (control). The CET resulted in decreased total body water and muscle glycogen concentration of 8.4 +/- 0.3 liters and 22.6%, respectively, in the control treatment, and 8.2 +/- 0.4 liters and 21.9% in the electrolyte treatment. Electrolyte resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis and faster restoration of hydration (as evidenced by faster recovery of plasma protein concentration, maintenance of plasma osmolality, and greater muscle intracellular fluid volume) during the recovery period compared with control. There were no differences in muscle Na, K, Cl, or Mg contents between the two treatments. It is concluded that oral administration of a hypotonic electrolyte solution after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhanced the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis during the recovery period compared with control. It is speculated that postexercise dehydration may be one key contributor to the slow muscle glycogen replenishment in horses.

  10. Age-related changes in motor unit firing pattern of vastus lateralis muscle during low-moderate contraction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Holobar, Aleš; Kouzaki, Motoki; Ogawa, Madoka; Akima, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Age-related changes in motor unit activation properties remain unclear for locomotor muscles such as quadriceps muscles, although these muscles are preferentially atrophied with aging and play important roles in daily living movements. The present study investigated and compared detailed motor unit firing characteristics for the vastus lateralis muscle during isometric contraction at low to moderate force levels in the elderly and young. Fourteen healthy elderly men and 15 healthy young men performed isometric ramp-up contraction to 70 % of the maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) during knee extension. Multichannel surface electromyograms were recorded from the vastus lateralis muscle using a two-dimensional grid of 64 electrodes and decomposed with the convolution kernel compensation technique to extract individual motor units. Motor unit firing rates in the young were significantly higher (~+29.7 %) than in the elderly (p < 0.05). There were significant differences in firing rates among motor units with different recruitment thresholds at each force level in the young (p < 0.05) but not in the elderly (p > 0.05). Firing rates at 60 % of the MVC force level for the motor units recruited at <20 % of MVC were significantly correlated with MVC force in the elderly (r = 0.885, p < 0.0001) but not in the young (r = 0.127, p > 0.05). These results suggest that the motor unit firing rate in the vastus lateralis muscle is affected by aging and muscle strength in the elderly and/or age-related strength loss is related to motor unit firing/recruitment properties.

  11. A Novel Fiber Bragg Grating Based Sensing Methodology for Direct Measurement of Surface Strain on Body Muscles during Physical Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Arudi Subbarao, Guru; Subbaramajois Narasipur, Omkar; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2012-07-01

    The present work proposes a new sensing methodology, which uses Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) to measure in vivo the surface strain and strain rate on calf muscles while performing certain exercises. Two simple exercises, namely ankle dorsi-flexion and ankle plantar-flexion, have been considered and the strain induced on the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle while performing these exercises has been monitored. The real time strain generated has been recorded and the results are compared with those obtained using a commercial Color Doppler Ultrasound (CDU) system. It is found that the proposed sensing methodology is promising for surface strain measurements in biomechanical applications.

  12. Musculotendon variability influences tissue strains experienced by the biceps femoris long head muscle during high-speed running.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Blemker, Silvia S

    2014-10-17

    The hamstring muscles frequently suffer injury during high-speed running, though the factors that make an individual more susceptible to injury remain poorly understood. The goals of this study were to measure the musculotendon dimensions of the biceps femoris long head (BFlh) muscle, the hamstring muscle injured most often, and to use computational models to assess the influence of variability in the BFlh's dimensions on internal tissue strains during high-speed running. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired over the thigh in 12 collegiate athletes, and musculotendon dimensions were measured in the proximal free tendon/aponeurosis, muscle and distal free tendon/aponeurosis. Finite element meshes were generated based on the average, standard deviation and range of BFlh dimensions. Simulation boundary conditions were defined to match muscle activation and musculotendon length change in the BFlh during high-speed running. Muscle and connective tissue dimensions were found to vary between subjects, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 17±6% across all dimensions. For all simulations peak local strain was highest along the proximal myotendinous junction, which is where injury typically occurs. Model variations showed that peak local tissue strain increased as the proximal aponeurosis width narrowed and the muscle width widened. The aponeurosis width and muscle width variation models showed that the relative dimensions of these structures influence internal muscle tissue strains. The results of this study indicate that a musculotendon unit's architecture influences its strain injury susceptibility during high-speed running.

  13. Muscle activation patterns in the Nordic hamstring exercise: Impact of prior strain injury.

    PubMed

    Bourne, M N; Opar, D A; Williams, M D; Al Najjar, A; Shield, A J

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine: (a) the spatial patterns of hamstring activation during the Nordic hamstring exercise (NHE); (b) whether previously injured hamstrings display activation deficits during the NHE; and (c) whether previously injured hamstrings exhibit altered cross-sectional area (CSA). Ten healthy, recreationally active men with a history of unilateral hamstring strain injury underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging of their thighs before and after six sets of 10 repetitions of the NHE. Transverse (T2) relaxation times of all hamstring muscles [biceps femoris long head (BFlh); biceps femoris short head (BFsh); semitendinosus (ST); semimembranosus (SM)] were measured at rest and immediately after the NHE and CSA was measured at rest. For the uninjured limb, the ST's percentage increase in T2 with exercise was 16.8%, 15.8%, and 20.2% greater than the increases exhibited by the BFlh, BFsh, and SM, respectively (P < 0.002 for all). Previously injured hamstring muscles (n = 10) displayed significantly smaller increases in T2 post-exercise than the homonymous muscles in the uninjured contralateral limb (mean difference -7.2%, P = 0.001). No muscles displayed significant between-limb differences in CSA. During the NHE, the ST is preferentially activated and previously injured hamstring muscles display chronic activation deficits compared with uninjured contralateral muscles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of passive skeletal muscle tissue subjected to large tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Takaza, Michael; Moerman, Kevin M; Gindre, Juliette; Lyons, Garry; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-01-01

    The passive mechanical properties of muscle tissue are important for many biomechanics applications. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the three-dimensional tensile response of passive skeletal muscle tissue to applied loading. In particular, the nature of the anisotropy remains unclear and the response to loading at intermediate fibre directions and the Poisson's ratios in tension have not been reported. Accordingly, tensile tests were performed along and perpendicular to the muscle fibre direction as well as at 30°, 45° and 60° to the muscle fibre direction in samples of Longissimus dorsi muscle taken from freshly slaughtered pigs. Strain was measured using an optical non-contact method. The results show the transverse or cross fibre (TT') direction is broadly linear and is the stiffest (77 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1), but that failure occurs at low stretches (approximately λ=1.15). In contrast the longitudinal or fibre direction (L) is nonlinear and much less stiff (10 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1) but failure occurs at higher stretches (approximatelyλ=1.65). An almost sinusoidal variation in stress response was observed at intermediate angles. The following Poisson's ratios were measured: VLT=VLT'=0.47, VTT'=0.28 and VTL=0.74. These observations have not been previously reported and they contribute significantly to our understanding of the three dimensional deformation response of skeletal muscle tissue.

  15. Does Race/Ethnicity Moderate the Association Between Job Strain and Leisure Time Physical Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary G.; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Avrunin, Jill S.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Sorensen, Glorian; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Emmons, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic minorities report myriad barriers to regular leisure time physical activity (LTPA), including the stress and fatigue resulting from their occupational activities. Purpose We sought to investigate whether an association exists between job strain and LTPA, and whether it is modified by race or ethnicity. Methods Data were collected from 1,740 adults employed in 26 small manufacturing businesses in eastern Massachusetts. LTPA and job strain data were self-reported. Adjusted mean hours of LTPA per week are reported. Results In age and gender adjusted analyses, reports of job strain were associated with LTPA. There was a significant interaction between job strain and race or ethnicity (p = .04). Whites experiencing job strain reported 1 less hr of LTPA per week compared to Whites not reporting job strain. Collectively, racial/ethnic minorities reporting job strain exhibited comparatively higher levels of LTPA compared to their counterparts with no job strain, although patterns for individual groups did not significantly differ. Conclusions Job strain was associated with LTPA in a lower income, multiethnic population of healthy adult men and women. The association between job strain and LTPA was modified by race or ethnicity, highlighting the importance of investigating the differential effects of psychosocial occupational factors on LTPA levels by race or ethnicity. PMID:16827630

  16. Papillary Muscle Free Strain in Patients with Severe Degenerative and Functional Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kılıcgedik, Alev; Kahveci, Gokhan; Gurbuz, Ahmet Seyfeddin; Karabay, Can Yucel; Guler, Ahmet; Efe, Suleyman Cagan; Aung, Soe Moe; Arslantas, Ugur; Demir, Serdar; Izgi, Ibrahim Akin; Kirma, Cevat

    2017-04-01

    The role of papillary muscle function in severe mitral regurgitation with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and the method of choice to evaluate PM have still been the subjects of controversy. To evaluate and compare papillary muscle function in and between patients with severe degenerative and functional mitral regurgitation by using the free strain method. 64 patients with severe mitral regurgitation - 39 patients with degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR group) and 25 patients with severe functional mitral regurgitation (FMR group) - and 30 control subjects (control group) were included in the study. Papillary muscle function was evaluated through the free strain method from apical four chamber images of the anterolateral papillary muscle (APM) and from apical three chamber images of the posteromedial papillary muscle (PPM). Global left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential strains were evaluated by applying 2D speckle tracking imaging. Global left ventricular longitudinal strain (DMR group, -17 [-14.2/-20]; FMR group, -9 [-7/-10.7]; control group, -20 [-18/-21] p < 0.001), global left ventricular circumferential strain (DMR group, -20 [-14.5/-22.7]; FMR group, -10 [-7/-12]; control group, -23 [-21/-27.5] p < 0.001) and papillary musle strains (PPMS; DMR group, -30.5 [-24/-46.7]; FMR group, -18 [-12/-30]; control group; -43 [-34.5/-39.5] p < 0.001; APMS; DMR group, (-35 [-23.5/-43]; FMR group, -20 [-13.5/-26]; control group, -40 [-32.5/-48] p < 0.001) were significantly different among all groups. APMS and PPMS were highly correlated with LVEF (p < 0.001, p < 0.001; respectively), GLS (p < 0.001, p < 0.001; respectively) and GCS (p < 0.001, p < 0.00; respectively) of LV among all groups. No correlation was found between papillary muscle strains and effective orifice area (EOA) in both groups of severe mitral regurgitation. Measuring papillary muscle longitudinal strain by the free strain method is practical and applicable

  17. A mathematical model on stress-strain of the epimysium of skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Xi, Man; Yun, Guohong; Narsu, B

    2015-01-21

    A mathematical model based on the distribution of collagen fibers in ground substance is established to investigate epimysium of skeletal muscle. Under the condition of pinned boundary, incompressible soft biological tissues and the mixed ratio of composite materials, the macro-mechanical properties of the skeletal muscle epimysium are investigated by the proposed model, utilizing the principle of virtual work and the nonlinear theory of elasticity in this study. The effect of physical and geometrical parameters of skeletal muscle epimysium on the stress-strain relationship is also discussed in detail. The result of the investigation concurs with the experimental observations, which demonstrate the effectiveness and validity of the established model. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Stress and strain in the flight muscles as constraints on the evolution of flying animals.

    PubMed

    Pennycuick, C J

    1996-05-01

    The minimum mechanical power needed for an animal to maintain level flight can be estimated, as can the wingbeat frequency, from measurements of the animal's mass, wing span and wing area, and of the strength of gravity and the air density. Dividing the power by the frequency gives the work done per cycle, and dividing this by the muscle mass gives the specific work, meaning the work done in each contraction by unit mass of muscle. This in turn is the product of the average stress during shortening and the strain, divided by the muscle density. The minimum specific work for level flight is strongly size dependent. To account for even minimum performance in the largest species known to be capable of prolonged, aerobic flight (whooper swan), the specific work of the myofibrils needs to be 57 J kg-1, which could be achieved, for example, by a stress of 240 kN m-2 combined with a strain of 0.25. The upper limits of stress and strain for sustained exercise are not known, but are not likely to be much higher than these figures. Much larger birds, such as the Miocene fossil Argentavis, would require improbably high values of stress and strain for level flight, unless the air density were much higher in Miocene times than at present, and/or the strength of gravity were much less. Birds of small and medium size have more than the minimum amount of muscle required for level flight. This opens a wide range of possibilities for different species to be specialised for different types of activity. The potential diversity for evolution in large species is less than for medium-sized or small ones, and dwindles to zero above a body mass of about 14 kg. There is also a strong positive trend in the aerobic scope, from about 3 in small, long-winged passerines such as swallows, to 47 in the whooper swan.

  19. Islamic Personal Religiosity as a Moderator of Job Strain and Employee's Well-Being: The Case of Malaysian Academic and Administrative Staff.

    PubMed

    Achour, Meguellati; Mohd Nor, Mohd Roslan; MohdYusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli

    2016-08-01

    Presently, there is increased in research on job strain and the effects of religiosity on employee well-being. Despite increased recognition of religiosity as a moderator of well-being, limited research has focused on Islamic perspective of moderating job strain. This study examines the moderating effects of Islamic personal religiosity on the relationship between job strain and employee well-being in Malaysian universities. One hundred and seventeen (117) Muslim academic and administrative staff from four public universities were sampled. Data were collected via questionnaires, and our findings show that the effect of job strain on well-being is significant for employees and that personal religiosity of employees contributed to alleviating job strain and enhancing well-being. Thus, the study concludes that Islamic personal religiosity moderates the relationship between job strain and employee well-being.

  20. Scaling skeletal muscle function to mass in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Carla; Nery, Luiz E; Dal Corso, Simone; Nápolis, Lara; De Fuccio, Marcelo Bicalho; Castro, Marise; Neder, J Alberto

    2006-11-01

    Skeletal muscle performance and muscle mass are commonly reduced in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is currently unclear, however, whether negative changes in muscle structure and function are proportionately related to each other in these patients. In a cross-sectional study, 39 patients (post-bronchodilator FEV1=49.7+/-15.5% pred) and 17 controls were submitted to knee isokinetic dynamometry [peak torque (PT), isometric strength (IS), and total work (TW)] and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for the evaluation of leg muscle mass (LMM). Muscle function (F) was normalised for LMM by using ratio standards (F.LMM-1), power function ratios (F.LMM-b, where b is usually not equal 1), and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Patients with COPD presented with reduced PT, IS, TW, and LMM as compared to controls: there were significant linear correlations among these variables in both groups (P<0.05). Ratio standards of PT.LMM-1 and TW.LMM-1 were, on average, 14% lower in patients than controls (P<0.01). The coefficients for allometric correction of IS and TW were significantly higher in patients as compared to controls (0.975 vs. 0.603 and 1.471 vs. 0.824, respectively, P<0.05), i.e. more LMM was needed to generate a given functional output in patients than normal subjects. In addition, adjusted means of muscle function variables by ANCOVA were 11-18% lower for patients than controls with LMM as the covariate (P<0.05). We conclude that factors other than simple atrophy (i.e. mass-independent mechanisms) might play a role in explaining the COPD-related skeletal muscle dysfunction.

  1. Calf muscle strain injuries in sport: a systematic review of risk factors for injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Brady; Pizzari, Tania

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review the literature to identify risk factors for calf strain injury, and to direct future research into calf muscle injuries. Systematic review DATA SOURCES: Database searches conducted for Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, AUSPORT, SportDiscus, PEDro and Cochrane Library. Manual reference checks, ahead of press searches, citation tracking. From inception to June 2016. Studies evaluating and presenting data related to intrinsic or extrinsic risk factors for sustaining future calf injury. Ten studies were obtained for review. Subjects across football, Australian football, rugby union, basketball and triathlon were reported on, representing 5397 athletes and 518 calf/ lower leg muscle injuries. Best evidence synthesis highlights chronological age and previous history of calf strain are the strongest risk factors for future calf muscle injury. Previous lower limb injuries (hamstring, quadriceps, adductor, knee) show some limited evidence for an association. Numerous factors lack evidence of an association, including height, weight, gender and side dominance. Increasing age and previous calf strain injury are the most predictive of future calf injury. The overall paucity of evidence and the trend for studies of a high risk of bias show that further research needs to be undertaken. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Effect of Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster on patients with lumbar muscle strain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tao; Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei; Zhang, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: observe the effect of Tai Chi exercise on the patients with the chronic lumbar muscle strain under the intervention treatment of auricular plaster. Methods: 74 middle-aged and elderly patients, suffering from the chronic lumbar muscle strain, are randomly and equally divided into an observation group and a control group, with 37 patients in each group. The patients in the control group do Tai Chi exercise, while those in the observation group are treated by the auricular plaster therapy in addition to Tai Chi exercise. Evaluate and compare the disease conditions of the patients in the two groups before the treatment and after 12 weeks’ treatment. Results: after 12 weeks’ treatment, the patients in the two groups have been improved differently in comparison with those before the treatment (P < 0.05). However, the cure rate, the excellence rate and total effective rate of the observation group are superior to those of the control group, respectively P < 0.05 or P < 0.01, thus their difference shows statistic significance. Conclusion: after 12 weeks’ Tai Chi exercise, it exercises an obvious curative effect on the patients with lumbar muscle strain but the curative effect is more remarkable if it is combined with auricular plaster therapy. PMID:25932261

  3. Effect of Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster on patients with lumbar muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei; Zhang, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    observe the effect of Tai Chi exercise on the patients with the chronic lumbar muscle strain under the intervention treatment of auricular plaster. 74 middle-aged and elderly patients, suffering from the chronic lumbar muscle strain, are randomly and equally divided into an observation group and a control group, with 37 patients in each group. The patients in the control group do Tai Chi exercise, while those in the observation group are treated by the auricular plaster therapy in addition to Tai Chi exercise. Evaluate and compare the disease conditions of the patients in the two groups before the treatment and after 12 weeks' treatment. after 12 weeks' treatment, the patients in the two groups have been improved differently in comparison with those before the treatment (P < 0.05). However, the cure rate, the excellence rate and total effective rate of the observation group are superior to those of the control group, respectively P < 0.05 or P < 0.01, thus their difference shows statistic significance. after 12 weeks' Tai Chi exercise, it exercises an obvious curative effect on the patients with lumbar muscle strain but the curative effect is more remarkable if it is combined with auricular plaster therapy.

  4. Combined effects of microtopography and cyclic strain on vascular smooth muscle cell orientation.

    PubMed

    Houtchens, Graham R; Foster, Michael D; Desai, Tejal A; Morgan, Elise F; Wong, Joyce Y

    2008-01-01

    Cellular alignment studies have shown that cell orientation has a large effect on the expression and behavior of cells. Cyclic strain and substrate microtopography have each been shown to regulate cellular alignment. This study examined the combined effects of these two stimuli on the alignment of bovine vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cells were cultured on substrates with microgrooves of varying widths oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of an applied cyclic tensile strain. We found that microgrooves oriented parallel to the direction of the applied strain limited the orientation response of VSMCs to the mechanical stimulus, while grooves perpendicular to the applied strain enhanced cellular alignment. Further, the extent to which parallel grooves limited cell alignment was found to be dependent on the groove width. It was found that for both a small (15microm) and a large (70microm) groove width, cells were better able to reorient in response to the applied strain than for an intermediate groove width (40microm). This study indicates that microtopographical cues modulate the orientation response of VSMCs to cyclic strain. The results suggest that there is a range of microgroove dimensions that is most effective at maintaining the orientation of the cells in the presence of an opposing stimulus induced by cyclic strain.

  5. Outcomes of mild to moderate upper eyelid ptosis correction using Müller's muscle-conjunctival resection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengyuan T; Totonchi, Ali; Katira, Kristopher; Daggett, Justin; Guyuron, Bahman

    2012-12-01

    Müller's muscle-conjunctival resection is used to correct mild to moderate ptosis commonly encountered in the rejuvenation patient population. The authors examined its efficacy and analyzed variables that potentially affect outcomes. Patients who underwent ptosis correction using Müller's muscle-conjunctival resection with greater than 10-month follow-up were included. Amount of ptosis reduction, eyelid symmetry, effects of concomitant facial aesthetic operations, and adverse outcomes were analyzed. Patients were grouped into medium- (<24 months after surgery) and long-term follow-up (>24 months) cohorts to determine whether outcomes changed over time. Forty patients with a mean follow-up of 28 months combined for a total of 70 resection operations. Resection significantly reduced ptosis by a mean of 1.48 ± 0.88 mm (p < 0.001), corresponding to 0.19 mm of eyelid elevation for every 1.0 mm of Müller's muscle resected. The procedure successfully corrected 84 percent of eyelids to within 0.5 mm and 94 percent to within 1.0 mm of normal eyelid position. On patients with asymmetric ptosis, it significantly improved eyelid symmetry to within 1.0 mm from 85 percent of patients before surgery to 95 percent after surgery, and to within 0.5 mm from 53 percent before surgery to 75 percent of patients after surgery (p = 0.036). Furthermore, the mean correction of ptosis was not significantly different between medium- (1.58 ± 0.93 mm) and long-term (1.32 ± 0.93 mm) follow-up patients (p = 0.258). Müller's muscle-conjunctival resection is an effective long-term solution to mild to moderate eyelid ptosis and asymmetry, and can be effectively performed concomitantly with other aesthetic facial procedures. Therapeutic, IV.

  6. Influence of exercise order on muscle damage during moderate-intensity resistance exercise and recovery.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Christianne Pereira Giesbrecht; Simão, Roberto; Miranda, Humberto; Ribeiro, João; Soares, Jorge; Salles, Belmiro; Silva, António; Mota, Maria Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of exercise order on total number of repetitions and to evaluate the possible importance on muscle damage and on rating perceived exertion (RPE). Ten trained participants completed two sequences: sequence A (SEQA) was leg press (LP), leg extension (LE), leg curl (LC), bench press (BP), shoulder press (SP), and triceps extension (TE) and in sequence B (SEQB), the order of execution of the exercises was reversed. Highest creatine kinase (CK) concentrations were observed 24 hours following both sessions, but no differences were found at any time between them, revealing that muscle damage has occurred. There were significant differences between SEQA and SEQB in the total number of repetitions for TE, LE, and LC. Our results suggest that differences in total strength production when exercise order is changed must be explained by some other mechanisms besides muscle damage and RPE.

  7. Strengthening of back muscles using a module of flexible strain sensors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Chun; Lin, Hwai-Ting; Chen, Wei-Long

    2015-02-09

    This research aims at developing a flexible strain module applied to the strengthening of back muscles. Silver films were sputtered onto flexible substrates to produce a flexible sensor. Assuming that back muscle elongation is positively correlated with the variations in skin surface length, real-time resistance changes exhibited by the sensor during simulated training sessions were measured. The results were used to identify the relationship between resistance change of sensors and skin surface stretch. In addition, muscle length changes from ultrasound images were used to determine the feasibility of a proof of concept sensor. Furthermore, this module is capable of detecting large muscle contractions, some of which may be undesirable for the prescribed training strategy. Therefore, the developed module can facilitate real-time assessments of the movement accuracy of users during training, and the results are instantly displayed on a screen. People using the developed training system can immediately adjust their posture to the appropriate position. Thus, the training mechanism can be constructed to help user improve the efficiency of back muscle strengthening.

  8. Mechanical strain and collagen potentiate mitogenic activity of angiotensin II in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, K; Wilson, E; Chatterjee, K; Ives, H E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of extracellular matrix proteins and mechanical strain on the mitogenic activity of angiotensins I and II (AI and AII) were examined in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. VSM cells on various extracellular matrices were exposed to AII (1 microM) for 48 h. On plastic, AII induced only a 1.6-fold increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, but on fibronectin- or type I collagen-coated plastic, the response to AII was enhanced from two- to fourfold. On a type I collagen-coated silicone elastomer, to which mechanical strain was applied, [3H]thymidine incorporation dramatically increased to a maximum of 53-fold. Dup 753 (10(-5) M) blocked the AII-induced increase in DNA synthesis. AI also increased DNA synthesis in VSM cells, and this response was also enhanced by mechanical strain. Mitogenic activity of AI was blocked by ramiprilat (10(-5) M), indicating that its mitogenic activity was via conversion to AII. The synergy between AII and strain was completely eliminated by neutralizing antibodies to PDGF AB (3 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, the mitogenic effect of AII in unstrained cells was also synergistic with submaximal concentrations of PDGF AB (1 ng/ml). Thus, the synergy between AII and mechanical strain probably results from synergism between AII and PDGF secreted in response to strain. PMID:8254054

  9. ‘Serious thigh muscle strains’: beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-01-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in ‘muscle strain’. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh ‘muscle strain’. PMID:26519522

  10. Perceived competence in computer use as a moderator of musculoskeletal strain in VDU work: an ergonomics intervention case.

    PubMed

    Tuomivaara, S; Ketola, R; Huuhtanen, P; Toivonen, R

    2008-02-01

    Musculoskeletal strain and other symptoms are common in visual display unit (VDU) work. Psychosocial factors are closely related to the outcome and experience of musculoskeletal strain. The user-computer relationship from the viewpoint of the quality of perceived competence in computer use was assessed as a psychosocial stress indicator. It was assumed that the perceived competence in computer use moderates the experience of musculoskeletal strain and the success of the ergonomics intervention. The participants (n = 124, female 58%, male 42%) worked with VDU for more than 4 h per week. They took part in an ergonomics intervention and were allocated into three groups: intensive; education; and reference group. Musculoskeletal strain, the level of ergonomics of the workstation assessed by the experts in ergonomics and amount of VDU work were estimated at the baseline and at the 10-month follow-up. Age, gender and the perceived competence in computer use were assessed at the baseline. The perceived competence in computer use predicted strain in the upper and the lower part of the body at the follow-up. The interaction effect shows that the intensive ergonomics intervention procedure was the most effective among participants with high perceived competence. The interpretation of the results was that an anxiety-provoking and stressful user-computer relationship prevented the participants from being motivated and from learning in the ergonomics intervention. In the intervention it is important to increase the computer competence along with the improvements of physical workstation and work organization.

  11. Quantification of classical swine fever virus in aerosols originating from pigs infected with strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2009-03-30

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), the route of virus introduction into a farm is often unclear. One of the suggested routes is via the air. Under experimental conditions, airborne transmission over a short distance seems possible, but analysis of outbreak data is still inconclusive. For a better understanding of the role of airborne transmission, quantitative information is needed on concentrations of virus emitted by infected pigs. This was studied in four groups of 10 pigs in which three pigs were inoculated with either a low virulent strain (Zoelen), a low or high dose of a moderately virulent strain (Paderborn), or a highly virulent strain (Brescia). The other seven pigs in each group served as contact pigs. At several moments after infection, air samples were obtained using gelatine filters. Infectious virus and viral RNA were detected in the air of rooms housing the pigs infected with the moderately and highly virulent strains with titres of 10(1.2) to 10(3.0)TCID(50)/m(3) of infectious virus, and 10(1.6) to 10(3.8)TCID(50)equiv./m(3) of viral RNA. It was observed that the higher the dose or virulence of the virus strain used for inoculation of the pigs, the sooner virus could be detected in the air samples. This is the first study describing the quantification of (infectious) CSFV in air samples of rooms housing infected pigs, enabling to quantify the contribution of individual infected pigs to virus concentrations in aerosols. This can be used as input for quantitative models of airborne spread over large distances.

  12. Concurrent speed endurance and resistance training improves performance, running economy, and muscle NHE1 in moderately trained runners.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christensen, Peter M; Larsen, Sonni; Andersen, Thomas Rostgaard; Thomassen, Martin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether speed endurance training (SET, repeated 30-s sprints) and heavy resistance training (HRT, 80-90% of 1 repetition maximum) performed in succession are compatible and lead to performance improvements in moderately trained endurance runners. For an 8-wk intervention period (INT) 23 male runners [maximum oxygen uptake (V̇O(2max)) 59 ± 1 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1); values are means ± SE] either maintained their training (CON, n = 11) or performed high-intensity concurrent training (HICT, n = 12) consisting of two weekly sessions of SET followed by HRT and two weekly sessions of aerobic training with an average reduction in running distance of 42%. After 4 wk of HICT, performance was improved (P < 0.05) in a 10-km run (42:30 ± 1:07 vs. 44:11 ± 1:08 min:s) with no further improvement during the last 4 wk. Performance in a 1,500-m run (5:10 ± 0:05 vs. 5:27 ± 0:08 min:s) and in the Yo-Yo IR2 test (706 ± 97 vs. 491 ± 65 m) improved (P < 0.001) only following 8 wk of INT. In HICT, running economy (189 ± 4 vs. 195 ± 4 ml·kg(-1)·km(-1)), muscle content of NHE1 (35%) and dynamic muscle strength was augmented (P < 0.01) after compared with before INT, whereas V̇O(2max), muscle morphology, capillarization, content of muscle Na(+)/K(+) pump subunits, and MCT4 were unaltered. No changes were observed in CON. The present study demonstrates that SET and HRT, when performed in succession, lead to improvements in both short- and long-term running performance together with improved running economy as well as increased dynamic muscle strength and capacity for muscular H(+) transport in moderately trained endurance runners.

  13. Moderately decreased maternal dietary energy intake during pregnancy reduces fetal skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in the pigs.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tiande; Yu, Bing; Yu, Jie; Mao, Xiangbing; Zheng, Ping; He, Jun; Huang, Zhiqing; Liu, Yue; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are of major importance in oocyte and early embryo, playing a key role in maintaining energy homeostasis. Epidemiological findings indicate that maternal undernutrition-induced mitochondrial dysfunction during pregnancy is associated with the development of metabolic disorders in offspring. Here, we investigated the effects of moderately decreased maternal energy intake during pregnancy on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in fetal offspring with pig as a model. Pregnant Meishan sows were allocated to a standard-energy (SE) intake group as recommended by the National Research Council (NRC; 2012) and a low-energy (LE) intake group. Fetal umbilical vein serum and longissimus muscle samples were collected for further analysis on day 90 of pregnancy. Sow and fetal weights and the concentrations of serum growth hormone (GH) and glucose were reduced in LE group. Maternal LE diet decreased the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), β subunit of mitochondrial H(+)-ATP synthase (ATB5B), sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), and citrate synthase (CS). The protein expression of PPARGC1A and Sirt1, intracellular NAD(+)-to-NADH ratio, and CS activity was reduced in LE group, and accordingly, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content was decreased. Moreover, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) expression at both mRNA and protein levels and SOD and catalase (CAT) activities were reduced in LE group as well. The observed decrease in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant defense capacity suggests that moderately decreased maternal energy intake during pregnancy impairs mitochondrial function in fetal pigs.

  14. Intramedullary Pressure and Matrix Strain Induced by Oscillatory Skeletal Muscle Stimulation and its Potential in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lam, Hoyan

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by oscillatory muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia, i.e., hindlimb suspension (HLS). To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a) MS induced ImP and bone strain as function of stimulation frequency, and b) the adaptive responses to functional disuse, and disuse plus 1Hz and 20Hz stimulation in vivo. Femoral ImP and bone strain generated by MS were measured in the frequencies of 1Hz-100Hz in four rats. Forty retired breeder rats were used for the in vivo HLS study. The quadriceps muscle was stimulated at frequencies of 1 Hz and 20 Hz, 10min/d for 4 weeks. The metaphyseal trabecular bone quantity and microstructure at the distal femur were evaluated using μCT, while bone formation indices were analyzed using histomorphometric techniques. Oscillatory MS generated a maximum ImP of 45±9 mmHg at 20 Hz and produced a maximum matrix strain of 128±19 με at 10 Hz. Our analyses from the in vivo study showed that MS at 20 Hz was able to attenuate trabecular bone loss and partially maintain the microstructure induced by HLS. Conversely, there was no evidence of an adaptive effect of stimulation at 1 Hz on disused skeleton. The results suggested that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics and mechanical strain in bone, which serves as a critical mediator of adaptation. These results clearly demonstrated the ability of MS in attenuating bone loss from the disuse osteopenia and could hold potential in mitigating skeletal degradation imposed by conditions of disuse, which may serve as a biomechanical intervention in clinic application. PMID:19081096

  15. Effectiveness of powered hospital bed movers for reducing physiological strain and back muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Daniell, Nathan; Merrett, Simon; Paul, Gunther

    2014-07-01

    Battery powered bed movers are becoming increasingly common within the hospital setting. The use of powered bed movers is believed to result in reduced physical efforts required by health care workers, which may be associated with a decreased risk of occupation related injuries. However, little work has been conducted assessing how powered bed movers impact on levels of physiological strain and muscle activation for the user. The muscular efforts associated with moving hospital beds using three different methods; powered StaminaLift Bed Mover (PBM1), powered Gzunda Bed Mover (PBM2) and manual pushing were measured on six male subjects. Fourteen muscles were assessed moving a weighted hospital bed along a standardized route in an Australian hospital environment. Trunk inclination and upper spine acceleration were also quantified. Powered bed movers exhibited significantly lower muscle activation levels than manual pushing for the majority of muscles. When using the PBM1, users adopted a more upright posture which was maintained while performing different tasks (e.g. turning a corner, entering a lift), while trunk inclination varied considerably for manual pushing and the PBM2. The reduction in lower back muscular activation levels may result in lower incidence of lower back injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Strain reorganizes focal adhesions and cytoskeleton in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, P G; Garcia, R; Kogerman, L

    1997-04-10

    Abnormal mechanical stress on pulmonary structures is associated with increased airway resistance and impaired gas exchange as a result of increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) deposition. Using an in vitro system with cultured ASM cells, we have demonstrated that cyclic deformational strain increases ASM cellular myosin and myosin light chain kinase. To determine if these contractile protein increases were accompanied by ultrastructural changes in cells indicating phenotypic modulation, cells subjected to strain were compared to cells grown under static conditions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescent staining. The strained ASM cells oriented perpendicular to the strain direction were more elongated and contained more actin stress fibers than identical cells grown under physically static conditions. The stress fiber bundles were thicker and reorganized parallel to the long axis of the cell. Marked increases in the numbers and lengths of focal adhesions between the cell membrane and the substratum were found by both TEM and immunostaining for talin. Mechanical strain thus increases organization of cytoskeletal elements in cultured ASM cells. Similar effects in vivo may serve to promote the expression of the contractile phenotype of cultured ASM cells independent of other in vivo factors and alter cell contractility. Increased organization of cytoskeletal elements might also increase the efficiency of signal transduction from the extracellular matrix into the cell interior.

  17. The Influence of Neck Muscle Tonus and Posture on Brain Tissue Strain in Pedestrian Head Impacts.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Victor S; Halldin, Peter; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-11-01

    Pedestrians are one of the least protected groups in urban traffic and frequently suffer fatal head injuries. An important boundary condition for the head is the cervical spine, and it has previously been demonstrated that neck muscle activation is important for head kinematics during inertial loading. It has also been shown in a recent numerical study that a tensed neck musculature also has some influence on head kinematics during a pedestrian impact situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence on head kinematics and injury metrics during the isolated time of head impact by comparing a pedestrian with relaxed neck and a pedestrian with increased tonus. The human body Finite Element model THUMS Version 1.4 was connected to head and neck models developed at KTH and used in pedestrian-to-vehicle impact simulations with a generalized hood, so that the head would impact a surface with an identical impact response in all simulations. In order to isolate the influence of muscle tonus, the model was activated shortly before head impact so the head would have the same initial position prior to impact among different tonus. A symmetric and asymmetric muscle activation scheme that used high level of activation was used in order to create two extremes to investigate. It was found that for the muscle tones used in this study, the influence on the strain in the brain was very minor, in general about 1-14% change. A relatively large increase was observed in a secondary peak in maximum strains in only one of the simulated cases.

  18. Eldercare Demands, Strain, and Work Engagement: The Moderating Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacher, Hannes; Winter, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Demographic changes give rise to an increasing number of middle-aged employees providing home-based care to an elderly family member. However, the potentially important role of employees' perceptions of organizational support for eldercare has so far not been investigated. The goal of this study was to examine a stressor-strain-outcome model…

  19. Genome sequence of the moderately halophilic bacterium Salinicoccus carnicancri type strain Crm(T) (= DSM 23852(T)).

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Whon, Tae Woong; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Joon-Yong; Kim, Pil Soo; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jina; Oh, Sei Joon; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Salinicoccus carnicancri Jung et al. 2010 belongs to the genus Salinicoccus in the family Staphylococcaceae. Members of the Salinicoccus are moderately halophilic and originate from various salty environments. The halophilic features of the Salinicoccus suggest their possible uses in biotechnological applications, such as biodegradation and fermented food production. However, the genus Salinicoccus is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. This study presents the draft genome sequence of S. carnicancri strain Crm(T) and its annotation. The 2,673,309 base pair genome contained 2,700 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 47.93 mol%. It was notable that the strain carried 72 predicted genes associated with osmoregulation, which suggests the presence of beneficial functions that facilitate growth in high-salt environments.

  20. Achilles tendon strain energy in distance running: consider the muscle energy cost

    PubMed Central

    MacIntosh, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    The return of tendon strain energy is thought to contribute to reducing the energy cost of running (Erun). However, this may not be consistent with the notion that increased Achilles tendon (AT) stiffness is associated with a lower Erun. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the potential for AT strain energy return relative to Erun for male and female runners of different abilities. A total of 46 long distance runners [18 elite male (EM), 12 trained male (TM), and 16 trained female (TF)] participated in this study. Erun was determined by indirect calorimetry at 75, 85, and 95% of the speed at lactate threshold (sLT), and energy cost per stride at each speed was estimated from previously reported stride length (SL)-speed relationships. AT force during running was estimated from reported vertical ground reaction force (Fz)-speed relationships, assuming an AT:ground reaction force moment arm ratio of 1.5. AT elongation was quantified during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction using ultrasound. Muscle energy cost was conservatively estimated on the basis of AT force and estimated cross-bridge mechanics and energetics. Significant group differences existed in sLT (EM > TM > TF; P < 0.001). A significant group × speed interaction was found in the energy storage/release per stride (TM > TF > EM; P < 0.001), the latter ranging from 10 to 70 J/stride. At all speeds and in all groups, estimated muscle energy cost exceeded energy return (P < 0.001). These results show that during distance running the muscle energy cost is substantially higher than the strain energy release from the AT. PMID:25593218

  1. Exacerbated skeletal muscle inflammation and calcification in the acute phase of infection by Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi DTUI strain.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno-Castillo, Andrea; Jiménez-Marín, Andrea; Espinoza, Bertha

    2014-01-01

    A murine model was used to study the histopathological aspects and cytokine expression levels in skeletal muscle provoked by the infection with Mexican TcI strains. BALB/c mice were inoculated with the virulent Querétaro strain and the nonvirulent Ninoa strain. Parasite numbers were counted in blood and skeletal muscle at different times post-infection, and real time-PCR expression levels of the cytokines IL-12, IL-4, IL-10, IFN- γ , and TNF- α were evaluated. In the acute phase of infection, a high parasitic load, both in blood and skeletal muscle, was detected. The histopathological analyses showed an exacerbated inflammation and granulomatous-like infiltrate with the Querétaro strain. Interestingly, extensive calcification areas were observed in the skeletal muscle surrounded by inflammatory infiltrates. TNF- α and IL-10 expression exhibited a significant increase at the peak of infection. In summary, Querétaro strain, a Mexican TcI strain, is virulent enough to induce high inflammation and calcification in skeletal muscle of the hind limbs, which could be related to high expression levels of TNF- α .

  2. Exacerbated Skeletal Muscle Inflammation and Calcification in the Acute Phase of Infection by Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi DTUI Strain

    PubMed Central

    Vizcaíno-Castillo, Andrea; Jiménez-Marín, Andrea; Espinoza, Bertha

    2014-01-01

    A murine model was used to study the histopathological aspects and cytokine expression levels in skeletal muscle provoked by the infection with Mexican TcI strains. BALB/c mice were inoculated with the virulent Querétaro strain and the nonvirulent Ninoa strain. Parasite numbers were counted in blood and skeletal muscle at different times post-infection, and real time-PCR expression levels of the cytokines IL-12, IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were evaluated. In the acute phase of infection, a high parasitic load, both in blood and skeletal muscle, was detected. The histopathological analyses showed an exacerbated inflammation and granulomatous-like infiltrate with the Querétaro strain. Interestingly, extensive calcification areas were observed in the skeletal muscle surrounded by inflammatory infiltrates. TNF-α and IL-10 expression exhibited a significant increase at the peak of infection. In summary, Querétaro strain, a Mexican TcI strain, is virulent enough to induce high inflammation and calcification in skeletal muscle of the hind limbs, which could be related to high expression levels of TNF-α. PMID:24991553

  3. Muscle-damaging exercise increases heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Matthew Benjamin; Di Felice, Umberto; Dolci, Alberto; Junglee, Naushad A; Crockford, Michael J; West, Liam; Hillier-Smith, Ryan; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo; Walsh, Neil Peter

    2013-10-01

    It remains unclear whether exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) increases heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress, which in turn may increase the risk of exertional heat illness. We examined heat strain during exercise heat stress 30 min after EIMD to coincide with increases in circulating pyrogens (e.g., interleukin-6 [IL-6]) and 24 h after EIMD to coincide with the delayed muscle inflammatory response when a higher rate of metabolic energy expenditure (M˙) and thus decreased economy might also increase heat strain. Thirteen non-heat-acclimated males (mean ± SD, age = 20 ± 2 yr) performed exercise heat stress tests (running for 40 min at 65% V˙O2max in 33°C, 50% humidity) 30 min (HS1) and 24 h (HS2) after treatment, involving running for 60 min at 65% V˙O2max on either -10% gradient (EIMD) or +1% gradient (CON) in a crossover design. Rectal (Tre) and skin (Tsk) temperature, local sweating rate, and M˙ were measured throughout HS tests. Compared with CON, EIMD evoked higher circulating IL-6 pre-HS1 (P < 0.01) and greater plasma creatine kinase and muscle soreness pre-HS2 (P < 0.01). The ΔTre was greater after EIMD than CON during HS1 (0.35°C, 95% confidence interval = 0.11°C-0.58°C, P < 0.01) and HS2 (0.17°C, 95% confidence interval = 0.07°C-0.28°C, P < 0.01). M˙ was higher on EIMD throughout HS1 and HS2 (P < 0.001). Thermoeffector responses (Tsk, sweating rate) were not altered by EIMD. Thermal sensation and RPE were higher on EIMD after 25 min during HS1 (P < 0.05). The final Tre during HS1 correlated with the pre-HS1 circulating IL-6 concentration (r = 0.67). Heat strain was increased during endurance exercise in the heat conducted 30 min after and, to a much lesser extent, 24 h after muscle-damaging exercise. These data indicate that EIMD is a likely risk factor for exertional heat illness particularly during exercise heat stress when behavioral thermoregulation cues are ignored.

  4. Musculotendon variability influences tissue strains experienced by the biceps femoris long head muscle during high-speed running

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2014-01-01

    The hamstring muscles frequently suffer injury during high-speed running, though the factors that make an individual more susceptible to injury remain poorly understood. The goals of this study were to measure the musculotendon dimensions of the biceps femoris long head (BFlh) muscle, the hamstring muscle injured most often, and to use computational models to assess the influence of variability in the BFlh’s dimensions on internal tissue strains during high-speed running. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired over the thigh in 12 collegiate athletes, and musculotendon dimensions were measured in the proximal free tendon/aponeurosis, muscle and distal free tendon/aponeurosis. Finite element meshes were generated based on the average, standard deviation and range of BFlh dimensions. Simulation boundary conditions were defined to match muscle activation and musculotendon length change in the BFlh during high-speed running. Muscle and connective tissue dimensions were found to vary between subjects, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 17 ± 6% across all dimensions. For all simulations peak local strain was highest along the proximal myotendinous junction, which is where injury typically occurs. Model variations showed that peak local tissue strain increased as the proximal aponeurosis width narrowed and the muscle width widened. The aponeurosis width and muscle width variation models showed that the relative dimensions of these structures influence internal muscle tissue strains. The results of this study indicate that a musculotendon unit’s architecture influences its strain injury susceptibility during high-speed running. PMID:25189094

  5. Biotransformation of Direct Blue 1 by a moderately halophilic bacterium Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA and toxicity assessment of degraded metabolites.

    PubMed

    Arun Prasad, A S; Satyanarayana, V S V; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2013-11-15

    The ability of halophiles to survive in the extreme salt concentrations has gained them the importance of being used in the treatment of industrial waste waters. A moderately halophilic bacterial strain with the ability to degrade the complex azo dye Direct Blue-1 (DB-1) was isolated from sea water and identified as Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA. Complete decolorization of DB-1 (100 mg L(-1)) was achieved in 6h at 37 °C, pH 8 and with 70 g L(-1) NaCl. Decolorization was analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The FT-IR spectrum revealed that Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA specifically targeted azo bond (NN) at 1631 cm(-1) to break down Direct Blue-1. Formation of metabolites at different retention times in HPLC indicated degradation. Biotransformation pathway for DB-1 was proposed based on LC-MS. Phytotoxicity study revealed the less toxic nature of the metabolites compared to the dye. Genotoxicity with Allium cepa confirmed the cytotoxic nature of DB-1 by inducing several chromosomal abnormalities compared to the negligible effects of degraded metabolites. The current study is the first report on the detoxification of DB-1 by Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus

    PubMed Central

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-01-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1). PMID:24031699

  7. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-07-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1).

  8. Branched-chain amino acids and arginine supplementation attenuates skeletal muscle proteolysis induced by moderate exercise in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Mizuno, M; Mizuno, T; Dilling-Hansen, B; Lahoz, A; Bertelsen, V; Münster, H; Jordening, H; Hamada, K; Doi, T

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of a single oral intake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) with Arg on skeletal muscle protein metabolism during moderate exercise in young individuals. Eight healthy volunteers (4 males and 4 females, means +/- SEM, 26 +/- 1 yrs, 177.8 +/- 3.7 cm, 72.6 +/- 3.9 kg) were studied in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The subjects performed 3 bouts of 20-min cycling exercise (5-min break between each bout) at 126 +/- 13 W corresponding to 50 % of the maximal work intensity. A single oral supplement of either a BCAA drink containing 2 g of BCAA and 0.5 g of Arg or an isocaloric placebo drink was given at 10 min of the 1st exercise bout. Both arterial and venous blood samples were simultaneously taken from the radial artery and the femoral vein, respectively. Blood flow in the femoral artery was determined using the ultrasound Doppler technique. The blood sampling and blood flow measurements were performed at rest, every 10 min during each exercise bout. Net balance of BCAA and Phe across the leg muscles were measured by the arteriovenous difference method. The BCAA ingestion resulted in increases in both the plasma BCAA concentration and BCAA uptake into the working leg. The Phe release from the leg during exercise significantly increased as compared to the basal level in the placebo trial (0.97 +/- 0.28 vs. 0.23 +/- 0.22 micromol/min, p < 0.05). In the BCAA trial, the cumulative Phe release from the leg during the 3rd exercise bout was significantly lower than that in the placebo trial (5.0 +/- 7.4 vs. 35.9 +/- 13.2 micromol/25 min, p < 0.05). These results suggest that endurance exercise at moderate intensity enhances proteolysis in working muscles, and a single oral intake of 2 g of BCAA with Arg at onset of exercise effectively suppresses exercise-induced skeletal muscle proteolysis.

  9. FE models of stress-strain states in vascular smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed

    Bursa, Jiri; Lebis, Radek; Janicek, Premysl

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with problems related to computational modelling of stress-strain states in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). First, motivation for stress-strain analysis of SMCs is presented. Problems of their structure, geometry, constitutive models and initial (stress-free) state are analyzed on the basis of anatomical, histological and physiological knowledge. Various types of computational FE models of SMCs are presented; their constitutive models are identified on the basis of published mechanical tests carried out with SMCs cultured in vitro. Results of two models are presented; the former is a homogeneous model of the cell tension test with hyperelastic constitutive relations of the cell material. The latter model is more complex, it comprehends cortical and deep cytoskeleton, modelled as a tensegrity structure, and homogeneous linear elastic nucleus and remaining cytoplasm; it is used in computational modelling of indentation test. Perspectives, assumptions and limitations of computational modelling of SMCs under physiological load are discussed.

  10. Knitted Carbon-Nanotube-Sheath/Spandex-Core Elastomeric Yarns for Artificial Muscles and Strain Sensing.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Aziz, Shazed; Mirabedini, Azadeh; Jeiranikhameneh, Ali; Wallace, Gordon G; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-09-08

    Highly stretchable, actuatable, electrically conductive knitted textiles based on Spandex (SPX)/CNT (carbon nanotube) composite yarns were prepared by an integrated knitting procedure. SPX filaments were continuously wrapped with CNT aerogel sheets and supplied directly to an interlocking circular knitting machine to form the three-dimensional electrically conductive and stretchable textiles. By adjusting the SPX/CNT feed ratio, the fabric electrical conductivities could be tailored in the range of 870 to 7092 S/m. The electrical conductivity depended on tensile strain, with a linear and largely hysteresis-free resistance change occurring on loading and unloading between 0 and 80% strain. Electrothermal heating of the stretched fabric caused large tensile contractions of up to 33%, and generated a gravimetric mechanical work capacity during contraction of up to 0.64 kJ/kg and a maximum specific power output of 1.28 kW/kg, which far exceeds that of mammalian skeletal muscle. The knitted textile provides the combination of strain sensing and the ability to control dimensions required for smart clothing that simultaneously monitors the wearer's movements and adjusts the garment fit or exerts forces or pressures on the wearer, according to needs. The developed processing method is scalable for the fabrication of industrial quantities of strain sensing and actuating smart textiles.

  11. Comparison of Surgical Efficacy of Levator Muscle Short- ening and Modified Levator Aponeurosis Tucking in Treat- ing Minimal and Moderate Congenital Blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Yanli

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the surgical effect of levator muscle shortening and levator aponeurosis tucking in treating minimal and moderate congenital blepharoptosis. Clinical data of 28 patients (40 eyes) diagnosed with mide and moderate congenital blepharoptosis at our institution were retrospectively analyzed. Postoperative efficacy was evaluated and statistically compared between these two techniques. During 14 months follow-up, 16 eyes with ptosis undergoing levator muscle shortening were treated, 3 with undercorrection of ptosis and 1 with overcorrection of ptosis. In patients receiving levator aponeurosis tucking, 16 eyes were cured and 4 with undercorrection of ptosis. Both levator muscle shortening and levator aponeurosis tucking are safe and efficacious for correcting minimal and moderate congenital blepharoptosis. (Eye Science

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cardiac Strain Pattern Following Transplantation of Human Tissue Engineered Heart Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Riegler, Johannes; Tiburcy, Malte; Zhao, Xin; Chour, Tony; Ndoye, Babacar; Nguyen, Michael; Adams, Jackson; Ameen, Mohamed; Denney, Thomas S.; Yang, Phillip C.; Nguyen, Patricia; Zimmermann, Wolfram H.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of tissue engineering approaches in combination with exogenously produced cardiomyocytes offers the potential to restore contractile function after myocardial injury. However, current techniques assessing changes in global cardiac performance following such treatments are plagued by relatively low detection ability. As the treatment is locally performed, this detection could be improved by myocardial strain imaging that measures regional contractility. Methods and Results Tissue engineered heart muscles (EHMs) were generated by casting human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes with collagen in preformed molds. EHMs were transplanted (n=12) to cover infarct and border zones of recipient rat hearts one month after ischemia reperfusion injury. A control group (n=10) received only sham placement of sutures without EHMs. To assess the efficacy of EHMs, MRI and ultrasound-based strain imaging were performed prior to and four weeks after transplantation. In addition to strain imaging, global cardiac performance was estimated from cardiac MRI. Although no significant differences were found with global changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (Control −9.6±1.3% vs. EHM −6.2±1.9%, P=0.17), regional myocardial strain from tagged MRI was able to detect preserved systolic function in EHM-treated animals compared to control (Control 4.4±1.0% vs. EHM 1.0±0.6%, P=0.04). However, ultrasound-based strain failed to detect any significant change (Control 2.1±3.0% vs. EHM 6.3±2.9%, P=0.46). Conclusions This study highlights the feasibility of using cardiac strain from tagged MRI to assess functional changes in rat models due to localized regenerative therapies, which may not be detected by conventional measures of global systolic performance. PMID:27903535

  13. Airway smooth muscle cell tone amplifies contractile function in the presence of chronic cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Nigel J; Connolly, Sarah C; Mackinnon, James D; Wehry, Kathrin; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2008-09-01

    Chronic contractile activation, or tone, in asthma coupled with continuous stretching due to breathing may be involved in altering the contractile function of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Previously, we (11) showed that cytoskeletal remodeling and stiffening responses to acute (2 h) localized stresses were modulated by the level of contractile activation of ASM. Here, we investigated if altered contractility in response to chronic mechanical strain was dependent on repeated modulation of contractile tone. Cultured human ASM cells received 5% cyclic (0.3 Hz), predominantly uniaxial strain for 5 days, with once-daily dosing of either sham, forskolin, carbachol, or histamine to alter tone. Stiffness, contractility (KCl), and "relaxability" (forskolin) were then measured as was cell alignment, myosin light-chain phosphorylation (pMLC), and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) content. Cells became aligned and baseline stiffness increased with strain, but repeated lowering of tone inhibited both effects (P < 0.05). Strain also reversed a negative tone-modulation dependence of MLCK, observed in static conditions in agreement with previous reports, with strain and tone together increasing both MLCK and pMLC. Furthermore, contractility increased 176% (SE 59) with repeated tone elevation. These findings indicate that with strain, and not without, repeated tone elevation promoted contractile function through changes in cytoskeletal organization and increased contractile protein. The ability of repeated contractile activation to increase contractility, but only with mechanical stretching, suggests a novel mechanism for increased ASM contractility in asthma and for the role of continuous bronchodilator and corticosteroid therapy in reversing airway hyperresponsiveness.

  14. Dynamic properties of a locomotory muscle of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta during strain cycling and simulated natural crawling.

    PubMed

    Woods, William A; Fusillo, Steven J; Trimmer, Barry A

    2008-03-01

    Caterpillars are soft-bodied terrestrial climbers that perform a wide variety of complex movements with several hundred muscles and a relatively small number of neurons. Control of movements is therefore expected to place unusual demands on the mechanical properties of the muscles. The muscles develop force slowly (1-6 s to peak) yet over a strain range extending from under 60% to more than 160% of resting length, with a length-tension relationship resembling that of supercontracting or cross-striated muscle. In passive and active sinusoidal strain cycling, muscles displayed viscoelastic qualities, with very low and stretch-velocity dependent resilience; there was a positive linear relationship between stretch velocity and the fraction of work dissipation attributable to passive muscle properties (20-80%). In linear stretches of unstimulated muscles at velocities bracketing those encountered in natural crawling, the rise in tension showed a distinct transition to a lower rate of increase, with transition tension dependent upon stretch velocity; peak force was exponentially related to stretch velocity. When stretching ceased, force decayed exponentially, with slower decay associated with lower stretch velocities; the decay time constant was exponentially related to stretch velocity. From the kinematics of caterpillars crawling horizontally we determined that the ventral interior lateral muscle (VIL) of the third abdominal segment (A3) is at or near resting length for most of the crawl cycle, with a fairly linear shortening by 25-30% and re-lengthening occupying about 45% of cycle duration. Synchronized kinematic and EMG recordings showed that during horizontal crawling A3 VIL is stimulated as the muscle shortens from about 95% to 75% of its resting length. We subjected in vitro VIL preparations to strain cycling and stimulus phase and duration similar to that of natural crawling. The resulting work loops were figure-eight shaped, with the muscle performing work

  15. Assessment of player performance following return to sport after hamstring muscle strain injury.

    PubMed

    Verrall, G M; Kalairajah, Y; Slavotinek, J P; Spriggins, A J

    2006-05-01

    To determine if there is any decrease in playing performance of athletes following return to sport after recovery from hamstring muscle strain injury. Prospective cohort study. One professional Australian football team over two playing seasons. For every game, the team coach rated player performance proportional to time spent on the ground playing (an integer score out of a maximum of 10). Player performance ratings were compared pre- and post-hamstring muscle strain injury to assess player performance upon return to sport. Thirteen athletes had hamstring injuries and the required player ratings were available. The mean player performance rating for the entire playing season in which the player was injured was 6.9. The mean player performance rating for the two games prior to injury was 6.8 as opposed to 5.4 for the two games after return to sport. Athletes had a significantly lower player performance rating immediately upon return to sport when compared to ratings for the entire season (p<0.001) and when compared to ratings from the two games prior to injury (p<0.001). Following return to sport from hamstring injury, player performance as assessed by the team coach is reduced. This suggests that some athletes may return to sport prior to complete resolution of the injury.

  16. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean) and P(peak) in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  17. Effect of Acute Exposure to Moderate Altitude on Muscle Power: Hypobaric Hypoxia vs. Normobaric Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch- Góngora, Juan G.; Galilea, Pedro A.; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest Pmean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to Pmax (∼3%) and maximal strength (1RM) (∼6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on Pmean and Ppeak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  18. Moderate anxiety modifies the electromyographic activity of a forearm muscle during a time-reaction task in women.

    PubMed

    Langlet, C; Hainaut, J P; Bolmont, B

    2017-03-16

    Arousal anxiety has a great impact on reaction time, physiological parameters and motor performance. Numerous studies have focused on the influence of anxiety on muscular activity during simple non ecologic task. We investigate the impact of a moderate state-anxiety (arousal stressor) on the specific component of a complex multi-joint ecologic movement during a reaction time task of auditory stimulus-response. Our objective is to know if central and peripheral voluntary motor processes were modulated in the same way by an arousal stressor. Eighteen women volunteers performed simple reaction time tasks of auditory stimulus-response. Video-recorded Stroop test with interferences was used to induced moderate state-anxiety. Electromyographic activity of the wrist extensor was recorded in order to analyse the two components of the reaction time: the premotor and motor time. In anxiogenic condition, an acceleration and an increase of muscular activity of the reaction time was obtained. This increase was due to a stronger muscle activity during the premotor time in the anxiogenic condition. Arousal anxiety has a different impact on central and peripheral voluntary motor processes. The modifications observed could be related to an increase in arousal related to a higher anxiety in order to prepare the body to act. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Moderate Intensity Cycling Exercise after Upper Extremity Resistance Training Interferes Response to Muscle Hypertrophy but Not Strength Gains.

    PubMed

    Tomiya, Shigeto; Kikuchi, Naoki; Nakazato, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of 30-min moderate intensity cycling exercise immediately after upper-body resistance training on the muscle hypertrophy and strength gain. Fourteen subjects were randomly divided between two groups. One group performed moderate intensity (55% of maximum oxygen consumption [VO2max], 30 min) cycle training immediately after arm resistance training as concurrent training (CT; n = 7, age: 21.8 ± 0.7 years, height: 1.68 ± 0.06 m, weight: 60.3 ± 7.4 kg); the second group performed the same endurance and arm RT on separate days as control group (SEP; n=7, age: 22.1 ± 0.7 years, height: 1.76 ± 0.05 m, weight: 63.8 ± 3.6 kg). The supervised progressive RT program was designed to induce muscular hypertrophy (3-5 sets of 10 repetitions) with bilateral arm-curl exercise using 75% of the one repetition maximum (1RM) with 2-min rest intervals. The RT program was performed for 8 weeks, twice per week. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), 1RM, and VO2max were measured pre- and post-training. Significant increases in muscle CSA from pre- to post-training were observed in both the SEP (p = 0.001, effect size [ES] = 0.84) and the CT groups (p = 0.004, ES = 0.45). A significant increase in 1RM from pre- to post-training was observed in the SEP (p = 0.025, ES = 0.91) and CT groups (p = 0.001, ES = 2.38). There were no interaction effects (time × group) for CSA, 1RM, or VO2max. A significantly higher percentage change of CSA was observed in the SEP group (12.1 ± 4.9%) compared to the CT group (5.0 ± 2.7%, p = 0.029), but no significant difference was observed in the 1RM (SEP: 19.8 ± 16.8%, CT: 24.3 ± 11.1%). The data suggest that significant improvement of CSA and strength can be expected with progressive resistance training with subsequent endurance exercise performed immediately or on a different day. Changes in CSA might be affected by subsequent cycling exercise after 8 weeks of training.

  20. Characterization of Lignocellulolytic Activities from a Moderate Halophile Strain of Aspergillus caesiellus Isolated from a Sugarcane Bagasse Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Miranda, Estefan; Sánchez-Reyes, Ayixón; Cuervo-Soto, Laura; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise; Atriztán-Hernández, Karina; Morales-Herrera, Catalina; Rodríguez-Hernández, Rocío; Folch-Mallol, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    A moderate halophile and thermotolerant fungal strain was isolated from a sugarcane bagasse fermentation in the presence of 2 M NaCl that was set in the laboratory. This strain was identified by polyphasic criteria as Aspergillus caesiellus. The fungus showed an optimal growth rate in media containing 1 M NaCl at 28°C and could grow in media added with up to 2 M NaCl. This strain was able to grow at 37 and 42°C, with or without NaCl. A. caesiellus H1 produced cellulases, xylanases, manganese peroxidase (MnP) and esterases. No laccase activity was detected in the conditions we tested. The cellulase activity was thermostable, halostable, and no differential expression of cellulases was observed in media with different salt concentrations. However, differential band patterns for cellulase and xylanase activities were detected in zymograms when the fungus was grown in different lignocellulosic substrates such as wheat straw, maize stover, agave fibres, sugarcane bagasse and sawdust. Optimal temperature and pH were similar to other cellulases previously described. These results support the potential of this fungus to degrade lignocellulosic materials and its possible use in biotechnological applications. PMID:25162614

  1. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  2. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the fami- ly Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Alla; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the family Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180813

  4. The mediating and moderating role of personal strain and coping resource in the relationship between work stressor and quality of life among Chinese nurses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si-Ying; Li, Huang-Yuan; Yang, Shu-Juan; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Rong

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether personal strain and coping resources act as either mediator or moderator or both in the relationship between work stressor and quality of life among Chinese nurses. A total of 1,012 nurses were selected from eight hospitals located in two provinces in China. Quality of life was measured with the Chinese version of the Short Form-36 Health Survey; work stressor, personal strain, and coping resources were evaluated using the Occupation Stress Inventory-Revised Edition. The hierarchical multiple regression procedure and Baron and Kenny's model of mediation were applied to test for moderation and mediation, respectively. A structural equation model was fit to assess the interrelationships among these variables. Work stressor was closely associated with quality of life, which was mediated and moderated by personal strain and coping resources. Personal strain also acted both as moderator and mediator in the relationship between coping resources and quality of life. The relationships were verified in the structural equation model. The greatest absolute value of the standardized total effects was seen in personal strain (0.817), followed by work stressor (0.634) and coping resources (0.488). Personal strain and coping resources have both mediating and moderating effects on the relationship between work stress and quality of life in a sample of Chinese nurses. An effective intervention strategy is needed to reduce work stress and ensure better quality of life.

  5. Changes in crossbridge and non-crossbridge energetics during moderate fatigue of frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, C J; Curtin, N A; Woledge, R C

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of sarcomere length (SL) during a fatiguing series of isometric tetani of frog muscle fibres was investigated. Tetani at 2.3 microns SL were more fatiguing than tetani at 3.2 microns SL, in that force declined twice as much as relaxation became much slower. 2. In a second set of experiments the force and heat production were measured during a series of fatiguing tetani. Heat was separated into two components: (a) crossbridge heat which is dependent on filament overlap and interaction, and (b) non-crossbridge heat which is independent of filament overlap and due to Ca2+ turnover. 3. In a series of fifty tetani, force, crossbridge heat and non-crossbridge heat each declined by 25-30% of its initial value. 4. The 25% reduction in non-crossbridge heat occurred completely during the first few tetani of the fatiguing series while force declined by less than 3%. This may be due to a reduction in Ca2+ binding to parvalbumin and to Ca2+ remaining bound during the remainder of the fatigue series. 5. After the first few tetani of the fatigue series the non-crossbridge heat hardly changed as force declined by a further 25% of its initial value. Continuing reduction of force with constant Ca2+ turnover indicates a reduction in the Ca2+ sensitivity of the filaments, and/or a reduction in the average force per attached crossbridge. 6. At the start of the fatiguing series, as force declines by about 7.5% there is a much larger decline of crossbridge heat (17%). The reason for this is unknown. Later in the series, force declined more rapidly than heat. This is probably due to a progressive accumulation of inorganic phosphate which acts by depressing force more than it depresses ATP breakdown. PMID:8254523

  6. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  7. [Comparative histoenzymochemical and electronmicroscopic assessment of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues under the conditions of moderate regimes of physical load in young rats].

    PubMed

    Isaev, A

    2006-12-01

    Ultrastructure and oxydoreductase activity of gastrocnemius and myocardium muscles were studied in - 22-50 days old and - 5-10 months old white rats. Physical load was modeled by swimming. The investigation was conducted in one, three, and five month's period after physical load. In gastrocnemius muscle and myocardium in both age animal groups after one month of moderate physical loads prevails the activity of enzymes of anaerobic respiration, which demonstrates the metabolic instability. The processes of tissue respiration disturbance, act as a disconnector of oxidative phosphorylation. In gastrocnemius muscle this disturbance decrease after 3 month and in cardiac muscle--after 5 month of swimming. The complex of changes in myocardium and skeletal muscle indicates on the adaptive reaction of structure (hypertrophia and hyperplasia) and realized as a "trained" effect of systemic physical exercises.

  8. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Norton, Joanna L.; Bright, Jen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  9. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  10. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  11. New mesoscopic constitutive model for deformation of pearlitic steels up to moderate strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkorta, J.; Martínez-Esnaola, J. M.; de Jaeger, P.; Gil Sevillano, J.

    2017-07-01

    A new constitutive model for deformation of pearlitic steels has been developed that describes the mechanical behaviour and microstructural evolution of lamellar multi-colony pearlite. The model, a two-phase continuum model, considers the plastic anisotropy of ferrite derived from its lamellar structure but ignores any anisotropy associated with cementite and does not consider the crystal structure of either constituent. The resulting plastic constitutive equation takes into account a dependence on both the pearlitic spacing (arising from the confined slip of dislocations in the lamellae) and on strengthening from the evolving intra-lamellar dislocation density. A Kocks-Mecking strain hardening/recovery model is used for the lamellar ferrite, whereas perfect-plastic behaviour is assumed for cementite. The model naturally captures the microstructural evolution and the internal micro-stresses developed due to the different mechanical behaviour of both phases. The model is also able to describe the lamellar evolution (orientation and interlamellar spacing) with good accuracy. The role of plastic anisotropy in the ferritic phase has also been studied, and the results show that anisotropy has an important impact on both microstructural evolution and strengthening of heavily drawn wires.

  12. Hamstring pain and muscle strains following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective, randomized trial comparing hamstring graft harvest techniques.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Peter; Wake, Giulia; Annear, Peter

    2013-04-01

    There is limited information in the literature regarding hamstring pain and muscle strains in patients following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring autograft. We sought to investigate whether dividing hamstring tendons distal to the musculotendinous junction rather than forcefully stripping tendons away from the muscle belly during graft harvest resulted in a lower incidence of hamstring pain, muscle strains, and leg flexion strength deficit following commencement of sport-specific training postoperatively. Patients were randomized to either the "Cut" or "Push" groups of hamstring tendon harvesting. All other operative techniques were uniform. A total of 34 (cut = 20, push = 14) patients had a mean follow-up of 30 months, and assessments were conducted by a blinded single practitioner. A customized hamstring strain questionnaire and visual analogue pain score provided information for the study's primary focus: evaluation of postoperative hamstring pain and muscle strains. Leg flexion strength was also measured and a full knee assessment was conducted. The Cincinnati sports activity rating scale (SARS) was used to account for varying degrees of sporting participation and intensity since reconstruction. The "Cut" group's mean visual analogue score was 10.05 mm, significantly lower than the "Push" group (24.66 mm, p = 0.0398). The Cut group also recorded a significant reduction in the incidence of hamstring strains following ACL reconstruction (5/20 patients 25%) compared with the Push group (7/14 patients 50%, p = 0.045). There was no difference in leg flexion strength between the groups. Of the patients who reported hamstring strains, there was no significant difference in the mean Cincinnati SARS between the groups, nor any difference in overall knee function. The incidence of hamstring pain and muscle strains was significantly reduced in patients receiving the "cut" technique of harvesting hamstring tendons in ACL reconstruction

  13. Muscle strain is modulated more with running slope than speed in wild turkey knee and hip extensors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas J; Higginson, Brian K; Nelson, Frank E; Gabaldón, Annette M

    2007-07-01

    We examined the length changes and electromyographic (EMG) activity of two hindlimb muscles in wild turkeys, to determine how these muscles modulate mechanical function with changes in running speed and slope. The muscles studied were the iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO), a biarticular knee and hip extensor, and the femorotibialis lateralis (FT), a knee extensor. Muscle length changes were recorded using sonomicrometry, and EMG activity was recorded from indwelling bipolar electrodes as the animals walked and ran at a range of speeds (1-3.5 m s(-1)). Treadmill slope was also varied, from a 12 degrees uphill slope to a downhill slope of -12 degrees. To test the hypothesis that the strain pattern in active muscles reflects the demand for mechanical work, we compared strain in the ILPO and FT across the range of slopes. Both muscles underwent active lengthen-shorten cycles during stance. We analyzed the lengthening and shortening part of the strain pattern separately to determine the response of muscle strain to surface slope. In both muscles stance phase shortening strain increased over the range of slopes studied, from 7.8+/-3.5% (ILPO) and 1.9+/-2.2% (FT) during downhill running at -12 degrees, to 30.3+/-3.9% (ILPO) and 8.2+/-5.6% (FT) during uphill running at 12 degrees. Stance-phase lengthening strain was also modulated with slope, from -15.6+/-3.2% (ILPO) and -22.1+/-9.6% (FT) during downhill running at -12 degrees, to -4.2+/-2.5% (ILPO) and -9.0+/-5.6% (FT) during uphill running at 12 degrees. The results suggest that for the ILPO and FT a change in net mechanical work output with running slope is likely mediated by a change in both the lengthening, energy absorbing portion of the contraction and the shortening, energy producing part of the contraction. We also found changes in the timing of EMG activity, and the relative portion of the stance period spent lengthening, which were consistent with a shift in muscle function from energy

  14. Moderate nutrient restriction influences transcript abundance of genes impacting production efficiencies of beef cattle in fetal liver, muscle, and cerebrum by d 50 of gestation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We hypothesized that a moderate maternal nutrient restriction during the first 50 d of gestation in beef heifers would affect transcript abundance of genes impacting production efficiency phenotypes in fetal liver, muscle, and cerebrum. Fourteen Angus-cross heifers were estrus synchronized and assig...

  15. Method of Quantifying Three Dimensional Strain Distribution in Skeletal Muscle Using Cine Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elisabeth R.; Morrow, Duane A.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Murthy, Naveen S.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular pressure (IMP), a correlate of muscle tension, may fill an important clinical testing void. A barrier to implementing this measure clinically is its non-uniform distribution, which is not fully understood. Pressure is generated by changes in fluid mass and volume, therefore 3D volumetric strain distribution may affect IMP distribution. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for quantifying 3D volumetric strain distribution in the human tibialis anterior (TA) during passive tension using cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI and to assess its accuracy and precision. Five healthy subjects each participated in three data collections. A custom MRI-compatible apparatus repeatedly rotated the subjects’ ankle between 0 and 26 degrees plantarflexion while CPC MRI data were collected. Additionally, T2-weighted images of the lower leg were collected both before and after the CPC data collection with the ankle stationary at both 0 and 26 degrees plantarflexion for TA muscle segmentation. A 3D hexahedral mesh was generated based on the TA surface before CPC data collection with the ankle at 0 degrees plantarflexion and the node trajectories were tracked using the CPC data. The volumetric strain of each element was quantified. Three tests were employed to assess the measure accuracy and precision. First, to quantify leg position drift, the TA segmentations were compared before and after CPC data collection. This error was 1.5±0.7 mm. Second, to assess the surface node trajectory accuracy, the deformed mesh surface was compared to the TA segmented at 26 degrees of ankle plantarflexion. This error was 0.6±0.2 mm. Third, the standard deviation of volumetric strain across the three data collections was calculated for each element and subject. The median between-day variability across subjects and mesh elements was 0.06 mm3/mm3 (95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.18 mm3/mm3). Overall the results demonstrated excellent accuracy and precision. PMID:26595686

  16. Menstrual cycle phase and sex influence muscle glycogen utilization and glucose turnover during moderate-intensity endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Devries, Michaela C; Hamadeh, Mazen J; Phillips, Stuart M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2006-10-01

    Numerous studies from our and other laboratories have shown that women have a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during exercise than equally trained men, indicating a greater reliance on fat oxidation. Differences in estrogen concentration between men and women likely play a role in this sex difference. Differing estrogen and progesterone concentrations during the follicular (FP) and luteal (LP) phases of the female menstrual cycle suggest that fuel use may also vary between phases. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of menstrual cycle phase and sex upon glucose turnover and muscle glycogen utilization during endurance exercise. Healthy, recreationally active young women (n = 13) and men (n = 11) underwent a primed constant infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose with muscle biopsies taken before and after a 90-min cycling bout at 65% peak O2 consumption. LP women had lower glucose rate of appearance (Ra, P = 0.03), rate of disappearance (Rd, P = 0.03), and metabolic clearance rate (MCR, P = 0.04) at 90 min of exercise and lower proglycogen (P = 0.04), macroglycogen (P = 0.04), and total glycogen (P = 0.02) utilization during exercise compared with FP women. Men had a higher RER (P = 0.02), glucose Ra (P = 0.03), Rd (P = 0.03), and MCR (P = 0.01) during exercise compared with FP women, and men had a higher RER at 75 and 90 min of exercise (P = 0.04), glucose Ra (P = 0.01), Rd (P = 0.01), and MCR (P = 0.001) and a greater PG utilization (P = 0.05) compared with LP women. We conclude that sex, and to a lesser extent menstrual cycle, influence glucose turnover and glycogen utilization during moderate-intensity endurance exercise.

  17. Repeated muscle damage blunts the increase in heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dolci, A; Fortes, M B; Walker, F S; Haq, A; Riddle, T; Walsh, N P

    2015-07-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has recently been shown to increase heat strain during exercise heat stress (HS), and represents a risk factor for exertional heat illness (EHI). We hypothesised that a repeated bout of EIMD blunts the increase in rectal temperature (T re) during subsequent endurance exercise in the heat. Sixteen non-heat-acclimated males were randomly allocated to EIMD (n = 9) or control (CON, n = 7). EIMD performed a downhill running treatment at -10 % gradient for 60 min at 65 % [Formula: see text]O2max in 20 °C, 40 % RH. CON participants performed the same treatment but at +1 % gradient. Following treatment, participants rested for 30 min, then performed HS (+1 % gradient running for 40 min at 65 % [Formula: see text]O2max in 33 °C, 50 % RH) during which thermoregulatory measures were assessed. Both groups repeated the treatment and subsequent HS 14 days later. Isometric quadriceps strength was assessed at baseline, and 48 h post-treatment. The decrease in leg strength 48 h post-EIMD trial 1 (-7.5 %) was absent 48 h post-EIMD trial 2 (+2.9 %) demonstrating a repeated bout effect. Final T re during HS was lower following EIMD trial 2 (39.25 ± 0.47 °C) compared with EIMD trial 1 (39.59 ± 0.49 °C, P < 0.01), with CON showing no difference. Thermal sensation and the T re threshold for sweating onset were also lower during HS on EIMD trial 2. The repeated bout effect blunted the increase in heat strain during HS conducted after EIMD. Incorporating a muscle-damaging bout into training could be a strategy to reduce the risk of EHI and improve endurance performance in individuals undertaking heavy exercise with an eccentric component in the heat.

  18. Moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation after postero-lateral myocardial infarction in sheep alters left ventricular shear but not normal strain in the infarct and infarct borderzone

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Wu, Yife; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Khazalpour, Michael; Takaba, Kiyoaki; Tartibi, Mehrzad; Zhang, Zhihong; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Saloner, David A.; Wallace, Arthur W.; Mishra, Rakesh; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR: MR) is associated with poor outcome. Left ventricular (LV) strain after postero-lateral myocardial infarction (MI) may drive LV remodeling. Although moderate CIMR has been previously shown to effect LV remodeling, the effect of CIMR on LV strain after postero-lateral MI remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that moderate CIMR alters LV strain after postero-lateral MI. Methods/Results Postero-lateral MI was created in 10 sheep. Cardiac MRI with tags was performed 2 weeks before and 2, 8 and 16 weeks after MI. LV and right ventricular (RV) volumes were measured and regurgitant volume indexed to body surface area (BSA; RegurgVolume Index) calculated as the difference between LV and RV stroke volumes / BSA. Three-dimensional strain was calculated. Circumferential (Ecc)and longitudinal (Ell) strains were reduced in the infarct proper, MI borderzone (BZ) and remote myocardium 16 weeks after MI. In addition, radial circumferential (Erc) and radial longitudinal (Erl) shear strains were reduced in remote myocardium but increased in the infarct and BZ 16 weeks after MI. Of all strain components, however, only Erc was effected by RegurgVolume Index (p=0.0005). There was no statistically significant effect of RegurgVolume Index on Ecc, Ell, Erl, or circumferential longitudinal shear strain (Ecl). Conclusions Moderate CIMR alters radial circumferential shear strain after postero-lateral MI in the sheep. Further studies are needed to determine the effect of shear strain on myocyte hypertrophy and the effect of mitral repair on myocardial strain. PMID:26857634

  19. Strains

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled muscle ... can include: Pain and difficulty moving the injured muscle Discolored and bruised skin Swelling ... if you still have pain. Rest the pulled muscle for at least a day. If possible, keep ...

  20. Transverse Strains in Muscle Fascicles during Voluntary Contraction: A 2D Frequency Decomposition of B-Mode Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibres shorten, they must increase in their transverse dimensions in order to maintain a constant volume. In pennate muscle, this transverse expansion results in the fibres rotating to greater pennation angle, with a consequent reduction in their contractile velocity in a process known as gearing. Understanding the nature and extent of this transverse expansion is necessary to understand the mechanisms driving the changes in internal geometry of whole muscles during contraction. Current methodologies allow the fascicle lengths, orientations, and curvatures to be quantified, but not the transverse expansion. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate techniques for quantifying transverse strain in skeletal muscle fascicles during contraction from B-mode ultrasound images. Images were acquired from the medial and lateral gastrocnemii during cyclic contractions, enhanced using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering and the spatial frequencies resolved using 2D discrete Fourier transforms. The frequency information was resolved into the fascicle orientations that were validated against manually digitized values. The transverse fascicle strains were calculated from their wavelengths within the images. These methods showed that the transverse strain increases while the longitudinal fascicle length decreases; however, the extent of these strains was smaller than expected. PMID:25328509

  1. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women

    PubMed Central

    Csapo, R.; Malis, V.; Hodgson, J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4–5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11–12% vs. SW: 6–8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction. PMID:24505104

  2. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Malis, V; Hodgson, J; Sinha, S

    2014-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4-5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11-12% vs. SW: 6-8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction.

  3. Effects of nutritional supplementation with l-arginine on repair of injuries due to muscle strain: experimental study on rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Lauren Izabel Medeiros; Wuicik, William Luiz; Kuhn, Ivan; Capriotti, Juan Rodolfo Vilela; Repka, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of oral supplementation with arginine on regeneration of injuries due to straining of the anterior tibial muscle of rats. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats of weight 492.5 ± 50.45 g were used. Injuries were induced through straining the anterior tibial muscles. The rats were separated into three groups of eight rats each. In the untreated group (UTG), after induction of injuries, the rats were observed for 24 h. In the simulation group (SG) and the arginine group (AG) respectively, the rats received isotonic saline solution and arginine solution via direct gavage, over a seven-day period. At the end of the period, blood samples were collected for serum evaluations of creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The right and left anterior tibial muscles were resected for histopathological evaluations on the muscle injuries, investigating edema, hemorrhage and disorganization or morphometric alteration of the muscle fibers. The tissue repair was investigated in terms of proliferation of adipose tissue, angiogenesis and collagen fibers. The ANOVA and Student's t methods were used and p ≤ 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. Results In the serum evaluations, the AG showed lower CK assay values and higher AST values. In the histopathological evaluation, the UTG presented edema and hemorrhage compatible with injuries due to strain; the SG presented edema and hemorrhage with proliferation of adipose tissue and collagen fibers; and the AG presented not only the findings of the SG but also, especially, intense angiogenesis. Conclusion Oral supplementation with arginine did not cause any significant metabolic alterations that would contraindicate its use and it induced angiogenesis during the repair of muscles injured due to strain. PMID:26401505

  4. Physical principles demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle relative to the other hamstring muscles exerts the most force: implications for hamstring muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Bronwyn; Verrall, Geoffrey; Reid, Iain

    2014-07-01

    Of the hamstring muscle group the biceps femoris muscle is the most commonly injured muscle in sports requiring interval sprinting. The reason for this observation is unknown. The objective of this study was to calculate the forces of all three hamstring muscles, relative to each other, during a lengthening contraction to assess for any differences that may help explain the biceps femoris predilection for injury during interval sprinting. To calculate the displacement of each individual hamstring muscle previously performed studies on cadaveric anatomical data and hamstring kinematics during sprinting were used. From these displacement calculations for each individual hamstring muscle physical principles were then used to deduce the proportion of force exerted by each individual hamstring muscle during a lengthening muscle contraction. These deductions demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle is required to exert proportionally more force in a lengthening muscle contraction relative to the semimembranosus and semitendinosus muscles primarily as a consequence of having to lengthen over a greater distance within the same time frame. It is hypothesized that this property maybe a factor in the known observation of the increased susceptibility of the biceps femoris muscle to injury during repeated sprints where recurrent higher force is required.

  5. Physical principles demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle relative to the other hamstring muscles exerts the most force: implications for hamstring muscle strain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, Bronwyn; Verrall, Geoffrey; Reid, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Summary Of the hamstring muscle group the biceps femoris muscle is the most commonly injured muscle in sports requiring interval sprinting. The reason for this observation is unknown. The objective of this study was to calculate the forces of all three hamstring muscles, relative to each other, during a lengthening contraction to assess for any differences that may help explain the biceps femoris predilection for injury during interval sprinting. To calculate the displacement of each individual hamstring muscle previously performed studies on cadaveric anatomical data and hamstring kinematics during sprinting were used. From these displacement calculations for each individual hamstring muscle physical principles were then used to deduce the proportion of force exerted by each individual hamstring muscle during a lengthening muscle contraction. These deductions demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle is required to exert proportionally more force in a lengthening muscle contraction relative to the semimembranosus and semitendinosus muscles primarily as a consequence of having to lengthen over a greater distance within the same time frame. It is hypothesized that this property maybe a factor in the known observation of the increased susceptibility of the biceps femoris muscle to injury during repeated sprints where recurrent higher force is required. PMID:25506583

  6. Efficacy of Plai Cream in Adult Patients with Muscle Strain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cheechareoan, Sukrom; Pathanawiriyasirikul, Thanate; Manmee, Charuwan; Janpol, Kanya

    2016-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are a standard treatment option for muscle strain; however, side effects persist. This clinical trial was designed to compare the efficacy of Plai cream compared to placebos in adult patients with muscle strain. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 140 participants aged over 18 years with muscle strain were randomized to receive either Plai cream (n = 70 patients, treatment group) or placebos (n = 70 patients, control group) . Outcome assessments included the visual analog scale (VAS), quality of life (QoL), the amount of remaining cream, and the number of acetaminophen tablets used. After 2 weeks, the mean pain scores following treatment with both Plai cream and placebos in patients with muscle strain decreased from baseline to the end of the study at week 2. However, no significant difference for VA S score was found. The QoL of the two groups showed improvements in QoL as witnessed by increased mean QoL scores from baseline to week 2; however, these differences were not statistically significant. In general, mean QoL scores above 50 indicate good quality of life. The amount of Plai cream used reduced from baseline to week 2, but no significant difference in the amount of cream remaining was found between the two groups at each visit. Similarly, the number of acetaminophen tablets used was not statistically different between the treatment and control groups. There was no difference in pain reduction in the 2-week period between patients with muscle strain using Plai cream and those given placebos, but Plai cream tended to reduce pain in the long term. No side effects were found from Plai cream, so this non-invasive treatment may be offered to patients.

  7. Moderate-intensity resistance exercise alters skeletal muscle molecular and cellular structure and function in inactive older adults with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark S; Callahan, Damien M; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Kaplan, Anna; Fiske, Brad R; Savage, Patrick D; Ades, Philip A; Beynnon, Bruce D; Toth, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    High-intensity resistance exercise (REX) training increases physical capacity, in part, by improving muscle cell size and function. Moderate-intensity REX, which is more feasible for many older adults with disease and/or disability, also increases physical function, but the mechanisms underlying such improvements are not understood. Therefore, we measured skeletal muscle structure and function from the molecular to the tissue level in response to 14 wk of moderate-intensity REX in physically inactive older adults with knee osteoarthritis (n = 17; 70 ± 1 yr). Although REX training increased quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), average single-fiber CSA was unchanged because of reciprocal changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIA fibers. Intermyofibrillar mitochondrial content increased with training because of increases in mitochondrial size in men, but not women, with no changes in subsarcolemmal mitochondria in either sex. REX increased whole muscle contractile performance similarly in men and women. In contrast, adaptations in single-muscle fiber force production per CSA (i.e., tension) and contractile velocity varied between men and women in a fiber type-dependent manner, with adaptations being explained at the molecular level by differential changes in myosin-actin cross-bridge kinetics and mechanics and single-fiber MHC protein expression. Our results are notable compared with studies of high-intensity REX because they show that the effects of moderate-intensity REX in older adults on muscle fiber size/structure and myofilament function are absent or modest. Moreover, our data highlight unique sex-specific adaptations due to differential cellular and subcellular structural and functional changes.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Moderate-intensity resistance training causes sex-specific adaptations in skeletal muscle structure and function at the cellular and molecular levels in inactive older adult men and women with knee osteoarthritis. However, these responses

  8. Respiratory muscle training and the performance of a simulated anti-G straining maneuver.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pearl; Frier, Bruce C; Goodman, Leonard; Duffin, James

    2007-11-01

    Prolonged +G,-exposure eventually decreases a pilot's ability to maintain an effective anti-G straining maneuver (AGSM). Previous studies have implicated the respiratory muscles (RMs) as main contributors to this AGSM-induced fatigue. Thus, this study aimed to investigate if respiratory muscle training (RMT) may be of benefit to improve RM strength, endurance, and performance of the AGSM. Subjects (N=14; 27 +/- 5.3 yrs) trained with a commercially available RM trainer for 6 wk, 4 times/wk 20 min per session. Data collection consisted of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and a RM testing protocol simulating the AGSM. Testing occurred every 2 wk for the duration of RMT, and similarly during the 6-wk control (CON) phase where subjects did not train. The simulated AGSM performance was evaluated through measures of peak respiratory pressures, peak systolic arterial pressure (SAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tidal volumes. Training significantly improved (P < 0.05) RM strength after 6 wk of RMT measured in maximal expiratory pressures (RMT = 207.8 +/- 15.8 cmH2O; CON = 181.3 +/- 13.7 cmH2O) and maximal inspiratory pressures (RMT = -154.7 +/- 8.9 cmH2O; CON = -141.9 +/- 8.5 cmH2O). All other PFTs were unchanged. During performance of the AGSM, only peak expiratory pressure demonstrated an increased performance benefit (RMT = 91.5 +/- 5.9 cmH2O; CON = 82.8 +/- 4.3 cmH2O). Peak inspiratory pressure, SAP, MAP, and tidal volumes remained unchanged. Without evident translation of the increased RM strength to performance of the AGSM at +1 Gz, the benefits of RMT for ameliorating AGSM-induced fatigue within the high +G, environment are limited.

  9. Strain activation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and alignment: study of strain dependency and the role of protein kinase A and C signaling pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, I.; Cohen, C. R.; Kamal, K.; Li, G.; Shin, T.; Du, W.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype can be altered by physical forces as demonstrated by cyclic strain-induced changes in proliferation, orientation, and secretion of macromolecules. However, the magnitude of strain required and the intracellular coupling pathways remain ill defined. To examine the strain requirements for SMC proliferation, we selectively seeded bovine aortic SMC either on the center or periphery of silastic membranes which were deformed with 150 mm Hg vacuum (0-7% center; 7-24% periphery). SMC located in either the center or peripheral regions showed enhanced proliferation compared to cells grown under the absence of cyclic strain. Moreover, SMC located in the center region demonstrated significantly (P < 0.005) greater proliferation as compared to those in the periphery. In contrast, SMC exposed to high strain (7-24%) demonstrated alignment perpendicular to the strain gradient, whereas SMC in the center (0-7%) remained aligned randomly. To determine the mechanisms of these phenomena, we examined the effect of cyclic strain on bovine aortic SMC signaling pathways. We observed strain-induced stimulation of the cyclic AMP pathway including adenylate cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulation. In addition, exposure of SMC to cyclic strain caused a significant increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity and enzyme translocation from the cytosol to a particulate fraction. Further study was conducted to examine the effect of strain magnitude on signaling, particularly protein kinase A (PKA) activity as well as cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein levels. We observed significantly (P < 0.05) greater PKA activity and CRE binding protein levels in SMC located in the center as compared to the peripheral region. However, inhibition of PKA (with 10 microM Rp-cAMP) or PKC (with 5-20 ng/ml staurosporine) failed to alter either the strain-induced increase in SMC proliferation or alignment. These data characterize the strain determinants for activation of

  10. Strain activation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and alignment: study of strain dependency and the role of protein kinase A and C signaling pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, I.; Cohen, C. R.; Kamal, K.; Li, G.; Shin, T.; Du, W.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype can be altered by physical forces as demonstrated by cyclic strain-induced changes in proliferation, orientation, and secretion of macromolecules. However, the magnitude of strain required and the intracellular coupling pathways remain ill defined. To examine the strain requirements for SMC proliferation, we selectively seeded bovine aortic SMC either on the center or periphery of silastic membranes which were deformed with 150 mm Hg vacuum (0-7% center; 7-24% periphery). SMC located in either the center or peripheral regions showed enhanced proliferation compared to cells grown under the absence of cyclic strain. Moreover, SMC located in the center region demonstrated significantly (P < 0.005) greater proliferation as compared to those in the periphery. In contrast, SMC exposed to high strain (7-24%) demonstrated alignment perpendicular to the strain gradient, whereas SMC in the center (0-7%) remained aligned randomly. To determine the mechanisms of these phenomena, we examined the effect of cyclic strain on bovine aortic SMC signaling pathways. We observed strain-induced stimulation of the cyclic AMP pathway including adenylate cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulation. In addition, exposure of SMC to cyclic strain caused a significant increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity and enzyme translocation from the cytosol to a particulate fraction. Further study was conducted to examine the effect of strain magnitude on signaling, particularly protein kinase A (PKA) activity as well as cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein levels. We observed significantly (P < 0.05) greater PKA activity and CRE binding protein levels in SMC located in the center as compared to the peripheral region. However, inhibition of PKA (with 10 microM Rp-cAMP) or PKC (with 5-20 ng/ml staurosporine) failed to alter either the strain-induced increase in SMC proliferation or alignment. These data characterize the strain determinants for activation of

  11. Theoretical study of the effects of vascular smooth muscle contraction on strain and stress distributions in arteries.

    PubMed

    Rachev, A; Hayashi, K

    1999-01-01

    To study the effects of smooth muscle contraction and relaxation on the strain and stress distribution in the vascular wall, a mathematical model was proposed. The artery was assumed to be a thick-walled orthotropic tube made of nonlinear, incompressible elastic material. Considering that the contraction of smooth muscle generates an active circumferential stress in the wall, a numerical study was performed using data available in the literature. The results obtained showed that smooth muscle contraction affects the residual strains which exist in a ring segment cut out from the artery and exposed to no external load. When the ring specimen is cut radially, it springs open with an opening angle. The predicted monotonic increase of the opening angle with increasing muscular tone was in agreement with recent experimental results reported in the literature. It was shown that basal muscular tone, which exists under physiological conditions, reduces the strain gradient in the arterial wall and yields a near uniform stress distribution. During temporary changes in blood pressure, the increase in muscular tone induced by elevated pressure tends to restore the distribution of circumferential strain in the arterial wall, and to maintain the flow-induced wall shear stress to normal level.

  12. Short-term, light- to moderate-intensity exercise training improves leg muscle strength in the oldest old: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Serra-Rexach, José A; Bustamante-Ara, Natalia; Hierro Villarán, Margarita; González Gil, Pedro; Sanz Ibáñez, Maria J; Blanco Sanz, Nekane; Ortega Santamaría, Victor; Gutiérrez Sanz, Natalia; Marín Prada, Ana B; Gallardo, Cristian; Rodríguez Romo, Gabriel; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Lucia, Alejandro

    2011-04-01

    To assess the effects of an 8-week exercise training program with a special focus on light- to moderate-intensity resistance exercises (30-70% of one repetition maximum, 1RM) and a subsequent 4-week training cessation period (detraining) on muscle strength and functional capacity in participants aged 90 and older. Randomized controlled trial performed during March to September 2009. Geriatric nursing home. Forty nonagenarians (90-97) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group (16 women and 4 men per group). Eight-week muscle strength exercise intervention focused on lower limb strength exercises of light to moderate intensity. 1RM leg press. handgrip strength, 8-m walk test, 4-step stairs test, Timed Up and Go test, and number of falls. A significant group by time interaction effect (P=.02) was observed only for the 1RM leg press. In the intervention group, 1RM leg press increased significantly with training by 10.6 kg [95% confidence interval (CI)=4.1-17.1 kg; P=.01]. Except for the mean group number of falls, which were 1.2 falls fewer per participant in the intervention group (95% CI=0.0-3.0; P=.03), no significant training effect on the secondary outcome measures was found. Exercise training, even of short duration and light to moderate intensity, can increase muscle strength while decreasing fall risk in nonagenarians. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Cyclic mechanical strain-induced proliferation and migration of human airway smooth muscle cells: role of EMMPRIN and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian; Chiarelli, Christian; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2005-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and migration are major components of airway remodeling in asthma. Asthmatic airways are exposed to mechanical strain, which contributes to their remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in remodeling. In the present study, we examined if the mechanical strain of human ASM (HASM) cells contributes to their proliferation and migration and the role of MMPs in this process. HASM were exposed to mechanical strain using the FlexCell system. HASM cell proliferation, migration and MMP release, activation, and expression were assessed. Our results show that cyclic strain increased the proliferation and migration of HASM; cyclic strain increased release and activation of MMP-1, -2, and -3 and membrane type 1-MMP; MMP release was preceded by an increase in extracellular MMP inducer; Prinomastat [a MMP inhibitor (MMPI)] significantly decreased cyclic strain-induced proliferation and migration of HASM; and the strain-induced increase in the release of MMPs was accompanied by an increase in tenascin-C release. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical strain plays an important role in HASM cell proliferation and migration. This increase in proliferation and migration is through an increase in MMP release and activation. Pharmacological MMPIs should be considered in the pursuit of therapeutic options for airway remodeling in asthma.

  14. Evaluation of the masseter muscle elasticity with the use of acoustic coupling agents as references in strain sonoelastography.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, M; Ariji, Y; Nishiyama, W; Ariji, E

    2015-01-01

    To verify the use of a single coupling agent as a reference to obtain the elasticity index (EI) ratios and to investigate the EI ratios of the masseter muscles of healthy volunteers. Muscle phantoms with known elasticity (20, 40 and 60 kPa in the Young's modulus) were examined by strain-type sonoelastography using a coupling agent as the reference. Eight examiners tested soft (with 7 kPa) and hard (with 40 kpa) reference coupling agents separately. The correlation coefficients were determined between the EI ratio and Young's modulus of muscle phantoms. The interclass correlation coefficients were calculated for inter- and intraexaminer agreement. Strong correlations were found between the EI ratios and Young's modulus for both soft and hard references. The variations of the EI ratios were larger with soft coupling agents than those with hard coupling agents, and they increased in phantoms with 60 kPa elasticity. There were no differences in the EI ratios of the masseter muscle at rest between males and females or between the right and left sides. The ratio increased during clenching. The hard reference coupling agent was suitable for obtaining EI ratio of the masseter muscle. No differences were found in the EI ratios of the masseter muscle either between sexes or between the right and left sides at rest, and the ratios increased with the widening of their variations during clenching.

  15. Evaluation of the masseter muscle elasticity with the use of acoustic coupling agents as references in strain sonoelastography

    PubMed Central

    Ariji, Y; Nishiyama, W; Ariji, E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To verify the use of a single coupling agent as a reference to obtain the elasticity index (EI) ratios and to investigate the EI ratios of the masseter muscles of healthy volunteers. Methods: Muscle phantoms with known elasticity (20, 40 and 60 kPa in the Young's modulus) were examined by strain-type sonoelastography using a coupling agent as the reference. Eight examiners tested soft (with 7 kPa) and hard (with 40 kpa) reference coupling agents separately. The correlation coefficients were determined between the EI ratio and Young's modulus of muscle phantoms. The interclass correlation coefficients were calculated for inter- and intraexaminer agreement. Results: Strong correlations were found between the EI ratios and Young's modulus for both soft and hard references. The variations of the EI ratios were larger with soft coupling agents than those with hard coupling agents, and they increased in phantoms with 60 kPa elasticity. There were no differences in the EI ratios of the masseter muscle at rest between males and females or between the right and left sides. The ratio increased during clenching. Conclusions: The hard reference coupling agent was suitable for obtaining EI ratio of the masseter muscle. No differences were found in the EI ratios of the masseter muscle either between sexes or between the right and left sides at rest, and the ratios increased with the widening of their variations during clenching. PMID:25411712

  16. Muscle strength is only a weak to moderate predictor of gait performance in persons with late effects of polio.

    PubMed

    Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Brogårdh, Christina; Lexell, Jan

    2013-01-01

    To assess muscle strength in the knee extensors, knee flexors and ankle dorsiflexors in persons with late effects of polio, and determine how much muscle strength, gender, age and BMI are related to gait performance. Ninety community-dwelling ambulant persons (47 men and 43 women; mean age 64 years SD 8) with late effects of polio participated. Isokinetic concentric knee extensor and flexor muscle strength was measured at 60°/s and ankle dorsiflexor muscle strength at 30°/s. Gait performance was assessed by the Timed "Up & Go", the Comfortable and Fast Gait Speed tests, and the 6-Minute Walk test. There were significant correlations between knee extensor and flexor muscle strength and gait performance (p < 0.01), and between ankle dorsiflexor muscle strength and gait performance (p < 0.05), for both lower limbs. Muscle strength in the knee extensors and flexors explained 7% to 37% and 9% to 47%, respectively, of the variance in gait performance. Strength in the ankle dorsiflexors explained 4% to 24%, whereas gender, age and BMI contributed at most an additional 9%. Knee muscle strength, and to some extent ankle dorsiflexor muscle strength, are predictors of gait performance in persons with late effects of polio, but the strength of the relationships indicates that other factors are also important.

  17. Strain of passive elements during force enhancement by stretch in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, K A; Tsuchiya, T

    1996-01-01

    1. The force enhancement during and after stretch (0.15 micron per sarcomere) was studied during fused tetani of single fibres isolated from the anterior tibialis muscle of Rana temporaria (0.5-3.6 degrees C; sarcomere length, 2.05-2.65 microns). Changes in length were recorded simultaneously from the fibre as a whole (puller movement) and from marked segments (approximately 0.5 mm in length) of the same fibre. 2. The residual force enhancement after stretch (recorded at the end of a long tetanus) was found to be linearly related to the slow component of tension rise during the stretch ramp. 3. The fibres were released to shorten against a very small load at different times after stretch (load clamp). The shortening records derived after a preceding stretch exhibited a larger and steeper initial transient than that recorded in an isometric tetanus without stretch. The excess length change (LS; nanometres per half-sarcomere) recorded during the initial transient increased with the amplitude of stretch and was linearly related to the force enhancement produced by the stretch (FE; % of maximum tetanic tension) according to the following regression: LS = 0.200 FE + 8.65 (P < 0.001). The length changes recorded from the whole fibre agreed well with measurements from individual segments. 4. Slack-test measurements confirmed the existence of a large initial transient phase when the fibre was released to shorten after a preceding stretch. The excess length change determined from the slack tests agreed closely with the values derived from load-clamp recordings. 5. The results support the view that stretching a muscle fibre during tetanus leads to strain of elastic elements and, presumably, to variation of filament overlap due to non-uniform distribution of the length change within the fibre volume. Regions with greater filament overlap are likely to generate the long-lasting extra force referred to as 'residual force enhancement after stretch'. The elastic elements

  18. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  19. Evaluation of knee joint muscle forces and tissue stresses-strains during gait in severe OA versus normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of pain and disability in the elderly with the knee being the most affected weight bearing joint. We used a musculoskeletal biomechanical model of the lower extremity including a detailed validated knee joint finite element model to compute lower extremity muscle forces and knee joint stresses-strains during the stance phase of gait. The model was driven by gait data on OA patients, and results were compared with those of the same model driven by data on normal controls. Additional analyses were performed with altered cartilage-menisci properties to evaluate the effects of deterioration during OA. In OA patients compared to normal subjects, muscle forces dropped at nearly all stance periods except mid-stance. Force in the anterior cruciate ligament remained overall the same. Total contact forces-stresses deceased by about 25%. Alterations in properties due to OA had negligible effects on muscle forces, but increased contact areas and cartilage strains and reduced contact pressures. Reductions in contact stresses and increases in tissue strains and transfer of load via menisci are partly due to the altered kinetics-kinematics of gait and partly due to deterioration in cartilage-menisci properties in OA patients. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both leg and arm muscles after sprint interval and moderate intensity training in subjects with Type 2 Diabetes or Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Sjöros, Tanja J; Heiskanen, Marja A; Motiani, Kumail K; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Eskelinen, Jari-Joonas; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Savisto, Nina J; Solin, Olof; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2017-03-13

    We investigated the effects of sprint interval (SIT) and moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) on glucose uptake (GU) during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and fatty acid uptake (FAU) at fasting state in thigh and arm muscles in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or prediabetes. Twenty-six patients (age 49, SD 4; 10 women) were randomly assigned into two groups: SIT (n=13), and MICT (n=13). The exercise in the SIT group consisted of 4-6 x 30 s of all-out cycling with 4 min recovery and in the MICT group 40-60 min cycling at 60% of VO2peak . Both groups completed six training sessions within two weeks. GU and FAU were measured before and after the intervention with positron emission tomography in thigh (quadriceps femoris, QF; and hamstrings) and upper arm (biceps and triceps brachii) muscles. Whole-body insulin-stimulated GU increased significantly by 25% in both groups and this was accompanied with significantly increased insulin-stimulated GU in all thigh and upper arm muscles and significantly increased FAU in QF. Within QF, insulin-stimulated GU improved more by SIT than MICT in rectus femoris (p=0.01), but not differently between the training modes in the other QF muscles. In individuals with T2D or prediabetes, both SIT and MICT training rapidly improve insulin-stimulated GU in whole body and in the thigh and arm muscles as well as FAU in the main working muscle QF. These findings highlight the underused potential of exercise in rapidly restoring the impaired skeletal muscle metabolism in subjects with impaired glucose metabolism. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Moderating effects of psychological job strain on the relationship between working hours and health: an examination of white-collar workers employed by a Japanese manufacturing company.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Kimio; Hagihara, Akihito; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2004-09-01

    The effects of working hours on health were examined taking psychological job strain into account. White-collar workers employed at the main office of a Japanese manufacturing company provided data for analysis done in 1997. The eligible subjects were 286 workers aged 20-39. Causal relationships between working hours, health, and psychological job strain were examined by covariance structure analyses. The main findings were as follows: Not only working hours but also sleeping hours and vacations affected the workers' effort to deal with work as a work-related hour factor. Decision authority and skill discretion of Karasek's psychological job strain items significantly constituted a discretion in the work factor, and this factor moderated the effects of the work-related hour factor on health. The effects of psychological job strain, especially discretion, must always be taken into account in examinations of working hours and health.

  2. Dose-volume relationships for moderate or severe neck muscle atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the dosimetric parameters and radiation dose tolerances associated with moderate or severe sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We retrospectively analysed 138 patients treated with IMRT between 2011 and 2012 for whom IMRT treatment plans and pretreatment and 3-year post-IMRT MRI scans were available. The association between mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), VX (% SCM volume that received more than X Gy), DX (dose to X% of the SCM volume) at X values of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and SCM atrophy at 3 years after IMRT were analyzed. All dosimetric parameters, except V40, V50 and V80, were significantly associated with moderate or severe SCM atrophy. Multivariate analysis showed that V65 was an independent predictor of moderate or severe SCM atrophy (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated a V65 of 21.47% (area under ROC curves, 0.732; P < 0.001) was the tolerated dose for moderate or severe SCM atrophy. We suggest a limit of 21.47% for V65 to optimize NPC treatment planning, whilst minimizing the risk of moderate or severe SCM atrophy. PMID:26678599

  3. Dose-volume relationships for moderate or severe neck muscle atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-12-18

    This study aimed to identify the dosimetric parameters and radiation dose tolerances associated with moderate or severe sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We retrospectively analysed 138 patients treated with IMRT between 2011 and 2012 for whom IMRT treatment plans and pretreatment and 3-year post-IMRT MRI scans were available. The association between mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), VX (% SCM volume that received more than X Gy), DX (dose to X% of the SCM volume) at X values of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and SCM atrophy at 3 years after IMRT were analyzed. All dosimetric parameters, except V40, V50 and V80, were significantly associated with moderate or severe SCM atrophy. Multivariate analysis showed that V65 was an independent predictor of moderate or severe SCM atrophy (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated a V65 of 21.47% (area under ROC curves, 0.732; P < 0.001) was the tolerated dose for moderate or severe SCM atrophy. We suggest a limit of 21.47% for V65 to optimize NPC treatment planning, whilst minimizing the risk of moderate or severe SCM atrophy.

  4. Effects of Repeated Bouts of Long-duration Endurance Exercise on Muscle and Urinary Levels of 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine in Moderately Trained Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Nobuo; Bolin, Celeste; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Ruby, Brent C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of repeated bouts of long-duration endurance exercise on both muscle and urinary levels of oxidative DNA damage in moderately trained individuals. Seven moderately trained male cyclists participated in this study. All participants repeated two sessions consisting of a 5 hour cycling period (equivalent to approximately 52% VO2peak) followed by a 15 hour rest, then a 40 km time trial. During the sessions, participants were instructed to take water ad libitum and to consume a standard sports drink consisting of 0.12 g·kg−1 body weight·hr−1 of carbohydrates. For each session, 24 hour urine output was collected on the day before the 5 hour exercise, and also between the 5 hour exercise and 40 km time trial, in addition to between days 1–5 post-exercise. Subsequently, muscle and urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2’- deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were determined using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. No significant alterations were observed between two sessions at the muscle or urinary levels of 8-OHdG. These results suggest that repeated bouts of exercise with a 7 day wash-out period did not lead to an accumulation of DNA damage products after a second 5 hour stationary cycling bout. PMID:25620316

  5. Absence of calf muscle metabolism alterations in active cystic fibrosis adults with mild to moderate lung disease.

    PubMed

    Decorte, N; Gruet, M; Camara, B; Quetant, S; Mely, L; Vallier, J M; Verges, S; Wuyam, B

    2017-01-01

    Specific alterations in skeletal muscle related to genetic defects may be present in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Limb muscle dysfunction may contribute to physical impairment in CF. We hypothesized that adults with CF would have altered calf muscle metabolism during exercise. Fifteen adults with CF and fifteen healthy controls matched for age, gender and physical activity performed a maximal cycling test and an evaluation of calf muscle energetics by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy before, during and after plantar flexions to exhaustion. Maximal cycling test revealed lower exercise capacities in CF (VO2peak 2.44±0.11 vs. 3.44±0.23L·Min(-1), P=0.03). At rest, calf muscle phosphorus metabolites and pHi were similar in CF and controls (P>0.05). Maximal power output during plantar flexions was significantly lower in CF compared to controls (7.8±1.2 vs. 6.6±2.4W; P=0.013). At exhaustion, PCr concentration was similarly reduced in both groups (CF -33±7%, controls -34±6%, P=0.44), while PCr degradation at identical absolute workload was greater in CF patients (P=0.04). These differences disappeared when power output was normalized for differences in calf size (maximal power output: 0.10±0.02 vs. 0.10±0.03W/cm(2); P=0.87). Pi/PCr ratio and pHi during exercise as well as PCr recovery after exercise were similar between groups. Similar metabolic calf muscle responses during exercise and recovery were found in CF adults and controls. Overall, muscle anabolism rather than specific metabolic dysfunction may be critical regarding muscle function in CF. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effects of priming exercise on the speed of adjustment of muscle oxidative metabolism at the onset of moderate-intensity step transitions in older adults.

    PubMed

    De Roia, Gabriela; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; Papadopoulou, Christina; Capelli, Carlo

    2012-05-15

    Aging is associated with a functional decline of the oxidative metabolism due to progressive limitations of both O(2) delivery and utilization. Priming exercise (PE) increases the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism during successive moderate-intensity transitions. We tested the hypothesis that such improvement is due to a better matching of O(2) delivery to utilization within the working muscles. In 21 healthy older adults (65.7 ± 5 yr), we measured contemporaneously noninvasive indexes of the overall speed of adjustment of the oxidative metabolism (i.e., pulmonary Vo(2) kinetics), of the bulk O(2) delivery (i.e., cardiac output), and of the rate of muscle deoxygenation (i.e., deoxygenated hemoglobin, HHb) during moderate-intensity step transitions, either with (ModB) or without (ModA) prior PE. The local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization was evaluated by the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio index. The overall speed of adjustment of the Vo(2) kinetics was significantly increased in ModB compared with ModA (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the kinetics of cardiac output was unaffected by PE. At the muscle level, ModB was associated with a significant reduction of the "overshoot" in the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio compared with ModA (P < 0.05), suggesting an improved O(2) delivery. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that, in older adults, PE, prior to moderate-intensity exercise, beneficially affects the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism due to an acute improvement of the local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization.

  7. A novel bioreactor for the generation of highly aligned 3D skeletal muscle-like constructs through orientation of fibrin via application of static strain.

    PubMed

    Heher, Philipp; Maleiner, Babette; Prüller, Johanna; Teuschl, Andreas Herbert; Kollmitzer, Josef; Monforte, Xavier; Wolbank, Susanne; Redl, Heinz; Rünzler, Dominik; Fuchs, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    The generation of functional biomimetic skeletal muscle constructs is still one of the fundamental challenges in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. With the notion that structure strongly dictates functional capabilities, a myriad of cell types, scaffold materials and stimulation strategies have been combined. To further optimize muscle engineered constructs, we have developed a novel bioreactor system (MagneTissue) for rapid engineering of skeletal muscle-like constructs with the aim to resemble native muscle in terms of structure, gene expression profile and maturity. Myoblasts embedded in fibrin, a natural hydrogel that serves as extracellular matrix, are subjected to mechanical stimulation via magnetic force transmission. We identify static mechanical strain as a trigger for cellular alignment concomitant with the orientation of the scaffold into highly organized fibrin fibrils. This ultimately yields myotubes with a more mature phenotype in terms of sarcomeric patterning, diameter and length. On the molecular level, a faster progression of the myogenic gene expression program is evident as myogenic determination markers MyoD and Myogenin as well as the Ca(2+) dependent contractile structural marker TnnT1 are significantly upregulated when strain is applied. The major advantage of the MagneTissue bioreactor system is that the generated tension is not exclusively relying on the strain generated by the cells themselves in response to scaffold anchoring but its ability to subject the constructs to individually adjustable strain protocols. In future work, this will allow applying mechanical stimulation with different strain regimes in the maturation process of tissue engineered constructs and elucidating the role of mechanotransduction in myogenesis. Mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered skeletal muscle constructs is a promising approach to increase tissue functionality. We have developed a novel bioreactor-based 3D culture system, giving the user the

  8. Dynamic behavior and microstructural evolution during moderate to high strain rate hot deformation of a Fe-Ni-Cr alloy (alloy 800H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Di, Hongshuang; Zhang, Jiecen; Yang, Yaohua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to fundamentally understand the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H at moderate to high strain rate using hot compression tests and propose nucleation mechanism associated with dynamic crystallization (DRX). We firstly investigated the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H with industrial scale strain rates using hot compression tests and adiabatic correction was performed to correct as-measured flow curves. Secondly, a Johnson-Cook model was established by using the corrected data and could give a precise prediction of elevated temperature flow stress for the studied alloy. Finally, the nucleation mechanism of DRX grains at high strain rates was studied. The results showed that the predominant nucleation mechanism for DRX is the formation of "bulge" at parent grain boundary. Additionally, the fragmentation of original grain at low deformation temperatures and the twinning near the bulged regions at high deformation temperatures also accelerate the DRX process.

  9. Numerical simulations of rubber networks at moderate to high tensile strains using a purely enthalpic force extension curve for individual chains

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David Edward

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of numerical simulations of random, three-dimensional, periodic, tetrafunctional networks in response to a volume-preserving tensile strain. For the intranode force, we use a polynomial fit to a purely enthalpic ab initio force extension curve for extended polyisoprene. The simulation includes a relaxation procedure to minimize the node forces and enforces chain rupture when the extension of a network chain reaches the ab initio rupture strain. For the reasonable assumption that the distribution of network chain lengths is Gaussian, we find that the calculated snap-back velocity, temperature increase due to chain ruptures and predicted tensile stress versus strain curve are consistent with experimental data in the moderate to high extension regime. Our results show that a perfect tetrafunctional polyisoprene network is extremely robust, capable of supporting tensile stresses at least a factor of 10 greater than what is observed experimentally.

  10. Shear-wave sonoelastography for assessing masseter muscle hardness in comparison with strain sonoelastography: study with phantoms and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Nakayama, Miwa; Nishiyama, Wataru; Nozawa, Michihito; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Shear-wave sonoelastography is expected to facilitate low operator dependency, high reproducibility and quantitative evaluation, whereas there are few reports on available normative values of in vivo tissue in head and neck fields. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliabilities on measuring hardness using shear-wave sonoelastography and to clarify normal values of masseter muscle hardness in healthy volunteers. Methods Phantoms with known hardness ranging from 20 to 140 kPa were scanned with shear-wave sonoelastography, and inter- and intraoperator reliabilities were examined compared with strain sonoelastography. The relationships between the actual and measured hardness were analyzed. The masseter muscle hardness in 30 healthy volunteers was measured using shear-wave sonoelastography. The inter- and intraoperator intraclass correlation coefficients were almost perfect. Strong correlations were seen between the actual and measured hardness. The mean hardness of the masseter muscles in healthy volunteers was 42.82 ± 5.56 kPa at rest and 53.36 ± 8.46 kPa during jaw clenching. The hardness measured with shear-wave sonoelastography showed high-level reliability. Shear-wave sonoelastography may be suitable for evaluation of the masseter muscles.

  11. Shear-wave sonoelastography for assessing masseter muscle hardness in comparison with strain sonoelastography: study with phantoms and healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Miwa; Nishiyama, Wataru; Nozawa, Michihito

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Shear-wave sonoelastography is expected to facilitate low operator dependency, high reproducibility and quantitative evaluation, whereas there are few reports on available normative values of in vivo tissue in head and neck fields. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliabilities on measuring hardness using shear-wave sonoelastography and to clarify normal values of masseter muscle hardness in healthy volunteers. Methods Phantoms with known hardness ranging from 20 to 140 kPa were scanned with shear-wave sonoelastography, and inter- and intraoperator reliabilities were examined compared with strain sonoelastography. The relationships between the actual and measured hardness were analyzed. The masseter muscle hardness in 30 healthy volunteers was measured using shear-wave sonoelastography. Results: The inter- and intraoperator intraclass correlation coefficients were almost perfect. Strong correlations were seen between the actual and measured hardness. The mean hardness of the masseter muscles in healthy volunteers was 42.82 ± 5.56 kPa at rest and 53.36 ± 8.46 kPa during jaw clenching. Conclusions: The hardness measured with shear-wave sonoelastography showed high-level reliability. Shear-wave sonoelastography may be suitable for evaluation of the masseter muscles. PMID:26624000

  12. Moderately increased protein intake predominately from egg sources does not influence whole body, regional, or muscle composition responses to resistance training in older people.

    PubMed

    Iglay, H B; Apolzan, J W; Gerrard, D E; Eash, J K; Anderson, J C; Campbell, W W

    2009-02-01

    The effects of increased dietary protein on resistance training (RT)-induced changes in body composition and skeletal muscle fiber size are uncertain in older people. We hypothesized that the ingestion of more animal-based foods, especially eggs, to achieve a higher protein intake would enhance RT-induced changes in body composition. West Lafayette, IN. 36 older people (age 61 +/- 1 y; mean +/- SEM). Subjects completed RT three d/wk for 12 weeks, and consumed omnivorous diets that contained either 0.9 +/- 0.1 (lower protein) or 1.2 +/- 0.0 (higher protein) g protein x kg(-1) x d(-1) (12 +/- 3 and 17 +/- 5% of energy intakes, respectively), with the higher protein intake achieved by consuming more eggs, meats, and dairy foods. The lower and higher protein diets contained 213 +/- 21 and 610 +/- 105 mg cholesterol/d, respectively. Strength, body composition, serum lipid-lipoprotein profile, urinary creatinine, skeletal muscle fiber type and size. Among all subjects, over time (i.e. with RT) body weight was unchanged, lean mass (1.1 +/- 0.2 kg) increased, and fat mass (-1.4 +/- 0.2 kg) decreased (all changes P < 0.05). Regional (i.e. trunk, legs, arms) lean mass increased and fat mass decreased. Whole body muscle mass (24-h urinary creatinine excretion) increased, but skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) type 1, type 2a, and type 2x fiber cross-sectional areas did not change from baseline. Serum total and LDL cholesterol decreased (P < 0.05) and HDL cholesterol and triacylglycerol were unchanged. Dietary protein and cholesterol intakes did not influence these responses to RT. Consumption of diets that contained moderately higher protein and variable amounts of cholesterol did not differentially affect body composition, skeletal muscle fiber size, or serum lipid-lipoprotein profile responses to resistance training in older people.

  13. Financial strain and impaired fasting glucose: the moderating role of physical activity in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.

    PubMed

    Puterman, Eli; Adler, Nancy; Matthews, Karen A; Epel, Elissa

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity and financial strain are independent, and opposite, predictors of disease. This study examines whether physical activity modifies the concurrent and prospective relation between financial strain and impaired fasting glucose. Participants were part of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study, a prospective study examining the development of disease. Participants were recruited in 1985 to 1986 and followed up for 20 years. The outcome measures were fasting glucose (FG) levels at Years 7 and 20. FG was available at Years 7 and 20 from 3991 and 3500 participants, respectively. The effects of financial strain on elevated glucose levels differed by physical activity levels as indicated by the significant interaction terms for the analyses of covariance at Year 7 (p = .02) and Year 20 (p = .04). Planned contrast comparisons demonstrated that FG levels in financially strained participants who were physically inactive were significantly different from financially strained participants who were active, and all participants with low financial strain. Specifically, in less active participants, the adjusted mean FG levels were higher in financially strained participants (2.27 mg/dL at Year 7 and 5.86 mg/dL at Year 20). In active participants, these differences were -1.78 mg/dL at Year 7 and negligible at Year 20. In adults burdened by financial strain, physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of developing impaired FG up to 13 years later. This adds to a growing literature showing the potential of physical activity to moderate stress-related disease processes.

  14. Elevated levels of petite formation in strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae restored to respiratory competence. II. Organization of mitochondrial genomes in strains having high and moderate frequencies of petite mutant formation.

    PubMed

    Evans, R J; Clark-Walker, G D

    1985-11-01

    Restriction enzyme analysis of aberrant mtDNA molecules in restored strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that displays an elevated level of petite formation has shown the occurrence of novel junction fragments and nonstoichiometric amounts for some unaltered bands. Five aberrant mitochondrial genomes from high-frequency petite-forming (hfp) strains (greater than 60% petites per generation) contain like-oriented duplications and single copy regions. High-frequency petite formation is postulated to arise from increased intramolecular recombination between duplicated segments. Mitochondrial DNA structures in two other hfp strains cannot be easily interpreted and might arise from intramolecular recombination. Mitochondria DNA from moderate-frequency petite-forming (mfp) strains (5-16% petites per generation) contains inverted duplications in two cases. The elevated petite formation is postulated to arise from homologous recombination between directly repeated sequences. In mtDNA from one mfp strain, deletion end-points have been shown to overlap. Such deletion endpoint overlap is postulated to be required for the maintenance of the tandem duplication in hfp strains. Two regions of the wild-type mtDNA (between cyb and oli2 and between SrRNA and oxi2) appear to be dispensable for mitochondrial function.

  15. Distinguishing the effects of convective and diffusive O2 delivery on V̇o2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle contracting at moderate intensity

    PubMed Central

    Spires, Jessica; Gladden, L. Bruce; Grassi, Bruno; Goodwin, Matthew L.; Saidel, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    With current techniques, experimental measurements alone cannot characterize the effects of oxygen blood-tissue diffusion on muscle oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics in contracting skeletal muscle. To complement experimental studies, a computational model is used to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of convective oxygen delivery, diffusion into cells, and oxygen utilization to V̇o2 kinetics. The model is validated using previously published experimental V̇o2 kinetics in response to slowed blood flow (Q) on-kinetics in canine muscle (τQ = 20 s, 46 s, and 64 s) [Goodwin ML, Hernández A, Lai N, Cabrera ME, Gladden LB. J Appl Physiol. 112:9–19, 2012]. Distinctive effects of permeability-surface area or diffusive conductance (PS) and Q on V̇o2 kinetics are investigated. Model simulations quantify the relationship between PS and Q, as well as the effects of diffusion associated with PS and Q dynamics on the mean response time of V̇o2. The model indicates that PS and Q are linearly related and that PS increases more with Q when convective delivery is limited by slower Q dynamics. Simulations predict that neither oxygen convective nor diffusive delivery are limiting V̇o2 kinetics in the isolated canine gastrocnemius preparation under normal spontaneous conditions during transitions from rest to moderate (submaximal) energy demand, although both operate close to the tipping point. PMID:23761640

  16. Distinguishing the effects of convective and diffusive O₂ delivery on VO₂ on-kinetics in skeletal muscle contracting at moderate intensity.

    PubMed

    Spires, Jessica; Gladden, L Bruce; Grassi, Bruno; Goodwin, Matthew L; Saidel, Gerald M; Lai, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    With current techniques, experimental measurements alone cannot characterize the effects of oxygen blood-tissue diffusion on muscle oxygen uptake (Vo₂) kinetics in contracting skeletal muscle. To complement experimental studies, a computational model is used to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of convective oxygen delivery, diffusion into cells, and oxygen utilization to Vo₂ kinetics. The model is validated using previously published experimental Vo₂ kinetics in response to slowed blood flow (Q) on-kinetics in canine muscle (τQ = 20 s, 46 s, and 64 s) [Goodwin ML, Hernández A, Lai N, Cabrera ME, Gladden LB. J Appl Physiol. 112:9-19, 2012]. Distinctive effects of permeability-surface area or diffusive conductance (PS) and Q on Vo₂ kinetics are investigated. Model simulations quantify the relationship between PS and Q, as well as the effects of diffusion associated with PS and Q dynamics on the mean response time of Vo₂. The model indicates that PS and Q are linearly related and that PS increases more with Q when convective delivery is limited by slower Q dynamics. Simulations predict that neither oxygen convective nor diffusive delivery are limiting Vo₂ kinetics in the isolated canine gastrocnemius preparation under normal spontaneous conditions during transitions from rest to moderate (submaximal) energy demand, although both operate close to the tipping point.

  17. Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain Cutipay enhances chalcopyrite bioleaching under moderate thermophilic conditions in the presence of chloride ion.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cortés, Maria Paz; Maass, Alejandro; Parada, Pilar

    2014-12-01

    Currently more than 90% of the world's copper is obtained through sulfide mineral processing. Among the copper sulfides, chalcopyrite is the most abundant and therefore economically relevant. However, primary copper sulfide bioleaching is restricted due to high ionic strength raffinate solutions and particularly chloride coming from the dissolution of ores. In this work we describe the chalcopyrite bioleaching capacity of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain Cutipay (DSM 27601) previously described at the genomic level (Travisany et al. (2012) Draft genome sequence of the Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay strain, an indigenous bacterium isolated from a naturally extreme mining environment in Northern Chile. J Bacteriol 194:6327-6328). Bioleaching assays with the mixotrophic strain Cutipay showed a strong increase in copper recovery from chalcopyrite concentrate at 50°C in the presence of chloride ion, a relevant inhibitory element present in copper bioleaching processes. Compared to the abiotic control and a test with Sulfobacillus acidophilus DSM 10332, strain Cutipay showed an increase of 42 and 69% in copper recovery, respectively, demonstrating its high potential for chalcopyrite bioleaching. Moreover, a genomic comparison highlights the presence of the 2-Haloacid dehalogenase predicted-protein related to a potential new mechanism of chloride resistance in acidophiles. This novel and industrially applicable strain is under patent application CL 2013-03335.

  18. Organizational Stress, Personal Life Stress, and Symptoms of Life Strains: An Examination of the Moderating Role of Sense of Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagat, Rabi S.; Allie, Stephen M.

    1989-01-01

    Examined self-competence and coping among 276 teachers. Found subjective feelings of competence concerning one's ability to interact effectively with one's work environment moderated satisfaction with work, satisfaction with coworkers, satisfaction with supervision, emotional exhaustion, and feelings of depersonalization. No significant moderating…

  19. Externally applied cyclic strain regulates localization of focal contact components in cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, James J; Linderman, Jennifer J; Mooney, David J

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical signals are critical regulators of cellular gene expression, yet little is understood of the mechanism whereby cells sense mechanical forces. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain applied to populations of cells via their adhesion substrate rapidly alters the cellular distribution of focal contact proteins. Focal contact-associated components (vinculin, a-actinin, paxillin) were assayed by immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative western blotting. Application of a single step increase in strain in multiple experiments caused overall a small change in focal contact-associated vinculin. In contrast, cyclic strain induced a large and very reproducible increase in detergent-insoluble vinculin (52% relative to static) after just 1 min of strain. Insoluble paxillin was transiently enriched with a similar time course, whereas insoluble a-actinin did not change significantly in response to cyclic strain. Rhodamine-labeled chicken vinculin added to permeabilized cells preferentially localized to focal contacts in response to cyclic strain, but not a single step increase in strain. These findings establish that insoluble levels of focal contact components are altered rapidly following application of an appropriate number of mechanical perturbations, and suggest that at least one component of the mechanism does not involve soluble intermediates.

  20. Can a wearable strain sensor based on a carbon nanotube network be an alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlikaya, Ruhan; Ege, Yavuz; Pündük, Zekine; Slobodian, Petr; Meriç, Gökhan

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to find out whether a wearable strain sensor including thermoplastic polyurethane composite with a multi-walled carbon nanotube network could be a viable alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength. For the first time, the voltage-torque and angle-time relations of the sensor were determined to allow a comparison between the angle-dependent torque changes of the dynamometer and the sensor. This comparison suggested that the torque-angle relations of the dynamometer and the sensor did not have the same characteristics. In this regard, the sensor may be used in the torque measurements due to the moderate correlation between the torque values determined via the isokinetic dynamometer and the sensor and due to the significant difference between low and high torque values of the sensor. By the same token, the torque-angle graph of the sensor may be more informative than that of the dynamometer in evaluation of knee problems.

  1. Randomized trial comparing exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot therapy, and low intensity laser therapy for chronic lumbar muscle strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Liu, Timon Chengyi; Yuan, Jianqin; Luo, Qingming

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot (ACH) therapy and low intensity laser (LIL) therapy in patients with chronic lumbar muscle strain (CLMS). Thirty-two patients were randomly allocated to four groups: exercise group, ACH group, LIL group, and combination group of exercise, ACH and LIL, eight in each group. Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 4 weeks. Lumbar muscle endurance, flexion and lateral flexion measures, visual analogue scale (VAS) and lumbar disability questionnaire (LDQ) were used in the clinical and functional evaluations before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after treatment. It was found that the values of endurance, VAS and LDQ in all groups were significantly improved from before to after treatment (P < 0.01). The combination group showed significantly larger reduction on pain level and functional disability than the other groups immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01). Pain level reduced significantly more in the ACH group than in the exercise group or the LIL group immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Lumbar muscle endurance and spinal ranges of motion in all groups were improved after treatment but there was no significant difference between any therapy groups. In conclusion, exercise therapy, ACH therapy and LIL therapy were effective in the treatment of CLMS. ACH therapy was more effective than exercise therapy or LIL therapy. The combination therapy of exercise, ACH and LIL had still better rehabilitative effects on CLMS.

  2. 2pBAb5. Validation of three-dimensional strain tracking by volumetric ultrasound image correlation in a pubovisceral muscle model.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Anna S; Nageswaren, Ashok R; Haridas, Balakrishna; Mast, T D

    2013-06-02

    Little is understood about the biomechanical changes leading to pelvic floor disorders such as stress urinary incontinence. In order to measure regional biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles in vivo, a three dimensional (3D) strain tracking technique employing correlation of volumetric ultrasound images has been implemented. In this technique, local 3D displacements are determined as a function of applied stress and then converted to strain maps. To validate this approach, an in vitro model of the pubovisceral muscle, with a hemispherical indenter emulating the downward stress caused by intra-abdominal pressure, was constructed. Volumetric B-scan images were recorded as a function of indenter displacement while muscle strain was measured independently by a sonomicrometry system (Sonometrics). Local strains were computed by ultrasound image correlation and compared with sonomicrometry-measured strains to assess strain tracking accuracy. Image correlation by maximizing an exponential likelihood function was found more reliable than the Pearson correlation coefficient. Strain accuracy was dependent on sizes of the subvolumes used for image correlation, relative to characteristic speckle length scales of the images. Decorrelation of echo signals was mapped as a function of indenter displacement and local tissue orientation. Strain measurement accuracy was weakly related to local echo decorrelation.

  3. The molecular kink paradigm for rubber elasticity: numerical simulations of explicit polyisoprene networks at low to moderate tensile strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E

    2011-08-07

    Based on recent molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of small isoprene molecules, we propose a new ansatz for rubber elasticity. We envision a network chain as a series of independent molecular kinks, each comprised of a small number of backbone units, and the strain as being imposed along the contour of the chain. We treat chain extension in three distinct force regimes: (Ia) near zero strain, where we assume that the chain is extended within a well defined tube, with all of the kinks participating simultaneously as entropic elastic springs, (II) when the chain becomes sensibly straight, giving rise to a purely enthalpic stretching force (until bond rupture occurs) and, (Ib) a linear entropic regime, between regimes Ia and II, in which a force limit is imposed by tube deformation. In this intermediate regime, the molecular kinks are assumed to be gradually straightened until the chain becomes a series of straight segments between entanglements. We assume that there exists a tube deformation tension limit that is inversely proportional to the chain path tortuosity. Here we report the results of numerical simulations of explicit three-dimensional, periodic, polyisoprene networks, using these extension-only force models. At low strain, crosslink nodes are moved affinely, up to an arbitrary node force limit. Above this limit, non-affine motion of the nodes is allowed to relax unbalanced chain forces. Our simulation results are in good agreement with tensile stress vs. strain experiments.

  4. Moderate Thermal Strain in Healthcare Workers Wearing Personal Protective Equipment During Treatment and Care Activities in the Context of the 2014 Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Grélot, Laurent; Koulibaly, Fassou; Maugey, Nancy; Janvier, Frédéric; Foissaud, Vincent; Aletti, Marc; Savini, Hélène; Cotte, Jean; Dampierre, Henry; Granier, Hervé; Carmoi, Thierry; Sagui, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    The extent of thermal strain while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during care activities for Ebola virus disease patients has not yet been characterized. From January to March 2015, 25 French healthcare workers (HCWs) in Conakry, Guinea, volunteered to be monitored while wearing PPE using an ingestible thermal sensor. The mean (standard deviation) working ambient temperature and relative humidity were 29.6 °C (2.0 °C) and 65.4% (10.3%), respectively; the mean time wearing PPE was 65.7 (13.5) minutes; and the mean core body temperature increased by 0.46 °C (0.20 °C). Four HCWs reached or exceeded a mean core body temperature of ≥ 38.5 °C. HCWs wearing PPE for approximately 1 hour exhibited moderate but safe thermal strain.

  5. Genomic Analysis of the Moderately Haloalkaliphilic Bacterium Oceanobacillus kimchii Strain X50T with Improved High-Quality Draft Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Whon, Tae Woong; Kim, Joon-Yong; Kim, Pil Soo; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2015-12-28

    Oceanobacillus kimchii is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus within the family Bacillaceae. Species of the Oceanobacillus possess moderate haloalkaliphilic features and originate from various alkali or salty environments. The haloalkaliphilic characteristics of Oceanobacillus advocate they may have possible uses in biotechnological and industrial applications, such as alkaline enzyme production and biodegradation. This study presents the draft genome sequence of O. kimchii X50(T) and its annotation. Furthermore, comparative genomic analysis of O. kimchii X 5 0(T) was performed with two previously reported Oceanobacillus genome sequences. The 3,822,411 base-pair genome contains 3,792 protein-coding genes and 80 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 35.18 mol%. The strain carried 67 and 13 predicted genes annotated with transport system and osmoregulation, respectively, which support the tolerance phenotype of the strain in high-alkali and high-salt environments.

  6. Effects of moderate-velocity strength training on peak muscle power and movement velocity: do women respond differently than men?

    PubMed

    Delmonico, Matthew J; Kostek, Matthew C; Doldo, Neil A; Hand, Brian D; Bailey, Jason A; Rabon-Stith, Karma M; Conway, Joan M; Carignan, Craig R; Lang, Jesse; Hurley, Ben F

    2005-11-01

    The effects of a 10-wk unilateral knee extension strength training (ST) program on peak power (PP) and peak movement velocity (PV), at given absolute (force load) and relative (same % of 1 repetition maximum) resistances (loads), were examined in 30 older men [64 yr (7 SD)] and 32 older women [62 yr (6 SD)]. PP increased significantly in both men and women at the same absolute (P < 0.001) and relative loads (P < 0.01) with ST. Men had a significantly greater increase in relative PP than women with ST at 60% (P < 0.01) and 70% (P < 0.001) of 1 repetition maximum when covarying for baseline differences and age. However, when each subject was tested at the same absolute load and when PP was normalized for the muscle volume of the trained knee extensors (i.e., absolute muscle power quality), women increased by 9% (P < 0.05), whereas men did not change. Both men and women increased their absolute PV (P < 0.001) but decreased their relative PV significantly with ST (P < 0.05). However, when baseline values and age were covaried, women had significantly less of a decrease in relative PV quality with ST than men (P < 0.01), although the difference was small. These normalized data suggest that ST-induced increases in PP depend on muscular hypertrophy in men, but not in women, providing further support for the hypothesis developed from our previous report (Ivey FM, Tracy BL, Lemmer JT, NessAiver M, Metter EJ, Fozard JL and Hurley BF. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 55: B152-B157, 2000) that improvements in muscle function with ST result from nonmuscle mass adaptations to a greater extent in women than men.

  7. Experimental characterization of post rigor mortis human muscle subjected to small tensile strains and application of a simple hyper-viscoelastic model.

    PubMed

    Gras, Laure-Lise; Laporte, Sébastien; Viot, Philippe; Mitton, David

    2014-10-01

    In models developed for impact biomechanics, muscles are usually represented with one-dimensional elements having active and passive properties. The passive properties of muscles are most often obtained from experiments performed on animal muscles, because limited data on human muscle are available. The aim of this study is thus to characterize the passive response of a human muscle in tension. Tensile tests at different strain rates (0.0045, 0.045, and 0.45 s⁻¹) were performed on 10 extensor carpi ulnaris muscles. A model composed of a nonlinear element defined with an exponential law in parallel with one or two Maxwell elements and considering basic geometrical features was proposed. The experimental results were used to identify the parameters of the model. The results for the first- and second-order model were similar. For the first-order model, the mean parameters of the exponential law are as follows: Young's modulus E (6.8 MPa) and curvature parameter α (31.6). The Maxwell element mean values are as follows: viscosity parameter η (1.2 MPa s) and relaxation time τ (0.25 s). Our results provide new data on a human muscle tested in vitro and a simple model with basic geometrical features that represent its behavior in tension under three different strain rates. This approach could be used to assess the behavior of other human muscles. © IMechE 2014.

  8. The activity pattern of the lumbo-pelvic muscles during prone hip extension in athletes with and without hamstring strain injury.

    PubMed

    Emami, Mahnaz; Arab, Amir Massoud; Ghamkhar, Leila

    2014-05-01

    Altered muscular activation pattern has been associated with musculoskeletal disorders. Some previous studies have demonstrated muscle weakness or tightness in athletes who have sustained hamstring (HAM) injuries. However, no study has clinically investigated the muscular activity pattern in subjects with HAM strain injuries. To investigate the activity pattern of the ipsilateral erector spinae (IES), contralateral erector spinae (CES), gluteus maximus (GM), and medial and lateral HAM muscles during the prone hip extension (PHE) test in athletes with and without history of HAM strain injury. Cross-sectional non-experimental study design. A convenience sample of 20 soccer athletes participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: those with history of HAM strain injury (n=10, mean age = 22.6 ± 3.74) and without history of HAM strain (n =10, mean age = 22.45 ± 3.77). Three repetitions of the PHE were performed by each subject, and the electromyographic (EMG) outputs of the IES, CES, GM, and HAM muscles were recorded, processed and normalized to maximum voluntary electrical activity (MVE). Independent t-tests were used for comparing activation means of each muscle between athletes with and without history of HAM strain injury. There were significant differences in EMG activity of the GM (p= 0.04) and medial HAM (p = 0.01) between two groups. No significant difference was found in EMG signals of the IES (p= 0.26), CES (= 0.33) and lateral HAM (p= 0.58) between the two groups. Greater although non-significant normalized EMG outputes of IES, CES and lateral HAM were seen in athletes with history of HAM strain compared to those without HAM strain. The findings of this study demonstrated greater normalized EMG activity of GM and medial HAM tested in athletes with history of HAM strain compared to those without HAM strain (altered activation pattern). 3a.

  9. An unusual variety of the extensor digiti muscles: report with notes on repetition strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt Pires, Maria Alexandre; Casal, Diogo; Mascarenhas de Lemos, Luís; Godinho, Carlos Eduardo; Pais, Diogo; Goyri-O'Neill, João

    2013-01-01

    In over 500 human cadaveric dissections of arms and forearms, performed to the present date, we find frequent anatomical variations, corresponding to classic descriptions. Last year, we found a singular anatomic variation of the extensor muscles of the forearm, which seems previously undescribed. It is our strong belief that gross anatomy studies, and gross dissection should be updated and reintroduced in modern anatomical studies, for teaching, research, or surgical training purposes. We detected a peculiar anatomical variant of the Superficial Extensor Digiti Muscles in the forearm of a human 73 year old male Caucasian cadaver. We clearly identified a thick bundle of muscular fibres, connecting the main muscular shafts of the Extensor Digiti Minimi, and the Extensor Digitorum Communis Muscles, in a perfectly defined muscular expansion, bridging obliquely downwards and outwards, between the two main muscular shafts. In our series, this is the first occurrence of such anatomical disposition. Anatomical variations of the extensor tendons to the fingers are frequently detected in the wrist, hand and fingers compartments. The careful analysis of the variants of muscular shafts in the forearm compartment, as commonly reported in the earliest anatomical descriptions will bring renewed light to the functional assessment of the extensor mechanism of the human fingers. In this sense, we reviewed the oldest anatomical descriptions, from the 16th century to the present date.

  10. A Novel System for Studying Mechanical Strain Waveform-Dependent Responses in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason; Wong, Mitchell; Smith, Quentin; Baker, Aaron B.

    2013-01-01

    While many studies have examined the effects mechanical forces on vSMCs, there is a limited understanding of how the different arterial strain waveforms that occur in disease and different vascular beds alter vSMC mechanotransduction and phenotype. Here, we present a novel system for applying complex, time-varying strain waveforms to cultured cells and use this system to understand how these waveforms can alter vSMC phenotype and signaling. We have developed a highly adaptable cell culture system that allows the application of mechanical strain to cells in culture and can reproduce the complex dynamic mechanical environment experienced by arterial cells in the body. Using this system, we examined whether the type of applied strain waveform altered phenotypic modulation of vSMCs by mechanical forces. Cells exposed to the brachial waveform had increased phosphorylation of AKT, EGR-1, c-Fos expression and cytoskeletal remodeling in comparison to cells treated with the aortic waveform. In addition, vSMCs exposed to physiological waveforms had adopted a more differentiated phenotype in comparison to those treated with static or sinusoidal cyclic strain, with increased expression of vSMC markers desmin, calponin and SM-22 as well as increased expression of regulatory miRNAs including miR-143, -145 and -221. Taken together, our studies demonstrate the development of a novel system for applying complex, timevarying mechanical forces to cells in culture. In addition, we have shown that physiological strain waveforms have powerful effects on vSMC phenotype. PMID:24096612

  11. Diagnostic and prognostic value of clinical findings in 83 athletes with posterior thigh injury: comparison of clinical findings with magnetic resonance imaging documentation of hamstring muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Verrall, Geoffrey M; Slavotinek, John P; Barnes, Peter G; Fon, Gerald T

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical features of posterior thigh injuries and their contribution to accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessment of hamstring muscle strain injury. The clinical features of posterior thigh injury can be used to diagnose hamstring muscle strain and to predict duration of absence from competition. Prospective clinical study. For two playing seasons, the clinical features of posterior thigh injury, timing of injury, and playing days lost were recorded for Australian Rules football players. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to confirm hamstring muscle injury. Posterior thigh injuries associated with pain and tenderness were recorded for 83 players, with magnetic resonance imaging confirming hamstring injury in 68 (82%). Most of the hamstring injuries were sudden onset (62; 91%) and occurred after a significant warm-up period (57; 84%). Of the patients whose injuries were sudden onset and occurred after the warm-up period (N = 59), 57 (97%) had hamstring muscle strain detected on magnetic resonance imaging. Hamstring muscle injury confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging was associated with a longer absence from competition (mean, 27 days) than injuries where no hamstring injury was detected (mean, 16 days). The clinical features of hamstring injury typically include sudden onset, pain, and tenderness, although exceptions do occur. Muscle fatigue may be important in the pathogenesis of hamstring injury.

  12. Recruitment of faster motor units is associated with greater rates of fascicle strain and rapid changes in muscle force during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sabrina S. M.; de Boef Miara, Maria; Arnold, Allison S.; Biewener, Andrew A.; Wakeling, James M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Animals modulate the power output needed for different locomotor tasks by changing muscle forces and fascicle strain rates. To generate the necessary forces, appropriate motor units must be recruited. Faster motor units have faster activation–deactivation rates than slower motor units, and they contract at higher strain rates; therefore, recruitment of faster motor units may be advantageous for tasks that involve rapid movements or high rates of work. This study identified motor unit recruitment patterns in the gastrocnemii muscles of goats and examined whether faster motor units are recruited when locomotor speed is increased. The study also examined whether locomotor tasks that elicit faster (or slower) motor units are associated with increased (or decreased) in vivo tendon forces, force rise and relaxation rates, fascicle strains and/or strain rates. Electromyography (EMG), sonomicrometry and muscle-tendon force data were collected from the lateral and medial gastrocnemius muscles of goats during level walking, trotting and galloping and during inclined walking and trotting. EMG signals were analyzed using wavelet and principal component analyses to quantify changes in the EMG frequency spectra across the different locomotor conditions. Fascicle strain and strain rate were calculated from the sonomicrometric data, and force rise and relaxation rates were determined from the tendon force data. The results of this study showed that faster motor units were recruited as goats increased their locomotor speeds from level walking to galloping. Slow inclined walking elicited EMG intensities similar to those of fast level galloping but different EMG frequency spectra, indicating that recruitment of the different motor unit types depended, in part, on characteristics of the task. For the locomotor tasks and muscles analyzed here, recruitment patterns were generally associated with in vivo fascicle strain rates, EMG intensity and tendon force. Together, these

  13. Complete genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic mineral-sulfide-oxidizing firmicute Sulfobacillus acidophilus type strain (NALT)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Chertkov, Olga; Chen, Amy; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, K

    2012-01-01

    Sulfobacillus acidophilus Norris et al. 1996 is a member of the genus Sulfobacillus which comprises five species of the order Clostridiales. Sulfobacillus species are of interest for comparison to other sulfur and iron oxidizers and also have biomining applications. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Sulfobacillus, and the second published genome of a member of the species S. acidophilus. The genome, which consists of one chromosome and one plasmid with a total size of 3,557,831 bp, harbors 3,626 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  15. Strain-Level Dependent Nonequilibrium Anisotropic Viscoelasticity: Application to the Abdominal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Marcos; Montáns, Francisco J

    2017-10-01

    Soft connective tissues sustain large strains of viscoelastic nature. The rate-independent component is frequently modeled by means of anisotropic hyperelastic models. The rate-dependent component is usually modeled through linear rheological models or quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) models. These viscoelastic models are unable, in general, to capture the strain-level dependency of the viscoelastic properties present in many viscoelastic tissues. In linear viscoelastic models, strain-level dependency is frequently accounted for by including the dependence of multipliers of Prony series on strains through additional evolution laws, but the determination of the material parameters is a difficult task and the obtained accuracy is usually not sufficient. In this work, we introduce a model for fully nonlinear viscoelasticity in which the instantaneous and quasi-static behaviors are exactly captured and the relaxation curves are predicted to a high accuracy. The model is based on a fully nonlinear standard rheological model and does not necessitate optimization algorithms to obtain material parameters. Furthermore, in contrast to most models used in modeling the viscoelastic behavior of soft tissues, it is valid for the large deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium typically observed in soft tissues.

  16. Single Myosin Cross-Bridge Orientation in Cardiac Papillary Muscle Detects Lever-Arm Shear Strain in Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Josephson, Matthew P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley–Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons (1971) Nature 233, 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution. PMID:21819137

  17. Single myosin cross-bridge orientation in cardiac papillary muscle detects lever-arm shear strain in transduction.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Josephson, Matthew P; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-09-13

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley-Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons ( 1971 ) Nature 233 , 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution.

  18. Effects of plasma adrenaline on hormone-sensitive lipase at rest and during moderate exercise in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Matthew J; Stellingwerff, Trent; Heigenhauser, George J F; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of increased plasma adrenaline on hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation during exercise. Seven untrained men rested for 20 min and exercised for 10 min at 60 % peak pulmonary oxygen uptake on three occasions: with adrenaline infusion throughout rest and exercise (ADR), with no adrenaline infusion (CON) and with adrenaline infusion commencing after 3 min of exercise (EX+ADR). Muscle samples were obtained at rest before (Pre, −20 min) and after (0 min) infusion, and at 3 and 10 min of cycling. Exogenous adrenaline infusion increased (P < 0.05) plasma adrenaline at rest during ADR, which resulted in greater HSL activity (Pre, 2.14 ± 0.10 mmol min−1 (kg dry matter (dm))−1; 0 min, 2.74 ± 0.20 mmol min−1 (kg dm)−1). Subsequent exercise had no effect on HSL activity. During exercise in CON, HSL activity was increased (P < 0.05) above rest at 3 min but was not increased further by 10 min. The infusion of exogenous adrenaline at 3 min of exercise in EX+ADR resulted in a marked elevation in plasma adrenaline levels (3 min, 0.57 ± 0.12 nM; 10 min, 10.08 ± 0.84 nM) and increased HSL activity by 25 %. HSL activity at 10 min was greater (P < 0.05) in EX+ADR compared with CON. There were no changes between trials in the plasma concentrations of insulin and free fatty acids (FFA) and the muscle contents of free AMP, all putative regulators of HSL activity. ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased at 3 min in CON and EX+ADR. Because HSL activity did not increase during exercise when adrenaline was infused prior to exercise (ADR) and because HSL activity increased when adrenaline was infused during exercise (EX+ADR), we conclude that (1) high adrenaline levels can stimulate HSL activity regardless of the metabolic milieu and (2) large increases in adrenaline during exercise, independent of changes in other putative regulators, are able to further stimulate the contraction-induced increase

  19. Reduction of selenite to red elemental selenium by moderately halotolerant Bacillus megaterium strains isolated from Bhitarkanika mangrove soil and characterization of reduced product.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rashmi Ranjan; Prajapati, Sunita; Das, Jyotirmayee; Dangar, Tushar Kanti; Das, Nigamananda; Thatoi, Hrudayanath

    2011-08-01

    Two Gram (+) bacterial strains, BSB6 and BSB12, showing resistance and potential for Se(IV) reduction among 26 moderately halotolerant isolates from the Bhitarkanika mangrove soil were characterized by biochemical and 16S rDNA sequence analyses. Both of them were strictly aerobic and able to grow in a wide range of pH (4-11), temperature (4-40°C) and salt concentration (4-12%) having an optimum growth at 37°C, pH ∼7.5 and 7% salt (NaCl). The biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis of BSB6 and BSB12 showed the closest phylogenetic similarity with the species Bacillus megaterium. Both the strains effectively reduced Se(IV) and complete reduction of selenite (up to 0.25 mM) was achieved within 40 h. SEM with energy dispersive X-ray and TEM analyses revealed the formation of nano size spherical selenium particles in and around the bacterial cells which were also supported by the confocal micrograph study. The UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra and XRD of selenium precipitates revealed that the selenium particles are in the nanometric range and crystalline in nature. These bacterial strains may be exploited further for bioremediation process of Se(IV) at relatively high salt concentrations and green synthesis of selenium nanoparticles.

  20. Chemotaxis and degradation of organophosphate compound by a novel moderately thermo-halo tolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain BUR11: evidence for possible existence of two pathways for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pailan, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    An organophosphate (OP) degrading chemotactic bacterial strain BUR11 isolated from an agricultural field was identified as a member of Pseudomonas genus on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain could utilize parathion, chlorpyrifos and their major hydrolytic intermediates as sole source of carbon for its growth and exhibited positive chemotactic response towards most of them. Optimum concentration of parathion for its growth was recorded to be 200 ppm and 62% of which was degraded within 96 h at 37 °C. Growth studies indicated the strain to be moderately thermo-halo tolerant in nature. Investigation based on identification of intermediates of parathion degradation by thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provided evidence for possible existence of two pathways. The first pathway proceeds via 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) while the second proceeds through formation of 4-aminoparathion (4-APar), 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and parabenzoquinone (PBQ). This is the first report of chemotaxis towards organophosphate compound by a thermo-halo tolerant bacterium. PMID:26587344

  1. Efficacy and tolerability of DHEP-heparin plaster in reducing pain in mild-to-moderate muscle contusions: a double-blind, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Peter; Kopačka, Pavel; Gugliotta, Barbara; Rovati, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    To investigate if the 180-mg diclofenac epolamine and heparin sodium 5600 IU medicated plaster (DHEP-heparin) is more effective for pain reduction in mild-to-moderate contusions than the reference diclofenac epolamine 180 mg plaster (DHEP). This multicenter, multinational, prospective, double-blind versus reference comparator and versus placebo, controlled trial had balanced random assignment in three parallel treatment groups. The DHEP-heparin medicated plaster was compared to the DHEP medicated plaster and a placebo medicated plaster. A total of 331 outpatients, aged ≥18 and ≤65 years, with unilateral mild-to-moderate muscle contusion, pain on standardized movement of ≥50 mm, and superficial hematoma of ≤10 × 14 cm(2) completed the study. Plasters were applied each morning, for ≥20 hours daily for 14 consecutive days. Outcomes were assessed in three visits, over 14 days, plus patients' daily self-assessment. 05DCz/FHp11 - Eudra CT n: 2005-003829-31 Primary efficacy endpoint was mean change from baseline in pain on movement after 3 days of treatment, compared between groups. Secondary efficacy endpoints included mean daily change from baseline in pain on movement during treatment, pain level as assessed at control visits after 7 and 14 days, time (days) to hematoma disappearance based on patients' daily evaluations, rescue medication use, and overall treatment efficacy as judged by both patients and investigators. Pain progressively declined in all groups, more rapidly in DHEP-heparin recipients, compared to DHEP, and in both active treatment groups compared to placebo. Adverse events were recorded in 24 of the 355 (6.7%) exposed patients, and generally resolved without need to interrupt treatment. The DHEP-heparin plaster is superior to the reference DHEP plaster in reducing pain associated with mild-to-moderate muscle contusion. Both active treatments were significantly more effective than placebo, and each showed a comparably favorable

  2. Fast-folding α-helices as reversible strain absorbers in the muscle protein myomesin

    PubMed Central

    Berkemeier, Felix; Bertz, Morten; Xiao, Senbo; Pinotsis, Nikos; Wilmanns, Matthias; Gräter, Frauke; Rief, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The highly oriented filamentous protein network of muscle constantly experiences significant mechanical load during muscle operation. The dimeric protein myomesin has been identified as an important M-band component supporting the mechanical integrity of the entire sarcomere. Recent structural studies have revealed a long α-helical linker between the C-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) domains My12 and My13 of myomesin. In this paper, we have used single-molecule force spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the mechanics of the myomesin dimer comprising immunoglobulin domains My12–My13. We find that at forces of approximately 30 pN the α-helical linker reversibly elongates allowing the molecule to extend by more than the folded extension of a full domain. High-resolution measurements directly reveal the equilibrium folding/unfolding kinetics of the individual helix. We show that α-helix unfolding mechanically protects the molecule homodimerization from dissociation at physiologically relevant forces. As fast and reversible molecular springs the myomesin α-helical linkers are an essential component for the structural integrity of the M band. PMID:21825161

  3. Hamstring muscle strains in professional football players: a 10-year review.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Marcus C C W; Zarins, Bertram; Powell, John W; Kenyon, Charles D

    2011-04-01

    Investigations into hamstring strain injuries at the elite level exist in sports such as Australian Rules football, rugby, and soccer, but no large-scale study exists on the incidence and circumstances surrounding these injuries in the National Football League (NFL). Injury rates will vary between different player positions, times in the season, and across different playing situations. Descriptive epidemiology study. Between 1989 and 1998, injury data were prospectively collected by athletic trainers for every NFL team and recorded in the NFL's Injury Surveillance System. Data collected included team, date of injury, activity the player was engaged in at the time of injury, injury severity, position played, mechanism of injury, and history of previous injury. Injury rates were reported in injuries per athlete-exposure (A-E). An athlete-exposure was defined as 1 athlete participating in either 1 practice or 1 game. Over the 10-year study period 1716 hamstring strains were reported for an injury rate (IR) of 0.77 per 1000 A-E. More than half (51.3%) of hamstring strains occurred during the 7-week preseason. The preseason practice IR was significantly elevated compared with the regular-season practice IR (0.82/1000 A-E and 0.18/1000 A-E, respectively). The most commonly injured positions were the defensive secondary, accounting for 23.1% of the injuries; the wide receivers, accounting for 20.8%; and special teams, constituting 13.0% of the injuries in the study. Hamstring strains are a considerable cause of disability in football, with the majority of injuries occurring during the short preseason. In particular, the speed position players, such as the wide receivers and defensive secondary, as well as players on the special teams units, are at elevated risk for injury. These positions and situations with a higher risk of injury provide foci for preventative interventions.

  4. Early mitochondrial adaptations in skeletal muscle to diet-induced obesity are strain dependent and determine oxidative stress and energy expenditure but not insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Boudina, Sihem; Sena, Sandra; Sloan, Crystal; Tebbi, Ali; Han, Yong Hwan; O'Neill, Brian T; Cooksey, Robert C; Jones, Deborah; Holland, William L; McClain, Donald A; Abel, E Dale

    2012-06-01

    This study sought to elucidate the relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance in two mouse models with differential susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. We examined the time course of mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity-prone C57B and obesity-resistant FVB mouse strains in response to high-fat feeding. After 5 wk, impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle developed in both strains in the absence of any impairment in proximal insulin signaling. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity preceded the development of insulin resistant glucose uptake in C57B mice in concert with increased oxidative stress in skeletal muscle. By contrast, mitochondrial uncoupling in FVB mice, which prevented oxidative stress and increased energy expenditure, did not prevent insulin resistant glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Preventing oxidative stress in C57B mice treated systemically with an antioxidant normalized skeletal muscle mitochondrial function but failed to normalize glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, high fat-fed uncoupling protein 3 knockout mice developed increased oxidative stress that did not worsen glucose tolerance. In the evolution of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, initial but divergent strain-dependent mitochondrial adaptations modulate oxidative stress and energy expenditure without influencing the onset of impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake.

  5. Strain and load thresholds for cervical muscle recruitment in response to quasi-static tensile stretch of the caprine C5-C6 facet joint capsule.

    PubMed

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Lu, Ying; Cavanaugh, John M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of cervical muscles to physiologic tensile stretch of cervical facet joint capsule (FJC) at a quasi-static displacement rate of 0.5mm/s. In vivo caprine left C5-C6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile displacement paradigm. EMG activity was recorded during FJC stretch from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels and bilaterally from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups at the C5-C6 level. Onset of muscular activity was later analyzed using visual and computer-based methods. Capsule load and strain at the time of onset were recorded and compared between the muscle groups. Results indicated capsule load was a better indicator of the tensile stretch thresholds for muscular recruitment than capsule strain. MF responded at significantly smaller capsule loads than TR and LC, while TR and LC activation loads were not significantly different. SM did not respond to physiologic FJC stretch. Muscle group recruitment order reflected the muscles' fiber type compositions and functional roles in the spine. This study provides the first evidence that the cervical ligamento-muscular reflex pathways are activated via tensile FJC stretch and extend to superficial and deep musculature on the anterior and posterior aspects of the neck, ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of FJC stretch.

  6. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E; Barber, John L; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-14

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  7. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-01

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  8. Effects of Leg-Press Training With Moderate Vibration on Muscle Strength, Pain, and Function After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bily, Walter; Franz, Carlo; Trimmel, Lukas; Loefler, Stefan; Cvecka, Jan; Zampieri, Sandra; Kasche, Waltraud; Sarabon, Nejc; Zenz, Peter; Kern, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effects of a time-saving leg-press training program with moderate vibration on strength parameters, pain, and functional outcomes of patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in comparison with functional physiotherapy. Randomized controlled trial. Outpatient rehabilitation department at a university teaching hospital. Patients (N=55) with TKA were randomly allocated into 2 rehabilitation groups. Six weeks after TKA, participants either underwent isokinetic leg-press training combined with moderate vibration (n=26) of 15 minutes per session or functional physiotherapy (n=29) of 30 minutes per session. Both groups received therapy twice a week for a period of 6 weeks. Participants were evaluated at baseline (6wk after TKA) and after the 6-week rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure was maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the involved leg. Secondary outcome measures were pain assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS), range of motion, stair test, timed Up and Go test, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in MVC of knee extensors measured on the knee dynamometer (leg-press group: from 0.8±.06 to 1±.09Nm/kg body weight [BW], physiotherapy group: from 0.7±.06 to 0.9±.06Nm/kg BW; P<.05) and in closed kinetic chain on the leg press (leg-press group: from 8.9±.77 to 10.3±1.06N/kg BW, physiotherapy group: from 6.7±.54 to 9.1±.70N/kg BW; P<.05) and in pain at rest (leg-press group: from 2±.36 to 1.3±.36 on the VAS, physiotherapy group: from 1.2±.28 to 1.1±.31; P<.05), WOMAC scores, and functional measurements after 6 weeks of training. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups concerning strength, pain, and functional outcomes after training (P>.05). Isokinetic leg-press training with moderate vibration and functional physiotherapy are both effective in regaining muscle strength and function after TKA; however, isokinetic

  9. Effects of high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training on glycaemic control and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Chavanelle, Vivien; Boisseau, Nathalie; Otero, Yolanda F; Combaret, Lydie; Dardevet, Dominique; Montaurier, Christophe; Delcros, Geoffrey; Peltier, Sébastien L; Sirvent, Pascal

    2017-03-16

    Physical activity is known as an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of Type 2 Diabetes. The aim of this work was to compare the effects of a traditional Moderate Intensity Continuous Training (MICT) with a High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in diabetic mice. Diabetic db/db male mice (N = 25) aged 6 weeks were subdivided into MICT, HIIT or control (CON) group. Animals in the training groups ran on a treadmill 5 days/week during 10 weeks. MICT group ran for 80 min (0° slope) at 50-60% of maximal speed (Vmax) reached during an incremental test. HIIT group ran thirteen times 4 minutes (20° slope) at 85-90% of Vmax separated by 2-min-rest periods. HIIT lowered fasting glycaemia and HbA1c compared with CON group (p < 0.05). In all mitochondrial function markers assessed, no differences were noted between the three groups except for total amount of electron transport chain proteins, slightly increased in the HIIT group vs CON. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase of muscle Glut4 content (about 2 fold) and higher insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation ratios in HIIT group. HIIT seems to improve glucose metabolism more efficiently than MICT in diabetic mice by mechanisms independent of mitochondrial adaptations.

  10. Hamstring strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... mild muscle strain or pull Grade 2 -- partial muscle tear Grade 3 -- complete muscle tear Recovery time depends on the grade of the ... be healing as expected. Alternative Names Pulled hamstring muscle; Sprain - ... Ali K, Leland JM. Hamstring strains and tears in the athlete. Clin Sports Med . 2012;31( ...

  11. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Unified scaling law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: I. Separability postulate, raw scaling data and parameterization at moderate strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekin, J. W.

    2010-08-01

    of these separable functions serves as an effective 'Rosetta Stone' table for translating among the various parameterizations. An accurate, simple parameterization of the USL is given in separable form for Nb3Sn for the less complex and less controversial moderate strain regime (-0.5% < ɛ0 < ɛ0irr), where many magnets are designed: \\[F_{\\mathrm {P}} \\equiv I_{\\mathrm {c}}(B,T, \\varepsilon) B=C [(1-a|\\varepsilon_{0}|^{1.7})^{s}] [(1-t^{ 2})^{\\mu }(1-t^{ 1.52})^{\\eta-\\mu }] [b^{p}(1-b)^{q}] \\] \\[b_{\\mathrm {c}2}(t, \\varepsilon_{0})=(1-a|\\varepsilon_{0}|^{1.7}) (1-t^{ 1.52}), \\] with free scaling parameters as follows: strain parameters ɛm, s, a - (for ɛ0 < 0) and a + (for ɛ0 > 0); temperature parameters Tc*(0) and η magnetic field parameters Bc2*(0, 0), p and q; and C is a proportionality constant. With this parameterization, the scaling parameters themselves are also separable, an important feature for practical engineering purposes, because the parameter values can be built up from separate strain and temperature measurements. The only non-separable parameter, w, is fixed at 3.0, as described above. The parameter μ is fixed at 0, 1 or 2, corresponding to the three parameterization models in present use for the temperature function h(t), all of which are effectively equivalent in fitting accuracy at T >= 4 K (the simplest being the original parameterization μ = 0). At high compressive strains (ɛ0 < - 0.5%), a consensus for the best parameterizations has not yet been achieved. In Part II of this review, raw scaling data will be used to assess the most commonly used parameterizations in this regime, especially bc2(ɛ0) and g(ɛ0) at high compressive strains, and h(t) over a wide temperature range. This article is based in part on the presentation 'Unified strain-and-temperature scaling law: separable parameter set' given at the Mechanical and Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors Conference (Princeton, NJ, Aug. 2007). Trade

  13. Elevated levels of petite formation in strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae restored to respiratory competence. I. Association of both high and moderate frequencies of petite mutant formation with the presence of aberrant mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Evans, R J; Oakley, K M; Clark-Walker, G D

    1985-11-01

    When recently arisen spontaneous petite mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are crossed, respiratory competent diploids can be recovered. Such restored strains can be divided into two groups having sectored or unsectored colony morphology, the former being due to an elevated level of spontaneous petite mutation. On the basis of petite frequency, the sectored strains can be subdivided into those with a moderate frequency (5-16%) and those with a high frequency (greater than 60%) of petite formation. Each of the three categories of restored strains can be found on crossing two petites, suggesting either that the parental mutants contain a heterogeneous population of deleted mtDNAs at the time of mating or that different interactions can occur between the defective molecules. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mtDNA from restored strains that have a wild-type petite frequency showed that they had recovered a wild-type mtDNA fragmentation pattern. Conversely, all examined cultures from both categories of sectored strains contained aberrant mitochondrial genomes that were perpetuated without change over at least 200 generations. In addition, sectored colony siblings can have different aberrant mtDNAs. The finding that two sectored, restored strains from different crosses have identical but aberrant mtDNAs provides evidence for preferred deletion sites from the mitochondrial genome. Although it appears that mtDNAs from sectored strains invariably contain duplications, there is no apparent correlation between the size of the duplication and spontaneous petite frequency.

  14. Elevated Levels of Petite Formation in Strains of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE Restored to Respiratory Competence. I. Association of Both High and Moderate Frequencies of Petite Mutant Formation with the Presence of Aberrant Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R. J.; Oakley, K. M.; Clark-Walker, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    When recently arisen spontaneous petite mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are crossed, respiratory competent diploids can be recovered. Such restored strains can be divided into two groups having sectored or unsectored colony morphology, the former being due to an elevated level of spontaneous petite mutation. On the basis of petite frequency, the sectored strains can be subdivided into those with a moderate frequency (5–16%) and those with a high frequency (>60%) of petite formation. Each of the three categories of restored strains can be found on crossing two petites, suggesting either that the parental mutants contain a heterogeneous population of deleted mtDNAs at the time of mating or that different interactions can occur between the defective molecules. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mtDNA from restored strains that have a wild-type petite frequency showed that they had recovered a wild-type mtDNA fragmentation pattern. Conversely, all examined cultures from both categories of sectored strains contained aberrant mitochondrial genomes that were perpetuated without change over at least 200 generations. In addition, sectored colony siblings can have different aberrant mtDNAs. The finding that two sectored, restored strains from different crosses have identical but aberrant mtDNAs provides evidence for preferred deletion sites from the mitochondrial genome. Although it appears that mtDNAs from sectored strains invariably contain duplications, there is no apparent correlation between the size of the duplication and spontaneous petite frequency. PMID:3902563

  15. A moderate acute increase in physical activity enhances nutritive flow and the muscle protein anabolic response to mixed nutrient intake in older adults.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Kyle L; Dhanani, Shaheen; Glynn, Erin L; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Jennings, Kristofer; Rasmussen, Blake B; Volpi, Elena

    2012-06-01

    Nutrient stimulation of muscle protein anabolism is blunted with aging and may contribute to the development and progression of sarcopenia in older adults. This is likely due to insulin resistance of protein metabolism and/or endothelial dysfunction with a reduction in nutritive flow, both of which can be improved by aerobic exercise. Our objective was to determine whether increasing physical activity can enhance the muscle protein anabolic effect of essential amino acid (EAA) + sucrose intake in older subjects by improving nutritive flow and/or insulin signaling. Using a randomized crossover design, we measured in older subjects [n = 6, 70 ± 3 y of age, BMI (in kg/m2) of 25 ± 1] the acute effects of increasing physical activity with aerobic exercise, as compared with normal sedentary lifestyle, on the response of blood flow, microvascular perfusion, insulin signaling, and muscle protein kinetics to EAA+sucrose intake. No differences between treatment groups were found in the basal state. The change from the basal state in blood flow, muscle perfusion, phenylalanine delivery, net balance, and muscle protein synthesis during the consumption of EAA+sucrose was significantly higher after the exercise than after the control treatment (P < 0.05). Insulin signaling increased during EAA+sucrose ingestion in both groups (P < 0.05). Our data indicate that a prior bout of aerobic exercise increases the anabolic effect of nutrient intake in older adults. This effect appears to be mediated by an exercise-induced improvement in nutrient-stimulated vasodilation and nutrient delivery to muscle rather than to improved insulin signaling. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00690534.

  16. Sprint interval and moderate-intensity continuous training have equal benefits on aerobic capacity, insulin sensitivity, muscle capillarisation and endothelial eNOS/NAD(P)Hoxidase protein ratio in obese men.

    PubMed

    Cocks, Matthew; Shaw, Christopher S; Shepherd, Sam O; Fisher, James P; Ranasinghe, Aaron; Barker, Thomas A; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2016-04-15

    Skeletal muscle capillary density and vasoreactivity are reduced in obesity, due to reduced nitric oxide bioavailability. Sprint interval training (SIT) has been proposed as a time efficient alternative to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), but its effect on the skeletal muscle microvasculature has not been studied in obese individuals. We observed that SIT and MICT led to equal increases in capillarisation and endothelial eNOS content, while reducing endothelial NOX2 content in microvessels of young obese men. We conclude that SIT is equally effective at improving skeletal muscle capillarisation and endothelial enzyme balance, while being a time efficient alternative to traditional MICT. Sprint interval training (SIT) has been proposed as a time efficient alternative to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), leading to similar improvements in skeletal muscle capillary density and microvascular function in young healthy humans. In this study we made the first comparisons of the muscle microvascular response to SIT and MICT in an obese population. Sixteen young obese men (age 25 ± 1 years, BMI 34.8 ± 0.9 kg m(-2) ) were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of MICT (40-60 min cycling at ∼65% V̇O2 peak , 5 times per week) or constant load SIT (4-7 constant workload intervals of 200% Wmax 3 times per week). Muscle biopsies were taken before and after training from the m. vastus lateralis to measure muscle microvascular endothelial eNOS content, eNOS serine(1177) phosphorylation, NOX2 content and capillarisation using quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Maximal aerobic capacity (V̇O2 peak ), whole body insulin sensitivity and arterial stiffness were also assessed. SIT and MICT increased skeletal muscle microvascular eNOS content and eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation in terminal arterioles and capillaries (P < 0.05), but the latter effect was eliminated when normalised to eNOS content (P = 0.217). SIT and MICT also reduced

  17. Self-Esteem and Negative Affect as Moderators of Sociocultural Influences on Body Dissatisfaction, Strategies To Decrease Weight, and Strategies To Increase Muscles among Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardelli, Lina A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the impact of sociocultural influences and the moderating role of self-esteem and negative affect on body dissatisfaction and body change strategies for adolescent boys and girls. Surveys indicated that sociocultural pressures significantly predicted body dissatisfaction and body change strategies among both sexes. Both boys and girls…

  18. Self-Esteem and Negative Affect as Moderators of Sociocultural Influences on Body Dissatisfaction, Strategies To Decrease Weight, and Strategies To Increase Muscles among Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardelli, Lina A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the impact of sociocultural influences and the moderating role of self-esteem and negative affect on body dissatisfaction and body change strategies for adolescent boys and girls. Surveys indicated that sociocultural pressures significantly predicted body dissatisfaction and body change strategies among both sexes. Both boys and girls…

  19. The hybrid personal cooling system (PCS) could effectively reduce the heat strain while exercising in a hot and moderate humid environment.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenfang; Wang, Faming

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a hybrid personal cooling system (PCS) in mitigating body heat stain while exercising in a hot environment. Eight subjects underwent two trials: PCS and CON (i.e. no cooling). All trials were conducted at an air temperature of 36 ± 0.5 °C and RH = 59 ± 5%. The key findings demonstrated that the PCS could significantly reduce the core temperature, mean skin temperature, heart rate and physiological strain index during both exercise and recovery periods (p < 0.05). Subjective perceptions were also significantly alleviated in PCS at the end of the exercise and during the recovery (p < 0.05). Besides, the PCS could also bring remarkable benefits in lowering local skin temperatures and in improving perceptual sensations in both upper and lower body during both exercise and recovery periods (p < 0.05). It was thus concluded that the hybrid PCS is effective in mitigating body heat strain while exercising in a hot environment. Practitioner Summary: In hot and humid environments, body heat dissipation through sweating is greatly restricted. Our newly developed hybrid PCS could effectively alleviate heat strain while exercising in hot environments. The findings contribute to the body of knowledge in improving the health and well-being of sportsmen while exercising in hot environments.

  20. AGE RELATED DIFFERENCES IN STRAIN RATE TENSOR OF THE MEDIAL GASTROCNEMIUS MUSCLE DURING PASSIVE PLANTARFLEXION AND ACTIVE ISOMETRIC CONTRACTION USING VELOCITY ENCODED MR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Usha; Malis, Vadim; Csapo, Robert; Moghadasi, Ali; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The strain rate (SR) tensor measures the principal directions and magnitude of the instantaneous deformation; this study aims to track age related changes in the 2D SR tensor in the medial gastrocnemius during passive joint rotation and active isometric contraction. Methods SR tensors were derived from velocity encoded magnetic resonance phase-contrast images in nine young (28 yrs) and eight senior (78 yrs) women. Strain rates along and in the cross-section of the fiber were calculated from the SR tensor and used to derive the out-plane SR. Age related and regional differences in the SR eigenvalues, orientation, and the angle between the SR and muscle fiber (SR-fiber angle) were statistically analyzed. Results SR along the fiber was significantly different between the cohorts during isometric contraction with higher values in the young (P<0.05). The SR-fiber angle was larger in the young for both motion types but this difference was not statistically significant. Significant regional differences in the SR indices was seen in passive joint rotation (P<0.05) for both cohorts. Conclusion SR mapping reflects age related and regional differences during active and passive motion respectively; this may arise from differences in contractility (active motion) and elastic properties (active and passive motion). PMID:25046255

  1. Adjustments of pulmonary O2 uptake and muscle deoxygenation during ramp incremental exercise and constant-load moderate-intensity exercise in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Gravelle, Braden M. R.; Murias, Juan M.; Spencer, Matthew D.; Paterson, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    The matching of muscle O2 delivery to O2 utilization can be inferred from the adjustments in muscle deoxygenation (Δ[HHb]) and pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p). This study examined the adjustments of V̇o2p and Δ[HHb] during ramp incremental (RI) and constant-load (CL) exercise in adult males. Ten young adults (YA; age: 25 ± 5 yr) and nine older adults (OA; age: 70 ± 3 yr) completed two RI tests and six CL step transitions to a work rate (WR) corresponding to 1) 80% of the estimated lactate threshold (same relative WR) and 2) 50 W (same absolute WR). V̇o2p was measured breath by breath, and Δ[HHb] of the vastus lateralis was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. Δ[HHb]-WR profiles were normalized from baseline (0%) to peak Δ[HHb] (100%) and fit using a sigmoid function. The sigmoid slope (d) was greater (P < 0.05) in OA (0.027 ± 0.01%/W) compared with YA (0.017 ± 0.01%/W), and the c/d value (a value corresponding to 50% of the amplitude) was smaller (P < 0.05) for OA (133 ± 40 W) than for YA (195 ± 51 W). No age-related differences in the sigmoid parameters were reported when WR was expressed as a percentage of peak WR. V̇o2p kinetics compared with Δ[HHb] kinetics for the 50-W transition were similar between YA and OA; however, Δ[HHb] kinetics during the transition to 80% of the lactate threshold were faster than V̇o2p kinetics in both groups. The greater reliance on O2 extraction displayed in OA during RI exercise suggests a lower O2 delivery-to-O2 utilization relationship at a given absolute WR compared with YA. PMID:22961268

  2. The effect of moderate-intensity exercise on the expression of HO-1 mRNA and activity of HO in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cailing; Qi, Jie; Li, Wanwei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effects of moderate-intensity training on the activity of heme oxygenase (HO) and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the aorta and the cardiac muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). After 9 weeks of swimming exercise, the activity of HO and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the SHRs were measured. The resting blood pressure in the exercise group was increased by 1.7% (P > 0.05), whereas it was significantly elevated by 10.3% (P < 0.01) in the SHR rats. Compared with animals in the control and sedentary groups, the expression level of HO-1 mRNA of aorta and cardiac muscle in the exercise group was significantly enhanced (P < 0.01). The HO activity and the content of plasma carbon monoxide (CO) in the sedentary group were dramatically decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) compared with the control group. HO activity and content of plasma CO in the exercise group were significantly higher compared with those in the sedentary group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). The HO/CO metabolic pathway might be involved in the regulation of blood pressure of the SHR models.

  3. The Effects of Positive and Negative Feedback on Maximal Voluntary Contraction Level of the Biceps Brachii Muscle: Moderating Roles of Gender and Conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    Sarıkabak, Murat; Yaman, Çetin; Tok, Serdar; Binboga, Erdal

    2016-11-02

    We investigated the effect of positive and negative feedback on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the biceps brachii muscle and explored the mediating effects of gender and conscientiousness. During elbow flexion, MVCs were measured in positive, negative, and no-feedback conditions. Participants were divided into high- and low-conscientiousness groups based on the median split of their scores on Tatar's five-factor personality inventory. Considering all participants 46 college student athletes (21 female, 28 male), positive feedback led to a greater MVC percentage change (-5.76%) than did negative feedback (2.2%). MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition differed significantly by gender, but the negative feedback condition did not. Thus, positive feedback increased female athletes' MVC level by 3.49%, but decreased male athletes' MVC level by 15.6%. For conscientiousness, MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition did not differ according to high and low conscientiousness. However, conscientiousness interacted with gender in the positive feedback condition, increasing MVC in high-conscientiousness female athletes and decreasing MVC in low-conscientiousness female athletes. Positive feedback decreased MVC in both high- and low-conscientiousness male athletes.

  4. Moderating strain without sacrificing reactivity: design of fast and tunable noncatalyzed alkyne-azide cycloadditions via stereoelectronically controlled transition state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Gold, Brian; Dudley, Gregory B; Alabugin, Igor V

    2013-01-30

    Recently, we have identified two strategies for selective transition state (TS) stabilization in catalyst-free azide/alkyne cycloadditions. In particular, the transition states for the formation of both 1,4- and 1,5-isomers can be stabilized via hyperconjugative assistance for the C···N bond formation, whereas the 1,5-TS can be stabilized via C-H···X H-bonding interactions. When the hyperconjugative assistance is maximized by the antiperiplanar arrangement of propargylic σ-acceptors relative to the forming bonds, the combination of these TS-stabilizing effects was predicted to lead to ~1 million fold acceleration of the cycloaddition with methyl azide. The present work investigated whether hyperconjugative assistance and H-bonding can be combined with strain activation for the design of even more reactive alkynes and whether reactivity can be turned "on demand." When stereoelectronic amplification is achieved by optimal positioning of σ-acceptors at the endocyclic bonds antiperiplanar to the breaking alkyne π-bonds, the stabilization of the bent alkyne geometry leads to a significant decrease in strain in cyclic alkynes without compromising their reactivity in alkyne-azide cycloadditions. The approach can be used in a modular fashion where the TS stabilizing effects are introduced sequentially until the desired level of reactivity is achieved. A significant increase in reactivity upon the protonation of an endocyclic NH-group suggests a new strategy for the design of click reactions triggered by a pH-change or introduction of an external Lewis acid.

  5. Carbohydrate Mouth Rinse Maintains Muscle Electromyographic Activity and Increases Time to Exhaustion during Moderate but not High-Intensity Cycling Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bastos-Silva, Victor José; Melo, Alan de Albuquerque; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Moura, Felipe Arruda; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; de Araujo, Gustavo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the influence of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) electromyographic activity (EMG) and time to exhaustion (TE) during moderate (MIE) and high-intensity cycling exercise (HIE). Thirteen participants cycled at 80% of their respiratory compensation point and at 110% of their peak power output to the point of exhaustion. Before the trials and every 15 min during MIE, participants rinsed with the CHO or Placebo (PLA) solutions. The root mean square was calculated. CHO had no effect on the TE during HIE (CHO: 177.3 ± 42.2 s; PLA: 163.0 ± 26.7 s, p = 0.10), but the TE was increased during MIE (CHO: 76.6 ± 19.7 min; PLA: 65.4 ± 15.2 min; p = 0.01). The EMG activity in the VL was higher than PLA at 30 min (CHO: 10.5% ± 2.6%; PLA: 7.7% ± 3.3%; p = 0.01) and before exhaustion (CHO: 10.3% ± 2.5%; PLA: 8.0% ± 2.9%; p = 0.01) with CHO rinsing. There was no CHO effect on the EMG activity of RF during MIE or for VL and RF during HIE. CHO mouth rinse maintains EMG activity and enhances performance for MIE but not for HIE. PMID:27005660

  6. Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification Cross-Species Products of Mouse-Adapted Scrapie Strain 139A and Hamster-Adapted Scrapie Strain 263K with Brain and Muscle Tissues of Opposite Animals Generate Infectious Prions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Han, Jun; Zhang, Jin; Wei, Jing; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Tian, Chan; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Qi; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2017-07-01

    Transmission of prions between mammalian species is limited by a "species barrier," a biological effect involving an increase in incubation period to decrease the percentage of animals succumbing to disease. In this study, we used protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique, which accelerates the conversion of prion proteins in vitro. Direct interspecies PMCA involving 144 cycles confirmed that both mouse-adapted scrapie strain 139A and hamster-adapted 263K could use brain homogenates of opposite species to form proteinase K (PK)-resistant PrP proteins (PrP(res)). Newly formed interspecies prions could stably propagate themselves in subsequent serial PMCA passages. The two types of PMCA-generated cross-species PrP(res) changed their glycosylation profiles, which was similar to that observed during interspecies infection by the mouse agent 139A in vivo. These profiles were distinct from individual seeded PrP(Sc) and possessed properties of new hosts. Comparative analysis with respect to PK resistance showed no significant diversity between PMCA-PrP(res) and native PrP(Sc) or between brain and muscle PrP(res). However, PrP(res) from the relatively early cycles of serial PMCA showed lower PK resistance than those from later cycles. Inoculation of these PMCA products amplified with homogeneous or heterogeneous brain tissues (cross-species products) induced experimental transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These results suggested that PMCA can help prion strains to overcome species barrier and to propagate efficiently both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. High-intensity interval training speeds the adjustment of pulmonary O2 uptake, but not muscle deoxygenation, during moderate-intensity exercise transitions initiated from low and elevated baseline metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alexandra M; Paterson, Donald H; Kowalchuk, John M

    2013-06-01

    During step transitions in work rate (WR) within the moderate-intensity (MOD) exercise domain, pulmonary O2 uptake (Vo2p) kinetics are slowed, and Vo2p gain (ΔVo2p/ΔWR) is greater when exercise is initiated from an elevated metabolic rate. High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been shown to speed Vo2p kinetics when step transitions to MOD exercise are initiated from light-intensity baseline metabolic rates. The effects of HIT on step transitions initiated from elevated metabolic rates have not been established. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of HIT on Vo2p kinetics during transitions from low and elevated metabolic rates, within the MOD domain. Eight young, untrained men completed 12 sessions of HIT (spanning 4 wk). HIT consisted of 8-12 1-min intervals, cycling at a WR corresponding to 110% of pretraining maximal WR (WRmax). Pre-, mid- and posttraining, subjects completed a ramp-incremental test to determine maximum O2 uptake, WRmax, and estimated lactate threshold (θL). Participants additionally completed double-step constant-load tests, consisting of step transitions from 20 W → Δ45% θL [lower step (LS)] and Δ45 → 90% θL [upper step (US)]. HIT led to increases in maximum O2 uptake (P < 0.05) and WRmax (P < 0.01), and τVo2p of both lower and upper MOD step transitions were reduced by ∼40% (LS: 24 s → 15 s; US: 45 s → 25 s) (P < 0.01). However, the time course of adjustment of local muscle deoxygenation was unchanged in the LS and US. These results suggest that speeding of Vo2p kinetics in both the LS and US may be due, in part, to an improved matching of muscle O2 utilization to microvascular O2 delivery within the working muscle following 12 sessions of HIT, although muscle metabolic adaptations cannot be discounted.

  8. Oxygen transport and intracellular bioenergetics on stimulated cat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nioka, S; McCully, K; McClellan, G; Park, Jane; Chance, B

    2003-01-01

    A unique multiparameter recording of skeletal muscle bioenergetics, biochemistry and biomechanics has permitted determination of novel relationships among hemodynamics, cellular high-energy metabolites and mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline skeletal muscle. The study utilizes 31P NMR, NIR, and NADH fluorescence spectrophotometry, biochemical assays and muscle performance. Seven cats were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Calf muscles were stimulated through sciatic nerve electrical stimulation and tension was monitored by a strain gauge connected to the Achilles tendon. We stimulated the muscle to produce several workloads up to Vmax. We also changed FiO2 from normoxia to hypoxia for each %Vmax. From these results, the most sensitive indicators of cellular hypoxia leading to a reduction in muscle performance can be determined. Hemoglobin deoxygenation generally does not correlate with cellular hypoxia, although when the HbO2 drops below 30% saturation there is an increased incidence of cellular hypoxia. The [ADP], which is known to regulate mitochondrial function, has a close relation to the work, not to the hypoxia. On the other hand, the mitochondrial NADH does respond to cellular PO2. The degree of oxidation (NADH decrease) due to the ATP flux shifts with oxygen availability in mild to moderate hypoxia (at FiO2 down to 9%). As cellular hypoxia causes decreases in muscle performance (moderate to severe hypoxia), NADH is being reduced rather than oxidized with increasing workloads.

  9. Purification and characterization of a halophilic α-amylase with increased activity in the presence of organic solvents from the moderately halophilic Nesterenkonia sp. strain F.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mohammad; Ziaee, Abed-Ali; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-07-01

    An extracellular halophilic α-amylase was purified from Nesterenkonia sp. strain F using 80 % ethanol precipitation and Q-Sepharose anion exchange chromatography. The enzyme showed a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 110 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The amylase exhibited maximal activity at pH 7-7.5, being relatively stable at pH 6.5-7.5. Optimal temperature for the amylase activity and stability was 45 °C. The purified enzyme was highly active in the broad range of NaCl concentrations (0-4 M) with optimal activity at 0.25 M NaCl. The amylase was highly stable in the presence of 3-4 M NaCl. Amylase activity was not influenced by Ca²⁺, Rb⁺, Li⁺, Cs⁺, Mg²⁺ and Hg²⁺, whereas Fe³⁺, Cu²⁺, Zn²⁺ and Al³⁺) strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. The α-amylase was inhibited by EDTA, but was not inhibited by PMSF and β-mercaptoethanol. K(m) value of the amylase for soluble starch was 6.6 mg/ml. Amylolytic activity of the enzyme was enhanced not only by 20 % of water-immiscible organic solvents but also by acetone, ethanol and chloroform. Higher concentration (50 %) of the water-miscible organic solvents had no significant effect on the amylase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on increased activity of a microbial α-amylase in the presence of organic solvents.

  10. Multi-scale finite element analyses for stress and strain evaluations of braid fibril artificial blood vessel and smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Uchida, Takahiro; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed a multi-scale finite element (FE) analysis code to obtain the stress and strain that occurred in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) at micro-scale, which was seeded in the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel. This FE code can predict the dynamic response of stress under the blood pressure loading. We try to establish a computer-aided engineering (CAE)-driven scaffold design technique for the blood vessel regeneration. Until now, there occurred the great progresses for the endothelial cell activation and intima layer regeneration in the blood vessel regeneration study. However, there remains the difficulty of the SMC activation and media layer regeneration. Therefore, many researchers are now studying to elucidate the fundamental mechanism of SMC activation and media layer regeneration by using the biomechanical technique. As the numerical tool, we used the dynamic-explicit FE code PAM-CRASH, ESI Ltd. For the material models, the nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive law was adapted for the human blood vessel, SMC and the extra-cellular matrix, and the elastic law for the polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber. Through macro-FE and micro-FE analyses of fabricated braid fibril tubes by using PGA fiber under the combined conditions of the orientation angle and the pitch of fiber, we searched an appropriate structure for the stress stimulation for SMC functionalization. Objectives of this study are indicated as follows: 1. to analyze the stress and strain of the human blood vessel and SMC, and 2. to calculate stress and strain of the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel and SMC to search an appropriate PGA fiber structure under combined conditions of PGA fiber numbers, 12 and 24, and the helical orientation angles of fiber, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 degrees. Finally, we found a braid fibril tube, which has an angle of 15 degree and 12 PGA fibers, as a most appropriate artificial blood vessel for SMC functionalization. Copyright

  11. Age-associated NF-κB signaling in myofibers alters the satellite cell niche and re-strains muscle stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kah Yong; Rosner, Bernard; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Gjata, Ornela; Tran, Peter; Shoelson, Steven E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly regenerative tissue, but muscle repair potential is increasingly compromised with advancing age. In this study, we demonstrate that increased NF-κB activity in aged muscle fibers contributes to diminished myogenic potential of their associated satellite cells. We further examine the impact of genetic modulation of NF-κB signaling in muscle satellite cells or myofibers on recovery after damage. These studies reveal that NF-κB activity in differentiated myofibers is sufficient to drive dysfunction of muscle regenerative cells via cell-non-autonomous mechanisms. Inhibition of NF-κB, or its downstream target Phospholipase A2, in myofibers rescued muscle regenerative potential in aged muscle. Moreover, systemic administration of sodium salicylate, an FDA-approved NF-κB inhibitor, decreased inflammatory gene expression and improved repair in aged muscle. Together, these studies identify a unique NF-κB regulated, non-cell autonomous mechanism by which stem cell function is linked to lipid signaling and homeostasis, and provide important new targets to stimulate muscle repair in aged individuals. PMID:27852976

  12. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the joint or muscle swelling and bruising warmth and redness of the injured area difficulty moving ... looks "bent" or misshapen signs of infection (increased warmth, redness, streaks, swelling, and pain) a strain or ...

  13. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stakeholders Info Guidance for Four-Year Training Programs Governance FAQs Single GME Accreditation System Newsletter Archive Events ... prevention, tuning into how a patient’s lifestyle and environment can impact their wellbeing. DOs strive to help ...

  14. Two rigor states in skinned crayfish single muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    We studied the tension and stiffness of crayfish skinned single muscle fibers during and after the induction of rigor by removal of MgATP (substrate). We found that the rigor state is not unique but depends on the condition of the muscle before rigor. Fibers induced into rigor with a minimum of activation (low rigor) develop a small tension and moderate stiffness, while those entering rigor during maximum activation (high rigor) maintain near peak tension (80%) and develop a high stiffness. These rigor states are insensitive to Ca addition or deletion but they are partially interconvertible by length change. Stiffness changes when the rigor muscle length is varied, a condition in which the number of attached cross-rigor muscle length is varied, a condition in which the number of attached cross-bridges cannot change, and high-rigor muscle becomes less stiff than low-rigor muscle when the former is brought to the same tension by length release. The sensitivity of low, high, or length-released high-rigor muscles to trace substrate concentration (less than muM) differs, and rigor at lower strain is more suscepitible to substrate. PMID:821913

  15. [Blood distribution in the human leg arteries during orthostasis: role of the hydrostatic factor and posturotonic straining of the anti-gravity muscles].

    PubMed

    Modin, A Iu

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasonic visualization and dopplerography were used to study volumetric blood flows along the femoral artery, deep artery of the thigh, and the popliteal and sural arteries in normal volunteers. Active standing test resulted in significant blood redistribution among the arteries with prioritized blood supply to predominantly anti-g muscles but not to predominantly locomotor muscles. Elimination of static loading on the anti-g muscles by weight removal (transfer of the body mass on the other leg) was conducive to the opposite effect, i.e. absolute and relative decreases in the intensity of blood flow along the sural artery and a relatively more marked blood redistribution toward the deep artery of the thigh.

  16. A systematic review of the effectiveness of eccentric strength training in the prevention of hamstring muscle strains in otherwise healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Osita; Cheong, Krystie; Grant, Andrew; Beers, Amanda; Moizumi, Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Hamstring strains are the most common soft-tissue injury observed in recreational and athletic activities, yet no consensus exists regarding appropriate primary and secondary strategies to prevent these strains. Eccentric exercise has been reported to reduce the incidence of ham-string strains but its role has not been clearly defined. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of eccentric exercise in preventing hamstring strains. Online databases, including MED-LINE, PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science were searched for relevant articles. Each database was searched from the earliest date to July 2007. Selection criteria included diagnosis of hamstring strain, otherwise healthy individuals, and at least one group receiving an eccentric exercise intervention. Seven articles {three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four cohort studies} met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted using a customized form. Methodological rigor of included studies was assessed using the PEDro scale and Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. STUDIES WERE GROUPED BY ECCENTRIC EXERCISE INTERVENTION PROTOCOL: hamstring lowers, isokinetic strengthening, and other strengthening. A best-evidence synthesis of pooled data was qualitatively summarized. Findings suggest that eccentric training is effective in primary and secondary prevention of hamstring strains. Study heterogeneity and poor methodological rigor limit the ability to provide clinical recommendations. Further RCTs are needed to support the use of eccentric training protocols in the prevention of hamstring strains.

  17. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  18. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  19. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  20. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  1. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Moderately Severe 20 Moderate 10 Slight 0 Lumbar region: Severe 60 Moderately Severe 40 Moderate 20 Slight 0..., facial muscles. Evaluate functional impairment as seventh (facial) cranial nerve neuropathy (diagnostic...

  2. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Moderately Severe 20 Moderate 10 Slight 0 Lumbar region: Severe 60 Moderately Severe 40 Moderate 20 Slight 0..., facial muscles. Evaluate functional impairment as seventh (facial) cranial nerve neuropathy (diagnostic...

  3. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Moderately Severe 20 Moderate 10 Slight 0 Lumbar region: Severe 60 Moderately Severe 40 Moderate 20 Slight 0..., facial muscles. Evaluate functional impairment as seventh (facial) cranial nerve neuropathy (diagnostic...

  4. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Moderately Severe 20 Moderate 10 Slight 0 Lumbar region: Severe 60 Moderately Severe 40 Moderate 20 Slight 0..., facial muscles. Evaluate functional impairment as seventh (facial) cranial nerve neuropathy (diagnostic...

  5. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Moderately Severe 20 Moderate 10 Slight 0 Lumbar region: Severe 60 Moderately Severe 40 Moderate 20 Slight 0..., facial muscles. Evaluate functional impairment as seventh (facial) cranial nerve neuropathy (diagnostic...

  6. Trunk position modulates anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat.

    PubMed

    Kulas, Anthony S; Hortobágyi, Tibor; DeVita, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Although the squat exercise and its variations are commonly prescribed for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation, whether trunk position affects these ligament forces and strains during the squat is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of trunk position on anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat. While instrumented for biomechanical analysis, twelve recreationally active subjects performed single-leg squats with minimal and moderate amounts of forward trunk lean. A combination of inverse dynamics, Hill-type muscle modeling, and mathematical computations estimated anterior cruciate ligament forces, strains and quadriceps, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius forces. The moderate forward trunk lean condition vs. minimal forward trunk lean condition had lower peak anterior cruciate ligament forces (↓24%), strains (↓16%), and average anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during knee flexion ranges of motion of 25-55°(descent) and 35-55°(ascent). A moderate vs. minimal forward trunk lean also produced 35% higher hamstring forces throughout the majority of the squat, but lower quadriceps forces only at knee flexion angles greater than 65°. Single-leg squats performed with a moderate forward trunk lean (~40°) can minimize anterior cruciate ligament loads. Mechanistically, trunk lean reduced anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains through concomitant modulations in hip flexion angle and biarticular thigh muscle forces. These findings are clinically relevant for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation as a common goal is to minimize anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains through enhancing hamstring and quadriceps co-contractions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Eccentric Strength Training in the Prevention of Hamstring Muscle Strains in Otherwise Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Krystie; Grant, Andrew; Beers, Amanda; Moizumi, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    Background Hamstring strains are the most common soft-tissue injury observed in recreational and athletic activities, yet no consensus exists regarding appropriate primary and secondary strategies to prevent these strains. Eccentric exercise has been reported to reduce the incidence of ham-string strains but its role has not been clearly defined. Objective The objective of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of eccentric exercise in preventing hamstring strains. Data Sources Online databases, including MED-LINE, PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science were searched for relevant articles. Each database was searched from the earliest date to July 2007. Study Selection Selection criteria included diagnosis of hamstring strain, otherwise healthy individuals, and at least one group receiving an eccentric exercise intervention. Seven articles {three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four cohort studies} met the inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Data were extracted using a customized form. Methodological rigor of included studies was assessed using the PEDro scale and Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. Data Synthesis Studies were grouped by eccentric exercise intervention protocol: hamstring lowers, isokinetic strengthening, and other strengthening. A best-evidence synthesis of pooled data was qualitatively summarized. Conclusions Findings suggest that eccentric training is effective in primary and secondary prevention of hamstring strains. Study heterogeneity and poor methodological rigor limit the ability to provide clinical recommendations. Further RCTs are needed to support the use of eccentric training protocols in the prevention of hamstring strains. PMID:21509129

  8. Predicting hamstring strain injury in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Camilla L; Morgan, David L; Proske, Uwe

    2004-03-01

    Eccentric exercise, where the contracting muscle is lengthened, produces microscopic damage in muscle fibers, and sensations of stiffness and soreness, the next day. These normally resolve within a week. A more major sports injury is the muscle strain. Because strain injuries are known to occur during eccentric contractions, it is hypothesized that the microscopic damage from eccentric exercise can, at times, progress to a muscle strain. As the amount of microscopic damage depends on the muscle's optimum length for active tension, it is further proposed that optimum length is a measure of susceptibility for muscle strains. The athletes most at risk of a hamstring strain are those with a previous history of such injuries. Here the prediction is tested that optimum lengths of previously injured hamstrings are shorter and therefore more prone to eccentric damage than uninjured muscles. Mean optimum angle for peak torque in a previously injured muscle of nine athletes with a history of unilateral hamstring strains was compared with the uninjured muscle of the other leg and with muscles of 18 uninjured athletes. Optimum angle was determined with isokinetic dynamometry. In previously injured muscles, torque peaked at significantly shorter lengths than for uninjured muscles. Peak torque and quadriceps:hamstrings torque ratios were not significantly different. The shorter optimum of previously injured muscles makes them more prone to damage from eccentric exercise than uninjured muscles and this may account for the high reinjury rate. The shorter optimum may reflect the muscle's preinjury state or be a consequence of the healing process. To reduce the incidence of strain injuries, it is recommended that a combined program of eccentric exercise and muscle testing be carried out.

  9. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  10. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  11. Muscle disorders and rehabilitation in canine athletes.

    PubMed

    Steiss, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Muscle disorders associated with physical exertion in human athletes include delayed-onset muscle soreness, muscle strain, muscle tears, rhabdomyolysis, and acute and chronic compartment syndromes. Given that the structure of muscle is similar among different species, it is reasonable to expect that dogs experience the same phenomena. This article focuses on several of the muscle disorders of bird dogs, namely, coccygeal muscle injury and infraspinatus muscle contracture, and on those of dogs involved in tracking-obedience-protection training, namely, fibrotic myopathy, with an additional discussion of muscle strain. For injury prevention, one important area that can be adapted to canine athletes is the incorporation of warm-up and cool-down into the training program.

  12. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  13. Age-related differences in strain rate tensor of the medial gastrocnemius muscle during passive plantarflexion and active isometric contraction using velocity encoded MR imaging: potential index of lateral force transmission.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Usha; Malis, Vadim; Csapo, Robert; Moghadasi, Ali; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Sinha, Shantanu

    2015-05-01

    The strain rate (SR) tensor measures the principal directions and magnitude of the instantaneous deformation; this study aims to track age-related changes in the 2D SR tensor in the medial gastrocnemius during passive joint rotation and active isometric contraction. SR tensors were derived from velocity encoded magnetic resonance phase-contrast images in nine young (28 years) and eight senior (78 years) women. Strain rates along and in the cross-section of the fiber were calculated from the SR tensor and used to derive the out-plane SR. Age-related and regional differences in the SR eigenvalues, orientation, and the angle between the SR and muscle fiber (SR-fiber angle) were statistically analyzed. SR along the fiber was significantly different between the cohorts during isometric contraction with higher values in the young (P < 0.05). The SR-fiber angle was larger in the young for both motion types but this difference was not statistically significant. Significant regional differences in the SR indices was seen in passive joint rotation (P < 0.05) for both cohorts. SR mapping reflects age-related and regional differences during active and passive motion respectively; this may arise from differences in contractility (active motion) and elastic properties (active and passive motion). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Quantitative ultrasound of denervated hand muscles.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Ralph, Jeffrey W; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Poncelet, Ann N; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kliot, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Presentations to the neuromuscular clinic commonly involve hand muscle denervation, but few studies have evaluated hand muscle ultrasound. Ultrasound studies of abductor pollicis brevis, first dorsal interosseous, and abductor digit minimi were prospectively performed in a cohort of 34 patients (77 muscles) with electromyography (EMG)-confirmed denervation, compared with 58 healthy control subjects. In control subjects, muscle thickness was highly reproducible [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.88-0.98], and echogenicity was moderately reproducible (ICC = 0.542-0.686). Age, gender, and body mass index influenced muscle thickness and echogenicity. Ultrasound changes in denervated muscles correlated with the severity of EMG abnormalities. A z-score cutoff of 0 identified denervated muscles with a sensitivity of 100% and 89% for echogenicity and muscle thickness, respectively. Hand muscle ultrasound provides a noninvasive method to quantify muscle denervation and may be useful as a screening tool before EMG studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  16. Knitting and weaving artificial muscles

    PubMed Central

    Maziz, Ali; Concas, Alessandro; Khaldi, Alexandre; Stålhand, Jonas; Persson, Nils-Krister; Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2017-01-01

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind’s oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices. PMID:28138542

  17. Knitting and weaving artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Maziz, Ali; Concas, Alessandro; Khaldi, Alexandre; Stålhand, Jonas; Persson, Nils-Krister; Jager, Edwin W H

    2017-01-01

    A need exists for artificial muscles that are silent, soft, and compliant, with performance characteristics similar to those of skeletal muscle, enabling natural interaction of assistive devices with humans. By combining one of humankind's oldest technologies, textile processing, with electroactive polymers, we demonstrate here the feasibility of wearable, soft artificial muscles made by weaving and knitting, with tunable force and strain. These textile actuators were produced from cellulose yarns assembled into fabrics and coated with conducting polymers using a metal-free deposition. To increase the output force, we assembled yarns in parallel by weaving. The force scaled linearly with the number of yarns in the woven fabric. To amplify the strain, we knitted a stretchable fabric, exhibiting a 53-fold increase in strain. In addition, the textile construction added mechanical stability to the actuators. Textile processing permits scalable and rational production of wearable artificial muscles, and enables novel ways to design assistive devices.

  18. Infection of Calomys callosus (Rodentia Cricetidae) with strains of different Trypanosoma cruzi biodemes: pathogenicity, histotropism, and fibrosis induction.

    PubMed

    Magalhães-Santos, Isis Fernandes; Souza, Márcia Maria; Lima, Carolina Silva Costa; Andrade, Sonia G

    2004-06-01

    The influence of different Trypanosoma cruzi biodemes on the evolution of the infection and on the histopathological lesions of the heart and skeletal muscles, during the experimental infection of Calomys callosus, was investigated. Three groups of C. callosus were infected, respectively, with parasite strains representative of three different Biodemes: Type I (Y strain), Type II (21 SF strain), and Type III (Colombian strain). For each group, normal C. callosus were also used as controls. Marked differences have been detected in the responses of C. callosus to the infection with the three strains in this model. The strains Types I and II (Y and 21 SF) determined moderate lesions, mostly in the myocardium, with low parasitism, a rapid course, and total regression of the lesions by the 60th day of infection. Differently, Type III strain (Colombian), was more pathogenic for C. callosus and induced necrotic-inflammatory lesions in skeletal muscles and myocardium, in correspondence to intracellular parasitism. Proliferation of fibroblasts and amorphous matrix deposits, followed by interstitial fibrosis were present. Progressive regression of the inflammatory changes and collagen deposits occurred spontaneously. The progression and regression of both inflammation and fibrosis induced by the Colombian strain were further submitted to quantitative evaluation by morphometry. Results of the morphometric studies presented good correlation with the histopathological findings. The results confirm the importance of the different biodemes in the determination of tissue lesions and the peculiarities of response of C. callosus to infection with T. cruzi.

  19. Soluble CD4 blocks the infectivity of diverse strains of HIV and SIV for T cells and monocytes but not for brain and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Clapham, P R; Weber, J N; Whitby, D; McIntosh, K; Dalgleish, A G; Maddon, P J; Deen, K C; Sweet, R W; Weiss, R A

    1989-01-26

    The CD4 antigen has been subverted as a receptor by the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV). Several groups have reported that recombinant, soluble forms of the CD4 molecule (sCD4) block the infection of T lymphocytes by HIV-1, as CD4 binds the HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, with high affinity. We now report that sCD4 blocks diverse strains of HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV, but is less effective for HIV-2. The blocking effect is apparent even after adsorption of virions to CD4 cells. Soluble CD4 prevents HIV infection of T-lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cell lines, but neither sCD4 nor anti-CD4 antibodies inhibit infection of glioma and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence for the Type Strain Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BR, a Strictly Anaerobic, Moderately Thermophilic, and Nitrate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Abin, Christopher A; Hollibaugh, James T

    2016-11-10

    Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BR(T) was isolated from calcite-rich, metalliferous core samples collected at the Rainbow deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we report the 2.2-Mb draft genome sequence for this strain, consisting of 100 contigs with a G+C content of 33.6% and 2,227 protein-coding sequences. Copyright © 2016 Abin and Hollibaugh.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence for the Type Strain Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BR, a Strictly Anaerobic, Moderately Thermophilic, and Nitrate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Abin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Vulcanibacillus modesticaldus BRT was isolated from calcite-rich, metalliferous core samples collected at the Rainbow deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we report the 2.2-Mb draft genome sequence for this strain, consisting of 100 contigs with a G+C content of 33.6% and 2,227 protein-coding sequences. PMID:27834704

  2. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... that affect the muscles (such as trichinosis or toxoplasmosis ) Inherited muscle disorders such as muscular dystrophy or ... nodosa Polymyalgia rheumatica Polymyositis - adult Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Toxoplasmosis Trichinosis Review Date 7/21/2016 Updated by: ...

  3. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  4. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  5. Residual strains in conduit arteries.

    PubMed

    Rachev, A; Greenwald, S E

    2003-05-01

    Residual strains and stresses are those that exist in a body when all external loads are removed. Residual strains in arteries can be characterized by the opening angle of the sector-like cross-section which arises when an unloaded ring segment is radially cut. A review of experimental methods for measuring residual strains and the main results about the variation of the opening angle with arterial localization, age, smooth muscle activity, mechanical environment and certain vascular pathologies are presented and discussed. It is shown that, in addition to their well-established ability to homogenize the stress field in the arterial wall, residual strains make arteries more compliant and thereby improve their performance as elastic reservoirs and ensure more effective local control of the arterial lumen by smooth muscle cells. Finally, evidence that, in some cases, residual strains remain in arteries even after they have been cut radially is discussed.

  6. Morphology of moderator bands (septomarginal trabecula) in porcine heart ventricles.

    PubMed

    Gulyaeva, A S; Roshchevskaya, I M

    2012-10-01

    The morphology of moderator bands in both heart ventricular cavities was examined on macro- and microscopic levels in 14 six-month-old Landrace pigs. One transverse moderator band, measuring 2.9 ± 0.6 mm in diameter, was located between the septum and the free wall of the right ventricular cavity. On cross-section, clumps of conductive cells were found at the periphery of the moderator band and in its central part around the blood vessels. Large amounts of muscle fibres were identified. The left ventricular cavity contained moderator bands in the form of thin cords, measuring 1.05 ± 0.09 mm in diameter and located mostly between the interventricular septum and the papillary muscles. Conductive tissue was represented by clumps of Purkinje cells, surrounded by myocardial fibres. The proportion of conductive cells and muscle fibres in the moderator bands was approximately the same. Owing to different amounts of conductive cells and muscle fibres in the bands, we assume that moderator bands in the right and left ventricles play different primary functional roles. Our results were compared with previous data on pigs and other ungulate animal species.

  7. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  8. Generalized Model of a Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shil'ko, S. V.; Chernous, D. A.; Bondarenko, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    A new phenomenological model of a skeletal muscle consisting of a contractile and two nonlinear viscoelastic elements is proposed. The corresponding system of differential equations of the model is obtained, which allows one to derive time-dependent relations between the axial stress and the longitudinal strain in passive and activated states of the muscle. Methods for determining the viscoelastic and functional characteristics of the muscle as input parameters of the equations mentioned above are developed. These methods are based on the joint application of known experimental relations for a single muscle fiber and the results of muscle indentation in vivo on a "Miometer UT 98-01" device.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of laryngeal posturing muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo

    2003-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of canine laryngeal muscles were measured in a series of in vitro experiments. Laryngeal posturing that controls vocal fold length and adduction/abduction is an essential component of the voice production. The dynamics of posturing depends on the viscoelastic and physiological properties of the laryngeal muscles. The time-dependent and nonlinear behaviors of these tissues are also crucial in the voice production and pitch control theories. The lack of information on some of these muscles such as posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA), lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA), and intraarytenoid muscle (IA) was the major incentive for this study. Samples of PCA and LCA muscles were made from canine larynges and mounted on a dual-servo system (Ergometer) as described in our previous works. Two sets of experiments were conducted on each muscle, a 1-Hz stretch and release experiment that provides stress-strain data and a stress relaxation test. Data from these muscles were fitted to viscoelastic models and Young's modulus and viscoelastic constants are obtained for each muscle. Preliminary data indicates that elastics properties of these muscles are similar to those of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. The relaxation response of these muscles also shows some similarity to other laryngeal muscles in terms of time constants.

  10. Moderate Load Eccentric Exercise; A Distinct Novel Training Modality

    PubMed Central

    Hoppeler, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years a number of studies have been published using progressive eccentric exercise protocols on motorized ergometers or similar devices that allow for controlled application of eccentric loads. Exercise protocols ramp eccentric loads over an initial 3 weeks period in order to prevent muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness. Final training loads reach 400–500 W in rehabilitative settings and over 1200 W in elite athletes. Training is typically carried out three times per week for durations of 20–30 min. This type of training has been characterizes as moderate load eccentric exercise. It has also been denoted RENEW (Resistance Exercise via Negative Eccentric Work by LaStayo et al., 2014). It is distinct from plyometric exercises (i.e., drop jumps) that impose muscle loads of several thousand Watts on muscles and tendons. It is also distinct from eccentric overload training whereby loads in a conventional strength training setting are increased in the eccentric phase of the movement to match concentric loads. Moderate load eccentric exercise (or RENEW) has been shown to be similarly effective as conventional strength training in increasing muscle strength and muscle volume. However, as carried out at higher angular velocities of joint movement, it reduces joint loads. A hallmark of moderate load eccentric exercise is the fact that the energy requirements are typically 4-fold smaller than in concentric exercise of the same load. This makes moderate load eccentric exercise training the tool of choice in medical conditions with limitations in muscle energy supply. The use and effectiveness of moderate load eccentric exercise has been demonstrated mostly in small scale studies for cardiorespiratory conditions, sarcopenia of old age, cancer, diabetes type 2, and neurological conditions. It has also been used effectively in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries of the locomotor system in particular the rehabilitation after anterior

  11. Moderate Load Eccentric Exercise; A Distinct Novel Training Modality.

    PubMed

    Hoppeler, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years a number of studies have been published using progressive eccentric exercise protocols on motorized ergometers or similar devices that allow for controlled application of eccentric loads. Exercise protocols ramp eccentric loads over an initial 3 weeks period in order to prevent muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness. Final training loads reach 400-500 W in rehabilitative settings and over 1200 W in elite athletes. Training is typically carried out three times per week for durations of 20-30 min. This type of training has been characterizes as moderate load eccentric exercise. It has also been denoted RENEW (Resistance Exercise via Negative Eccentric Work by LaStayo et al., 2014). It is distinct from plyometric exercises (i.e., drop jumps) that impose muscle loads of several thousand Watts on muscles and tendons. It is also distinct from eccentric overload training whereby loads in a conventional strength training setting are increased in the eccentric phase of the movement to match concentric loads. Moderate load eccentric exercise (or RENEW) has been shown to be similarly effective as conventional strength training in increasing muscle strength and muscle volume. However, as carried out at higher angular velocities of joint movement, it reduces joint loads. A hallmark of moderate load eccentric exercise is the fact that the energy requirements are typically 4-fold smaller than in concentric exercise of the same load. This makes moderate load eccentric exercise training the tool of choice in medical conditions with limitations in muscle energy supply. The use and effectiveness of moderate load eccentric exercise has been demonstrated mostly in small scale studies for cardiorespiratory conditions, sarcopenia of old age, cancer, diabetes type 2, and neurological conditions. It has also been used effectively in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries of the locomotor system in particular the rehabilitation after anterior cruciate

  12. The Relationship of Coping Resources to Occupational Stress and Strain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osipow, Samuel H.; Davis, Anne S.

    1988-01-01

    Conducted a field study using the Osipow and Spokane (1983) scales to test the relationship of coping resources as moderators to stress-strain relationships. Found role overload to be the most significant source of strain but that coping resources contributed to moderating this and other stress-strain relationships. (Author/KS)

  13. Managerial Stress and Strain in a Mining Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, James F.; Axelrod, Wendy L.

    1977-01-01

    Measures of job stress and strain were obtained from 95 management level employees in an underground mine. In addition, 13 potential moderators of stress-strain relations were assessed. Findings indicated that such stresses had moderate to high relationships with the psychological strains of anxiety. (Author)

  14. Hamstring strain injuries: factors that lead to injury and re-injury.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are common in a number of sports and incidence rates have not declined in recent times. Additionally, the high rate of recurrent injuries suggests that our current understanding of HSI and re-injury risk is incomplete. Whilst the multifactoral nature of HSIs is agreed upon by many, often individual risk factors and/or causes of injury are examined in isolation. This review aims to bring together the causes, risk factors and interventions associated with HSIs to better understand why HSIs are so prevalent. Running is often identified as the primary activity type for HSIs and given the high eccentric forces and moderate muscle strain placed on the hamstrings during running these factors are considered to be part of the aetiology of HSIs. However, the exact causes of HSIs remain unknown and whilst eccentric contraction and muscle strain purportedly play a role, accumulated muscle damage and/or a single injurious event may also contribute. Potentially, all of these factors interact to varying degrees depending on the injurious activity type (i.e. running, kicking). Furthermore, anatomical factors, such as the biarticular organization, the dual innervations of biceps femoris (BF), fibre type distribution, muscle architecture and the degree of anterior pelvic tilt, have all been implicated. Each of these variables impact upon HSI risk via a number of different mechanisms that include increasing hamstring muscle strain and altering the susceptibility of the hamstrings to muscle damage. Reported risk factors for HSIs include age, previous injury, ethnicity, strength imbalances, flexibility and fatigue. Of these, little is known, definitively, about why previous injury increases the risk of future HSIs. Nevertheless, interventions put in place to reduce the incidence of HSIs by addressing modifiable risk factors have focused primarily on increasing eccentric strength, correcting strength imbalances and improving flexibility. The response to

  15. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  16. Moderate views of abortion.

    PubMed

    Sumner, L W

    1997-01-01

    This essay offers a moderate view of abortion that imposes a time limit for unrestricted abortion and specific indications for later abortions. The introduction notes that the discussion will provide a defense for this policy based on a moral analysis but that other options for moderates, especially options provided by freestanding views (the defense of which does not rest on any prior commitment about the morality of abortion), will also be considered. The next section considers the moral status of the fetus grounded in a criterion of moral standing that stipulates the necessary characteristics to achieve moral standing. This discussion concludes that a fetus acquires moral standing only when it becomes sentient. Section 3 moves the argument from ethics to politics to prove that a moderate policy must place no limitations on abortion before the time the fetus becomes sentient because before that time the fetus has no interest for the state to protect. The final section notes that some pro-choice advocates may be happier with the moderate policy proposed than with its controversial defense based on the moral status of the fetus and that another defense of a moderate policy could be based on a finding that the ethical issue can not be decided and that no view about abortion ethics is more reasonable than any other. The essay concludes that the ethical debate is ultimately unavoidable.

  17. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Tudor, J.J.

    1963-08-01

    An improved moderator structure for nuclear reactors consists of moderator blocks arranged in horizontal layers to form a multiplicity of vertically stacked columns of blocks. The blocks in each vertical column are keyed together, and a ceramic grid is disposed between each horizontal layer of blocks. Pressure plates cover- the lateral surface of the moderator structure in abutting relationship with the peripheral terminal lengths of the ceramic grids. Tubular springs are disposed between the pressure plates and a rigid external support. The tubular springs have their axes vertically disposed to facilitate passage of coolant gas through the springs and are spaced apart a selected distance such that at sonae preselected point of spring deflection, the sides of the springs will contact adjacent springs thereby causing a large increase in resistance to further spring deflection. (AEC)

  18. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  19. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogeneis imperfecta mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J. Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J.; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (Po, Po/mg and Po/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased Po and an inability to sustain Po for the 300 ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. PMID:20619344

  20. Muscle fibre recruitment can respond to the mechanics of the muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M; Uehli, Katrin; Rozitis, Antra I

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the motor unit recruitment patterns between and within muscles of the triceps surae during cycling on a stationary ergometer at a range of pedal speeds and resistances. Muscle activity was measured from the soleus (SOL), medial gastrocnemius (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) using surface electromyography (EMG) and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. Muscle fascicle strain rates were quantified using ultrasonography, and the muscle–tendon unit lengths were calculated from the segmental kinematics. The EMG intensities showed that the body uses the SOL relatively more for the higher-force, lower-velocity contractions than the MG and LG. The EMG spectra showed a shift to higher frequencies at faster muscle fascicle strain rates for MG: these shifts were independent of the level of muscle activity, the locomotor load and the muscle fascicle strain. These results indicated that a selective recruitment of the faster motor units occurred within the MG muscle in response to the increasing muscle fascicle strain rates. This preferential recruitment of the faster fibres for the faster tasks indicates that in some circumstances motor unit recruitment during locomotion can match the contractile properties of the muscle fibres to the mechanical demands of the contraction. PMID:16849250

  1. Moderators and Subgroups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, William A.

    1978-01-01

    The author suggests that it is more efficient to cluster subjects on the basis of their profiles across several dimensions of significance and to seek "between" subgroup correlates, than to search for a moderator variable "within" levels of which criterion relationships may vary in nonrandom fashion. (Author/RK)

  2. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  3. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  4. Factors in delayed muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Abraham, W M

    1977-01-01

    The possible causes of delayed muscle soreness which occur 24 to 48 hr after exercise were examined from three different approaches, each designed to test an existing hypothesis. Surface electromyograms were used to evaluate the muscle spasm theory; the possibility of actual muscle cell damage was monitored by the presence of myoglobinuria, while the ratio of hydroxyproline/creatinine (OHP/Cr) in 24 hr urine collection was used as a marker for connective tissue involvement. In the first study, although all volunteers developed muscle soreness 24 and 48 hr after exercise, no change in the EMG activity of the sore muscles was observed. Myoglobin excretion was found in 88% of the subjects who developed soreness. However, in a second study, 92% of the subject who performed both moderate and heavy exercise but did not develop muscle soreness had myoglobinuria. In contrast, during a third experiment subjects on gelatin-free diets showed an increase (P less than .1) in the OHP/Cr between control (.020+/-.001) and 48 hr post-exercise (.002+/-.001, X+/-SE). Soreness resulted in all cases. When the OHP/Cr value is taken for the day of maximal soreness, the post-exercise mean increases to .024+/-.001 and the level of significance rises (P less than .005). These observations support the concept that exercise induced soreness may be related to disruption of the connective tissue elements in the muscle and/or their attachments.

  5. The role of passive muscle stiffness in symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M P; Connolly, D A; Eston, R G; Kremenic, I J; Nicholas, S J; Gleim, G W

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether passive stiffness of an eccentrically exercising muscle group affects the subsequent symptoms of muscle damage. Passive hamstring muscle stiffness was measured during an instrumented straight-leg-raise stretch in 20 subjects (11 men and 9 women) who were subsequently classified as "stiff" (N = 7), "normal" (N = 6), or "compliant" (N = 7). Passive stiffness was 78% higher in the stiff subjects (36.2 +/- 3.3 N.m.rad(-1)) compared with the compliant subjects (20.3 +/- 1.8 N.m.rad(-1)). Subjects then performed six sets of 10 isokinetic (2.6 rad.s(-1)) submaximal (60% maximal voluntary contraction) eccentric actions of the hamstring muscle group. Symptoms of muscle damage were documented by changes in isometric hamstring muscle strength, pain, muscle tenderness, and creatine kinase activity on the following 3 days. Strength loss, pain, muscle tenderness, and creatine kinase activity were significantly greater in the stiff compared with the compliant subjects on the days after eccentric exercise. Greater symptoms of muscle damage in subjects with stiffer hamstring muscles are consistent with the sarcomere strain theory of muscle damage. The present study provides experimental evidence of an association between flexibility and muscle injury. Muscle stiffness and its clinical correlate, static flexibility, are risk factors for more severe symptoms of muscle damage after eccentric exercise.

  6. Structural alterations of skeletal muscle in copd

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sunita; Brooks, Dina; Carvalho, Celso R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease associated with a systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral muscle dysfunction has been well characterized in individuals with COPD and results from a complex interaction between systemic and local factors. Objective: In this narrative review, we will describe muscle wasting in people with COPD, the associated structural changes, muscle regenerative capacity and possible mechanisms for muscle wasting. We will also discuss how structural changes relate to impaired muscle function and mobility in people with COPD. Key Observations: Approximately 30–40% of individuals with COPD experience muscle mass depletion. Furthermore, muscle atrophy is a predictor of physical function and mortality in this population. Associated structural changes include a decreased proportion and size of type-I fibers, reduced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial density mainly in the quadriceps. Observations related to impaired muscle regenerative capacity in individuals with COPD include a lower proportion of central nuclei in the presence or absence of muscle atrophy and decreased maximal telomere length, which has been correlated with reduced muscle cross-sectional area. Potential mechanisms for muscle wasting in COPD may include excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered amino acid metabolism and lower expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma-coactivator 1-alpha mRNA. Despite a moderate relationship between muscle atrophy and function, impairments in oxidative metabolism only seems weakly related to muscle function. Conclusion: This review article demonstrates the cellular modifications in the peripheral muscle of people with COPD and describes the evidence of its relationship to muscle function. Future research will focus on rehabilitation strategies to improve muscle wasting and maximize function. PMID:24678302

  7. Traumatic injuries: office treatment of strain.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A J

    1977-03-01

    Strain, defined as trauma to a musculotendinous unit, is characterized by pain, muscle spasm, swelling, and loss of range of motion. Conservative treatment consists of rest and elevation of the affected muscle, application of ice and compression, active and passive stretching, and resisted motion exercises. If rupture of muscle and fascia is extensive, surgery may be required. Chronic strain may result from repeated injuries. It is usually treated with rest and administration of an anti-inflammatory agent, such as oxyphenbutazone or a corticosteroid preparation. In the event that this regimen does not provide relief from pain and disability, surgery may be necessary.

  8. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle abscess , polio , Rocky Mountain spotted ... enzymes (creatine kinase) and possibly a test for Lyme disease or a connective tissue disorder Physical therapy ...

  9. Getting Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscular as a superhero or your favorite professional athlete? Well, the big muscles you're thinking about ... Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes are grownups, whose bodies are different from kids' ...

  10. Ultrasound strain zero-crossing elasticity measurement in assessment of renal allograft cortical hardness: a preliminary observation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether ultrasound strain zero-crossing elasticity measurement can be used to discriminate moderate cortical fibrosis or inflammation in renal allografts, we prospectively assessed cortical hardness with quasi-static ultrasound elastography in 38 renal transplant patients who underwent kidney biopsy from January 2013 to June 2013. With the Banff score criteria for renal cortical fibrosis as gold standard, 38 subjects were divided into two groups: group 1 (n = 18) with ≤25% cortical fibrosis and group 2 (n = 20) with >26% cortical fibrosis. We then divided this population again into group 3 (n = 20) with ≤ 25% inflammation and group 4 (n = 18) with >26% inflammation based on the Banff score for renal parenchyma inflammation. To estimate renal cortical hardness in both population divisions, we propose an ultrasound strain relative zero-crossing elasticity measurement (ZC) method. In this technique, the relative return to baseline, that is zero strain, of strain in the renal cortex is compared with that of strain in reference soft tissue (between the abdominal wall and pelvic muscles). Using the ZC point on the reference strain decompression slope as standard, we determined when cortical strain crossed zero during decompression. ZC was negative when cortical strain did not return or returned after the reference, whereas ZC was positive when cortical strain returned ahead of the reference. Fisher's exact test was used to examine the significance of differences in ZC between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4. The accuracy of ZC in determining moderate cortical fibrosis and moderate inflammation was examined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The intra-class correlation coefficient and analysis of variance were used to test inter-rater reliability and reproducibility. ZC had good inter-observer agreement (ICC = 0.912) and reproducibility (p = 0.979). ZCs were negative in 18 of 18 cases in group 1 and positive in 19 of 20 cases in

  11. Factors related to postmenopausal muscle performance: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Sirola, Joonas; Rikkonen, Toni; Kröger, Heikki; Honkanen, Risto; Tuppurainen, Marjo; Airaksinen, Olavi; Saarikoski, Seppo

    2004-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate cross-sectionally the association of postmenopausal muscle strength with simple performance tests. A random sample of 1,166 naturally postmenopausal women (born 1932-1941) was selected from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention (OSTPRE) study cohort. Grip and quadriceps strength were measured with strain gauge dynamometers and reported in both absolute values (KPa and kg) and per kilogram of body mass (N cm(-2) kg(-1) and N kg(-1)). In addition, two performance tests, 'ability to stand on one foot' and 'ability to squat down to touch the floor' were carried out. A five-category self-assessment of overall health ('very good', 'good', 'moderate', 'bad', and 'very bad') was obtained by postal questionnaire. The women that were able to stand on one foot and able to squat down to touch the floor had greater grip and quadriceps strength than their counterparts ( P<0.001 and P<0.03 in ANOVA, respectively). In addition, self-assessed health had a strong positive association with muscle strength in the grip and leg extensor muscles in ANOVA ( P<0.001 between 'very good' and 'moderate' or poorer state of health) and regression model ( P<0.001). Adjustment for age, duration of menopause, body mass, height, physical activity level, use of HRT, and number of diseases and medications did not change any of the main effects. Also, there were no differences in results between absolute measurement values and values reported per kilogram of body mass. According to the present study, a simple performance test may be useful in the prediction of postmenopausal muscle strength. Furthermore, self-assessed state of health is strongly associated with muscle strength in postmenopausal women.

  12. Passive mechanical properties of human gastrocnemius muscle tendon units, muscle fascicles and tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoang, P D; Herbert, R D; Todd, G; Gorman, R B; Gandevia, S C

    2007-12-01

    This study provides the first in vivo measures of the passive length-tension properties of relaxed human muscle fascicles and their tendons. A new method was used to derive passive length-tension properties of human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon units from measures of ankle stiffness obtained at a range of knee angles. Passive length-tension curves of the muscle-tendon unit were then combined with ultrasonographic measures of muscle fascicle length and pennation to determine passive length-tension curves of the muscle fascicles and tendons. Mean slack lengths of the fascicles, tendons and whole muscle-tendon units were 3.3+/-0.5 cm, 39.5+/-1.6 cm and 42.3+/-1.5 cm, respectively (means +/- s.d., N=6). On average, the muscle-tendon units were slack (i.e. their passive tension was zero) over the shortest 2.3+/-1.2 cm of their range. With combined changes of knee and ankle angles, the maximal increase in length of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit above slack length was 6.7+/-1.9 cm, of which 52.4+/-11.7% was due to elongation of the tendon. Muscle fascicles and tendons underwent strains of 86.4+/-26.8% and 9.2+/-4.1%, respectively, across the physiological range of lengths. We conclude that the relaxed human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit falls slack over about one-quarter of its in vivo length and that muscle fascicle strains are much greater than tendon strains. Nonetheless, because the tendons are much longer than the muscle fascicles, tendons contribute more than half of the total compliance of the muscle-tendon unit.

  13. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects.

  14. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  15. How do people define moderation?

    PubMed

    vanDellen, Michelle R; Isherwood, Jennifer C; Delose, Julie E

    2016-06-01

    Eating in moderation is considered to be sound and practical advice for weight maintenance or prevention of weight gain. However, the concept of moderation is ambiguous, and the effect of moderation messages on consumption has yet to be empirically examined. The present manuscript examines how people define moderate consumption. We expected that people would define moderate consumption in ways that justified their current or desired consumption rather than view moderation as an objective standard. In Studies 1 and 2, moderate consumption was perceived to involve greater quantities of an unhealthy food (chocolate chip cookies, gummy candies) than perceptions of how much one should consume. In Study 3, participants generally perceived themselves to eat in moderation and defined moderate consumption as greater than their personal consumption. Furthermore, definitions of moderate consumption were related to personal consumption behaviors. Results suggest that the endorsement of moderation messages allows for a wide range of interpretations of moderate consumption. Thus, we conclude that moderation messages are unlikely to be effective messages for helping people maintain or lose weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The moderating effects of religiosity on the relationship between stressful life events and delinquent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Morris, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that many forms of strain are positively related to delinquency. Evidence also suggests that religiosity buffers the effects of strain on offending, but this issue requires further research. Using data from a national sample of adolescents, this study examined whether or not religiosity conditioned the relationship between strain and delinquency. This study also looked at the ability of social support, self-esteem, and depression to moderate the influence of strain on delinquent behavior. The findings here lend support to general strain theory in that strain had a direct positive effect on delinquency, yet there was little evidence that the relationship was moderated by religiosity or other conditioning variables. The roles of moderating variables on strain across genders were also considered. PMID:19122862

  17. The moderating effects of religiosity on the relationship between stressful life events and delinquent behavior.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew C; Morris, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that many forms of strain are positively related to delinquency. Evidence also suggests that religiosity buffers the effects of strain on offending, but this issue requires further research. Using data from a national sample of adolescents, this study examined whether or not religiosity conditioned the relationship between strain and delinquency. This study also looked at the ability of social support, self-esteem, and depression to moderate the influence of strain on delinquent behavior. The findings here lend support to general strain theory in that strain had a direct positive effect on delinquency, yet there was little evidence that the relationship was moderated by religiosity or other conditioning variables. The roles of moderating variables on strain across genders were also considered.

  18. Exercise dose response in muscle.

    PubMed

    Duscha, B D; Annex, B H; Johnson, J L; Huffman, K; Houmard, J; Kraus, W E

    2012-03-01

    Exercise increases peak VO2 partially through muscle adaptations. However, understanding muscle adaptations related to exercise dose is incomplete. This study investigated exercise training dose on capillaries per fiber and capillaries per area; and citrate synthase from vastus lateralis and related both to changes in peak VO2. This randomized trial compared 3 exercise doses: low amount-moderate intensity (n=40), low amount-high intensity (n=47), high amount-high intensity (n=41), and a control group (n=35). Both measures of capillary supply increased in all exercise groups (p<0.05). Low amount-high intensity and high amount-high intensity improved citrate synthase (p<0.05) and the low amount-moderate intensity citrate synthase approached significance (p=0.059). Muscle improvements were only related to improvements in peak VO2 in high amount-high intensity (citrate synthase, r=0.304; capillaries:fiber, r= - 0.318; p<0.05 and capillaries/mm2 r= - 0.310, p<0.05). These data suggest muscle adaptations occur following both low and high exercise doses, but are only related to improved peak VO2 following high amount-high intensity training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Exercise Dose Response in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Duscha, Brian D.; Annex, Brian H.; Johnson, Johanna L.; Huffman, Kim M.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Kraus, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise increases peak VO2 partially through muscle adaptations. However, understanding muscle adaptations related to exercise dose is incomplete. This study investigated exercise training dose on capillaries per fiber and capillaries per area; and citrate synthase from vastus lateralis and related both to changes in peak VO2. This randomized trial compared 3 exercise doses: low amount-moderate intensity (n = 40), low amount-high intensity (n=47 ), high amount-high intensity (n=41 ), and a control group (n=35). Both measures of capillary supply increased in all exercise groups (p<0.05). Low amount-high intensity and high amount-high intensity improved citrate synthase (p<0.05) and the low amount-moderate intensity citrate synthase approached significance (p=0.059). Muscle improvements were only related to improvements in peak VO2 in high amount-high intensity (citrate synthase, r = 0.308; capillaries: fiber, r = −0.318; p < 0.05 and capillaries/mm2 r= −0.310, p < 0.05 ). These data suggest muscle adaptations occur following both low and high exercise doses, but are only related to improved peak VO2 following high amount-high intensity training. PMID:22261824

  20. A 3D skeletal muscle model coupled with active contraction of muscle fibres and hyperelastic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Tang, C Y; Zhang, G; Tsui, C P

    2009-05-11

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of skeletal muscle which was developed to simulate active and passive non-linear mechanical behaviours of the muscle during lengthening or shortening under either quasi-static or dynamic condition. Constitutive relation of the muscle was determined by using a strain energy approach, while active contraction behaviour of the muscle fibre was simulated by establishing a numerical algorithm based on the concept of the Hill's three-element muscle model. The proposed numerical algorithm could be used to predict concentric, eccentric, isometric and isotonic contraction behaviours of the muscle. The proposed numerical algorithm and constitutive model for the muscle were derived and implemented into a non-linear large deformation finite element programme ABAQUS by using user-defined material subroutines. A number of scenarios have been used to demonstrate capability of the model for simulating both quasi-static and dynamic response of the muscle. Validation of the proposed model has been performed by comparing the simulated results with the experimental ones of frog gastrocenemius muscle deformation. The effects of the fusiform muscle geometry and fibre orientation on the stress and fibre stretch distributions of frog muscle during isotonic contraction have also been investigated by using the proposed model. The predictability of the present model for dynamic response of the muscle has been demonstrated by simulating the extension of a squid tentacle during a strike to catch prey.

  1. Sex Differences in Exercise-Induced Muscle Pain and Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Liu, Ying; Rector, R. Scott; Thomas, Tom R.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    There is uncertainty about sex differences in exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage due to several methodological weaknesses in the literature. This investigation tested the hypothesis that higher levels of exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage indicators would be found in women than men when several methodological improvements were executed in the same study. Participants (N = 33; 42% women) with an average age of 23 years (SD = 2.82) consented to participate. After a familiarization session, participants visited the laboratory before and across four days after eccentric exercise was completed to induce arm muscle pain and muscle damage. Our primary outcomes were arm pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds. However, we also measured the following indicators of muscle damage: arm girth; resting elbow extension; isometric elbow flexor strength; myoglobin (Mb); tumor necrosis factor (TNFa); interleukin 1beta (IL1b); and total nitric oxide (NO). Temporary induction of muscle damage was indicated by changes in all outcome measures except TNFa, and IL1b. In contrast to our hypotheses, women reported moderately lower and less frequent muscle pain than men. Also, women’s arm girth and Mb levels increased moderately less than men’s, but the differences were not significant. Few large sex differences were detected. PMID:23182229

  2. Artificial muscles versus natural actuators from frogs to flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Full, Robert J.; Meijer, Kenneth

    2000-06-01

    When is a human-made actuator an artificial muscle. Natural actuators in the animal kingdom vary greatly in their capacity and role. Maximum stress variety by 100-fold as does the velocity at which muscles contract. Some muscles generate near maximum force over broad strain ranges, while others function over only the narrowest ranges. Frequencies of operation range from less than 1 Hz to 1000 Hz. Mass- specific power output can reach over 250 W/kg muscle. Muscles function not simply as force generators, but as springs and dampers. Our isolated muscle experiments on insects show that some muscles function primarily as energy absorber sand have a role in control, while others are effective at power generation. At present, we are evaluating EAPs to see where these actuators fit in the functional space of nature's muscles. EAPs appear particularly promising as artificial muscles for insect-sized robots.

  3. Muscle "Building."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of constructivism in teaching human anatomy. Provides directions for constructing arm-hand and leg-foot models that include extensor and flexor muscles and that are easily and cheaply constructed. Lists resources that provide ideas for using such models depending upon the curriculum implemented in a school or the course that is…

  4. FLUID MODERATED REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-10-22

    A reactor which utilizes fissionable fuel elements in rod form immersed in a moderator or heavy water and a means of circulating the heavy water so that it may also function as a coolant to remove the heat generated by the fission of the fuel are described. In this design, the clad fuel elements are held in vertical tubes immersed in heavy water in a tank. The water is circulated in a closed system by entering near the tops of the tubes, passing downward through the tubes over the fuel elements and out into the tank, where it is drawn off at the bottom, passed through heat exchangers to give up its heat and then returned to the tops of the tubes for recirculation.

  5. Muscle conditioning and muscle injuries.

    PubMed

    Stone, M H

    1990-08-01

    Empirical and objective data suggest that muscle and connective tissue can undergo adaptations to physical training resulting in greater tissue mass and increased maximum tensile strength. These adaptations are especially apparent as a result of load bearing and resistive training. Furthermore, information is presented suggesting that pre-conditioning and in-season muscle conditioning, especially strength training, reduce injuries among athletes. Additionally, a theoretical model of training, "periodization", is offered as a method of increasing performance to maximum or optimal values while reducing overtraining and injury potential. Periodization of training can reduce overtraining potential and injury potential while optimizing performance by variation of volume, intensity, and exercise selection during a training program.

  6. Suturing of lacerations of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kragh, J F; Svoboda, S J; Wenke, J C; Ward, J A; Walters, T J

    2005-09-01

    Our aim was to compare the biomechanical properties of suturing methods to determine a better method for the repair of lacerated skeletal muscle. We tested Kessler stitches and the combination of Mason-Allen and perimeter stitches. Individual stitches were placed in the muscle belly of quadriceps femoris from a pig cadaver and were tensioned mechanically. The maximum loads and strains were measured and failure modes recorded. The mean load and strain for the Kessler stitches were significantly less than those for combination stitches. All five Kessler stitches tore out longitudinally from the muscle. All five combination stitches did not fail but successfully elongated. Our study has shown that the better method of repair for suturing muscle is the use of combination stitches.

  7. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  8. The effect of the muscle environment on the regenerative capacity of human skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jinhong; Bencze, Maximilien; Asfahani, Rowan; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Muscle stem cell transplantation is a possible treatment for muscular dystrophy. In addition to the intrinsic properties of the stem cells, the local and systemic environment plays an important role in determining the fate of the grafted cells. We therefore investigated the effect of modulating the host muscle environment in different ways (irradiation or cryoinjury or a combination of irradiation and cryoinjury) in two immunodeficient mouse strains (mdx nude and recombinase-activating gene (Rag)2-/γ chain-/C5-) on the regenerative capacity of two types of human skeletal muscle-derived stem cell (pericytes and CD133+ cells). Human skeletal muscle-derived pericytes or CD133+ cells were transplanted into muscles of either mdx nude or recombinase-activating gene (Rag)2-/γ chain-/C5- host mice. Host muscles were modulated prior to donor cell transplantation by either irradiation, or cryoinjury, or a combination of irradiation and cryoinjury. Muscles were analysed four weeks after transplantation, by staining transverse cryostat sections of grafted muscles with antibodies to human lamin A/C, human spectrin, laminin and Pax 7. The number of nuclei and muscle fibres of donor origin and the number of satellite cells of both host and donor origin were quantified. Within both host strains transplanted intra-muscularly with both donor cell types, there were significantly more nuclei and muscle fibres of donor origin in host muscles that had been modulated by cryoinjury, or irradiation+cryoinjury, than by irradiation alone. Irradiation has no additive effects in further enhancing the transplantation efficiency than cryodamage. Donor pericytes did not give rise to satellite cells. However, using CD133+ cells as donor cells, there were significantly more nuclei, muscle fibres, as well as satellite cells of donor origin in Rag2-/γ chain-/C5- mice than mdx nude mice, when the muscles were injured by either cryodamage or irradiation+cryodamage. Rag2-/γ chain-/C5- mice are a

  9. Muscle force recovery in relation to muscle oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ufland, Pierre; Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Buchheit, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of human muscle reoxygenation on force recovery following a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Ten athletes (22·9 ± 4·0 years) executed a plantar-flexion sequence including two repeated MVCs [i.e. a 30-s MVC (MVC(30)) followed by a 10-s MVC (MVC(10))] separated by 10, 30, 60, 120 or 300 s of passive recovery. A 10-min passive recovery period was allowed between each MVC sequence. This procedure was randomly repeated with two different recovery conditions: without (CON) or with (OCC) arterial occlusion of the medial gastrocnemius. During OCC, the occlusion was maintained from the end of MVC(30) to the end of MVC(10). Muscle oxygenation (Near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS, [Hb(diff) ]) was continuously measured during all MVC sequences and expressed as a percentage of the maximal changes in optical density observed during MVC(30). Maximal Torque was analysed at the start of each contraction. Torque during each MVC(10) was expressed as a percentage of the Torque during the previous MVC(30). Torque recovery was complete within 300 s after MVC(30) during CON (MVC(10) = 101·8 ± 5·0%); 88·6 ± 8·9% of the Torque was recovered during OCC (P = 0·005). There was also a moderate correlation between absolute level of muscle oxygenation and Torque (r = 0·32 (90% CI, 0·09;0·52), P = 0·02). Present findings confirm the role of human muscle oxygenation in muscular force recovery during repeated-maximal efforts. However, the correlation between absolute muscle oxygenation and force level during recovery is only moderate, suggesting that other mechanisms are likely involved in the force recovery process.

  10. Passive mechanics of muscle tendinous junction of canine diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Willy; Kelly, Neil G; Boriek, Aladin M

    2005-04-01

    The diaphragmatic muscle tendon is a biaxially loaded junction in vivo. Stress-strain relations along and transverse to the fiber directions are important in understanding its mechanical properties. We hypothesized that 1) the central tendon possesses greater passive stiffness than adjacent muscle, 2) the diaphragm muscle is anisotropic, whereas the central tendon near the junction is essentially isotropic, and 3) a gradient in passive stiffness exists as one approaches the muscle-tendinous junction (MTJ). To investigate these hypotheses, we conducted uniaxial and biaxial mechanical loading on samples of the MTJ excised from the midcostal region of dog diaphragm. We measured passive length-tension relationships of the muscle, tendon, and MTJ in the direction along the muscle fibers as well as transverse to the fibers. The MTJ was slack in the unloaded state, resulting in a J-shaped passive tension-strain curve. Generally, muscle strain was greater than that of MTJ, which was greater than tendon strain. In the muscular region, stiffness in the direction transverse to the fibers is much greater than that along the fibers. The central tendon is essentially inextensible in the direction transverse to the fibers as well as along the fibers. Our data demonstrate the existence of more pronounced anisotropy in the muscle than in the tendon near the junction. Furthermore, a gradient in muscle stiffness exists as one approaches the MTJ, consistent with the hypothesis of continuous passive stiffness across the MTJ.

  11. Electromyography of the pubococcygeus muscles in patients with obstructed defaecation.

    PubMed

    Lubowski, D Z; King, D W; Finlay, I G

    1992-12-01

    The function of the pubococcygeus muscles during defaecation straining was compared in 10 women with obstructed defaecation and 12 age-matched control subjects. Video-proctography in each patient showed failure to evacuate the rectum and sagging of the pelvic floor during attempted defaecation. Trans-perineal concentric needle electromyography in the puborectalis muscle and transvaginal electromyography in the pubococcygeus muscle was carried out during defaecation straining and during attempted rectal balloon expulsion. Contraction of the pubococcygeus muscle was observed in 10 of the 12 control subjects and in 2 of the 10 patients with obstructed defaecation (P < 0.005). Virtually equal proportions of subjects in each group showed relaxation or contraction of the puborectalis muscle during straining. There was significant perineal descent on straining in the patient group (P = 0.005). This group of patients with obstructed defaecation showed failure of the pubococcygeus muscles to contract, perhaps due to neuropathic weakness of the muscles. The puborectalis muscle did not cause obstructed defaecation in these patients, and the concept of "paradoxical" contraction of this muscle is questioned.

  12. Anisotropic compressive properties of passive porcine muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Renee; Wheatley, Benjamin B; Haut Donahue, Tammy L; Gilbrech, Ryan; Prabhu, Rajkumar; Liao, Jun; Williams, Lakiesha N

    2014-11-01

    The body has approximately 434 muscles, which makes up 40-50% of the body by weight. Muscle is hierarchical in nature and organized in progressively larger units encased in connective tissue. Like many soft tissues, muscle has nonlinear visco-elastic behavior, but muscle also has unique characteristics of excitability and contractibility. Mechanical testing of muscle has been done for crash models, pressure sore models, back pain, and other disease models. The majority of previous biomechanical studies on muscle have been associated with tensile properties in the longitudinal direction as this is muscle's primary mode of operation under normal physiological conditions. Injury conditions, particularly high rate injuries, can expose muscle to multiple stress states. Compressive stresses can lead to tissue damage, which may not be reversible. In this study, we evaluate the structure-property relationships of porcine muscle tissue under compression, in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations at 0.1 s-1, 0.01 s-1, or 0.001 s-1. Our results show an initial toe region followed by an increase in stress for muscle in both the longitudinal and transverse directions tested to 50% strain. Strain rate dependency was also observed with the higher strain rates showing significantly more stress at 50% strain. Muscle in the transverse orientation was significantly stiffer than in the longitudinal orientation indicating anisotropy. The mean area of fibers in the longitudinal orientation shows an increasing mean fiber area and a decreasing mean fiber area in the transverse orientation. Data obtained in this study can help provide insight on how muscle injuries are caused, ranging from low energy strains to high rate blast events, and can also be used in developing computational injury models.

  13. Gradients of strain and strain rate in the hollow muscular organs of soft-bodied animals

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joseph T.; Taylor, Kari R.; Gentile, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The cylindrical shape of soft-bodied invertebrates is well suited to functions in skeletal support and locomotion, but may result in a previously unrecognized cost—large non-uniformities in muscle strain and strain rate among the circular muscle fibres of the body wall. We investigated such gradients of strain and strain rate in the mantle of eight long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii and two oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana. Transmural gradients of circumferential strain were present during all jets (n = 312); i.e. for a given change in the circumference of the outer surface of the mantle, the inner surface experienced a greater proportional change. The magnitude of the difference increased with the amplitude of the mantle movement, with circular muscle fibres at the inner surface of the mantle experiencing a total range of strains up to 1.45 times greater than fibres at the outer surface during vigorous jets. Differences in strain rate between the circular fibres near the inner versus the outer surface of the mantle were also present in all jets, with the greatest differences occurring during vigorous jetting. The transmural gradients of circumferential strain and strain rate we describe probably apply not only to squids and other coleoid cephalopods, but also to diverse soft-bodied invertebrates with hollow cylindrical or conical bodies and muscular organs. PMID:20106857

  14. Gradients of strain and strain rate in the hollow muscular organs of soft-bodied animals.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joseph T; Taylor, Kari R; Gentile, Christopher

    2010-08-23

    The cylindrical shape of soft-bodied invertebrates is well suited to functions in skeletal support and locomotion, but may result in a previously unrecognized cost-large non-uniformities in muscle strain and strain rate among the circular muscle fibres of the body wall. We investigated such gradients of strain and strain rate in the mantle of eight long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii and two oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana. Transmural gradients of circumferential strain were present during all jets (n = 312); i.e. for a given change in the circumference of the outer surface of the mantle, the inner surface experienced a greater proportional change. The magnitude of the difference increased with the amplitude of the mantle movement, with circular muscle fibres at the inner surface of the mantle experiencing a total range of strains up to 1.45 times greater than fibres at the outer surface during vigorous jets. Differences in strain rate between the circular fibres near the inner versus the outer surface of the mantle were also present in all jets, with the greatest differences occurring during vigorous jetting. The transmural gradients of circumferential strain and strain rate we describe probably apply not only to squids and other coleoid cephalopods, but also to diverse soft-bodied invertebrates with hollow cylindrical or conical bodies and muscular organs.

  15. Biophysical Stimulation for Engineering Functional Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Somers, Sarah; Spector, Alexander; DiGirolamo, Douglas; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-04-12

    Tissue engineering is a promising therapeutic strategy to regenerate skeletal muscle. However, ex vivo cultivation methods typically result in a low differentiation efficiency of stem cells as well as grafts that resemble the native tissues morphologically, but lack contractile function. The application of biomimetic tensile strain provides a potent stimulus for enhancing myogenic differentiation and engineering functional skeletal muscle grafts. We reviewed integrin-dependent mechanisms that potentially link mechanotransduction pathways to the upregulation of myogenic genes. Yet, gaps in our understanding make it challenging to use these pathways to theoretically determine optimal ex vivo strain regimens. A multitude of strain protocols have been applied to in vitro cultures for the cultivation of myogenic progenitors (adipose- and bone marrow-derived stem cells & satellite cells) and transformed murine myoblasts, C2C12s. Strain regimen are characterized by orientation, amplitude, and time-dependent factors (effective frequency, duration, and the rest period between successive strain cycles). Analysis of published data has identified possible minimum/maximum values for these parameters and suggests that uniaxial strains may be more potent than biaxial strains possibly because they more closely mimic physiologic strain profiles. The application of these biophysical stimuli for engineering 3D skeletal muscle grafts is non-trivial and typically requires custom-designed bioreactors used in combination with biomaterial scaffolds. Consideration of the physical properties of these scaffolds is critical for effective transmission of the applied strains to encapsulated cells. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that biomimetic tensile strain generally results in improved myogenic outcomes in myogenic progenitors and differentiated myoblasts. However, for 3D systems, the optimization of the strain regimen may require the entire system - cells, biomaterials, and

  16. Distinct muscle fascicle length changes in feline medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles during slope walking.

    PubMed

    Maas, Huub; Gregor, Robert J; Hodson-Tole, Emma F; Farrell, Brad J; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2009-04-01

    On the basis of differences in physiology, e.g., histochemical properties and spindle density, and the structural design of the cat soleus (SO) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, we hypothesized that 1) fascicle length changes during overground walking would be both muscle and slope dependent, which would have implications for the muscles' force output as well as sensory function, and that 2) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) and fascicle length changes would be different, in which case MTU length could not be used as an indicator of muscle spindle strain. To test these hypotheses, we quantified muscle fascicle length changes and compared them with length changes of the whole MTU in the SO and MG during overground walking at various slopes (0, +/- 25, +/- 50, +75, and +100%). The SO and MG were surgically instrumented with sonomicrometry crystals and fine-wire electromyogram electrodes to measure changes in muscle fascicle length and muscle activity, respectively. MTU lengths were calculated using recorded ankle and knee joint angles and a geometric model of the hindlimb. The resultant joint moments were calculated using inverse dynamics analysis to infer muscle loading. It was found that although MTU length and velocity profiles of the SO and MG appeared similar, length changes and velocities of muscle fascicles were substantially different between the two muscles. Fascicle length changes of both SO and MG were significantly affected by slope intensity acting eccentrically in downslope walking (-25 to -50%) and concentrically in upslope walking (+25 to +100%). The differences in MTU and fascicle behaviors in both the SO and MG muscles during slope walking were explained by the three distinct features of these muscles: 1) the number of joints spanned, 2) the pennation angle, and 3) the in-series elastic component. It was further suggested that the potential role of length feedback from muscle spindles is both task and muscle dependent.

  17. Hamstring muscle kinematics and activation during overground sprinting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Queen, Robin M; Abbey, Alicia N; Liu, Yu; Moorman, Claude T; Garrett, William E

    2008-11-14

    Hamstring muscle strain injury is one of the most commonly seen injuries in sports such as track and field, soccer, football, and rugby. The purpose of this study was to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of hamstring muscle strain injuries during over ground sprinting by investigating hamstring muscle-tendon kinematics and muscle activation. Three-dimensional videographic and electromyographic (EMG) data were collected for 20 male runners, soccer or lacrosse players performing overground sprinting at their maximum effort. Hamstring muscle-tendon lengths, elongation velocities, and linear envelop EMG data were analyzed for a running gait cycle of the dominant leg. Hamstring muscles exhibited eccentric contractions during the late stance phase as well as during the late swing phase of overground sprinting. The peak eccentric contraction speeds of the hamstring muscles were significantly greater during the late swing phase than during the late stance phase (p=0.001) while the hamstring muscle-tendon lengths at the peak eccentric contraction speeds were significantly greater during the late stance phase than during the late swing phase (p=0.001). No significant differences existed in the maximum hamstring muscle-tendon lengths between the two eccentric contractions. The potential for hamstring muscle strain injury exists during the late stance phase as well as during the late swing phases of overground sprinting.

  18. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Kênia Kp; Nascimento, Lucas R; Ada, Louise; Polese, Janaine C; Avelino, Patrick R; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-07-01

    After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8), showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14) and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25); it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96) compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. PROSPERO (CRD42015020683). [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016) Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 138-144]. Copyright © 2016 Australian

  19. Muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical disability in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Andrews, James S; Trupin, Laura; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Barton, Jennifer; Margaretten, Mary; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward H; Katz, Patricia P

    2015-01-01

    Data describing relationships between muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical disability among individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are limited. The present study examines the relationship of muscle strength and muscle mass with physical disability among adult women with SLE. A total of 146 women from a longitudinal SLE cohort participated in the study. All measures were collected during an in-person research visit. Lower extremity muscle strength was assessed by peak knee torque of extension and flexion and by chair-stand time. Total lean body mass, appendicular lean mass, and fat mass (kg/m(2) ) were measured by whole-body dual x-ray absorptiometry. Self-reported physical disability was assessed using the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36) physical functioning subscale, and the Valued Life Activities (VLA) disability scale. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients tested the correlations between muscle strength, muscle mass, and disability scores. Regression analyses modeled the effect of lower extremity muscle strength and mass on SF-36 and VLA disability scores controlling for age, SLE duration, SLE disease activity measured with the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire, physical activity level, prednisone use, body composition, and depression. On all measures, reduced lower extremity muscle strength was associated with poorer SF-36 and VLA disability scores. Trends persisted after adjustment for covariates. Muscle mass was moderately correlated with muscle strength, but did not contribute significantly to adjusted regression models. Lower extremity muscle strength, but not muscle mass, was strongly associated with physical disability scores. While further studies are needed, these findings suggest that improving muscle strength may reduce physical disability among women with SLE. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Physical Disability in Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, James S.; Trupin, Laura; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Barton, Jennifer; Margaretten, Mary; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward H.; Katz, Patricia P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Limited data exist describing relationships between muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical disability among individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study examines the relationship of muscle strength and muscle mass with physical disability among adult women with SLE. Methods One hundred forty-six women from a longitudinal SLE cohort participated in the study. All measures were collected during an in-person research visit. Lower extremity muscle strength was assessed by peak knee torque of extension and flexion and by chair-stand time. Total lean body mass, appendicular lean mass, and fat mass (kg/m2) were measured by whole-body dual energy absorptiometry. Self-reported physical disability was assessed using the SF-36 Physical Functioning subscale and Valued Life Activities (VLA) Disability scale. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients tested the correlations between muscle strength, muscle mass, and disability scores. Regression analyses modeled the effect of lower extremity muscle strength and mass on SF-36 and VLA disability scores controlling for age, SLE duration, SLE disease activity measured with the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ), physical activity level, prednisone use, body composition, and depression. Results On all measures, reduced lower extremity muscle strength was associated with poorer SF-36 and VLA disability scores. Trends persisted after adjustment for covariates. Muscle mass was moderately correlated with muscle strength, but did not contribute significantly to adjusted regression models. Conclusions Lower extremity muscle strength, but not muscle mass, was strongly associated with physical disability scores. While further studies are needed, these findings suggest that improving muscle strength may reduce physical disability among women with SLE. PMID:25049114

  1. Tendinous muscle insertions (scleromuscular junctions of the recti muscles) in patients with ocular alignment problems.

    PubMed

    Todorova, M G; Palmowski-Wolfe, A M; Meyer, P

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the hypothesis whether the scleromuscular junction of extraocular recti muscle is tendinous. Muscle samples of the 41 extraocular recti muscles of 33 patients and 4 muscle-/eye-matched samples from 2 postmortem eyes, were processed for light/electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry with antibodies against desmin, smooth-muscle actin and muscle regulating proteins like myf3 and myf4 (myogenin), tenascin C and for 8 samples against collagens I to IV. Histological examination of the muscle samples confirmed a thick collagen-structured tissue, specific for muscle tendon; without appearance of muscle tissue. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with antibodies against desmin, smooth-muscle actin, myf3 and myf4 (myogenin) and for eight samples with collagens I to IV. Anti-tenascin C marker was only strongly positive in the connective tissue of the blood vessel walls. Electron microscopy demonstrated collagen bundles composed of parallel oriented fibrils with a moderate amount of ground substance. The absence of contractile fibers at the sclerotendinous junction is an entirely normal finding in humans and cannot be related to ocular alignment pathogenesis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Anisotropic properties of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sarma, P A; Pidaparti, R M; Meiss, R A

    2003-04-01

    The anisotropic (directional-dependent) properties of contracting tracheal smooth muscle tissue are estimated from a computational model based on the experimental data of length-dependent stiffness. The area changes are obtained at different muscle lengths from experiments in which stimulated muscle undergoes unrestricted shortening. Then, through an interative process, the anisotropic properties are estimated by matching the area changes obtained from the finite element analysis to those derived from the experiments. The results obtained indicate that the anisotropy ratio (longitudinal stiffness to transverse stiffness) is about 4 when the smooth muscle undergoes 70% strain shortening, indicating that the transverse stiffness reduces as the longitudinal stiffness increases. It was found through a sensitivity analysis from the simulation model that the longitudinal stiffness and the in-plane shear modulus are not very sensitive as compared to major Poisson's ratio to the area changes of the muscle tissue. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Conceptual framework for strengthening exercises to prevent hamstring strains.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    High-speed running accounts for the majority of hamstring strains in many sports. The terminal swing phase is believed to be the most hazardous as the hamstrings are undergoing an active lengthening contraction in a long muscle length position. Prevention-based strength training mainly focuses on eccentric exercises. However, it appears crucial to integrate other parameters than the contraction type. Therefore, the aim of this study is to present a conceptual framework based on six key parameters (contraction type, load, range of motion, angular velocity, uni-/bilateral exercises, kinetic chain) for the hamstring's strength exercise for strain prevention. Based on the biomechanical parameters of sprinting, it is proposed to use high-load eccentric contractions. The movement should be performed at a slow to moderate angular velocity and focused at the knee joint, while the hip is kept in a large flexion position in order to reach a greater elongation stress of the hamstrings than in the terminal swing phase. In this way, we believe that, during sprinting, athletes would be better trained to brake the knee extension effectively in the whole range of motion without overstretch of the hamstrings. Finally, based on its functional application, unilateral open kinetic chain should be preferred.

  4. Thermal limits of men in moderate to heavy work in tropical farming.

    PubMed

    Nag, Pranab Kumar; Nag, Anjali; Ashtekar, Shirish Pratap

    2007-01-01

    The farmers in tropical climate are exposed to high heat during the summer months. The study examined the physiological strains of farmers (N=26) to six combined exposures of work and high heat, with moderate and heavy work (26 to 50%, and 51 to 75% VO(2max)) and three ambient conditions, i.e., 34.4 to 42.2 degrees C WBGT (inside) in an environmental chamber. While the cardio-respiratory responses and Tcr were predominantly influenced by the work severity (p<0.001), the environmental warmth greatly influenced the sweating response (p<0.001). The importance was placed on the segmental Tsk as the first rank indicator of the bodily heat strain. Both the environmental warmth and work severity had independent discernable effects on the dynamic equilibrium of the central and peripheral mechanism to regulate the body temperature. The segmental and compartmental (core, muscle, fat and skin) heat balance analysis indicated the span of convergence of the segmental core and muscle temperatures to the divergence of skin and fat temperatures (CORE-SHELL) as a quantitative estimate of the segmental gradient for heat transfer. The summation of heat exchange across the compartments and segments yielded the transient change in Tcr (0.06 to 0.12 degrees C/min), with significant difference between the moderate and heavy work. The Tcr of 39 degrees C was taken as the limit of tolerance for the farmers, and by defining the criteria limit of Tcr of approximately 2.5 degrees C gradient from the basal Tcr and the rate of change in Tcr, the tolerance times were estimated. Corollary to the development of ISO 7933 standard (PHS index), the predictions of tolerance times from the transient change in Tcr or the exponential relationship with the WBGT (tolerance time, min = 1,841 e (-0.103 WBGT)) were useful to suggest the protective limit for men at work in extremely hot environment. The simplicity of prediction lies in using WBGT as a criterion. The exponential equation estimated the tolerance

  5. POPLITEUS STRAIN WITH CONCURRENT DELTOID LIGAMENT SPRAIN IN AN ELITE SOCCER ATHLETE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Josh; Tarnay, Lorena; Silvers, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report (Differential diagnosis) Background and Purpose: Differential diagnosis of knee pathology after trauma may be difficult when diagnosing an isolated popliteus strain and concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain. Upon a thorough search of the published literature, the authors found no reports delineating a popliteus strain in professional soccer in the United States. The joints most affected by injury in soccer players are the knee and ankle joints. The purpose of this case report is to describe the presentation of and difficulties encountered in diagnosing a popliteus strain in a Major League Soccer athlete. Case Description: During an in-season away game, an outside defender was slide-tackled from behind when his right shank was caught in an externally rotated position underneath himself and the opposing player. The initial point of contact was made to the proximal third of the posterior right shank with an anteromedially directed force. The medial longitudinal arch of the foot was forced into a more midfoot pronated position and the subtalar joint was forced into eversion. Diagnosis: The athlete was diagnosed with a moderate strain of the right popliteus muscle with a concurrent medial deltoid ligament sprain of the right ankle. This mechanism of injury, pain with passive knee flexion and internal rotation during McMurray's test, pain with Garrick's Test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study confirmed the diagnosis. The athlete returned to full ninety-minute game participation after an intensive 15-day rehabilitation program. Discussion: This case is unique because the injury manifested itself at multiple joints and specifically involved the popliteus muscle. The mechanism of injury can be associated with many other soft tissue injuries to the knee, and thus, may not lead the clinician initially to consider the diagnosis of a popliteus strain. Diagnosis of this entity may be difficult due to the possible shared attachment of the

  6. Cutoffs of isokinetic strength ratio and hamstring strain prediction in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Dauty, M; Menu, P; Fouasson-Chailloux, A

    2017-04-04

    Hamstring strain injuries frequently occur during professional soccer practice. Low hamstring strength represents an intrinsic modifiable risk factor but cutoffs of isokinetic knee strength ratios are controversial to predict hamstring strain in professional soccer players. We aimed to predict hamstring strain in accordance with cutoffs of isokinetic knee strength ratios. Bilateral, conventional, and functional isokinetic strength ratios were calculated in 194 professional soccer players at the beginning of 15 consecutive seasons. 36 soccer players presented a moderate hamstring strain and 158 were not injured. The different calculated isokinetic ratios were compared with the right and left limb of the uninjured population. Different usual cutoffs were tested: at 0.85 and 0.90 for the bilateral concentric and eccentric hamstring-to-hamstring ratio, at 0.60 and 0.47 for the conventional hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio and at 0.80 and 1 for the mixed hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. The specific ratios for the studied population were also determined by the 10th percentile and then tested. Hamstring strain prediction was established in terms of odds ratios. No cutoff with bilateral, conventional, or functional isokinetic strength ratio was predictive of hamstring strain after univariate analysis. Specific cutoffs determined from the studied population were not more predictive. Very few injured soccer players presented values under the cutoffs at 0.47 for the conventional ratio and at 0.80 for the mixed ratio. Regardless of their values, cutoffs of isokinetic strength ratios were not predictive of hamstring injuries. The use of isokinetic cutoffs is not recommended to predict hamstring muscle strain in professional soccer players. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Classification of the intrafusal muscle fibres in the frog muscle spindle: histochemical and immunofluorescent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, A; Fujitsuka, N; Sokabe, M; Naruse, K; Nomura, K; Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1990-01-01

    Intrafusal muscle fibres from bull-frog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were classified into three types using the histochemical, immunofluorescent and morphological characteristics, with reference to the extrafusal muscle fibres, which were classified into five types in accordance with Rowlerson & Spurway (1988). Immunofluorescent reactions with antibodies against slow or fast myosins obtained from anterior or posterior latissimus dorsi muscles (ALD or PLD), respectively, of chicken were used as the primary criterion. Histochemical profiles of muscle fibres were classified into nine types of myosin ATPase activity as the secondary criterion. Anti-PLD intrafusal fibres (polar zone) with ATPase profiles of moderate to high acid and alkaline stabilities correspond to large nuclear bag fibres in the classification of Diwan & Ito (1989), whereas anti-ALD fibres (polar zone) with alkaline-labile ATPase profiles correspond to medium nuclear bag fibres. On the basis of diameter, anti-PLD fibres (polar zone) with ATPase profiles of moderate to low acid stability and moderate to high alkaline stability seem to correspond to two types of small nuclear chain fibre. Variations between muscles, between intra- and extrafusal fibres and also between zones along intrafusal fibres are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:2148748

  8. Neuromuscular alterations during walking in persons with moderate knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hubley-Kozey, C L; Deluzio, K J; Landry, S C; McNutt, J S; Stanish, W D

    2006-08-01

    This paper compared the neuromuscular responses during walking between those with early-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) to asymptomatic controls. The rationale for studying those with mild to moderate knee OA was to determine the alterations in response to dynamic loading that might be expected before severe pain, joint space narrowing and joint surface changes occur. We used pattern recognition techniques to explore both amplitude and shape changes of the surface electromyograms recorded from seven muscles crossing the knee joint of 40 subjects with knee OA and 38 asymptomatic controls during a walking task. The principal patterns for each muscle grouping explained over 83% of the variance in the waveforms. This result supported the notion that the main neuromuscular patterns were similar between asymptomatic controls and those with OA, reflecting the specific roles of the major muscles during walking. ANOVA revealed significant (p<0.05) differences in the principal pattern scores reflecting both amplitude and shape alterations in the OA group and among muscles. These differences captured subtle changes in the neuromuscular responses of the subjects with OA throughout different phases of the gait cycle and most likely reflected changes in the mechanical environment (joint loading, instability) and pain. The subjects with OA attempted to increase activity of the lateral sites and reduce activity in the medial sites, having minimal but prolonged activity during late stance. Therefore, alterations in neuromuscular responses were found even in this high functioning group with moderate knee OA.

  9. The role of epimysium in suturing skeletal muscle lacerations.

    PubMed

    Kragh, John F; Svoboda, Steven J; Wenke, Joseph C; Brooks, Daniel E; Bice, Terry G; Walters, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    Direct muscle trauma is a common and disabling clinical problem. Surgical muscle repair is difficult to evaluate because reliable repair techniques have not been established scientifically. The purpose of this study was to assess the biomechanical properties of epimysium, the collagenous tissue sheath that surrounds muscles in the body. We surgically repaired transected porcine muscle bellies with and without epimysium. For both groups, 25 figure-eight stitches in lacerated quadriceps bellies from a euthanatized pig were loaded under tension on a biomechanical machine (model 8521S, Instron Company). Maximum loads and strains were measured and mechanisms of failure recorded. The mean load for repairs with epimysium (25.1 N) was significantly higher (p = 0.034) than that for repairs without epimysium (21.2 N). The mean strain for repairs with epimysium (10.4%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than that for repairs without epimysium (7.3%). The mechanisms of failure were also different. Among epimysium repairs, 15 stitches avulsed muscle transversely, and 10 stitches tore out longitudinally from the muscle. In the nonepimysium group, 1 suture avulsed muscle and 24 sutures tore out. Muscle was the weakest element in each test. These data showed that epimysium incorporation into suturing improves the capacity of repairs to bear force. These findings fill a knowledge gap and may improve outcomes of muscle suturing. By focusing the experiment on biomechanical properties of muscle stitching, this study showed the key role epimysium plays in muscle suturing.

  10. Truncal muscle tonus in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, A.; Komiyama, A.; Hasegawa, O.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To elucidate the character and distribution of the abnormal muscle tonus in the body axis in progressive supranuclear palsy. Although neck hypertonus has been well described in progressive supranuclear palsy, little is known about the involvement of the truncal muscles.
METHODS—Muscle tonus of the neck and trunk was separately investigated in 13 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy by clinical examination and surface EMG during passive rotation. Muscle hypertonus was graded according to a four point scale, and subjected to statistical analysis. The results were compared with those from 13 age matched patients with Parkinson's disease and six healthy volunteers.
RESULTS—In all but one patient with progressive supranuclear palsy, there was a distinct difference in muscle tonus between the neck and trunk. A tonic shortening reaction characteristic of dystonia and an increased tonic stretch reflex (rigidity) were present in the neck muscles of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, whereas only normal to moderately increased tonus was noted in the truncal muscles (neck v trunk, shortening reaction p=0.0001; stretch reflex p=0.0241). Follow up studies disclosed an increase in axial muscle tonus with predilection for the neck in three of four patients. In the 13 patients with Parkinson's disease, however, no significant difference was found in muscle rigidity between the neck and trunk.
CONCLUSION—Mild changes in truncal muscle tonus with prominent neck dystonia and rigidity are characteristic of progressive supranuclear palsy. It is suggested that separate clinical evaluation of muscle tonus in the neck and trunk may be helpful for distinguishing progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease.

 PMID:9489529

  11. Truncal muscle tonus in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, A; Komiyama, A; Hasegawa, O

    1998-02-01

    To elucidate the character and distribution of the abnormal muscle tonus in the body axis in progressive supranuclear palsy. Although neck hypertonus has been well described in progressive supranuclear palsy, little is known about the involvement of the truncal muscles. Muscle tonus of the neck and trunk was separately investigated in 13 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy by clinical examination and surface EMG during passive rotation. Muscle hypertonus was graded according to a four point scale, and subjected to statistical analysis. The results were compared with those from 13 age matched patients with Parkinson's disease and six healthy volunteers. In all but one patient with progressive supranuclear palsy, there was a distinct difference in muscle tonus between the neck and trunk. A tonic shortening reaction characteristic of dystonia and an increased tonic stretch reflex (rigidity) were present in the neck muscles of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, whereas only normal to moderately increased tonus was noted in the truncal muscles (neck v trunk, shortening reaction p=0.0001; stretch reflex p=0.0241). Follow up studies disclosed an increase in axial muscle tonus with predilection for the neck in three of four patients. In the 13 patients with Parkinson's disease, however, no significant difference was found in muscle rigidity between the neck and trunk. Mild changes in truncal muscle tonus with prominent neck dystonia and rigidity are characteristic of progressive supranuclear palsy. It is suggested that separate clinical evaluation of muscle tonus in the neck and trunk may be helpful for distinguishing progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease.

  12. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  13. Estimation of genetic parameters for growth, carcass and overfeeding traits in a white geese strain

    PubMed Central

    Larzul, Catherine; Rouvier, Roger; Rousselot-Pailley, Daniel; Guy, Gérard

    2000-01-01

    In an experimental strain of white plumage geese created in 1989, two experiments were carried out from 1993 to 1995 in order to estimate genetic parameters for growth, and carcass composition traits in non-overfed animals, and genetic parameters for growth and fatty liver formation in overfed animals. Four hundred and thirty-one non-overfed animals were bred and slaughtered at 11 weeks of age; they were measured for forearm length, keel bone length, chest circumference and breast depth before and after slaughtering. The carcasses were partly dissected in order weigh breast, breast muscle and skin + fat, and abdominal fat. Four hundred and seventy-seven overfed animals were slaughtered at 20 weeks of age; they were measured for "paletot" (breast meat, bone and meat from wings, bone and meat from thigh and legs) weight and liver weight. In these two experiments, the weights had moderate to high heritability values. Breast depth measured on live animals showed a low heritability value. In overfed animals, liver weight showed a high heritability value. Liver weight could be increased by selection without a great effect on "paletot" weight. Thus, obtaining a white plumage geese strain for fatty liver production by selection would be difficult because only 20% of overfed animals had fatty liver. The results did not allow to conclude on the influence of selection on liver weight on carcass traits such as muscle or fatty tissue weight. PMID:14736387

  14. Muscle shortening velocity depends on tissue inertia and level of activation during submaximal contractions.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephanie A; Wakeling, James M

    2016-06-01

    In order to perform external work, muscles must do additional internal work to deform their tissue, and in particular, to overcome the inertia due to their internal mass. However, the contribution of the internal mass within a muscle to the mechanical output of that muscle has only rarely been studied. Here, we use a dynamic, multi-element Hill-type muscle model to examine the effects of the inertial mass within muscle on its contractile performance. We find that the maximum strain-rate of muscle is slower for lower activations and larger muscle sizes. As muscle size increases, the ability of the muscle to overcome its inertial load will decrease, as muscle tension is proportional to cross-sectional area and inertial load is proportional to mass. Thus, muscles that are larger in size will have a higher inertial cost to contraction. Similarly, when muscle size and inertial load are held constant, decreasing muscle activation will increase inertial cost to contraction by reducing muscle tension. These results show that inertial loads within muscle contribute to a slowing of muscle contractile velocities (strain-rates), particularly at the submaximal activations that are typical during animal locomotion.

  15. Cyclic mechanical preconditioning improves engineered muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Moon, Du Geon; Christ, George; Stitzel, Joel D; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2008-04-01

    The inability to engineer clinically relevant functional muscle tissue remains a major hurdle to successful skeletal muscle reconstructive procedures. This article describes an in vitro preconditioning protocol that improves the contractility of engineered skeletal muscle after implantation in vivo. Primary human muscle precursor cells (MPCs) were seeded onto collagen-based acellular tissue scaffolds and subjected to cyclic strain in a computer-controlled bioreactor system. Control constructs (static culture conditions) were run in parallel. Bioreactor preconditioning produced viable muscle tissue constructs with unidirectional orientation within 5 days, and in vitro-engineered constructs were capable of generating contractile responses after 3 weeks of bioreactor preconditioning. MPC-seeded constructs preconditioned in the bioreactor for 1 week were also implanted onto the latissimus dorsi muscle of athymic mice. Analysis of tissue constructs retrieved 1 to 4 weeks postimplantation showed that bioreactor-preconditioned constructs, but not statically cultured control tissues, generated tetanic and twitch contractile responses with a specific force of 1% and 10%, respectively, of that observed on native latissimus dorsi. To our knowledge, this is the largest force generated for tissue-engineered skeletal muscle on an acellular scaffold. This finding has important implications to the application of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to skeletal muscle replacement and reconstruction.

  16. Assessment of skeletal muscle fatigue of road maintenance workers based on heart rate monitoring and myotonometry

    PubMed Central

    Roja, Zenija; Kalkis, Valdis; Vain, Arved; Kalkis, Henrijs; Eglite, Maija

    2006-01-01

    Objective This research work is dedicated to occupational health problems caused by ergonomic risks. The research object was road building industry, where workers have to work very intensively, have long work hours, are working in forced/constrained work postures and overstrain during the work specific parts of their bodies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the work heaviness degree and to estimate the muscle fatigue of workers after one week work cycle. The study group consisted of 10 road construction and maintenance workers and 10 pavers aged between 20 and 60 years. Methods Physical load were analyzed by measuring heart rate (HR), work postures (OWAS) and perceived exertion (RPE). Assessments of the muscles strain and functional state (tone) were carried out using myotonometric (MYO) measurements. The reliability of the statistical processing of heart rate monitoring and myotonometry data was determined using correlating analysis. Results This study showed that that road construction and repairing works should be considered as a hard work according to average metabolic energy consumption 8.1 ± 1.5 kcal/min; paving, in its turn, was a moderately hard work according to 7.2 ± 1.1 kcal/min. Several muscle tone levels were identified allowing subdivision of workers into three conditional categories basing on muscle tone and fatigue: I – absolute muscle relaxation and ability to relax; II – a state of equilibrium, when muscles are able to adapt to the work load and are partly able to relax; and III – muscle fatigue and increased tone. It was also found out that the increase of muscle tone and fatigue mainly depend on workers physical preparedness and length of service, and less – on their age. Conclusion We have concluded that a complex ergonomic analysis consisting of heart rate monitoring, assessment of compulsive working postures and myotonometry is appropriate to assess the work heaviness degree and can provide prognosis of occupational pathology

  17. Assessment of skeletal muscle fatigue of road maintenance workers based on heart rate monitoring and myotonometry.

    PubMed

    Roja, Zenija; Kalkis, Valdis; Vain, Arved; Kalkis, Henrijs; Eglite, Maija

    2006-07-27

    This research work is dedicated to occupational health problems caused by ergonomic risks. The research object was road building industry, where workers have to work very intensively, have long work hours, are working in forced/constrained work postures and overstrain during the work specific parts of their bodies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the work heaviness degree and to estimate the muscle fatigue of workers after one week work cycle. The study group consisted of 10 road construction and maintenance workers and 10 pavers aged between 20 and 60 years. Physical load were analyzed by measuring heart rate (HR), work postures (OWAS) and perceived exertion (RPE). Assessments of the muscles strain and functional state (tone) were carried out using myotonometric (MYO) measurements. The reliability of the statistical processing of heart rate monitoring and myotonometry data was determined using correlating analysis. This study showed that that road construction and repairing works should be considered as a hard work according to average metabolic energy consumption 8.1 +/- 1.5 kcal/min; paving, in its turn, was a moderately hard work according to 7.2 +/- 1.1 kcal/min. Several muscle tone levels were identified allowing subdivision of workers into three conditional categories basing on muscle tone and fatigue: I--absolute muscle relaxation and ability to relax; II--a state of equilibrium, when muscles are able to adapt to the work load and are partly able to relax; and III--muscle fatigue and increased tone. It was also found out that the increase of muscle tone and fatigue mainly depend on workers physical preparedness and length of service, and less on their age. We have concluded that a complex ergonomic analysis consisting of heart rate monitoring, assessment of compulsive working postures and myotonometry is appropriate to assess the work heaviness degree and can provide prognosis of occupational pathology or work-related musculoskeletal disorders for the

  18. Strain in the Braincase and Its Sutures During Function

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Susan W.; Teng, Shengyi

    2010-01-01

    The skull is distinguished from other parts of the skeleton by its composite construction. The sutures between bony elements provide for interstitial growth of the cranium, but at the same time they alter the transmission of stress and strain through the skull. Strain gages were bonded to the frontal and parietal bones of miniature pigs and across the interfrontal, interparietal and coronal sutures. Strains were recorded 1) during natural mastication in conjunction with electromyographic activity from the jaw muscles and 2) during stimulation of various cranial muscles in anesthetized animals. Vault sutures exhibited vastly higher strains than did the adjoining bones. Further, bone strain primarily reflected torsion of the braincase set up by asymmetrical muscle contraction; the tensile axis alternated between +45° and −45° depending on which diagonal masseter/temporalis pair was most active. However, suture strains were not related to overall torsion but instead were responses to local muscle actions. Only the coronal suture showed significant strain (tension) during jaw opening; this was caused by the contraction of neck muscles. All sutures showed strain during jaw closing, but polarity depended on the pattern of muscle usage. For example, masseter contraction tensed the coronal suture and the anterior part of the interfrontal suture, whereas the temporalis caused compression in these locations. Peak tensile strains were larger than peak compressive strains. Histology suggested that the skull is bent at the sutures, with the ectocranial surface tensed and the endocranial surface predominantly compressed. Collectively, these results indicate that skulls with patent sutures should be analyzed as complexes of independent parts rather than solid structures. PMID:10918130

  19. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  20. Focal adhesion kinase and its role in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Zachary A.; Gallagher, Philip M.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a remarkable ability to respond to different physical stresses. Loading muscle through exercise, either anaerobic or aerobic, can lead to increases in muscle size and function while, conversely, the absence of muscle loading stimulates rapid decreases in size and function. A principal mediator of this load-induced change is focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a downstream non-receptor tyrosine kinase that translates the cytoskeletal stress and strain signals transmitted across the cytoplasmic membrane by integrins to activate multiple anti-apoptotic and cell growth pathways. Changes in FAK expression and phosphorylation have been found to correlate to specific developmental states in myoblast differentiation, muscle fiber formation and muscle size in response to loading and unloading. With the capability to regulate costamere formation, hypertrophy and glucose metabolism, FAK is a molecule with diverse functions that are important in regulating muscle cell health. PMID:26142360

  1. Focal adhesion kinase and its role in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Graham, Zachary A; Gallagher, Philip M; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal muscle has a remarkable ability to respond to different physical stresses. Loading muscle through exercise, either anaerobic or aerobic, can lead to increases in muscle size and function while, conversely, the absence of muscle loading stimulates rapid decreases in size and function. A principal mediator of this load-induced change is focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a downstream non-receptor tyrosine kinase that translates the cytoskeletal stress and strain signals transmitted across the cytoplasmic membrane by integrins to activate multiple anti-apoptotic and cell growth pathways. Changes in FAK expression and phosphorylation have been found to correlate to specific developmental states in myoblast differentiation, muscle fiber formation and muscle size in response to loading and unloading. With the capability to regulate costamere formation, hypertrophy and glucose metabolism, FAK is a molecule with diverse functions that are important in regulating muscle cell health.

  2. Intramuscular Fat Infiltration Contributes to Impaired Muscle Function in COPD.

    PubMed

    Robles, Priscila Games; Sussman, Marshall S; Naraghi, Ali; Brooks, Dina; Goldstein, Roger S; White, Lawrence M; Mathur, Sunita

    2015-07-01

    Muscle weakness is a prevalent complication in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Atrophy does not fully explain muscle weakness in this population. The recent focus on fat infiltration and its clinical implications in age and diseased muscles are important because it may further explain the extent of declining muscle strength and mobility seen in COPD. The objectives of this study are to quantify fat infiltration (muscle quality) of lower-limb muscles in people with COPD and healthy older adults using magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and to explore its relationship with muscle strength and walking capacity in COPD. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed in people with COPD (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 10) matched for age, gender, and body mass index. Maximal cross-sectional area (muscle size), isokinetic and isometric muscle peak torques, and 6-min walk distance were also assessed. In addition to muscle atrophy (mean between-group differences of 20% to 25%, P < 0.05), COPD group presented with fatty infiltration in thigh and calf muscles that were significantly greater than what was observed in their healthy counterparts (mean between-group differences of 74% to 89%, P = 0.001). There was a strong inverse correlation between intramuscular fat infiltration, muscle peak torque, and walking distance (r = -0.6 to -0.8, P < 0.001) in this group as opposed to fair-to-moderate correlations between muscle size and the same outcomes (r = 0.4-0.6, P < 0.01). Poor muscle quality accompanies atrophy in people with COPD. Intramuscular fat infiltration not only appears to have a strong correlation with impaired function but also is more profound than muscle atrophy in this group. Monitoring both muscle size and quality may enable a more comprehensive assessment of exercise programs in COPD.

  3. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410–450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  4. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  5. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  6. The role of masticatory muscles in the continuous loading of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, W C; Korfage, J A M; Langenbach, G E J

    2011-01-01

    Muscles are considered to play an important role in the ongoing daily loading of bone, especially in the masticatory apparatus. Currently, there are no measurements describing this role over longer periods of time. We made simultaneous and wireless in vivo recordings of habitual strains of the rabbit mandible and masseter muscle and digastric muscle activity up to ∼ 25 h. The extent to which habitually occurring bone strains were related to muscle-activity bursts in time and in amplitude is described. The data reveal the masseter muscle to load the mandible almost continuously throughout the day, either within cyclic activity bouts or with thousands of isolated muscle bursts. Mandibular strain events rarely took place without simultaneous masseter activity, whereas the digastric muscle only played a small role in loading the mandible. The average intensity of masseter-muscle activity bouts was strongly linked to the average amplitude of the concomitant bone-strain events. However, individual pairs of muscle bursts and strain events showed no relation in amplitude within cyclic loading bouts. Larger bone-strain events, presumably related to larger muscle-activity levels, had more constant principal-strain directions. Finally, muscle-to-bone force transmissions were detected to take place at frequencies up to 15 Hz. We conclude that in the ongoing habitual loading of the rabbit mandible, the masseter muscle plays an almost non-stop role. In addition, our results support the possibility that muscle activity is a source of low-amplitude, high-frequency bone loading. PMID:21492160

  7. Human skeletal muscle fibroblasts stimulate in vitro myogenesis and in vivo muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Abigail L; Magnan, Mélanie; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Kjaer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    membrane. MPC proliferation, differentiation and fusion were assessed from cells stained for BrdU, desmin and myogenin. On biopsy cross-sections, fibroblast number was seen to increase, along with myogenic cell number, by d7 and increase further by d30, where fibroblasts were observed to be preferentially located immediately surrounding regenerating muscle fibres. In vitro, the presence of fibroblasts in direct contact with MPCs was found to moderately stimulate MPC proliferation and strongly stimulate both MPC differentiation and MPC fusion. It thus appears, in humans, that fibroblasts exert a strong positive regulatory influence on MPC activity, in line with observations during in vivo skeletal muscle regeneration. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  8. Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Cooymans, Pascale; Al-Zuhaibi, Sana; Al-Senawi, Rana; Ganesh, Anuradha

    2010-05-01

    Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) describes a group of rare congenital eye movement disorders that result from the dysfunction of all or part of the oculomotor (CN 3) and the trochlear (CN 4) nerves, and/or the muscles these nerves innervate. To describe the clinical and neuro-radiological findings in three patients with CFEOM and review literature with respect to clinical features, genetics and management of this condition. A retrospective chart review was performed of three Omani patients who had been diagnosed with CFEOM in our institution. All patients had undergone standardized orthoptic and ocular evaluations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbits and brain. The three patients (age range nine months - 10 years) presented a history of congenital strabismus. All patients had severe bilateral ptosis and mild to moderate visual impairment secondary to the ptosis and astigmatism. Two of three patients demonstrated a positive jaw-winking phenomenon. A moderate to large angle exotropia with varying amount of hypotropia and limitations of almost all the extra ocular muscles was noted. Patient 3 was also developmentally delayed. MRI brain and orbit showed abnormalities of the extraocular muscles in two patients and brain malformation in one patient. CFEOM is a rare, congenital, and non-progressive disorder with multiple extra ocular muscle restrictions. CFEOM can be associated with neuro-radiological abnormalities; its diagnosis and classification is defined by clinical characteristics and genetics. Options for treatment are limited and difficult.

  9. Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  10. Finite element modeling of passive material influence on the deformation and force output of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, John A; Chi, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Judy P; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Edgerton, Victor R; Sinha, Shantanu

    2012-05-01

    The pattern of deformation of different structural components of a muscle-tendon complex when it is activated provides important information about the internal mechanics of the muscle. Recent experimental observations of deformations in contracting muscle have presented inconsistencies with current widely held assumption about muscle behavior. These include negative strain in aponeuroses, non-uniform strain changes in sarcomeres, even of individual muscle fibers and evidence that muscle fiber cross sectional deformations are asymmetrical suggesting a need to readjust current models of contracting muscle. We report here our use of finite element modeling techniques to simulate a simple muscle-tendon complex and investigate the influence of passive intramuscular material properties upon the deformation patterns under isometric and shortening conditions. While phenomenological force-displacement relationships described the muscle fiber properties, the material properties of the passive matrix were varied to simulate a hydrostatic model, compliant and stiff isotropically hyperelastic models and an anisotropic elastic model. The numerical results demonstrate that passive elastic material properties significantly influence the magnitude, heterogeneity and distribution pattern of many measures of deformation in a contracting muscle. Measures included aponeurosis strain, aponeurosis separation, muscle fiber strain and fiber cross-sectional deformation. The force output of our simulations was strongly influenced by passive material properties, changing by as much as ~80% under some conditions. The maximum output was accomplished by introducing anisotropy along axes which were not strained significantly during a muscle length change, suggesting that correct costamere orientation may be a critical factor in the optimal muscle function. Such a model not only fits known physiological data, but also maintains the relatively constant aponeurosis separation observed during in vivo

  11. Curvature reduces bending strains in the quokka femur

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kyle; Henderson, Keith; Pantinople, Jess; Milne, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how curvature in the quokka femur may help to reduce bending strain during locomotion. The quokka is a small wallaby, but the curvature of the femur and the muscles active during stance phase are similar to most quadrupedal mammals. Our hypothesis is that the action of hip extensor and ankle plantarflexor muscles during stance phase place cranial bending strains that act to reduce the caudal curvature of the femur. Knee extensors and biarticular muscles that span the femur longitudinally create caudal bending strains in the caudally curved (concave caudal side) bone. These opposing strains can balance each other and result in less strain on the bone. We test this idea by comparing the performance of a normally curved finite element model of the quokka femur to a digitally straightened version of the same bone. The normally curved model is indeed less strained than the straightened version. To further examine the relationship between curvature and the strains in the femoral models, we also tested an extra-curved and a reverse-curved version with the same loads. There appears to be a linear relationship between the curvature and the strains experienced by the models. These results demonstrate that longitudinal curvature in bones may be a manipulable mechanism whereby bone can induce a strain gradient to oppose strains induced by habitual loading. PMID:28348929

  12. Curvature reduces bending strains in the quokka femur.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Kyle; Henderson, Keith; Pantinople, Jess; Richards, Hazel L; Milne, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how curvature in the quokka femur may help to reduce bending strain during locomotion. The quokka is a small wallaby, but the curvature of the femur and the muscles active during stance phase are similar to most quadrupedal mammals. Our hypothesis is that the action of hip extensor and ankle plantarflexor muscles during stance phase place cranial bending strains that act to reduce the caudal curvature of the femur. Knee extensors and biarticular muscles that span the femur longitudinally create caudal bending strains in the caudally curved (concave caudal side) bone. These opposing strains can balance each other and result in less strain on the bone. We test this idea by comparing the performance of a normally curved finite element model of the quokka femur to a digitally straightened version of the same bone. The normally curved model is indeed less strained than the straightened version. To further examine the relationship between curvature and the strains in the femoral models, we also tested an extra-curved and a reverse-curved version with the same loads. There appears to be a linear relationship between the curvature and the strains experienced by the models. These results demonstrate that longitudinal curvature in bones may be a manipulable mechanism whereby bone can induce a strain gradient to oppose strains induced by habitual loading.

  13. Neutron moderation theory with thermal motion of the moderator nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusov, V. D.; Tarasov, V. A.; Chernezhenko, S. A.; Kakaev, A. A.; Smolyar, V. P.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present the analytical expression for the neutron scattering law for an isotropic source of neutrons, obtained within the framework of the gas model with the temperature of the moderating medium as a parameter. The obtained scattering law is based on the solution of the general kinematic problem of elastic scattering of neutrons on nuclei in the L-system. Both the neutron and the nucleus possess arbitrary velocities in the L-system. For the new scattering law we obtain the flux densities and neutron moderation spectra as functions of temperature for the reactor fissile medium. The expressions for the moderating neutrons spectra allow reinterpreting the physical nature of the underlying processes in the thermal region.

  14. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  15. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  16. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    PubMed

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  17. Identifying athletes at risk of hamstring strains and how to protect them.

    PubMed

    Proske, U; Morgan, D L; Brockett, C L; Percival, P

    2004-08-01

    1. One common soft-tissue injury in sports involving sprinting and kicking a ball is the hamstring strain. Strain injuries often occur while the contracting muscle is lengthened, an eccentric contraction. We have proposed that the microscopic damage to muscle fibres that routinely occurs after a period of unaccustomed eccentric exercise can lead to a more severe strain injury. 2. An indicator of susceptibility for the damage from eccentric exercise is the optimum angle for torque. When this is at a short muscle length, the muscle is more prone to eccentric damage. It is known that subjects most at risk of a hamstring strain have a previous history of hamstring strains. By means of isokinetic dynamometry, we have measured the optimum angle for torque for nine athletes with a history of unilateral hamstring strains. We also measured optimum angles for 18 athletes with no previous history of strain injuries. It was found that mean optimum angle in the previously injured muscles was at a significantly shorter length than for the uninjured muscles of the other leg and for muscles of both legs in the uninjured group. This result suggests that previously injured muscles are more prone to eccentric damage and, therefore, according to our hypothesis, more prone to strain injuries than uninjured muscles. 3. After a period of unaccustomed eccentric exercise, if the exercise is repeated 1 week later, there is much less evidence of damage because the muscle has undergone an adaptation process that protects it against further damage. We propose that for athletes considered at risk of a hamstring strain, as indicated by the optimum angle for torque, a regular programme of mild eccentric exercise should be undertaken. This approach seems to work because evidence from a group of athletes who have implemented such a programme shows a significant reduction in the incidence of hamstring strains.

  18. Inhibition of the quadriceps muscles in elite male volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Huber, A; Suter, E; Herzog, W

    1998-04-01

    Inhibition of the quadriceps muscles was assessed in 13 elite male volleyball players using the interpolated twitch technique. This technique involves applying an electrical stimulus to the voluntarily contracted quadriceps muscles to estimate the number of motor units not fully activated during the contraction. Knee extensor moments and muscle inhibition were measured during isometric contractions at knee angles of 30 degrees and 60 degrees from full extension. A medical history of knee joint injury and pain experienced in the knee during testing were assessed. Previous knee joint injury did not affect the knee extensor moments, but produced a difference in muscle inhibition: muscle inhibition in legs with previous injuries was significantly lower than muscle inhibition in legs with no previous injury. Moderate pain in the knee during testing did not affect muscle inhibition, but was associated with reduced knee extensor moments. We consider that the loss in knee extensor moments associated with pain might be caused by atrophy of the quadriceps muscles as a consequence of the disrupted training routine. The lower muscle inhibition in volleyball players with previous injury suggested that the intense rehabilitation programme that these athletes undergo after knee injury improves muscle activation. As a result, athletes with previous knee joint injuries were able to produce the same knee extensor moments as athletes with no previous injury, probably because of their ability to recruit the available motor units more completely. This recruitment may compensate for the possible loss in muscle mass encountered during the period of injury and detraining.

  19. Muscle tone abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Habel, M

    1997-01-01

    Rehabilitation nurses frequently encounter clients with neurological disorders that adversely affect muscle tone. By understanding the physiological etiology of abnormal muscle tone, individual practitioners can design nursing interventions for various care settings that appropriately protect clients from injury and that can help clients and caregivers learn effective techniques for managing muscle tone problems. This article explains muscle tone abnormalities in detail and offers insight into how rehabilitation nurses can play a key role in managing clients' alterations in muscle tone.

  20. Monolayer graphene oxide as a building block for artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Geoffrey W.; Liu, Jefferson Z.

    2013-01-01

    The electromechanical actuation of a highly ordered compound of graphene oxide (GO) is shown via ab initio simulations to produce high-performance quantum-mechanical responses, which mimic the behaviour of mammalian skeletal muscle. In addition to large expansive strains (˜10%), this GO compound (asymmetrically unzipped C4O) exhibits large contractive strains of -4.8% upon -0.15 e/C-atom electron injection. Furthermore, as these contractive strains are coupled with equally high stresses (˜100 GPa) and short response times (˜1 ns), we show that this GO material meets all of the functional requirements of an artificial muscle building block.

  1. Graphite moderated (252)Cf source.

    PubMed

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Barros, Haydn; Greaves, Eduardo D; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    The Thorium molten-salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid-fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a (252)Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the (252)Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Skeletal muscle contractility and fatigability in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Mathieu; Decorte, Nicolas; Mely, Laurent; Vallier, Jean-Marc; Camara, Boubou; Quetant, Sébastien; Wuyam, Bernard; Verges, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent discovery of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression in human skeletal muscle suggests that CF patients may have intrinsic skeletal muscle abnormalities potentially leading to functional impairments. The aim of the present study was to determine whether CF patients with mild to moderate lung disease have altered skeletal muscle contractility and greater muscle fatigability compared to healthy controls. Thirty adults (15 CF and 15 controls) performed a quadriceps neuromuscular evaluation using single and paired femoral nerve magnetic stimulations. Electromyographic and mechanical parameters during voluntary and magnetically-evoked contractions were recorded at rest, during and after a fatiguing isometric task. Quadriceps cross-sectional area was determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Some indexes of muscle contractility tended to be reduced at rest in CF compared to controls (e.g., mechanical response to doublets stimulation at 100 Hz: 74±30 Nm vs. 97±28 Nm, P=0.06) but all tendencies disappeared when expressed relative to quadriceps cross-sectional area (P>0.5 for all parameters). CF and controls had similar alterations in muscle contractility with fatigue, similar endurance and post exercise recovery. We found similar skeletal muscle endurance and fatigability in CF adults and controls and only trends for reduced muscle strength in CF which disappeared when normalized to muscle cross-sectional area. These results indicate small quantitative (reduced muscle mass) rather than qualitative (intrinsic skeletal muscle abnormalities) muscle alterations in CF with mild to moderate lung disease. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  4. Involvement of the muscle-tendon junction in skeletal muscle atrophy: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    de Palma, L; Marinelli, M; Pavan, M; Bertoni-Freddari, C

    2011-01-01

    The muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) is a physiologically vital tissue interface and a highly specialized region in the muscle-tendon unit. It is the weakest point in the muscle-tendon unit, making it susceptible to strain injuries. Nonetheless, knowledge of the pathological changes affecting this region and of its response to the atrophy process is very limited. The aim of the study was to examine MTJ ultrastructural morphology in patients with different conditions that induce skeletal muscle atrophy and to attempt a grading of the atrophy process. Fifteen patients undergoing amputation in the distal or proximal third of the lower leg due to chronic or acute conditions were divided into two groups. Specimens of gastrocnemius muscle collected at the time of surgery were analyzed by histology and electron microscopy. The contact between muscle and tendon was measured using a dedicated software that calculated semi-automatically the base (B) and perimeter (P) of muscle cell finger-like processes at the MTJ. Electron microscopy. The cells in the atrophic muscle of the chronic group were shallow and bulky. In the acute group, the myotendinous endings differed significantly in their structure from those of the chronic group. In atrophic muscle, the contact between muscle and tendon was reduced by quantitative and qualitative changes in the myotendinous endings. The B/P ratio allowed definition of three grades of myotendinous ending degeneration. It is unclear whether degenerative changes induced by immobilization in muscle and, specifically, the MTJ are temporary and reversible or permanent. This preliminary study suggested a classification of ultrastructural MTJ changes into grade 0, reflecting a quite normal MTJ; grade 1, an intermediate process that might lead to irreversible atrophy or to recovery, spontaneously or with drug therapy; and grade 2, irreversible process with complete structural alteration.

  5. Resolving Shifting Patterns of Muscle Energy Use in Swimming Fish

    PubMed Central

    Gerry, Shannon P.; Ellerby, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle metabolism dominates the energy costs of locomotion. Although in vivo measures of muscle strain, activity and force can indicate mechanical function, similar muscle-level measures of energy use are challenging to obtain. Without this information locomotor systems are essentially a black box in terms of the distribution of metabolic energy. Although in situ measurements of muscle metabolism are not practical in multiple muscles, the rate of blood flow to skeletal muscle tissue can be used as a proxy for aerobic metabolism, allowing the cost of particular muscle functions to be estimated. Axial, undulatory swimming is one of the most common modes of vertebrate locomotion. In fish, segmented myotomal muscles are the primary power source, driving undulations of the body axis that transfer momentum to the water. Multiple fins and the associated fin muscles also contribute to thrust production, and stabilization and control of the swimming trajectory. We have used blood flow tracers in swimming rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to estimate the regional distribution of energy use across the myotomal and fin muscle groups to reveal the functional distribution of metabolic energy use within a swimming animal for the first time. Energy use by the myotomal muscle increased with speed to meet thrust requirements, particularly in posterior myotomes where muscle power outputs are greatest. At low speeds, there was high fin muscle energy use, consistent with active stability control. As speed increased, and fins were adducted, overall fin muscle energy use declined, except in the caudal fin muscles where active fin stiffening is required to maintain power transfer to the wake. The present data were obtained under steady-state conditions which rarely apply in natural, physical environments. This approach also has potential to reveal the mechanical factors that underlie changes in locomotor cost associated with movement through unsteady flow regimes. PMID:25165858

  6. Risk, Causation, Mediation, and Moderation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumsta, Robert; Rutter, Michael; Stevens, Suzanne; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout this monograph, there has been frequent reference to levels of risk, inference of causation, testing for mediating variables, and the need to consider possible moderating influences. In this chapter, the authors review what is meant by these concepts, and then seek to pull together the findings from the English and Romanian Adoptee…

  7. Moderate Psoriasis: A Proposed Definition.

    PubMed

    Llamas-Velasco, M; de la Cueva, P; Notario, J; Martínez-Pilar, L; Martorell, A; Moreno-Ramírez, D

    2017-08-16

    The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) is the most widely used scale for assessing the severity of psoriasis and for therapeutic decision making. On the basis of the PASI score, patients have been stratified into 2 groups: mild disease and moderate-to-severe disease. To draft a proposal for the definition and characterization of moderate psoriasis based on PASI and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores. A group of 6 dermatologists with experience in the treatment of psoriasis undertook a critical review of the literature and a discussion of cases to draft a proposal. In order of priority, PASI, DLQI, and body surface area (BSA) are the parameters to be used in daily practice to classify psoriasis as mild, moderate, or severe. Severity should be assessed on the basis of a combined evaluation and interpretation of the PASI and DLQI. And 3, PASI and DLQI should carry equal weight in the determination of disease severity. On this basis, psoriasis severity was defined using the following criteria: mild, PASI<7 and DLQI<7; moderate, PASI=7-15 and DLQI=5-15 (classified as severe when difficult-to-treat sites are affected or when there is a significant psychosocial impact); severe, PASI >15, independently of the DLQI score. A more precise classification of psoriasis according to disease severity will improve the risk-benefit assessment essential to therapeutic decision making in these patients. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The universe at moderate redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Report on the universe at moderate redshift covering the period from 1 Mar. 1988 to 28 Feb. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included: galaxy formation and large-scale structure; intergalactic medium and background radiation fields; quasar statistics and evolution; and gravitational lenses.

  9. Recombinant expression in moderate halophiles.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masao; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko

    2010-04-01

    A novel expression of recombinant proteins was developed using moderate halophiles that accumulate osmolytes and hence provide cytoplasmic environments where osmolyte-driven folding can take place. Promoters and selection marker were developed for high expression of foreign proteins. Examples are given for expression of bacterial nucleoside diphosphate kinase and human serine racemase.

  10. Effects of the homeopathic remedy arnica on attenuating symptoms of exercise-induced muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Plezbert, Julie A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency (200c), on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Methods Twenty subjects completed a maximal eccentric exercise protocol with the non-dominate elbow flexors to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Either Arnica or placebo tablets were administered in a random, double- blinded fashion immediately after exercise and at 24 hours and 72 hours after exercise. Before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post-exercise, assessments of delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle function included: 1) muscle soreness and functional impairment; 2) maximum voluntary contraction torque; 3) muscle swelling; and 4) range of motion tests to document spontaneous muscle shortening and muscle shortening ability. Blood samples drawn before exercise and at 24, 48, and 96 hours after exercise were used to measure muscle enzymes as indirect indices of muscle damage. Results Regardless of the intervention, the extent of delayed onset muscle soreness and elevations in muscle enzymes were similar on the days following the eccentric exercise protocol. The post-exercise time profiles of decreases in maximum voluntary contraction torque and muscle shortening ability and increases in muscle swelling and spontaneous muscle shortening were similar for each treatment intervention. Conclusions The results of this study did not substantiate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Despite the findings of this study, future investigations on the clinical efficacy of homeopathic interventions should consider incorporating research strategies that emphasize differential therapeutics for each patient rather than treating a specific disease or symptom complex, such as DOMS, with a single homeopathic remedy. PMID:19674657

  11. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  12. Transmission of muscle force to fascia during exercise.

    PubMed

    Findley, Thomas; Chaudhry, Hans; Dhar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    As the muscle contracts, fibers get thicker, forcing the fascial tubular layers surrounding the muscle (endomysium, perimysium and epimysium) to expand in diameter and hence to shorten in length. We develop a mathematical model to determine the fraction of force generated by extremity muscles during contraction that is transmitted to the surrounding tubes of fascia. Theory of elasticity is used to determine the modulus of elasticity, radial strain and the radial stress transmitted to the fascia. Starting with published data on dimensions of muscle and muscle force, we find radial stress is 50% of longitudinal stress in the soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and elbow flexor and extensor muscles. Substantial stress is transmitted to fascia during muscular exercise, which has implications for exercise therapies if they are designed for fascial as well as muscular stress. This adds additional perspective to myofascial force transmission research. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, B A; Forsythe, M E; Stanish, W D

    2001-02-01

    To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management.

  14. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  15. Thymoma Metastasis to the Semimembranosus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kenta; Susa, Michiro; Ogata, Sho; Ozeki, Yuichi; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common thymic epithelial tumor whose classification was first introduced in 1999. Type B2 thymoma is considered a moderate/high-risk tumor; however, extrathoracic metastases are extremely rare with limited reports to date. In this report, we present a rare thymoma metastasis to the semimembranosus muscle, which was resected with a wide margin after confirmation by open biopsy. At the final follow-up after 1 year, no local recurrence has been observed. PMID:28203162

  16. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  17. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  18. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G; Thompson, Joseph T

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 mum across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form 'dyads' along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of 'myofibrils' approximately 0.25-0.5 microm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are approximately 25 nm in diameter and approximately 2.8 microm long. 'Dense bodies' are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17 degrees C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low V(max) (2.15 +/-0.26 L(0) s(-1), where L(0) was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270+/-20 mN mm(-2) physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg(-1)), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/V(max) of 0.33+/-0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to -0.15 relative to resting length, L(R)) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 L(R) s(-1) ), corresponding to a range of V/V(max) from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of

  19. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G.; Thompson, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 μm across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form ‘dyads’ along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of ‘myofibrils’ ~0.25–0.5 μm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are ~25 nm in diameter and ~2.8 μm long. ‘Dense bodies’ are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17°C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low Vmax (2.15 ±0.26 L0 s−1, where L0 was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270±20 mN mm−2 physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg−1), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/Vmax of 0.33±0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to −0.15 relative to resting length, LR) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 LR s−1 ), corresponding to a range of V/Vmax from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of strains was even narrower: maximum range less than ±0

  20. Minimally Invasive Muscle Embedding (MIME) - A Novel Experimental Technique to Facilitate Donor-Cell-Mediated Myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roche, Joseph A; Begam, Morium; Galen, Sujay S

    2017-08-24

    Skeletal muscle possesses regenerative capacity due to tissue-resident, muscle-fiber-generating (myogenic) satellite cells (SCs), which can form new muscle fibers under the right conditions. Although SCs can be harvested from muscle tissue and cultured in vitro, the resulting myoblast cells are not very effective in promoting myogenesis when transplanted into host muscle. Surgically exposing the host muscle and grafting segments of donor muscle tissue, or the isolated muscle fibers with their SCs onto host muscle, promotes better myogenesis compared to myoblast transplantation. We have developed a novel technique that we call Minimally Invasive Muscle Embedding (MIME). MIME involves passing a surgical needle through the host muscle, drawing a piece of donor muscle tissue through the needle track, and then leaving the donor tissue embedded in the host muscle so that it may act as a source of SCs for the host muscle. Here we describe in detail the steps involved in performing MIME in an immunodeficient mouse model that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) in all of its cells. Immunodeficiency in the host mouse reduces the risk of immune rejection of the donor tissue, and GFP expression enables easy identification of the host muscle fibers (GFP+) and donor-cell-derived muscle fibers (GFP-). Our pilot data suggest that MIME can be used to implant an extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle from a donor mouse into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of a host mouse. Our data also suggest that when a myotoxin (barium chloride, BaCl2) is injected into the host muscle after MIME, there is evidence of donor-cell-derived myogenesis in the host muscle, with approximately 5%, 26%, 26% and 43% of the fibers in a single host TA muscle showing no host contribution, minimal host contribution, moderate host contribution, and maximal host contribution, respectively.

  1. Muscle silent period in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Higgins, D C; Haidri, N H; Wilbourn, A J

    1971-10-01

    The muscle silent period was measured in 11 patients with moderate to severe rigidity associated with Parkinson's disease. The determinations were made under conditions of maximum disability for each patient, since all medications had been withdrawn before testing. The duration of the EMG silence, produced by small and large electrical twitch contractions of the adductor pollicis muscle, fell within a range of values previously determined for normal individuals. Major alleviation of the rigidity and bradykinesia with chronic oral l-dopa therapy was not accompanied by any change in the silent period. It was concluded that in untreated Parkinsonism, and also after its treatment with l-dopa, the functioning of the muscle spindles and local inhibitory reflexes remains normal.

  2. Can a clinical test of hamstring strength identify football players at risk of hamstring strain?

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Crossley, Kay M; Macindoe, Ian G; Fahrner, Brendan B; Pandy, Marcus G

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate the potential for a simple clinical test of hamstring muscle strength to identify susceptibility to muscle strain injury. A single-case design was used; specifically, an elite-level male Australian Rules football player performed bilateral isometric maximum voluntary contractions of the hamstring muscles on a weekly basis for a period of 5 weeks preceding a right hamstring muscle strain injury. Minimal asymmetry (no greater than ±1.2% difference) was evident in the hamstring isometric maximum voluntary contractions during the first 4 weeks, but 5 days prior to injury, the right hamstring isometric maximum voluntary contraction was reduced by 10.9% compared to the left. Measuring asymmetry in isometric maximum voluntary contractions of the hamstring muscles may be a useful clinical test to identify susceptibility to muscle strain injury.

  3. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  4. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  5. Respiratory muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Katharine L; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2005-07-28

    Plasticity of respiratory muscles must be considered in the context of their unique physiological demands. The continuous rhythmic activation of respiratory muscles makes them among the most active in the body. Respiratory muscles, especially the diaphragm, are non-weight-bearing, and thus, in contrast to limb muscles, are not exposed to gravitational effects. Perturbations in normal activation and load known to induce plasticity in limb muscles may not cause similar adaptations in respiratory muscles. In this review, we explore the structural and functional properties of the diaphragm muscle and their response to alterations in load and activity. Overall, relatively modest changes in diaphragm structural and functional properties occur in response to perturbations in load or activity. However, disruptions in the normal influence of phrenic innervation by frank denervation, tetrodotoxin nerve block and spinal hemisection, induce profound changes in the diaphragm, indicating the substantial trophic influence of phrenic motoneurons on diaphragm muscle.

  6. Lower extremity muscle activation during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Brian M; Stodden, David F; Nixon, Megan K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation levels of select lower extremity muscles during the pitching motion. Bilateral surface electromyography data on 5 lower extremity muscles (biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius) were collected on 11 highly skilled baseball pitchers and compared with individual maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) data. The pitching motion was divided into 4 distinct phases: phase 1, initiation of pitching motion to maximum stride leg knee height; phase 2, maximum stride leg knee height to stride foot contact (SFC); phase 3, SFC to ball release; and phase 4, ball release to 0.5 seconds after ball release (follow-through). Results indicated that trail leg musculature elicited moderate to high activity levels during phases 2 and 3 (38-172% of MVIC). Muscle activity levels of the stride leg were moderate to high during phases 2-4 (23-170% of MVIC). These data indicate a high demand for lower extremity strength and endurance. Specifically, coaches should incorporate unilateral and bilateral lower extremity exercises for strength improvement or maintenance and to facilitate dynamic stabilization of the lower extremities during the pitching motion.

  7. Botox induced muscle paralysis rapidly degrades bone

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Sarah E.; Sanford, David A.; Becker, Blair A.; Bain, Steven D.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gross, Ted S.

    2006-01-01

    The means by which muscle function modulates bone homeostasis is poorly understood. To begin to address this issue, we have developed a novel murine model of unilateral transient hindlimb muscle paralysis using botulinum toxin A (Botox). Female C57BL/6 mice (16 weeks) received IM injections of either saline or Botox (n = 10 each) in both the quadriceps and calf muscles of the right hindleg. Gait dysfunction was assessed by multi-observer inventory, muscle alterations were determined by wet mass, and bone alterations were assessed by micro-CT imaging at the distal femur, proximal tibia, and tibia mid-diaphysis. Profound degradation of both muscle and bone was observed within 21 days despite significant restoration of weight bearing function by 14 days. The muscle mass of the injected quadriceps and calf muscles was diminished −47.3% and −59.7%, respectively, vs. saline mice (both P < 0.001). The ratio of bone volume to tissue volume (BV/TV) within the distal femoral epiphysis and proximal tibial metaphysis of Botox injected limbs was reduced −43.2% and −54.3%, respectively, while tibia cortical bone volume was reduced −14.6% (all P < 0.001). Comparison of the contralateral non-injected limbs indicated the presence of moderate systemic effects in the model that were most probably associated with diminished activity following muscle paralysis. Taken as a whole, the micro-CT data implied that trabecular and cortical bone loss was primarily achieved by bone resorption. These data confirm the decisive role of neuromuscular function in mediating bone homeostasis and establish a model with unique potential to explore the mechanisms underlying this relation. Given the rapidly expanding use of neuromuscular inhibitors for indications such as pain reduction, these data also raise the critical need to monitor bone loss in these patients. PMID:16185943

  8. [The role of the psoas muscle: apropos of the dissection of the muscles from 10 adults and 10 newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Le Floch-Prigent, P

    1983-06-01

    The action of the iliopsoas muscle (Musculus iliopsoas) on movements of the hip is studied by direct traction on fresh cadavers (10 still-born and 10 adults). The psoas muscle is a powerful flexor of the hip but also an external rotator. The action of external rotation is moderate but obvious in every position of the femur (Os femoris) and more important if previously in abduction and internal rotation.

  9. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  10. Molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a truncated dystrophin

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Glen B.; Combs, Ariana C.; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Myotendinous strain injury is the most common injury of human skeletal muscles because the majority of muscle forces are transmitted through this region. Although the immediate response to strain injury is well characterized, the chronic response to myotendinous strain injury is less clear. Here we examined the molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a microdystrophin transgene (microdystrophinΔR4–R23). We found that muscles with myotendinous strain injury had an increased expression of utrophin and α7-integrin together with the dramatic restructuring of peripheral myofibrils into concentric rings. The sarcolemma of the microdystrophinΔR4–R23/mdx gastrocnemius muscles was highly protected from experimental lengthening contractions, better than wild-type muscles. We also found a positive correlation between myotendinous strain injury and ringed fibers in the HSALR (human skeletal actin, long repeat) mouse model of myotonic dystrophy. We suggest that changes in protein expression and the formation of rings are adaptations to myotendinous strain injury that help to prevent muscle necrosis and retain the function of necessary muscles during injury, ageing and disease. PMID:18799475

  11. Molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a truncated dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Banks, Glen B; Combs, Ariana C; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2008-12-15

    Myotendinous strain injury is the most common injury of human skeletal muscles because the majority of muscle forces are transmitted through this region. Although the immediate response to strain injury is well characterized, the chronic response to myotendinous strain injury is less clear. Here we examined the molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a microdystrophin transgene (microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23)). We found that muscles with myotendinous strain injury had an increased expression of utrophin and alpha7-integrin together with the dramatic restructuring of peripheral myofibrils into concentric rings. The sarcolemma of the microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23)/mdx gastrocnemius muscles was highly protected from experimental lengthening contractions, better than wild-type muscles. We also found a positive correlation between myotendinous strain injury and ringed fibers in the HSA(LR) (human skeletal actin, long repeat) mouse model of myotonic dystrophy. We suggest that changes in protein expression and the formation of rings are adaptations to myotendinous strain injury that help to prevent muscle necrosis and retain the function of necessary muscles during injury, ageing and disease.

  12. The series elastic shock absorber: tendon elasticity modulates energy dissipation by muscle during burst deceleration.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-04-07

    During downhill running, manoeuvring, negotiation of obstacles and landings from a jump, mechanical energy is dissipated via active lengthening of limb muscles. Tendon compliance provides a 'shock-absorber' mechanism that rapidly absorbs mechanical energy and releases it more slowly as the recoil of the tendon does work to stretch muscle fascicles. By lowering the rate of muscular energy dissipation, tendon compliance likely reduces the risk of muscle injury that can result from rapid and forceful muscle lengthening. Here, we examine how muscle-tendon mechanics are modulated in response to changes in demand for energy dissipation. We measured lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle activity, force and fascicle length, as well as leg joint kinematics and ground-reaction force, as turkeys performed drop-landings from three heights (0.5-1.5 m centre-of-mass elevation). Negative work by the LG muscle-tendon unit during landing increased with drop height, mainly owing to greater muscle recruitment and force as drop height increased. Although muscle strain did not increase with landing height, ankle flexion increased owing to increased tendon strain at higher muscle forces. Measurements of the length-tension relationship of the muscle indicated that the muscle reached peak force at shorter and likely safer operating lengths as drop height increased. Our results indicate that tendon compliance is important to the modulation of energy dissipation by active muscle with changes in demand and may provide a mechanism for rapid adjustment of function during deceleration tasks of unpredictable intensity.

  13. Causal Moderation Analysis Using Propensity Score Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on previous studies in applying propensity score methods to study multiple treatment variables to examine the causal moderator effect. The propensity score methods will be demonstrated in a case study to examine the causal moderator effect, where the moderators are categorical and continuous variables. Moderation analysis is an…

  14. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  15. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  16. HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1958-04-29

    A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

  17. The moderators of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jessie L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which Department of Defense (DOD) active duty patient sociodemographic, health status, geographic location, and utilization factors, predict overall patient satisfaction with health care in military facilities. A theoretical framework developed from patient satisfaction and social identity theories and from previous empirical findings was used to develop a model to predict patient satisfaction and delineate moderating variables. The major finding indicated in this study was the significance of patients' characteristics in moderating their satisfaction. Principal components factor analysis and hierarchical linear regression revealed that patient specific factors predicted patients' satisfaction after controlling for factors depicting patients' evaluations of health system characteristics. Patient specific factors provided added, although very minimal, explanatory value to the determination of patients' satisfaction. The study findings can aid in the development of targeted, objectively prioritized programs of improvement and marketing by ranking variables using patients' passively derived importance schema.

  18. In vitro quantification of strain patterns in the craniofacial skeleton due to masseter and temporalis activities.

    PubMed

    Maloul, Asmaa; Regev, Eran; Whyne, Cari M; Beek, Marteen; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2012-09-01

    Many complications in craniofacial surgery can be attributed to a lack of characterization of facial skeletal strain patterns. This study aimed to delineate human midfacial strain patterns under uniform muscle loading. The left sides of 5 fresh-frozen human cadaveric heads were dissected of all soft tissues except the temporalis and masseter muscles. Tensile forces were applied to the free mandibular ends of the muscles. Maxillary alveolar arches were used to restrain the skulls. Eight strain gauges were bonded to the surface of the midface to measure the strain under single muscle loading conditions (100 N). Maxillary strain gauges revealed a biaxial load state for both muscles. Thin antral bone experienced high maximum principal tensile strains (maximum of 685.5 με) and high minimum principal compressive strains (maximum of -722.44 με). Similar biaxial patterns of lower magnitude were measured on the zygoma (maximum of 208.59 με for maximum principal strains and -78.11 με for minimum principal strains). Results, consistent for all specimens and counter to previously accepted concepts of biomechanical behavior of the midface under masticatory muscle loading, included high strain in the thin maxillary antral wall, rotational bending through the maxilla and zygoma, and a previously underestimated contribution of the temporalis muscle. This experimental model produced repeatable strain patterns quantifying the mechanics of the facial skeleton. These new counterintuitive findings underscore the need for accurate characterization of craniofacial strain patterns to address problems in the current treatment methods and develop robust design criteria.

  19. Cryogenic moderator simulations : confronting reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-06

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities.

  20. Muscle power output limits fast-start performance in fish.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, J M; Johnston, I A

    1998-05-01

    Fast-starts associated with escape responses were filmed at the median habitat temperatures of six teleost fish: Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii (Antarctica), Myoxocephalus scorpius (North Sea), Scorpaena notata and Serranus cabrilla (Mediterranean) and Paracirrhites forsteri (Indo-West-Pacific Ocean). Methods are presented for estimating the spine positions for silhouettes of swimming fish. These methods were used to validate techniques for calculating kinematics and muscle dynamics during fast-starts. The starts from all species show common patterns, with waves of body curvature travelling from head to tail and increasing in amplitude. Cross-validation with sonomicrometry studies allowed gearing ratios between the red and white muscle to be calculated. Gearing ratios must decrease towards the tail with a corresponding change in muscle geometry, resulting in similar white muscle fibre strains in all the myotomes during the start. A work-loop technique was used to measure mean muscle power output at similar strain and shortening durations to those found in vivo. The fast Sc. notata myotomal fibres produced a mean muscle-mass-specific power of 142.7 W kg-1 at 20 degrees C. Velocity, acceleration and hydrodynamic power output increased both with the travelling rate of the wave of body curvature and with the habitat temperature. At all temperatures, the predicted mean muscle-mass-specific power outputs, as calculated from swimming sequences, were similar to the muscle power outputs measured from work-loop experiments.

  1. Regeneration and Maintenance of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthers, Christopher M.

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical engineering that involves growing artificial organs to replace those lost to disease or injury. Within tissue engineering, there is a demand for artificial smooth muscle to repair tissues of the digestive tract, bladder, and vascular systems. Attempts to develop engineered smooth muscle tissues capable of contracting with sufficient strength to be clinically relevant have so far proven unsatisfactory. The goal of this research was to develop and sustain mature, contractile smooth muscle. Survival of implanted SMCs is critical to sustain the benefits of engineered smooth muscle. Survival of implanted smooth muscle cells was studied with layered, electrospun polycaprolactone implants with lasercut holes ranging from 0--25% porosity. It was found that greater angiogenesis was associated with increased survival of implanted cells, with a large increase at a threshold between 20% and 25% porosity. Heparan sulfate coatings improved the speed of blood vessel infiltration after 14 days of implantation. With these considerations, thicker engineered tissues may be possible. An improved smooth muscle tissue culture technique was utilized. Contracting smooth muscle was produced in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle tissue organization, specifically by sustaining intact smooth muscle strips rather than dissociating tissue in to isolated smooth muscle cells. Isolated cells showed a decrease in maturity and contained fewer enteric neural and glial cells. Muscle strips also exhibited periodic contraction and regular fluctuation of intracellular calclium. The muscle strip maturity persisted after implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds. A low-cost, disposable bioreactor was developed to further improve maturity of cultured smooth muscle cells in an environment of controlled cyclical stress.The bioreactor consistently applied repeated mechanical strain with controllable inputs for strain

  2. Truncated dystrophins reduce muscle stiffness in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle stiffness is a major clinical feature in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is the most common lethal inherited muscle-wasting disease in boys, and it is caused by the lack of the dystrophin protein. We recently showed that the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of mdx mice (a DMD mouse model) exhibits disease-associated muscle stiffness. Truncated micro- and mini-dystrophins are the leading candidates for DMD gene therapy. Unfortunately, it has never been clear whether these truncated genes can mitigate muscle stiffness. To address this question, we examined the passive properties of the EDL muscle in transgenic mdx mice that expressed a representative mini- or micro-gene (ΔH2-R15, ΔR2-15/ΔR18-23/ΔC, or ΔR4-23/ΔC). The passive properties were measured at the ages of 6 and 20 mo and compared with those of age-matched wild-type and mdx mice. Despite significant truncation of the gene, surprisingly, the elastic and viscous properties were completely restored to the wild-type level in every transgenic strain we examined. Our results demonstrated for the first time that truncated dystrophin genes may effectively treat muscle stiffness in DMD. PMID:23221959

  3. Recent applications of X-ray microanalysis in muscle pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Wroblewski, R.; Edstrom, L.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray microanalysis of single muscle fibres visualized in the scanning- and scanning-transmission mode of electron microscopy has been applied to human muscle biopsies to quantify changes of intracellular elements in different muscle disorders. To detect elements representing diffusible ions, cryofixation and cryosectioning was performed and analyses were conducted on freeze-dried cryosections 6..mu..m thick. Changes in the concentration of elements were found to differentiate certain muscular disorders. A large increase in sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl), and a decrease in potassium (K) was typical of myotubular myopathy, while a moderate increase in Na and Cl was found in central core disease and nemaline myopathy.

  4. Oxidative Metabolism in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantages and problems of near-infrared spectroscopy measurements, in resting and exercising skeletal muscles studies, are discussed through some representative examples.

  5. Epimysium and perimysium in suturing in skeletal muscle lacerations.

    PubMed

    Kragh, John F; Svoboda, Steven J; Wenke, Joseph C; Ward, John A; Walters, Thomas J

    2005-07-01

    Direct muscle belly trauma is common. Selecting optimal methods for surgical repair of muscle disruption is difficult because reliable methods have not been established. Suturing tendon offers strong repairs, but epimysium and perimysium, the connective tissues that coalesce to form tendons, offer unknown repair strength. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanical properties of repaired muscle in transected muscle bellies with epimysium and perimysium. The authors surgically repaired with figure-eight stitches in both epimysium and perimysium groups. Individual stitches were placed in lacerated quadriceps bellies from a euthanized pig and were tensioned on a biomechanical machine. Maximum loads and strains were measured, and failure mechanisms were recorded. Loads and strains for repairs with epimysium were higher than those for repairs with perimysium. Failure mechanisms were significantly different between groups. These data showed that epimysium incorporation into suturing improves capacity to bear forces compared with perimysium incorporation.

  6. Muscle injury: review of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Souza, Jaqueline de; Gottfried, Carmem

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the human body. Its main characteristic is the capacity to regenerate after injury independent of the cause of injury through a process called inflammatory response. Mechanical injuries are the most common type of the skeletal muscle injuries and are classified into one of three areas strain, contusion, and laceration. First, this review aims to describe and compare the main experimental methods that replicate the mechanical muscle injuries. There are several ways to replicate each kind of mechanical injury; there are, however, specific characteristics that must be taken into account when choosing the most appropriate model for the experiment. Finally, this review discusses the context of mechanical injury considering types, variability of methods, and the ability to reproduce injury models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Predictability of jaw muscle pains from surface electromyograms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T

    1996-04-01

    In seven (88%) of eight healthy subjects, weak to moderate pains were elicited in the masseter muscles through the isometric contractions of maximum voluntary teeth clenching. Integrated surface electromyograms of the right and left masseter muscles were used to quantify the absolute and relative contractile activities of the two muscles. The risk (relative probability) of inducing pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the larger amount of isometric activity was 2.5 times the risk of eliciting pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the lesser amount of isometric activity. However, as an aid in the diagnosis of pain onset, the method of masseteric surface electromyography had a false diagnostic ratio of 0.67.

  8. Optical characterization of muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-10-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  9. Optical characterization of muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2012-03-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  10. Passive biomechanical properties of sutured mammalian muscle lacerations.

    PubMed

    Kragh, John F; Svoboda, Steven J; Wenke, Joseph C; Ward, John A; Walters, Thomos J

    2005-01-01

    Muscle trauma, such as laceration or transection, is a common occurrence, but repairing delicate tissue poses a clinical challenge. This is at least partially due to the lack of established muscle repair models. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of stitches in transected porcine and bovine muscle bellies. A biomechanical protocol was designed for measuring suture performance in muscle belly lacerations. Twenty simple stitches in porcine and 21 stitches in bovine specimens were tested. Individual stitches were placed in lacerated muscle bellies and tensioned on a biomechanical tester (model 8521S, Instron Corporation, Canton, MA). The mean maximum load for porcine (22.0 N) and bovine (23.9 N)stitches was not significantly different (p = .48). The difference in mean strains at maximum load between porcine (9.70/%) and bovine(8.0%0/) groups was statistically significant (p = .004). Failure mechanisms were similar. One porcine stitch avulsed the muscle transversely,while 19 stitches tore out longitudinally. All 20 stitches tore out in bovine specimens. Sutured muscle was the weakest element in each test. The present study demonstrated that sutured muscles performed similarly for the two mammals regarding the parameters of maximum load and mechanism of failure. Regarding suturing of skeletal muscle lacerations, both mammalian models had similar biomechanical performance for maximum loads and failure mechanisms, while strain data differed. The stitch load magnitudes in this study approximate those required to successfully repair transected muscle. Knowledge introduced by this study fills a gap concerning muscle stitching relevant to clinical care.

  11. Muscle function in avian flight: achieving power and control

    PubMed Central

    Biewener, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    Flapping flight places strenuous requirements on the physiological performance of an animal. Bird flight muscles, particularly at smaller body sizes, generally contract at high frequencies and do substantial work in order to produce the aerodynamic power needed to support the animal's weight in the air and to overcome drag. This is in contrast to terrestrial locomotion, which offers mechanisms for minimizing energy losses associated with body movement combined with elastic energy savings to reduce the skeletal muscles' work requirements. Muscles also produce substantial power during swimming, but this is mainly to overcome body drag rather than to support the animal's weight. Here, I review the function and architecture of key flight muscles related to how these muscles contribute to producing the power required for flapping flight, how the muscles are recruited to control wing motion and how they are used in manoeuvring. An emergent property of the primary flight muscles, consistent with their need to produce considerable work by moving the wings through large excursions during each wing stroke, is that the pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscles shorten over a large fraction of their resting fibre length (33–42%). Both muscles are activated while being lengthened or undergoing nearly isometric force development, enhancing the work they perform during subsequent shortening. Two smaller muscles, the triceps and biceps, operate over a smaller range of contractile strains (12–23%), reflecting their role in controlling wing shape through elbow flexion and extension. Remarkably, pigeons adjust their wing stroke plane mainly via changes in whole-body pitch during take-off and landing, relative to level flight, allowing their wing muscles to operate with little change in activation timing, strain magnitude and pattern. PMID:21502121

  12. [Clinical consequences of muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sauleda Roig, J

    2006-05-01

    The function of respiratory muscles, and mainly inspiratory muscles, is impaired in COPD patients. Most of these impairments are essentially due to pulmonary hyperinflation that puts these muscles in a disadvantageous situation. The main consequence of this dysfunction is respiratory muscle fatigue that may cause shortness of breath, exertion intolerance, and hypoventilation with onset of hypercapnic respiratory failure. This function may be measured at the pulmonary function laboratory by means of unspecific (spirometry, pulmonary volumes) or specific tests (maxim respiratory pressures [MIP - M], transdiaphragmatic pressure, tension-time index of the diaphragm, electromyography, or endura tests). Therapy should aim at improving hyperinflation with bronchodilator therapy, improving muscular strength with rehabilitation, and in severe cases muscle rest with mechanical ventilation. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is a common complication in moderate-severe COPD, and it may be the result of chronic inactivity, hypoxemia, electrolytic impairments, under nutrition, steroids, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Besides, it may contribute to patients' quality of life worsening, disability, and even an increase in morbimortality. It may tested by impedanciometry, muscle strength tests (dynamometry), imaging tests, and even muscle biopsy in research studies. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is potentially manageable with rehabilitation, nutritional supplementation, and anabolic drugs. However, therapeutic success is often incomplete, so that further studies with new therapeutic strategies are needed.

  13. Stimulating Multiple Respiratory Muscles With Intramuscular Permaloc Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, James S; Wurster, Robert D; Zhu, Qianlong; Staunton, Christine; Laghi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To test the feasibility of implanting intramuscular electrodes (Permaloc, Synapse Biomedical Inc, Oberlin OH) with self-securing polypropylene anchors to stimulate upper-intercostal and abdominal muscles plus the diaphragm. Methods/Results: In 6 anesthetized dogs, 12 Permaloc electrodes were implanted in the 3 respiratory muscles (4 in each muscle group). Tidal volume with diaphragmatic stimulation was 310 ± 38 mL (mean ± SE); with upper intercostal stimulation, it was 68 ± 18 mL; and with combined diaphragm intercostal stimulation, it was 438 ± 78 mL. By study design, stimulation in the upper intercostal muscles was limited to not more than slight/moderate contraction of the serratus and latissimus muscles overlying the ribs. Abdominal muscle stimulation produced exhaled volumes of 38 ± 20 mL (this stimulation was limited by the maximal output of the stimulator of 25 milliamperes). Combined diaphragm intercostal stimulation followed by abdominal muscle stimulation increased exhaled volumes from 312 ± 31 mL to 486 ± 58 mL (P  =  0.024). Conclusions: Permaloc electrodes can be successfully implanted in upper intercostal and abdominal muscles in addition to the diaphragm. Combined diaphragm intercostal stimulation followed by abdominal muscle stimulation increased the exhaled volumes recorded with diaphragmatic stimulation alone. PMID:20486532

  14. Shared muscle synergies in human walking and cycling.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Filipe O; Torricelli, Diego; Moreno, Juan C; Taylor, Julian; Gomez-Soriano, Julio; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Piazza, Stefano; Santos, Cristina; Pons, José L

    2014-10-15

    The motor system may rely on a modular organization (muscle synergies activated in time) to execute different tasks. We investigated the common control features of walking and cycling in healthy humans from the perspective of muscle synergies. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) muscle synergies extracted from walking trials are similar to those extracted during cycling; 2) muscle synergies extracted from one of these motor tasks can be used to mathematically reconstruct the electromyographic (EMG) patterns of the other task; 3) muscle synergies of cycling can result from merging synergies of walking. A secondary objective was to identify the speed (and cadence) at which higher similarities emerged. EMG activity from eight muscles of the dominant leg was recorded in eight healthy subjects during walking and cycling at four matched cadences. A factorization technique [nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF)] was applied to extract individual muscle synergy vectors and the respective activation coefficients behind the global muscular activity of each condition. Results corroborated hypotheses 2 and 3, showing that 1) four synergies from walking and cycling can successfully explain most of the EMG variability of cycling and walking, respectively, and 2) two of four synergies from walking appear to merge together to reconstruct one individual synergy of cycling, with best reconstruction values found for higher speeds. Direct comparison of the muscle synergy vectors of walking and the muscle synergy vectors of cycling (hypothesis 1) produced moderated values of similarity. This study provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that cycling and walking share common neuromuscular mechanisms.

  15. Moderate deformations in extension-torsion of incompressible isotropic elastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, L.

    IT HAS been previously shown by anand (1979) that the classical strain energy function of infinitesimal isotropic elasticity is in good agreement with experiment for a wide class of materials for moderately large deformations, provided the infinitesimal strain measure occurring in the strain energy function is replaced by the Hencky or logarithmic measure of finite strain. The basis in Anand's paper for relating Hencky's strain energy function to experiment was data from experiments on metals and rubbers in uniaxial strain, simple tension and compression, and pure shear. Here, to test further the validity of this strain energy function for moderate deformations, its predictions for the twisting moment and the axial force in simple torsion and combined extension-torsion of solid cylinders of incompressible materials are calculated and shown to be in good agreement with data from the classical experiments of R IVLIN and S AUNDERS (1951) on vulcanized natural rubber. Indeed, the predictions from Hencky's strain energy function are in better accord with experiment than the predictions from the widely used Mooney (or Mooney-Rivlin) strain energy function.

  16. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  17. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.