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Sample records for moderate operative temperature

  1. EVALUATION OF ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR OPERATION AT LOW TO MODERATE TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test program was performed at the Environmental Protection Agency Incineration Research Facility to study the effectiveness of incineration at low-to-moderate temperatures in decontaminating soils containing organic compounds with different volatilities (boiling points). The da...

  2. EVALUATION OF ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR OPERATION AT LOW TO MODERATE TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test program was performed at the Environmental Protection Agency Incineration Research Facility to study the effectiveness of incineration at low-to-moderate temperatures in decontaminating soils containing organic compounds with different volatilities (boiling points). The da...

  3. EVALUATION OF ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR OPERATION AT LOW TO MODERATE TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test program was performed at the Environmental Protection Agency Incineration Research Facility to study the effectiveness of incineration at low-to-moderate volatilities (boiling points). The data in the Appendix contain: incinerator operating data, laboratory analyses, sampl...

  4. EVALUATION OF ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR OPERATION AT LOW TO MODERATE TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test program was performed at the Environmental Protection Agency Incineration Research Facility to study the effectiveness of incineration at low-to-moderate volatilities (boiling points). The data in the Appendix contain: incinerator operating data, laboratory analyses, sampl...

  5. Effect of operating parameters and reactor structure on moderate temperature dry desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; You, Changfu; Qi, Haiying; Hou, Bo; Chen, Changhe; Xu, Xuchang

    2006-07-01

    A moderate temperature dry desulfurization process at 600-800 degrees C was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed flue gas desulfurization (CFB-FGD) experimental facility. The desulfurization efficiency was investigated for various operating parameters, such as bed temperature, CO2 concentration, and solids concentration. In addition, structural improvements in key parts of the CFB-FGD system, i.e., the cyclone separator and the distributor, were made to improve the desulfurization efficiency and flow resistance. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiency increased rapidly with increasing temperature above 600 degrees C due to enhanced gas diffusion and the shift of the equilibrium for the carbonate reaction. The sorbent sulfated gradually after quick carbonation of the sorbent with a long particle residence time necessary to realize a high desulfurization ratio. A reduced solids concentration in the bed reduced the particle residence time and the desulfurization efficiency. A single-stage cyclone separator produced no improvement in the desulfurization efficiency compared with a two-stage cyclone separator. Compared with a wind cap distributor, a large hole distributor reduced the flow resistance which reduced the desulfurization efficiency due to the reduced bed pressure drop and worsened bed fluidization. The desulfurization efficiency can be improved by increasing the collection efficiency of fine particles to prolong their residence time and by improving the solids concentration distribution to increase the gas-solid contact surface area.

  6. Effect of operating parameters and reactor structure on moderate temperature dry desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Zhang; Changfu You; Haiying Qi; Bo Hou; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu

    2006-07-01

    A moderate temperature dry desulfurization process at 600-800 C was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed flue gas desulfurization (CFB-FGD) experimental facility. The desulfurization efficiency was investigated for various operating parameters. Structural improvements in key parts of the CFB-FGD system, i.e., the cyclone separator and the distributor, were made to improve the desulfurization efficiency and flow resistance. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiency increased rapidly with increasing temperature above 600 C due to enhanced gas diffusion and the shift of the equilibrium for the carbonate reaction. The sorbent sulfated gradually after quick carbonation of the sorbent with a long particle residence time necessary to realize a high desulfurization ratio. A reduced solids concentration in the bed reduced the particle residence time and the desulfurization efficiency. A single-stage cyclone separator produced no improvement in the desulfurization efficiency compared with a two-stage cyclone separator. Compared with a wind cap distributor, a large hole distributor reduced the flow resistance which reduced the desulfurization efficiency due to the reduced bed pressure drop and worsened bed fluidization. The desulfurization efficiency can be improved by increasing the collection efficiency of fine particles to prolong their residence time and by improving the solids concentration distribution to increase the gas-solid contact surface area. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Evaluation of rotary kiln incinerator operation at low-to-moderate temperature conditions. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Fournier, D.; King, C.; Venkatesh, S.; Goldman, C.

    1996-09-01

    A test program was performed at the Environmental Protection Agency Incineration Research Facility to study the effectiveness of incineration at low-to-moderate volatilities (boiling points). The data in the Appendix contain: incinerator operating data, laboratory analyses, sample train worksheets, and data analysis worksheets.

  8. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, J Del [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Hau-Riege, Stefan [Fremont, CA; Walton, Chris [Oakland, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  9. Moderate temperature rechargeable sodium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Rupich, M. W.; Pitts, L.; Elliott, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Cells utilizing the organic electrolyte, NaI in triglyme, operated at approx. 130 C with Na(+) - intercalating cathodes. However, their rate and stability were inadequate. NaAlCl4 was found to be a highly useful electrolyte for cell operation at 165-190 C. Na(+) intercalating chalcogenides reacted with NaAlCl4 during cycling to form stable phases. Thus, VS2 became essentially VS2Cl, with reversible capacity of approx 2.8 e(-)/V, and a mid-discharge voltage of approx 2.5V and 100 deep discharge cycles were readily achieved. A positive electrode consisting of VCl3 and S plus NaAlCl4 was subjected to deep-discharge cycles 300 times and it demonstrated identity with the in-situ-formed BSxCly cathode. NiS2 and NiS which are not Na(+)-intercalating structures formed highly reversible electrodes in NaAlCl4. The indicated discharge mechanism implies a theoretical capacity 4e(-)/Ni for NiS2 and 2e(-)/Ni for NiS. The mid-discharge potentials are, respectively, 2.4V and 2.1V. A Na/NiS2 cell cycling at a C/5 rate has exceeded 500 deep discharge cycles with 2.5e(-)/Ni average utilization. A 4 A-hr nominal capacity prototype Na/NiS2 cell was tested at 190 C. It was voluntarily terminated after 80 cycles. Further development, particularly of cathode structure and hardware should produce a battery capable of at least 50-W-hr/lb and more than 1000 cycles.

  10. Pressure inactivation of microorganisms at moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, P.; Ludwig, H.

    1986-05-01

    The inactivation of bacteria, bacterial spores, yeasts and molds by high hydrostatic pressure was investigated over a pressure range up to 3000 bar. Survival curves were measured as a function of temperature and pressure applied on the microorganisms. Conditions are looked for under which heat or radiation sensitive pharmaceutical preparations can be sterilized by high pressure treatment at moderate temperatures. All organisms tested can be inactivated in the range of 2000-2500 bar and between 40-60 degrees.

  11. Direct utilization of a moderate temperature geothermal resource in agribusiness

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, T.J.; Grams, W.H.; Howard, S.M.

    1980-09-01

    A demonstration project of the direct utilization of geothermal energy in a South Dakota agribusiness was undertaken. Off-the-shelf hardware was used in demonstrating that the technology was available today to develop geothermal energy resources. An existing artesian well into the Madison Formation having an energy resource of 67/sup 0/C and a flow rate of 655 liters per minute was developed into an energy for grain drying and space heating. The Diamond Ring Ranch structures and the wellhead are 2500 meters apart at the farthest point and the distribution of the highly corrosive, moderate temperature resource presented several unique problems. With the completion of the construction and the operation of the system through the first heating season, the direct utilization of geothermal resources is proving economically feasible and environmentally compatible. Compatible with the ranch operations.

  12. Temperature-Operated Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D.

    1994-01-01

    Bimetallic valve stem positions orifice at end of inner pipe orifice so liquid flows to outlet when temperature lies within small range of preset value. If liquid too cold or too hot, orifices misaligned and liquid returned to source. Such as in shower, valve prevents outflow of dangerously hot or uncomfortably cold water.

  13. Temperature-Operated Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D.

    1994-01-01

    Bimetallic valve stem positions orifice at end of inner pipe orifice so liquid flows to outlet when temperature lies within small range of preset value. If liquid too cold or too hot, orifices misaligned and liquid returned to source. Such as in shower, valve prevents outflow of dangerously hot or uncomfortably cold water.

  14. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  15. Differential temperature operation of plant immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Gao, Xiquan; Feng, Baomin; Sheen, Jen; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Temperature fluctuation is a key determinant for microbial invasion and host evasion. In contrast to mammalians that maintain constant body temperature, plant temperature oscillates on a daily basis. It remains elusive how plants operate inducible defenses in response to temperature fluctuation. Here we report that ambient temperature changes lead to pronounced shifts of two distinct plant immune responses: pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Plants preferentially activate ETI signaling at relatively low temperatures (10~23°C), whereas they switch to PTI signaling at moderately elevated temperatures (23~32°C). The Arabidopsis arp6 and hta9hta11 mutants, phenocopying plants grown at the elevated temperatures, exhibit enhanced PTI and yet reduced ETI responses. As the secretion of bacterial effectors favors low temperatures whereas bacteria multiply vigorously at elevated temperatures accompanied with increased microbe-associated molecular pattern production, our findings suggest that temperature oscillation might have driven dynamic co-evolution of distinct plant immune signaling responding to pathogen physiological changes. PMID:24067909

  16. Determining Solar-Cell Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.; Rathod, M. S.; Paslaski, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory test measures effect of windspeed and wind directon. Series of tests shows solar-photovoltaic cell temperature extremely sensitive to windspeed, moderately sensitive to wind direction, and rather insensitive to ambient temperature.

  17. The Effect of Moderate Temperatures on Latent Fingerprint Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew; Rogers, Keith

    2017-09-01

    The effect of moderate temperatures (25-75 ℃) on latent fingerprints over a five-hour period was examined using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. The aim of the study was to detect changes in IR spectra due to any changes in fingerprint chemistry; these results were then compared to pure compounds found in sebum that was subjected to 75 ℃ for 5 h. Latent fingerprints deposited on CaF2 microscope slides and placed on a Peltier pump heating stage showed that higher temperatures significantly reduced the quantity of sebaceous compounds after 5 h, whereas temperatures below 45 ℃ had little effect on the quantity of these compounds over the same time period. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy allowed for the real-time detection of changes to the IR spectra and demonstrated an increase in the OH stretch band (3250 cm(-1)) over 5 h at all temperatures investigated, suggesting various oxidation processes were taking place. Pure samples analyzed included squalene, fatty acids, wax esters, and mixed triglycerides. Unsaturated lipids showed a similar increase in the OH stretch band to the latent fingerprints whereas saturated compounds showed no change over time. This information is required to better understand the effect of moderate temperatures on latent fingerprints and how these temperatures could affect aged print composition.

  18. Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kobel, Mark; Rogers, Paul; Kaya, Tarik; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices that have gained increasing acceptance for space and terrestrial applications. The operating temperature of an LHP is a function of its operating conditions. The LHP usually reaches a steady operating temperature for a given heat load and sink temperature. The operating temperature will change when the heat load and/or the sink temperature changes, but eventually reaches another steady state in most cases. Under certain conditions, however, the loop operating temperature never really reaches a true steady state, but instead becomes oscillatory. This paper discusses the temperature oscillation phenomenon using test data from a miniature LHP.

  19. Detection of long wavelength infrared at moderate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tredwell, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Technical approaches for the advanced development of 8-12 micrometer detectors operating at elevated temperatures were defined. The theoretical limits to performance of 8-12 micrometer quantum detectors (photoconductive and photovoltaic) and thermal detectors (pyroelectrics, bolometers etc). An analytic model of signal and noise in both quantum detectors and pyroelectric detectors was developed and candidate materials for both detector types were identified and examined. The present status of both quantum and thermal detectors was assessed as well as the parameters limiting operating temperature and detectivity. The areas of research and development likely to lead to detector performance near the theoretical limit are identified.

  20. Capillary gas chromatography with two new moderately high temperature phases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatography test results are presented for two new moderately high-temperature phases of Dexsil 400-GC with free hydroxyl end groups (uncapped) and with end groups covered by trimethyl silyl groups (capped). The two Dexsil 400-GC phases were tested for their ability to resolve N-TFA-DL-(+)-2-butyl esters and n-butyl esters, as well as fatty acid methyl esters and hydrocarbon standards. Generally the more polar uncapped phase was superior to the capped phase in all separation comparisons, except for the hydrocarbons.

  1. Capillary gas chromatography with two new moderately high temperature phases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatography test results are presented for two new moderately high-temperature phases of Dexsil 400-GC with free hydroxyl end groups (uncapped) and with end groups covered by trimethyl silyl groups (capped). The two Dexsil 400-GC phases were tested for their ability to resolve N-TFA-DL-(+)-2-butyl esters and n-butyl esters, as well as fatty acid methyl esters and hydrocarbon standards. Generally the more polar uncapped phase was superior to the capped phase in all separation comparisons, except for the hydrocarbons.

  2. Moderate-temperature zeolitic alteration in a cooling pyroclastic deposit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levy, S.S.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The locally zeolitized Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (13 Myr.), Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.A., is part of a thick sequence of zeolitized pyroclastic units. Most of the zeolitized units are nonwelded tuffs that were altered during low-temperature diagenesis, but the distribution and textural setting of zeolite (heulandite-clinoptilolite) and smectite in the densely welded Topopah Spring tuff suggest that these hydrous minerals formed while the tuff was still cooling after pyroclastic emplacement and welding. The hydrous minerals are concentrated within a transition zone between devitrified tuff in the central part of the unit and underlying vitrophyre. Movement of liquid and convected heat along fractures from the devitrified tuff to the ritrophyre caused local devitrification and hydrous mineral crystallization. Oxygen isotope geothermometry of cogenetic quartz confirms the nondiagenetic moderate temperature origin of the hydrous minerals at temperatures of ??? 40-100??C, assuming a meteoric water source. The Topopah Spring tuff is under consideration for emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The natural rock alteration of the cooling pyroclastic deposit may be a good natural analog for repository-induced hydrothermal alteration. As a result of repository thermal loading, temperatures in the Topopah Spring vitrophyre may rise sufficiently to duplicate the inferred temperatures of natural zeolitic alteration. Heated water moving downward from the repository into the vitrophyre may contribute to new zeolitic alteration. ?? 1989.

  3. Effects of color temperature of fluorescent lamps on body temperature regulation in a moderately cold environment.

    PubMed

    Yasukouchi, A; Yasukouchi, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2000-05-01

    A study on the effects of different color temperatures of fluorescent lamps on skin and rectal temperatures in a moderately cold environment involving (i) changes in skin temperature of 7 male subjects exposed to an ambient temperature ranging from 28 degrees C to 18 degrees C (experiment I) and (ii) changes in skin and rectal temperatures and metabolic heat production of 11 male subjects exposed to ambient temperature of 15 degrees C for 90 min (Experiment II) was conducted. In Experiment I, the reduction of mean skin temperature from the control value was significantly greater under 3000 K than under 5000 K or 7500 K lighting. In Experiment II, the reductions in mean skin temperature and rectal temperature were respectively greater and smaller under 3000 K than those under 5000 K or 7500 K lighting. However, metabolic heat production was not affected by color temperature conditions. The relationships between morphological and physiological parameters revealed that no significant relation of rectal temperature to body surface area per unit body weight was found only under 3000 K. Furthermore, while the mean skin temperature was independent on the mean skinfold thickness under 3000 K, a significant negative correlation between the rectal and mean skin temperatures was observed. Therefore, body heat loss might be suppressed effectively by increasing the vasoconstrictor tone under a color temperature of 3000 K, and the body shell was dependent only on morphological factors under 5000 K and 7500 K lighting.

  4. Moderate temperature control technology for a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D.; Sridhar, K. R.; Gottmann, Matthias

    1993-01-01

    A parametric analysis is performed to compare different heat pump based thermal control systems for a Lunar Base. Rankine cycle and absorption cycle heat pumps are compared and optimized for a 100 kW cooling load. Variables include the use or lack of an interface heat exchanger, and different operating fluids. Optimization of system mass to radiator rejection temperature is performed. The results indicate a relatively small sensitivity of Rankine cycle system mass to these variables, with optimized system masses of about 6000 kg for the 100 kW thermal load. It is quantitaively demonstrated that absorption based systems are not mass competitive with Rankine systems.

  5. Lower operating temperatures oxidize VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) is a new volatile organic compound (VOC) abatement technology that is gaining acceptance in plants where energy costs are high and hours of operation are long. By combining the features of thermal and catalytic oxidation, RCO technology provides an efficient and cost-effective solution to air pollution problems in a variety of industries where hours of operation reach 4,000 annually, and the challenge is growing to reduce energy and operating costs, yet comply with increasingly stringent VOC control regulations. These may include: printed circuit board fabrication (laminate manufacturing), printing (lithography and flexography), coating (cans, coils and fabrics), forest products (production of woods ranging from plywood to medium- and high-density fiberboard) and automotive OEM (spray-paint booths) and component manufacturing (parts spray-painting, resin components, adhesive components, miscellaneous metalworking applications).

  6. Moderation control in low enriched {sup 235}U uranium hexafluoride packaging operations and transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.H.; Kovac, F.M.; Pryor, W.A.

    1993-10-01

    Moderation control is the basic parameter for ensuring nuclear criticality safety during the packaging and transport of low {sup 235}U enriched uranium hexafluoride before its conversion to nuclear power reactor fuel. Moderation control has permitted the shipment of bulk quantities in large cylinders instead of in many smaller cylinders and, therefore, has resulted in economies without compromising safety. Overall safety and uranium accountability have been enhanced through the use of the moderation control. This paper discusses moderation control and the operating procedures to ensure that moderation control is maintained during packaging operations and transportation.

  7. Electronics Demonstrated for Low- Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many NASA spacecraft, such as planetary explorers and deep space probes. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would experience an average temperature near Saturn of about 183 C. Electronics capable of low-temperature operation in the harsh deep space environment also would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. An ongoing research and development program on low-temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is focusing on the design of efficient power systems that can survive and exploit the advantages of low-temperature environments. The targeted systems, which are mission driven, include converters, inverters, controls, digital circuits, and special-purpose circuits. Initial development efforts successfully demonstrated the low-temperature operation and cold-restart of several direct-current/direct-current (dc/dc) converters based on different types of circuit design, some with superconducting inductors. The table lists some of these dc/dc converters with their properties, and the photograph shows a high-voltage, high-power dc/dc converter designed for an ion propulsion system for low-temperature operation. The development efforts of advanced electronic systems and the supporting technologies for low-temperature operation are being carried out in-house and through collaboration with other Government agencies, industry, and academia. The Low Temperature Electronics Program supports missions and development programs at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center. The developed technologies will be transferred to commercial end users for applications such as satellite infrared sensors and medical diagnostic equipment.

  8. INFLUENCE OF MODERATE TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND MALIC DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY OF A MARINE PSYCHROPHILE.

    PubMed

    MORITA, R Y; BURTON, S D

    1963-11-01

    Morita, Richard Y. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Sheril D. Burton. Influence of moderate temperature on growth and malic dehydrogenase activity of a marine psychrophile. J. Bacteriol. 86:1025-1029. 1963.-The maximal and optimal growth temperatures for a marine psychrophilic vibrio (PS 207) were determined to be 30 and 24.5 C, respectively. Malic dehydrogenase was found to be functioning in whole cells at about 1/20 of its observed maximum. Incubation of the cells, prior to or during the assay, at temperatures above the maximal growth temperature permitted the malic dehydrogenase to operate nearer its maximum, but this also inactivated the intracellular enzyme. The heating of whole cells gave an apparent effect of increasing malic dehydrogenase activity. Lysis of the cells permitted the enzyme to function at its full potential but rendered the enzyme more sensitive to heat denaturation. Lysis of the cells also caused the enzyme to lose approximately one-half of its malic dehydrogenase activity with each 10 C drop in temperature, whereas whole cells only lose approximately 1/5 of their enzyme activity at low temperatures with each 10 C drop.

  9. Moderate induced hypotension provides satisfactory operating conditions in maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Schindler, I; Andel, H; Leber, J; Kimla, T

    1994-05-01

    Patients scheduled for maxillofacial surgery were randomly assigned to receive isoflurane (n = 22) or nitroglycerin (n = 18) in order to induce hypotension. Surgeons, blinded for the actual level of blood pressure and the technique used for inducing hypotension, were asked to rate operating conditions on a scale from 1 to 5. Systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were reduced by 26% for both groups. Although blood pressure levels showed little variation throughout the induced hypotension period, scores of 2 to 5 were given significantly more often at incision and at 30 min compared to the following measuring points (P < 0.01). In total, the surgical field was rated significantly more often with a score of 1 and 2 than with a score of 3 to 5 (P < 0.01). A relation between score and SAP and/or MAP could not be found. There was also no relation between scores and the technique used for hypotension. Our data suggest that, with the exception of the first half hour of surgery, on average a SAP of 89 mmHg and a MAP of 65 mmHg were sufficient to produce satisfactory operating conditions.

  10. Hydriding system for moderately severe conditions of pressure and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, J.; Oesterreicher, H.

    1983-12-01

    A hydriding system capable of pressures up to 1000 atm and temperatures up to 550 °C is described. A pressure generator in which H is outgassed from a metal hydride is used to produce the highest pressures. With this unit one can rather accurately determine the hydrogen uptake in metal hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures by employing the virial equation of state out to the fourth virial coefficient.

  11. Common bearing material has highest fatigue life at moderate temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Dietrich, M. W.

    1972-01-01

    AISI 52100, a high carbon chromium steel, has the longest fatigue life of eight bearing materials tested. Fatigue lives of the other materials ranged from 7 to 78 percent of the fatigue life of AISI 52100 at a temperature of 340 K (150 F).

  12. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with inlet...

  13. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with inlet...

  14. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with inlet...

  15. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with inlet...

  16. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with inlet...

  17. Recently developed well test insrumentation for low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Solbau, R.; Goranson, C.B.; Benson, S.M.

    1981-08-01

    The engineering drawings, assembly instructions, and recommended usage for several of the instruments developed for low and moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal well testing are presented. Included are the drawings for: a downhole pressure and temperature instrument, a multi-conductor cablehead, a line driver to be used with the downhole pressure and temperature instrument, and a fluid-level detector.

  18. New Waste Calciner High Temperature Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, M.C.

    2000-09-01

    A new Calciner flowsheet has been developed to process the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the INTEC Tank Farm. The new flowsheet increases the normal Calciner operating temperature from 500 C to 600 C. At the elevated temperature, sodium in the waste forms stable aluminates, instead of nitrates that melt at calcining temperatures. From March through May 2000, the new high-temperature flowsheet was tested in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Calciner. Specific test criteria for various Calciner systems (feed, fuel, quench, off-gas, etc.) were established to evaluate the long-term operability of the high-temperature flowsheet. This report compares in detail the Calciner process data with the test criteria. The Calciner systems met or exceeded all test criteria. The new flowsheet is a visible, long-term method of calcining SBW. Implementation of the flowsheet will significantly increase the calcining rate of SBW and reduce the amount of calcine produced by reducing the amount of chemical additives to the Calciner. This will help meet the future waste processing milestones and regulatory needs such as emptying the Tank Farm.

  19. Rotational relaxation of molecular hydrogen at moderate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    Using a coupled rotation-vibration-dissociation model the rotational relaxation times for molecular hydrogen as a function of final temperature (500-5000 K), in a hypothetical scenario of sudden compression, are computed. The theoretical model is based on a master equation solver. The bound-bound and bound-free transition rates have been computed using a quasiclassical trajectory method. A review of the available experimental data on the rotational relaxation of hydrogen is presented, with a critical overview of the method of measurements and data reduction, including the sources of errors. These experimental data are then compared with the computed results.

  20. Vegetation Placement for Summer Built Surface Temperature Moderation in an Urban Microclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millward, Andrew A.; Torchia, Melissa; Laursen, Andrew E.; Rothman, Lorne D.

    2014-06-01

    Urban vegetation can mitigate increases in summer air temperature by reducing the solar gain received by buildings. To quantify the temperature-moderating influence of city trees and vine-covered buildings, a total of 13 pairs of temperature loggers were installed on the surfaces of eight buildings in downtown Toronto, Canada, for 6 months during the summer of 2008. One logger in each pair was shaded by vegetation while the other measured built surface temperature in full sunlight. We investigated the temperature-moderating benefits of solitary mature trees, clusters of trees, and perennial vines using a linear-mixed model and a multiple regression analysis of degree hour difference. We then assessed the temperature-moderating effect of leaf area, plant size and proximity to building, and plant location relative to solar path. During a period of high solar intensity, we measured an average temperature differential of 11.7 °C, with as many as 10-12 h of sustained cooler built surface temperatures. Vegetation on the west-facing aspect of built structures provided the greatest temperature moderation, with maximum benefit (peak temperature difference) occurring late in the afternoon. Large mature trees growing within 5 m of buildings showed the greatest ability to moderate built surface temperature, with those growing in clusters delivering limited additional benefit compared with isolated trees. Perennial vines proved as effective as trees at moderating rise in built surface temperature to the south and west sides of buildings, providing an attractive alternative to shade trees where soil volume and space are limited.

  1. Properties of zinc oxide at low and moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkarev, G. V.; Karpyna, V. A.; Lazorenko, V. I.; Ievtushenko, A. I.; Shtepliuk, I. I.; Khranovskyy, V. D.

    2011-03-01

    The properties of zinc oxide are examined as an analog of gallium nitride over a wide range of temperatures and possible applications. Its economic and environmental advantages are noted, as well as its radiation hardness, compared to group III nitrides. Methods for growing films and nanostructures with high crystal perfection are proposed. In particular, a magnetron technique for layer-by-layer growth of films is implemented which makes it possible to obtain high structural perfection and substantial thicknesses unattainable by several other methods. The feasibility of producing monochromatic UV radiation from films excited by short-wavelength radiation and electrons is demonstrated; this means that they may be useable as short-wavelength radiation sources. Efficient field emission by ZnO nanostructures and films is demonstrated and opens up the prospect of their use in vacuum microelectronics equipment. Nitrogen-doped ZnO films, in particular, have been used to fabricate a phototransistor with a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than conventional detectors. The physical basis for creating LEDs for different colors based on ZnO films and solid solutions with CdO is discussed. The importance of studying the physics and technology of zinc oxide-based devices is emphasized.

  2. Improved high operating temperature MCT MWIR modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Figgemeier, H.; Schallenberg, T.; Schirmacher, W.; Wollrab, R.

    2014-06-01

    High operating temperature (HOT) IR-detectors are a key factor to size, weight and power (SWaP) reduced IR-systems. Such systems are essential to provide infantrymen with low-weight handheld systems with increased battery lifetimes or most compact clip-on weapon sights in combination with high electro-optical performance offered by cooled IR-technology. AIM's MCT standard n-on-p technology with vacancy doping has been optimized over many years resulting in MWIR-detectors with excellent electro-optical performance up to operating temperatures of ~120K. In the last years the effort has been intensified to improve this standard technology by introducing extrinsic doping with Gold as an acceptor. As a consequence the dark current could considerably be suppressed and allows for operation at ~140K with good e/o performance. More detailed investigations showed that limitation for HOT > 140K is explained by consequences from rising dark current rather than from defective pixel level. Recently, several crucial parameters were identified showing great promise for further optimization of HOT-performance. Among those, p-type concentration could successfully be reduced from the mid 1016 / cm3 to the lower 1015/ cm3 range. Since AIM is one of the leading manufacturers of split linear cryocoolers, an increase in operating temperature will directly lead to IR-modules with improved SWaP characteristics by making use of the miniature members of its SX cooler family with single piston and balancer technology. The paper will present recent progress in the development of HOT MWIR-detector arrays at AIM and show electro-optical performance data in comparison to focal plane arrays produced in the standard technology.

  3. Wide-Temperature-Range Integrated Operational Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Levanas, Greg; Chen, Yuan; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Cozy, Raymond; Blalock, Benjamin; Greenwell, Robert; Terry, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated- circuit operational amplifier to be replicated and incorporated into sensor and actuator systems of Mars-explorer robots. This amplifier is designed to function at a supply potential less than or equal to 5.5 V, at any temperature from -180 to +120 C. The design is implemented on a commercial radiation-hard SOI CMOS process rated for a supply potential of less than or equal to 3.6 V and temperatures from -55 to +110 C. The design incorporates several innovations to achieve this, the main ones being the following: NMOS transistor channel lengths below 1 m are generally not used because research showed that this change could reduce the adverse effect of hot carrier injection on the lifetimes of transistors at low temperatures. To enable the amplifier to withstand the 5.5-V supply potential, a circuit topology including cascade devices, clamping devices, and dynamic voltage biasing was adopted so that no individual transistor would be exposed to more than 3.6 V. To minimize undesired variations in performance over the temperature range, the transistors in the amplifier are biased by circuitry that maintains a constant inversion coefficient over the temperature range.

  4. Operator manual: high temperature heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.; Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.

    1980-03-04

    Experimental data is being obtained from operating a high temperature heat pump system. The use of methanol as a working fluid will necessitate careful monitoring of refrigerant temperatures and pressures with chemical analysis performed on the working fluid during scheduled down time. Materials sent to vendors by Auburn University and quotes received by Auburn concerning equipment (compressor, evaporator, condensor, air heater, dryer, two accumulator tanks, and three expansion valves) are discussed. The simulated dryer and two accumulator tanks were designed by Auburn. The detailed design and pricing estimates are included. Additional information is presented on layout and construction; start-up; testing; shut down; scheduled maintenance and inspection; safety precautions; control system; and trouble shooting.

  5. Present state of Tevatron lower temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab continues to work on raising the particle energy of the Tevatron by lowering magnet temperatures using cold vapor compressors. In 1995, another two rounds of power tests were completed. These power tests, although showing significant improvement over the initial tests of 1993-94, have led to the conclusion that 1000 GeV operation cannot be attained without replacing/rearranging magnets with lower quench currents before the next Collider Run in 1999. Development of more cold compressor control strategies also continues.

  6. Effect of moderate high temperature on the vegetative growth and potassium allocation in olive plants.

    PubMed

    Benlloch-González, María; Quintero, José Manuel; Suárez, María Paz; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Fernández-Escobar, Ricardo; Benlloch, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    There is little information about the prolonged effect of a moderately high temperature on the growth of olive (Olea europaea L.). It has been suggested that when the temperature of the air rises above 35°C the shoot growth of olive is inhibited while there is any reference on how growth is affected when the soil is warmed. In order to examine these effects, mist-cuttings and young plants generated from seeds were grown under moderate high temperature (37°C) for 64 and 42days respectively. In our study, plant dry matter accumulation was reduced when the temperature of both the air and the root medium was moderately high. However, when the temperature of the root medium was 25°C, the inhibitory effect of air high temperature on plant growth was not observed. The exposure of both the aerial part and the root to moderate high temperature also reduced the accumulation of K(+) in the stem and the root, the water use efficiency and leaf relative water content. However, when only the aerial part was exposed to moderate high temperature, the accumulation of K(+) in the stem, the water use efficiency and leaf relative water content were not modified. The results from this study suggest that the olive is very efficient in regulating the water and potassium transport through the plant when only the atmosphere surrounding the aerial part is warmed up. However, an increase in the soil temperature decrease root K(+) uptake and its transport to the aerial parts resulting in a reduction in shoot water status and growth.

  7. Passive components for high temperature operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, L. S.; Clark, D. R.; Black, D. O.; Hamilton, D. J.; Kerwin, W.

    1981-01-01

    The development of resistors, capacitors, and interconnect metalizations utilizing a low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) process is described. The LPCVD process allows the passive components to be fabricated at temperatures higher than their highest operating temperatures. The deposition of thin films by LPCVD is accomplished by reacting one or more gases on the surface of a heated substrate. The substrates to be coated are placed on a graphite susceptor and then loaded into the center of a quartz reaction tube. The RF power is applied to the coil on the outside of the reaction tube which in turn is coupled into the graphite susceptor causing it to heat. Pressures of several torr or less are typical, with carrier flow rates of 0.1 to 2.0 liters/min. Nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium are typical carrier gases. These are controlled with mass flow controllers and the pressure is continuously monitored with a capacitive manometer. Materials selection and device testing are also discussed.

  8. Vibrations of rectangular plates with moderately large initial deflections at elevated temperatures using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element formulation is developed for the free vibration of rectangular plates which are under the influence of moderately large stress-free initial deflections and large thermal deflections. The von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used to account for the thermal deflections. The plates are thin, isotropic, and Hookean in nature. The temperature imposed on the plate is assumed to be constant through the thickness of the plate. Uniform and sinusoidal temperature distributions are studied. The material properties of the plates are temperature-dependent due to the relatively high temperatures imposed on the plates.

  9. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described in...

  10. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described in...

  11. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described in...

  12. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described in...

  13. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described in...

  14. Simultaneous energy recovery and autotrophic nitrogen removal from sewage at moderately low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Lu, Jian-Cong; Liang, Hong

    2014-03-01

    This study assessed the technical feasibility of treating sewage with a combination of direct anaerobic treatment and autotrophic nitrogen removal, while simultaneously achieving energy recovery and nitrogen removal under moderately low temperatures. The concentrations of ammonia, nitrite, and COD in effluent were below 1, 0.1, and 30 mg/L, respectively. In the up-flow, anaerobic sludge fixed-bed, there was no obvious change observed in the total methane production at temperatures of 35 ± 1 °C, 28 ± 1 °C, 24 ± 3 °C, and 17 ± 3 °C, with the accumulation of volatile fatty acids occurring with decreasing temperatures. The control strategy employed in this study achieved a stable effluent with equimolar concentrations of nitrite and ammonium, coupled with high nitrite accumulation (>97 %) in the partial nitrification sequencing batch reactor system at moderately low temperatures. In the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) reactor, a short hydraulic retention time of 0.96 h, with a nitrogen removal rate of 0.83 kgN/(m(3)/day) was achieved at 12-15 °C. At low temperatures, the corresponding fluorescence in situ hybridization image revealed a high amount of anammox bacteria. This study demonstrates that efficient nitrogen removal and energy recovery from sewage at moderately low temperatures can be achieved by utilizing a combined system. Additionally, this system has the potential to become energy-neutral or even energy-producing.

  15. Microhabitats and canopy cover moderate high summer temperatures in a fragmented Mediterranean landscape

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sharolyn; Williams, Craig; Kleindorfer, Sonia; O’Connell, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Extreme heat events will become more frequent under anthropogenic climate change, especially in Mediterranean ecosystems. Microhabitats can considerably moderate (buffer) the effects of extreme weather events and hence facilitate the persistence of some components of the biodiversity. We investigate the microclimatic moderation provided by two important microhabitats (cavities formed by the leaves of the grass-tree Xanthorrhoea semiplana F.Muell., Xanthorrhoeaceae; and inside the leaf-litter) during the summer of 2015/16 on the Fleurieu Peninsula of South Australia. We placed microsensors inside and outside these microhabitats, as well as above the ground below the forest canopy. Grass-tree and leaf-litter microhabitats significantly buffered against high temperatures and low relative humidity, compared to ground-below-canopy sensors. There was no significant difference between grass-tree and leaf-litter temperatures: in both microhabitats, daily temperature variation was reduced, day temperatures were 1–5°C cooler, night temperatures were 0.5–3°C warmer, and maximum temperatures were up to 14.4°C lower, compared to ground-below-canopy sensors. Grass-tree and leaf-litter microhabitats moderated heat increase at an average rate of 0.24°C temperature per 1°C increase of ambient temperature in the ground-below-canopy microhabitat. The average daily variation in temperature was determined by the type (grass-tree and leaf-litter versus ground-below-canopy) of microhabitat (explaining 67%), the amount of canopy cover and the area of the vegetation fragment (together explaining almost 10% of the variation). Greater canopy cover increased the amount of microclimatic moderation provided, especially in the leaf-litter. Our study highlights the importance of microhabitats in moderating macroclimatic conditions. However, this moderating effect is currently not considered in species distribution modelling under anthropogenic climate change nor in the management of

  16. Endocrine-metabolic responses to military field operations: Effects of cold and moderate altitude exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, E.; Hackney, A.C.; Hodgdon, J.A.; Coyne, J.T.; Kelleher, D.L. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill )

    1991-03-11

    Select endocrine-metabolic responses of US Marines to 4.5 day field operations (FOPS) in different environments were examined. Blood and urine samples were collected in the field immediately before and after FOPS at: (1) sea level, neutral temperatures (Ts) (SLN; n = 14), (2) sea level, cold Ts (SLC; n = 16), (3) 2,500 M altitude, neutral Ts (ALN; n = 16), and (4) 2,500 M altitude, cold Ts (ALC; n = 45). Measures examined were testosterone (T), cortisol (C), glucose (Glu), triglycerides (Tg), and urinary ketones (Uket). T decreased pre-post the FOPS in the cold conditions ({bar X}; 6.7 to 5.5 hg/ml; n = 61) but did not change in neutral conditions. C increased pre-post FOPS at SLC (12.1 to 19.8 ug/dl, p < 0.01), ALN (9.3 to 13.9 ug/dl, p < 0.01), and ALC (16.7 to 19.0 ug/dl, p = 0.08). Normoglycemia was maintained under each condition. Tg decreased (p < 0.01) at SLC, ALN, and ALC ({bar X}{triangle}: {minus}59.1, {minus}102.2, {minus}93.3 mg/dl, respectively), but increased at SLN (+74.0 mg/dl). Uket increased post FOPS only at ALN and ALC ({bar X}{triangle}: 3.4 mg/dl and +11.3 mg/dl). The Uket increases were correlated to Tg decreases. Results suggest FOPS induces a slight endocrine stress response, which is augmented with moderate altitude or cold exposure. Furthermore FOPS at altitude, especially in the cold, seems to shift the body towards fat metabolism.

  17. Ion density and temperature variations at altitude of 500 km during moderate seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Khurana, M. S.; Bahal, B. M.; Aggarwal, Malini; Sharma, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Ionospheric ions (O+ and H+) and temperature (Ti) as precursory parameters to seismic activity have been analysed from year 1995 till 1998, using SROSS-C2 (average altitude range of ∼500 km) satellite measurements for moderate magnitude earthquakes. The details of seismic events during this period are downloaded from United State Geological Survey (USGS) and National Earthquake Information Centre (NEIC) website. 13 seismic events of moderate magnitude (M = 4-5.5) from 1995 to 1998, using SROSS-C2 satellite measurements have been analysed. During seismic affected period, considerable decrease in the density of heavier ion - O+ and increase in the ion temperature (Ti) is observed during all the selected events. Lighter ion - H+ doesn't show any significant change. Electric field and electromagnetic emissions generated due to seismogenic activity could be the plausible initializing agents responsible for change in ion concentration and temperature values during these events.

  18. Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Orazov, Marat; Davis, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Retro-aldol reactions have been implicated as the limiting steps in catalytic routes to convert biomass-derived hexoses and pentoses into valuable C2, C3, and C4 products such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, 2-hydroxy-3-butenoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, and alkyl esters thereof. Due to a lack of efficient retro-aldol catalysts, most previous investigations of catalytic pathways involving these reactions were conducted at high temperatures (≥160 °C). Here, we report moderate-temperature (around 100 °C) retro-aldol reactions of various hexoses in aqueous and alcoholic media with catalysts traditionally known for their capacity to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular carbon shift (1,2-CS) reactions of aldoses, i.e., various molybdenum oxide and molybdate species, nickel(II) diamine complexes, alkali-exchanged stannosilicate molecular sieves, and amorphous TiO2–SiO2 coprecipitates. Solid Lewis acid cocatalysts that are known to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular hydride shift (1,2-HS) reactions that enable the formation of α-hydroxy carboxylic acids from tetroses, trioses, and glycolaldehyde, but cannot readily catalyze retro-aldol reactions of hexoses and pentoses at these moderate temperatures, are shown to be compatible with the aforementioned retro-aldol catalysts. The combination of a distinct retro-aldol catalyst with a 1,2-HS catalyst enables lactic acid and alkyl lactate formation from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures (around 100 °C), with yields comparable to best-reported chemocatalytic examples at high temperature conditions (≥160 °C). The use of moderate temperatures enables numerous desirable features such as lower pressure and significantly less catalyst deactivation. PMID:26372958

  19. Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Orazov, Marat; Davis, Mark E

    2015-09-22

    Retro-aldol reactions have been implicated as the limiting steps in catalytic routes to convert biomass-derived hexoses and pentoses into valuable C2, C3, and C4 products such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, 2-hydroxy-3-butenoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, and alkyl esters thereof. Due to a lack of efficient retro-aldol catalysts, most previous investigations of catalytic pathways involving these reactions were conducted at high temperatures (≥160 °C). Here, we report moderate-temperature (around 100 °C) retro-aldol reactions of various hexoses in aqueous and alcoholic media with catalysts traditionally known for their capacity to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular carbon shift (1,2-CS) reactions of aldoses, i.e., various molybdenum oxide and molybdate species, nickel(II) diamine complexes, alkali-exchanged stannosilicate molecular sieves, and amorphous TiO2-SiO2 coprecipitates. Solid Lewis acid cocatalysts that are known to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular hydride shift (1,2-HS) reactions that enable the formation of α-hydroxy carboxylic acids from tetroses, trioses, and glycolaldehyde, but cannot readily catalyze retro-aldol reactions of hexoses and pentoses at these moderate temperatures, are shown to be compatible with the aforementioned retro-aldol catalysts. The combination of a distinct retro-aldol catalyst with a 1,2-HS catalyst enables lactic acid and alkyl lactate formation from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures (around 100 °C), with yields comparable to best-reported chemocatalytic examples at high temperature conditions (≥160 °C). The use of moderate temperatures enables numerous desirable features such as lower pressure and significantly less catalyst deactivation.

  20. Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Orazov, Marat; Davis, Mark E.

    2015-09-08

    Retro-aldol reactions have been implicated as the limiting steps in catalytic routes to convert biomass-derived hexoses and pentoses into valuable C2, C3, and C4 products such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, 2-hydroxy-3-butenoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, and alkyl esters thereof. Due to a lack of efficient retro-aldol catalysts, most previous investigations of catalytic pathways involving these reactions were conducted at high temperatures (≥160 °C). Here, we report moderate-temperature (around 100 °C) retro-aldol reactions of various hexoses in aqueous and alcoholic media with catalysts traditionally known for their capacity to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular carbon shift (1,2-CS) reactions of aldoses, i.e., various molybdenum oxide and molybdate species, nickel(II) diamine complexes, alkali-exchanged stannosilicate molecular sieves, and amorphous TiO2–SiO2 coprecipitates. Solid Lewis acid cocatalysts that are known to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular hydride shift (1,2-HS) reactions that enable the formation of α-hydroxy carboxylic acids from tetroses, trioses, and glycolaldehyde, but cannot readily catalyze retro-aldol reactions of hexoses and pentoses at these moderate temperatures, are shown to be compatible with the aforementioned retro-aldol catalysts. The combination of a distinct retro-aldol catalyst with a 1,2-HS catalyst enables lactic acid and alkyl lactate formation from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures (around 100 °C), with yields comparable to best-reported chemocatalytic examples at high temperature conditions (≥160 °C). The use of moderate temperatures enables numerous desirable features such as lower pressure and significantly less catalyst deactivation.

  1. Escherichia coli inactivation kinetics in anaerobic digestion of dairy manure under moderate, mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Batch anaerobic digestion experiments using dairy manure as feedstocks were performed at moderate (25°C), mesophilic (37°C), and thermophilic (52.5°C) temperatures to understand E. coli, an indicator organism for pathogens, inactivation in dairy manure. Incubation periods at 25, 37, and 52.5°C, were 61, 41, and 28 days respectively. Results were used to develop models for predicting E. coli inactivation and survival in anaerobic digestion. For modeling we used the decay of E. coli at each temperature to calculate the first-order inactivation rate coefficients, and these rates were used to formulate the time - temperature - E. coli survival relationships. We found the inactivation rate coefficient at 52.5°C was 17 and 15 times larger than the inactivation rate coefficients at 25 and 37°C, respectively. Decimal reduction times (D10; time to achieve one log removal) at 25, 37, and 52.5°C, were 9 -10, 7 - 8 days, and < 1 day, respectively. The Arrhenius correlation between inactivation rate coefficients and temperatures over the range 25 -52.5°C was developed to understand the impacts of temperature on E. coli inactivation rate. Using this correlation, the time - temperature - E. coli survival relationships were derived. Besides E. coli inactivation, impacts of temperature on biogas production, methane content, pH change, ORP, and solid reduction were also studied. At higher temperatures, biogas production and methane content was greater than that at low temperatures. While at thermophilic temperature pH was increased, at mesophilic and moderate temperatures pH were reduced over the incubation period. These results can be used to understand pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion of dairy manure, and impacts of temperatures on performance of anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure. PMID:21906374

  2. Keep your eyes open: dispositional vigilance moderates the relationship between operational police stress and stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Jeanette; Krick, Annika; Egloff, Boris

    2017-09-01

    Vigilant coping is characterized by a deep processing of threat-related information. In many cases, vigilant coping increases stress symptoms, whereas avoidant coping decreases negative affect. However, vigilance may be beneficial when stress-eliciting situations involve a risk of injury or escalation as is usually the case in police operations. We investigated the roles of vigilance and cognitive avoidance in police operations in a cross-sectional survey. The participants were 137 students (104 men, Mage = 28.54, SD = 8.04) from the Federal University of Applied Administrative Sciences; 76 of them were already police officers (work experience: M = 12.59 years), and 61 were police officer candidates who had completed a 3- to 6-month police internship. Participants completed a paper-and-pencil survey and reported their operational stress, dispositional vigilance and cognitive avoidance in police operations, and stress symptoms. We found that vigilance was negatively associated with stress symptoms and moderated the relationship between operational stress and stress symptoms. Cognitive avoidance, on the other hand, just missed the level of statistical significance in our test of whether it was positively associated with stress symptoms. Our findings demonstrate that vigilance may protect against the negative consequences of stress in police operations.

  3. Data-Model Comparisons of Plasma Sheet Ion Temperatures during Moderate Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Trigo, B.; Robison, G.; Carr, J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Ion heating occurs during geomagnetic storms as a result of many physical processes, including magnetic reconnection and adiabatic heating. Ion temperatures calculated from TWINS energetic neutral atom (ENA) data provide a global view of regions of heated ions in the plasma sheet. Two storms of similar, moderate magnitude are analyzed, a coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven storm that occurred on 26 September 2011 and a high speed stream (HSS)-driven storm on 13 October 2012. We present a comparison of the ion temperatures during the storms to patterns observed in a superposed epoch analysis of ion temperatures [Keesee et al., 2013] and compare the October storm to a previously analyzed HSS-driven storm [Keesee et al., 2012]. We also present a comparison of observed ion temperatures to those calculated from a simulation of each storm using the Space Weather Modeling Framework, including the BATS-R-US MHD model coupled with the HEIDI inner magnetosphere model.

  4. Oxalate complexation with aluminum(III) and iron(III) at moderately elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R.; Clark, D.L.; Bennett, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    To add to our understanding of the weathering of rocks in organic rich environments such as sedimentary brines and oil field waters, we have examined the temperature dependent complexation of aluminum with oxalate. Raman vibrational studies show that even the association constant for the highly charged Al(ox){sub 3}{sup 3{minus}} unexpectedly increases with moderate temperature increases to 80{degrees}C. To evaluate the potential importance of these Al-oxalate species in complex natural systems, temperature dependent competition experiments Fe(III) and Al(III) for oxalate have been initiated. Similar to aluminum, ferric oxalates show increases in association constants at higher temperatures. In competition experiments, the first association constant for Fe(ox){sup +} increases faster than that for Al(ox){sup +} to 90{degrees}C.

  5. Oxalate complexation with aluminum(III) and iron(III) at moderately elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R.; Clark, D.L. ); Bennett, P.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    To add to our understanding of the weathering of rocks in organic rich environments such as sedimentary brines and oil field waters, we have examined the temperature dependent complexation of aluminum with oxalate. Raman vibrational studies show that even the association constant for the highly charged Al(ox){sub 3}{sup 3{minus}} unexpectedly increases with moderate temperature increases to 80{degrees}C. To evaluate the potential importance of these Al-oxalate species in complex natural systems, temperature dependent competition experiments Fe(III) and Al(III) for oxalate have been initiated. Similar to aluminum, ferric oxalates show increases in association constants at higher temperatures. In competition experiments, the first association constant for Fe(ox){sup +} increases faster than that for Al(ox){sup +} to 90{degrees}C.

  6. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, J. L.; Stott, I.; Davies, Z. G.; Gaston, K. J.; Leake, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health. PMID:27641002

  7. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  8. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, J. L.; Stott, I.; Davies, Z. G.; Gaston, K. J.; Leake, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  9. Wide-temperature integrated operational amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad (Inventor); Levanas, Greg (Inventor); Chen, Yuan (Inventor); Cozy, Raymond S. (Inventor); Greenwell, Robert (Inventor); Terry, Stephen (Inventor); Blalock, Benjamin J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a reference current circuit. The reference circuit comprises a low-level current bias circuit, a voltage proportional-to-absolute temperature generator for creating a proportional-to-absolute temperature voltage (VPTAT), and a MOSFET-based constant-IC regulator circuit. The MOSFET-based constant-IC regulator circuit includes a constant-IC input and constant-IC output. The constant-IC input is electrically connected with the VPTAT generator such that the voltage proportional-to-absolute temperature is the input into the constant-IC regulator circuit. Thus the constant-IC output maintains the constant-IC ratio across any temperature range.

  10. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly accomplished by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. Using this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within +/- 0.5K. However, because of the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP has been carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor is placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir is cold-biased and is heated by a control heater. Tests results show that it is feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. Using this method, the heat source temperature can be maintained within a tight range for moderate and high powers. At low powers, however, temperature oscillations may occur due to interactions among the reservoir control heater power, the heat source mass, and the heat output from the heat source. In addition, the heat source temperature could temporarily deviate from its set point during fast thermal transients. The implication is that more sophisticated feedback control algorithms need to be implemented for LHP transient operation when the heat source temperature is used for feedback control.

  11. Method and apparatus for determination of temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power

    DOEpatents

    Vagelatos, Nicholas; Steinman, Donald K.; John, Joseph; Young, Jack C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear method and apparatus determines the temperature of a medium by injecting fast neutrons into the medium and detecting returning slow neutrons in three first energy ranges by producing three respective detection signals. The detection signals are combined to produce three derived indicia each systematically related to the population of slow neutrons returning from the medium in a respective one of three second energy ranges, specifically exclusively epithermal neutrons, exclusively substantially all thermal neutrons and exclusively a portion of the thermal neutron spectrum. The derived indicia are compared with calibration indicia similarly systematically related to the population of slow neutrons in the same three second energy ranges returning from similarly irradiated calibration media for which the relationships temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power to such calibration indicia are known. The comparison indicates the temperature at which the calibration indicia correspond to the derived indicia and consequently the temperature of the medium. The neutron absorption cross section and moderating power of the medium can be identified at the same time.

  12. Effect of the Temperature of the Moderator on the Velocity Distribution of Neutrons with Numerical Calculations for H as Moderator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wigner, E. P.; Wilkins, J. E. Jr.

    1944-09-14

    In this paper we set up an integral equation governing the energy distribution of neutrons that are being slowed down uniformly throughout the entire space by a uniformly distributed moderator whose atoms are in motion with a Maxwellian distribution of velocities. The effects of chemical binding and crystal reflection are ignored. When the moderator is hydrogen, the integral equation is reduced to a differential equation and solved by numerical methods. In this manner we obtain a refinement of the dv/v{sup 2} law. (auth)

  13. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B. C.

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.

  14. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    DOE PAGES

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; ...

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with amore » statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.« less

  15. Optically Pumped Subwavelength Lasers Operated at Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-06

    REPORT NACHOS Project Final Report_University of Michigan Optically pumped subwavelength lasers operated at room temperature 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...28-Feb-2011 NACHOS Project Final Report_University of Michigan Optically pumped subwavelength lasers operated at room temperature Report Title

  16. Sea Ice Surface Temperature Product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Key, Jeffrey R.; Casey, Kimberly A.; Riggs, George A.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2003-01-01

    Global sea ice products are produced from the Earth Observing System (EOS) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board both the Terra and Aqua satellites. Daily sea ice extent and ice-surface temperature (IST) products are available at 1- and 4-km resolution. Validation activities have been undertaken to assess the accuracy of the MODIS IST product at the South Pole station in Antarctica and in the Arctic Ocean using near-surface air-temperature data from a meteorological station and drifting buoys. Results from the study areas show that under clear skies, the MODIS ISTs are very close to those of the near-surface air temperatures with a bias of -1.1 and -1.2 K, and an uncertainty of 1.6 and 1.7 K, respectively. It is shown that the uncertainties would be reduced if the actual temperature of the ice surface were reported instead of the near-surface air temperature. It is not possible to get an accurate IST from MODIS in the presence of even very thin clouds or fog, however using both the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and the MODIS on the Aqua satellite, it may be possible to develop a relationship between MODIS-derived IST and ice temperature derived from the AMSR-E. Since the AMSR-E measurements are generally unaffected by cloud cover, they may be used to complement the MODIS IST measurements.

  17. Case studies of low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Six development projects are examined that use low- (less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F)) to-moderate (90 to 150/sup 0/C (194 to 302/sup 0/F)) temperature geothermal resources. These projects were selected from 22 government cost-shared projects to illustrate the many facets of hydrothermal development. The case studies describe the history of this development, its exploratory methods, and its resource definition, as well as address legal, environmental, and institutional constraints. A critique of procedures used in the development is also provided and recommendations for similar future hydrothermal projects are suggested.

  18. Physiological, biochemical and molecular responses of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plant to moderately elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Robert D; Morris, Wayne L; Ducreux, Laurence J M; Morris, Jenny A; Usman, Muhammad; Verrall, Susan R; Fuller, John; Simpson, Craig G; Zhang, Runxuan; Hedley, Pete E; Taylor, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Although significant work has been undertaken regarding the response of model and crop plants to heat shock during the acclimatory phase, few studies have examined the steady-state response to the mild heat stress encountered in temperate agriculture. In the present work, we therefore exposed tuberizing potato plants to mildly elevated temperatures (30/20 °C, day/night) for up to 5 weeks and compared tuber yield, physiological and biochemical responses, and leaf and tuber metabolomes and transcriptomes with plants grown under optimal conditions (22/16 °C). Growth at elevated temperature reduced tuber yield despite an increase in net foliar photosynthesis. This was associated with major shifts in leaf and tuber metabolite profiles, a significant decrease in leaf glutathione redox state and decreased starch synthesis in tubers. Furthermore, growth at elevated temperature had a profound impact on leaf and tuber transcript expression with large numbers of transcripts displaying a rhythmic oscillation at the higher growth temperature. RT-PCR revealed perturbation in the expression of circadian clock transcripts including StSP6A, previously identified as a tuberization signal. Our data indicate that potato plants grown at moderately elevated temperatures do not exhibit classic symptoms of abiotic stress but that tuber development responds via a diversity of biochemical and molecular signals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Meristem temperature substantially deviates from air temperature even in moderate environments: is the magnitude of this deviation species-specific?

    PubMed

    Savvides, Andreas; van Ieperen, Wim; Dieleman, Janneke A; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2013-11-01

    Meristem temperature (Tmeristem ) drives plant development but is hardly ever quantified. Instead, air temperature (Tair ) is usually used as its approximation. Meristems are enclosed within apical buds. Bud structure and function may differ across species. Therefore, Tmeristem may deviate from Tair in a species-specific way. Environmental variables (air temperature, vapour pressure deficit, radiation, and wind speed) were systematically varied to quantify the response of Tmeristem . This response was related to observations of bud structure and transpiration. Tomato and cucumber plants were used as model plants as they are morphologically distinct and usually growing in similar environments. Tmeristem substantially deviated from Tair in a species-specific manner under moderate environments. This deviation ranged between -2.6 and 3.8 °C in tomato and between -4.1 and 3.0 °C in cucumber. The lower Tmeristem observed in cucumber was linked with the higher transpiration of the bud foliage sheltering the meristem when compared with tomato plants. We here indicate that for properly linking growth and development of plants to temperature in future applications, for instance in climate change scenarios studies, Tmeristem should be used instead of Tair , as a species-specific trait highly reliant on various environmental factors.

  20. Moderately and strongly supercooled liquids: a temperature-derivative study of the primary relaxation time scale.

    PubMed

    Kokshenev, Valery B; Borges, Pablo D; Sullivan, Neil S

    2005-03-15

    The primary relaxation time scale tau(T) derived from the glass forming supercooled liquids (SCLs) is discussed within ergodic-cluster Gaussian statistics, theoretically justified near and above the glass-transformation temperature T(g). An analysis is given for the temperature-derivative data by Stickel et al. on the steepness and the curvature of tau(T). Near the mode-coupling-theory (MCT) crossover T(c), these derivatives separate by a kink and a jump, respectively, the moderately and strongly SCL states. After accounting for the kink and the jump, the steepness remains a piecewise conitnuous function, a material-independent equation for the three fundamental characteristic temperatures, T(g), T(c), and the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) T(0), is found. Both states are described within the heterostructured model of solidlike clusters parametrized in a self-consistent manner by a minimum set of observable parameters: the fragility index, the MCT slowing-down exponent, and the chemical excess potential of Adam and Gibbs model (AGM). Below the Arrhenius temperature, the dynamically and thermodynamically stabilized clusters emerge with a size of around of seven to nine and two to three molecules above and close to T(g) and T(c), respectively. On cooling, the main transformation of the moderately into the strongly supercooled state is due to rebuilding of the cluster structure, and is attributed to its rigidity, introduced through the cluster compressibility. It is shown that the validity of the dynamic AGM (dynamically equivalent to the standard VFT form) is limited by the strongly supercooled state (T(g) < T < T(c)) where the superrigid cooperative rearranging regions are shown to be well-chosen parametrized solidlike clusters. Extension of the basic parameter set by the observable kinetic and diffusive exponents results in prediction of a subdiffusion relaxation regime in SCLs that is distinct from that established for amorphous polymers.

  1. Evaluation of the Boron Dilution Method for Moderator Temperature Coefficient Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demaziere, Christophe; Pazsit, Imre; Por, Gabor

    2002-11-15

    A measurement of the at-power moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) at the pressurized water reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. The measurement was performed when the boron concentration decreased under 300 ppm in the reactor coolant system, by using the boron dilution method. Detailed calculations were made to estimate all reactivity effects taking place during such a measurement. These effects can only be accounted for through static core calculations that allow calculating contributions to the reactivity change induced by the moderator temperature change. All the calculations were performed with the Studsvik Scandpower SIMULATE-3 code. Analysis of the measurement showed that the contribution of the Doppler effect (in the fuel) was almost negligible, whereas the reactivity effects due to other than the Doppler fuel coefficient and the boron change were surprisingly significant. It was concluded that due to the experimental inaccuracies, the uncertainty associated with the boron dilution method could be much larger than previously expected. The MTC might then be close to -72 pcm/degC, whereas the main goal of the measurement is to verify that the MTC is larger (less negative) than this threshold. The usefulness of the boron dilution method for MTC measurements can therefore be questioned.

  2. Fetal Exposure to Moderate Ethanol Doses: Heightened Operant Responsiveness elicited by Ethanol-Related Reinforcers

    PubMed Central

    March, Samanta M.; Abate, Paula; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposure to moderate ethanol doses during late gestation modifies postnatal ethanol palatability and ingestion. The use of Pavlovian associative procedures, has indicated that these prenatal experiences broaden the range of ethanol doses capable of supporting appetitive conditioning. Recently, a novel operant technique aimed at analyzing neonatal predisposition to gain access to ethanol has been developed. Experiment 1 tested the operant conditioning technique for developing rats described by Arias et al. (2007) and Bordner et al. (2008). In Experiment 2 we analyzed changes in the disposition to gain access to ethanol as a result of moderate prenatal exposure to the drug. Methods In Experiment 1 newborn pups were intraorally cannulated and placed in a supine position that allowed access to a touch-sensitive sensor. Paired pups received an intraoral administration of a given reinforcer (milk or quinine) contingent upon physical contact with the sensor. Yoked controls received similar reinforcers only when Paired pups activated the circuit. In Experiment 2, natural reinforcers (water or milk) as well as ethanol (3% or 6 % v/v) or an ethanol-related reinforcer (sucrose compounded with quinine) were tested. In this Experiment pups had been exposed to water or ethanol (1 or 2 g/kg) during gestational days 17–20. Results Experiment 1 confirmed previous results showing that 1-day-old pups rapidly learn an operant task to gain access to milk, but not to gain access to a bitter tastant. Experiment 2 showed that water and milk were highly reinforcing across prenatal treatments. Furthermore, general activity during training was not affected by prenatal exposure to ethanol. Most importantly, prenatal ethanol exposure facilitated conditioning when the reinforcer was 3% v/v ethanol or a psychophysical equivalent of ethanol’s gustatory properties (sucrose-quinine). Conclusions The present results suggest that late prenatal experience with ethanol changes

  3. Response of photosynthetic apparatus to moderate high temperature in contrasting wheat cultivars at different oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Stasik, Oleg; Jones, Hamlyn G

    2007-01-01

    The photosynthetic responses to moderately high temperatures (38 degrees C, imposed at 21% or 2% O(2) in air and 1500 mumol m(-2) s(-1)) were compared in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars grown in northern regions of Ukraine and expected to be relatively sensitive to high temperatures ('North' cultivars) and in cultivars grown in southern regions and expected to be relatively heat-tolerant ('South' cultivars). Heating intact leaves in 21% O(2) for 1 h decreased CO(2) assimilation by c. 63% in 'North' cultivars and only c. 32% in 'South' cultivars, with a decrease in PSII activity being observed in only one of the 'North' cultivars. Carboxylation efficiency was decreased by about 2.7-fold in 'North' cultivars with no significant effect in 'South' cultivars. The maximum rates of carboxylation by Rubisco in vivo, V(cmax), estimated from Farquhar's model, increased more than 2-fold in 'South' cultivars and remained unchanged in 'North' cultivars while the maximum rate of RuBP regeneration, J(max), decreased by 53% and 21% in 'North' and 'South' cultivars, respectively. Where the heat treatment was imposed in 2% O(2) this increased (as compared with treatment at 21% O(2)) the inhibitory effect on CO(2) assimilation in tolerant cultivars, but decreased it in sensitive ones. The results suggested that differences in tolerance of moderately high temperatures in wheat relate to the stability of the Rubisco function and to RuBP regeneration activity rather than to the effects on PSII activity or stomatal control.

  4. System for controlling the operating temperature of a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fabis, Thomas R.; Makiel, Joseph M.; Veyo, Stephen E.

    2006-06-06

    A method and system are provided for improved control of the operating temperature of a fuel cell (32) utilizing an improved temperature control system (30) that varies the flow rate of inlet air entering the fuel cell (32) in response to changes in the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32). Consistent with the invention an improved temperature control system (30) is provided that includes a controller (37) that receives an indication of the temperature of the inlet air from a temperature sensor (39) and varies the heat output by at least one heat source (34, 36) to maintain the temperature of the inlet air at a set-point T.sub.inset. The controller (37) also receives an indication of the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) and varies the flow output by an adjustable air mover (33), within a predetermined range around a set-point F.sub.set, in order to maintain the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) at a set-point T.sub.opset.

  5. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Rachel K.; Snell, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental temperature greatly affects lifespan in a wide variety of animals, but the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are still largely unknown. A moderate temperature decrease from 22°C to 16°C extends the lifespan of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas by up to 163%. Thermodynamic effects on metabolism contribute to this increase in longevity, but are not the only cause. When rotifers are exposed to 16°C for four days and then transfered to 22°C, they survive until day 13 at nearly identical rates as rotifers maintained at 16°C continuously. This persistence of the higher survival for nine days after transfer to 22°C suggests that low temperature exposure alters the expression of genes that affect the rate of aging. The relative persistence of the gene regulation effect suggests that it may play an even larger role in slowing aging than the thermodynamic effects. The life extending effects of these short-term low temperature treatments are largest when the exposure happens early in the life cycle, demonstrating the importance of early development. There is no advantage to lowering the temperature below 16°C to 11° or 5°C. Rotifers exposed to 16°C also displayed increased resistance to heat, starvation, oxidative and osmotic stress. Reproductive rates at 16°C were lower than those at 22°C, but because they reproduce longer, there is no significant change in the lifetime fecundity of females. To investigate which genes contribute to these effects, the expression of specific temperature sensing genes was knocked down using RNAi. Of 12 genes tested, RNAi knockdown of four eliminated the survival enhancing effects of the four-day cold treatment: TRP7, forkhead box C, Y-box factor, and ribosomal protein S6. This demonstrates that active gene regulation is an important factor in temperature mediated life extension, and that these particular genes play an integral role in these pathways. As a thermoresponsive sensor, TRP7 may be

  6. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): Thermodynamics or gene regulation?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rachel K; Snell, Terry W

    2016-06-01

    Environmental temperature greatly affects lifespan in a wide variety of animals, but the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are still largely unknown. A moderate temperature decrease from 22°C to 16°C extends the lifespan of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas by up to 163%. Thermodynamic effects on metabolism contribute to this increase in longevity, but are not the only cause. When rotifers are exposed to 16°C for four days and then transfered to 22°C, they survive until day 13 at nearly identical rates as rotifers maintained at 16°C continuously. This persistence of the higher survival for nine days after transfer to 22°C suggests that low temperature exposure alters the expression of genes that affect the rate of aging. The relative persistence of the gene regulation effect suggests that it may play an even larger role in slowing aging than the thermodynamic effects. The life extending effects of these short-term low temperature treatments are largest when the exposure happens early in the life cycle, demonstrating the importance of early development. There is no advantage to lowering the temperature below 16°C to 11° or 5°C. Rotifers exposed to 16°C also displayed increased resistance to heat, starvation, oxidative and osmotic stress. Reproductive rates at 16°C were lower than those at 22°C, but because they reproduce longer, there is no significant change in the lifetime fecundity of females. To investigate which genes contribute to these effects, the expression of specific temperature sensing genes was knocked down using RNAi. Of 12 genes tested, RNAi knockdown of four eliminated the survival enhancing effects of the four-day cold treatment: TRP7, forkhead box C, Y-box factor, and ribosomal protein S6. This demonstrates that active gene regulation is an important factor in temperature mediated life extension, and that these particular genes play an integral role in these pathways. As a thermoresponsive sensor, TRP7 may be

  7. Sol-gel auto-combustion synthesis of zinc ferrite for moderate temperature desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Rongjun Zhang; Jiejie Huang; Jiantao Zhao; Zhiqiang Sun; Yang Wang

    2007-09-15

    Zinc ferrite as a desulfurization sorbent with an average crystallite size of about 36 nm was synthesized by a sol-gel auto-combustion method. The precursor for the sorbent was a gel obtained from metal nitrates and citric acid by a sol process. The nitrate-citrate gel exhibits a self-propagating combustion behavior, and after combustion, it can transform into a nanosized spinel structured zinc ferrite directly. The prepared sorbent has a larger specific surface area and higher reactivity when compared with the sorbent achieved by a solid mixing method, and it could efficiently reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration from 6000 ppm to less than 2 ppm at a moderate temperature range. The sulfur capacity at 400{sup o}C reaches about 38.5 g of sulfur/100 g of sorbent, which corresponds to 96.4% of the theoretical value. The temperature programmed oxidation test for the sulfided sorbent shows that the most sulfur is desorbed before 500{sup o}C. XRD results confirm that the sulfided sample after exposure to a 5% O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} gas mixture at 500{sup o}C can be regenerated completely, which indicates that the regeneration temperature of the sorbent prepared by the sol-gel auto-combustion method could be greatly reduced. 40 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Analyses of mixed-hydrocarbon binary thermodynamic cycles for moderate-temperature geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Demuth, O.J.

    1981-02-01

    A number of binary geothermal cycles utilizing mixed hydrocarbon working fluids were analyzed with the overall objective of finding a working fluid which can produce low-cost electrical energy using a moderately-low temperature geothermal resource. Both boiling and supercritical shell-and-tube cycles were considered. The performance of a dual-boiling isobutane cycle supplied by a 280/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource (corresponding to the 5 MW pilot plant at the Raft River site in Idaho) was selected as a reference. To investigate the effect of resource temperature on the choice of working fluid, several analyses were conducted for a 360/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource, which is representative of the Heber resource in California. The hydrocarbon working fluids analyzed included methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, isopentane, hexane, heptane, and mixtures of those pure hydrocarbons. For comparison, two fluorocarbon refrigerants were also analyzed. These fluorocarbons, R-115 and R-22, were suggested as resulting in high values of net plant geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) at the two resource temperatures chosen for the study. Preliminary estimates of relative heat exchanger size (product of overall heat transfer coefficient times heater surface area) were made for a number of the better performing cycles.

  9. Numerical predictions of dry oxidation of iron and low-carbon steel at moderately elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.

    1996-11-01

    Wrought and cast low-carbon steel are candidate materials for the thick (e.g. 10 cm) outer barrier of nuclear waste packages being considered for use in the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. Dry oxidation is possible at the moderately elevated temperatures expected at the container surface (323-533 K or 50-260 C). Numerical predictions of dry oxidation damage were made based on experimental data for iron and low-carbon steel and parabolic oxidation theory. The Forward Euler method was implemented to integrate the parabolic rate law for arbitrary, complex temperature histories. Assuming growth of a defect-free, adherent oxide, the surface penetration of a low-carbon steel barrier following 5000 years of exposure to a severe, but repository-relevant, temperature history is predicted to be only about 0.127 mm, less than 0.13% of the expected container thickness of 10 cm. Allowing the oxide to spall upon reaching a critical thickness increases the predicted metal penetration values, but degradation is still computed to be negligible. Thus, dry oxidation is not expected to significantly degrade the performance of thick, corrosion allowance barriers constructed of low-carbon steel.

  10. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, Leslie G.

    1982-07-01

    The California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) selected the San Bernardino area for detailed geothermal resource investigation because the area was known to contain promising geothermal resource sites, the area contained a large population center, and the City of San Bernardino had expressed serious interest in developing the area's geothermal resource. Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs, South San Bernardino, and Harlem Hot Springs--in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the South San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142 C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the South San Bernardino geothermal area was 56 C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal areas was 49.5 C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well.

  11. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MOD21 Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulley, G.; Malakar, N.; Hughes, T.; Islam, T.; Hook, S.

    2016-01-01

    This document outlines the theory and methodology for generating the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Level-2 daily daytime and nighttime 1-km land surface temperature (LST) and emissivity product using the Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm. The MODIS-TES (MOD21_L2) product, will include the LST and emissivity for three MODIS thermal infrared (TIR) bands 29, 31, and 32, and will be generated for data from the NASA-EOS AM and PM platforms. This is version 1.0 of the ATBD and the goal is maintain a 'living' version of this document with changes made when necessary. The current standard baseline MODIS LST products (MOD11*) are derived from the generalized split-window (SW) algorithm (Wan and Dozier 1996), which produces a 1-km LST product and two classification-based emissivities for bands 31 and 32; and a physics-based day/night algorithm (Wan and Li 1997), which produces a 5-km (C4) and 6-km (C5) LST product and emissivity for seven MODIS bands: 20, 22, 23, 29, 31-33.

  12. Improved Wide Operating Temperature Range of Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2013-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range (-60 to +60 C) to satisfy the requirements of various applications including landers, rovers, penetrators, CEV, CLV, etc. This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. The Department of Energy (DoE) has identified a number of technical barriers associated with the development of Liion rechargeable batteries for PHEVs. For this reason, DoE has interest in the development of advanced electrolytes that will improve performance over a wide range of temperatures, and lead to long life characteristics (5,000 cycles over a 10-year life span). There is also interest in improving the high-voltage stability of these candidate electrolyte systems to enable the operation of up to 5 V with high specific energy cathode materials. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. In addition, the low-temperature performance typically deteriorates rapidly upon being exposed to high temperatures. A number of electrolyte formulations were developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl propionate (MP)-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalate borate) (LiBOB), which have previously been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. These MP-based electrolytes with additives have been shown to have improved performance in experiments with MCMB-LiNiCoAlO2 cells.

  13. Low Temperature Operation of a Switching Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglada-Sanchez, Carlos R.; Perez-Feliciano, David; Ray, Biswajit

    1997-01-01

    The low temperature operation of a 48 W, 50 kHz, 36/12 V pulse width modulated (PWM) buck de-de power converter designed with standard commercially available components and devices is reported. The efficiency of the converter increased from 85.6% at room temperature (300 K) to 92.0% at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The variation of power MOSFET, diode rectifier, and output filter inductor loss with temperature is discussed. Relevant current, voltage. and power waveforms are also included.

  14. Operating and maintenance benefits of automated oven wall temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Leuchtmann, K.P.; Hinz, D.; Bergbau, D.; Platts, M.

    1997-12-31

    For a very long time and regardless of all shortcomings associated with it, the manual measurement of the heating flue temperature has been the only method of monitoring the temperature prevailing in a coke oven battery and discovering weak points in the heating system. In the course of the last few years a number of automated temperature measuring systems have been developed that are intended to replace or supplement the manual heating flue measurement system. These measuring systems and their advantages/disadvantages are briefly described in this paper. Additionally, operational experience gathered with the oven chamber wall temperature measuring system is discussed in detail.

  15. Extreme operative temperatures are better descriptors of the thermal environment than mean temperatures.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Agustín; Trefaut Rodrigues, Miguel; Navas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In ecological studies of thermal biology the thermal environment is most frequently described using the mean or other measures of central tendency in environmental temperatures. However, this procedure may hide biologically relevant thermal variation for ectotherms, potentially misleading interpretations. Extremes of operative temperatures (EOT) can help with this problem by bracketing the thermal environment of focal animals. Within this paper, we quantify how mean operative temperatures relate to the range of simultaneously available operative temperatures (a measure of error). We also show how EOT: 1) detect more thermal differences among microsites than measures of central tendency, like the mean OT, 2) allow inferring on microsite use by ectothermic animals, and 3) clarify the relationships between field operative temperatures and temperatures measured at weather stations (WS). To do that, we explored operative temperatures measured at four sites of the Brazilian Caatingas and their correspondent nearest weather stations. We found that the daily mean OT can hide temperature ranges of 41 °C simultaneously available at our study sites. In addition, EOT detected more thermal differences among microsites than central quantiles. We also show how EOT allow inferring about microsite use of ectothermic animals in a given site. Finally, the daily maximum temperature and the daily temperature range measured at WSs predicted well the minimum available field OT at localities many kilometers away. Based on our results, we recommend the use of EOT, instead of mean OT, in thermal ecology studies.

  16. Energy budget, oxidative stress and antioxidant in striped hamster acclimated to moderate cold and warm temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Xin; Wang, Chun-Ming; Wang, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism of the rate of living-free radical theory suggests that higher rate of oxidative metabolism results from greater rate of mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation, leading to a consequent increase in production of free radicals. However, the relation between metabolic rate and oxidative stress is tissue dependent in animals acclimated to cold temperatures. Here we examined oxidative stress, reflected by changes of antioxidant activity and other related markers, in striped hamsters acclimated to moderate cold (15°C), room (23°C) or warm temperature (30°C) for 6 weeks, by which either higher or lower metabolic rate was induced experimentally. Energy intake and the rate of metabolism and nonshivering thermogenesis were increased at 15°C, but decreased at 30°C compared with that at 23°C. Effects of temperatures on the markers of both oxidative stress and antioxidant activities were rarely significant. The percentages of positive correlation between the 11 tissues (brain, BAT, liver, heart, lung, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, caecum and skeletal muscle) were 14.5% (8/55) for catalase (CAT), 7.3% (4/55) for the capacity of inhibition of hydroxyl free radical (CIH), 5.5% (3/55) for activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), 1.8% (1/55) for total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), 4.3% (2/46) for H2O2 and 11.1% (4/36) for the capacity of inhibition of hydroxyl free radical (CIH). This indicated that the tissue-dependent changes of both oxidative stress and antioxidant activity were less consistent among the different tissues. Finally the data from this study were less consistent with the prediction of the mechanism of the rate of living-free radical theory.

  17. Dynamic modeling of temperature change in outdoor operated tubular photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Androga, Dominic Deo; Uyar, Basar; Koku, Harun; Eroglu, Inci

    2017-04-06

    In this study, a one-dimensional transient model was developed to analyze the temperature variation of tubular photobioreactors operated outdoors and the validity of the model was tested by comparing the predictions of the model with the experimental data. The model included the effects of convection and radiative heat exchange on the reactor temperature throughout the day. The temperatures in the reactors increased with increasing solar radiation and air temperatures, and the predicted reactor temperatures corresponded well to the measured experimental values. The heat transferred to the reactor was mainly through radiation: the radiative heat absorbed by the reactor medium, ground radiation, air radiation, and solar (direct and diffuse) radiation, while heat loss was mainly through the heat transfer to the cooling water and forced convection. The amount of heat transferred by reflected radiation and metabolic activities of the bacteria and pump work was negligible. Counter-current cooling was more effective in controlling reactor temperature than co-current cooling. The model developed identifies major heat transfer mechanisms in outdoor operated tubular photobioreactors, and accurately predicts temperature changes in these systems. This is useful in determining cooling duty under transient conditions and scaling up photobioreactors. The photobioreactor design and the thermal modeling were carried out and experimental results obtained for the case study of photofermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus, but the approach is applicable to photobiological systems that are to be operated under outdoor conditions with significant cooling demands.

  18. Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Colin F.; Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Galanis, S. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of our Nation's geothermal resources. Geothermal power plants are currently operating in six states: Alaska, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. The assessment indicates that the electric power generation potential from identified geothermal systems is 9,057 Megawatts-electric (MWe), distributed over 13 states. The mean estimated power production potential from undiscovered geothermal resources is 30,033 MWe. Additionally, another estimated 517,800 MWe could be generated through implementation of technology for creating geothermal reservoirs in regions characterized by high temperature, but low permeability, rock formations.

  19. Liquid Nitrogen Temperature Operation of a Switching Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Myers, Ira T.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a 42/28 V, 175 W, 50 kHz pulse-width modulated buck dc/dc switching power converter at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) is compared with room temperature operation. The power circuit as well as the control circuit of the converter, designed with commercially available components, were operated at LNT and resulted in a slight improvement in converter efficiency. The improvement in power MOSFET operation was offset by deteriorating performance of the output diode rectifier at LNT. Performance of the converter could be further improved at low temperatures by using only power MOSFET's as switches. The use of a resonant topology will further improve the circuit performance by reducing the switching noise and loss.

  20. Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Operation Being Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2001-01-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of low-temperature operation are needed for many future NASA missions where it is desirable to have smaller, lighter, and cheaper (unheated) spacecraft. These missions include Mars (-20 to -120 C) orbiters, landers, and rovers; Europa (-150 C) oceanic exploratory probes and instrumentation; Saturn (-183 C) and Pluto (-229 C) interplanetary probes. At the present, most electronic equipment can operate down to only -55 C. It would be very desirable to have electronic components that expand the operating temperature range down to -233 C. The successful development of these low-temperature components will eventually allow space probes and onboard electronics to operate in very cold environments (out as far as the planet Pluto). As a result, radioisotope heating units, which are used presently to keep space electronics near room temperature, will be reduced in number or eliminated. The new cold electronics will make spacecraft design and operation simpler, more flexible, more reliable, lighter, and cheaper. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are evaluating potential commercial off-the- shelf devices and are developing new electronic components that will tolerate operation at low temperatures down to -233 C. This work is being carried out mainly inhouse and also through university grants and commercial contracts. The components include analog-to-digital converters, semiconductor switches, capacitors, dielectric and packaging material, and batteries. For example, the effect of low temperature on the capacitance of three different types of capacitors is shown in the graph. Using these advanced components, system products will be developed, including dc/dc converters, battery charge/discharge management systems, digital control electronics, transducers, and sensor instrumentation.

  1. Nylon coil actuator operating temperature range and stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianzad, Soheil; Pandit, Milind; Bahi, Addie; Rafie Ravandi, Ali; Ko, Frank; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Madden, John D. W.

    2015-04-01

    Components in automotive and aerospace applications require a wide temperature range of operation. Newly discovered thermally active Baughman muscle potentially provides affordable and viable solutions for driving mechanical devices by heating them from room temperature, but little is known about their operation below room temperature. We study the mechanical behavior of nylon coil actuators by testing elastic modulus and by investigating tensile stroke as a function of temperature. Loads that range from 35 MPa to 155 MPa were applied. For the nylon used and the coiling conditions, active thermal contraction totals 19.5 % when the temperature is raised from -40 °C to 160 °C. The thermal contraction observed from -40 °C to 20°C is only ~2 %, whereas between 100 and 160 °C the contraction is 10 %. A marked increase in thermal contraction is occurs in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (~ 45°C). The elastic modulus drops as temperature increases, from ~155 MPa at - 40 °C to 35 MPa at 200 °C. Interestingly the drop in active contraction with increasing load is small and much less than might be expected given the temperature dependence of modulus.

  2. [Responses of mesophyllic conductance in leaves of 4 dominant subtropical forest tree species to moderate high temperature].

    PubMed

    Sun, Gu-chou; Zhao, Ping

    2007-06-01

    By using CO2 exchange system and chlorophyll fluorescence method, the magnitude of mesophyllic conductance (g(m)), namely the CO2 transfer conductance from intercellular space to chloroplast, in the leaves of four dominant subtropical forest tree species under moderate high temperature (38 degrees C) was studied. The results revealed that sun or early-successional species Schima superba had a higher g(m) than mesophytic and shade-tolerant species, such as Castanopsis hystrix, C. fissa and Cryptocarya concinna, and the leaves under full direct light had a higher g(m) than those under shade. The average g(m) of the four test trees from 25 degrees C to 38 degrees C was 1.59 +/- 0.27, and the responses of g(m) to temperature were dependant on the tree species and their leaf type (sun or shade leaves). Because the diffusion of CO2 in water was only about 1.25, g(m) might be controlled by a protein-related process besides temperature. Moderate high temperature could increase the g(m) value, resulting in the increase of CO2 concentration and carboxylation rate in chloroplasts. Comparing with that of S. superba, the carboxylation rate of C. hystrix, C. fissa and C. concinna was significantly increased by moderate high temperature, regardless of under full direct light or shading, indicating that moderate high temperature would favor the succession of mid- and late-successional species.

  3. The Effect of Operating Temperature on De-pressurized Conduction Cooldown for a High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, Brian E.; Woaye-Hune, Antony; Simoneau, Jan-Patrice; Gabeloteau, Thierry; Lefort, Frederic; Haque, Hamidul; Lommers, Lewis

    2004-07-01

    Passive decay heat removal through conduction and radiation (i.e., conduction cooldown) is a key feature of the high temperature reactor (HTR) designs currently being developed. Several evaluations of conduction cooldown performance have been performed previously for current HTR designs with core outlet temperatures of around 850 degrees Celsius. However, additional work is required to assess the impact of adopting alternate operating conditions, such as those of the Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept (e.g., 1000 degrees Celsius outlet temperature). This study examines the effect of reactor operating temperature on de-pressurized conduction cooldown results. Numerical simulations of a de-pressurized conduction cooldown event for a prismatic block HTR are performed using STAR-CD{sup R}, a commercially available computational-fluid dynamics/ heat-transfer code. In parallel, calculations are performed using THERMIX, a code used in the German HTR program. These calculations first are performed for a design based on the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) configuration with an outlet temperature of 850 degrees Celsius. The calculations then are extended to VHTR operating conditions to assess the thermal consequences of higher outlet temperatures, and potentially lower inlet temperatures, on the fuel and reactor vessel. Increasing the outlet temperature to VHTR conditions (approximately 1000 degrees Celsius) results in a relatively small increase in the peak fuel temperature. A more significant effect results from changing the inlet temperature, since this change affects a much larger volume of graphite in the reactor. In all cases, changes in the operating temperature primarily influence only the early phases of the transient. The long-term behavior-governed by the quasi-steady-state balance of the decay heat power, the geometry, and the heat transport properties of the system-is less sensitive to such changes. Therefore, the significance

  4. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed us to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which has taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, our new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach our goal. New features are being added to the control system which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending.

  5. A moderate change in temperature induces changes in fatty acid composition of storage and membrane lipids in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Ellers, Jacintha

    2010-02-01

    A moderate change in ambient temperature can lead to vital physiological and biochemical adjustments in ectotherms, one of which is a change in fatty acid composition. When temperature decreases, the composition of membrane lipids (phospholipid fatty acids) is expected to become more unsaturated to be able to maintain homeoviscosity. Although different in function, storage lipids (triacylglycerol fatty acids) are expected to respond to temperature changes in a similar way. Age-specific differences, however, could influence this temperature response between different life stages. Here, we investigate if fatty acid composition of membrane and storage lipids responds similarly to temperature changes for two different life stages of Orchesella cincta. Juveniles and adults were cold acclimated (15 degrees C-->5 degrees C) for 28 days and then re-acclimated (5 degrees C-->15 degrees C) for another 28 days. We found adult membranes had a more unsaturated fatty acid composition than juveniles. Membrane lipids became more unsaturated during cold acclimation, and a reversed response occurred during warm acclimation. Membrane lipids, however, showed no warm acclimation, possibly due to the moderate temperature change. The ability to adjust storage lipid composition to moderate changes in ambient temperature may be an underestimated fitness component of temperature adaptation because fluidity of storage lipids permits accessibility of enzymes to energy reserves.

  6. Regional Skin Temperature Response to Moderate Aerobic Exercise Measured by Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Bouzas Marins, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infrared thermography (IRT) does not require contact with the skin, and it is a convenient, reliable and non-invasive technique that can be used for monitoring the skin temperature (TSK). Objectives: The aim of this study was to monitor the variations in the regional TSK during exercise on 28 regions of interest (ROIs) (forehead, face, chest, abdomen, back, lumbar, anterior and posterior neck, and posterior and anterior views of the right and left hands, forearms, upper arms, thighs, and legs) with IRT. Patients and Methods: 12 physically active young males were monitored with IRT during the following three phases: a) 30 minutes before exercise b) while performing one hour of moderate intensity exercise on a treadmill at 60% of the VO2max, and c) 60 minutes after exercise. Results: During pre-exercise, all TSK reached a steady-state (P ≤ 0.05), which ensured adequate thermal stabilisation. At the beginning of exercise, there was a significant reduction in the TSK in most ROIs after 10 minutes of activity, except for the lower limbs (legs and thighs). After one hour of recovery, in the anterior view of the hands and thighs and in the posterior view of the legs, there were significant increases in the TSK compared to pre-exercise. Conclusions: There were significant distinctions in the skin temperature distribution during exercise according to the activity of the area under consideration during exercise, which may be important in the development of physiological models and heat flux analyses for different purposes. PMID:27217931

  7. Adhesive carrier particles for rapidly hydrated sorbent for moderate-temperature dry flue gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; You, Changfu; Song, Chenxing

    2010-06-15

    A rapidly hydrated sorbent for moderate-temperature dry flue gas desulfurization was prepared by rapidly hydrating adhesive carrier particles and lime. The circulation ash from a circulating fluidized bed boiler and chain boiler ash, both of which have rough surfaces with large specific surface areas and specific pore volumes, can improve the adhesion, abrasion resistance, and desulfurization characteristics of rapidly hydrated sorbent when used as the adhesive carrier particles. The adhesion ability of sorbent made from circulation ash is 67.4% higher than that of the existing rapidly hydrated sorbent made from fly ash, the abrasion ratio is 76.2% lower, and desulfurization ability is 14.1% higher. For sorbent made from chain boiler ash, the adhesion ability is increased by 74.7%, the desulfurization ability is increased by 30.3%, and abrasion ratio is decreased by 52.4%. The abrasion ratios of the sorbent made from circulation ash having various average diameters were all about 9%, and their desulfurization abilities were similar (approximately 150 mg/g).

  8. Pretreatment of Corn Stover by Soaking in Aqueous Ammonia at Moderate Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tea Hyun; Lee, Y. Y.

    Soaking in aqueous ammonia at moderate temperatures was investigated as a method of pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis as well as simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF) of corn stover. The method involves batch treatment of the feedstock with aqueous ammonia (15-30 wt%) at 40-90°C for 6-24 h. The optimum treatment conditions were found to be 15 wt% of NH3, 60°C, 1∶6 of solid-to-liquid ratio, and 12 h of treatment time. The treated corn stover retained 100% glucan and 85% of xylan, but removed 62% of lignin. The enzymatic digestibility of the glucan content increased from 17 to 85% with 15 FPU/g-glucan enzyme loading, whereas the digestibility of the xylan content increased to 78%. The treated corn stover was also subjected to SSCF test using Spezyme-CP and recombinant Escherichia coli (KO11). The SSCF of the soaking in aqueous ammonia treated corn stover resulted in an ethanol concentration of 19.2 g/L from 3% (w/v) glucan loading, which corresponds to 77% of the maximum theoretical yield based on glucan and xylan.

  9. When do self-discrepancies predict negative emotions? Exploring formal operational thought and abstract reasoning skills as moderators.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Erin N; Holmberg, Nicole J; Lovejoy, M Christine; Pittman, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in higher-order cognitive abilities may be an important piece to understanding how and when self-discrepancies lead to negative emotions. In the current study, three measures of reasoning abilities were considered as potential moderators of the relationship between self-discrepancies and depression and anxiety symptoms. Participants (N = 162) completed measures assessing self-discrepancies, depression and anxiety symptoms, and were administered measures examining formal operational thought, and verbal and non-verbal abstract reasoning skills. Both formal operational thought and verbal abstract reasoning were significant moderators of the relationship between actual:ideal discrepancies and depressive symptoms. Discrepancies predicted depressive symptoms for individuals with higher levels of formal operational thought and verbal abstract reasoning skills, but not for those with lower levels. The discussion focuses on the need to consider advanced reasoning skills when examining self-discrepancies.

  10. 980nm diode laser pump modules operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jenna; Semenic, Tadej; Leisher, Paul; Bhunia, Avijit; Mashanovitch, Milan; Renner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Existing thermal management technologies for diode laser pumps place a significant load on the size, weight and power consumption of High Power Solid State and Fiber Laser systems, thus making current laser systems very large, heavy, and inefficient in many important practical applications. This problem is being addressed by the team formed by Freedom Photonics and Teledyne Scientific through the development of novel high power laser chip array architectures that can operate with high efficiency when cooled with coolants at temperatures higher than 50 degrees Celsius and also the development of an advanced thermal management system for efficient heat extraction from the laser chip array. This paper will present experimental results for the optical, electrical and thermal characteristics of 980 nm diode laser pump modules operating effectively with liquid coolant at temperatures above 50 degrees Celsius, showing a very small change in performance as the operating temperature increases from 20 to 50 degrees Celsius. These pump modules can achieve output power of many Watts per array lasing element with an operating Wall-Plug-Efficiency (WPE) of >55% at elevated coolant temperatures. The paper will also discuss the technical approach that has enabled this high level of pump module performance and opportunities for further improvement.

  11. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  12. Methods of Controlling the Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2008-01-01

    The operating temperature of a loop heat pipe (LHP) is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC); the latter is in turn determined by the balance among the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, the amount of subcooling carried by the liquid returning to the CC, and the amount of heat exchanged between the CC and ambient. The LHP operating temperature can be controlled at a desired set point by actively controlling the CC temperature. The most common method is to cold bias the CC and use electric heater power to maintain the CC set point temperature. The required electric heater power can be large when the condenser sink is very cold. Several methods have been developed to reduce the control heater power, including coupling block, heat exchanger and separate subcooler, variable conductance heat pipe, by-pass valve with pressure regulator, secondary evaporator, and thermoelectric converter. The paper discusses the operating principles, advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  13. Solid oxide fuel cell operable over wide temperature range

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    2001-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  14. The oxidation of Ba dosed Mo(100) surfaces with O/sub 2/ at moderately high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Blair, D.S.; Paffett, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The oxidation of Mo(100) and Ba-covered Mo(100) by O/sub 2/ have been examined at moderately high temperature (700 to 1400/sup 0/K) using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicate that the Ba or BaO overlayer retards but does not prevent oxidation of the underlying Mo surface. The high temperature surface chemistry of the O/Ba/Mo surface is described. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Walker R; Bermel, Peter; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C N; Marton, Christopher H; Jensen, Klavs F; Senkevich, Jay J; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2013-04-02

    The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system design, which we name the microthermophotovoltaic (μTPV) generator. The approach is predicted to be capable of up to 32% efficient heat-to-electricity conversion within a millimeter-scale form factor. Although considerable technological barriers need to be overcome to reach full performance, we have performed a robust experimental demonstration that validates the theoretical framework and the key system components. Even with a much-simplified μTPV system design with theoretical efficiency prediction of 2.7%, we experimentally demonstrate 2.5% efficiency. The μTPV experimental system that was built and tested comprises a silicon propane microcombustor, an integrated high-temperature photonic crystal selective thermal emitter, four 0.55-eV GaInAsSb thermophotovoltaic diodes, and an ultra-high-efficiency maximum power-point tracking power electronics converter. The system was demonstrated to operate up to 800 °C (silicon microcombustor temperature) with an input thermal power of 13.7 W, generating 344 mW of electric power over a 1-cm(2) area.

  16. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Walker R.; Bermel, Peter; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.; Marton, Christopher H.; Jensen, Klavs F.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system design, which we name the microthermophotovoltaic (μTPV) generator. The approach is predicted to be capable of up to 32% efficient heat-to-electricity conversion within a millimeter-scale form factor. Although considerable technological barriers need to be overcome to reach full performance, we have performed a robust experimental demonstration that validates the theoretical framework and the key system components. Even with a much-simplified μTPV system design with theoretical efficiency prediction of 2.7%, we experimentally demonstrate 2.5% efficiency. The μTPV experimental system that was built and tested comprises a silicon propane microcombustor, an integrated high-temperature photonic crystal selective thermal emitter, four 0.55-eV GaInAsSb thermophotovoltaic diodes, and an ultra-high-efficiency maximum power-point tracking power electronics converter. The system was demonstrated to operate up to 800 °C (silicon microcombustor temperature) with an input thermal power of 13.7 W, generating 344 mW of electric power over a 1-cm2 area. PMID:23440220

  17. Moderate temperature sodium cells. V - Discharge reactions and rechargeability of NiS and NiS2 positive electrodes in molten NaAlCl4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Elliot, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    NiS2 and NiS have been characterized as high energy density rechargeable positive electrodes for moderate-temperature Na batteries of the configuration, Na(1)/beta double prime-Al2O3/NaAlCl4(1), NiSx. The batteries operate in the temperature range 170 - 190 C. Positive electrode reactions during discharge/charge cycles have been characterized. Excellent rechargeability of the batteries has been demonstrated by extended cell cycling. A Na/NiS2 cell, operating at 190 C, exceeded 600 deep discharge/charge cycles with practically no capacity deterioration. The feasibility of secondary Na/NiSx batteries with specific energies equal to or greater than 50 Wh/lb and cycle lifes exceeding 1000 deep discharge/charge cycles has been demonstrated.

  18. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-07-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of Silicon-on-Insulator HTOP-01 Operational Amplifier for Wide Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronics capable of operation under extreme temperatures are required in many of NASA space exploration missions. Aerospace and military applications, as well as some terrestrial industries constitute environments where electronic systems are anticipated to be exposed to extreme temperatures and wide-range thermal swings. Electronics that are able to withstand and operate efficiently in such harsh environments would simplify, if not eliminate, traditional thermal control elements and their associated structures for proper ambient operation. As a result, overall system mass would be reduced, design would be simplified, and reliability would be improved. Electronic parts that are built utilizing silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are known to offer better radiation-tolerance compared to their conventional silicon counterparts, provide faster switching, and consume less power. They also exhibit reduced leakage current and, thus, they are often tailored for high temperature operation. These attributes make SOI-based devices suitable for use in harsh environments where extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings are anticipated. A new operational amplifier, based on silicon-on-insulator technology and geared for high temperature well-logging applications, was recently introduced by Honeywell Corporation. This HTOP-01 dual precision operational amplifier is a low power device, operates on a single supply, and has an internal oscillator and an external clocking option [1]. It is rated for operation from -55 C to +225 C with a maximum output current capability of 50 mA. The amplifier chip is designed as a 14-pin, hermetically-sealed device in a ceramic package. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specifications.

  20. Amplifier circuit operable over a wide temperature range

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ronald D.; Cannon, William L.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier circuit having stable performance characteristics over a wide temperature range from approximately 0.degree. C up to as high as approximately 500.degree. C, such as might be encountered in a geothermal borehole. The amplifier utilizes ceramic vacuum tubes connected in directly coupled differential amplifier pairs having a common power supply and a cathode follower output stage. In an alternate embodiment, for operation up to 500.degree. C, positive and negative power supplies are utilized to provide improved gain characteristics, and all electrical connections are made by welding. Resistor elements in this version of the invention are specially heat treated to improve their stability with temperature.

  1. Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1994-01-01

    In the method of operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber (20) containing an array of cells (12) having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas (F) contacts the outside of the cells (12) and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850.degree. C., where N.sub.2 gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells (12) in any case when the generating chamber (20) temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550.degree. C. to 800.degree. C., to eliminate cracking within the cells (12).

  2. Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Bratton, R.J.

    1994-04-26

    A method is described for operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber containing an array of cells having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas contacts the outside of the cells and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850 C, where N[sub 2] gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells in any case when the generating chamber temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550 C to 800 C, to eliminate cracking within the cells. 2 figures.

  3. Effect of operating microscope light on brain temperature during craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Gayatri, Parthasarathi; Menon, Girish G; Suneel, Puthuvassery R

    2013-07-01

    Operating microscopes used during neurosurgery are fitted with xenon light. Burn injuries have been reported because of xenon microscope lighting as the intensity of xenon light is 300 W. We designed this study to find out if the light of operating microscope causes an increase in temperature of the brain tissue, which is exposed underneath. Twenty-one adult patients scheduled for elective craniotomies were enrolled. Distal esophageal temperature (T Eso), brain temperature under the microscope light (T Brain), and brain temperature under dura mater (T Dura) were measured continuously at 15-minute intervals during microscope use. The irrigation fluid temperature, room temperature, intensity of the microscope light, and the distance of the microscope from the brain surface were kept constant. The average age of the patients was 44±15 years (18 males and 3 females). The mean duration of microscope use was 140±39 minutes. There were no significant changes in T Brain and T Dura and T Eso over time. T Dura was significantly lower than T Brain both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. T Brain was significantly lower than T Eso both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. The T Dura remained significantly lower than T Eso at 0, 60, and 90 minutes. Our study shows that there is no significant rise in brain temperature under xenon microscope light up to 120 minutes duration, at intensity of 60% to 70%, from a distance of 20 to 25 cm from the brain surface.

  4. Performance of High Temperature Operational Amplifier, Type LM2904WH, under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Operation of electronic parts and circuits under extreme temperatures is anticipated in NASA space exploration missions as well as terrestrial applications. Exposure of electronics to extreme temperatures and wide-range thermal swings greatly affects their performance via induced changes in the semiconductor material properties, packaging and interconnects, or due to incompatibility issues between interfaces that result from thermal expansion/contraction mismatch. Electronics that are designed to withstand operation and perform efficiently in extreme temperatures would mitigate risks for failure due to thermal stresses and, therefore, improve system reliability. In addition, they contribute to reducing system size and weight, simplifying its design, and reducing development cost through the elimination of otherwise required thermal control elements for proper ambient operation. A large DC voltage gain (100 dB) operational amplifier with a maximum junction temperature of 150 C was recently introduced by STMicroelectronics [1]. This LM2904WH chip comes in a plastic package and is designed specifically for automotive and industrial control systems. It operates from a single power supply over a wide range of voltages, and it consists of two independent, high gain, internally frequency compensated operational amplifiers. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specifications.

  5. Respiration as a percentage of daily photosynthesis in whole plants is homeostatic at moderate, but not high, growth temperatures.

    PubMed

    Atkin, O K; Scheurwater, I; Pons, T L

    2007-01-01

    Here, we investigated the impact of temperature on the carbon economy of two Plantago species from contrasting habitats. The lowland Plantago major and the alpine Plantago euryphylla were grown hydroponically at three constant temperatures: 13, 20 and 27 degrees C. Rates of photosynthetic CO(2) uptake (P) and respiratory CO(2) release (R) in shoots and R in roots were measured at the growth temperature using intact plants. At each growth temperature, air temperatures were changed to establish short-term temperature effects on the ratio of R to P (R/P). In both species, R/P was essentially constant in plants grown at 13 and 20 degrees C. However, R/P was substantially greater in 27 degrees C-grown plants, particularly in P. euryphylla. The increase in R/P at 27 degrees C would have been even greater had biomass allocation to roots not decreased with increasing growth temperature. Short-term increases in air temperature increased R/P in both species, with the effects of air temperature being most pronounced in 13 degrees C-grown plants. We conclude that temperature-mediated changes in biomass allocation play an important role in determining whole-plant R/P values, and, while homeostasis of R/P is achieved across moderate growth temperatures, homeostasis is not maintained when plants are exposed to growth temperatures higher than usually experienced in the natural habitat.

  6. Improved Nominal Operating Cell Temperature (NOCT) test procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L.; Berns, D.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is developed to improve testing of Nominal Operating Cell Temperature (NOCT) as it applies to solar energy conversion modules. NOCT is a direct reflection of module thermal design and is closely related to the representative ambient temperature. It is also a key to array energy production and estimates of module lifetimes. Present NOCT test and evaluation procedures are inconsistent, producing significant scatter. Test refinements would specify a clear sky, the addition of 10% to the insolation level for ground reflection, the addition of a ground emission factor of 0.8 (at 30C ground temperature), an effective wind direction of 135 degrees from the North, and a module tilt of 30 degrees from the horizon.

  7. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip-sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal-semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution.

  8. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    PubMed Central

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip–sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal–semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution. PMID:26936427

  9. Sterilization of ginseng using a high pressure CO2 at moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Fariba; Annabi, Nasim; Titus, Mamata; Valtchev, Peter; Tumilar, Aldric

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using high pressure CO2 for sterilization of Ginseng powder, as an alternative method to conventional techniques such as gamma-irradiation and ethylene oxide. The Ginseng sample used in this study was originally contaminated with fungi and 5 x 10(7) bacteria/g that was not suitable for oral use. This is the first time that high pressure CO2 has been used for the sterilization of herbal medicine to decrease the total aerobic microbial count (TAMC) and fungi. The effect of the process duration, operating pressure, temperature, and amount of additives on the sterilization efficiency of high pressure CO2 were investigated. The process duration was varied over 15 h; the pressure between 100 and 200 bar and the temperature between 25 and 75 degrees C. A 2.67-log reduction of bacteria in the Ginseng sample was achieved after long treatment time of 15 h at 60 degrees C and 100 bar, when using neat carbon dioxide. However, the addition of a small quantity of water/ethanol/H2O2 mixture, as low as 0.02 mL of each additive/g Ginseng powder, was sufficient for complete inactivation of fungi within 6 h at 60 degrees C and 100 bar. At these conditions the bacterial count was decreased from 5 x 10(7) to 2.0 x 10(3) TAMC/g complying with the TGA standard for orally ingested products. A 4.3 log reduction in bacteria was achieved at 150 bar and 30 degrees C, decreasing the TAMC in Ginseng sample to 2,000, below the allowable limit. However, fungi still remained in the sample. The complete inactivation of both bacteria and fungi was achieved within 2 h at 30 degrees C and 170 bar using 0.1 mL of each additive/g Ginseng. Microbial inactivation at this low temperature opens an avenue for the sterilization of many thermally labile pharmaceutical and food products that may involve sensitive compounds to gamma-radiation and chemically reactive antiseptic agents.

  10. Moderation of neoclassical impurity accumulation in high temperature plasmas of helical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; Calvo, I.; Satake, S.; Alonso, A.; Nunami, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Sato, M.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Liniers, M.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Ochando, M.; Parra, F.; Sugama, H.; Zhezhera, A.; The LHD Experimental Team; The TJ-II Team

    2017-01-01

    Achieving impurity and helium ash control is a crucial issue in the path towards fusion-grade magnetic confinement devices, and this is particularly the case of helical reactors, whose low-collisionality ion-root operation scenarios usually display a negative radial electric field which is expected to cause inwards impurity pinch. In this work we discuss, based on experimental measurements and standard predictions of neoclassical theory, how plasmas of very low ion collisionality, similar to those observed in the impurity hole of the large helical device (Yoshinuma et al and The LHD Experimental Group 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 062002, Ida et al and The LHD Experimental Group 2009 Phys. Plasmas 16 056111 and Yokoyama et al and LHD Experimental Group 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 143), can be an exception to this general rule, and how a negative radial electric field can coexist with an outward impurity flux. This interpretation is supported by comparison with documented discharges available in the International Stellarator-Heliotron Profile Database, and it can be extrapolated to show that achievement of high ion temperature in the core of helical devices is not fundamentally incompatible with low core impurity content.

  11. Effect of Temperature on the Aging rate of Li Ion Battery Operating above Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Feng; Tan, Cher Ming; Pecht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is known to have a significant impact on the performance, safety, and cycle lifetime of lithium-ion batteries (LiB). However, the comprehensive effects of temperature on the cyclic aging rate of LiB have yet to be found. We use an electrochemistry-based model (ECBE) here to measure the effects on the aging behavior of cycled LiB operating within the temperature range of 25 °C to 55 °C. The increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB during cycling at elevated temperature is found to relate mainly to the degradations at the electrodes, and that the degradation of LCO cathode is larger than graphite anode at elevated temperature. In particular, the formation and modification of the surface films on the electrodes as well as structural/phase changes of the LCO electrode, as reported in the literatures, are found to be the main contributors to the increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB with temperature for the specific operating temperature range. Larger increases in the Warburg elements and cell impedance are also found with cycling at higher temperature, but they do not seriously affect the state of health (SoH) of LiB as shown in this work. PMID:26245922

  12. Effect of Temperature on the Aging rate of Li Ion Battery Operating above Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Leng, Feng; Tan, Cher Ming; Pecht, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Temperature is known to have a significant impact on the performance, safety, and cycle lifetime of lithium-ion batteries (LiB). However, the comprehensive effects of temperature on the cyclic aging rate of LiB have yet to be found. We use an electrochemistry-based model (ECBE) here to measure the effects on the aging behavior of cycled LiB operating within the temperature range of 25 °C to 55 °C. The increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB during cycling at elevated temperature is found to relate mainly to the degradations at the electrodes, and that the degradation of LCO cathode is larger than graphite anode at elevated temperature. In particular, the formation and modification of the surface films on the electrodes as well as structural/phase changes of the LCO electrode, as reported in the literatures, are found to be the main contributors to the increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB with temperature for the specific operating temperature range. Larger increases in the Warburg elements and cell impedance are also found with cycling at higher temperature, but they do not seriously affect the state of health (SoH) of LiB as shown in this work.

  13. 40 CFR 63.1185 - How do I establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operating temperature of an incinerator? 63.1185 Section 63.1185 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operating temperature of an incinerator? (a) During the performance test, you must establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator as follows: (1) Continuously measure the operating temperature of...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1185 - How do I establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operating temperature of an incinerator? 63.1185 Section 63.1185 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operating temperature of an incinerator? (a) During the performance test, you must establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator as follows: (1) Continuously measure the operating temperature of...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1185 - How do I establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operating temperature of an incinerator? 63.1185 Section 63.1185 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operating temperature of an incinerator? (a) During the performance test, you must establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator as follows: (1) Continuously measure the operating temperature of...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1185 - How do I establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operating temperature of an incinerator? 63.1185 Section 63.1185 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operating temperature of an incinerator? (a) During the performance test, you must establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator as follows: (1) Continuously measure the operating temperature of...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1185 - How do I establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operating temperature of an incinerator? 63.1185 Section 63.1185 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... operating temperature of an incinerator? (a) During the performance test, you must establish the average operating temperature of an incinerator as follows: (1) Continuously measure the operating temperature of...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited by...

  3. SY-101 Rapid Transfer Project Low Temperature Operations Review and Recommendations to Support Lower Temperature Limits

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    2000-01-10

    The lower temperature limit for the 241 SY-101 RAPID transfer project is currently set at 20 F Based on the analysis and recommendations in this document this limit can be lowered to 0 F. Analysis of all structures systems and components (SSCs) indicate that a reduction in operating temperature may be achieved with minor modifications to field-installed equipment. Following implementation of these changes it is recommended that the system requirements be amended to specify a temperature range for transfer or back dilute evolutions of 0 F to 100 F.

  4. Methanol induces low temperature resilient methanogens and improves methane generation from domestic wastewater at low to moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shaswati; Badhe, Neha; De Vrieze, Jo; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature (<20 °C) limits bio-methanation of sewage. Literature shows that hydrogenotrophic methanogens can adapt themselves to low temperature and methanol is a preferred substrate by methanogens in cold habitats. The study hypothesizes that methanol can induce the growth of low-temperature resilient, methanol utilizing, hydrogenotrophs in UASB reactor. The hypothesis was tested in field conditions to evaluate the impact of seasonal temperature variations on methane yield in the presence and absence of methanol. Results show that 0.04% (v/v) methanol increased methane up to 15 times and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The qPCR analysis showed the presence of Methanobacteriales along with Methanosetaceae in large numbers. This indicates methanol induced the growth of both the hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic groups through direct and indirect routes, respectively. This study thus demonstrated that methanol can impart resistance in methanogenic biomass to low temperature and can improve performance of UASB reactor.

  5. Li/CFx Cells Optimized for Low-Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Bhalla, Pooja; Smith, Kiah

    2009-01-01

    Some developments reported in prior NASA Tech Briefs articles on primary electrochemical power cells containing lithium anodes and fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx) cathodes have been combined to yield a product line of cells optimized for relatively-high-current operation at low temperatures at which commercial lithium-based cells become useless. These developments have involved modifications of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries, which are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current-limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. One of two developments that constitute the present combination is, itself, a combination of developments: (1) the use of sub-fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx wherein x<1) cathode material, (2) making the cathodes thinner than in most commercial units, and (3) using non-aqueous electrolytes formulated especially to enhance low-temperature performance. This combination of developments was described in more detail in High-Energy-Density, Low- Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells (NPO-43219), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (July 2007), page 43. The other development included in the present combination is the use of an anion receptor as an electrolyte additive, as described in the immediately preceding article, "Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells" (NPO- 43579). A typical cell according to the present combination of developments contains an anion-receptor additive solvated in an electrolyte that comprises LiBF4 dissolved at a concentration of 0.5 M in a mixture of four volume parts of 1,2 dimethoxyethane with one volume part of propylene carbonate. The proportion, x, of fluorine in the cathode in such a cell lies between 0.5 and 0.9. The best of such cells fabricated to date have exhibited discharge capacities as large as 0.6 A h per gram at a temperature of 50 C when discharged at a rate of C/5 (where C is the magnitude of the

  6. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, G. R.; Gordon, N. T.; Hall, D. J.; Ashby, M. K.; Little, J. C.; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, M. T.; Ashley, T.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source’ of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for, and non-uniformity correction of, high sensitivity staring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, infrared (IR) detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We present results on negative luminescence in the mid- and long-IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1 cm×1 cm. We also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high-performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  7. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Geoff R.; Gordon, Neil T.; Hall, David J.; Little, J. Chris; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, Martin T.; Ashley, Tim

    2004-02-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source" of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very higher performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  8. Infrared Negative Luminescent Devices and Higher Operating Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Tim

    2003-03-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a source' of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  9. Operation and design selection of high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Floegel-Delor, U.; Riedel, T.; Rothfeld, R.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.

    2004-10-01

    Axial and radial high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic bearings are evaluated by their parameters. Journal bearings possess advantages over thrust bearings. High magnetic gradients in a multi-pole permanent magnet (PM) configuration, the surrounding melt textured YBCO stator and adequate designs are the key features for increasing the overall bearing stiffness. The gap distance between rotor and stator determines the specific forces and has a strong impact on the PM rotor design. We report on the designing, building and measuring of a 200 mm prototype 100 kg HTS bearing with an encapsulated and thermally insulated melt textured YBCO ring stator. The encapsulation requires a magnetically large-gap (4-5 mm) operation but reduces the cryogenic effort substantially. The bearing requires 3 l of LN2 for cooling down, and about 0.2 l LN2 h-1 under operation. This is a dramatic improvement of the efficiency and in the practical usage of HTS magnetic bearings.

  10. Towards an operational soil temperature product for Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzelmüller, B.; Westermann, S.; Gisnås, K.; Schuler, T.

    2012-12-01

    In this century, thawing of permafrost is expected to occur in large areas due to climate change, which may become a trigger for climatic feedback mechanisms on the local to global scale. While it is not feasible to cover the vast permafrost areas by ground-based monitoring of soil temperatures in boreholes, wealth of novel multi-sensor-multi-source data could be exploited to assess the thermal ground conditions on large scales. In Norway, a wide range of permafrost conditions occurs - from mountain permafrost over organic-rich wetlands to high-arctic permafrost in Svalbard. Furthermore, gridded data sets from various sources are available so that it is a well-suited test region to evaluate and benchmark the performance of various modeling approaches. While soil temperatures can be modeled using Fourier's law of heat conduction, it is crucial to drive such models by accurate time series of the key input variables at suitable spatial and temporal resolutions. For soil thermal models, these are land surface temperature, snow depth and soil and snow thermal properties. We present a framework for transient and distributed modeling the ground thermal regime in Norway, CryoGRID 2.0. In the model, the subsurface heat flow is treated in terms of 1D heat conduction using the land or snow surface temperature as upper boundary condition. The model features a dynamical representation of the snow cover and explicitly accounts for the heat flux through the snow pack. The model is driven by operationally gridded data of daily air temperature and snow depth available at http://senorge.no. These datasets are available from 1957 to present-day at a spatial resolution of 1 km. The spatial distributions of ground thermal properties (e.g. thermal conductivity) and surface cover are derived from geological maps, borehole measurements and remote sensing data. We present model runs from South Norway highlighting the capacity of the approach to simulate permafrost distribution and duration

  11. Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Szymkowicz, Patrick G.; Northrop, William F

    2012-01-01

    It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that

  12. [Kinetic mechanism and characteristics researches for hydrazine-based NOx removal at moderate to high temperatures].

    PubMed

    Hong, Liu; Chen, De-zhen; Wang, Du; Huang, Su

    2012-08-01

    The kinetic mechanism of NOx reduction with hydrazine hydrate in selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process was studied and verified by the experimental results, the dominant radicals and reactions were confirmed through sensitivity analysis and key parameters in SNCR process have been obtained. The results of numerical simulation based on the proposed mechanism showed that the effective temperatures for SNCR de-NOx process were bimodal distribution with the optimum temperatures being 650 degrees C and 975 degrees C respectively and the lower temperature window fell in the range of 597-747 degrees C; while the experimental results proved the bimodal distribution of effective temperature with peak values being 653 degrees C and 968 degrees C respectively and the lower temperature window was within the range of 587-707 degrees C for hydrazine-based SNCR process, Simulation results and experimental results matched well with respect to reaction behaviors versus temperature. Through sensitivity analysis it had been found that the most effective reaction to reduce NO was the decomposition reaction of N2H4 to NH2 and the most helpful radical was NH2. Compared to ammonia the temperature window of hydrazine-based SNCR process on the lower temperature side is more flexible for application. Decreased O2 concentration would move the temperature window to the right side, which was contrary to that of ammonia; while increased n(N2H4)/n(NO) moved the temperature window to the left side and NO, reduction efficiency was also improved. All of these results showed that hydrazine has lower temperature window than those traditional de-NOx reagents and it will be widely used in application of SNCR as a potential reductant for NOx reduction.

  13. Moderate Physical Work Effects on Performance and Mood during Sustained Operations (SUSOPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    quality of performance contigu’ns to sleep periods, not the long - term effects of the nap. Since no group differences were found, the experimental and...Increased as the sustained operation stretched out into the long hours of night and early morning. We concluded from a comparison of our nap studies that...task, word meory or reading. However, in each case trends toward degraded performance were indicated. Interestingly, there were significant (F=3.36

  14. A Moderated Discussion about Interesting Careers in Aerospace and Mission Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers have one of the lowest unemployment rates in the US, yet many do not work in the field of astronomy because of few permanent traditional options relative to the number of PhDs produced each year. Where do so many astronomers find employment? Learn more at this session. Astronomical training provides the background for many interesting careers. As appropriate to the location of this meeting, this session provides a perspective on what those opportunities may be among aerospace industry-related careers. They are more diverse than you might think. In this session, two speakers with wide ranging experience in the field and a high level view of staffing large projects offer their thoughts. Kathy Flanagan is Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, which will conduct the science and mission operations for the James Webb Space Telescope. This project has involved staffing at many levels of hardware, software, data analysis, science, operations, and outreach. Jeff Grant is sector vice president and general manager of the Space Systems Division at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, and leads the design, build, launch and operations of major systems in space. We invite early career scientists and their mentors to hear their thoughts and ask questions at this session.

  15. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Gyro Temperature Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, J. N.; Noonan, C. H.; Garrick, J.

    1996-01-01

    The geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 1/M series of spacecraft are geostationary weather satellites that use the latest in weather imaging technology. The inertial reference unit package onboard consists of three gyroscopes measuring angular velocity along each of the spacecraft's body axes. This digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) is calibrated and used to maintain spacecraft attitude during orbital delta-V maneuvers. During the early orbit support of GOES-8 (April 1994), the gyro drift rate biases exhibited a large dependency on gyro temperature. This complicated the calibration and introduced errors into the attitude during delta-V maneuvers. Following GOES-8, a model of the DIRA temperature and drift rate bias variation was developed for GOES-9 (May 1995). This model was used to project a value of the DIRA bias to use during the orbital delta-V maneuvers based on the bias change observed as the DIRA warmed up during the calibration. The model also optimizes the yaw reorientation necessary to achieve the correct delta-V pointing attitude. As a result, a higher accuracy was achieved on GOES-9 leading to more efficient delta-V maneuvers and a propellant savings. This paper summarizes the: Data observed on GOES-8 and the complications it caused in calibration; DIRA temperature/drift rate model; Application and results of the model on GOES-9 support.

  16. Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator Demonstrated High-Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2002-01-01

    Space applications that utilize solar thermal energy--such as electric power conversion systems, thermal propulsion systems, and furnaces--require highly efficient solar concentration systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced lightweight primary concentrators, such as inflatable thin films, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios and very high temperatures. Last year, Glenn successfully demonstrated a secondary concentrator throughput efficiency of 87 percent, with a projected efficiency of 93 percent using an antireflective coating. Building on this achievement, Glenn recently successfully demonstrated high-temperature operation of the secondary concentrator when it was used to heat a rhenium receiver to 2330 F. The high-temperature demonstration of the concentrator was conducted in Glenn's 68-ft long Tank 6 thermal vacuum facility equipped with a solar simulator. The facility has a rigid panel primary concentrator that was used to concentrate the light from the solar simulator onto the refractive secondary concentrator. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center provided a rhenium cavity, part of a solar thermal propulsion engine, to serve as the high-temperature receiver. The prototype refractive secondary concentrator, measuring 3.5 in. in diameter and 11.2 in. long, is made of single-crystal sapphire. A water-cooled splash shield absorbs spillage light outside of the 3.5-in. concentrator aperture. Multilayer foil insulation composed of tungsten, molybdenum, and niobium is used to minimize heat loss from the hightemperature receiver. A liquid-cooled canister calorimeter is used to measure the heat loss through the multilayer foil insulation.

  17. Moderate-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Nearshore North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic defining habitat suitability for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. The purpose of this publication is to provide access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers...

  18. Moderate-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Nearshore North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic defining habitat suitability for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. The purpose of this publication is to provide access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers...

  19. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the Arctic Ocean Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. Of particular interest is the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish (M...

  20. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the Arctic Ocean Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. Of particular interest is the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish (M...

  1. Validation of Two Temperature Pill Telemetry Systems in Humans During Moderate and Strenuous Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    the thermoregulatory controller . The site where core temperature is measured must also respond rapidly and accurately to changes in brain temperature...presumably due to the anatomical proximity to the great vessels of the heart. Once the site of peak temperatura in the esophagus was found, the T". probe was...previously by the FDA. The components used in the TR6B receiver included a transceiver, a microreceiver controller , two I/O boards and a power supply which

  2. Influence of fish meal and supplemental fat on performance of finishing steers exposed to moderate or high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    White, T W; Bunting, L D; Sticker, L S; Hembry, F G; Saxton, A M

    1992-11-01

    Ninety-six Hereford x Angus steers (mean initial BW = 295 kg) were used in two growth experiments conducted at moderate and high ambient temperatures (AT), 48 steers per AT. Within each AT, calves were assigned to six dietary treatments consisting of a basal diet (approximately 60% corn and 20% grass hay) supplemented with either 0, 2.5, or 5% fat and with either soybean meal (SBM) or Menhaden fish meal (FM) included at levels such that a ratio of 16.3 kcal of NEm per kilogram of CP was maintained. Blood and ruminal fluid were collected 40 d before slaughter. During the final 28 d of the moderate AT experiment, apparent digestibility of dietary components was measured in four individually fed steers from each dietary treatment. Steer ADG was not affected by fat, and DMI and efficiency of gain were not affected (P > .10) by treatment. Average daily gain was lower for steers fed FM than for those fed SBM at moderate AT but higher at high AT (CP source x AT interaction; P < .05). Ruminal ratio of acetate to propionate declined linearly with increasing fat at moderate AT but was not affected by fat at high AT (fat x AT interaction trend; P = .08). Plasma urea N concentration increased linearly (P < .05) with increasing fat and was higher (P < .05) in steers kept at high than in those kept at moderate AT. Although apparent digestibility was not altered in steers fed FM, DM and NDF (P < .05) and ADF (P = .07) digestibility decreased with increasing fat in steers fed SBM (CP source x fat interaction).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Effects of a Moderately Lower Temperature on the Proliferation and Degranulation of Rat Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoyu; Yin, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiwei; Chen, Lin; Chen, Jingwen; Han, Xiaodong; Xiang, Zou; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are traditionally considered as key effector cells in IgE-mediated allergic diseases. However, the roles of mast cells have also been implicated in diverse physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells are distributed in various organs and tissues of various species. Some of the organs and tissues, such as testis, skin, and the upper part of the respiratory tract, have a temperature that is lower than the body's core temperature. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a lower temperature on the proliferation and degranulation of rat mast cells. Here, we demonstrate that cell growth was retarded at 35°C compared to 37°C for both rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) and RBL-2H3, a rat mast cell line. Furthermore, RPMC became more susceptible to degranulation at 35°C compared to 37°C. In contrast, degranulation of RBL-2H3 was not as sensitive to temperature change as RPMC. The functionality of mast cells in unique organs with a lower temperature warrants further analysis.

  4. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part I: maximum temperatures in summer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of summer maximum temperatures is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, summer maximum daily temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent heat-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict heat-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that high temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily maximum temperatures during summer over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the summer forecast period of 1 June - 30 September, 2007. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated maximum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme heat episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia, Spain).

  5. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part II: minimum temperatures in winter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of minimum temperatures during winter is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, winter minimum temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent cold-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict cold-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that low temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily minimum temperatures during winter over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the winter forecast period from 1 December 2007 - 31 March 2008. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated minimum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme cold episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia

  6. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  7. Design of broadband QWIPs for operation above BLIP temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guériaux, Vincent; Nedelcu, Alexandru; Coulibaly, Agnes; Dua, Lydie; l'Isle, Nadia Brière de; Trinité, Virginie; Marcadet, Xavier

    2011-05-01

    One of the key features of quantum well infrared photodetectors is the narrow absorption band. This inherently narrow spectral response has been proven to be an excellent asset to enhance the contrast in thermal images. Yet, some applications, as the infrared spectroscopy, require broadband detection. Several approaches have been used to get a broadband response with QWIPs. In particular, superlattices and digital graded barriers in the active layers have been proposed to get transitions between minibands in the first case and multiple transitions in the second case. A number of authors reported stacked and interlaced designs using regular QWIPs. In this article we focus on the interlaced approach. We show that conventional design approaches lead to a systematic extinction of longer wavelengths when the detector operates above BLIP temperature. We investigate both numerically and experimentally the underlying origins of this spectral change. This effect is attributed to an internal electric field redistribution in order to conserve the current flow through the active layer. Based on this study, we propose a specific design for broadband interlaced QWIP. This sample has been grown, processed and characterized. The experimental results present a quasi-independent spectral shape whatever the temperature or bias.

  8. Auxiliary Heating of Geothermally Preheated Water or CO2 - A Potential Solution for Low- to Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Garapati, N.; Adams, B. M.; Randolph, J.; Kuehn, T. H.; Saar, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Typically, low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resources are more effectively used for direct heat energy applications. However, due to high thermal losses during transport, direct use requires that the heat resource is located near the user. Alternatively, we show here that if such a low-temperature geothermal resource is combined with an additional or secondary energy resource, the power production is increased compared to the sum from two separate (geothermal and secondary fuel) power plants (DiPippo et al. 1978) and the thermal losses are minimized because the thermal energy is utilized where it is produced. Since Adams et al. (2015) found that using CO2 as a subsurface working fluid produces more net power than brine at low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource conditions, we compare over a range of parameters the net power and efficiencies of hybrid geothermal power plants that use brine or CO2 as the subsurface working fluid, that are then heated further with a secondary energy source that is unspecified here. Parameters varied include the subsurface working fluid (brine vs. CO2), geothermal reservoir depth (2.5-4.5 km), and turbine inlet temperature (200-600°C) after auxiliary heating. The hybrid power plant is numerically modeled using an iterative coupling approach of TOUGH2-ECO2N/ECO2H (Pruess, 2004) for simulation of the subsurface reservoir and Engineering Equation Solver for well bore fluid flow and surface power plant performance. We find that hybrid power plants that are CO2-based (subsurface) systems have higher thermal efficiencies than the brine based systems at low turbine inlet temperatures. Specifically, our results indicate that geothermal hybrid plants that are CO2-based are more efficient than brine-based systems when the contribution of the geothermal resource energy is higher than 48%.

  9. Assessment of segregation kinetics in water-moderated reactors pressure vessel steels under long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Lavrukhina, Z. V.; Saltykov, M. A.; Fedotova, S. V.; Khodan, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    In reactor pressure vessel (RPV) bcc-lattice steels temper embrittlement is developed under the influence of both operating temperature of ∼300 °C and neutron irradiation. Segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) begin to play a special role in the assessment of the safe operation of the RPV in case of its lifetime extension up to 60 years or more. The most reliable information on the RPV material condition can be obtained by investigating the surveillance specimens (SS) that are exposed to operational factors simultaneously with the RPV itself. In this paper the GB composition in the specimens with different thermal exposure time at the RPV operating temperature as well as irradiated by fast neutrons (E ≥ 0.5 MeV) to different fluences (20-71)·1022 m-2 was studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) including both impurity and main alloying elements content. The data obtained allowed to trace the trend of the operating temperature and radiation-stimulated diffusion influence on the overall segregants level in GB. The revealed differences in the concentration levels of GB segregants in different steels, are due to the different chemical composition of the steels and also due to different grain boundary segregation levels in initial (unexposed) state. The data were used to estimate the RPV steels working capacity for 60 years. The estimation was carried out using both the well-known Langmuir-McLean model and the one specially developed for RPV steels, which takes into account the structure and phase composition of VVER-1000 RPV steels, as well as the long-term influence of operational factors.

  10. The finite temperature behaviour of lattice QCD with moderate to large quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Simulations of lattice QCD with 4 flavours of staggered quarks were performed using the Hybrid algorithm on a 12/sup 3/ /times/ 4 lattice. For quark masses greater than or equal to.1 (lattice units) the finite temperature transition did not appear to be first order. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Insulation and body temperature of prepubescent children wearing a thermal swimsuit during moderate-intensity water exercise.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Kaneda, Koichi; Okura, Masashi; Nomura, Takeo

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated thermal swimsuits (TSS) effects on body temperature and thermal insulation of prepubescent children during moderate-intensity water exercise. Nine prepubescent children (11.0+/-0.7 yrs) were immersed in water (23 degrees C) and pedalled on an underwater cycle-ergometer for 30 min with TSS or normal swimsuits (NSS). The rectal temperature (Tre) was maintained slightly higher with TSS than with NSS. The total insulation (Itotal) was significantly higher with TSS. The DeltaTre, Deltamean body temperature (Tb), and tissue insulation (Itissue) in the NSS condition were correlated with % body fat, which indicated that the insulation layer of subjects with low body fat was thinner than that of obese subjects, and tended to decrease body temperature. Wearing TSS increased Itotal, thereby reducing heat loss from subjects' skin to the water. Consequently, subjects with TSS were able to maintain higher body temperatures. In addition, TSS is especially advantageous for subjects with low body fat to compensate for the smaller Itissue.

  12. Outcomes of Mild to Moderate Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Mitral Valve Operations: A Meta-Analysis of 2,488 Patients.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ibrahim; Koksal, Cengiz; Erkin, Alper; Sacli, Hakan; Demirtas, Mucahit; Percin, Bilal; Diler, Mevriye Serpil; Kirali, Kaan

    2015-12-01

    This meta-analysis examined the prognosis of patients who were found to have mild to moderate functional tricuspid regurgitation during mitral valve operations. Overall, this meta-analysis included 2,488 patients in 10 studies. Compared with the group without tricuspid valve annuloplasty, the probability of not progressing to moderate to severe functional tricuspid regurgitation was significantly higher in the tricuspid valve annuloplasty group. A more aggressive surgical approach involving concomitant tricuspid repair with mitral valve operations may be considered to avoid the development of moderate to severe functional tricuspid regurgitation in the follow-up.

  13. Preparation and characterization of starch nanoparticles via self-assembly at moderate temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengzhen; Qin, Yang; Li, Xiaojing; Sun, Qingjie; Xiong, Liu; Liu, Zhuzhu

    2016-03-01

    Starch nanoparticles (SNPs) were fabricated via short glucan chains self-assembly at 50 °C and their characteristics were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, molecular weight distributions, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that SNPs exhibited spherical particles with a diameter of approximately 30-40 nm. The molecular weight of the SNPs mainly distributed at degree of polymerization (DP) 12 and DP 30. The gelatinization temperature of the SNPs increased dramatically compared to that of native waxy maize starch. The crystallinity of the samples increased as the assembling time increased and showed the same A-type in the X-ray diffraction pattern as native starch. This newly proposed SNPs approach has potential application in starch nanocomposite films due to their high gelatinization temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrogen diffusion at moderate temperatures in p-type Czochralski silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.L.; Ma, Y.; Job, R.; Ulyashin, A.G.

    2004-12-15

    In plasma-hydrogenated p-type Czochralski silicon, rapid thermal donor (TD) formation is achieved, resulting from the catalytic support of hydrogen. The n-type counter doping by TD leads to a p-n junction formation. A simple method for the indirect determination of the diffusivity of hydrogen via applying the spreading resistance probe measurements is presented. Hydrogen diffusion in silicon during both plasma hydrogenation and post-hydrogenation annealing is investigated. The impact of the hydrogenation duration, annealing temperature, and resistivity of the silicon wafers on the hydrogen diffusion is discussed. Diffusivities of hydrogen are determined in the temperature range 270-450 deg. C. The activation energy for the hydrogen diffusion is deduced to be 1.23 eV. The diffusion of hydrogen is interpreted within the framework of a trap-limited diffusion mechanism. Oxygen and hydrogen are found to be the main traps.

  15. Irreversible xenon insertion into a small-pore zeolite at moderate pressures and temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Seoung, Donghoon; Cynn, Hyunchae; Park, Changyong; ...

    2014-09-01

    Pressure drastically alters the chemical and physical properties of materials and allows structural phase transitions and chemical reactions to occur that defy much of our understanding gained under ambient conditions. Particularly exciting is the high-pressure chemistry of xenon, which is known to react with hydrogen and ice at high pressures and form stable compounds. Here, we show that Ag16Al16Si24O8·16H2O (Ag-natrolite) irreversibly inserts xenon into its micropores at 1.7 GPa and 250 °C, while Ag+ is reduced to metallic Ag and possibly oxidized to Ag2+. In contrast to krypton, xenon is retained within the pores of this zeolite after pressure releasemore » and requires heat to desorb. This irreversible insertion and trapping of xenon in Ag-natrolite under moderate conditions sheds new light on chemical reactions that could account for the xenon deficiency relative to argon observed in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres.« less

  16. Irreversible xenon insertion into a small-pore zeolite at moderate pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Seoung, Donghoon; Cynn, Hyunchae; Park, Changyong; Choi, Kwang -Yong; Blom, Douglas A.; Evans, William J.; Kao, Chi -Chang; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2014-09-01

    Pressure drastically alters the chemical and physical properties of materials and allows structural phase transitions and chemical reactions to occur that defy much of our understanding gained under ambient conditions. Particularly exciting is the high-pressure chemistry of xenon, which is known to react with hydrogen and ice at high pressures and form stable compounds. Here, we show that Ag16Al16Si24O8·16H2O (Ag-natrolite) irreversibly inserts xenon into its micropores at 1.7 GPa and 250 °C, while Ag+ is reduced to metallic Ag and possibly oxidized to Ag2+. In contrast to krypton, xenon is retained within the pores of this zeolite after pressure release and requires heat to desorb. This irreversible insertion and trapping of xenon in Ag-natrolite under moderate conditions sheds new light on chemical reactions that could account for the xenon deficiency relative to argon observed in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres.

  17. Toward High-Energy-Density, High-Efficiency, and Moderate-Temperature Chip-Scale Thermophotovoltaics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-02

    to simplify the test and character- ization. Thermal energy generated from chemical reaction inside the reactor heats up the Si and is consequently...for μTPV and TPV systems in general. As we shall see below, high-temperature material stability and reactivity of the Si reactor prompt the use of a Si...based photonic crystal thermal emitter. Experimental Results for Two Silicon Reactor Designs The theoretical formalism developed can accurately

  18. Process for CO.sub.2 capture using zeolites from high pressure and moderate temperature gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V [Morgantown, WV; Stevens, Robert W [Morgantown, WV

    2012-03-06

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from a gas stream comprised of CO.sub.2 and other gaseous constituents using a zeolite sorbent in a swing-adsorption process, producing a high temperature CO.sub.2 stream at a higher CO.sub.2 pressure than the input gas stream. The method utilizes CO.sub.2 desorption in a CO.sub.2 atmosphere and effectively integrates heat transfers for optimizes overall efficiency. H.sub.2O adsorption does not preclude effective operation of the sorbent. The cycle may be incorporated in an IGCC for efficient pre-combustion CO.sub.2 capture. A particular application operates on shifted syngas at a temperature exceeding 200.degree. C. and produces a dry CO.sub.2 stream at low temperature and high CO.sub.2 pressure, greatly reducing any compression energy requirements which may be subsequently required.

  19. Shelf-Life and Safety Enhancement of Processed Meat by Hydrostatic Pressure in Combination with Moderate Temperature and Biopreservatives, Phase IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cells/g of four pathogens and four spoilage bacteria along with pediocin AcH or one of two bacteriocin -based biopreservatives . After vacuum-packaging...The effectiveness of a moderate hydrostatic pressure in combination with moderate temperature and biopreservatives to reduce high populations of

  20. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in Paso Robles, California

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, L.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    Ninety-eight geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted, and a geologic map and cross sections were compiled. Detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The geological and geophysical work delineated the basement highs and trough-like depressions that can exercise control on the occurrence of the thermal waters. The Rinconada fault was also evident. Cross sections drawn from oil well logs show the sediments conforming against these basement highs and filling the depressions. It is along the locations where the sediments meet the basement highs that three natural warm springs in the area occur. Deep circulation of meteoric waters along faults seems to be a reasonable source for the warm water. The Santa Margarita, Pancho Rico, and Paso Robles Formations would be the first permeable zones that abut the faults through which water would enter. Temperatures and interpretation of well logs indicate the warmest aquifer at the base of the Paso Robles Formation. Warm water may be entering higher up in the section, but mixing with water from cooler zones seems to be evident. Geothermometry indicates reservoir temperatures could be as high as 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F).

  1. Enzyme inactivation and quality preservation of sake by high-pressure carbonation at a moderate temperature.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Shota; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Fujii, Kazuyoshi; Ohdoi, Ritsushi; Sakamoto, Koji; Yamane, Yuichi; Miyake, Masaki; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Osajima, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a high-pressure carbonation treatment on the change in quality of sake during storage was investigated. Measurements of the amino acidity and isovaleraldehyde content of carbonated sake (20 MPa pressure at 40, 45 and 50 degrees C for 7, 21 and 33 min, respectively) as well as of heat-treated sake (reaching temperature of 65 degrees C and immediately cooled) were almost unchanged during storage at 3 and 20 degrees C. Glucose in the sake subjected to these treatments was retained at an almost constant under the same storage conditions, except for the sake carbonated at 40 degrees C and stored at 20 degrees C. In contrast, the amino acidity, and glucose and isovaleraldehyde contents of non-pasteurized (fresh) sake increased during storage at both temperatures. The sake samples subjected to the carbonation treatment and heat treatment both gave better sensory scores than the fresh sake sample after 6 month of storage at 3 and 20 degrees C, especially at 3 degrees C for the flavor. These results suggest that the high-pressure carbonation treatment is an effective new technique for preserving the quality of sake.

  2. Apparatus for measurements of transport properties of thin films under sulfur atmosphere at moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clamagirand, J. M.; Ares, J. R.; Diaz-Chao, P.; Pascual, A.; Ferrer, I. J.; Sánchez, C.

    2015-04-01

    An experimental system able to simultaneously measure the electrical resistance and the thermopower of metallic and semiconducting thin films (with thicknesses from ~nm to ~µm) under sulfur atmosphere from room temperature up to 400 °C and total pressures >0.5-1 mbar is designed and implemented. Calibration tests of the system were performed with palladium foils and films as well as p-type and n-type sulfide semiconducting films: iron disulfide and palladium monosulfide. Uncertainties of measured thermopower and resistance values are less than 10% and 5%, respectively. To check the capability of the system under sulfur atmosphere, in situ measurements of transport properties during sulfuration of palladium films were carried out. During the process, sulfur partial pressure and film temperature are accurately controlled. Apparatus may be used to determine the evolution of transport properties of different metal sulfides during their formation/decomposition processes, opening new pathways to investigate the thermoelectric properties of more complex thin film sulfides.

  3. A study of six operational sea surface temperature analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Folland, C.K.; Gordon, M.; Parker, D.E. ); Reynolds, R.W. )

    1993-01-01

    This study results from recommendations made by a 1984 WMO Expert Committee on Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction Relevant to Long-Range Forecasting. The committee suggested that comparisons be carried out between monthly sea surface temperature (SST) analyses routinely made in several different countries in near real time. Emphasis was placed on the improvement of such analyses for use in operational long-range forecasting, especially for initializing dynamical long-range forecasting models. Six different monthly averaged SST analyses have been compared. The extent to which the analyses agree on several space scales and for regions covering the global oceans is shown, together with estimates of the magnitude of various types of errors. Independent estimates of SST obtained from expendable bathythermographs indicate that the monthly mean Meteorological Office (UKMO), Climate Analysis Center (CAC) in situ, and CAC blended analyses showed small differences (biases) from the expendable bathythermograph data. The differences were near to or below the margins of statistical significance over the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere tropics. Apparent negative biases in the analyses were noted, however, in the extratropical Southern Hemisphere. The authors finish with a discussion of recent improvements to the accuracy and scope of SST analyses for both long-range forecasting and climate studies. These improvements include an integrated analysis of ice limit, in situ and satellite SST data, and the developing use of optimum interpolation as a method of SST analysis. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela [State College, PA; Narayanan, Deepa [Redmond, WA

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  5. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the nearshore North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry; Brown, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability of habitat for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on nearshore marine habitats or processes. The data cover the Temperate Northern Pacific Ocean as defined by the 'Marine Ecosystems of the World' (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy. The spatial resolution of the SST data is 4-km grid cells within 20 km of the shore. The data span a 29-year period - from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements compiled into monthly means as part of the Pathfinder versions 5.0 and 5.1 (PFSST V50 and V51) Project. The processing methods used to transform the data from their native Hierarchical Data Format Scientific Data Set (HDF SDS) to georeferenced, spatial datasets capable of being read into geographic information systems (GIS) software are explained. In addition, links are provided to examples of scripts involved in the data processing steps. The scripts were written in the Python programming language, which is supported by ESRI's ArcGIS version 9 or later. The processed data files are also provided in text (.csv) and Access 2003 Database (.mdb) formats. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema.

  6. Influence of protein percentage and degradability on performance of lactating cows during moderate temperature.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, G E; Huber, J T; Wallentine, M V; Johnston, N P; Andrus, D

    1989-07-01

    Sixty high producing Holstein cows (15/treatment) averaging 157 d postpartum were offered the following diets: high protein (18.5%), high rumen degradability (60%); high protein (18.0%), medium degradability (41%); medium protein (15.4%), high degradability (61%); medium protein (15.0%), medium degradability (46%). All diets contained 32% corn silage, 15% alfalfa haylage, and 10% whole cottonseed. Degradabilities were determined by the ficin method and were lowered by replacing soybean meal with meat and bone meal and brewers dried grains. Cows were milked three times daily and the study was conducted from May 11 to June 23 in Provo, UT during ascending day temperatures but cool nights. Milk yields were not different for the respective treatments (36.9, 35.4, 34.8, and 36.7 kg/d), but milk fat was higher at high protein degradability: 3.11, 2.89, 3.04, 2.78%, respectively, resulting in a tendency toward higher FCM. Lower acetate and propionate and acetate:propionate ratios were observed for medium degradability diets and were consistent with lower milk fat. Rumen NH3, butyrate, valerate, isovalerate, 2-methyl butyrate, and blood urea N were higher for cows on high protein diets but were not affected by degradability. Serum glucose and cortisol were not significantly affected by protein treatment, but serum triiodothyronine was lower on high protein; the interaction effect for thyroxine was significant.

  7. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  8. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data and seasonal pattern analysis for the Arctic Ocean ecoregions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. In particular, the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish, is in question. This poses an intriguing problem for future research of Arctic environments - one that will require examination of long-term SST records. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use Arctic SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on habitats and/or processes in the Arctic Ocean. The data cover the Arctic ecoregions as defined by the "Marine Ecoregions of the World" (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy as well as the region to the north from approximately 46°N to about 88°N (constrained by the season and data coverage). The data span a 29-year period from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements that had been compiled into monthly means at 4-kilometer grid cell spatial resolution. The processed data files are available in ArcGIS geospatial datasets (raster and point shapefiles) and also are provided in text (.csv) format. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying latitude/longitude coordinates, and realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema. A seasonal analysis of these Arctic ecoregions reveals a wide range of SSTs experienced throughout the Arctic, both over the course of an annual cycle and within each month of that cycle. Sea ice distribution plays a major role in SST regulation in all Arctic ecoregions.

  9. Coexistance of two Different Methane Hydrate Phases at Moderate Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzinger, J.

    2003-12-01

    For a better understanding of the formation and decomposition of natural gas hydrates, detailed data on their thermodynamical properties are an important prerequisite. Until now, it was generally accepted that small guest molecules such as methane and carbondioxid form structure I hydrates whereas large molecules such as propane form structure II hydrates. Expectedly, natural gas hydrates and synthesized methane hydrates grown under natural conditions, prefer structure I. The formation of structure II methane hydrates was only observed at very high pressures ( 100 MPa) by Chou et al. 1 In this contribution, results from Raman spectroscopic investigation on pure methane hydrates are presented. It will be shown, that a coexistence of structure I and structure II methane hydrates at pressures between 3.0 and 9.0 MPa and at temperatures between -15° C and +15° C is possible. However, structure II methane hydrate are present as a metastable phase in a kinetic inhibited equilibrium with the established structure I methane hydrate phase. A slight variation of the T-P-x-conditions initiates the transformation of the structure II methane hydrates into structure I hydrates. This (exothermic) process results in a re crystallization of the complete hydrate phase until a stable state is reached. It turned out, that the instability of the structure II methane hydrate phase is also the driving force for other processes, such as the exchange of CH4 with CO2: A change in the composition of the gaseous phase through the addition of CO2 induces an immediate replacement of methane with carbondioxid in the structure II hydrate. In contrast, the exchange of CH4 with CO2 in structure I hydrates is a very slow process. 1 Chou, I-M.; Sharma, A.; Burrus, R. C.; Shu, J.; Mao, H-k.; Hemley, R. J.; Goncharov, A. F.; Stern, L. A.; Kirby, S. H.; PNAS; vol. 97; no. 25;13484-13487 (2000)

  10. Operating temperatures of open-rack installed photovoltaic inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Wang, L.; Kurtz, S.; Wu, J.; Quan, P.; Sorensen, R.; Liu, S.; Bai, J. B.; Zhu, Z. W.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a model for evaluating the heat-sink and component temperatures of open-rack installed photovoltaic inverters. These temperatures can be used for predicting inverter reliability. Inverter heat-sink temperatures were measured for inverters connected to three grid-connected PV (photovoltaic) test systems in Golden, Colorado, US. A model is proposed for calculating the inverter heat-sink temperature based on the ambient temperature, the ratio of the consumed power to the rated power of the inverter, and the measured wind speed. To verify and study this model, more than one year of inverter DC/AC power, irradiance, wind speed, and heat sink temperature rise data were collected and analyzed. The model is shown to be accurate in predicting average inverter temperatures, but will require further refinement for prediction of transient temperatures.

  11. High-rate anaerobic treatment of domestic wastewater at ambient operating temperatures: A review on benefits and drawbacks.

    PubMed

    Gomec, Cigdem Yangin

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on high-rate anaerobic sewage treatment at ambient operating temperatures while presenting the benefits and drawbacks. Since domestic sewage is reported as the main point-source pollutant on a global scale, its treatment deserves ample research. In most of the cities and towns of some developing countries, wastewater produced in households is still discharged into the nearest water body without subjected any treatment. Therefore, simple, affordable, and effective sewage treatment systems are required. Anaerobic digestion of wastewater is reported as a sustainable alternative as recovery of energy is provided while nutrients are preserved for reuse. Anaerobic sewage treatment is certainly not limited to regions of hot climates but it also offers treatment potential in sub-tropical and even in moderate climatic regions due to their favorable temperature conditions. Since many sewage-like dilute wastewaters are discharged at low ambient temperatures especially under moderate climate conditions (15 to 20 degrees C), heating the wastewater to maintain mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C) for anaerobic treatment necessitates high energy and certainly high operating costs. Thus, the development of anaerobic treatment systems operated at ambient temperatures without doubt will have a great ecological and economic impact. High-rate anaerobic treatment systems, especially upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, have been occupying a noticeable position for sewage treatment in several tropical countries where artificial heating can be eliminated. However, in spite of their undeniable advantages, there are certain drawbacks of anaerobic sewage treatment at low operating temperatures which should be clarified. Among them, the main concern for anaerobic treatment application is its producing effluents that barely comply with the standarts for reuse in agriculture or discharge to the environment. Therefore, the effluents from

  12. Performance limitation and the role of core temperature when wearing light-weight workwear under moderate thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Philipp; Burtscher, Martin; Heinrich, Dieter; Bottoni, Giuliamarta; Caven, Barnaby; Bechtold, Thomas; Teresa Herten, Anne; Hasler, Michael; Faulhaber, Martin; Nachbauer, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to achieve an understanding about the relationship between heat stress and performance limitation when wearing a two-layerfire-resistant light-weight workwear (full-clothed ensemble) compared to an one-layer short sports gear (semi-clothed ensemble) in an exhaustive, stressful situation under moderate thermal condition (25°C). Ten well trained male subjects performed a strenuous walking protocol with both clothing ensembles until exhaustion occurred in a climatic chamber. Wearing workwear reduced the endurance performance by 10% (p=0.007) and the evaporation by 21% (p=0.003), caused a more pronounced rise in core temperature during submaximal walking (0.7±0.3 vs. 1.2±0.4°C; p≤0.001) and from start till exhaustion (1.4±0.3 vs. 1.8±0.5°C; p=0.008), accelerated sweat loss (13±2 vs. 15±3gmin(-1); p=0.007), and led to a significant higher heart rate at the end of cool down (103±6 vs. 111±7bpm; p=0.004). Correlation analysis revealed that core temperature development during submaximal walking and evaporation may play important roles for endurance performance. However, a critical core temperature of 40°C, which is stated to be a crucial factor for central fatigue and performance limitation, was not reached either with the semi-clothed or the full-clothed ensemble (38.3±0.4 vs. 38.4±0.5°C). Additionally, perceived exertion did not increase to a higher extent parallel with the rising core temperature with workwear which would substantiate the critical core temperature theory. In conclusion, increased heat stress led to cardiovascular exercise limitation rather than central fatigue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Study on inhibition of NO(x) and dioxin emissions by carbohydrazide under moderate to high temperatures].

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhen-Zhen; Chen, De-Zhen; Hong, Xiu; Li, Xian-Wei; Yu, Yong-Mei; Wang, Yong-Ji

    2011-09-01

    Experimental researches were carried out on the inhibition effects of carbohydrazide (CHZ) on NO(x) and dioxin emissions under moderate to high temperatures, namely De-NO(x) effect of CHZ was investigated in the temperature range of 450-1 050 degrees C with the O2 concentration between 10.1% and 16.7%; and its suppression effect on dioxin emissions was studied both by spraying CHZ solution into incineration flue gases and by mixing CHZ in iron ore in the sintering pot. It was proved that CHZ could reduce NO(x) with dual temperature-linked peaks, i. e. the De-NO(x) efficiency peaks appeared both around 600 degrees C and 967 degrees C, with a vale around 850 degrees C. The results also indicated that CHZ had good suppression effect on dioxin synthesis in the fly ash precipitated in the temperature range of 250-450 degrees C when CHZ solution was sprayed into flue gases at proper temperatures; comparably, for dioxin emissions from the iron ore sintering pot, the more CHZ mixed into iron ore, the less dioxin emissions took place; when the mixture proportion of CHZ (mass fraction) was up to 0.1%, the concentration of PCDD/Fs in TEQ in sintering flue gases was decreased by 78.8% compared to the scenario without CHZ mixing, showing that CHZ is an effective inhibitors for reducing dioxin emissions in the iron ore sintering furnace. All of these results showed that CHZ is a potential inhibitor for dioxin emissions from incinerators and iron ore sintering furnaces as well as a reduction agent for NO(x).

  14. Improvement of the operation rate of medical temperature measuring devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotra, O.; Boyko, O.; Zyska, T.

    2014-08-01

    A method of reducing measuring time of temperature measurements of biological objects based on preheating the resistance temperature detector (RTD) up to the temperature close to the temperature to be measured, is proposed. It has been found that at the same measuring time, the preheating allows to decrease the measurement error by a factor of 5 to 45 over the temperature range of 35-41°С. The measurement time is reduced by 1.6-4 times over this range, keeping the same value of the measurement error.

  15. Impact of pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid under moderate temperature on hydrolysis of corn stover with two enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Keshwani, Deepak

    2014-03-01

    Pretreatment of corn stover with dilute sulfuric acid at moderate temperature was investigated, and glucan digestibility by Cellic CTec2 and Celluclast on the pretreated biomass was compared. Pretreatments were carried out from 60 to 180 min at the temperature from 105 to 135 °C, with acid concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2% (w/v). Significant portion of xylan was removed during pretreatment, and the glucan digestibility by CTec2 was significantly better than that by Celluclast in all cases. Analysis showed that glucan digestibility by both two enzymes correlated directly with the extent of xylan removal in pretreatment. Confidence interval was built to give a more precise range of glucan conversion and to test the significant difference among pretreatment conditions. Response surface model was built to obtain the optimal pretreatment condition to achieve high glucan conversion after enzymatic hydrolysis. Considering the cost and energy savings, the optimal pretreatment condition of 1.75% acid for 160 min at 135 °C was determined, and glucan conversion can achieve the range from 72.86 to 76.69% at 95% confidence level after enzymatic hydrolysis, making total glucan recovery up to the range from 89.42 to 93.25%.

  16. Daily Scheduled High Fat Meals Moderately Entrain Behavioral Anticipatory Activity, Body Temperature, and Hypothalamic c-Fos Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Christian M.; Gunapala, Keith M.; King, Oliver D.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    When fed in restricted amounts, rodents show robust activity in the hours preceding expected meal delivery. This process, termed food anticipatory activity (FAA), is independent of the light-entrained clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, yet beyond this basic observation there is little agreement on the neuronal underpinnings of FAA. One complication in studying FAA using a calorie restriction model is that much of the brain is activated in response to this strong hunger signal. Thus, daily timed access to palatable meals in the presence of continuous access to standard chow has been employed as a model to study FAA in rats. In order to exploit the extensive genetic resources available in the murine system we extended this model to mice, which will anticipate rodent high fat diet but not chocolate or other sweet daily meals (Hsu, Patton, Mistlberger, and Steele; 2010, PLoS ONE e12903). In this study we test additional fatty meals, including peanut butter and cheese, both of which induced modest FAA. Measurement of core body temperature revealed a moderate preprandial increase in temperature in mice fed high fat diet but entrainment due to handling complicated interpretation of these results. Finally, we examined activation patterns of neurons by immunostaining for the immediate early gene c-Fos and observed a modest amount of entrainment of gene expression in the hypothalamus of mice fed a daily fatty palatable meal. PMID:22815954

  17. Removal efficiency and methanogenic activity profiles in a pilot-scale UASB reactor treating settled sewage at moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Seghezzo, L; Guerra, R G; González, S M; Trupiano, A P; Figueroa, M E; Cuevas, C M; Zeeman, G; Lettinga, G

    2002-01-01

    The performance of a sewage treatment system consisting of a settler followed by an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor is described. Mean ambient and sewage temperature were 16.5 and 21.6 degrees C, respectively. Total Chemical Oxygen Demand (CODt) concentration averaged 224.2 and 152.6 mg/L, for raw and settled sewage, respectively. The effluent concentration was 68.5 mgCODt/L. Total and suspended COD removal efficiencies of approximately 70 and 80%, respectively, have been observed in the system at a mean Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) of 2 + 5 h. Maximum COD removal efficiency was achieved in the UASB reactor when upflow velocity (Vup) was 0.43 m/h (HRT = 6 h). Mean Specific Methanogenic Activity (SMA) and Volatile Suspended Solids (VSS) concentration in the granular sludge bed were 0.11 gCOD-CH4/gVSS.d and 30.0 gVSS/Lsludge, respectively. SMA was inversely related to VSS concentration, and both parameters varied along the sludge bed height. The Solids Retention Time (SRT) in the reactor was 450 days. Sludge characteristics have not been affected by changes of up to one month in Vup in the range 0.28-0.85 m/h (HRT 3-9 h). This system or two UASB reactors in series could be an alternative for sewage treatment under moderate temperature conditions.

  18. Effects of platinum stagnation surface on the lean extinction limits of premixed methane/air flames at moderate surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiswall, J.T.; Li, J.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Im, H.G.

    2011-01-15

    A stagnation flow reactor was used to study the effects of platinum on the lean flammability limits of atmospheric pressure premixed methane/air flames at moderate stagnation surface temperatures. Experimental and computational methods were used to quantify the equivalence ratio at the lean extinction limit ({phi}{sub ext}) and the corresponding stagnation surface temperature (T{sub s}). A range of flow rates (57-90 cm/s) and corresponding strain rates were considered. The results indicate that the gas-phase methane/air flames are sufficiently strong relative to the heterogeneous chemistry for T{sub s} conditions less than 750 K that the platinum does not affect {phi}{sub ext}. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimentally observed trends and further indicate that higher reactant flow rates (>139 cm/s) and levels of dilution (>{proportional_to}10% N{sub 2}) are required to weaken the gas-phase flame sufficiently for surface reaction to play a positive role on extending the lean flammability limits. (author)

  19. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) have been used for thermal control of several NASA and commercial orbiting spacecraft. The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC). Most LHPs use the CC temperature for feedback control of its operating temperature. There exists a thermal resistance between the heat source to be cooled by the LHP and the LHP's CC. Even if the CC set point temperature is controlled precisely, the heat source temperature will still vary with its heat output. For most applications, controlling the heat source temperature is of most interest. A logical question to ask is: "Can the heat source temperature be used for feedback control of the LHP operation?" A test program has been implemented to answer the above question. Objective is to investigate the LHP performance using the CC temperature and the heat source temperature for feedback control

  20. Standard-resistor compounds with adjustable operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oe, T.; Urano, C.; Kaneko, N.; Hadano, M.; Takenaka, K.

    2013-10-01

    The broad peak of the temperature-resistivity curve ρ(T) in antiperovskite Mn3AgN can potentially be used to develop materials with temperature coefficients of resistance as low as that of the widely used standard-resistor material Manganin. By partially replacing Ag by In or Mn by Fe, we suppressed the peak height of ρ(T) in Mn3AgN to levels that in some cases were lower than that of Manganin, and by co-doping with Cu and In or Fe, the peak temperature could be controlled over a temperature width of at least 50 K around room temperature while retaining the broadness of ρ(T) curve.

  1. Faraday isolator stably operating in a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, E. A.; Voitovich, A. V.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    A method of stabilizing Faraday isolator characteristics at varying temperatures is proposed in this letter. The method is based on the use of a magnetic system with an inhomogeneous magnetic field and a magneto-optical element holder made of a material with a high value of thermal expansion coefficient. Changing the rotation angle of the polarization plane of radiation caused by the temperature variation of the magneto-optical element and the temperature dependence of its Verdet constant is compensated by its shifting in the magnetic field. The developed device demonstrates an isolation ratio of more than 40 dB at a temperature range of 25 °C. Estimates show the possibility of providing an isolation ratio of more than 45 dB in a temperature range of 60 °C.

  2. Moderate temperature detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marciniec, J. W.; Briggs, R. J.; Sood, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    P-side backside reflecting constant, photodiode characterization, and photodiode diffusion and G-R currents were investigated in an effort to develop an 8 m to 12 m infrared quantum detector using mercury cadmium telluride. Anodization, phosphorus implantation, and the graded band gap concept were approaches considered for backside formation. Variable thickness diodes were fabricated with a back surface anodic oxide to investigate the effect of this surface preparation on the diffusion limited zero bias impedance. A modeling technique was refined to thoroughly model diode characteristics. Values for the surface recombination velocity in the depletion region were obtained. These values were improved by implementing better surface damage removal techniques.

  3. Transferred Overhauser DNP: A Fast, Efficient Approach for Room Temperature (13)C ODNP at Moderately Low Fields and Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Dey, Arnab; Banerjee, Abhishek; Chandrakumar, Narayanan

    2017-07-27

    Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) is investigated at a moderately low field (1.2 T) for natural abundance (13)C NMR of small molecules in solution state at room temperature. It is shown that ODNP transferred from (1)H to (13)C by NMR coherence transfer is in general significantly more efficient than direct ODNP of (13)C. Compared to direct (13)C ODNP, we demonstrate over 4-fold higher (13)C sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio, SNR), achieved in one-eighth of the measurement time by transferred ODNP (t-ODNP). Compared to the (13)C signal arising from Boltzmann equilibrium in a fixed measurement time, this is equivalent to about 1500-fold enhancement of (13)C signal by t-ODNP, as against a direct (13)C ODNP signal enhancement of about 45-fold, both at a moderate ESR saturation factor of about 0.25. This owes in part to the short polarization times characteristic of (1)H. Typically, t-ODNP reflects the essentially uniform ODNP enhancements of all protons in a molecule. Although the purpose of this work is to establish the superiority of t-ODNP vis-à-vis direct (13)C ODNP, a comparison is also made of the SNR in t-ODNP experiments with standard high resolution NMR as well. Finally, the potential of t-ODNP experiments for 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy of small molecules is demonstrated in 2D (1)H-(13)C HETCOR experiments at natural abundance, with decoupling in both dimensions.

  4. Flashlamp Pumped, Room Temperature, Nd:YAG Laser Operating at 0.946 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Walsh, Brian M.

    1998-01-01

    Room temperature operation of flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG at 0.946 micrometers was achieved with a laser rod having undoped ends. Performance was characterized and compared with 1.064 micrometer operation and other quasi four level lasers.

  5. Primary and Secondary Lithium Batteries Capable of Operating at Low Temperatures for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Brandon, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives and Approach: (1) Develop advanced Li ]ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -60 to +60 C). Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (2) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (3) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  6. Primary and Secondary Lithium Batteries Capable of Operating at Low Temperatures for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Brandon, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives and Approach: (1) Develop advanced Li ]ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -60 to +60 C). Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (2) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (3) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  7. Extreme High and Low Temperature Operation of the Silicon-On-Insulator Type CHT-OPA Operational Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    A new operational amplifier chip based on silicon-on-insulator technology was evaluated for potential use in extreme temperature environments. The CHT-OPA device is a low power, precision operational amplifier with rail-to-rail output swing capability, and it is rated for operation between -55 C and +225 C. A unity gain inverting circuit was constructed utilizing the CHT-OPA chip and a few passive components. The circuit was evaluated in the temperature range from -190 C to +200 C in terms of signal gain and phase shift, and supply current. The investigations were carried out to determine suitability of this device for use in space exploration missions and aeronautic applications under wide temperature incursion. Re-restart capability at extreme temperatures, i.e. power switched on while the device was soaked at extreme temperatures, was also investigated. In addition, the effects of thermal cycling under a wide temperature range on the operation of this high performance amplifier were determined. The results from this work indicate that this silicon-on-insulator amplifier chip maintained very good operation between +200 C and -190 C. The limited thermal cycling had no effect on the performance of the amplifier, and it was able to re-start at both -190 C and +200 C. In addition, no physical degradation or packaging damage was introduced due to either extreme temperature exposure or thermal cycling. The good performance demonstrated by this silicon-on-insulator operational amplifier renders it a potential candidate for use in space exploration missions or other environments under extreme temperatures. Additional and more comprehensive characterization is, however, required to establish the reliability and suitability of such devices for long term use in extreme temperature applications.

  8. Low-temperature operation of a Buck DC/DC converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Myers, Ira T.

    1995-01-01

    Low-temperature (77 K) operation of a 42/28 V, 175 W, 50 kHz PWM Buck DC/DC converter designed with commercially available components is reported. Overall, the converter losses decreased at 77 K compared to room temperature operation. A full-load efficiency of 97 percent was recorded at liquid-nitrogen temperature, compared to 95.8 percent at room temperature. Power MOSFET operation improved significantly where as the output rectifier operation deteriorated at low-temperature. The performance of the output filter inductor and capacitor did not change significantly at 77 K compared to room temperature performance. It is possible to achieve high-density and high efficiency power conversion at low-temperatures due to improved electronic, electrical and thermal properties of materials.

  9. Lithium Batteries and Supercapacitors Capable of Operating at Low Temperatures for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Brandon, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co - solvents (i.e., methyl propionate and ethyl butyrate) in a number of prototype cells: center dot Successfully scaled up low temperature technology to 12 Ah size prismatic Li - ion cells (Quallion, LCC), and demonstrated good performance down to - 60 o C. center dot Demonstrated wide operating temperature range performance ( - 60 o to +60 o C) in A123 Systems LiFePO 4 - based lithium - ion cells containing methyl butyrate - based low temperature electrolytes. These systems were also demonstrated to have excellent cycle life performance at ambient temperatures, as well as the ability to be cycled up to high temperatures.

  10. Lithium Batteries and Supercapacitors Capable of Operating at Low Temperatures for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Brandon, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co - solvents (i.e., methyl propionate and ethyl butyrate) in a number of prototype cells: center dot Successfully scaled up low temperature technology to 12 Ah size prismatic Li - ion cells (Quallion, LCC), and demonstrated good performance down to - 60 o C. center dot Demonstrated wide operating temperature range performance ( - 60 o to +60 o C) in A123 Systems LiFePO 4 - based lithium - ion cells containing methyl butyrate - based low temperature electrolytes. These systems were also demonstrated to have excellent cycle life performance at ambient temperatures, as well as the ability to be cycled up to high temperatures.

  11. Thermal measurement. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A; White, E R; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B C

    2015-02-06

    Modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit's glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum's bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz(-1/2), an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. High accuracy magnetic field sensors with wide operation temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'evskii, I. S.; Vinichenko, A. N.; Rubakin, D. I.; Bolshakova, I. A.; Kargin, N. I.

    2016-10-01

    n+InAs(Si) epitaxial thin films heavily doped by silicon and Hall effect magnetic field sensors based on this structures have been fabricated and studied. We have demonstrated the successful formation of highly doped InAs thin films (∼100 nm) with the different intermediate layer arrangement and appropriate electron mobility values. Hall sensors performance parameters have been measured in wide temperature range. Obtained sensitivity varied from 1 to 40 Ω/T, while the best linearity and lower temperature coefficient have been found in the higher doped samples with lower electron mobility. We attribute this to the electron system degeneracy and decreased phonon contribution to electron mobility and resistance.

  13. GC/MS Gas Separator Operates At Lower Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Gutnikov, George

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show palladium/silver tube used to separate hydrogen carrier gas from gases being analyzed in gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) system functions satisfactorily at temperatures as low as 70 to 100 degrees C. Less power consumed, and catalytic hydrogenation of compounds being analyzed diminished. Because separation efficiency high even at lower temperatures, gas load on vacuum pump of mass spectrometer kept low, permitting use of smaller pump. These features facilitate development of relatively small, lightweight, portable GC/MS system for such uses as measuring concentrations of pollutants in field.

  14. Use of Self-Operated Auditory Prompts To Decrease Off-Task Behavior for a Student with Autism and Moderate Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Teresa A.; Seltzer, Allison; Heflin, L. Juane; Alberto, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    The use of a self-operated auditory prompting system by a 12-year-old student with autism and moderate mental retardation to decrease inappropriate and off-task behavior was examined. Results indicated a significant decrease in the number of teacher-delivered prompts required by the student to engage in appropriate behaviors and remain on task.…

  15. CSER 99-002: CSER for unrestricted moderation of sludge material with two-boat operations in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC21-C

    SciTech Connect

    LAN, J.S.

    1999-04-29

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report was prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest under contract to BWHC. This document establishes the criticality safety parameters for unrestricted moderation of Sludge material with two-boat operations in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC-21C.

  16. Use of a Proximity Sensor Switch for "Hands Free" Operation of Computer-Based Video Prompting by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Alexandria N.; Mechling, Linda C.; Spencer, Galen P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of a "hands free" approach for operating video prompts to complete multi-step tasks was measured. Students advanced the video prompts by using a motion (hand wave) over a proximity sensor switch. Three young adult females with a diagnosis of moderate intellectual disability participated in the study.…

  17. Reduced light and moderate water deficiency sustain nitrogen assimilation and sucrose degradation at low temperature in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Majláth, Imre; Darko, Eva; Palla, Balázs; Nagy, Zoltán; Janda, Tibor; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-02-01

    The rate of carbon and nitrogen assimilation is highly sensitive to stress factors, such as low temperature and drought. Little is known about the role of light in the simultaneous effect of cold and drought. The present study thus focused on the combined effect of mild water deficiency and different light intensities during the early cold hardening in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum L.) cultivars with different levels of cold sensitivity. The results showed that reduced illumination decreased the undesirable effects of photoinhibition in the case of net photosynthesis and nitrate reduction, which may help to sustain these processes at low temperature. Mild water deficiency also had a slight positive effect on the effective quantum efficiency of PSII and the nitrate reductase activity in the cold. Glutamine synthesis was affected by light rather than by water deprivation during cold stress. The invertase activity increased to a greater extent by water deprivation, but an increase in illumination also had a facilitating effect on this enzyme. This suggests that both moderate water deficiency and light have an influence on nitrogen metabolism and sucrose degradation during cold hardening. A possible rise in the soluble sugar content caused by the invertase may compensate for the decline in photosynthetic carbon assimilation indicated by the decrease in net photosynthesis. The changes in the osmotic potential can be also correlated to the enhanced level of invertase activity. Both of them were regulated by light at normal water supply, but not at water deprivation in the cold. However, changes in the metabolic enzyme activities and osmotic adjustment could not be directly contributed to the different levels of cold tolerance of the cultivars in the early acclimation period.

  18. Live performance of male broilers subjected to constant or increasing air velocities at moderate temperatures with a high dew point.

    PubMed

    Dozier, W A; Lott, B D; Branton, S L

    2005-08-01

    This study examined the effects of varying air velocities vs. a constant air velocity with a cyclic temperature curve of 25-30-25 degrees C and a dew point of 23 degrees C on broilers from 28 to 49 d of age. Four replicate trials were conducted. In each trial, 742 male broilers were randomly allocated to 6 floor pens or 2 air velocity tunnels, with each tunnel consisting of 4 pens. Bird density, feeder, and waterer space were similar across all pens (53 birds/ pen; 0.07 m2/bird). The treatments were control (still air), constant air velocity of 120 m/min, and increasing air velocity (90 m/min from 28 to 35 d, 120 m/min from 36 to 42 d, and 180 m/min from 43 to 49 d). Birds grown in a still air environment gained less weight, consumed less feed, and converted feed less efficiently between 28 and 49 d than birds subjected to moving air (constant or increasing). Growth responses between the air velocity treatments were similar from 28 to 35 and 36 to 42 d of age. Increasing air velocity to 180 m/min improved (P < or = 0.02) the growth rate of broilers from 43 to 49 d of age over birds receiving an air velocity of 120 m/min, but the incidence of mortality was not affected. These results provide evidence that increasing air velocity from 120 to 180 m/min is beneficial to broilers weighing 2.5 kg or greater when exposed to moderate temperatures.

  19. Structural and Electrical Characterization of SiO2 Gate Dielectrics Deposited from Solutions at Moderate Temperatures in Air.

    PubMed

    Esro, Mazran; Kolosov, Oleg; Jones, Peter J; Milne, William I; Adamopoulos, George

    2017-01-11

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is the most widely used dielectric for electronic applications. It is usually produced by thermal oxidation of silicon or by using a wide range of vacuum-based techniques. By default, the growth of SiO2 by thermal oxidation of silicon requires the use of Si substrates whereas the other deposition techniques either produce low quality or poor interface material and mostly require high deposition or annealing temperatures. Recent investigations therefore have focused on the development of alternative deposition paradigms based on solutions. Here, we report the deposition of SiO2 thin film dielectrics deposited by spray pyrolysis in air at moderate temperatures of ≈350 °C from pentane-2,4-dione solutions of SiCl4. SiO2 dielectrics were investigated by means of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS, XRD, UFM/AFM, admittance spectroscopy, and field-effect measurements. Data analysis reveals smooth (RRMS < 1 nm) amorphous films with a dielectric constant of about 3.8, an optical band gap of ≈8.1 eV, leakage current densities in the order of ≈10(-7) A/cm(2) at 1 MV/cm, and high dielectric strength in excess of 5 MV/cm. XPS measurements confirm the SiO2 stoichiometry and FTIR spectra reveal features related to SiO2 only. Thin film transistors implementing spray-coated SiO2 gate dielectrics and C60 and pentacene semiconducting channels exhibit excellent transport characteristics, i.e., negligible hysteresis, low leakage currents, high on/off current modulation ratio on the order of 10(6), and high carrier mobility.

  20. Silicon solar cell monitors high temperature furnace operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Silicon solar cell, attached to each viewpoint, monitors that incandescent emission from the hot interior of a furnace without interfering with the test assembly or optical pyrometry during the test. This technique can provide continuous indication of hot spots or provide warning of excessive temperatures in cooler regions.

  1. Low threshold interband cascade lasers operating above room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, B.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Mid-IR type-II interband cascade lasers were demonstrated in pulsed mode at temperatures up to 325 K and in continuous mode up to 200 K. At 80 K, the threshold current density was 8.9 A/cm2 and a cw outpout power of 140 mW/facet was obtained.

  2. Electrolytes for Wide Operating Temperature Lithium-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Provided herein are electrolytes for lithium-ion electrochemical cells, electrochemical cells employing the electrolytes, methods of making the electrochemical cells and methods of using the electrochemical cells over a wide temperature range. Included are electrolyte compositions comprising a lithium salt, a cyclic carbonate, a non-cyclic carbonate, and a linear ester and optionally comprising one or more additives.

  3. Rationale and design of the Exercise Intensity Trial (EXCITE): A randomized trial comparing the effects of moderate versus moderate to high-intensity aerobic training in women with operable breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Exercise Intensity Trial (EXcITe) is a randomized trial to compare the efficacy of supervised moderate-intensity aerobic training to moderate to high-intensity aerobic training, relative to attention control, on aerobic capacity, physiologic mechanisms, patient-reported outcomes, and biomarkers in women with operable breast cancer following the completion of definitive adjuvant therapy. Methods/Design Using a single-center, randomized design, 174 postmenopausal women (58 patients/study arm) with histologically confirmed, operable breast cancer presenting to Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) will be enrolled in this trial following completion of primary therapy (including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy). After baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomized to one of two supervised aerobic training interventions (moderate-intensity or moderate/high-intensity aerobic training) or an attention-control group (progressive stretching). The aerobic training interventions will include 150 mins.wk-1 of supervised treadmill walking per week at an intensity of 60%-70% (moderate-intensity) or 60% to 100% (moderate to high-intensity) of the individually determined peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) between 20-45 minutes/session for 16 weeks. The progressive stretching program will be consistent with the exercise interventions in terms of program length (16 weeks), social interaction (participants will receive one-on-one instruction), and duration (20-45 mins/session). The primary study endpoint is VO2peak, as measured by an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test. Secondary endpoints include physiologic determinants that govern VO2peak, patient-reported outcomes, and biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence/mortality. All endpoints will be assessed at baseline and after the intervention (16 weeks). Discussion EXCITE is designed to investigate the intensity of aerobic training required to induce optimal improvements in

  4. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives of this work are: (1) Develop advanced Li -ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -30 to +60C). (2) Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (3) Improve the high voltage stability of these candidate electrolytes systems to enable operation up to 5V with high specific energy cathode materials. (4) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (5) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  5. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives of this work are: (1) Develop advanced Li -ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -30 to +60C). (2) Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (3) Improve the high voltage stability of these candidate electrolytes systems to enable operation up to 5V with high specific energy cathode materials. (4) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (5) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  6. Impacts of operation of CVP regulating reservoirs on water temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, L.W.

    1996-06-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets and transmits electric power throughout 15 western states. Western's Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (Sierra Nevada Region) markets approximately 1,480 megawatts (MW) of firm power (and 100 MW of seasonal peaking capacity) from the Central Valley Project (CVP) and other sources and markets available nonfirm power from the Washoe Project. Western's mission is to sell and deliver electricity generated from CVP powerplants. The hydroelectric facilities of the CVP are operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation). Reclamation manages and releases water in accordance with the various acts authorizing specific projects and with enabling legislation. Western's capacity and energy sales must be in conformance with the laws that govern its sale of electrical power. Further, Western's hydropower operations at each facility must comply with minimum and maximum flows and other constraints set by Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or other agencies, acting in accord with law or policy.

  7. High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

    2012-09-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this

  8. Moderate evidence to recommend submucosal injection of dexamethasone in reducing post-operative oedema and pain after third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Freda, Nicolas M; Keenan, Analia Veitz

    2016-06-01

    of -1.79 (95% CI -3.28 to -0.30) and showed a statistically significant difference favouring dexamethasone.ConclusionsThe review found moderate quality evidence that submucosal injections of dexamethasone reduced post-operative oedema and pain compared to a placebo following impacted third molar surgery. There was no significant difference, in regards to trismus, between placebo and dexamethasone.

  9. Operating experience using venturi flow meters at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.C.

    1992-06-01

    Experiences using commercial venturi to measure single phase helium flow near 4 K (degree Kelvin) for cooling superconducting magnets have been presented. The mass flow rate was calculated from the differential pressure and the helium density evaluated from measured pressure and temperature. The venturi flow meter, with a full range of 290 g/s (0.29 Kg/s) at design conditions, has been found to be reliable and accurate. The flow measurements have been used, with great success, for evaluating the performance of a cold centrifugal compressor, the thermal acoustic heat load of a cryogenic system and the cooling of a superconducting magnet after quench.

  10. Operating experience using venturi flow meters at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiences using commercial venturi to measure single phase helium flow near 4 K (degree Kelvin) for cooling superconducting magnets have been presented. The mass flow rate was calculated from the differential pressure and the helium density evaluated from measured pressure and temperature. The venturi flow meter, with a full range of 290 g/s (0.29 Kg/s) at design conditions, has been found to be reliable and accurate. The flow measurements have been used, with great success, for evaluating the performance of a cold centrifugal compressor, the thermal acoustic heat load of a cryogenic system and the cooling of a superconducting magnet after quench.

  11. Operation of silicon single photon avalanche diodes at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Rech, Ivan; Labanca, Ivan; Armellini, Giacomo; Gulinatti, Angelo; Ghioni, Massimo; Cova, Sergio

    2007-06-01

    This article reports a complete characterization of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) at temperatures down to 120 K. We show that deep cooling of the device by means of a compact liquid-nitrogen Dewar brings several advantages, such as extremely low dark counting rates (down to 1 counts/s), better time resolution, and higher quantum efficiency in the visible range. By using a special current pick-off circuit, we achieved a time resolution of 20 ps full width at half maximum at 120 K for a 50 mum diameter SPAD. Afterpulsing effects are avoided by using a sufficiently long hold-off time (microseconds).

  12. Extreme temperature operation of thulium-doped silica fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Benjamin R.; Creeden, Daniel J.; Setzler, Scott D.

    2017-02-01

    We measure changes in the 2um absorption and emission spectra of thulium-doped silica fiber lasers operating from 80 K - 373 K. Reduction of the long wavelength tail of the 3H6-3H4 absorption feature under cryogenic cooling allows for efficient lasing in the 1800nm region. Greater than 17 W of output power was generated at 1850 nm by 793 nm diode-pumping a free-running single-mode thulium oscillator under cryogenic cooling conditions.

  13. Pregnant women maintain body temperatures within safe limits during moderate-intensity aqua-aerobic classes conducted in pools heated up to 33 degrees Celsius: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Brearley, Amanda L; Sherburn, Margaret; Galea, Mary P; Clarke, Sandy J

    2015-10-01

    What is the body temperature response of healthy pregnant women exercising at moderate intensity in an aqua-aerobics class where the water temperature is in the range of 28 to 33 degrees Celsius, as typically found in community swimming pools? An observational study. One hundred and nine women in the second and third trimester of pregnancy who were enrolled in a standardised aqua-aerobics class. Tympanic temperature was measured at rest pre-immersion (T1), after 35minutes of moderate-intensity aqua-aerobic exercise (T2), after a further 10minutes of light exercise while still in the water (T3) and finally on departure from the facility (T4). The range of water temperatures in seven indoor community pools was 28.8 to 33.4 degrees Celsius. Body temperature increased by a mean of 0.16 degrees Celsius (SD 0.35, p<0.001) at T2, was maintained at this level at T3 and had returned to pre-immersion resting values at T4. Regression analysis demonstrated that the temperature response was not related to the water temperature (T2 r = -0.01, p = 0.9; T3 r = -0.02, p=0.9; T4 r=0.03, p=0.8). Analysis of variance demonstrated no difference in body temperature response between participants when grouped in the cooler, medium and warmer water temperatures (T2 F=0.94, p=0.40; T3 F=0.93, p=0.40; T4 F=0.70, p=0.50). Healthy pregnant women maintain body temperatures within safe limits during moderate-intensity aqua-aerobic exercise conducted in pools heated up to 33 degrees Celsius. The study provides evidence to inform guidelines for safe water temperatures for aqua-aerobic exercise during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Scheduling field operations as a function of temperature, soil moisture, and available resources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scheduling field operations in SWAT can be done by specifying fixed dates or by using the heat unit index, which considers temperature constraints. However, soil moisture and labor requirements can also limit the ability of farm operators to perform field operations at the optimal time. The SWAT2012...

  15. Optimization of Multistage Extraction of Olive Leaves for Recovery of Phenolic Compounds at Moderated Temperatures and Short Extraction Times

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Konstantinos; Chatzilazarou, Archontoula; Katsoyannos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve the recovery of polyphenols from olive leaves (OL) by optimizing a multistage extraction scheme; provided that the olive leaves have been previously steam blanched. The maximum total phenol content expressed in ppm caffeic acid equivalents was obtained at pH 2, particle size 0.315 mm, solid-liquid ratio 1:7 and aqueous ethanol concentration 70% (v/v). The optimum duration time of each extraction stage and the operation temperature, were chosen based on qualitative and quantitative analysis of oleuropein (OLE), verbascoside, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and apigenin-7-O-glucoside performed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The optimum conditions for multistage extraction were 30 min total extraction time (10 min × 3 stages) at 85 °C. The 80% of the total yield of polyphenols was obtained at the 1st stage of the extraction. The total extraction yield of oleuropein was found 23 times higher (103.1 mg OLE/g dry weight (d.w.) OL) compared to the yield (4.6 mg OLE/g d.w. OL) obtained by the conventional extraction method (40 °C, 48 h). However, from an energetic and hence from an economical point of view it is preferable to work at 40 °C, since the total extraction yield of polyphenolic compounds was only 17% higher for a double increase in the operating temperature (i.e., 85 °C). PMID:28234304

  16. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on internal body temperature and respiration rate of black-hided feedlot steers and heifers during moderate heat stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on the internal body temperature and respiration rate of feedlot cattle during moderate heat stress. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech...

  17. Selection of process conditions by risk assessment for apple juice pasteurization by UV-heat treatments at moderate temperatures.

    PubMed

    Gayán, E; Torres, J A; Alvarez, I; Condón, S

    2014-02-01

    The effect of bactericidal UV-C treatments (254 nm) on Escherichia coli O157:H7 suspended in apple juice increased synergistically with temperature up to a threshold value. The optimum UV-C treatment temperature was 55 °C, yielding a 58.9% synergistic lethal effect. Under these treatment conditions, the UV-heat (UV-H55 °C) lethal variability achieving 5-log reductions had a logistic distribution (α = 37.92, β = 1.10). Using this distribution, UV-H55 °C doses to achieve the required juice safety goal with 95, 99, and 99.9% confidence were 41.17, 42.97, and 46.00 J/ml, respectively, i.e., doses higher than the 37.58 J/ml estimated by a deterministic procedure. The public health impact of these results is that the larger UV-H55 °C dose required for achieving 5-log reductions with 95, 99, and 99.9% confidence would reduce the probability of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children by 76.3, 88.6, and 96.9%, respectively. This study illustrates the importance of including the effect of data variability when selecting operational parameters for novel and conventional preservation processes to achieve high food safety standards with the desired confidence level.

  18. Miniature cryocooler developments for high operating temperatures at Thales Cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, R.; Martin, J.-Y.; Willems, D.; Seguineau, C.; Van Acker, S.; Mullié, J. C.; Göbel, A.; Tops, M.; Le Bordays, J.; Etchanchu, T.; Benschop, A. A. J.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years there has been a drive towards miniaturized cooled IDCA solutions for low-power, low-mass, low-size products (SWaP). To support this drive, coolers are developed optimized for high-temperature, low heat load dewar-detector assemblies. In this paper, Thales Cryogenics development activities supporting SWaP are presented. Design choices are discussed and compared to various key requirements. Trade-off analysis results are presented on drive voltage, cold finger definition (length, material, diameter and sealing concept), and other interface considerations, including cold finger definition. In parallel with linear and rotary cooler options, designs for small-size high-efficiency drive electronics based on state-of-the-art architectures are presented.

  19. High refractive index and temperature sensitivity LPGs for high temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, I. M.; Gouveia, C.; Jana, Surnimal; Bera, Susanta; Baptista, J. M.; Moreira, Paulo; Biwas, Palas; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Jorge, Pedro A. S.

    2013-11-01

    A fiber optic sensor for high sensitivity refractive index and temperature measurement able to withstand temperature up to 450 °C is reported. Two identical LPG gratings were fabricated, whereas one was coated with a high refractive index (~1.78) sol-gel thin film in order to increase its sensitivity to the external refractive index. The two sensors were characterized and compared in refractive index and temperature. Sensitivities of 1063 nm/RIU (1.338 - 1.348) and 260 pm/°C were achieved for refractive index and temperature, respectively.

  20. High Frequency Low Amplitude Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2003-01-01

    The operating temperature of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with a single evaporator is governed by the compensation chamber (CC) temperature, which in turn is a finction of the evaporator power, condenser sink temperature, and ambient temperature. As the operating condition changes, the CC temperature will change during the transient but eventually reach a new steady temperature. Under certain conditions, however, the LHP never really reaches a true steady state, but instead displays an oscillatory behavior. This paper presents a study on the oscillation of the loop operating temperature with amplitudes on the order of one degree Kelvin and frequencies on the order of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -2) Hertz. The source of the high frequency temperature oscillation is the fast movement of the vapor front in the condenser section, which usually occurs when the vapor front is near the condenser inlet or the condenser outlet. At these locations, the vapor front is unable to find a stable position for the given operating conditions, and will move back and forth. The movement of the vapor front causes the movement of the liquid in the condenser and the liquid line, leading to oscillations of the CC and the loop temperatures. Factors that affect the vapor front movement include evaporator power, condenser sink temperature, body forces and whether or the CC temperature is actively controlled. As long as there are no large thermal masses attached to the evaporator, the loop can self adjust rather quickly and the vapor front will move rapidly around the condenser inlet or outlet, leading to high frequency temperature oscillations. The amplitude of temperature oscillation is usually the largest in the liquid line, up to 20 degrees Kelvin in many cases, but diminishes to less than one degree Kelvin in the CC. Furthermore, the high frequency temperature oscillation can occur at any CC temperature when the right combination of the evaporator power and condenser sink temperature prevails.

  1. Small CO2 Sensors Operate at Lower Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.

    2009-01-01

    Solid-electrolyte-based amperometric sensors for measuring concentrations of CO2 in air are being developed for use in detection of fires, environmental monitoring, and other applications where liquid-based electrochemical cells are problematic. These sensors are small (sizes of the order of a millimeter), are robust, are amenable to batch fabrication at relatively low cost, and exhibit short response times (seconds) and wide detection ranges. A sensor of this type at a previous stage of development included a solid electrolyte of Na3Zr2Si2PO12 deposited mainly between interdigitated Pt electrodes on an alumina substrate, all overcoated with an auxiliary solid electrolyte of (Na2CO3:BaCO3 in a molar ratio of 1:1.7). It was necessary to heat this device to a temperature as high as 600 C to obtain the desired sensitivity and rapid response. Heating sensors increases the power consumption of the sensor system and complicates the use of the sensor in some applications. Thus, decreasing a sensor s power consumption while maintaining its performance is a technical goal of ongoing development.

  2. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF STREAM TEMPERATURES TO BOUNDARY AND INFLOW PERTURBATION DUE TO RESERVOIR OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2008-05-01

    Dams and reservoir operations modify natural stream behaviour and affect the downstream characteristics such as mean temperatures and diurnal temperature amplitudes. Managing phase effects due to reservoir operation and the associated amplification of daily maximum temperatures in the downstream reaches remains a challenge. An analytical approach derived from a one-dimensional heat advection and dispersion equation with surface heating in the form of equilibrium temperature was developed to examine the potential for restoration of natural stream temperatures. The analytical model was validated with observed temperature data collected in the Clackamas River, Oregon, and was used to highlight key downstream temperature behaviour characteristics. Mean stream temperatures below the dam are relatively stable and upon deviating from natural stream mean temperatures, return asymptotically to their natural state. In contrast, the amplitudes of daily temperature variation are highly sensitive to the phase differences induced by the dam and could nearly double in natural amplitude within the first 24 h. The analysis showed that restoring average stream temperatures to natural levels through structural and operational modifications at the dam may not be sufficient as phase-induced temperatures maximums would continue to persist

  3. Verilog-A Device Models for Cryogenic Temperature Operation of Bulk Silicon CMOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akturk, Akin; Potbhare, Siddharth; Goldsman, Neil; Holloway, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Verilog-A based cryogenic bulk CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) compact models are built for state-of-the-art silicon CMOS processes. These models accurately predict device operation at cryogenic temperatures down to 4 K. The models are compatible with commercial circuit simulators. The models extend the standard BSIM4 [Berkeley Short-channel IGFET (insulated-gate field-effect transistor ) Model] type compact models by re-parameterizing existing equations, as well as adding new equations that capture the physics of device operation at cryogenic temperatures. These models will allow circuit designers to create optimized, reliable, and robust circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Interaction of moderate UV-B exposure and temperature on the formation of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica).

    PubMed

    Neugart, Susanne; Fiol, Michaela; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Zrenner, Rita; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2014-05-07

    Kale has a high number of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. In this study we investigated the interaction of moderate UV-B radiation and temperature on these compounds. Kale plants were grown at daily mean temperatures of 5 or 15 °C and were exposed to five subsequent daily doses (each 0.25 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) of moderate UV-B radiation at 1 d intervals. Of 20 phenolic compounds, 11 were influenced by an interaction of UV-B radiation and temperature, e.g., monoacylated quercetin glycosides. Concomitantly, enhanced mRNA expression of flavonol 3'- hydroxylase showed an interaction of UV-B and temperature, highest at 0.75 kJ m(-2) and 15 °C. Kaempferol glycosides responded diversely and dependent on, e.g., the hydroxycinnamic acid residue. Compounds containing a catechol structure seem to be favored in the response to UV-B. Taken together, subsequent exposure to moderate UV-B radiation is a successful tool for enhancing the flavonoid profile of plants, and temperature should be considered.

  5. High-power QCW arrays for operation over wide temperature extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeler, Ryan; Junghans, Jeremy; Stephens, Ed

    2009-02-01

    A family of laser diode arrays has been developed for QCW operation in adverse environmental conditions. The arrays contain expansion-matched heatsinks, hard solder, and are built using a process that minimizes the packaging-induced strain on the laser diode bars. The arrays are rated for operation at 200 Watts/bar under normal operating conditions. This work contains test results for these arrays when run under a variety of harsh operating conditions. The conditions were chosen to mimic those required by many military and aerospace laser programs. Life test results are presented over a range of operating temperatures common to military specifications (-40 °C to + 70 °C) at a power level of approximately 215 Watts/bar. The arrays experienced no measurable degradation over the course of the life test. Operation at the temperature extremes did not introduce any additional detectable failure mechanisms. Also presented are results of characterization and reliability tests conducted at cryogenic temperatures. Diode arrays have been subjected to repeated cycles in rapid succession between room temperature and 77 K with temperature ramp rates up to 100 K/minute. Pre- and post- thermal cycle P-I-V data are compared. The results demonstrate the suitability of these arrays for operation at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  7. Drilling Addendum to Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Gary C.; Bacon, C. Forrest; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Majmundar, Hasmukhrai H.

    1981-05-01

    This addendum report presents the results of the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) drilling program at Calistoga, California, which was the final geothermal-resource assessment investigation performed under terms of the second year contract (1979-80) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CDMG under the State Coupled Program. This report is intended to supplement information presented in CDMG's technical report for the project year, ''Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California''. During the investigative phase of the CDMG's Geothermal Project, over 200 well-driller's reports were obtained from the Department of Water Resources (DWR). It was hoped that the interpretation and correlation of these logs would reveal the subsurface geology of the Upper Napa Valley and also provide a check for the various geophysical surveys that were performed in the course of the study. However, these DWR driller logs proved to be inadequate due to the brief, non-technical, and erroneous descriptions contained on the logs. As a result of the lack of useable drill-hole data, and because information was desired from,deeper horizons, it became evident that drilling some exploratory holes would be necessary in order to obtain physical evidence of the stratigraphy and aquifers in the immediate Calistoga area. Pursuant to this objective, a total of twelve sites were selected--four under jurisdiction of Napa County and eight under jurisdiction of the City of Calistoga. A moratorium is currently in existence within Napa County on most geothermal drilling, and environmental and time constraints precluded CDMG from obtaining the necessary site permits within the county. However, a variance was applied for and obtained from the City of Calistoga to allow CDMG to drill within the city limits. With this areal constraint and also funding limits in mind, six drilling sites were selected on the basis of (1

  8. Bacterial diversity and active biomass in full-scale granular activated carbon filters operated at low water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kaarela, Outi E; Härkki, Heli A; Palmroth, Marja R T; Tuhkanen, Tuula A

    2015-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration enhances the removal of natural organic matter and micropollutants in drinking water treatment. Microbial communities in GAC filters contribute to the removal of the biodegradable part of organic matter, and thus help to control microbial regrowth in the distribution system. Our objectives were to investigate bacterial community dynamics, identify the major bacterial groups, and determine the concentration of active bacterial biomass in full-scale GAC filters treating cold (3.7-9.5°C), physicochemically pretreated, and ozonated lake water. Three sampling rounds were conducted to study six GAC filters of different operation times and flow modes in winter, spring, and summer. Total organic carbon results indicated that both the first-step and second-step filters contributed to the removal of organic matter. Length heterogeneity analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes illustrated that bacterial communities were diverse and considerably stable over time. α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira dominated in all of the GAC filters, although the relative proportion of dominant phylogenetic groups in individual filters differed. The active bacterial biomass accumulation, measured as adenosine triphosphate, was limited due to low temperature, low flux of nutrients, and frequent backwashing. The concentration of active bacterial biomass was not affected by the moderate seasonal temperature variation. In summary, the results provided an insight into the biological component of GAC filtration in cold water temperatures and the operational parameters affecting it.

  9. Conductor and associated hardware impacts during high temperature operations: Issues and problems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, L.; Douglass, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of a sensitivity study of high temperature conductor sag. Relevant calculations were performed using suitable sag-tension computer programs to quantify the sensitivity and range of possible errors related to the common conductor parameters which affect calculated high temperature sag (e.g., conductor creep, loading history, effect of ruling span design, interaction of steel and aluminum, differences in installation and manufacturing temperatures, radial temperatures, etc.). Additionally, it addresses the factors that cause errors in the calculation of high temperature sag for overhead transmission lines and suggests future development work in the area of high temperature operation. This report also discusses issues related to the life of conductors and hardware operated at elevated temperatures. Based on the results of this preliminary study, recommendations are provided for improving the ability to predict the performance of conductors and hardware operated at high temperature. This information is useful to utility engineers when designing new power lines or evaluating existing lines for high temperature operation.

  10. [Course of central body temperature in the laminar airflow operating room in various anesthesia procedures].

    PubMed

    Kochs, E; Blanc, I; Pfeifer, G

    1986-08-01

    The oesophageal body temperature of 130 patients was measured pre- and intraoperatively. 92% (n = 116) of the operations (implantation or replacement of hip prostheses) were performed in an operating room having a laminar air flow system with horizontal air flow. 9% (n = 14) of the operations (laparotomies) were performed in a room of identical design without an air circulation system. Three different forms of anesthesia were investigated with regard to their influence on interior body temperature: 1) general anesthesia with a volatile anesthetic (INH); 2) peridural anesthesia with additional general anesthesia (KPDA+ITN); and 3) neuroleptic anesthesia (NLA). A drop in temperature during the operation was found in all patients. In the conventional operating room the mean drop was 0.3 degrees C/h. In the operating room with laminar air flow the INH-patients sustained the greatest decrease in temperature; the mean value in the first hour was 1.1 degrees C/h, and up to 4.6 degrees C/3 h toward the end of the operation. There was a comparable drop in temperature in the first hour in patients anesthetized with KPDA+ITN, but the rate slowed down toward the end of the investigation (2.2 degrees C/3 h). NLA caused a characteristic temperature behavior, with an initial fall in temperature, plateau phase, and subsequent rise (total: -1.0 degrees C/3 h) Temperature regulation was influenced least by NLA in the operating room with laminar air flow; thus, in this context, NLA proved to be a favourable form of anesthesia.

  11. Modeling Shasta Dam operations to regulate temperatures for Chinook salmon under extreme climate and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, A.; Saito, L.; Sapin, J. R.; Rajagopalan, B.; Hanna, R. B.; Kauneckis, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Chinook salmon populations have declined significantly after the construction of Shasta Dam on the Sacramento River in 1945 prevented them from spawning in the cold waters upstream. In 1994, the winter-run Chinook were listed under the Endangered Species Act and 3 years later the US Bureau of Reclamation began operating a temperature control device (TCD) on the dam that allows for selective withdrawal for downstream temperature control to promote salmon spawning while also maximizing power generation. However, dam operators are responsible to other interests that depend on the reservoir for water such as agriculture, municipalities, industry, and recreation. An increase in temperatures due to climate change may place additional strain on the ability of dam operations to maintain spawning habitat for salmon downstream of the dam. We examined the capability of Shasta Dam to regulate downstream temperatures under extreme climates and climate change by using stochastically generated streamflow, stream temperature, and weather inputs with a two-dimensional CE-QUAL-W2 model under several operational options. Operation performance was evaluated using degree days and cold pool volume (volume of water below a temperature threshold). Model results indicated that a generalized operations release schedule, in which release elevations varied over the year to match downstream temperature targets, performed best overall in meeting temperature targets while preserving cold pool volume. Releasing all water out the bottom throughout the year tended to meet temperature targets at the expense of depleting the cold pool, and releasing all water out uppermost gates preserved the cold pool, but released water that was too warm during the critical spawning period. With higher air temperatures due to climate change, both degree day and cold pool volume metrics were worse than baseline conditions, which suggests that Chinook salmon may be more negatively affected under climate change.

  12. Comparison of photovoltaic cell temperatures in modules operating with exposed and enclosed back surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.; Simon, F. F.

    1981-01-01

    Four different photovoltaic module designs were tested to determine the cell temperature of each design. The cell temperatures were compared to those obtained on identical design, using the same nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) concept. The results showed that the NOCT procedure does not apply to the enclosed configurations due to continuous transient conditions. The enclosed modules had higher cell temperatures than the open modules, and insulated modules higher than the uninsulated. The severest performance loss - when translated from cell temperatures - 17.5 % for one enclosed, insulated module as a compared to that module mounted openly.

  13. HTCAP-1: a program for calcuating operating temperatures in HFIR target irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Howard A.M.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal modeling code, HTCAP-1, calculates in-reactor operating temperatures of fueled specimens contained in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target irradiation experiments (HT-series). Temperature calculations are made for loose particle and bonded fuel rod specimens. Maximum particle surface temperatures are calculated for the loose particles and centerline and surface temperatures for the fuel rods. Three computational models are employed to determine fission heat generation rates, capsule heat transfer analysis, and specimen temperatures. This report is also intended to be a users' manual, and the application of HTCAP-1 to the HT-34 irradiation capsule is presented.

  14. Low Frequency High Amplitude Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Rodriguez, Jose

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the low frequency high amplitude temperature oscillations observed in loop heat pipe operations. The topics include: 1) Proposed Theory; 2) Test Loop and Test Results; and 3) Effects of Various Parameters. The author also presents a short summary on the conditiions that must be met in order to sustain a low frequency high amplitude temperature oscillation.

  15. Red-light-emitting laser diodes operating CW at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressel, H.; Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction laser diodes of AlGaAs have been prepared with threshold current densities substantially below those previously achieved at room temperature in the 7200-8000-A spectral range. These devices operate continuously with simple oxide-isolated stripe contacts to 7400 A, which extends CW operation into the visible (red) portion of the spectrum.

  16. Implications of Graphite Radiation Damage on the Neutronic, Operational, and Safety Aspects of Very High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I

    2011-08-30

    In both the prismatic and pebble bed designs of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR), the graphite moderator is expected to reach exposure levels of 1021 to 1022 n/cm2 over the lifetime of the reactor. This exposure results in damage to the graphite structure. In this work, molecular dynamic and ab initio molecular static calculations will be used to: 1) simulate radiation damage in graphite under various irradiation and temperature conditions, 2) generate the thermal neutron scattering cross sections for damaged graphite, and 3) examine the resulting microstructure to identify damage formations that may produce the high-temperature Wigner effect. The impact of damage on the neutronic, operational and safety behavior of the reactor will be assessed using reactor physics calculations. In addition, tests will be performed on irradiated graphite samples to search for the high-temperature Wigner effect, and phonon density of states measurements will be conducted to quantify the effect on thermal neutron scattering cross sections using these samples.

  17. Temperature Compensated Sapphire Resonator for Ultrastable Oscillator Operating at Temperatures Near 77 Deg Kelvin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John (Inventor); Santiago, David G. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A sapphire resonator for an ultrastable oscillator capable of substantial performance improvements over the best available crystal quartz oscillators in a compact cryogenic package is based on a compensation mechanism enabled by the difference between copper and sapphire thermal expansion coefficients for so tuning the resonator as to cancel the temperature variation of the sapphire's dielectric constant. The sapphire resonator consists of a sapphire ring separated into two parts with webs on the outer end of each to form two re-entrant parts which are separated by a copper post. The re-entrant parts are bonded to the post by indium solder for good thermal conductivity between parts of that subassembly which is supported on the base plate of a closed copper cylinder (rf shielding casing) by a thin stainless steel cylinder. A unit for temperature control is placed in the stainless steel cylinder and is connected to the subassembly of re-entrant parts and copper post by a layer of indium for good thermal conduction. In normal use, the rf shielding casing is placed in a vacuum tank which is in turn placed in a thermos flask of liquid nitrogen. The temperature regulator is controlled from outside the thermos flask to a temperature in a range of about 40K to 150K, such as 87K for the WGH-811, mode of resonance in response to microwave energy inserted into the rf shielding casing through a port from an outside source.

  18. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  19. Cell separator operation within temperature ranges to minimize effects on Chinese hamster ovary cell perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Hans; Ritter, Joachim B; Gorenflo, Volker M; Bowen, Bruce D; Piret, James M

    2007-01-01

    A cell retention device that provides reliable high-separation efficiency with minimal negative effects on the cell culture is essential for robust perfusion culture processes. External separation devices generally expose cells to periodic variations in temperature, most commonly temperatures below 37 degrees C, while the cells are outside the bioreactor. To examine this phenomenon, aliquots of approximately 5% of a CHO cell culture were exposed to 60 s cyclic variations of temperature simulating an acoustic separator environment. It was found that, for average exposure temperatures between 31.5 and 38.5 degrees C, there were no significant impacts on the rates of growth, glucose consumption, or t-PA production, defining an acceptable range of operating temperatures. These results were subsequently confirmed in perfusion culture experiments for average exposure temperatures between 31.6 and 38.1 degrees C. A 2(5-1) central composite factorial design experiment was then performed to systematically evaluate the effects of different operating variables on the inlet and outlet temperatures of a 10L acoustic separator. The power input, ambient temperature, as well as the perfusion and recycle flow rates significantly influenced the temperature, while the cell concentration did not. An empirical model was developed that predicted the temperature changes between the inlet and the outlet of the acoustic separator within +/-0.5 degrees C. A series of perfusion experiments determined the ranges of the significant operational settings that maintained the acoustic separator inlet and outlet temperatures within the acceptable range. For example, these objectives were always met by using the manufacturer-recommended operational settings as long as the recirculation flow rate was maintained above 15 L day(-1) and the ambient temperature was near 22 degrees C.

  20. High Temperature Electrolysis 4 kW Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-09-01

    This report provides results of long-term stack testing completed in the new high-temperature steam electrolysis multi-kW test facility recently developed at INL. The report includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This facility has provided a demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis operation at the 4 kW scale with advanced cell and stack technology. This successful large-scale demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

  1. The Effective Lifetime of ACSR Full Tension Splice Connector Operated at Higher Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; King Jr, Thomas J; Graziano, Joe; Chan, John; Goodwin, Tip

    2009-01-01

    This paper is to address the issues related to integrity of ACSR full tension splice connectors operated at high temperatures. A protocol of integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of a full tension single-stage splice connector (SSC) assembly during service at high operating temperature was developed. Based on the developed protocol the effective lifetime evaluation was demonstrated with ACSR Drake conductor SSC systems. The investigation indicates that thermal cycling temperature and frequency, conductor cable tension loading, and the compressive residual stress field within a SSC system have significant impact on the SSC integrity and the associated effective lifetime.

  2. Experimental Investigation of a Broadband High-Temperature Superconducting Terahertz Mixer Operating at Temperatures Between 40 and 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Du, Jia; Zhang, Ting; Jay Guo, Y.; Foley, Cathy P.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a systematic investigation of a broadband thin-film antenna-coupled high-temperature superconducting (HTS) terahertz (THz) harmonic mixer at relatively high operating temperature from 40 to 77 K. The mixer device chip was fabricated using the CSIRO established step-edge YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) Josephson junction technology, packaged in a well-designed module and cooled in a temperature adjustable cryocooler. Detailed experimental characterizations were carried out for the broadband HTS mixer at both the 200 and 600 GHz bands in harmonic mixing mode. The DC current-voltage characteristics (IVCs), bias current condition, local oscillator (LO) power requirement, frequency response, as well as conversion efficiency under different bath temperatures were thoroughly investigated for demonstrating the frequency down-conversion performance.

  3. Operation of SOI P-Channel Field Effect Transistors, CHT-PMOS30, under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Electronic systems are required to operate under extreme temperatures in NASA planetary exploration and deep space missions. Electronics on-board spacecraft must also tolerate thermal cycling between extreme temperatures. Thermal management means are usually included in today s spacecraft systems to provide adequate temperature for proper operation of the electronics. These measures, which may include heating elements, heat pipes, radiators, etc., however add to the complexity in the design of the system, increases its cost and weight, and affects its performance and reliability. Electronic parts and circuits capable of withstanding and operating under extreme temperatures would reflect in improvement in system s efficiency, reducing cost, and improving overall reliability. Semiconductor chips based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are designed mainly for high temperature applications and find extensive use in terrestrial well-logging fields. Their inherent design offers advantages over silicon devices in terms of reduced leakage currents, less power consumption, faster switching speeds, and good radiation tolerance. Little is known, however, about their performance at cryogenic temperatures and under wide thermal swings. Experimental investigation on the operation of SOI, N-channel field effect transistors under wide temperature range was reported earlier [1]. This work examines the performance of P-channel devices of these SOI transistors. The electronic part investigated in this work comprised of a Cissoid s CHT-PMOS30, high temperature P-channel MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) device [2]. This high voltage, medium-power transistor is designed for geothermal well logging applications, aerospace and avionics, and automotive industry, and is specified for operation in the temperature range of -55 C to +225 C. Table I shows some specifications of this transistor [2]. The CHT-PMOS30 device was characterized at various temperatures

  4. Influence of gadolinium doping on the structure and defects of ceria under fuel cell operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, S. A.; Gaikwad, V. M.; Sathe, V.; Kulkarni, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    Correlation between atomic positional shift, oxygen vacancy defects, and oxide ion conductivity in doped ceria system has been established in the gadolinium doped ceria system from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy study at operating temperature (300-600 °C) of Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IT-SOFC). High temperature XRD data are used to quantify atomic positional shift from mean position with temperature. The Raman spectroscopy study shows additional vibration modes related to ordering of defect spaces (GdCe'-Vo••)* and (2GdCe'-Vo••)x generated due to association of oxygen vacancies and reduced cerium or dopant cations site (Gd3+), which disappear at 450 °C; indicating oxygen vacancies dissociation from the defect complex. The experimental evidences of cation-anion positional shifting and oxygen vacancies dissociation from defect complex in the IT-SOFC operating temperature are discussed to correlate with activation energy for ionic conductivity.

  5. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging.

  6. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging. PMID:27789976

  7. The impact of ambient operating room temperature on neonatal and maternal hypothermia and associated morbidities: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Elaine L; Nelson, David B; Wyckoff, Myra H; Grant, Erica N; Tao, Weike; Sadana, Neeti; Chalak, Lina F; McIntire, Donald D; Leveno, Kenneth J

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal hypothermia is common at the time of cesarean delivery and has been associated with a constellation of morbidities in addition to increased neonatal mortality. Additionally, maternal hypothermia is often uncomfortable for the surgical patient and has been associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications. Various methods to decrease the rates of neonatal and maternal hypothermia have been examined and found to have varying levels of success. We sought to determine whether an increase in operating room temperature at cesarean delivery results in a decrease in the rate of neonatal hypothermia and associated morbidities. In this single-center randomized trial, operating room temperatures were adjusted weekly according to a cluster randomization schedule to either 20°C (67°F), which was the standard at our institution, or 23°C (73°F), which was the maximum temperature allowable per hospital policy. Neonatal hypothermia was defined as core body temperature <36.5°C (97.7°F) per World Health Organization criteria. The primary study outcome was neonatal hypothermia on arrival to the admitting nursery. Measures of neonatal morbidity potentially associated with hypothermia were examined. From February through July 2015, 791 women who underwent cesarean deliveries were enrolled, resulting in 410 infants in the 20°C standard management group and 399 in the 23°C study group. The rate of neonatal hypothermia on arrival to the admitting nursery was lower in the study group as compared to the standard management group: 35% vs 50%, P < .001. Moderate to severe hypothermia was infrequent when the operating room temperature was 23°C (5%); in contrast such hypothermia occurred in 19% of the standard management group, P < .001. Additionally, neonatal temperature in the operating room immediately following delivery and stabilization was also higher in the study group, 37.1 ± 0.6°C vs 36.9 ± 0.6°C, P < .001. We found no difference in rates of intubation

  8. Operative environmental temperatures and basking behavior of the turtle Pseudemys scripta

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, K.M.; Spotila, J.R.; Standora, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Operative environmental temperatures (T/sub e/, an index of the thermal environment) were measured for basking Pseudemys scripta in South Carolina. Operative environmental temperatures were good predictors of the basking behavior of P. scripta. Turtles in this study generally did not bask unless T/sub e/ was 28/sup 0/C (preferred body temperature) or higher. This demonstrated that basking was not a random behavior in respect to T/sub e/, and implicated thermoregulation as a major factor eliciting basking behavior. Operative environmental temperature was positively related to short-wave and total solar radiation as well as to air and substrate temperature. Substrate temperature was the best single predictor of T/sub e/. A multiple regression equation (T/sub e/ = 0.005R + 0.103T/sub a/ - 1.16 log V + 0.932T/sub s/ - 2.54, r/sup 2/ = .90, where R = total radiation in watts per square metre, T/sub a/ = air temperature in degrees Celsius, V = wind speed in metres per second, and T/sub s/ = substrate temperature in degrees Celsius) defines the relationship of T/sub e/ to microclimate variables. Movement of the sun through the day results in spatial variation in T/sub e/'s available to turtles and influences their location and basking behavior.

  9. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    Met programmatic milestones for program. Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co-solvents (i.e., methyl butyrate) containing electrolyte additives in A123 prototype cells: Previously demonstrated excellent low temperature performance, including 11C rates at -30 C and the ability to perform well down to -60 C. Excellent cycle life at room temperature has been displayed, with over 5,000 cycles being demonstrated. Good high temperature cycle life performance has also been achieved. Demonstrated improved performance with methyl propionate-containing electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells: Demonstrated the wide operating temperature range capability in large cells (12 Ah), successfully scaling up technology from 0.25 Ah size cells. Demonstrated improved performance at low temperature and good cycle life at 40 C with methyl propionate-based electrolyte containing increasing FEC content and the use of LiBOB as an additive. Utilized three-electrode cells to investigate the electrochemical characteristics of high voltage systems coupled with wide operating temperature range electrolytes: From Tafel polarization measurements on each electrode, it is evident the NMC-based cathode displays poor lithium kinetics (being the limiting electrode). The MB-based formulations containing LiBOB delivered the best rate capability at low temperature, which is attributed to improved cathode kinetics. Whereas, the use of lithium oxalate as an additive lead to the highest reversible capacity and lower irreversible losses.

  10. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    Met programmatic milestones for program. Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co-solvents (i.e., methyl butyrate) containing electrolyte additives in A123 prototype cells: Previously demonstrated excellent low temperature performance, including 11C rates at -30 C and the ability to perform well down to -60 C. Excellent cycle life at room temperature has been displayed, with over 5,000 cycles being demonstrated. Good high temperature cycle life performance has also been achieved. Demonstrated improved performance with methyl propionate-containing electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells: Demonstrated the wide operating temperature range capability in large cells (12 Ah), successfully scaling up technology from 0.25 Ah size cells. Demonstrated improved performance at low temperature and good cycle life at 40 C with methyl propionate-based electrolyte containing increasing FEC content and the use of LiBOB as an additive. Utilized three-electrode cells to investigate the electrochemical characteristics of high voltage systems coupled with wide operating temperature range electrolytes: From Tafel polarization measurements on each electrode, it is evident the NMC-based cathode displays poor lithium kinetics (being the limiting electrode). The MB-based formulations containing LiBOB delivered the best rate capability at low temperature, which is attributed to improved cathode kinetics. Whereas, the use of lithium oxalate as an additive lead to the highest reversible capacity and lower irreversible losses.

  11. Low Frequency High Amplitude Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Rodriquez, Jose; Simpson, Alda D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a theory that explains low frequency, high amplitude temperature oscillations in loop heat pipe (LHP) operation. Oscillations of the CC temperature with amplitudes on the order of tens of degrees Kelvin and periods on the order of hours have been observed in some LHPs during ambient testing. There are presently no satisfactory explanations for such a phenomenon in the literature. It is well-known that the operating temperature of an LHP with a single evaporator is governed by the compensation chamber (CC) temperature, which in turn is a function of the evaporator heat load, sink temperature, and ambient temperature. As the operating condition changes, the CC temperature will change during the transient but eventually reach a new steady temperature. Under certain conditions, however, the LHP never really reaches a true steady state, but instead displays an oscillatory behavior. The proposed new theory describes why low frequency, high amplitude oscillations may occur when the LHP has a low evaporator power, a low heat sink temperature (below ambient temperature), and a large thermal mass attached to the evaporator. When this condition prevails, there are some complex interactions between the CC, condenser, thermal mass and ambient. The temperature oscillation is a result of the large movement of the vapor front inside the condenser, which is caused by a change in the net evaporator power modulated by the large thermal mass through its interaction with the sink and CC. The theory agrees very well with previously published test data. Effects of various parameters on the amplitude and frequency of the temperature oscillation are also discussed.

  12. Performance of Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes in Quallion Prototype Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Tomcsi, M. R.; Nagata, M.; Visco, V.; Tsukamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    For a number of applications, there is a continued interest in the development of rechargeable lithium-based batteries that can effectively operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 deg C). These applications include powering future planetary rovers for NASA, enabling the next generation of automotive batteries for DOE, and supporting many DOD applications. Li-ion technology has been demonstrated to have good performance over a reasonably wide temperature range with many systems; however, there is still a desire to improve the low temperature rate capacity as well as the high temperature resilience. In the current study, we would like to present recent results obtained with prototype Li-Ion cells (manufactured by Quallion, LLC) which include various wide operating temperature range electrolytes developed by both JPL and Quallion. To demonstrate the viability of the technology, a number of performance tests were carried out, including: (a) discharge rate characterization over a wide temperature range (down to -60 deg C) using various rates (up to 20C rates), (b) discharge rate characterization at low temperatures with low temperature charging, (c) variable temperature cycling over a wide temperature range (-40 to +70 deg C), and (d) cycling at high temperature (50 deg C). As will be discussed, impressive rate capability was observed at low temperatures with many systems, as well as good resilience to high temperature cycling. To augment the performance testing on the prototype cells, a number of experimental three electrodes cells were fabricated (including Li reference electrodes) to allow the determination of the lithium kinetics of the respective electrodes and interfacial properties as a function of temperatures.

  13. Performance of Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes in Quallion Prototype Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Tomcsi, M. R.; Nagata, M.; Visco, V.; Tsukamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    For a number of applications, there is a continued interest in the development of rechargeable lithium-based batteries that can effectively operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 deg C). These applications include powering future planetary rovers for NASA, enabling the next generation of automotive batteries for DOE, and supporting many DOD applications. Li-ion technology has been demonstrated to have good performance over a reasonably wide temperature range with many systems; however, there is still a desire to improve the low temperature rate capacity as well as the high temperature resilience. In the current study, we would like to present recent results obtained with prototype Li-Ion cells (manufactured by Quallion, LLC) which include various wide operating temperature range electrolytes developed by both JPL and Quallion. To demonstrate the viability of the technology, a number of performance tests were carried out, including: (a) discharge rate characterization over a wide temperature range (down to -60 deg C) using various rates (up to 20C rates), (b) discharge rate characterization at low temperatures with low temperature charging, (c) variable temperature cycling over a wide temperature range (-40 to +70 deg C), and (d) cycling at high temperature (50 deg C). As will be discussed, impressive rate capability was observed at low temperatures with many systems, as well as good resilience to high temperature cycling. To augment the performance testing on the prototype cells, a number of experimental three electrodes cells were fabricated (including Li reference electrodes) to allow the determination of the lithium kinetics of the respective electrodes and interfacial properties as a function of temperatures.

  14. Magneto-optical controlled transmittance alteration of PbS quantum dots by moderately applied magnetic fields at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh K.; Barik, Puspendu; Ullrich, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    We observed changes of the transmitted monochromatic light passing through a colloidal PbS quantum dot film on glass owing to an applied moderate (smaller than 1 T) magnetic field under ambient conditions. The observed alterations show a square dependence on the magnetic field increase that cannot be achieved with bulk semiconductors. The findings point to so far not recognized application potentials of quantum dots.

  15. Magneto-optical controlled transmittance alteration of PbS quantum dots by moderately applied magnetic fields at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akhilesh K.; Barik, Puspendu; Ullrich, Bruno E-mail: bruno.ullrich@yahoo.com

    2014-12-15

    We observed changes of the transmitted monochromatic light passing through a colloidal PbS quantum dot film on glass owing to an applied moderate (smaller than 1 T) magnetic field under ambient conditions. The observed alterations show a square dependence on the magnetic field increase that cannot be achieved with bulk semiconductors. The findings point to so far not recognized application potentials of quantum dots.

  16. Moderate increase of mean daily temperature adversely affects fruit set of Lycopersicon esculentum by disrupting specific physiological processes in male reproductive development.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Kamiyama, M; Iwata, T; Makita, N; Furukawa, H; Ikeda, H

    2006-05-01

    Global warming is gaining significance as a threat to natural and managed ecosystems since temperature is one of the major environmental factors affecting plant productivity. Hence, the effects of moderate temperature increase on the growth and development of the tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum) were investigated. Plants were grown at 32/26 degrees C as a moderately elevated temperature stress (METS) treatment or at 28/22 degrees C (day/night temperatures) as a control with natural light conditions. Vegetative growth and reproductive development as well as sugar content and metabolism, proline content and translocation in the androecium were investigated. METS did not cause a significant change in biomass, the number of flowers, or the number of pollen grains produced, but there was a significant decrease in the number of fruit set, pollen viability and the number of pollen grains released. Glucose and fructose contents in the androecium (i.e. all stamens from one flower) were generally higher in the control than METS, but sucrose was higher in METS. Coincidently, the mRNA transcript abundance of acid invertase in the androecium was decreased by METS. Proline contents in the androecium were almost the same in the control and METS, while the mRNA transcript level of proline transporter 1, which expresses specifically at the surface of microspores, was significantly decreased by METS. The research indicated that failure of tomato fruit set under a moderately increased temperature above optimal is due to the disruption of sugar metabolism and proline translocation during the narrow window of male reproductive development.

  17. Moderate Increase of Mean Daily Temperature Adversely Affects Fruit Set of Lycopersicon esculentum by Disrupting Specific Physiological Processes in Male Reproductive Development

    PubMed Central

    SATO, S.; KAMIYAMA, M.; IWATA, T.; MAKITA, N.; FURUKAWA, H.; IKEDA, H.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Global warming is gaining significance as a threat to natural and managed ecosystems since temperature is one of the major environmental factors affecting plant productivity. Hence, the effects of moderate temperature increase on the growth and development of the tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum) were investigated. • Methods Plants were grown at 32/26 °C as a moderately elevated temperature stress (METS) treatment or at 28/22 °C (day/night temperatures) as a control with natural light conditions. Vegetative growth and reproductive development as well as sugar content and metabolism, proline content and translocation in the androecium were investigated. • Key Results METS did not cause a significant change in biomass, the number of flowers, or the number of pollen grains produced, but there was a significant decrease in the number of fruit set, pollen viability and the number of pollen grains released. Glucose and fructose contents in the androecium (i.e. all stamens from one flower) were generally higher in the control than METS, but sucrose was higher in METS. Coincidently, the mRNA transcript abundance of acid invertase in the androecium was decreased by METS. Proline contents in the androecium were almost the same in the control and METS, while the mRNA transcript level of proline transporter 1, which expresses specifically at the surface of microspores, was significantly decreased by METS. • Conclusions The research indicated that failure of tomato fruit set under a moderately increased temperature above optimal is due to the disruption of sugar metabolism and proline translocation during the narrow window of male reproductive development. PMID:16497700

  18. Small-Scale Mechanical Testing on Proton Beam-Irradiated 304 SS from Room Temperature to Reactor Operation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Reichardt, A.; Howard, C.; Abad, M. D.; Kaoumi, D.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are common structural components in light water reactors. Because reactor components are subjected to harsh conditions such as high operating temperatures and neutron radiation, they can undergo irradiation-induced embrittlement and related failure, which compromises reliable operation. Small-scale mechanical testing has seen widespread use as a testing method for both ion- and reactor-irradiated materials because it allows access to the mechanical properties of the ion beam-irradiated region, and for safe handling of a small amount of activated material. In this study, nanoindentation and microcompression testing were performed on unirradiated and 10 dpa proton-irradiated 304 SS, from 25°C to 300°C. Increases in yield stress (YS), critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and hardness ( H) were seen in the irradiated region relative to the unirradiated region. Relationships between H, YS, and CRSS of irradiated and unirradiated materials are discussed over this temperature range.

  19. Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets under Monotonic and Cyclic Loadings at Room and Moderately Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Trung; Seo, Oh Suk; Lee, Chung An; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kim, Heon Young

    2014-01-01

    Large-strain monotonic and cyclic loading tests of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheets were performed with a newly developed testing system, at different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 250 °C. Behaviors showing significant twinning during initial in-plane compression and untwinning in subsequent tension at and slightly above room temperature were recorded. Strong yielding asymmetry and nonlinear hardening behavior were also revealed. Considerable Bauschinger effects, transient behavior, and variable permanent softening responses were observed near room temperature, but these were reduced and almost disappeared as the temperature increased. Different stress–strain responses were inherent to the activation of twinning at lower temperatures and non-basal slip systems at elevated temperatures. A critical temperature was identified to account for the transition between the twinning-dominant and slip-dominant deformation mechanisms. Accordingly, below the transition point, stress–strain curves of cyclic loading tests exhibited concave-up shapes for compression or compression following tension, and an unusual S-shape for tension following compression. This unusual shape disappeared when the temperature was above the transition point. Shrinkage of the elastic range and variation in Young’s modulus due to plastic strain deformation during stress reversals were also observed. The texture-induced anisotropy of both the elastic and plastic behaviors was characterized experimentally. PMID:28788514

  20. Acceleration tests: Degradation of anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cells at elevated operating temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Jae; Choi, Moon-Bong; Park, Mansoo; Kim, Hyoungchul; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Hae-Weon; Kim, Seung-Goo; Yoon, Kyung Joong

    2017-08-01

    As the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology matures, durability under real operating conditions is considered as one of the most critical issues for commercialization. The severe conditions encountered in practical operation include a large temperature gradient and generation of local hot spots within stacks. Herein, we report the degradation mechanisms of anode-supported planar SOFCs supplied by Posco Energy at elevated operating temperatures. A simple comparison of the voltage reduction rates at different operating temperatures does not appropriately represent the degree of degradation, because the rapid deterioration of the cell components at high temperatures is compensated for by the fast reaction and transport kinetics. A combination of impedance interpretation and post-mortem analysis reveals the major degradation processes that are distinctively accelerated by increasing temperature, including the chemical interaction between the cathode and electrolyte, the enlargement of the interfacial pores, the coarsening of the fine particles in the composite electrodes, the formation of interfacial cracks and Cr poisoning. Systematic analysis presented in this study provides guidelines for counteracting the unexpected temperature increase, and the database established under various extreme conditions would form the groundwork for achieving the lifetime goals of commercial SOFC systems.

  1. On the potential of solar cells to efficiently operate at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitouny, Joya; Lalau, Noémie; Katz, Eugene A.; Dollet, Alain; Vossier, Alexis

    2017-09-01

    The development of high temperature CPV/thermal (CSP) hybrid systems appears to be a promising route to improve the overall solar to electricity conversion efficiency. Moreover, such systems would not only use the residual heat stemming from the unconverted fraction of the incident solar radiation in PV cells, but they would also provide the advantage of storing energy as heat. However, the performances of such hybrid systems depend strongly on the temperature of the thermal receivers which are only effective at high temperatures (typically above 250°C) while solar cells typically operate at temperatures close to ambient. An appropriate strategy is to make PV cells efficiently operate at temperature levels significantly exceeding the normal range of temperatures for which they are commonly designed. The degradation of electrical performance associated with high working temperature is less pronounced when the cell is submitted to high sunlight concentrations. An efficient photovoltaic conversion at temperature levels exceeding the ambient may however require significant modifications in the architecture of the cells. In this work, we assessed the feasibility of this strategy by studying the electrical properties as well as the overall efficiency of the PV/CSP system at different temperatures and sunlight illuminations.

  2. Characterization and calibration of Raman based distributed temperature sensing system for 600°C operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sudeep; Dekate, Sachin; Lee, Boon K.; Guida, Renato; Mondanos, Michael; Yeo, Jackson; Goranson, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing based on Raman scattering of light in optical fibers has become a very attractive solution for distributed temperature sensing (DTS) applications. The Raman scattered signal is independent of strain within the fiber, enabling simple packaging solutions for fiber optic temperature sensors while simultaneously improving accuracy and robustness of temperature measurements due to the lack of strain-induced errors in these measurements. Furthermore, the Raman scattered signal increases in magnitude at higher fiber temperatures, resulting in an improved SNR for high temperature measurements. Most Raman DTS instruments and fiber sensors are designed for operation up to approximately 300˚C. We will present our work in demonstrating high temperature calibration of a Raman DTS system using both Ge doped and pure silica core multi-mode optical fiber. We will demonstrate the tradeoffs involved in using each type of fiber for high temperature measurements. In addition, we will describe the challenges of measuring large temperature ranges (0 - 600˚C) with a single DTS interrogator and will demonstrate the need to customize the interrogator electronics and detector response in order to achieve reliable and repeatable high temperature measurements across a wide temperature range.

  3. Operating Temperatures of a Sodium-Cooled Exhaust Valve as Measured by a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J C; Wilsted, H D; Mulcahy, B A

    1943-01-01

    Report presents the results of a thermocouple installed in the crown of a sodium-cooled exhaust valve. The valve was tested in an air-cooled engine cylinder and valve temperatures under various engine operating conditions were determined. A temperature of 1337 degrees F. was observed at a fuel-air ratio of 0.064, a brake mean effective pressure of 179 pounds per square inch, and an engine speed of 2000 r.p.m. Fuel-air ratio was found to have a large influence on valve temperature, but cooling-air pressure and variation in spark advance had little effect. An increase in engine power by change of speed or mean effective pressure increased the valve temperature. It was found that the temperature of the rear-spark-plug bushing was not a satisfactory indication of the temperature of the exhaust valve.

  4. Operating Temperatures of a Sodium-Cooled Exhaust Valve as Measured by a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J. C.; Wilsted, H. D.; Mulcahy, B. A.

    1943-01-01

    A thermocouple was installed in the crown of a sodium-cooled exhaust valve. The valve was then tested in an air-cooled engine cylinder and valve temperatures under various engine operating conditions were determined. A temperature of 1337 F was observed at a fuel-air ratio of 0.064, a brake mean effective pressure of 179 pounds per square inch, and an engine speed of 2000 rpm. Fuel-air ratio was found to have a large influence on valve temperature, but cooling-air pressure and variation in spark advance had little effect. An increase in engine power by change of speed or mean effective pressure increased the valve temperature. It was found that the temperature of the rear spark-plug bushing was not a satisfactory indication of the temperature of the exhaust valve.

  5. Correlation between defect transition levels and thermoelectric operational temperature of doped CrSi2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek; Pandey, Tribhuwan

    2014-03-01

    The performance of a thermoelectric material is quantified by figure of merit ZT. The challenge in achieving high ZT value requires simultaneously high thermopower, high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity at optimal carrier concentration. So far doping is the most versatile approach used for modifying thermoelectric properties. Previous studies have shown that doping can significantly improve the thermoelectric performance, however the tuning the operating temperature of a thermoelectric device is a main issue. Using first principles density functional theory, we report for CrSi2, a linear relationship between thermodynamic charge state transition levels of defects and temperature at which thermopower peaks. We show for doped CrSi2 that the peak of thermopower occurs at the temperature Tm, which corresponds to the position of defect transition level. Therefore, by modifying the defect transition level, a thermoelectric material with a given operational temperature can be designed. The authors thankfully acknowledge support from ADA under NpMASS.

  6. Initial Operation of the High Temperature Electrolysis Integrated Laboratory Scale Experiment at INL

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Stoots; J. E. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2008-06-01

    An integrated laboratory scale, 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation.

  7. Imaging of Flame Temperature in a Combustion Chamber of Diesel Engine at Transient Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Hidenori; Sumi, Nariaki

    In this study, the flame temperature is visualized in a newly designed optical access diesel engine in order to investigate the mechanism of soot emission at transient operation mode. This single cylinder diesel engine has hydraulic variable valve system and an optical access window instead of an exhaust valve. Optical access window has cleaned by the laser cleaning technique in which the soot on the window is vaporized by the Nd:YAG laser incident. Using this optical engine, high speed photographs of flame were taken under transient operation, and flame temperature was analyzed by two color pyrometry.

  8. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of the sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures below 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves cyclability. One of the main technical issues with operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which causes reduced active area and limits charging. In order to overcome the poor wettability of molten sodium on BASE at 175°C, a Pt grid was applied on the anode side of the BASE using a screen printing technique. Cells with their active area increased by metallized BASEs exhibited deeper charging and stable cycling behavior.

  9. Double quantum wire Aharonov-Bohm interferometers for possible LN 2 temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Porod, W.

    In this paper, we discuss the design of semiconductor electrostatic and magnetostatic Aharonov-Bohm interferometers that could operate at liquid nitrogen temperature. We find that for elevated temperature operation, one dimensional structures constructed from quantum wires are invariably the only choice, especially when transport is diffusive instead of ballistic. We have proposed such a structure which can be fabricated by present day technology. It may exhibit large conductance modulation in an electric field at 77 K and is an ideal configuration for "Quantum Interference Transistors" (QUITS) based on the electrostatic Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  10. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of the sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures below 200 °C reduces cell degradation and improves cyclability. One of the main technical issues with operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175 °C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β″-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which causes reduced active area and limits charging. In order to overcome the poor wettability of molten sodium on BASE at 175 °C, a Pt grid was applied on the anode side of the BASE using a screen printing technique. Cells with their active area increased by metallized BASEs exhibited deeper charging and stable cycling behavior.

  11. Stability of a Crystal Oscillator, Type Si530, Inside and Beyond its Specified Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Data acquisition and control systems depend on timing signals for proper operation and required accuracy. These clocked signals are typically provided by some form of an oscillator set to produce a repetitive, defined signal at a given frequency. Crystal oscillators are commonly used because they are less expensive, smaller, and more reliable than other types of oscillators. Because of the inherent characteristics of the crystal, the oscillators exhibit excellent frequency stability within the specified range of operational temperature. In some cases, however, some compensation techniques are adopted to further improve the thermal stability of a crystal oscillator. Very limited data exist on the performance and reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) crystal oscillators at temperatures beyond the manufacturer's specified operating temperature range. This information is very crucial if any of these parts were to be used in circuits designed for use in space exploration missions where extreme temperature swings and thermal cycling are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the operation of Silicon Laboratories crystal oscillator, type Si530, under specified and extreme ambient temperatures.

  12. EHL Transition Temperature Measurements on a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Filter Wheel Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark J.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Shogrin, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) transition temperature was measured for a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sounder filter wheel bearing in a vacuum tribometer. Conditions included both an 89 N (20 lb.) hard and soft load, 600 rpm, temperatures between 23 C (73 F) and 85 C (185 F), and a vacuum of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp -5) Pa. Elastohydrodynamic to mixed lubrication started to occur at approximately 70 C (158 F).

  13. Optically Tunable Long Wavelength Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Operated at Room Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-09

    dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4774267] Rapidly tunable quantum cascade lasers ( QCLs ) is a key element for the recently proposed long-wavelength infrared (LWIR...is the signal data bandwidth.1,2 QCLs are the only semiconductor lasers that can operate continuous-wave (CW) at room temperature in LWIR. Cur- rently...frequency-tuning of the distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs is typically achieved by temperature control over effective refractive index using pump

  14. Nanoscopic voltage distribution of operating cascade laser devices in cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Dhar, R S; Ban, D

    2016-06-01

    A nanoscopic exploratory measurement technique to measure voltage distribution across an operating semiconductor device in cryogenic temperature has been developed and established. The cross-section surface of the terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) has been measured that resolves the voltage distribution at nanometer scales. The electric field dissemination across the active region of the device has been attained under the device's lasing conditions at cryogenic temperature of 77 K. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Temperature limits for LMFBR fuel cladding under upset and emergency operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Govindarajan, S.; Chetal, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    LMFBR fuel pin cladding tube is subjected to high transient temperatures during incidents such as pump trip, pump to grid plate pipe rupture etc. It is required to know temperature limits under such transient operating conditions for components involved while analyzing such incidents. A methodology for deriving such limits for fuel clad tube is worked out in this paper by making use of the transient damage correlation proposed by W.F. Brizes et. al.

  16. Defining the Operational Conditions for High Temperature Polymer Fuel Cells in Naval Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-31

    benefits of both Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells ( PEMFCs ) and phosphoric acid fuel cell technologies: a solid polymer electrolyte, the PBI...membrane, but with higher temperature (160°C) operation. PBI membrane technology is far less developed than that for PEMFCs , but it is rapidly emerging as...how air contaminants affect the properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cells ( PEMFCs ). PEMFCs operate at 80 °C, and are the present choice of fuel

  17. A new molecular precursor route for the synthesis of Bi-Y, Y-Nb and Bi-doped Y-Nb oxides at moderate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bayot, D.A.; Dupont, A.M.; Devillers, Michel M.

    2007-03-15

    Yttrium-based multimetallic oxides containing bismuth and/or niobium were prepared by a method starting from pre-isolated stable water-soluble precursors which are complexes with the ethylenediaminetetraacetate ligand (edta). The cubic Bi{sub 1-} {sub x} Y {sub x} O{sub 1.5} (x=0.22, 0.25 and 0.3) and Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} oxides were obtained in a pure form in a range of moderate temperatures (600-650 deg. C). This preparation method also allowed to stabilize at room temperature, without quenching, the tetragonal YNbO{sub 4} oxide in a distorted form (T'-phase) by calcining the precursor at 800 deg. C. When heated up to 1000 deg. C, this metastable T'-phase transforms into the metastable 'high-temperature' T oxide, which converts on cooling down to room temperature into the thermodynamically stable monoclinic M oxide. Doping the YNbO{sub 4} oxide with Bi{sup 3+} cations (0.5% and 1% Bi with respect to total Bi+Y amount) led at 800 deg. C to a mixture of the T'-phase and the thermodynamically stable monoclinic one. At 900 deg. C, the almost pure monoclinic structure was obtained. - Graphical abstract: Bi-Y, Nb-Y and Bi-doped Nb-Y oxides were prepared by a molecular precursors method from pre-isolated water-soluble edta-based complexes. The cubic Bi{sub 1-} {sub x} Y {sub x} O{sub 1.5} and Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} oxides were obtained in a pure form at the moderate temperature of 650 deg. C. A distorted tetragonal YNbO{sub 4} phase was also stabilized at room temperature by calcining the precursor at 800 deg. C, and the pure corresponding monoclinic oxide has been obtained near 1100 deg. C.

  18. Identification of miRNAs and their targets in wild tomato at moderately and acutely elevated temperatures by high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rong; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Fangling; Cao, Xue; Sun, Mintao; Liu, Min; Wu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19–24 nucleotide (nt) noncoding RNAs that play important roles in abiotic stress responses in plants. High temperatures have been the subject of considerable attention due to their negative effects on plant growth and development. Heat-responsive miRNAs have been identified in some plants. However, there have been no reports on the global identification of miRNAs and their targets in tomato at high temperatures, especially at different elevated temperatures. Here, three small-RNA libraries and three degradome libraries were constructed from the leaves of the heat-tolerant tomato at normal, moderately and acutely elevated temperatures (26/18 °C, 33/33 °C and 40/40 °C, respectively). Following high-throughput sequencing, 662 conserved and 97 novel miRNAs were identified in total with 469 conserved and 91 novel miRNAs shared in the three small-RNA libraries. Of these miRNAs, 96 and 150 miRNAs were responsive to the moderately and acutely elevated temperature, respectively. Following degradome sequencing, 349 sequences were identified as targets of 138 conserved miRNAs, and 13 sequences were identified as targets of eight novel miRNAs. The expression levels of seven miRNAs and six target genes obtained by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were largely consistent with the sequencing results. This study enriches the number of heat-responsive miRNAs and lays a foundation for the elucidation of the miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanism in tomatoes at elevated temperatures. PMID:27653374

  19. Durability of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Operated at Subfreezing Temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Macauley, Natalia; Lujan, Roger W.; Spernjak, Dusan; ...

    2016-09-15

    The structure, composition, and interfaces of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and gas-diffusion layers (GDLs) have a significant effect on the performance of single-proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures. During isothermal constant-current operation at subfreezing temperatures, water forming at the cathode initially hydrates the membrane, then forms ice in the catalyst layer and/or GDL. This ice formation results in a gradual decay in voltage. High-frequency resistance initially decreases due to an increase in membrane water content and then increases over time as the contact resistance increases. The water/ice holding capacity of a fuel cell decreases with decreasing subfreezingmore » temperature (-10°C vs. -20°C vs. -30°C) and increasing current density (0.02 A cm-2 vs. 0.04 A cm-2). Ice formation monitored using in-situ high-resolution neutron radiography indicated that the ice was concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer at low operating temperatures (≈-20°C) and high current densities (0.04 A cm-2). Significant ice formation was also observed in the GDLs at higher subfreezing temperatures (≈-10°C) and lower current densities (0.02 A cm-2). These results are in good agreement with the long-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at lower temperatures (-20°C and -30°C).« less

  20. Effects of operating conditions on performance of high-temperature polymer electrolyte water electrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua; Inada, Akiko; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakajima, Hironori; Sasaki, Kazunari; Ito, Kohei

    2016-06-01

    Effects of operating conditions of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte water electrolyzer (HT-PEWE) on the electrolysis voltage are evaluated, and the optimal conditions for a high performance are revealed. A HT-PEWE unit cell with a 4-cm2 electrode consisting of Nafion117-based catalyst-coated membrane with IrO2 and Pt/C as the oxygen and hydrogen evolution catalysts is fabricated, and its electrolysis voltage and high-frequency resistance are assessed. The cell temperature and pressure are controlled at 80-130 °C and 0.1-0.5 MPa, respectively. It is observed that increasing the temperature at a constant pressure of 0.1 MPa does not increase the ohmic overvoltage of the cell; however, it does increase the concentration overvoltage. It is also found that the increase in the overvoltage resulting from the rise in the temperature can be suppressed by elevating the pressure. When operating the cell at a temperature of 100 °C, pressure greater than 0.1 MPa suppresses the overvoltage, and so does pressures greater than 0.3 MPa at 130 °C. This behavior suggests that keeping the water in a liquid water phase by increasing the pressure is critical for operating PEWEs at high temperatures.

  1. A Rapid Method for Optimizing Running Temperature of Electrophoresis through Repetitive On-Chip CE Operations

    PubMed Central

    Kaneda, Shohei; Ono, Koichi; Fukuba, Tatsuhiro; Nojima, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a rapid and simple method to determine the optimal temperature conditions for denaturant electrophoresis using a temperature-controlled on-chip capillary electrophoresis (CE) device is presented. Since on-chip CE operations including sample loading, injection and separation are carried out just by switching the electric field, we can repeat consecutive run-to-run CE operations on a single on-chip CE device by programming the voltage sequences. By utilizing the high-speed separation and the repeatability of the on-chip CE, a series of electrophoretic operations with different running temperatures can be implemented. Using separations of reaction products of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer, the effectiveness of the presented method to determine the optimal temperature conditions required to discriminate a single-base substitution (SBS) between two different ssDNAs is demonstrated. It is shown that a single run for one temperature condition can be executed within 4 min, and the optimal temperature to discriminate the SBS could be successfully found using the present method. PMID:21845077

  2. The effect of operating temperature on open, multimegawatt space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    This study addresses reactor powered and combustion powered multimegawatt, burst mode, space power systems to evaluate the effect turbine inlet temperature will have on their performance and mass. Both systems will provide power to space based antiballistic missile weapons that require hydrogen for cooling, and both use this hydrogen coolant as a working fluid or as a fuel for power generation. The quantity of hydrogen needed for weapon cooling increases as the weapon's cooling load increases and as weapon coolant outlet temperature decreases. Also, the hydrogen needed by the turbines in both power systems increases as turbine inlet temperature decreases. When weapon cooling loads are above 40% to 50% of weapon power and weapon coolant outlet temperature is below 300 K to 400 K, the weapon needs more hydrogen than the turbine in either the reactor or combustion powered systems using turbine inlet temperatures consistent with current material technology. There is therefore very little system mass reduction to be gained by operating a burst mode power system at a turbine inlet temperature above present material temperature limits unless the weapon's cooling load is below 40% to 50% or coolant outlet temperature is above 300 K to 400 K. Furthermore, the combustion system's mass increases as turbine inlet temperature increases because oxygen inventory increases with increased turbine inlet temperature.

  3. Temperature dependence of resonance characteristics of silicon resonators and thermal stability improvement by differential operation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Amrita Kumar; Jun, Maeda; Yokoyama, Shuhei; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Yokoyama, Shin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we describe the mechanism and solution for dominating temperature effects on refractive-index-based Si optical resonator sensors such as ring resonator and photonic crystal resonator sensors. The temperature change affects the silicon refractive index and also the resonator mechanical shape. As a result, it is reported that the refractive index change is marked, whereas the mechanical deformation effect is negligible. We also demonstrated that the differential operation is effective for suppressing the temperature effect for Si ring resonator sensors.

  4. A Simple Technique for Creating Regional Composites of Sea Surface Temperature from MODIS for Use in Operational Mesoscale NWP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knievel, Jason C.; Rife, Daran L.; Grim, Joseph A.; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hacker, Joshua P.; Ge, Ming; Fisher, Henry H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for creating regional, high-resolution, daytime and nighttime composites of sea surface temperature (SST) for use in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP). The composites are based on observations from NASA s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Aqua and Terra. The data used typically are available nearly in real time, are applicable anywhere on the globe, and are capable of roughly representing the diurnal cycle in SST. The composites resolution is much higher than that of many other standard SST products used for operational NWP, including the low- and high-resolution Real-Time Global (RTG) analyses. The difference in resolution is key because several studies have shown that highly resolved SSTs are important for driving the air sea interactions that shape patterns of static stability, vertical and horizontal wind shear, and divergence in the planetary boundary layer. The MODIS-based composites are compared to in situ observations from buoys and other platforms operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) off the coasts of New England, the mid-Atlantic, and Florida. Mean differences, mean absolute differences, and root-mean-square differences between the composites and the NDBC observations are all within tenths of a degree of those calculated between RTG analyses and the NDBC observations. This is true whether or not one accounts for the mean offset between the skin temperatures of the MODIS dataset and the bulk temperatures of the NDBC observations and RTG analyses. Near the coast, the MODIS-based composites tend to agree more with NDBC observations than do the RTG analyses. The opposite is true away from the coast. All of these differences in point-wise comparisons among the SST datasets are small compared to the 61.08C accuracy of the NDBC SST sensors. Because skin-temperature variations from land to water so strongly affect the development and life cycle of the sea breeze, this

  5. A Simple Technique for Creating Regional Composites of Sea Surface Temperature from MODIS for Use in Operational Mesoscale NWP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knievel, Jason C.; Rife, Daran L.; Grim, Joseph A.; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hacker, Joshua P.; Ge, Ming; Fisher, Henry H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for creating regional, high-resolution, daytime and nighttime composites of sea surface temperature (SST) for use in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP). The composites are based on observations from NASA s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Aqua and Terra. The data used typically are available nearly in real time, are applicable anywhere on the globe, and are capable of roughly representing the diurnal cycle in SST. The composites resolution is much higher than that of many other standard SST products used for operational NWP, including the low- and high-resolution Real-Time Global (RTG) analyses. The difference in resolution is key because several studies have shown that highly resolved SSTs are important for driving the air sea interactions that shape patterns of static stability, vertical and horizontal wind shear, and divergence in the planetary boundary layer. The MODIS-based composites are compared to in situ observations from buoys and other platforms operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) off the coasts of New England, the mid-Atlantic, and Florida. Mean differences, mean absolute differences, and root-mean-square differences between the composites and the NDBC observations are all within tenths of a degree of those calculated between RTG analyses and the NDBC observations. This is true whether or not one accounts for the mean offset between the skin temperatures of the MODIS dataset and the bulk temperatures of the NDBC observations and RTG analyses. Near the coast, the MODIS-based composites tend to agree more with NDBC observations than do the RTG analyses. The opposite is true away from the coast. All of these differences in point-wise comparisons among the SST datasets are small compared to the 61.08C accuracy of the NDBC SST sensors. Because skin-temperature variations from land to water so strongly affect the development and life cycle of the sea breeze, this

  6. Effects of encapsulated niacin on evaporative heat loss and body temperature in moderately heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Zimbelman, R B; Baumgard, L H; Collier, R J

    2010-06-01

    Twelve multiparous Holstein cows (145+/-9 d in milk) were randomly assigned to receive either 0 g/d of encapsulated niacin (control diet; C) or 12 g/d of encapsulated niacin (NI) and were exposed to thermoneutral (TN; 7 d) or heat stress (HS; 7 d) conditions in climate-controlled chambers. The temperature-humidity index during TN conditions never exceeded 72, whereas HS conditions consisted of a circadian temperature range in which the temperature-humidity index exceeded 72 for 12 h/d. Measures of thermal status obtained 4 times/d included respiration rate (RR); rectal temperature; surface temperature of both shaved and unshaved areas at the rump, shoulder, and tail head; vaginal temperature; and evaporative heat loss (EVHL) of the shoulder shaved and unshaved areas. Cows fed NI had increased free plasma niacin concentrations in both the TN and HS periods (1.70 vs. 1.47+/-0.17 microg/mL). Milk yield did not differ between dietary groups or periods. Dry matter intake was not affected by NI, but decreased (3%) for both C and NI treatments during HS. Water intake was increased during HS in both treatments (C: 40.4 vs. 57.7+/-0.8L/d for TN and HS, respectively; NI: 52.7 vs. 57.7+/-0.8 L/d for TN and HS, respectively). Average EVHL for shaved and unshaved skin for C and NI treatments was higher during HS (90.1 vs. 108.1 g/m(2) per hour) than TN (20.7 vs. 15.7+/-4.9 g/m(2) per hour). Between 1000 and 1600 h, mean EVHL for shaved and unshaved areas for NI fed cows was higher than for C fed cows (106.9 vs. 94.4+/-4.9 g/m(2) per hour). The NI fed cows had decreased rectal temperatures during HS compared with the C fed cows (38.17 vs. 38.34+/-0.07 degrees C) and had lower vaginal temperatures (38.0 vs. 38.4+/-0.02 degrees C). Calculated metabolic rate decreased during HS regardless of diet (50.25 and 49.70+/-0.48 kcal/kg of body weight per day for TN and HS, respectively). Feeding NI increased free plasma NI levels, increased EVHL during peak thermal load, and was associated

  7. Optical properties and electronic requirements for low-temperature operation of yellow semiconductor LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Susanne M.; Mueller, Eduard K.; Van de Workeen, Brian C.; Mueller, Otward M.

    2001-05-01

    In such LED applications as lighting, it is desirable to have the highest light output for the lowest power consumption. This paper investigates the optical properties and electronic requirements of a commercially available yellow LED as a function of temperature from ambient to liquid nitrogen temperatures. It was found that the illuminance increased by almost an order of magnitude, producing much higher light output at the same diode current. However, the operating voltage increased, increasing the overall power consumption slightly. The efficiency (light-watt output to electrical watts consumed) of the LED, though, improved by a factor of more than three. This, combined with the enhanced light output, compensates for the small increase in power consumption and added cooling costs. These improvements further translate into a comparable increase in the lifetime of the LEDs. In general, each ten-degree reduction in temperature corresponds to a doubling of the lifetime of semiconductor devices. It was also found that the maximum operating current increased significantly at liquid nitrogen temperatures over that at ambient temperatures. Lastly, the emitted wavelength range shifted to shorter values in addition to the significant increase in brightness. Thus, a yellow- colored LED at room temperature gave off a much brighter yellow-green-white color at liquid nitrogen temperatures.

  8. Progress report on the design of a varying temperature irradiation experiment for operation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Muroga, T.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to determine effects of temperature variation during irradiation on microstructure and mechanical properties of potential fusion reactor structural materials. A varying temperature irradiation experiment is being performed under the framework of the Japan-USA Program of Irradiation Tests for fusion Research (JUPITER) to study the effects of temperature variation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of candidate fusion reactor structural materials. An irradiation capsule has been designed for operation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will allow four sets of metallurgical test specimens to be irradiated to exposure levels ranging from 5 to 10 dpa. Two sets of specimens will be irradiated at constant temperature of 500{degrees}C and 350{degrees}C. Matching specimen sets will be irradiated to similar exposure levels, with 10% of the exposure to occur at reduced temperatures of 300{degrees}C and 200{degrees}C.

  9. Climate change (elevated CO₂, elevated temperature and moderate drought) triggers the antioxidant enzymes' response of grapevine cv. Tempranillo, avoiding oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Parra, Carolina; Aguirreolea, Jone; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Irigoyen, Juan José; Morales, Fermín

    2012-02-01

    Photosynthetic carbon fixation (A(N) ) and photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are affected by different environmental stress factors, such as those associated with climate change. Under stress conditions, it can be generated an electron excess that cannot be consumed, which can react with O₂, producing reactive oxygen species. This work was aimed to evaluate the influence of climate change (elevated CO₂, elevated temperature and moderate drought) on the antioxidant status of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cv. Tempranillo leaves, from veraison to ripeness. The lowest ratios between electrons generated (ETR) and consumed (A(N) + respiration + photorespiration) were observed in plants treated with elevated CO₂ and elevated temperature. In partially irrigated plants under current ambient conditions, electrons not consumed seemed to be diverted to alternative ways. Oxidative damage to chlorophylls and carotenoids was not observed. However, these plants had increases in thiobarbituric acid reacting substances, an indication of lipid peroxidation. These increases matched well with an early rise of H₂O₂ and antioxidant enzyme activities, superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6). Enzymatic activities were maintained high until ripeness. In conclusion, plants grown under current ambient conditions and moderate drought were less efficient to cope with oxidative damage than well-irrigated plants, and more interestingly, plants grown under moderate drought but treated with elevated CO₂ and elevated temperature were not affected by oxidative damage, mainly because of higher rates of electrons consumed in photosynthetic carbon fixation. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  10. Inhibition of salt water survival and Na-K-ATPase elevation in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) by moderate water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, B. L.; Zaugg, W.S.; McLain, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The steelhead trout metamorphosis from a freshwater parr to a sea water-tolerant smolt possessing the migration tendency was evaluated at six different growth temperatures ranging from 6 to 15 C during January through July. The highest temperature where a transformation was indicated was 11.3 C. By April fish reared at 6 C had elevated ATPase levels typical of smolts or migratory animals and showed 92% survival in sea water. Ten and 11.3 C-reared fish showed a short-lived elevation in ATPase in mid-April alone concurrently with 100% sea water survival at that time. Only in 6 C-reared animals did the salt water survival ability continue into May. High ATPase levels likewise were prolonged into May and June only in the 6 C-reared group. The data indicate that metamorphosis (and therefore successful migration) of juvenile steelhead trout is directly controlled by water temperature.

  11. Using a simple mixing model to assess the role of riparian wetlands in moderating stream water temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Stream water temperature is a fundamental physical characteristic of riverine systems, influencing many processes; from biological productivity to many other aspects of water quality. Given climatic global warming projections, and the implications for stream thermal regimes, they are increasingly considered as part of river basin management plans. Along with the effects of energy exchanges at the water-air interface and riparian vegetation cover, advective heat transport from the different sources of water generating stream flow can strongly influence temperature within the stream channel. Riparian wetland areas are important geomorphic components of landscapes in many parts of the world, and are often a dominant source of stream flow during hydrological events. During wet periods large volumes of water may be displaced into stream channels via near-surface flow paths, which typically have high variability. In dry conditions, more groundwater with less variable temperatures dominate. The mixing of these waters can have great influence over the thermal regimes of streams over a range of flow conditions. Here, we present the use of a simple mixing model to predict daily mean stream water temperature on the basis of mixing groundwater and near surface riparian waters as the end-members in a 3.2km2 watershed in the Scottish Highlands. The resulting model fit was analysed against energy balance components and the spatial extent of the wetland to investigate the importance of energy-exchange in riparian wetlands in determining stream temperatures. Results showed generally good agreement between modelled results and measured temperatures under wet conditions. Model fit was generally better in winter than during the summer months (when the model under predicted temperatures), with a strong correlation evident between net radiation and the fit of the model. This indicated the limited skill of the simple mixing structure to account for the increased importance of energy

  12. Impact of long-term moderate hypercapnia and elevated temperature on the energy budget of isolated gills of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Kreiss, Cornelia M; Michael, Katharina; Bock, Christian; Lucassen, Magnus; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2015-04-01

    Effects of severe hypercapnia have been extensively studied in marine fishes, while knowledge on the impacts of moderately elevated CO2 levels and their combination with warming is scarce. Here we investigate ion regulation mechanisms and energy budget in gills from Atlantic cod acclimated long-term to elevated PCO2 levels (2500 μatm) and temperature (18°C). Isolated perfused gill preparations were established to determine gill thermal plasticity during acute exposures (10-22°C) and in vivo costs of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, protein and RNA synthesis. Maximum enzyme capacities of F1Fo-ATPase, H(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were measured in vitro in crude gill homogenates. After whole animal acclimation to elevated PCO2 and/or warming, branchial oxygen consumption responded more strongly to acute temperature change. The fractions of gill respiration allocated to protein and RNA synthesis remained unchanged. In gills of fish CO2-exposed at both temperatures, energy turnover associated with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was reduced by 30% below rates of control fish. This contrasted in vitro capacities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, which remained unchanged under elevated CO2 at 10°C, and earlier studies which had found a strong upregulation under severe hypercapnia. F1Fo-ATPase capacities increased in hypercapnic gills at both temperatures, whereas Na(+)/K(+)ATPase and H(+)-ATPase capacities only increased in response to elevated CO2 and warming indicating the absence of thermal compensation under CO2. We conclude that in vivo ion regulatory energy demand is lowered under moderately elevated CO2 levels despite the stronger thermal response of total gill respiration and the upregulation of F1Fo-ATPase. This effect is maintained at elevated temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temperature dependent operation of PSAPD-based compact gamma camera for SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtaek; McClish, Mickel; Alhassen, Fares; Seo, Youngho; Shah, Kanai S.; Gould, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the dependence of image quality on the temperature of a position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD)-based small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gamma camera with a CsI:Tl scintillator. Currently, nitrogen gas cooling is preferred to operate PSAPDs in order to minimize the dark current shot noise. Being able to operate a PSAPD at a relatively high temperature (e.g., 5 °C) would allow a more compact and simple cooling system for the PSAPD. In our investigation, the temperature of the PSAPD was controlled by varying the flow of cold nitrogen gas through the PSAPD module and varied from −40 °C to 20 °C. Three experiments were performed to demonstrate the performance variation over this temperature range. The point spread function (PSF) of the gamma camera was measured at various temperatures, showing variation of full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the PSF. In addition, a 99mTc-pertechnetate (140 keV) flood source was imaged and the visibility of the scintillator segmentation (16×16 array, 8 mm × 8 mm area, 400 μm pixel size) at different temperatures was evaluated. Comparison of image quality was made at −25 °C and 5 °C using a mouse heart phantom filled with an aqueous solution of 99mTc-pertechnetate and imaged using a 0.5 mm pinhole collimator made of tungsten. The reconstructed image quality of the mouse heart phantom at 5 °C degraded in comparision to the reconstructed image quality at −25 °C. However, the defect and structure of the mouse heart phantom were clearly observed, showing the feasibility of operating PSAPDs for SPECT imaging at 5 °C, a temperature that would not need the nitrogen cooling. All PSAPD evaluations were conducted with an applied bias voltage that allowed the highest gain at a given temperature. PMID:24465051

  14. High-Operating-Temperature Direct Ink Writing of Mesoscale Eutectic Architectures.

    PubMed

    Boley, J William; Chaudhary, Kundan; Ober, Thomas J; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Chen, Wei Ting; Hanson, Erik; Kulkarni, Ashish; Oh, Jaewon; Kim, Jinwoo; Aagesen, Larry K; Zhu, Alexander Y; Capasso, Federico; Thornton, Katsuyo; Braun, Paul V; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2017-02-01

    High-operating-temperature direct ink writing (HOT-DIW) of mesoscale architectures that are composed of eutectic silver chloride-potassium chloride. The molten ink undergoes directional solidification upon printing on a cold substrate. The lamellar spacing of the printed features can be varied between approximately 100 nm and 2 µm, enabling the manipulation of light in the visible and infrared range.

  15. Piston Temperatures in an Air-Cooled Engine for Various Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manganiello, Eugene J

    1940-01-01

    As part of a program for the study of piston cooling, this report presents the results of tests conducted on a single-cylinder, air-cooled, carburetor engine to determine the effect of engine operating conditions on the temperatures at five locations on the piston.

  16. Sensitivity of Ion Absorption of Room Temperature Operating Single Electron Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Kumar Karre, Paul L. Bergstrom, Govind Mallick, and Shashi P. Karna, “Room Temperature Operational Single Electron Transistor Fabricated by Focused...Ion Beam Deposition,” J. Appl. Phys. 102, 024316 (2007). P. Santosh Kumar Karre, Manoranjan Acharya, William R . Knudsen, and Paul L. Bergstrom

  17. Modulation of Coulomb Blockade Behavior of Room Temperature Operational Single Electron Transistors by Tunnel Junction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Aditya Kapoor2, Govind Mallick3, Shashi P. Karna3, Senior Member IEEE and Paul L. Bergstrom1*, Member, IEEE 978-1-4244-2104-6/08/$25.00 ©2008 IEEE...1999). [6] P. Santosh Kumar Karre, Paul L. Bergstrom, Govind Mallick, and Shashi P. Karna, “Room Temperature Operational Single Electron

  18. Room-temperature operation of a Co:MgF2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Moulton, P. F.

    1988-01-01

    A normal-mode, pulsed Co:MgF2 laser has been operated at room temperature for the first time. Continuous tuning from 1750 to 2500 nm with pulse energies up to 70 mJ and 46-percent slope efficiency was obtained with a 1338-nm Nd:YAG pump laser.

  19. Ice formation in PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Luhan, Roger W; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S; Borup, Rodney L; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Arif, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    The effect of MEA and GDL structure and composition on the performance of single-PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures is presented. The cell performance and durability are not only dependent on the MEA/GDL materials used but also on their interfaces. When a cell is operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures in constant current mode, the water formation due to the current density initially hydrates the membrane/ionomer and then forms ice in the catalyst layer/GDL. An increase in high frequency resistance was also observed in certain MEAs where there is a possibility of ice formation between the catalyst layer and GDL leading to a loss in contact area. The total water/ice holding capacity for any MEA was lower at lower temperatures and higher current densities. The durability of MEAs subjected to multiple isothermal starts was better for LANL prepared MEAs as compared to commercial MEAs, and cloth GDLs when compared to paper GDLs. The ice formation was monitored using high-resolution neutron radiography and was found to be concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer. However, there was significant ice formation in the GDLs especially at the higher temperature ({approx} -10 C) and lower current density (0.02 A/cm{sup 2}) operations. These results are consistent with the longer-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at the lower temperatures.

  20. A Proton Channel Allows a Hydrogen Oxidation Catalyst to Operate at a Moderate Overpotential with Water Acting as a Base

    SciTech Connect

    Lense, Sheri J.; Dutta, Arnab; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-01-25

    Proton channels facilitate the movement of protons over large distances and are critical in many reactions, from controlling proton delivery in metalloenzymes[1] to moving protons through PEM fuel cells.[2] Hydrogenases are enzymes that use proton channels to deliver protons to or from the enzyme active site to achieve high rates of hydrogen production and oxidation at low overpotentials.[3] The [Ni(PR2NR’2)2]2+ series of complexes, which are functional mimics of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site, utilize pendant amines to move the proton to or from the Ni, resulting in some of the fastest synthetic catalysts for hydrogen production and oxidation reported.[4] While intramolecular proton movement has been shown to be facile,[5] deprotonation of hydrogen oxidation catalysts can be a slow step for catalysis.[6] Additionally, a stable H2 adduct (endo-endo) is formed which, if bypassed, could contribute to an overall enhanced rate (Figure 1). A proton channel may aid in addressing these outstanding issues, and the well-studied nature of these catalysts allows them to serve as a platform to investigate the role of a proton channel in solving these problems. To this end we added a second proton relay to this complex, which we demonstrate serves two purposes: we show that the second proton relay facilitates rapid proton transfer, altering the kinetic products formed following H2 addition, and avoiding the low energy endo-endo intermediate. It also aids in lowering the overpotential at which the catalyst operates using water as a base, demonstrating the multi-functional role of a proton channel in molecular catalysts, and possibly in enzymes. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Early Career Research Program, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division and by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

  1. EFFECTS OF MODERATELY HIGH TEMPERATURE ON DIURNAL POLLEN TUBE GROWTH AND FERTILIZATION IN FIELD-GROWN COTTON

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For Gossypium hirsutum pollination, germination, and pollen tube growth must occur in a highly concerted fashion on the day of flowering for fertilization to occur. We hypothesized that increased temperatures under field conditions would limit fertilization by inhibiting diurnal pollen tube growth t...

  2. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation...). (a) For service temperatures below 0 °F. but not below the designated minimum service...

  3. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation...). (a) For service temperatures below 0 °F. but not below the designated minimum service...

  4. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation...). (a) For service temperatures below 0 °F. but not below the designated minimum service...

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation...). (a) For service temperatures below 0 °F. but not below the designated minimum service...

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation...). (a) For service temperatures below 0 °F. but not below the designated minimum service...

  7. A simple, battery-operated, temperature-controlled cuvette for respiration measurements.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, R M; Ryan, M G; Lukens, D L

    1995-03-01

    We designed a simple, portable, battery-operated, temperature-controlled cuvette to measure respiration of small samples of plant tissue in the field. The cuvette is built around a peltier cell and is controlled with a data logger. The cuvette maintained sample temperature within 0.5 degrees C over a temperature range of 5 to 45 degrees C and operated for 6-8 h from a 12 V 105 ampere-hour "deep-cycle" battery. Based on measurements with this cuvette, we found that, at 15 degrees C, CO(2) efflux from dark respiration of white pine (Pinus strobus L.) foliage was 40% greater during the day than at night.

  8. Multi-color tunneling quantum dot infrared photodetectors operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, G.; Perera, A. G. U.; Su, X. H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2007-04-01

    Quantum dot structures designed for multi-color infrared detection and high temperature (or room temperature) operation are demonstrated. A novel approach, tunneling quantum dot (T-QD), was successfully demonstrated with a detector that can be operated at room temperature due to the reduction of the dark current by blocking barriers incorporated into the structure. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunneling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunneling barriers placed in the structure. A two-color tunneling-quantum dot infrared photodetector (T-QDIP) with photoresponse peaks at 6 μm and 17 μm operating at room temperature will be discussed. Furthermore, the idea can be used to develop terahertz T-QD detectors operating at high temperatures. Successful results obtained for a T-QDIP designed for THz operations are presented. Another approach, bi-layer quantum dot, uses two layers of InAs quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes separated by a thin GaAs layer. The detector response was observed at three distinct wavelengths in short-, mid-, and far-infrared regions (5.6, 8.0, and 23.0 μm). Based on theoretical calculations, photoluminescence and infrared spectral measurements, the 5.6 and 23.0 μm peaks are connected to the states in smaller QDs in the structure. The narrow peaks emphasize the uniform size distribution of QDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. These detectors can be employed in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, spectroscopy, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  9. Quality and Antioxidant Activity of Buckwheat-Based Cookies Designed for a Raw Food Vegan Diet as Affected by Moderate Drying Temperature.

    PubMed

    Brožková, Iveta; Dvořáková, Veronika; Michálková, Kateřina; Červenka, Libor; Velichová, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Buckwheat cookies with various ingredients for raw food vegan diet are usually prepared by soaking them in water at ambient temperature followed by drying at moderate temperature. The aim of this study was to examine the temperature effect on the microbiological quality, antioxidant properties and oxidative stability of lipids of final dried samples. The mixture of ingredients was soaked for 20 h in distilled water, and then cookies were formed and dried in air-forced oven at constant temperature in the range from 40 to 60 °C. Total viable counts, fungi, yeasts, coliform and aerobic spore-forming bacteria counts were evaluated in dried samples and were found to decrease during drying at 50 and 60 °C. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ABTS assays, and the former showed the highest value at 40 °C. Superoxide dismutase activity was also higher at 40 °C in comparison with that at 60 °C. The percentage of lipid peroxidation inhibition increased with the increase in drying temperature until 4th day of incubation. While peroxide value was significantly higher in samples dried at 40 °C, TBARS values did not show significant changes during the drying process. The results of this study suggest that drying buckwheat-based cookies at 40 °C retained their good antioxidant properties but represent a potentially serious microbial hazard.

  10. EFFECT OF GEOMETRY AND OPERATING PARAMETERS ON SIMULATED SOFC STACK TEMPERATURE UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Lai, Canhai; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-08-10

    A uniform temperature field is desirable in the solid oxide fuel cell stack to avoid local hot regions that contribute to material degradation, thermal stresses, and differences in electrochemical performance. Various geometric and operational design changes were simulated by numerical modeling of co-flow and counter-flow multi-cell stacks, and the effects on stack maximum temperature, stack temperature difference, and maximum cell temperature difference were characterized. The results showed that 40-60% on-cell steam reforming of methane and a reduced reforming rate of 25-50% of the nominal rate was beneficial for a more uniform temperature field. Fuel exhaust recycling up to 30% was shown to be advantageous for reforming fuels and co-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel, but counter-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel showed higher temperature differences. Cells with large aspect ratios showed a more uniform temperature response due to either the strong influence of the inlet gas temperatures or the greater thermal exchange with the furnace boundary condition. Improved lateral heat spreading with thicker interconnects was demonstrated, but greater improvements towards a uniform thermal field for the same amount of interconnect mass could be achieved using thicker heat spreader plates appropriately distributed along the stack height.

  11. Improved operation of graded-channel SOI nMOSFETs down to liquid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Marcelo Antonio; de Souza, Michelly; Ribeiro, Thales Augusto; Martino, João Antonio; Flandre, Denis

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the operation of Graded-Channel (GC) Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) nMOSFETs at low temperatures down to liquid helium temperature in comparison to standard uniformly doped transistors. Devices from two different technologies have been measured and show that the mobility increase rate with temperature for GC SOI transistors is similar to uniformly doped devices for temperatures down to 90 K. However, at liquid helium temperature the rate of mobility increase is larger in GC SOI than in standard devices because of the different mobility scattering mechanisms. The analog properties of GC SOI devices have been investigated down to 4.16 K and show that because of its better transconductance and output conductance, an intrinsic voltage gain improvement with temperature is also obtained for devices in the whole studied temperature range. GC devices are also capable of reducing the impact ionization due to the high electric field in the drain region, increasing the drain breakdown voltage of fully-depleted SOI MOSFETs at any studied temperature and the kink voltage at 4.16 K.

  12. Production of porcine hemoglobin peptides at moderate temperature and medium pressure under a nitrogen stream. Functional and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carlos; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2012-06-06

    A new hydrolysis method for producing peptides from porcine hemoglobin has been developed. Current processes are based on the use of expensive enzymes or high hydrostatic pressures. In the present study, a cheap and effective process has been assayed to produce peptides from purified porcine hemoglobin. A solution of purified hemoglobin is heated at different temperatures and pressurized at 4 MPa while a stream of nitrogen is injected into the reactor. A total of 82% of initial hemoglobin was transformed into peptides presenting an average size of 3.2 kDa. Some preferential hydrolyzed bonds have been detected. The peptide size distribution was evaluated at different times and temperatures. It has been demonstrated that this technique produces large amounts of peptides possessing good antioxidant properties. Furthermore, functional properties are conserved, and a desirable decrease in color (80%) is achieved.

  13. SNCR De-NOx within a moderate temperature range using urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate as reductant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Chen, D Z; Fan, S; Hong, L; Wang, D

    2016-10-01

    In this research, urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions are used as reductants for the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) De-NOx process below 650 °C. The urea concentration in the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions is chosen through experimental and theoretical studies. To determine the mechanism of the De-NOx process, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions and their thermal decomposition in air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied to understand their decomposition behaviours and redox characteristics. Then a plug flow reactor (PFR) model was adopted to simulate the De-NOx processes in a pilot scale tubular reactor, and the calculated De-NOx efficiency vs. temperature profiles were compared with experimental results to support the mechanism and choose the proper reductant and its reaction temperature. Both the experimental and calculated results show that when the urea is spiked into hydrazine hydrate solution to make the urea-N content approximately 16.7%-25% of the total N content in the solution, better De-NOx efficiencies can be obtained in the temperature range of 550-650 °C, under which NH3 is inactive in reducing NOx. And it is also proved that for these urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions, the hydrazine decomposition through the pathway N2H4 + M = N2H3 + H + M is enhanced to provide radical H, which is active to reduce NO. Finally, the reaction routes for SNCR De-NOx process based on urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate at the proper temperature are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High-Operating Temperature HgCdTe: A Vision for the Near Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Carmody, M.; Piquette, E.; Dreiske, P.; Chen, A.; Yulius, A.; Edwall, D.; Bhargava, S.; Zandian, M.; Tennant, W. E.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent advances in the HgCdTe material quality and detector performance achieved at Teledyne using molecular beam epitaxy growth and the double-layer planar hetero-junction (DLPH) detector architecture. By using an un-doped, fully depleted absorber, Teledyne's DLPH architecture can be extended for use in high operating temperatures and other applications. We assess the potential achievable performance for long wavelength infrared (LWIR) hetero-junction p-lightly-doped n or p-intrinsic- n (p-i-n) detectors based on recently reported results for 10.7 μm cutoff 1 K × 1 K focal plane arrays (FPAs) tested at temperatures down to 30 K. Variable temperature dark current measurements show that any Shockley-Read-Hall currents in the depletion region of these devices have lifetimes that are reproducibly greater than 100 ms. Under the assumption of comparable lifetimes at higher temperatures, it is predicted that fully-depleted background radiation-limited performance can be expected for 10- μm cutoff detectors from room temperature to well below liquid nitrogen temperatures, with room-temperature dark current nearly 400 times lower than predicted by Rule 07. The hetero-junction p-i-n diode is shown to have numerous other significant potential advantages including minimal or no passivation requirements for pBn-like processing, low 1/ f noise, compatibility with small pixel pitch while maintaining high modulation transfer function, low crosstalk and good quantum efficiency. By appropriate design of the FPA dewar shielding, analysis shows that dark current can theoretically be further reduced below the thermal equilibrium radiative limit. Modeling shows that background radiation-limited LWIR HgCdTe operating with f/1 optics has the potential to operate within √2 of background-limited performance at 215 K. By reducing the background radiation by 2/3 using novel shielding methods, operation with a single-stage thermo-electric-cooler may be possible. If the

  15. Study of the operation temperature in the spin-exchange relaxation free magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie; Duan, Lihong; Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of the cell temperature on the sensitivity of the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometer and analyze the possibility of operating at a low temperature. Utilizing a 25 × 25 × 25 mm(3) Cs vapor cell with a heating temperature of 85 °C, which is almost half of the value of potassium, we obtain a linewidth of 1.37 Hz and achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 55 fT/Hz(1/2) in a single channel. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device with an active volume of 1 cm(3) could approach 1 fT/Hz(1/2). Taking advantage of the higher saturated vapor pressure, SERF magnetometer based on Cs opens up the possibility for low cost and portable sensors and is particularly appropriate for lower temperature applications.

  16. Study of the operation temperature in the spin-exchange relaxation free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie Duan, Lihong; Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei

    2015-07-15

    We study the influence of the cell temperature on the sensitivity of the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometer and analyze the possibility of operating at a low temperature. Utilizing a 25 × 25 × 25 mm{sup 3} Cs vapor cell with a heating temperature of 85 {sup ∘}C, which is almost half of the value of potassium, we obtain a linewidth of 1.37 Hz and achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 55 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} in a single channel. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device with an active volume of 1 cm{sup 3} could approach 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. Taking advantage of the higher saturated vapor pressure, SERF magnetometer based on Cs opens up the possibility for low cost and portable sensors and is particularly appropriate for lower temperature applications.

  17. Room temperature operation of GaSb-based resonant tunneling diodes by prewell injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Knebl, Georg; Hartmann, Fabian; Weih, Robert; Bader, Andreas; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    We present room temperature resonant tunneling of GaSb/AlAsSb double barrier resonant tunneling diodes with pseudomorphically grown prewell emitter structures comprising the ternary compound semiconductors GaInSb and GaAsSb. At room temperature, resonant tunneling is absent for diode structures without prewell emitters. The incorporation of Ga0.84In0.16Sb and GaAs0.05Sb0.95 prewell emitters leads to room temperature resonant tunneling with peak-to-valley current ratios of 1.45 and 1.36 , respectively. The room temperature operation is attributed to the enhanced Γ-L-valley energy separation and consequently depopulation of L-valley states in the conduction band of the ternary compound emitter prewell with respect to bulk GaSb.

  18. A comparison of performance between Teflon and polyurethane safety cannulae at extremes of operating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jeyanathan, J; Webster, B B; Hawksley, O J; Mellor, A J

    2012-06-01

    In the United Kingdom, approximately eight million peripheral cannulations are performed each year. Intravenous cannulae are made from either polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) or polyurethane. Polyurethane has a lower incidence of thrombophlebitis, however the physical characteristics of polyurethane may make the cannulae difficult to use at higher ambient temperatures. This effect maybe of importance to those involved in cannulation in extreme environments and especially for military doctors deployed in current theatres of operations. In a randomised single blinded study we investigated the different characteristics of Teflon and polyurethane cannulae (Vasofix Safety Cannulae, B Braun) at three different temperatures (-10 degrees C, 21 degrees C and 40 degrees C). There is no statistically significant difference in the ease or speed of cannulation of either polyurethane or Teflon safety cannulae in extremes of temperature. This study provides evidence that performance of polyurethane safety cannulae are not impaired by temperature extremes.

  19. High performance shape memory effect in nitinol wire for actuators with increased operating temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Riccardo; Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Vedani, Maurizio; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-07-01

    In this research, the high performance shape memory effect (HP-SME) is experimented on a shape memory NiTi wire, with austenite finish temperature higher than room temperature. The HP-SME consists in the thermal cycling of stress induced martensite and it allows achieving mechanical work higher than that produced by conventional shape memory actuators based on the heating/cooling of detwinned martensite. The Nitinol wire was able to recover about 5.5% of deformation under a stress of 600 MPa and to withstand about 5000 cycles before failure. HP-SME path increased the operating temperature of the shape memory actuator wire. Functioning temperatures higher than 100°C was reached.

  20. Low and moderate photosynthetically active radiation affects the flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) dependent on two low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Neugart, Susanne; Fiol, Michaela; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Zrenner, Rita; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2013-11-01

    Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) contains a large number of naturally occurring structurally different non-acylated and acylated flavonol glycosides as well as hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of low and moderate photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and how these levels interact with low temperature in these phenolic compounds. Juvenile kale plants were treated with PAR levels from 200 to 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at 5 and 10 °C under defined conditions in climate chambers. Of the investigated 20 compounds, 11 and 17 compounds were influenced by PAR and temperature, respectively. In addition, an interaction between PAR and temperature was found for eight compounds. The response of the phenolic compounds to PAR was structure-dependent. While quercetin triglycosides increased with higher PAR at 5 and 10 °C, the kaempferol triglycosides exhibited the highest concentrations at 400 μmol m(-2) s(-1). In contrast, kaempferol diglycosides exhibited the highest concentrations at increased PAR levels of 600 and 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at 10 °C. However, key genes of flavonol biosynthesis were influenced by temperature but remained unaffected by PAR. Furthermore, there was no interaction between the PAR level and the low temperature in the response of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale with the exception of caffeoylquinic acid, which decreased with higher PAR levels of 600 and 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and at a lower temperature. In conclusion, PAR and its interaction with temperature could be a suitable tool for modifying the profile of phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. S∧4 Reactor: Operating Lifetime and Estimates of Temperature and Burnup Reactivity Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The S∧4 reactor has a sectored, Mo-14%Re solid core for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion. The reactor is loaded with UN fuel, cooled with a He-Xe gas mixture at ~1200 K and operates at steady thermal power of 550 kW. Following a launch abort accident, the axial and radial BeO reflectors easily disassemble upon impact so that the bare reactor is subcriticial when submerged in wet sand or seawater and the core voids are filled with seawater. Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) additives have been shown to increase the UN fuel enrichment and significantly reduce the total mass of the reactor. This paper investigates the effects of SSA additions on the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients and the operational lifetime of the S∧4 reactor. SSAs slightly decrease the temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, but significantly increase the operating lifetime by decreasing the burnup reactivity coefficient. With no SSAs, fuel enrichment is only 58.5 wt% and the estimated operating lifetime is the shortest (7.6 years) with the highest temperature and burnup reactivity feedback coefficients (-0.2709 ¢/K and -1.3470 $/atom%). With europium-151 and gadolinium-155 additions, the enrichment (91.5 and 94 wt%) and operating lifetime (9.9 and 9.8 years) of the S∧4 reactor are the highest while the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients (-0.2382 and -0.2447 ¢/K -0.9073 and 0.8502 $/atom%) are the lowest.

  2. Investigation of high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjemian, Kevork Tro

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have garnered much attention in the media over the past years as they can provide a clean, environmentally friendly alternative to internal combustion engines. PEMFCs also have the flexibility to operate on many different types of fuels, thereby diminishing our reliance on foreign oil. PEMFCs, however, suffer from many drawbacks which need to be overcome before mass production becomes viable. One drawback is the expense of the fuel cell system, costing several times more than existing technologies. Another problem is that if the fuel cell is running on reformed fuels, trace amounts of carbon monoxide (10 ppm) in the hydrogen gas stream will completely poison the anode electrocatalyst, killing the PEMFC. Also, as a lot of waste heat is generated, a very elaborate cooling system needs to be used, making the overall system more expensive and complex. A possible solution to both the carbon monoxide poisoning and thermal management of a PEMFC is to elevate its operating temperature above 100°C. Unfortunately, current state-of-the-art electrolytes used in PEMFCs, i.e. Nafion 115, rely on water for the conduction of protons and by elevating the temperature, water loss occurs due to evaporation resulting in inadequate PEMFC performance. This thesis delves into the modification of Nafion and similar electrolytes to permit PEMFC operation above 100°C. This was accomplished by impregnating the pores of the Nafion with hydrophilic inorganic materials-silicon oxide via sol-gel processing and various inorganic particles. By performing these modifications to the various electrolytes, several composite membranes performed exceptionally well at an operating temperature of 130°C and demonstrated carbon monoxide tolerance of up to 500 ppm. In addition, a theory on how these materials help improve the water management characteristics of Nafion was developed, laying the foundation for the development of a completely novel membrane to

  3. Metabolic response to air temperature and wind in day-old mallards and a standard operative temperature scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakken, G.S.; Reynolds, P.S.; Kenow, K.P.; Korschgen, C.E.; Boysen, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    Most duckling mortality occurs during the week following hatching and is often associated with cold, windy, wet weather and scattering of the brood. We estimated the thermoregulatory demands imposed by cold, windy weather on isolated 1-d-old mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings resting in cover. We measured O-2 consumption and evaporative water loss at air temperatures from 5 degrees to 25 degrees C and wind speeds of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mis. Metabolic heat production increased as wind increased or temperature decreased but was less sensitive to wind than that of either adult passerines or small mammals. Evaporative heat loss ranged from 5% to 17% of heat production. Evaporative heal loss and the ratio of evaporative heat loss to metabolic heat production was significantly lower in rest phase. These data were used to define a standard operative temperature (T-es) scale for night or heavy overcast conditions. An increase of wind speed from 0.1 to 1 mis decreased T-es by 3 degrees-5 degrees C.

  4. Metabolic response to air temperature and wind in day-old mallards and a standard operative temperature scale.

    PubMed

    Bakken, G S; Reynolds, P S; Kenow, K P; Korschgen, C E; Boysen, A F

    1999-01-01

    Most duckling mortality occurs during the week following hatching and is often associated with cold, windy, wet weather and scattering of the brood. We estimated the thermoregulatory demands imposed by cold, windy weather on isolated 1-d-old mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings resting in cover. We measured O2 consumption and evaporative water loss at air temperatures from 5 degrees to 25 degrees C and wind speeds of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 m/s. Metabolic heat production increased as wind increased or temperature decreased but was less sensitive to wind than that of either adult passerines or small mammals. Evaporative heat loss ranged from 5% to 17% of heat production. Evaporative heat loss and the ratio of evaporative heat loss to metabolic heat production was significantly lower in rest phase. These data were used to define a standard operative temperature (Tes) scale for night or heavy overcast conditions. An increase of wind speed from 0.1 to 1 m/s decreased Tes by 3 degrees -5 degrees C.

  5. New constant-temperature operating mode for graphite calorimeter at LNE-LNHB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daures, J.; Ostrowsky, A.

    2005-09-01

    The realization of the unit of absorbed dose at LNE-LNHB is based on calorimetry with the present GR8 graphite calorimeter. For this reason the calorimetric technique must be maintained, developed and improved in the laboratory. The usual quasi-adiabatic operating mode at LNHB is based on the thermal feedback between the core (sensitive element) and the jacket (adjacent body). When a core-jacket temperature difference is detected, a commercially available analogue PID (Proportional, Integral, Derivative) controller sends to the jacket an amount of electrical power to reduce this difference. Nevertheless, the core and jacket temperatures increase with irradiations and electrical calibrations whereas the surrounding is maintained at a fixed temperature to shield against the room temperature variations. At radiotherapy dose rates, fewer than ten measurements, or electrical calibrations, per day can be performed. This paper describes the new constant-temperature operating mode which has been implemented recently to improve flexibility in use and, to some extent, accuracy. The core and the jacket temperatures are maintained at fixed temperatures. A steady state is achieved without irradiation. Then, under irradiation, the electrical power needed to maintain the assigned temperature in the core is reduced by the amount of heat generated by ionizing radiation. The difference between these electrical powers, without and with irradiation, gives the mean absorbed dose rate to the core. The quality of this electrical power substitution measurement is strongly dependent upon the quality of the core and jacket thermal control. The core temperature is maintained at the set value using a digital PID regulator developed at the laboratory with LabView software on PC for this purpose. This regulator is versatile and particularly well suited for calorimetry purposes. Measurements in a cobalt-60 beam have shown no significant difference (<0.09%) between the two operating modes, with

  6. Assessment of SOI AND Gate, Type CHT-7408, for Operation in Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla Rivera

    2009-01-01

    Electronic parts based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are finding widespread applications due to their ability to operate in harsh environments and the benefits they offer as compared to their silicon counterparts. Due to their construction, they are tailored for high temperature operation and show good tolerance to radiation events. In addition, their inherent design lessens the formation of parasitic junctions, thereby reducing leakage currents, decreasing power consumption, and enhancing speed. These devices are typically rated in temperature capability from -55 C to about +225 C, and their characteristics over this temperature range are documented in data sheets. Since electronics in some of NASA space exploration missions are required to operate under extreme temperature conditions, both cold and hot, their characteristic behavior within the full temperature spectrum must be determined to establish suitability for use in space applications. The effects of extreme temperature exposure on the performance of a new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) SOI AND gate device were evaluated in this work. The high temperature, quad 2-inputs AND gate device, which was recently introduced by CISSOID, is fabricated using a CMOS SOI process. Some of the specifications of the CHT-7408 chip are listed in a table. By supplying a constant DC voltage to one gate input and a 10 kHz square wave into the other associated gate input, the chip was evaluated in terms of output response, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (tf), and propagation delays (using a 50% level between input and output during low to high (tPLH) and high to low (tPHL) transitions). The supply current of the gate circuit was also obtained. These parameters were recorded at various test temperatures between -195 C and +250 C using a Sun Systems environmental chamber programmed at a temperature rate of change of 10 C/min. In addition, the effects of thermal cycling on this chip were determined by exposing

  7. Durability of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Operated at Subfreezing Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Macauley, Natalia; Lujan, Roger W.; Spernjak, Dusan; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.; More, Karren; Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2016-09-15

    The structure, composition, and interfaces of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and gas-diffusion layers (GDLs) have a significant effect on the performance of single-proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures. During isothermal constant-current operation at subfreezing temperatures, water forming at the cathode initially hydrates the membrane, then forms ice in the catalyst layer and/or GDL. This ice formation results in a gradual decay in voltage. High-frequency resistance initially decreases due to an increase in membrane water content and then increases over time as the contact resistance increases. The water/ice holding capacity of a fuel cell decreases with decreasing subfreezing temperature (-10°C vs. -20°C vs. -30°C) and increasing current density (0.02 A cm-2 vs. 0.04 A cm-2). Ice formation monitored using in-situ high-resolution neutron radiography indicated that the ice was concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer at low operating temperatures (≈-20°C) and high current densities (0.04 A cm-2). Significant ice formation was also observed in the GDLs at higher subfreezing temperatures (≈-10°C) and lower current densities (0.02 A cm-2). These results are in good agreement with the long-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at lower temperatures (-20°C and -30°C).

  8. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC employing thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at moderate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G.; Hallén, A.

    2015-12-21

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a major point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers limiting the minority charge carrier lifetime. In layers grown by chemical vapor deposition techniques, the V{sub C} concentration is typically in the range of 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −3}, and after device processing at temperatures approaching 2000 °C, it can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. In the present study, both as-grown layers and a high-temperature processed one have been annealed at 1500 °C and the V{sub C} concentration is demonstrated to be strongly reduced, exhibiting a value of only a few times 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −3} as determined by deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements. The value is reached already after annealing times on the order of 1 h and is evidenced to reflect thermodynamic equilibrium under C-rich ambient conditions. The physical processes controlling the kinetics for establishment of the V{sub C} equilibrium are estimated to have an activation energy below ∼3 eV and both in-diffusion of carbon interstitials and out-diffusion of V{sub C}'s are discussed as candidates. This concept of V{sub C} elimination is flexible and readily integrated in a materials and device processing sequence.

  9. The autoignition of iso-cetane at high to moderate temperatures and elevated pressures: Shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.; Steinberg, Justin; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2009-11-15

    Iso-cetane (2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, C{sub 16}H{sub 34}) is a highly branched alkane reference compound for determining cetane ratings. It is also a candidate branched alkane representative in surrogate mixtures for diesel and jet fuels. Here new experiments and kinetic modeling results are presented for the autoignition of iso-cetane at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to combustion in internal combustion engines. Ignition delay time measurements were made in reflected shock experiments in a heated shock tube for {phi} = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 iso-cetane/air mixtures at temperatures ranging from 879 to 1347 K and pressures from 8 to 47 atm. Ignition delay times were measured using electronically excited OH emission, monitored through the shock tube end wall, and piezoelectric pressure transducer measurements, made at side wall locations. A new kinetic mechanism for the description of the oxidation of iso-cetane is presented that is developed based on a previous mechanism for iso-octane. Computed results from the mechanism are found in good agreement with the experimental measurements. To our knowledge, the ignition time measurements for iso-cetane presented here are the first of their kind. (author)

  10. Influence of temperature and surfactant on Escherichia coli inactivation in aqueous suspensions treated by moderate pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    El Zakhem, H; Lanoisellé, J-L; Lebovka, N I; Nonus, M; Vorobiev, E

    2007-12-15

    This research employed a conductometric technique to estimate the inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli cells in aqueous suspensions (1 wt.%) during simultaneous pulsed electric fields (PEF) and thermal treatments. The electric field strength was E=5 kV/cm, the effective PEF treatment time t(PEF) was within 0-0.2 s, the pulse duration t(i) was 10(-3) s, the medium temperature was 30-50 degrees C, and the time of thermal treatment t(T) was within 0-7000 s. The damage of E. coli was accompanied by cell size decrease and release of intracellular components. The synergy between PEF and thermal treatments on E. coli inactivation was clearly present. The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 additionally improved its inactivation. The characteristic damage time followed the Arrhenius law within the temperature range 30-50 degrees C with activation energies W=94+/-2 kJ mol(-1) and W=103+/-5 kJ mol(-1) with and without the presence of surfactant, respectively. Relations between cell aggregation, cell zeta-potentials and presence of surfactant were analysed.

  11. Influence of gadolinium doping on the structure and defects of ceria under fuel cell operating temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, S. A. Gaikwad, V. M.; Sathe, V.; Kulkarni, S. K.

    2014-03-17

    Correlation between atomic positional shift, oxygen vacancy defects, and oxide ion conductivity in doped ceria system has been established in the gadolinium doped ceria system from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy study at operating temperature (300–600 °C) of Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IT-SOFC). High temperature XRD data are used to quantify atomic positional shift from mean position with temperature. The Raman spectroscopy study shows additional vibration modes related to ordering of defect spaces (Gd{sub Ce}{sup ′}−V{sub o}{sup ••}){sup *} and (2Gd{sub Ce}{sup ′}−V{sub o}{sup ••}){sup x} generated due to association of oxygen vacancies and reduced cerium or dopant cations site (Gd{sup 3+}), which disappear at 450 °C; indicating oxygen vacancies dissociation from the defect complex. The experimental evidences of cation-anion positional shifting and oxygen vacancies dissociation from defect complex in the IT-SOFC operating temperature are discussed to correlate with activation energy for ionic conductivity.

  12. Operation of a Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Digital Isolator, Type IL510, Under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Panko, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new type of signal isolation based on Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) technology was investigated for potential use in harsh temperature environments. Operational characteristics of the 2Mbps single channel, IL510-Series commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) digital isolator chip was obtained under extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling in the range of -190 C to +120 C. The isolator was evaluated in terms of its output signal delivery and stability, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (t(sub f)), and propagation delays at 50% level between input and output during low to high (t(sub PLH)) and high to low (t(sub PHL)) transitions. The device performed very well throughout the entire test temperature range as no significant changes occurred either in its function or in its output signal timing characteristics. The limited thermal cycling, which comprised of 12 cycles between -190 C and +120 C, also had no influence on its performance. In addition, the device packaging underwent no structural damage due to the extreme temperature exposure. These preliminary results indicate that this semiconductor chip has the potential for use in a temperature range that extends beyond its specified regime. Additional and more comprehensive testing, however, is required to establish its operation and reliability and to determine its suitability for long-term use in space exploration missions.

  13. High-temperature operation of broadband bidirectional terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Sudeep; Gao, Liang; Zhao, Le; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a broadband gain medium could play an important role for sensing and spectroscopy since then distributed-feedback schemes could be utilized to produce laser arrays on a single semiconductor chip with wide spectral coverage. QCLs can be designed to emit at two different frequencies when biased with opposing electrical polarities. Here, terahertz QCLs with bidirectional operation are developed to achieve broadband lasing from the same semiconductor chip. A three-well design scheme with shallow-well GaAs/Al0.10Ga0.90As superlattices is developed to achieve high-temperature operation for bidirectional QCLs. It is shown that shallow-well heterostructures lead to optimal quantum-transport in the superlattice for bidirectional operation compared to the prevalent GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As material system. Broadband lasing in the frequency range of 3.1–3.7 THz is demonstrated for one QCL design, which achieves maximum operating temperatures of 147 K and 128 K respectively in opposing polarities. Dual-color lasing with large frequency separation is demonstrated for a second QCL, that emits at ~3.7 THz and operates up to 121 K in one polarity, and at ~2.7 THz up to 105 K in the opposing polarity. These are the highest operating temperatures achieved for broadband terahertz QCLs at the respective emission frequencies, and could lead to commercial development of broadband terahertz laser arrays. PMID:27615416

  14. High-temperature operation of broadband bidirectional terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Sudeep; Gao, Liang; Zhao, Le; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-09-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a broadband gain medium could play an important role for sensing and spectroscopy since then distributed-feedback schemes could be utilized to produce laser arrays on a single semiconductor chip with wide spectral coverage. QCLs can be designed to emit at two different frequencies when biased with opposing electrical polarities. Here, terahertz QCLs with bidirectional operation are developed to achieve broadband lasing from the same semiconductor chip. A three-well design scheme with shallow-well GaAs/Al0.10Ga0.90As superlattices is developed to achieve high-temperature operation for bidirectional QCLs. It is shown that shallow-well heterostructures lead to optimal quantum-transport in the superlattice for bidirectional operation compared to the prevalent GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As material system. Broadband lasing in the frequency range of 3.1-3.7 THz is demonstrated for one QCL design, which achieves maximum operating temperatures of 147 K and 128 K respectively in opposing polarities. Dual-color lasing with large frequency separation is demonstrated for a second QCL, that emits at ~3.7 THz and operates up to 121 K in one polarity, and at ~2.7 THz up to 105 K in the opposing polarity. These are the highest operating temperatures achieved for broadband terahertz QCLs at the respective emission frequencies, and could lead to commercial development of broadband terahertz laser arrays.

  15. High-temperature operation of broadband bidirectional terahertz quantum-cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Sudeep; Gao, Liang; Zhao, Le; Reno, John L; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-09-12

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a broadband gain medium could play an important role for sensing and spectroscopy since then distributed-feedback schemes could be utilized to produce laser arrays on a single semiconductor chip with wide spectral coverage. QCLs can be designed to emit at two different frequencies when biased with opposing electrical polarities. Here, terahertz QCLs with bidirectional operation are developed to achieve broadband lasing from the same semiconductor chip. A three-well design scheme with shallow-well GaAs/Al0.10Ga0.90As superlattices is developed to achieve high-temperature operation for bidirectional QCLs. It is shown that shallow-well heterostructures lead to optimal quantum-transport in the superlattice for bidirectional operation compared to the prevalent GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As material system. Broadband lasing in the frequency range of 3.1-3.7 THz is demonstrated for one QCL design, which achieves maximum operating temperatures of 147 K and 128 K respectively in opposing polarities. Dual-color lasing with large frequency separation is demonstrated for a second QCL, that emits at ~3.7 THz and operates up to 121 K in one polarity, and at ~2.7 THz up to 105 K in the opposing polarity. These are the highest operating temperatures achieved for broadband terahertz QCLs at the respective emission frequencies, and could lead to commercial development of broadband terahertz laser arrays.

  16. High-temperature operation of broadband bidirectional terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, Sudeep; Gao, Liang; Zhao, Le; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-09-12

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a broadband gain medium could play an important role for sensing and spectroscopy since then distributed-feedback schemes could be utilized to produce laser arrays on a single semiconductor chip with wide spectral coverage. QCLs can be designed to emit at two different frequencies when biased with opposing electrical polarities. Here, we develop terahertz QCLs with bidirectional operation to achieve broadband lasing from the same semiconductor chip. A three-well design scheme with shallow-well GaAs/Al0.10Ga0.90As superlattices is developed to achieve high-temperature operation for bidirectional QCLs. It is shown that shallow-well heterostructures lead to optimal quantum-transport in the superlattice for bidirectional operation compared to the prevalent GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As material system. Furthermore, broadband lasing in the frequency range of 3.1–3.7 THz is demonstrated for one QCL design, which achieves maximum operating temperatures of 147 K and 128 K respectively in opposing polarities. Dual-color lasing with large frequency separation is demonstrated for a second QCL, that emits at ~3.7 THz and operates up to 121 K in one polarity, and at ~2.7 THz up to 105 K in the opposing polarity. Finally, these are the highest operating temperatures achieved for broadband terahertz QCLs at the respective emission frequencies, and could lead to commercial development of broadband terahertz laser arrays.

  17. High-temperature operation of broadband bidirectional terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, Sudeep; Gao, Liang; Zhao, Le; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-09-12

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a broadband gain medium could play an important role for sensing and spectroscopy since then distributed-feedback schemes could be utilized to produce laser arrays on a single semiconductor chip with wide spectral coverage. QCLs can be designed to emit at two different frequencies when biased with opposing electrical polarities. Here, we develop terahertz QCLs with bidirectional operation to achieve broadband lasing from the same semiconductor chip. A three-well design scheme with shallow-well GaAs/Al0.10Ga0.90As superlattices is developed to achieve high-temperature operation for bidirectional QCLs. It is shown that shallow-well heterostructures lead to optimal quantum-transport in the superlattice for bidirectional operation compared to the prevalent GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As material system. Furthermore, broadband lasing in the frequency range of 3.1–3.7 THz is demonstrated for one QCL design, which achieves maximum operating temperatures of 147 K and 128 K respectively in opposing polarities. Dual-color lasing with large frequency separation is demonstrated for a second QCL, that emits at ~3.7 THz and operates up to 121 K in one polarity, and at ~2.7 THz up to 105 K in the opposing polarity. Finally, these are the highest operating temperatures achieved for broadband terahertz QCLs at the respective emission frequencies, and could lead to commercial development of broadband terahertz laser arrays.

  18. High-temperature operation of broadband bidirectional terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Khanal, Sudeep; Gao, Liang; Zhao, Le; ...

    2016-09-12

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a broadband gain medium could play an important role for sensing and spectroscopy since then distributed-feedback schemes could be utilized to produce laser arrays on a single semiconductor chip with wide spectral coverage. QCLs can be designed to emit at two different frequencies when biased with opposing electrical polarities. Here, we develop terahertz QCLs with bidirectional operation to achieve broadband lasing from the same semiconductor chip. A three-well design scheme with shallow-well GaAs/Al0.10Ga0.90As superlattices is developed to achieve high-temperature operation for bidirectional QCLs. It is shown that shallow-well heterostructures lead to optimal quantum-transport inmore » the superlattice for bidirectional operation compared to the prevalent GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As material system. Furthermore, broadband lasing in the frequency range of 3.1–3.7 THz is demonstrated for one QCL design, which achieves maximum operating temperatures of 147 K and 128 K respectively in opposing polarities. Dual-color lasing with large frequency separation is demonstrated for a second QCL, that emits at ~3.7 THz and operates up to 121 K in one polarity, and at ~2.7 THz up to 105 K in the opposing polarity. Finally, these are the highest operating temperatures achieved for broadband terahertz QCLs at the respective emission frequencies, and could lead to commercial development of broadband terahertz laser arrays.« less

  19. An Experimental Study of the Operating Temperature in a Loop Heat Pipe with Two Evaporators and Two Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Birur, Gaj; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive experimental study of the loop operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP) which has two parallel evaporators and two parallel condensers. In a single evaporator LHP, it is well known that the loop operating temperature is a function of the heat load, the sink temperature and the ambient temperature. The objective of the present study emphasizes on the stability of the loop operating temperature and parameters that affects the loop operation. Tests results show that the loop operating temperature is a function of the total system heat load, sink temperature, ambient temperature, and beat load distribution between the two evaporators. Under most conditions, only one compensation chamber (CC) contains two-phase fluid and controls the loop operating temperature, and the other CC is completely filled with liquid. Moreover, as the test condition changes, control of the loop operating temperature often shifted from one CC to another. In spite of complex interactions between various components, the test loop has demonstrated very robust operation even during fast transients.

  20. Operational and theoretical temperature considerations in a Penning surface plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D. C. Lawrie, S. R.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Dudnikov, V.

    2015-04-08

    A fully detailed 3D thermal model of the ISIS Penning surface plasma source is developed in ANSYS. The proportion of discharge power applied to the anode and cathode is varied until the simulation matches the operational temperature observations. The range of possible thermal contact resistances are modelled, which gives an estimation that between 67% and 85% of the discharge power goes to the cathode. Transient models show the electrode surface temperature rise during the discharge pulse for a range of duty cycles. The implications of these measurements are discussed and a mechanism for governing cesium coverage proposed. The requirements for the design of a high current long pulse source are stated.

  1. Frequency characteristics of an inherently stable Nd:YAG laser operated at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, Matthias; Kovalchuk, Evgeny; Peters, Achim

    2009-07-10

    We report on frequency measurements of a free-running Nd:YAG laser operating at temperatures down to 6.5 K using a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Due to lower thermal expansion and thermo-optic effects as well as reduced electron-phonon interactions in Nd:YAG at cryogenic temperatures, a laser frequency stability on the order of 10{sup -11} at {tau} < or = 30s has been achieved. Within a one-week measurement period, absolute frequency deviations were lower than 1.85 MHz. This is up to a 100-fold improvement of frequency stability compared to any existing free-running solid-state laser.

  2. The Lifetime Estimate for ACSR Single-Stage Splice Connector Operating at Higher Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Graziano, Joe; Chan, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the continuation of Part I effort to develop a protocol of integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of a full tension single-stage splice connector (SSC) assembly during service at high operating temperature.1The Part II efforts are mainly focused on the thermal mechanical testing, thermal-cycling simulation and its impact on the effective lifetime of the SSC system. The investigation indicates that thermal cycling temperature and frequency, conductor cable tension loading, and the compressive residual stress field within a SSC system have significant impact on the SSC integrity and the associated effective lifetime.

  3. Operational and theoretical temperature considerations in a Penning surface plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Dudnikov, V.

    2015-04-01

    A fully detailed 3D thermal model of the ISIS Penning surface plasma source is developed in ANSYS. The proportion of discharge power applied to the anode and cathode is varied until the simulation matches the operational temperature observations. The range of possible thermal contact resistances are modelled, which gives an estimation that between 67% and 85% of the discharge power goes to the cathode. Transient models show the electrode surface temperature rise during the discharge pulse for a range of duty cycles. The implications of these measurements are discussed and a mechanism for governing cesium coverage proposed. The requirements for the design of a high current long pulse source are stated.

  4. Method for producing ceramic composition having low friction coefficient at high operating temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Lankford, Jr., James

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stable ceramic composition having a surface with a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance at high operating temperatures. A first deposition of a thin film of a metal ion is made upon the surface of the ceramic composition and then a first ion implantation of at least a portion of the metal ion is made into the near surface region of the composition. The implantation mixes the metal ion and the ceramic composition to form a near surface composite. The near surface composite is then oxidized sufficiently at high oxidizing temperatures to form an oxide gradient layer in the surface of the ceramic composition.

  5. Room temperature operational single electron transistor fabricated by focused ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karre, P. Santosh Kumar; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi P.

    2007-07-01

    We present the fabrication and room temperature operation of single electron transistors using 8nm tungsten islands deposited by focused ion beam deposition technique. The tunnel junctions are fabricated using oxidation of tungsten in peracetic acid. Clear Coulomb oscillations, showing charging and discharging of the nanoislands, are seen at room temperature. The device consists of an array of tunnel junctions; the tunnel resistance of individual tunnel junction of the device is calculated to be as high as 25.13GΩ. The effective capacitance of the array of tunnel junctions was found to be 0.499aF, giving a charging energy of 160.6meV.

  6. Low-temperature series for renormalized operators: The ferromagnetic square-lattice Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for computing low-temperature series for renormalized operators in the two-dimensional Ising model is proposed. These series are applied to the study of the properties of the truncated renormalized Hamiltonians when we start at very low temperature and zero field. The truncated Hamiltonians for majority rule, Kadanoff transformation, and decimation for 2×2 blocks depend on the how we approach the first-order phase-transition line. The renormalization group transformations are multivalued and discontinuous at this first-order transition line when restricted to some finite-dimensional interaction space.

  7. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  8. General information for operation of the high-temperature electromagnetic containerless vacuum induction furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Hahs, C.A.; Fox, R.J.

    1994-06-01

    The High-Temperature Electromagnetic Containerless Vacuum Induction Furnace was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama. The high-efficiency radio-frequency system developed for the conceptual design of the Modular Electromagnetic Levitator was created to evaluate this hardware on the KC135 microgravity airplane operated by NASA. Near-future KC135 flights are being planned to levitate, melt, and undercool 5-mm samples of niobium. General information on the operation of this hardware is included.

  9. Continuous wave operation of a mid-infrared semiconductor laser at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Beck, Mattias; Hofstetter, Daniel; Aellen, Thierry; Faist, Jérôme; Oesterle, Ursula; Ilegems, Marc; Gini, Emilio; Melchior, Hans

    2002-01-11

    Continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers is reported up to a temperature of 312 kelvin. The devices were fabricated as buried heterostructure lasers with high-reflection coatings on both laser facets, resulting in continuous wave operation with optical output power ranging from 17 milliwatts at 292 kelvin to 3 milliwatts at 312 kelvin, at an emission wavelength of 9.1 micrometers. The results demonstrate the potential of quantum cascade lasers as continuous wave mid-infrared light sources for high-resolution spectroscopy, chemical sensing applications, and free-space optical communication systems.

  10. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration.

  11. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration.

  12. Gradual crossover in molecular organization of stable liquid H{sub 2}O at moderately high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Yoshida, Koh; Inaba, Akira; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Using the literature raw data of the speed of sound and the specific volume, the isothermal compressibility, κ{sub T}, a second derivative thermodynamic quantity of G, was evaluated for liquid H{sub 2}O in the pressure range up to 350 MPa and the temperature to 50 ºC. We then obtained its pressure derivative, dκ{sub T}/dp, a third derivative numerically without using a fitting function to the κ{sub T} data. On taking yet another p-derivative at a fixed T graphically without resorting to any fitting function, the resulting d{sup 2}κ{sub T}/dp{sup 2}, a fourth derivative, showed a weak but clear step anomaly, with the onset of the step named point X and its end point Y. In analogy with another third and fourth derivative pair in binary aqueous solutions of glycerol, dα{sub p}/dx{sub Gly} and d{sup 2}α{sub p}/dx{sub Gly}{sup 2}, at 0.1 MPa (α{sub p} is the thermal expansivity and x{sub Gly} the mole fraction of solute glycerol) in our recent publication [J. Solution Chem. 43, 663-674 (2014); DOI:10.1007/s10953-013-0122-7], we argue that there is a gradual crossover in the molecular organization of pure H{sub 2}O from a low to a high p-regions starting at point X and ending at Y at a fixed T. The crossover takes place gradually spanning for about 100 MPa at a fixed temperature. The extrapolated temperature to zero p seems to be about 70 – 80 °C for points X and 90 – 110 °C for Y. Furthermore, the mid-points of X and Y seem to extrapolate to the triple point of liquid, ice Ih and ice III. Recalling that the zero x{sub Gly} extrapolation of point X and Y for binary aqueous glycerol at 0.1 MPa gives about the same T values respectively, we suggest that at zero pressure the region below about 70 °C the hydrogen bond network is bond-percolated, while above about 90 ºC there is no hydrogen bond network. Implication of these findings is discussed.

  13. Comparison of Temperature-Index Snowmelt Models for Use within an Operational Water Quality Model.

    PubMed

    Watson, Brett M; Putz, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The accurate prediction of snowmelt runoff is a critical component of integrated hydrological and water quality models in regions where snowfall constitutes a significant portion of the annual precipitation. In cold regions, the accumulation of a snowpack and the subsequent spring snowmelt generally constitutes a major proportion of the annual water yield. Furthermore, the snowmelt runoff transports significant quantities of sediment and nutrients to receiving streams and strongly influences downstream water quality. Temperature-index models are commonly used in operational hydrological and water quality models to predict snowmelt runoff. Due to their simplicity, computational efficiency, low data requirements, and ability to consistently achieve good results, numerous temperature-index models of varying complexity have been developed in the past few decades. The objective of this study was to determine how temperature-index models of varying complexity would affect the performance of the water quality model SWAT (a modified version of SWAT that was developed for watersheds dominated by boreal forest) for predicting runoff. Temperature-index models used by several operational hydrological models were incorporated into SWAT. Model performance was tested on five watersheds on the Canadian Boreal Plain whose hydrologic response is dominated by snowmelt runoff. The results of this study indicate that simpler temperature-index models can perform as well as more complex temperature-index models for predicting runoff from the study watersheds. The outcome of this study has important implications because the incorporation of simpler temperature-index snowmelt models into hydrological and water quality models can lead to a reduction in the number of parameters that need to be optimized without sacrificing predictive accuracy.

  14. Characterization and temperature dependence of PAH emissions from a simulated rubber combustion operation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, B W; Billings, C E

    1985-10-01

    The operation investigated uses two induction furnaces for removal of rubber from tracked-vehicle treads. A laboratory-scale simulation of the field operation was employed to generate emissions at 399 degrees C (750 degrees F) and 677 degrees C (1250 degrees F), and emission samples were collected using glass fiber filters and Tenax as the sampling media. Sampling and analytical methods were developed and evaluated with 10 representative polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were used to characterize emissions. The PAH were profiled as subsets and graphically displayed as micrograms (micrograms) of emissions per kilogram of rubber and as percentages of total emissions. In each subset, relative amounts of PAH were found to be related to combustion temperatures. Identical coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPV) exposures to emissions generated at the two temperatures studied would result in a 178-fold difference in exposure to carcinogenic PAH.

  15. The Integrity of ACSR Full Tension Single-Stage Splice Connector at Higher Operation Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; King Jr, Thomas J

    2008-10-01

    Due to increases in power demand and limited investment in new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than those used for the original design criteria. This has led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors. It is manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increases in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reductions in the connector clamping strength, which could ultimately result in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector appears to be the weakest link in electric power transmission lines. This report presents a protocol for integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of full tension single-stage splice connector assemblies and the associated effective lifetime at high operating temperature.

  16. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures lower than 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves the cyclability. One of the main technical issues in terms of operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) causing reduced active area and limited charging . In order to overcome the problem related to poor wettability of Na melt on BASE at 175°C, Pt grid was applied on the anode side of BASE using a screen printing technique. Deeper charging and improved cycling behavior was observed on the cells with metalized BASEs due to extended active area.

  17. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch−2, ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns. PMID:22109527

  18. High power and high temperature continuous-wave operation of distributed Bragg reflector quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Feng Caneau, Catherine G.; LeBlanc, Herve P.; Ho, Ming-tsung; Wang, Jie; Chaparala, Satish; Hughes, Lawrence C.; Zah, Chung-en

    2014-02-17

    High temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) quantum cascade laser is demonstrated up to a heat sink temperature of 80 °C. A CW output power of 2 W and a single mode operation with side mode suppression ratio of 30 dB around wavelength of 4.48 μm were achieved at 20 °C. The maximum pulsed and CW wall-plug-efficiencies reached 14.7% and 10.3% at 20 °C, respectively. A large tuning range of 5 cm{sup −1} between mode hopping was observed and attributed to the thermal cross-talk from the gain section to the DBR section.

  19. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-11-22

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch(-2), ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns.

  20. Cell chip temperature measurements in different operation regimes of HCPV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, V. D.; Chekalin, A. V.; Davidyuk, N. Yu.; Malevskiy, D. A.; Pokrovskiy, P. V.; Sadchikov, N. A.; Pan'chak, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    A new method has been developed for accurate measurements of the solar cell temperature in maximum power point (MPP) operation regime in comparison with that in open circuit (OC) regime (TMPP and TOC). For this, an electronic circuit has been elaborated for fast variation of the cell load conditions and for voltage measurements, so that VOC values could serve as an indicator of TMPP at the first moment after the load disconnection. The method was verified in indoor investigations of the single-junction AlGaAs/GaAs cells under CW laser irradiation, where different modifications of the heat spreaders were involved. PV modules of the "SMALFOC" design (Small-size concentrators; Multijunction cells; "All-glass" structure; Lamination technology; Fresnel Optics for Concentration) with triple-junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge cells were examined outdoors to evaluate temperature regimes of their operation.

  1. High-Performing, Low-Temperature-Operating, Long-Lifetime Aerospace Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Long-duration space exploration will require spacecraft systems that can operate effectively over several years with minimal or no maintenance. Aerospace lubricants are key components of spacecraft systems. Physical Sciences Inc., has synthesized and characterized novel ionic liquids for use in aerospace lubricants that contribute to decreased viscosity, friction, and wear in aerospace systems. The resulting formulations offer low vapor pressure and outgassing properties and thermal stability up to 250 C. They are effective for use at temperatures as low as -70 C and provide long-term operational stability in aerospace systems. In Phase II, the company scaled several new ionic liquids and evaluated a novel formulation in a NASA testbed. The resulting lubricant compounds will offer lower volatility, decreased corrosion, and better tribological characteristics than standard liquid lubricants, particularly at lower temperatures.

  2. Performance and durability of PEM fuel cells operated at sub-freezing temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Lujan, Roger W; Spendelow, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells operated at sub-freezing temperatures has received increasing attention in recent years. The Department of Energy's PEM fuel cell stack technical targets for the year 2010 include unassisted start-up from -40 {sup o}C and startup from -20 {sup o}C ambient in as low as 30 seconds with < 5 MJ energy consumption. Moreover, the sub-freezing operations should not have any impact on acieving other technical targets including 5000 hours durability. The effect of MEA preparation on the performance of single-PEM fuel cells operated at sub-freezing temperatures is presented. The cell performance and durability are dependent on the MEA and are probably influenced by the porosity of the catalyst layers. When a cell is operated isothermally at -10 {sup o}C in constant current mode, the voltage gradually decreases over time and eventually drops to zero. AC impedance analysis indicated that the rate of voltage loss is initially due to an increase in the charge transfer resistance and is gradual. After a period, the rate of decay accelerates rapidly due to mass transport limitations at the catalyst and/or gas diffusion layers. The high frequency resistance also increases over time during the isothermal operation at sub-freezing temperatures and was a function of the initial membrane water content. LANL prepared MEAs showed very little loss in the catalyst surface area with multiple sub-freezing operations, whereas the commercial MEAs exhibited significant loss in cathode surface area with the anode being unaffected. These results indicate that catalyst layer ice formation is influenced strongly by the MEA and is responsible for the long-term degradation of fuel cells operated at sub-freezing temperatures. This ice formation was monitored using neutron radiography and was found to be concentrated near cell edges at the flow field turns. The water distribution also indicated that ice may be forming mainly in the GDLs at

  3. High operating temperature IR-modules with reduced pitch for SWaP sensitive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, R.; Wendler, J.; Lutz, H.; Rutzinger, S.; Ihle, T.; Ziegler, J.; Rühlich, I.

    2011-06-01

    Low size, weight and power (SWaP) are the most critical requirements for portable thermal imagers like weapon sights or handheld observations devices. On the other hand due to current asymmetrical conflicts there are high requirements for the e/o performance of these devices providing the ability to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in adequate ranges. Despite of all the success with uncooled technology, such requirements usually still require cooled detectors. AIM has developed a family of thermal weapon sights called HuntIR and RangIR based on high performance cooled IR-modules which are used e.g. in the infantryman of the future program of the German army (IdZ). The specific capability of these devices is a high ID range >1500m for tank targets being suitable in use as thermal sights for .50 cal rifles like the G82, targeting units for the 40mm AGL or for night observation. While such ranges sound far beyond the operational needs in urban operations, the a.m. specific needs of asymmetric warfare require sometimes even more range performance. High operating temperature (HOT) is introduced in the AIM MCT 640x512/15μm MWIR or LWIR modules for further reduction of cooler power consumption, shorter cooldown times and higher MTTF. As a key component to keep performance while further reducing SWaP AIM is developing a new cooled MCT IR-module with reduced pitch of 12 μm operating at a temperature >120 K. The module will provide full TV format with 640x480 elements sensitive in the MWIR spectral band. The paper will show recent results of AIM IR-modules with high operating temperature and the impact of design regarding the IR-module itself and thermal sights making use of it.

  4. Extreme Temperature Operation of a 10 MHz Silicon Oscillator Type STCL1100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    The performance of STMicroelectronics 10 MHz silicon oscillator was evaluated under exposure to extreme temperatures. The oscillator was characterized in terms of its output frequency stability, output signal rise and fall times, duty cycle, and supply current. The effects of thermal cycling and re-start capability at extreme low and high temperatures were also investigated. The silicon oscillator chip operated well with good stability in its output frequency over the temperature region of -50 C to +130 C, a range that by far exceeded its recommended specified boundaries of -20 C to +85 C. In addition, this chip, which is a low-cost oscillator designed for use in applications where great accuracy is not required, continued to function at cryogenic temperatures as low as - 195 C but at the expense of drop in its output frequency. The STCL1100 silicon oscillator was also able to re-start at both -195 C and +130 C, and it exhibited no change in performance due to the thermal cycling. In addition, no physical damage was observed in the packaging material due to extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling. Therefore, it can be concluded that this device could potentially be used in space exploration missions under extreme temperature conditions in microprocessor and other applications where tight clock accuracy is not critical. In addition to the aforementioned screening evaluation, additional testing, however, is required to fully establish the reliability of these devices and to determine their suitability for long-term use.

  5. Dynamical modelling of an activated sludge system of a petrochemical plant operating at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Maqueda, M A M; Martinez, Sergio A; Narváez, D; Rodriguez, Miriam G; Aguilar, Ricardo; Herrero, Victor M

    2006-01-01

    The Mexican petrochemical industry, Morelos S.A. de C.V., is one of the biggest and more important petroleum industries in Mexico and Latin America. It has an activated sludge system to treat its wastewater flow, which is approximately 7,000 m3/d. The wastewater contains volatile organic carbon substances classified as toxics. The old surface aeration system was changed for fine bubble diffusers; however, one major drawback of the new aeration system is that the temperature in the bioreactor has increased due to the compression of the air, which at the compressor exit reaches 85 degrees C. This effect results in the temperature in the bioreactor attaining 32 degrees C during the fall, whereas in the spring and summer, the bioreactor temperature reaches higher values than 40 degrees C. The high temperatures reduce the microorganism activity and cause a higher volatilisation rate of volatile compounds, among other effects, which affect the performance of the biological treatment. This work was performed to obtain a better modelling of the wastewater treatment from the petrochemical industry. The model describes the effect of the temperature on the performance of the biological treatment. The model was obtained from tests that were carried out in laboratory reactors with 14 L capacity, which were operated at different temperatures (from 30 to 45 degrees C), with the same wastewater and conditions as the actual system.

  6. Wide-temperature range operation supercapacitors from nanostructured activated carbon fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Kaihsuan; Masarapu, Charan; Ko, Tsehao; Wei, Bingqing

    Electrochemical power sources that offer high energy and power densities and, can also withstand a harsh temperature range have become extremely desirable in applications ranging from civilian portable electronic devices to military weapons. In this report, we demonstrated a wide temperature withstanding supercapacitor which can be operated from 100 °C to -40 °C within a voltage window from -2 V to 2 V. The performance of the supercapacitor coin cells, assembled with nanostructured activated carbon fabric (ACF) as the electrode material and 1 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF 4) in polypropylene carbonate (PC) solution as the electrolyte, was systematically studied within the set temperature window. The ACF supercapacitor yielded ideal rectangular shapes in cyclic voltammograms within 0-100 °C with an average mass capacitance of 90 F g -1 and, 60 F g -1 at -25 °C. The capacitance was still over 20 F g -1 at the extremely low temperature of -40 °C. Another exciting feature of the ACF supercapacitors was that they resumed their room temperature capacitance when cooled from 100 °C and defrosted from -40 °C, demonstrating an excellent repeatability and stability. The charge-discharge behavior of the ACF supercapacitors showed long-cycle stability at extreme temperatures. These high electrochemical performances make this type of supercapacitors very promising in many practical applications.

  7. Effect of operating temperature on the HWB model for solar-collector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Howell, J. R.

    1983-02-01

    The Hottel-Whillier-Bliss (HWB) Model for the thermal efficiency of a flat plate solar collector plots as a straight line in an esa/sub c/ approx. (T/sub f,in/ - T/sub a/)/g/sub s/ coordinate system under the following assumptions: (1) the effect of the thermal capacity in the collector is negligible; (2) F/sub R/, U/sub L/ are constant in the range of operating temperature. These assumptions simplify the model and make it convenient to use. Because of the intermittance of insulation and the variation of ambient temperature and wind speed, the thermal capacity of the collector may affect the transient efficiency of the collector. In addition, the values of F/sub R/ and U/sub L/ are actually not constant and cause deviation of the efficiency curve from a straight line. The concern is with the deviation of the confidence level for a specific operating range. The effect of operating temperature of the values of F/sub R/ and U/sub L/ is discussed.

  8. Effect of moderate inlet temperatures in ultra-high-pressure homogenization treatments on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of milk.

    PubMed

    Amador-Espejo, G G; Suàrez-Berencia, A; Juan, B; Bárcenas, M E; Trujillo, A J

    2014-02-01

    The effect of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH) on raw whole milk (3.5% fat) was evaluated to obtain processing conditions for the sterilization of milk. Ultra-high-pressure homogenization treatments of 200 and 300 MPa at inlet temperatures (Ti) of 55, 65, 75, and 85 °C were compared with a UHT treatment (138 °C for 4s) in terms of microbial inactivation, particle size and microstructure, viscosity, color, buffering capacity, ethanol stability, propensity to proteolysis, and sensory evaluation. The UHPH-treated milks presented a high level of microbial reduction, under the detection limit, for treatments at 300 MPa with Ti of 55, 65, 75, and 85 °C, and at 200 MPa with Ti = 85 °C, and few survivors in milks treated at 200 MPa with Ti of 55, 65, and 75 °C. Furthermore, UHPH treatments performed at 300 MPa with Ti = 75 and 85 °C produced sterile milk after sample incubation (30 and 45 °C), obtaining similar or better characteristics than UHT milk in color, particle size, viscosity, buffer capacity, ethanol stability, propensity to protein hydrolysis, and lower scores in sensory evaluation for cooked flavor.

  9. Subpolar gyre and radiative forcings moderate sea surface temperatures of the Norwegian Sea during the mid-Piacenzian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, Paul; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; McClymont, Erin

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Piacenzian age (ca. 3.3-3.0 Ma) of the Pliocene epoch has been proposed as a possible reference for future warm climate states. We have developed a new set of orbital-resolution alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) and ice rafted debris (IRD) records from the Norwegian Sea. SSTs in the Norwegian Sea were 2-3°C warmer in the mid-Piacenzian compared to the Holocene average. There is notable orbital-scale SST variability with a range of 4°C. The most likely cause of the average long-term warmth is a higher atmospheric CO2 concentration. A correlation of SST variability with the presence of Greenland-sourced IRD suggests a common climate forcing acting across the Nordic Seas region. The orbital-scale variability was in part caused by interplay of obliquity and precession, as low SSTs coincide with times of low northern summer insolation. Changes of the SST gradient between the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic sites suggest that the subpolar gyre was at least of comparable strength as during the Holocene. The North Atlantic Current (NAC) influence on the Norwegian Sea SSTs does not appear to have been stronger than during the Holocene.

  10. Experimental hingeless rotor characteristics at low advance ratio with thrust. [wind tunnel tests of rotary wing operating at moderate to high lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, R. J.; Watts, G. A.; Sissingh, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation to determine the dynamic characteristics of a hingeless rotor operating at moderate to high lift was conducted on a small scale, 7.5-foot diameter, four-bladed hingeless rotor model in a 7 x 10-foot wind tunnel. The primary objective of this research program was the empirical determination of the rotor steady-state and frequency responses to swashplate and body excitations. Collective pitch was set from 0 to 20 degrees, with the setting at a particular advance ratio limited by the cyclic pitch available for hub moment trim. Advance ratio varied from 0.00 to 0.36 for blades with nondimensional first-flap frequencies at 1.15, 1.28 and 1.33 times the rotor rotation frequency. Several conditions were run with the rotor operating in the transition regime. Rotor response at high lift is shown to be generally nonlinear in this region. As a secondary objective an experimental investigation of the rotor response to 4/revolution swashplate excitations at advance ratios of 0.2 to 0.85 and at a nondimensional, first-flap modal frequency of 1.34 was also conducted, using the 7 x 10-foot wind tunnel. It is shown that 4/revolution swashplate inputs are a method for substantially reducing rotor-induced, shafttransmitted vibratory forces.

  11. A novel NO2 gas sensor based on Hall effect operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Xie, W. M.; He, X. L.; Wang, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide nanoparticles were obtained by a simple thermal oxidation approach. The structural and morphological properties of these nanoparticles are investigated using XRD, SEM and TEM. A WO3 thick film was deposited on the four Au electrodes to be a WO3 Hall effect sensor. The sensor was tested between magnetic field in a plastic test chamber. Room-temperature nitrogen dioxide sensing characteristics of Hall effect sensor were studied for various concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide at dry air and humidity conditions. A typical room-temperature response of 3.27 was achieved at 40 ppm of NO2 with a response and recovery times of 36 and 45 s, respectively. NO2 gas sensing mechanism of Hall effect sensor was also studied. The room-temperature operation, with the low deposition cost of the sensor, suggests suitability for developing a low-power cost-effective nitrogen dioxide sensor.

  12. Green monolithic II-VI vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Ulrich, S. M.; Alexe, G.; Roventa, E.; Kröger, R.; Brendemühl, B.; Michler, P.; Gutowski, J.; Hommel, D.

    2004-02-01

    The realization of a monolithic all II-VI-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) for the green spectral region is reported. Optically pumped lasing operation was achieved up to room temperature using a planar VCSEL structure. Taking advantage of distributed Bragg-reflectors based on MgS/Zn(Cd)Se superlattices as the low-refractive index material and ZnS0.06Se0.94 layers as the high-index material with a refractive index contrast of n = 0.6, a quality factor exceeding Q = 2000 is reached by using only 18 Bragg periods for the bottom DBR and 15 Bragg periods for the top DBR. The threshold power density is 0.32 MW/cm2 at a temperature of 10 K (emission wavelength 498.5 nm) and 1.9 MW/cm2 at room temperature (emission wavelength 502.3 nm).

  13. Numerical study of high-power semiconductor lasers for operation at sub-zero temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, K. H.; Frevert, C.; Crump, P.; Erbert, G.; Wenzel, H.

    2017-04-01

    We present results on the impact of the Al-content in the waveguide structure on the electro-optical characteristics of 9xx nm, GaAs-based high-power lasers operated at room (300 K) and at sub-zero (200 K) heat sink temperatures. Experimentally a strong improvement of conversion efficiency and output power has been found if the lasers are cooled down. Numerical simulations using a software tool which solves the thermo-dynamic based drift-diffusion equations are able to reproduce the experimental findings. The reasons for the improved performance at lower temperatures are the enhancement of the modal gain and the reduced accumulation of electrons in the p-confinement layers resulting in a reduction of the leakage current. The latter allows the realization of lasers with a reduced Al content having a smaller series resistance and thus further enlarged conversion efficiency at sub-zero temperatures.

  14. Study of YBCO tape anisotropy as a function of field, field orientation and operating temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, v.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2011-06-01

    Superconducting magnets with magnetic fields above 20 T will be needed for a Muon Collider and possible LHC energy upgrade. This field level exceeds the possibilities of traditional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) such as Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al. Presently the use of high field high temperature superconductors (HTS) is the only option available for achieving such field levels. Commercially available YBCO comes in tapes and shows noticeable anisotropy with respect to field orientation, which needs to be accounted for during magnet design. In the present work, critical current test results are presented for YBCO tape manufactured by Bruker. Short sample measurements results are presented up to 14 T, assessing the level of anisotropy as a function of field, field orientation and operating temperature.

  15. Enhancement of magnetoelectric operating temperature in compressed Cr2O3 under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Yohei; Yoshimori, Yusuke; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on structure and magnetism was investigated by a combined theoretical and experimental study for Cr2O3 showing the linear magnetoelectric effect below the Néel temperature TN ≈ 307 K. Based on first-principles calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations, we predicted that TN linearly increases with increasing applied pressure P with the slope of (1/TN)(dTN/dP) = +1.9 × 10-2 GPa-1. This theoretical prediction was qualitatively verified by our experimental observation about the pressure dependence of TN, which was detected by measurements of dielectric constant through the magnetoelectric coupling [(1/TN)(dTN/dP) = +1.6 × 10-2 GPa-1]. These results provide an effective way to enhance magnetoelectric operating temperature in the rare room-temperature magnetoelectric, Cr2O3.

  16. Electron density and temperature in NIO1 RF source operated in oxygen and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.; Cavenago, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Zanini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The NIO1 experiment, built and operated at Consorzio RFX, hosts an RF negative ion source, from which it is possible to produce a beam of maximum 130 mA in H- ions, accelerated up to 60 kV. For the preliminary tests of the extraction system the source has been operated in oxygen, whose high electronegativity allows to reach useful levels of extracted beam current. The efficiency of negative ions extraction is strongly influenced by the electron density and temperature close to the Plasma Grid, i.e. the grid of the acceleration system which faces the source. To support the tests, these parameters have been measured by means of the Optical Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic. This technique has involved the use of an oxygen-argon mixture to produce the plasma in the source. The intensities of specific Ar I and Ar II lines have been measured along lines of sight close to the Plasma Grid, and have been interpreted with the ADAS package to get the desired information. This work will describe the diagnostic hardware, the analysis method and the measured values of electron density and temperature, as function of the main source parameters (RF power, pressure, bias voltage and magnetic filter field). The main results show that not only electron density but also electron temperature increase with RF power; both decrease with increasing magnetic filter field. Variations of source pressure and plasma grid bias voltage appear to affect only electron temperature and electron density, respectively.

  17. Electrolytes for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-CFx Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Bhalla, Pooja; Smith, Kiah

    2009-01-01

    A report describes a study of electrolyte compositions selected as candidates for improving the low-temperature performances of primary electrochemical cells that contain lithium anodes and fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx) cathodes. This study complements the developments reported in Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells (NPO- 43579) and Li/CFx Cells Optimized for Low-Temperature Operation (NPO- 43585), which appear elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Similar to lithium-based electrolytes described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, each of these electrolytes consisted of a lithium salt dissolved in a nonaqueous solvent mixture. Each such mixture consisted of two or more of the following ingredients: propylene carbonate (PC); 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME); trifluoropropylene carbonate; bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) ether; diethyl carbonate; dimethyl carbonate; and ethyl methyl carbonate. The report describes the physical and chemical principles underlying the selection of the compositions (which were not optimized) and presents results of preliminary tests made to determine effects of the compositions upon the low-temperature capabilities of Li-CFx cells, relative to a baseline composition of LiBF4 at a concentration of 1.0 M in a solvent comprising equal volume parts of PC and DME.

  18. Hydrazine Operations at Near-Freezing Temperatures During the Ulysses Extended Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, A.; Castro, F.; Hodges, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Ulysses mission was recently extended for the third time to March 2008. This extension will require Ulysses to operate far beyond its intended design lifetime at very low power and thermal margins. As a result, it will enter the coldest part of its orbit, as it returns from aphelion at Jupiter distance, with parts of the Reaction Control System (RCS) pipework containing the hydrazine propellant already at near-freezing temperatures. With limited telemetry, no simulator and only a thermal model optimized for the prime mission case, the operations team faces many challenges to avoid freezing of propellant in the RCS, and the hazardous consequences which would result. This paper gives an overview and operational history of the Ulysses monopropellant pressurized hydrazine RCS, describes techniques for detecting possible indications of hydrazine freezing, and potential contingency strategies should partial freezing occur.

  19. Multispectral mixing scheme for LED clusters with extended operational temperature window.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ming-Chin; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2012-03-12

    LEDs have changed the concept of illumination not only in an expectation of the highest electroluminance efficiency but also in tremendous chances for smart lighting applications. With a cluster mixing, many studies were addressed to strategically manipulate the chromaticity point, system efficiency and color rendering performance according to different operational purposes. In this paper, we add an additional thermal function to extend the operational thermal window of a pentachromatic R/G/B/A/CW light engine over a chromaticity from 2800K to 8000K. The proposed model is experimentally validated to offer a full operable range in ambient temperature (Ta = 10° to 100°C) associated with high color quality scale (above 85 points) as well as high luminous efficiency (above 100 lm/watt).

  20. Active Control of the Operating Temperature in a Loop Heat Pipe with Two Evaporators and Two Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Birur, Gaj; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The operating temperature of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with multiple evaporators is a function of the total heat load, heat load distribution among evaporators, condenser temperature and ambient temperature. Because of the many variables involved, the operating temperature also showed more hystereses than an LHP with a single evaporator. Tight temperature control can be achieved by controlling its compensation chamber (CC) temperatures at the desired set point. This paper describes a test program on active control of the operating temperature in an LHP with two evaporators and two condensers. Temperature control was achieved by heating one or both CC's. Tests performed included start-up, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, CC temperature cycle, and capillary limit. Test results show that, regardless one or two CC's were heated to the set point temperature, one of CC's was always flooded with liquid. The loop could operate successfully at the desired set point temperature under most conditions, including some fast transients. At low heat loads, however, the CC temperature could suddenly increase above the set point temperature, possibly due to a sudden change of the vapor content inside the evaporator core.

  1. Standard operative temperatures and cost of thermoregulation in the arctic ground squirrel, Spermophilus undulatus.

    PubMed

    Chappell, M A

    1981-07-01

    Body temperatures (T b) and daily activity patterns of free-living arctic ground squirrells (Spermophilus undulatus) were determined via telemetry at a field site in northern Alaska. Simultaneous measurements were made of ambient temperature (T a), wind speed (V), and incident solar radiation. The operative environmental temperature (T e) for ground squirrels was obtained from fur-covered, thin metal taxidermic models of the animals. Standard operative temperature (T es), a comparative index of heat flow, was calculated from T e, V, and laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity.During the period of the study (August), S. undulatus were active for about 14 h per day (06.00 to 20.00 h). T b was high throughout the daily cycle, averaging 38-39°C. Circadian variations in T b were slight; average T b values dropped <1°C at night. Daytime T b fluctuations were not closely correlated to activity or to changes in environmental conditions. Air temperatures during the study were low, usually between 10 and 15°C during the day. However, T es in exposed areas was normally higher, even though skies were generally overcast. During periods of sunshine, T es may be as high as 34°C. The absence of nocturnal activity may result from increased costs of thermoregulation at night, which sharply reduces foraging efficiency. The high and stable body temperatures of S. undulatus probably result from thermoneutral daytime T es, low activity levels, and the use of well-insulated nests.

  2. Moderate temperature increase leads to disintegration of floating sludge and lower abundance of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Lienen, T; Kleyböcker, A; Verstraete, W; Würdemann, H

    2014-11-15

    Filamentous bacteria such as Microthrix parvicella can cause serious foaming and floating sludge problems in anaerobic digesters fed with sewage sludge. The sewage sludge and oil co-fermenting laboratory-scale biogas digesters in this study were fed with substrates from a foaming-prone full-scale biogas plant containing the filamentous bacterium M. parvicella. At 37 °C, in both pneumatically mixed digesters a highly viscous and approximately 3 cm thick floating sludge was observed. A gradual increase of the temperature from 37 °C to 56 °C led to a significant decrease in the floating sludge thickness, which correlated with a strong decrease in the abundance of M. parvicella in the digestate. Furthermore, the stepwise temperature increase allowed for an adaption of the microbial community and prevented process failure. The study indicates that already a moderate temperature increase from 37 °C to 41 °C might help to control the M. parvicella abundance in full-scale biogas plants.

  3. High temperature operation In1-xAlxSb infrared focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Yanqiu; Si, Junjie; Cao, Xiancun; Zhang, Liang; Peng, Zhenyu; Ding, Jiaxin; Yao, Guansheng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Reobrazhenskiy, Valeriy

    2016-05-01

    A high temperature operation mid-wavelength 128×128 infrared focal plane arrays (FPA) based on low Al component In1-xAlxSb was presented in this work. InAlSb materials were grown on InSb (100) substrates using MBE technology, which was confirmed by XRD and AFM analyses. We have designed and grown two structures with and without barrier. The pixel of the detector had a conventional PIN structure with a size of 50μmx50μm. The device fabrication process consisted of mesa etching, passivation, metallization and flip-chip hybridization with readout integrated circuit (ROIC), epoxy backfill, lap and polish. Diode resistance, imaging, NETD and operability results are presented for a progression of structures that reduce the diode leakage current as the temperature is raised above 80K. These include addition of a thin region of InAlSb to reduce p-contact leakage current, and construction of the whole device from InAlSb to reduce thermal generation in the active region of the detector. An increase in temperature to 110K, whilst maintaining full 80K performance, is achieved. The I-V curves were measured at different temperature. Quantum efficiency, pixel operability, non-uniformity, and the mean NETD values of the FPAs were measured at 110K. This gives the prospect of significant benefits for the cooling systems, including, for example, use of argon in Joule-Thomson coolers or an increase in the life and/or decrease in the cost, power consumption and cool-down time of Stirling engines by several tens of percent.

  4. Steady state calorimetric measurement of total hemispherical emittance of cylindrical absorber samples at operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effertz, Timo; Pernpeintner, Johannes; Schiricke, Björn

    2017-06-01

    At DLR's QUARZ Center a test bench has been established to measure, using steady state calorimetric method, the total hemispherical emittance of cylindrical solar thermal absorber samples at temperatures up to 450 °C. Emittance measurement of solar absorber surfaces is commonly performed by direct-hemispherical reflectance measurements with spectrophotometers. However, the measurement of cylindrical samples with spectrophotometers can be considered still a challenge as integrating spheres, reference samples and calibration services by national metrology institutions are optimized for flat sample measurement. Additionally samples are typically measured at room temperature. The steady state calorimetric method does not rely on reference samples and the measurement is performed at operating temperature. In the steady state calorimetric method electrical power input used to heat the sample is equated to the radiative heat loss from a heated sample to the environment. The total emittance can be calculated using the Stefan-Boltzmann equation from radiative heat loss power, the defined sample surface area and measured surface temperature. The expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the total hemispherical emittance has been determined to ±13 % for a typical parabolic trough absorber sample at a temperature of 300 °C and a heating power of 100 W. The test bench was validated by the measurement of three samples with the spectrophotometer and the steady state calorimetric method.

  5. Graft copolymer-based lithium-ion battery for high-temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qichao; Osswald, Sebastian; Daniel, Reece; Zhu, Yan; Wesel, Steven; Ortiz, Luis; Sadoway, Donald R.

    The use of conventional lithium-ion batteries in high temperature applications (>50 °C) is currently inhibited by the high reactivity and volatility of liquid electrolytes. Solvent-free, solid-state polymer electrolytes allow for safe and stable operation of lithium-ion batteries, even at elevated temperatures. Recent advances in polymer synthesis have led to the development of novel materials that exhibit solid-like mechanical behavior while providing the ionic conductivities approaching that of liquid electrolytes. Here we report the successful charge and discharge cycling of a graft copolymer electrolyte (GCE)-based lithium-ion battery at temperatures up to 120 °C. The GCE consists of poly(oxyethylene) methacrylate-g-poly(dimethyl siloxane) (POEM-g-PDMS) doped with lithium triflate. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we analyze the temperature stability and cycling behavior of GCE-based lithium-ion batteries comprised of a LiFePO 4 cathode, a metallic lithium anode, and an electrolyte consisting of a 20-μm-thick layer of lithium triflate-doped POEM-g-PDMS. Our results demonstrate the great potential of GCE-based Li-ion batteries for high-temperature applications.

  6. Impact of Radiation Hardness and Operating Temperatures of Silicon Carbide Electronics on Space Power System Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Tew, Roy C.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) electronics operating temperatures on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD), or Power Conditioning (PC), subsystem radiator size and mass requirements was evaluated for three power output levels (100 kW(e) , 1 MW(e), and 10 MW(e)) for near term technology ( i.e. 1500 K turbine inlet temperature) Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) power systems with a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) heat source. The study was conducted for assumed PC radiator temperatures ranging from 370 to 845 K and for three scenarios of electrical energy to heat conversion levels which needed to be rejected to space by means of the PC radiator. In addition, during part of the study the radiation hardness of the PC electronics was varied at a fixed separation distance to estimate its effect on the mass of the instrument rated reactor shadow shield. With both the PC radiator and the conical shadow shield representing major components of the overall power system the influence of the above on total power system mass was also determined. As expected, results show that the greatest actual mass savings achieved by the use of SiC electronics occur with high capacity power systems. Moreover, raising the PC radiator temperature above 600 K yields only small additional system mass savings. The effect of increased radiation hardness on total system mass is to reduce system mass by virtue of lowering the shield mass.

  7. Operation results of the first commercial PFBC plant with high temperature ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, S.; Suga, N.

    1998-07-01

    Trial operation is now successfully underway at Tomato-Atsuma Unit No. 3 of Hokkaido Electric Power Co. (HEPCO) in Japan. This newly built 85 MWe unit is an innovative PFBC plant, which is the first commercial PFBC in Japan, and equipped with full capacity ceramic filters operated at 850 C. The high temperature ceramic filter effectively removes dusts in the hot gas and the dust loading at gas turbine inlet is much less than that of two-stage cyclones, minimizing the cost and time of gas turbine maintenance. The PFBC plant is composed of a pressurized fluidized-bed boiler, cyclones, ceramic filters, a gas turbine, a steam turbine, etc. and all of the equipment were manufactured and supplied by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI). Joint R and D program between HEPCO and MHI started 7 years ago, based on their own private funding and without any financial supports from public sectors, studying the optimum design of the first commercial PFBC aiming at environmental and economical advantages. And now fruitful results have been achieved. The commercial operation will start in March 1998 or earlier. Several troubles had been experienced during initial trial operation stage including pressure drop increase in ceramic filters. All these problems were solved one by one by the joint efforts of HEPCO and MHO. Load rejection tests, load swing tests, and automatic power control tests were successfully done in the spring of 1997. And tests with various kinds of coals are scheduled before the commercial operation.

  8. Operating experience with the southwire 30-meter high-temperature superconducting power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, J. P.; Lue, J. W.; Demko, J. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Hawsey, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hughey, R. L.; Lindsay, D. T.; Roden, M. L.; Sinha, U. K.; Tolbert, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    Southwire Company is operating a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system at its corporate headquarters. The 30-m long, 3-phase cable system is powering three Southwire manufacturing plants and is rated at 12.4-kV, 1250-A, 60-Hz. Cooling is provided by a pressurized liquid nitrogen system operating at 70-80 K. The cables were energized on January 5, 2000 for on-line testing and operation and in April 2000 were placed into extended service. As of June 1, 2001, the HTS cables have provided 100% of the customer load for 8000 hours. The cryogenic system has been in continuous operation since November 1999. The HTS cable system has not been the cause of any power outages to the average 20 MW industrial load served by the cable. The cable has been exposed to short-circuit currents caused by load-side faults without damage. Based upon field measurements described herein, the cable critical current-a key performance parameter-remains the same and has not been affected by the hours of real-world operation, further proving the viability of this promising technology.

  9. A New Operational Snow Retrieval Algorithm Applied to Historical AMSR-E Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Marco; Jeyaratnam, Jeyavinoth

    2016-01-01

    Snow is a key element of the water and energy cycles and the knowledge of spatio-temporal distribution of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) is fundamental for hydrological and climatological applications. SWE and snow depth estimates can be obtained from spaceborne microwave brightness temperatures at global scale and high temporal resolution (daily). In this regard, the data recorded by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Orbiting System (EOS) (AMSR-E) onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) AQUA spacecraft have been used to generate operational estimates of SWE and snow depth, complementing estimates generated with other microwave sensors flying on other platforms. In this study, we report the results concerning the development and assessment of a new operational algorithm applied to historical AMSR-E data. The new algorithm here proposed makes use of climatological data, electromagnetic modeling and artificial neural networks for estimating snow depth as well as a spatio-temporal dynamic density scheme to convert snow depth to SWE. The outputs of the new algorithm are compared with those of the current AMSR-E operational algorithm as well as in-situ measurements and other operational snow products, specifically the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC) and GlobSnow datasets. Our results show that the AMSR-E algorithm here proposed generally performs better than the operational one and addresses some major issues identified in the spatial distribution of snow depth fields associated with the evolution of effective grain size.

  10. A New Operational Snow Retrieval Algorithm Applied to Historical AMSR-E Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Marco; Jeyaratnam, Jeyavinoth

    2016-01-01

    Snow is a key element of the water and energy cycles and the knowledge of spatio-temporal distribution of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) is fundamental for hydrological and climatological applications. SWE and snow depth estimates can be obtained from spaceborne microwave brightness temperatures at global scale and high temporal resolution (daily). In this regard, the data recorded by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Orbiting System (EOS) (AMSR-E) onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) AQUA spacecraft have been used to generate operational estimates of SWE and snow depth, complementing estimates generated with other microwave sensors flying on other platforms. In this study, we report the results concerning the development and assessment of a new operational algorithm applied to historical AMSR-E data. The new algorithm here proposed makes use of climatological data, electromagnetic modeling and artificial neural networks for estimating snow depth as well as a spatio-temporal dynamic density scheme to convert snow depth to SWE. The outputs of the new algorithm are compared with those of the current AMSR-E operational algorithm as well as in-situ measurements and other operational snow products, specifically the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC) and GlobSnow datasets. Our results show that the AMSR-E algorithm here proposed generally performs better than the operational one and addresses some major issues identified in the spatial distribution of snow depth fields associated with the evolution of effective grain size.

  11. Effect of core body temperature, time of day, and climate conditions on behavioral patterns of lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Allen, J D; Hall, L W; Collier, R J; Smith, J F

    2015-01-01

    Cattle show several responses to heat load, including spending more time standing. Little is known about what benefit this may provide for the animals. Data from 3 separate cooling management trials were analyzed to investigate the relationship between behavioral patterns in lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress and their body temperature. Cows (n=157) were each fitted with a leg data logger that measured position and an intravaginal data logger that measures core body temperature (CBT). Ambient conditions were also collected. All data were standardized to 5-min intervals, and information was divided into several categories: when standing and lying bouts were initiated and the continuance of each bout (7,963 lying and 6,276 standing bouts). In one location, cows were continuously subjected to heat-stress levels according to temperature-humidity index (THI) range (THI≥72). The THI range for the other 2 locations was below and above a heat-stress threshold of 72 THI. Overall and regardless of period of day, cows stood up at greater CBT compared with continuing to stand or switching to a lying position. In contrast, cows lay down at lower CBT compared with continuing to lie or switching to a standing position, and lying bouts lasted longer when cows had lower CBT. Standing bouts also lasted longer when cattle had greater CBT, and they were less likely to lie down (less than 50% of lying bouts initiated) when their body temperature was over 38.8°C. Also, cow standing behavior was affected once THI reached 68. Increasing CBT decreased lying duration and increased standing duration. A CBT of 38.93°C marked a 50% likelihood a cow would be standing. This is the first physiological evidence that standing may help cool cows and provides insight into a communally observed behavioral response to heat. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance of MEMS Silicon Oscillator, ASFLM1, under Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) resonator-based oscillators began to be offered as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts by a few companies [1-2]. These quartz-free, miniature silicon devices could compete with the traditional crystal oscillators in providing the timing (clock function) for many digital and analog electronic circuits. They provide stable output frequency, offer great tolerance to shock and vibration, and are immune to electro-static discharge [1-2]. In addition, they are encapsulated in compact lead-free packages, cover a wide frequency range (1 MHz to 125 MHz), and are specified, depending on the grade, for extended temperature operation from -40 C to +85 C. The small size of the MEMS oscillators along with their reliability and thermal stability make them candidates for use in space exploration missions. Limited data, however, exist on the performance and reliability of these devices under operation in applications where extreme temperatures or thermal cycling swings, which are typical of space missions, are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the evaluation of an ABRACON Corporation MEMS silicon oscillator chip, type ASFLM1, under extreme temperatures.

  13. High Operating Temperature and Low Power Consumption Boron Nitride Nanosheets Based Broadband UV Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Manuel; Velázquez, Rafael; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zhou, Andrew F.; Feng, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We extend our work on the use of digitally controlled pulsed laser plasma deposition (PLPD) technique to synthesize high quality, 2-dimensional single crystalline boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) at a low substrate temperature for applications in high-performance deep UV photodetectors. The obtained sample consists of a large amount of BNNSs partially overlapping one another with random orientations. Each sheet is composed of a few (from 2 to 10) stacked atomic layers exhibiting high transparency due to its highly ordered hBN crystallinity. Deep UV detectors based on the obtained BNNSs were designed, fabricated, and tested. The bias and temperature effects on the photocurrent strength and the signal-to-noise ratio have been carefully characterized and discussed. A significant shift in the cut off wavelength of the BNNSs based photodetectors was observed suggesting a band gap reduction as a result of the BNNSs’ collective structure. The newly designed photodetector presented exceptional properties: a high sensitivity to weak intensities of radiation in both UVC and UVB range while remaining visible-blind, and a high signal-to-noise ratio operation even at temperatures as high as 400 °C. In addition, the BNNSs based photodetector exhibited potential for self-powered operation. PMID:28256507

  14. Reduced group delay dispersion in quantum dot passively mode-locked lasers operating at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, J. K.; Raghunathan, R.; Murrell, D.; Braga, A.; Li, Y.; Lester, L. F.

    2014-09-01

    A detailed study of the pulse characteristics emitted from a monolithic Quantum Dot (QD) passively Mode-Locked Laser (MLL) has been performed using a state-of-the-art Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) pulse measurement system. While traditionally the time-domain pulse characteristics of semiconductor MLLs have been studied using digital sampling oscilloscope or intensity autocorrelation techniques, the FROG measurements allow for simultaneous characterization of time and frequency, which has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for true determination of mode-locked stability. In this paper, FROG pulse measurements are presented on a two-section QD MLL operating over wide temperature excursions. The FROG measurement allows for extraction of the temporal and spectral intensity and phase profiles from which the Group Delay Dispersion (GDD) can be determined. The magnitude of the GDD is found to decrease from 16.1 to 3.5 ps/nm when the temperature is increased from 20 to 50 oC, mirroring the trend of pulse width reduction at elevated temperature, which has been shown to correlate strongly with reduced unsaturated absorption. The possibility to further optimize pulse generation via intra-cavity dispersion compensation in a novel three-section MLL design is also examined, and shows strong potential toward providing valuable insight into the optimal cavity designs and operating parameters for QD MLLs.

  15. High Operating Temperature and Low Power Consumption Boron Nitride Nanosheets Based Broadband UV Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Manuel; Velázquez, Rafael; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zhou, Andrew F; Feng, Peter

    2017-03-03

    We extend our work on the use of digitally controlled pulsed laser plasma deposition (PLPD) technique to synthesize high quality, 2-dimensional single crystalline boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) at a low substrate temperature for applications in high-performance deep UV photodetectors. The obtained sample consists of a large amount of BNNSs partially overlapping one another with random orientations. Each sheet is composed of a few (from 2 to 10) stacked atomic layers exhibiting high transparency due to its highly ordered hBN crystallinity. Deep UV detectors based on the obtained BNNSs were designed, fabricated, and tested. The bias and temperature effects on the photocurrent strength and the signal-to-noise ratio have been carefully characterized and discussed. A significant shift in the cut off wavelength of the BNNSs based photodetectors was observed suggesting a band gap reduction as a result of the BNNSs' collective structure. The newly designed photodetector presented exceptional properties: a high sensitivity to weak intensities of radiation in both UVC and UVB range while remaining visible-blind, and a high signal-to-noise ratio operation even at temperatures as high as 400 °C. In addition, the BNNSs based photodetector exhibited potential for self-powered operation.

  16. High Operating Temperature and Low Power Consumption Boron Nitride Nanosheets Based Broadband UV Photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Manuel; Velázquez, Rafael; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zhou, Andrew F.; Feng, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We extend our work on the use of digitally controlled pulsed laser plasma deposition (PLPD) technique to synthesize high quality, 2-dimensional single crystalline boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) at a low substrate temperature for applications in high-performance deep UV photodetectors. The obtained sample consists of a large amount of BNNSs partially overlapping one another with random orientations. Each sheet is composed of a few (from 2 to 10) stacked atomic layers exhibiting high transparency due to its highly ordered hBN crystallinity. Deep UV detectors based on the obtained BNNSs were designed, fabricated, and tested. The bias and temperature effects on the photocurrent strength and the signal-to-noise ratio have been carefully characterized and discussed. A significant shift in the cut off wavelength of the BNNSs based photodetectors was observed suggesting a band gap reduction as a result of the BNNSs’ collective structure. The newly designed photodetector presented exceptional properties: a high sensitivity to weak intensities of radiation in both UVC and UVB range while remaining visible-blind, and a high signal-to-noise ratio operation even at temperatures as high as 400 °C. In addition, the BNNSs based photodetector exhibited potential for self-powered operation.

  17. High operation temperature mid-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors grown on InAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Zhicheng; He, Li

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, interband cascade detectors (ICIP) based on typer-II superlattice have shown great performance potential at high operation temperature. In this paper, we report our studies on mid-infrared interband cascade photodetectors first grown on InAs substrate. We examined the photo-generated carriers' transport in ICIP structures by comparing three detectors grown on InAs substrate. The 2-stages ICIP device has demonstrated a high quantum efficiency around 20% at room temperature. The dark current density of the 2-stages ICIP device at -0.05V is as low as 1 nA at 80K, 1 mA at 150K, which is comparable to the state of art PIN superlattice photodetectors with similar cutoff wavelength. The Johnson-noise limited D* reaches 1.64×1014cm.Hz1/2/W at 3.65 μm and 80K, and 4.1×1010cm.Hz1/2/W at 3.8 μm and 200K. The 300 K background limited infrared performance (BLIP) operation temperature is estimated to be over 140 K.

  18. Moderate altitude is not associated with adverse postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan operation: a comparative study among Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Malhotra, Sunil P; Yu, Xiaoyang; Rutledge, Jennifer; Rebeyka, Ivan M; Ross, David B; Rausch, Christopher; Gu, Hong; McCrindle, Brian; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Ivy, Dunbar; Li, Jia

    2013-11-01

    Outcomes of patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing cavopulmonary palliations depend on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and have been suggested to be adversely affected by living at elevated altitude. We compared the pulmonary hemodynamic data in correlation with postoperative outcomes at the 3 centers of Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto at altitudes of 1604, 668, and 103 meters, respectively. Hemodynamic data at pre-bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis (BCPA) and pre-Fontan catheterization between 1995 and 2007 were collected. Death from cardiac failure or heart transplantation in the same period was used to define palliation failure. There was no significant correlation between altitude (ranged from 1 to 2572 meters) and PVR, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) or transpulmonary gradient (TPG) at pre-BCPA and pre-Fontan catheterization. BCPA failure occurred in 11 (9.2%) patients in Denver, 3 (2.9%) in Edmonton, and 34 (11.9%) in Toronto. Fontan failure occurred in 3 (6.1%) patients in Denver, 5 (7.2%) in Edmonton, and 11 (7.0%) in Toronto. There was no significant difference in BCPA and Fontan failure among the 3 centers. BCPA failure positively correlated with PVR and the presence of a right ventricle as the systemic ventricle. Fontan failure positively correlated with PAP and TPG. Moderate altitude is not associated with an increased PVR or adverse outcomes in patients with a functional single ventricle undergoing BCPA and the Fontan operation. The risk factors for palliation failure are higher PVR, PAP, and TPG and a systemic right ventricle, but not altitude. Our study reemphasizes the importance of cardiac catheterization assessments of pulmonary hemodynamics before BCPA and Fontan operations. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Moderate altitude is not associated with adverse postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan operation: A comparative study among Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi; Malhotra, Sunil P.; Yu, Xiaoyang; Rutledge, Jennifer; Rebeyka, Ivan M.; Ross, David B.; Rausch, Christopher; Gu, Hong; McCrindle, Brian; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Ivy, Dunbar; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Objective Outcomes of patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing cavopulmonary palliations depend on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and have been suggested to be adversely affected by living at elevated altitude. We compared the pulmonary hemodynamic data in correlation with postoperative outcomes at the 3 centers of Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto at altitudes of 1604, 668, and 103 meters, respectively. Methods Hemodynamic data at pre-bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis (BCPA) and pre-Fontan catheterization between 1995 and 2007 were collected. Death from cardiac failure or heart transplantation in the same period was used to define palliation failure. Results There was no significant correlation between altitude (ranged from 1 to 2572 meters) and PVR, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) or transpulmonary gradient (TPG) at pre-BCPA and pre-Fontan catheterization. BCPA failure occurred in 11 (9.2%) patients in Denver, 3 (2.9%) in Edmonton, and 34 (11.9%) in Toronto. Fontan failure occurred in 3 (6.1%) patients in Denver, 5 (7.2%) in Edmonton, and 11 (7.0%) in Toronto. There was no significant difference in BCPA and Fontan failure among the 3 centers. BCPA failure positively correlated with PVR and the presence of a right ventricle as the systemic ventricle. Fontan failure positively correlated with PAP and TPG. Conclusions Moderate altitude is not associated with an increased PVR or adverse outcomes in patients with a functional single ventricle undergoing BCPA and the Fontan operation. The risk factors for palliation failure are higher PVR, PAP, and TPG and a systemic right ventricle, but not altitude. Our study reemphasizes the importance of cardiac catheterization assessments of pulmonary hemodynamics before BCPA and Fontan operations. PMID:23353110

  20. Above room temperature continuous wave operation of a broad-area quantum-cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtsiv, M. P.; Masselink, W. T.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a broad-area (w ≈ 30 μm) quantum-cascade laser operating in a continuous wave mode up to heat-sink temperatures beyond +100 °C. The room-temperature emission wavelength is 4.6 μm. The temperature gradient in the active region of such a wide laser stripe is essentially perpendicular to the epitaxial layers and the resulting steady-state active region temperature offset scales approximately with the square of the number of cascades. With only 10 cascades in the active region, the threshold electrical power density in the current quantum-cascade laser in the continuous-wave mode is as low as Vth × Ith = 3.8 V × 0.9 kA/cm2 = 3.4 kW/cm2 at room temperature for 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe. A 4 mm-long one-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe delivers in continuous-wave mode above 0.6 W at +20 °C and above 1.3 W at -27 °C (cooled with a single-stage Peltier element). A 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe demonstrates continuous-wave lasing up to at least +102 °C (375 K). The thermal conductance, Gth, ranges between 235 W/K cm2 and 140 W/K cm2 for temperatures between -33 °C and +102 °C. This demonstration opens the route for continuous-wave power scaling of quantum-cascade lasers via broad-area laser ridges.

  1. A 4 μW/Ch analog front-end module with moderate inversion and power-scalable sampling operation for 3-D neural microsystems.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashmouny, Khaled M; Chang, Sun-Il; Yoon, Euisik

    2012-10-01

    We report an analog front-end prototype designed in 0.25 μm CMOS process for hybrid integration into 3-D neural recording microsystems. For scaling towards massive parallel neural recording, the prototype has investigated some critical circuit challenges in power, area, interface, and modularity. We achieved extremely low power consumption of 4 μW/channel, optimized energy efficiency using moderate inversion in low-noise amplifiers (K of 5.98 × 10⁸ or NEF of 2.9), and minimized asynchronous interface (only 2 per 16 channels) for command and data capturing. We also implemented adaptable operations including programmable-gain amplification, power-scalable sampling (up to 50 kS/s/channel), wide configuration range (9-bit) for programmable gain and bandwidth, and 5-bit site selection capability (selecting 16 out of 128 sites). The implemented front-end module has achieved a reduction in noise-energy-area product by a factor of 5-25 times as compared to the state-of-the-art analog front-end approaches reported to date.

  2. Positive bias temperature instability of SiC-MOSFETs induced by gate-switching operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Eiichi; Furuichi, Takahiro; Takeshita, Tatsuya; Oda, Kazuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Despite the advances in SiC-MOSFET technology in recent years, high-temperature stability remains a significant issue. In this work, we examine the positive bias temperature instability of SiC-MOSFETs induced by gate-switching operation (AC-PBTI). The dependence of the threshold voltage shift (ΔV th) on the duty-cycle of gate pulses (1 kHz) is measured, which shows a strong dependence on the gate off-voltage V gs(OFF). When using V gs(OFF) = -5 V, ΔV th becomes negligible even in a 90% duty cycle, which is practically informative for power circuit applications. The trap-detrap model for Si is used to explain this marked behavior. Finally, by considering the band bending at V gs(OFF), we propose the interface-state-assisted detrapping mechanism as one possible explanation for this behavior.

  3. Operation results of the first commercial PFBC plant with high temperature ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, Nobuyuki; Ishioka, Hidekazu; Ohnishi, Takashi; Kaneko, Shozo; Kinoshita, Masaaki; Hyakutake, Yoshinori

    1998-07-01

    A variety of tests were finished in Unit No. 3 of Tomatoh-Atsuma Power Station, the first commercial PFBC combined cycle unit for utility power generation in Japan, proving the superiority in environmental performance and stable operability. In December, 1997 efficiency test was carried out and commercial operation will start in March 9, 1998. The success in high temperature ceramic filters, will contribute to the establishment of advanced clean coal technologies. Reflecting the results obtained in this first commercial PFBC unit, MHI is finalizing the design of larger size PFBC unit. And along with the development of IGCC, MHI is now developing an advanced PFBC POSEIDON aiming at even better efficiency and environmental performance.

  4. Room-temperature operation of a titanium supersaturated silicon-based infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hemme, E.; García-Hernansanz, R.; Olea, J.; Pastor, D.; del Prado, A.; Mártil, I.; González-Díaz, G.

    2014-05-01

    We report room-temperature operation of 1 × 1 cm2 infrared photoconductive photodetectors based on silicon supersaturated with titanium. We have fabricated these Si-based infrared photodetectors devices by means of ion implantation followed by a pulsed laser melting process. A high sub-band gap responsivity of 34 mV W-1 has been obtained operating at the useful telecommunication applications wavelength of 1.55 μm (0.8 eV). The sub-band gap responsivity shows a cut-off frequency as high as 1.9 kHz. These Si-based devices exhibit a non-previous reported specific detectivity of 1.7 × 104 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 660 Hz, under a 1.55 μm wavelength light. This work shows the potential of Ti supersaturated Si as a fully CMOS-compatible material for the infrared photodetection technology.

  5. Rolling contact fatigue behavior of heat resistant bearing steels at high operational temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, H.J.; Hirsch, T.; Streit, E.

    1998-12-31

    An approach was made to estimate the endurance limit in rolling contact fatigue in dependence of the operational conditions for the bearing steels M50 (AMS 6491), M50 NiL (AMS 6278) and the nitrogen-alloyed Cronidur 30 (AMS 5898) by investigating the changes in the residual stress profiles after 5 million cycles of overrolling. Real main shaft bearings with a pitch diameter of 168 mm have been tested. To simulate the heat generated in the turbine engines even under boundary operational conditions oil inlet temperatures between 80 and 210 C have been applied, the rotational speed has been varied between 2,500 and 14,000 r/min and the interference fit has been changed to produce different hoop stress levels.

  6. A room-temperature semiconductor spaser operating near 1.5 μm.

    PubMed

    Flynn, R A; Kim, C S; Vurgaftman, I; Kim, M; Meyer, J R; Mäkinen, A J; Bussmann, K; Cheng, L; Choa, F-S; Long, J P

    2011-04-25

    Room temperature spasing of surface plasmon polaritons at 1.46 μm wavelength has been demonstrated by sandwiching a gold-film plasmonic waveguide between optically pumped InGaAs quantum-well gain media. The spaser exhibits gain narrowing, the expected transverse-magnetic polarization, and mirror feedback provided by cleaved facets in a 1-mm long cavity fabricated with a flip-chip approach. The 1.06-μm pump-threshold of ~60 kW/cm2 is in good agreement with calculations. The architecture is readily adaptable to all-electrical operation on an integrated microchip.

  7. Theory of operation of high temperature Josephson fluxon-antifluxon transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Terzioglu, E.; Beasley, M.R.; Zhang, Y.M.; Berkowitz, S.J.

    1996-11-01

    We provide two qualitative models for the operation of Josephson fluxon{endash}antifluxon transistor based on the pendulum model and image currents induced in the junction. This device, which is a variant of a Josephson vortex flow transistor, utilizes high temperature superconductor long Josephson junctions with a control line on top of the junction. Our models are consistent with the experimental observation that the coupling efficiency increases with this geometry. We also provide a quantitative model using numerical simulations to confirm the static and dynamic characteristics predicted by the intuitive models. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Low temperature operation and influence parameters on the cold start ability of portable PEMFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszcipok, M.; Zedda, M.; Riemann, D.; Geckeler, D.

    The start up behaviour of PEM fuel cells below 0 °C is one of the most challenging tasks to be solved before commercialisation. The automotive industry started to develop solutions to reduce the start up time of fuel cell systems in the middle of the nineties. The strategies varied from catalytic combustion of hydrogen on the electrode catalyst to fuel starvation or external stack heating via cooling loops to increase the stack temperature. Beside the automotive sector the cold start ability is as well important for portable PEMFC applications for outdoor use. But here the cold start issue is even more complicated, as the fuel cell system should be operated as passive as possible. Below 0 °C freezing of water inside the PEMFC could form ice layers in the electrode and in the gas diffusion layer. Therefore the cell reaction is limited or even inhibited. Product water during the start up builds additional barriers and leads to a strong decay of the output power at isothermal operating conditions. In order to find out which operational and hardware parameters affect this decay, potentiostatic experiments on single cells were performed at isothermal conditions. These experiments comprise investigations of the influence of membrane thickness and different GDL types as well as the effect of gas flow rates and humidification levels of the membrane. As pre stage to physical based models, empirical based prediction models are used to gain a better understanding of the main influence parameters during cold start. The results are analysed using the statistical software Cornerstone 4.0. The experience of single cell investigations are compared to start up behaviour of portable fuel cell stacks which are operated in a climate chamber at different ambient temperatures below 0 °C. Additional flow sharing problems in the fuel cell stack could be seen during cold start up experiments.

  9. Electromagnetic power absorption and temperature changes due to brain machine interface operation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Abraham, Doney; Rennaker, Robert L

    2007-05-01

    To fully understand neural function, chronic neural recordings must be made simultaneously from 10s or 100s of neurons. To accomplish this goal, several groups are developing brain machine interfaces. For these devices to be viable for chronic human use, it is likely that they will need to be operated and powered externally via a radiofrequency (RF) source. However, RF exposure can result in tissue heating and is regulated by the FDA/FCC. This paper provides an initial estimate of the amount of tissue heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the operation of a brain-machine interface (BMI). The operation of a brain machine interface was evaluated in an 18-tissue anatomically detailed human head mesh using simulations of electromagnetics and bio-heat phenomena. The simulations were conducted with a single chip, as well as with eight chips, placed on the surface of the human brain and each powered at four frequencies (13.6 MHz, 1.0 GHz, 2.4 GHz, and 5.8 GHz). The simulated chips consist of a wire antenna on a silicon chip covered by a Teflon dura patch. SAR values were calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method and used to predict peak temperature changes caused by electromagnetic absorption in the head using two-dimensional bio-heat equation. Results due to SAR alone show increased heating at higher frequencies, with a peak temperature change at 5.8 GHz of approximately 0.018 degrees C in the single-chip configuration and 0.06 degrees C in the eight-chip configuration with 10 mW of power absorption (in the human head) per chip. In addition, temperature elevations due to power dissipation in the chip(s) were studied. Results show that for the neural tissue, maximum temperature rises of 3.34 degrees C in the single-chip configuration and 7.72 degrees C in the eight-chip configuration were observed for 10 mW dissipation in each chip. Finally, the maximum power dissipation allowable in each chip before a 1.0 degrees C temperature

  10. Assessment of Operation of EMK21 MEMS Silicon Oscillator Over Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Electronic control systems, data-acquisition instrumentation, and microprocessors require accurate timing signals for proper operation. Traditionally, ceramic resonators and crystal oscillators provided this clock function for the majority of these systems. Over the last few years, MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) resonator-based oscillators began to surface as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts by a few companies. These quartz-free, miniature silicon devices could easily replace the traditional crystal oscillators in providing the timing/clock function for many digital and analog circuits. They are reported to provide stable output frequency, offer great tolerance to shock and vibration, and are immune to electro-static discharge [ 1-2]. In addition, they are encapsulated in compact lead-free packages and cover a wide frequency range (1 MHz to 125 MHz). The small size of the MEMS oscillators along with their thermal stability make them ideal candidates for use in space exploration missions. Limited data, however, exist on the performance and reliability of these devices under operation in applications where extreme temperatures or thermal cycling swings, which are typical of space missions, are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the evaluation of an Ecliptek Corporation MEMS silicon oscillator chip under extreme temperatures.

  11. Numerical simulation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells at high operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jie; Lee, Seung Jae

    A three-dimensional, single-phase, non-isothermal numerical model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell at high operating temperature (T ≥ 393 K) was developed and implemented into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for convective and diffusive transport and allows predicting the concentration of species. The heat generated from electrochemical reactions, entropic heat and ohmic heat arising from the electrolyte ionic resistance were considered. The heat transport model was coupled with the electrochemical and mass transport models. The product water was assumed to be vaporous and treated as ideal gas. Water transportation across the membrane was ignored because of its low water electro-osmosis drag force in the polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The results show that the thermal effects strongly affect the fuel cell performance. The current density increases with the increasing of operating temperature. In addition, numerical prediction reveals that the width and distribution of gas channel and current collector land area are key optimization parameters for the cell performance improvement.

  12. High-temperature passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with concentrated fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuxin; Yuan, Wenxiang; Wu, Qixing; Sun, Hongyuan; Luo, Zhongkuan; Fu, Huide

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are fed with diluted methanol solutions and can hardly be operated at elevated temperatures (>120 °C) because the ionic conductivity of Nafion-type proton exchange membranes depends strongly on water content. Such a system design would limit its energy density and power density in mobile applications. In this communication, a passive vapor feed DMFC capable of operating with concentrated fuels at high temperatures is reported. The passive DMFC proposed in this work consists of a fuel reservoir, a perforated silicone sheet, a vapor chamber, two current collectors and a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) based on a phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The experimental results reveal that the methanol crossover through a PBI membrane is substantially low when compared with the Nafion membranes and the PBI-based passive DMFC can yield a peak power density of 37.2 mW cm-2 and 22.1 mW cm-2 at 180 °C when 16 M methanol solutions and neat methanol are used respectively. In addition, the 132 h discharge test indicates that the performance of this new DMFC is quite stable and no obvious performance degradation is observed after activation, showing its promising applications in portable power sources.

  13. Low temperature operated NiO-SnO2 heterostructured SO2 gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Punit; Sharma, Anjali; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is among the most toxic gas released by the industries which is extremely dangerous for human health. In the present communication, an attempt has been made for the detection of SO2 gas (500 ppm) with the help of SnO2 thin film based gas sensor. A low sensing response of 1.3 is obtained for sputtered SnO2 thin films based sensors at a high operating temperature of 220 °C. To improve the sensing response, different heterostructured sensors are developed by incorporating other metal oxide thin films (PdO, MgO, NiO, V2O5) over SnO2 thin film surface. Sensing response studies of different sensors towards SO2 gas (500 ppm) are presented in the present report. Among all the prepared sensors NiO-SnO2 hetero-structure sensor is showing highest sensing response (˜8) at a comparatively lower operating temperature (140 °C). Possible sensing mechanism for NiO-SnO2 heterostructured sensor has also been discussed in the present report.

  14. Interface stability of electrode/Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide for high-temperature operational capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Kumaragurubaran, Somu; Tsunekawa, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Ri, Sung-Gi; Suzuki, Setsu; Oh, Seungjun; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-06-01

    The interface stability between electrodes (Pt, TaC, TiC, and RuO2) and a Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide, BaTiO3-Bi(Mg2/3Nb1/3)O3 (BT-BMN), applied to a high-temperature operational capacitor was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All the electrodes showed electron filling at the Fermi level after annealing at 400 °C. However, Pt and TaC indicated electrical property degradations due to the thick intermediate layer formation and defect formation of the BT-BMN layer relating to the Bi diffusion into the electrodes. In contrast, TiC inhibited the Bi diffusion and did not show any change in the band alignment after annealing. Furthermore, RuO2 eliminated the defect formation in BT-BMN and showed no change in the band alignment although the Bi diffusion was also observed. These results suggest that the TiC/RuO2/BT-BMN stack structure is a potential candidate for the high-temperature operational capacitor.

  15. High-Operating-Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector with Tailorable Cutoff Wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory, J.; Soibel, Alexander; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    A mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) barrier photodetector is capable of operating at higher temperature than the prevailing MWIR detectors based on InSb. The standard high-operating-temperature barrier infrared detector (HOT-BIRD) is made with an InAsSb infrared absorber that is lattice-matched to a GaSb substrate, and has a cutoff wavelength of approximately 4 microns. To increase the versatility and utility of the HOT-BIRD, it is implemented with IR absorber materials with customizable cutoff wavelengths. The HOT-BIRD can be built with the quaternary alloy GaInAsSb as the absorber, GaAlSbAs as the barrier, on a lattice-matching GaSb substrate. The cutoff wavelength of the GaInAsSb can be tailored by adjusting the alloy composition. To build a HOT-BIRD requires a matching pair of absorber and barrier materials with the following properties: (1) their valence band edges must be approximately the same to allow unimpeded hole flow, while their conduction band edges should have a large difference to form an electron barrier; and (2) the absorber and the barrier must be respectively lattice-matched and closely lattice-matched to the substrate to ensure high material quality and low defect density. To make a HOT-BIRD with cutoff wavelength shorter than 4 microns, a GaInAsSb quaternary alloy was used as the absorber, and a matching GaAlSbAs quaternary alloy as the barrier. By changing the alloy composition, the band gap of the quaternary alloy absorber can be continuously adjusted with cutoff wavelength ranging from 4 microns down to the short wavelength infrared (SWIR). By carefully choosing the alloy composition of the barrier, a HOT-BIRD structure can be formed. With this method, a HOT-BIRD can be made with continuously tailorable cutoff wavelengths from 4 microns down to the SWIR. The HOT-BIRD detector technology is suitable for making very-large-format MWIR/SWIR focal plane arrays that can be operated by passive cooling from low Earth orbit. High-operating temperature

  16. The effect of substrate, ADP and uncoupler on the respiration of tomato pollen during incubation in vitro at moderately high temperature.

    PubMed

    Karapanos, I C; Akoumianakis, K A; Olympios, C M; Passam, H C

    2009-09-01

    Pollen of tomato cv. Supermarmande was collected from greenhouse-grown plants at various intervals throughout the year and arbitrarily classified as of high, medium or low respiratory activity on the basis of CO(2) production during 8 h incubation in vitro at 30 degrees C, a temperature that is considered to be moderately high for tomato fruit set. After an initial burst of respiration during the first stage of hydration at 30 degrees C (>1 h), the respiration rate of pollen of all three categories declined, the decrease being greater in the lots with a low or medium respiratory activity than in the high category. During hydration (10 min after the start of incubation), the addition of succinate or reduced beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to the substrate increased the respiratory rate of slowly-respiring pollen more than that of fast-respiring pollen, but carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) had less effect. After 1-4 h incubation, the respiration rate of the slow- or medium-respiring pollen lots had decreased, but was stimulated by succinate or NADH, and to a lesser degree by ADP. By 7 h, the respiration rate of all pollen lots had declined and was stimulated less by substrate, ADP or CCCP. The oxidation of NADH by tomato pollen contrasts with the failure of other pollen species to utilize this substrate; moreover, a synergistic effect of NADH and succinate was consistently observed. We conclude that the decline in respiration during incubation for up to 4 h at 30 degrees C may reflect a lack of respiratory substrate. After 7 h, however, the decreased response to substrate indicates a loss of mitochondrial integrity or an accumulation of metabolic inhibitors. It is concluded that at 30 degrees C (a moderately high temperature for tomato pollen), the initially high rate of respiration leads to exhaustion of the endogenous respiratory substrates (particularly in pollen with low to medium respiratory

  17. Therapeutic temperature modulation in severe or moderate traumatic brain injury: a propensity score analysis of data from the Nationwide Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kei; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Mikami, Takeshi; Akiyama, Yukinori; Iihoshi, Satoshi; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Uemura, Shuji; Tanno, Katsutoshi; Narimatsu, Eichi; Asai, Yasufumi

    2016-02-01

    In patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), a randomized controlled trial revealed that outcomes did not significantly improve after therapeutic hypothermia (TH) or normothermia (TN). However, avoiding pyrexia, which is often associated with intracranial disorders, might improve clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to compare neurological outcomes among patients with moderate and severe TBI after therapeutic temperature modulation (TTM) in the absence of other interventions. Data from 1091 patients were obtained from the Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank Project 2009, a cohort observational study. Patients with cardiac arrest, those with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 and dilated fixed pupils, and those whose cause of death was injury to another area of the body were excluded, leaving 687 patients aged 16 years or older in this study. The patients were divided into 2 groups: the TTM group underwent TN (213 patients) or TH (82 patients), and the control group (392 patients) did not receive TTM. The primary end point for this study was the rate of poor outcome at hospital discharge, and the secondary end point was in-hospital death. Out of the 208 total items in the database, 29 variables that could potentially affect outcome were matched using the propensity score (PS) method in order to reduce selection bias and balance the baseline characteristics. From each group, 141 patients were extracted using the PS-matching process. Among the patients in the TTM group, 29 had undergone TH and 112 had undergone TN. In a log-rank test using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, no significant differences in patient outcome or death were observed between the 2 groups (poor outcome, p = 0.83; death, p = 0.18). A Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis established the HR for poor outcome and mortality at 1.03 (95% CI 0.78-1.36, p = 0.83) and 1.34 (95% CI 0.87-2.07, p = 0.18), respectively. There was no clear improvement in neurological outcomes after TTM in

  18. Dynamic modeling of nutrient removal by a MBR operated at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, M; Sayi-Ucar, N; Cokgor, E; Orhon, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Insel, G

    2017-10-15

    The process performance of a MBR operated on municipal sewage at elevated temperatures was evaluated by dynamic modeling. The enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) performance varied from 40% to 95% with process temperature ranging from 24 to 38 °C. The respective maximum substrate uptake rate (qPHA) was estimated at 1.5 gCODS/gCODX.day(-1) for Glycogen Accumulating Organisms (GAO) and 4.7 gCODS/gCODX.day(-1) for Phosphate Accumulating Organisms (PAO) with Arrhenius coefficients (θ) for GAOs and PAOs of 1.06 and 1.04 respectively. With these parameters the effluent PO4 levels of the MBR operated for 450 days could be well described. In addition, the impact of mesophilic conditions and low influent P/VFA levels on GAO proliferation was evaluated under dynamic process conditions. Nitrification process was temporarily impaired at high temperatures around 38 °C. Simulations revealed that the contribution of the anoxic reactor to the total overall denitrification was limited to 40%The contribution of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SNdN) process to the denitrification was around 40-50% depending upon dissolved oxygen levels in aerobic and MBR tanks. The large contribution of SNdN was due to gas/liquid mass transfer limitation conditions mediated by high mixed liquor viscosities (20-35 mPa.S) in MBR system. The membrane flux was 43 L/m(2)/h corresponding to the specific permeability (K) of 413 L/m(2)/h/bar at 38 °C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling and operation of sub-miniature constant temperature hot-wire anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samie, M.; Watmuff, J. H.; Van Buren, T.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Hultmark, M.; Smits, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    High-Reynolds number flows are very common in technological applications and in nature, and hot-wire anemometry is the preferred method for measuring the time-series of fluctuating velocity in such flows. However, measurement of very high-Reynolds number flows requires hot-wires with higher temporal and spatial resolution than is available with conventional probes. Much effort has therefore been devoted to decreasing the size of the hot-wire probes and this has led to associated challenges with operation. It is this latter operation problem which is the focus of this paper. To this end, an existing theoretical model of constant-temperature hot-wire anemometers (Perry 1982 Hot-Wire Anemometry (New York: Oxford University Press), Watmuff 1995 Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 11 117-34) is applied, and its accuracy is tested for the first time by comparison to measurements using an in-house constant temperature anemometer (CTA) for both conventional 5~μ m-diameter wires and sub-miniature hot-wires. With the aid of this model, we propose modifications to the CTA design and demonstrate successful operation of the CTA with the Princeton nano-scale thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) (Bailey et al 2010 J. Fluid Mech. 663 160-79). It is also shown that the transfer function obtained from the model can be utilized to estimate the true frequency response and cut-off frequency of a hot-wire-CTA system to the velocity fluctuations, which is essential in accurate measurements of energy spectrum and higher order statistics of turbulent flows.

  20. Do operational sex ratios influence sex allocation in viviparous lizards with temperature-dependent sex determination?

    PubMed

    Allsop, D J; Warner, D A; Langkilde, T; DU, W; Shine, R

    2006-07-01

    Under certain environmental situations, selection may favour the ability of females to adjust the sex ratio of their offspring. Two recent studies have suggested that viviparous scincid lizards can modify the sex ratio of the offspring they produce in response to the operational sex ratio (OSR). Both of the species in question belong to genera that have also recently been shown to exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Here we test whether pregnant montane water skinks (Eulamprus tympanum) utilise TSD to select offspring sex in response to population wide imbalances in the OSR, by means of active thermoregulation. We use a combination of laboratory and field-based experiments, and conduct the first field-based test of this hypothesis by maintaining females in outdoor enclosures of varying OSR treatments throughout pregnancy. Although maternal body temperature during pregnancy was influenced by OSR, the variation in temperature was not great enough to affect litter sex ratios or any other phenotypic traits of the offspring.

  1. High-temperature operation of 640 nm wavelength high-power laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Daisuke

    2017-03-01

    We realized the fabrication of a red semiconductor laser array with high optical power and reliability using an AlGaInP-based compound semiconductor. To obtain a high optical output, the semiconductor laser requires high-quality quantum wells. In this work, we improved quantum well layer abruptness by applying high-temperature growth condition to quantum wells. We obtained a very high optical power of 20.1 W with a wavelength of 644 nm under this growth condition using magnesium as a dopant for a p-type layer. As a results, we achieved a high characteristic temperature of 68 K and a high electrical-to-optical (E-O) conversion efficiency 37% at 15 W optical output. When the laser lifetime at a temperature of 35 °C and an optical output power of 6.6 W for operation is defined as the time when the output power decreases to 50%, which is usually used for defining the lifetime of ultra high-pressure (UHP) lamps in projection display, we can estimate the lifetime of this laser to be longer than 10000 h or more.

  2. Potassium ion channels operated by receptor stimulation can be activated simply by raising temperature.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Y; Matsumoto, M; Kudo, A; Sasaki, K

    1991-01-01

    Application of either dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), or histamine (HA) to the identified ganglion cells of Aplysia elicits a K(+)-dependent slow hyperpolarization. When temperature of the bathing solution was raised from 22 to 32 degrees C, these cells were also hyperpolarized with a marked increase in K+ conductance. The warm- and transmitter-induced current responses recorded under voltage clamp were not blocked by either 1 mM Ba2+ or 10 mM TEA. Intracellularly injected guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) depressed both warm- and transmitter-induced K+ responses immediately after the injection. Intracellular application of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) caused a gradual, irreversible increase in K+ conductance of the plasma membrane and occluded both responses. Transmitter-induced response markedly decreased when the temperature was raised from 22 to 32 degrees C, suggesting that the response to transmitter was occluded during the warm-induced response. These results suggested that the G-protein regulating the receptor-operated K+ channels could be activated simply by raising temperature.

  3. Experimental design, operation, and results of a 4 kW high temperature steam electrolysis experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; Tao, Greg; Zhou, Can; Housley, Gregory K.

    2015-11-01

    High temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) is a promising technology for large-scale hydrogen production. However, research on HTSE performance above the kW level is limited. This paper presents the results of 4 kW HTSE long-term test completed in a multi-kW test facility recently developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The 4 kW HTSE unit consisted of two solid oxide electrolysis stacks electrically connected in parallel, each of which included 40 electrode-supported planar cells. A current density of 0.41 A cm-2 was used for the long-term operating at a constant current mode, resulting in a theoretical hydrogen production rate about 23 slpm. A demonstration of 830 h stable operation was achieved with a degradation rate of 3.1% per 1000 h. The paper also includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This successful demonstration of multi-kW scale HTSE unit will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

  4. Surgical management of moderate adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with ApiFix®: a short peri- apical fixation followed by post-operative curve reduction with exercises.

    PubMed

    Floman, Yizhar; Burnei, Gheorghe; Gavriliu, Stefan; Anekstein, Yoram; Straticiuc, Sergiu; Tunyogi-Csapo, Miklos; Mirovsky, Yigal; Zarzycki, Daniel; Potaczek, Tomasz; Arnin, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Surgery in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a major operative intervention where 10-12 vertebrae are instrumented and fused. A smaller motion preserving surgery would be more desirable for these otherwise healthy adolescents. The ApiFix® system is a novel less invasive short segment pedicle screw based instrumentation inserted around the apex of the main curve. The system has a ratchet mechanism that enables gradual postoperative device elongation and curve correction. The ratchet is activated by performing specific spinal exercises. The unique features of the device allow curve correction without fusion. The system which has a CE approval was employed in adolescents with main thoracic curves. More than a dozen of ApiFix surgeries have been performed so far. The preoperative Cobb angle was 45° ± 8, and 25° ± 8 at final follow up. The following is a report on three adolescent females aged 13-16 years with curves between 43°-53° and Risser sign of 1-4 who underwent surgery with ApiFix®. Two pedicle screws were inserted around the curve apex and the ratchet based device with polyaxial ring connectors was attached to the screws. No fusion attempt was made. Operative time was around one hour. Two weeks after surgery the patients were instructed to perform Schroth like daily exercises with the aim of rod elongation and gradual curve correction. Patients were followed between 6 months to 2 years. Curves were reduced and maintained between 22- 33°. Patients were pain free and were able to perform their spinal exercises. Postoperative gradual elongation of the device was observed. No screw loosening or rod breakage were observed. No adding on or curve progression was seen. Three factors may contribute to the ApiFix® success: polyaxial connections that prevent mechanical failure, gradual curve correction by spinal motion and spinal growth modulation. The ApiFix® system allows managing moderate AIS with a simple and minor surgical intervention

  5. Influence of temperature on Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG microchip laser operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Eisenschreiber, Jan; Jelínková, Helena; Nejezchleb, Karel; Å koda, Václav

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this work was an investigation of the temperature influence (in range from 80 up to 320 K) on the laser properties of Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG Q-switched diode-pumped microchip laser. This laser was based on monolith crystal (diameter 3mm) which combines in one piece an active laser part (Yb:YAG crystal, 10 at.% Yb/Y, 3mm long) and saturable absorber (Cr:YAG crystal, 1.36mm long, initial transmission 90% @ 1031 nm). The laser resonator pump mirror (HT for pump radiation, HR for generated radiation) was directly deposited on the Yb:YAG monolith part. The output coupler with reflection 55% for the generated wavelength was placed on the Cr:YAG part. The microchip laser was placed in the temperature controlled cupreous holder inside vacuum chamber of the liquid nitrogen cryostat. For Yb:YAG part longitudinal pulsed pumping (pumping pulse length 2.5 ms, rep-rate 20 Hz, power amplitude 21W) a fibre coupled (core diameter 400 μm, NA= 0:22) laser diode, operating at wavelength 933 nm, was used. The microchip laser mean output power, pulse duration, repetition rate, emission wavelength, and laser beam profile were measured in dependence on temperature. The generated pulse length was in range from 2.2 ns to 1.1 ns (FWHM) with the minimum at 230 K. The single pulse energy was peaking (0.4 mJ) at 180 K. The highest peak power (325 kW) was obtained at 220 K. The highest pulse repetition rate (38 kHz) and output mean power (370mW) was reached for temperature 80 K.

  6. A comparison of dilute aqueous p-toluenesulfonic and sulfuric acid pretreatments and saccharification of corn stover at moderate temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S; Wiredu, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Single step pretreatment-saccharification of corn stover was investigated in aqueous p-toluenesulfonic and sulfuric acid media. Dilute aqueous solution of p-toluenesulfonic acid was a better catalyst than aqueous sulfuric acid of the same H(+) ion concentration for single step pretreatment-saccharification of corn stover at moderate temperatures and pressures. For example, 100mg corn stover heated at 150°C for 1h in 0.100 M H(+) aqueous sulfuric acid produced 64 μmol of total reducing sugars (TRS), whereas the sample heated in 0.100 M H(+)p-toluenesulfonic acid produced 165 μmol of TRS under identical conditions. Glucose yield showed a similar trend, as aq. sulfuric acid and p-toluene sulfonic acid media produced 29 and 35 μmol of glucose respectively after 2.5h. Higher catalytic activity of p-toluenesulfonic acid may be due to an interaction with biomass, supported by repulsion of hydrophobic tolyl group by the aqueous phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E; Barber, John L; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-14

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  8. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-01

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  9. Analysis of the linearised observation operator in a soil moisture and temperature analysis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharssi, I.; Candy, B.; Steinle, P.

    2015-06-01

    Several weather forecasting agencies have developed advanced land data assimilation systems that, in principle, can analyse any model land variable. Such systems can make use of a wide variety of observation types, such as screen level (2 m above the surface) observations and satellite based measurements of surface soil moisture and skin temperature. Indirect measurements can be used and information propagated from the surface into the deeper soil layers. A key component of the system is the calculation of the linearised observation operator matrix (Jacobian matrix) which describes the link between the observations and the land surface model variables. The elements of the Jacobian matrix (Jacobians) are estimated using finite difference by performing short model forecasts with perturbed initial conditions. The calculated Jacobians show that there can be strong coupling between the screen level and the soil. The coupling between the screen level and surface soil moisture is found to be due to a number of processes including bare soil evaporation, soil thermal conductivity as well as transpiration by plants. Therefore, there is significant coupling both during the day and at night. The coupling between the screen level and root-zone soil moisture is primarily through transpiration by plants. Therefore the coupling is only significant during the day and the vertical variation of the coupling is modulated by the vegetation root depths. The calculated Jacobians that link screen level temperature to model soil temperature are found to be largest for the topmost model soil layer and become very small for the lower soil layers. These values are largest during the night and generally positive in value. It is found that the Jacobians that link observations of surface soil moisture to model soil moisture are strongly affected by the soil hydraulic conductivity. Generally, for the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) land surface model, the coupling between the surface

  10. Determination of allowable fluid temperature during start-up operation of outlet header under the assumption of constant and temperature-dependent material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rząsa, Dariusz; Duda, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    Modern supercritical power plants operate at very high temperatures and pressures. Thus the construction elements are subjected to both high thermal and mechanical loads. As a result high stresses in those components are created. In order to operate safely, it is important to monitor stresses, especially during start-up and shut-down processes. The maximum stresses in the construction elements should not exceed the allowable stresses that are defined according to boiler regulations. It is important to find optimum operating parameters, that can assure safe heating and cooling processes. The optimum parameters define temperature and pressure histories that can keep the highest stresses within allowable limit and reduce operation time as much as possible. In this paper a new numerical method for determining optimum working fluid parameters is presented. In this method, properties of steel can be assumed as constant or temperature dependent. The constant value is taken usually at the average temperature of the operation cycle. For both cases optimal parameters are determined. Based on these parameters start-up operations for both cases are conducted. During entire processes stresses in the heated element are monitored. The results obtained are compared with German boiler regulations - Technische Regeln fur Dampfkessel 301.

  11. AATSR - Precise Sea-Surface Temperature for Climate Monitoring and for Operational Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn-Jones, David; Corlett, Gary; Donlon, Craig; Stark, John

    The Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) is an imaging radiometer specifi- cally designed to measure Sea-Surface Temperature (SST) to the demanding levels of accuracy and stability required for climate research. AATSR, which has been operating continuously on ESA's Envisat Satellite since its launch in 2002, achieves the required levels of accuracy on account of its unique dual view, whereby each terrestrial scene is viewed twice, once at nadir and then through an inclined path which uses a different atmospheric path-length, thereby providing a direct observation of atmospheric effects, leading to an exceptionally accurate atmospheric correction. This feature is accompanied by an advanced calibration system combined with excellent optical and thermal designs. Recent rigorous and extensive comparisons with in situ data have shown that, for most of the global oceans, AATSR can achieve and accuracy of around 0.2o C with high stability, which has qualified them for use in climate analysis schemes. Because AATSR is the third sensor in a near-continuous series which started with the launch of ATSR-1 on ERS-1 satellite in 1991, there is a time-series of 16+ years of climate standard SSTs which have recently been re-processed and are now becoming available to the World-wide user community from data centres in Europe. SST data from AATSR have been included in the suite of operational SST products generated by the GODAE/GHRSST Pilot Project, on a timescale needed by operational users and in a format which allows easy ingestion and error estimates for data from AATSR and most of the other sensors currently providing SST measurements from space. Within the GODAE/GHRSST data-products, AATSR SST data are generally regarded as the benchmark for accuracy and are used to provide bias corrections for data from the other sensors, which often have superior coverage, thus exploiting synergistically the complementary qualities if the different data-sets. The UK Met Office

  12. Designing Nanoscale Precipitates in Novel Cobalt-based Superalloys to Improve Creep Resistance and Operating Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dunand, David C.; Seidman, David N.; Wolverton, Christopher; Saal, James E.; Bocchini, Peter J.; Sauza, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    High-temperature structural alloys for aerospace and energy applications have long been dominated by Ni-base superalloys, whose strength and creep resistance can be attributed to microstructures consisting of a large volume fraction of ordered (L12) γ'-precipitates embedded in a disordered’(f.c.c.) γ-matrix. These alloys exhibit excellent mechanical behavior and thermal stability, but after decades of incremental improvement are nearing the theoretical limit of their operating temperatures. Conventional Co-base superalloys are solid-solution or carbide strengthened; although they see industrial use, these alloys are restricted to lower-stress applications because the absence of an ordered intermetallic phase places an upper limit on their mechanical performance. In 2006, a γ+γ' microstructure with ordered precipitates analogous to (L12) Ni3Al was first identified in the Co-Al-W ternary system, allowing, for the first time, the development of Co-base alloys with the potential to meet or even exceed the elevated-temperature performance of their Ni-base counterparts. The potential design space for these alloys is complex: the most advanced Ni-base superalloys may contain as many as 8-10 minor alloying additions, each with a specified purpose such as raising the γ' solvus temperature or improving creep strength. Our work has focused on assessing the effects of alloying additions on microstructure and mechanical behavior of γ'-strengthened Co-base alloys in an effort to lay the foundations for understanding this emerging alloy system. Investigation of the size, morphology, and composition of γ' and other relevant phases is investigated utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 3-D picosecond ultraviolet local electrode atom probe tomography (APT). Microhardness, compressive yield stress at ambient and elevated temperatures, and compressive high-temperature creep measurements are employed to extract mechanical behavior

  13. Thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Morrow, M.S.

    1995-09-12

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering. 1 fig.

  14. Method of preparing thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Morrow, M.S.

    1996-07-16

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering. 1 fig.

  15. Thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Morrow, Marvin S.

    1995-01-01

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering.

  16. Method of preparing thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Morrow, Marvin S.

    1996-01-01

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering.

  17. The Integrity of ACSR Full Tension Splice Connector at Higher Operation Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; King Jr, Thomas J; Graziano, Joe; Chan, John

    2007-01-01

    Due to the increase in power demand and limited investment in new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than those used for the original design criteria. This has led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors, which have been manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increase in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reduction in the connector clamping strength, which could ultimately result in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector appears to be the weakest link in the electric power transmission lines. This paper presents a protocol for integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of a full tension single-stage splice connector assembly.

  18. The calibration and operation of a constant-temperature crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernando, E. M.; Donovan, J. F.; Smits, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration and operation of a constant-temperature crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow is considered. Crossed-wire probes offer considerable advantages over single, inclined wires: the kinematic shear stress can be derived from a single point measurement; the rms quantities can be derived from the same measurement, and the instantaneous quantities can be obtained as a continuous function of time. However, using a crossed-wire probe in supersonic flow is subject to the following practical difficulties: the problem of flow interference, where the shock waves from one wire and its supports interfere with the flow over the other wire; the necessity for high frequency response to resolve the spectral content, and the sensitivity of the results to small changes in the calibration constants. In the present contribution, each of these problems is addressed. Practical solutions are suggested, and some encouraging results are presented.

  19. Simulating waste temperatures in an operating landfill in Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bonany, James E; Van Geel, Paul J; Gunay, H Burak; Isgor, O Burkan

    2013-07-01

    A bioreactor landfill operated in Sainte-Sophie, Québec, Canada was instrumented to better understand the waste stabilization process in northern climates. Instrument bundles were placed within the waste to monitor temperature, oxygen, moisture content, settlement, total load, mounding of leachate and electrical conductivity. A finite element model was developed to simulate the heat fluxes to and from the waste, as well as heat generation within the waste from both anaerobic and aerobic processes. The results of the analysis suggest the majority of the aerobic activity occurs in the top portion of the waste lift exposed to ambient air. In addition, the model indicates that frozen waste lifts require a significant amount of heat to thaw the liquid fraction. The model also demonstrates that when a lift of cold waste is placed at the bottom of the landfill, the subsurface acts as a significant source of heat.

  20. Dark current reduction in a long wavelength quantum well infrared photodetector operating at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Péré-Laperne, Nicolas; Rosencher, Emmanuel; Ribet-Mohamed, Isabelle; Nedelcu, Alexandru; Doyennette, Laetitia; Berger, Vincent

    2011-05-01

    Defence and astronomy are particularly demanding applications of infrared focal plane arrays in the 8-20 μm range of wavelength. QWIP is a good candidate for the low flux applications. Dark current is clearly a limiting parameter for it. Therefore, we have studied the dark current at very low operating temperature where the electronic transport is in the tunneling regime. We have developed a model of transport based on hopping between localized states. In the tunneling regime of transport, we have identified the main role played by the interaction between electron and ionized impurities. Thus the dark current in the structure is sensitive to the doping profile (magnitude and shape). This paper is suggesting a new way of reduction of the dark current while keeping a constant absorption. A decrease of 50% of the dark current has already been achieved for specially designed components. An extra structure is presented and is leading to an even lower dark current.

  1. Continuous operation of a monolithic semiconductor terahertz source at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate room temperature continuous wave THz sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation from mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. Buried ridge, buried composite distributed-feedback waveguide with Čerenkov phase-matching scheme is used to reduce the waveguide loss and enhance the heat dissipation for continuous wave operation. Continuous emission at 3.6 THz with a side-mode suppression ratio of 20 dB and output power up to 3 μW are achieved, respectively. THz peak power is further scaled up to 1.4 mW in pulsed mode by increasing the mid-infrared power through increasing the active region doping and device area.

  2. Effect of Operating Temperature on Structure Properties of TICX Nanoparticle Coating Applied by Pacvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Sabour Rouhaghdam, Ali Reza; Ahangarani, Shahrokh; Moradi, Hadi; Mohammadi, Ali

    Titanium carbide (TiC) is a widely used hard coating to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of tools because of its outstanding properties such as high melting point, high hardness, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance. These properties were drastically improved by using nanotechnology. So in this project, TiCx was applied on hot-working die steel (H11) by Plasma CVD (PACVD). The effect of operating temperatures on TiCx structure properties have been studies by typical and advanced analyses methods such as SEM, XRD, FTIR and Raman. The best properties of TiCx nanoparticle, such as nanostructure, mechanical properties and chemical properties, were obtained at 480 °C.

  3. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  4. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  7. 46 CFR 54.25-15 - Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-high alloy steels (modifies... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-15 Low temperature operation—high alloy steels (modifies UHA-23(b) and UHA-51). (a)...

  8. Design and performance of a rugged standard operative temperature thermometer for avian studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakken, G.S.; Boysen, A.F.; Korschgen, C.E.; Kenow, K.P.; Lima, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    The lack of a truly satisfactory sensor which can characterize the thermal environment at the spatial scale experienced by small endotherms has hindered study of their thermoregulatory behavior. We describe a general design for a rugged, easily constructed sensor to measure standard operative temperature, Tes. We present specific designs for adult dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) and hatchling mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Sensor response was stable and repeatable (??1.4%) over the course of several months. Over the range of conditions for which validation data were available (variable air temperature and wind with negligible net radiation), sensors predicted the mean net heat production of live animals to within ??0.023W (equivalent to ??1??C at Tes= 15??C). The main limit on accuracy was scatter in the data on metabolism and evaporative water loss in live animals. These sensors are far more rugged and easily constructed than the heated taxidermic mounts previously used to measure Tes. These characteristics facilitate the use of significant numbers of sensors in thermal mapping studies of endotherms. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary operational results of the low-temperature solar industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Six solar industrial process heat field tests have been in operation for a year or more - three are hot water systems and three are hot air systems. All are low-temperature projects (process heat at temperatures below 212/sup 0/F). Performance results gathered by each contractor's data acquisition system are presented and project costs and problems encountered are summarized. Flat-plate, evacuated-tube, and line-focus collectors are all represented in the program, with collector array areas ranging from 2500 to 21,000 ft/sup 2/. Collector array efficiencies ranged from 12% to 36% with net system efficiencies from 8% to 33%. Low efficiencies are attributable in some cases to high thermal losses and, for the two projects using air collectors, are due in part to high parasitic power consumption. Problems have included industrial effluents on collectors, glazing and absorber surface failures, excessive thermal losses, freezing and overheating, control problems, and data acquisition system failure. With design and data acquisition costs excluded costs of the projects ranged from $25/ft/sup 2/ to $87/ft/sup 2/ and $499/(MBtu/yr) to $1537/(MBtu/yr).

  10. Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Y.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; ...

    2017-02-27

    Rare event search experiments, such as those searching for dark matter and observations of neutrinoless double beta decay, require ultra low levels of radioactive background for unmistakable identification. In order to reduce the radioactive background of detectors used in these types of event searches, low background photosensors are required, as the physical size of these detectors become increasing larger, and hence the number of such photosensors used also increases rapidly. Considering that most dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are turning towards using noble liquids as the target choice, liquid xenon and liquid argon for instance, photosensors thatmore » can work well at cryogenic temperatures are required, 165 K and 87 K for liquid xenon and liquid argon, respectively. The Silicon Geiger Hybrid Tube (SiGHT) is a novel photosensor designed specifically for use in ultra low background experiments operating at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on the proven photocathode plus silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) hybrid technology and consists of very few other, but also ultra radio-pure, materials like fused silica and silicon for the SiPM. Lastly, the introduction of the SiGHT concept, as well as a feasibility study for its production, is reported in this article.« less

  11. Monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade laser and photodetector operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Shazzad Rassel, S. M.; Yang, Rui Q.; Corrége, Cédric J.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Larson, Preston R.; Gupta, James A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the demonstration of a monolithically integrated mid-IR interband cascade (IC) laser and photodetector operating at room temperature. The base structure for the integrated laser and detector is a six-stage type-I IC laser with GaInAsSb quantum well active regions. The laser/detector pair was defined using focused ion beam milling. The laser section lased in cw mode with an emission wavelength of ˜3.1 μm at 20 °C and top-illuminated photodetectors fabricated from the same wafer had Johnson-noise-limited detectivity of 1.05 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W at this wavelength and temperature. Under the same condition, the detectivity for the edge illumination configuration for the monolithically integrated laser/photodetector pairs is projected to be as high as 1.85 × 1010 cm Hz1/2/W, as supported by experimentally observed high photocurrent and open-circuit voltage. These high performance characteristics for monolithically integrated IC devices show great prospects for on-chip integration of mid-IR photonic devices for miniaturized sensors and on-chip optical communication systems.

  12. Operation and Improvement of Liquid Nitrogen Pumps with Radial High- Temperature Superconductor Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q. X.; Jiang, D. H.; Deng, Z. G.; Ma, G. T.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W. J.; Shin, D. I.; Gu, X.; Lin, N.; Shao, M. L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper reviews the advantages of replacing the mechanical bearings of low-temperature pumps by radial high- temperature superconductor (HTS) bearings. Radial HTS bearings have the advantage of being non-abrasive, so that the working life is increased significantly. In this article, two types of liquid nitrogen pump with radial HTS bearings are proposed. To reduce heat leakage, one pump uses a permanent magnet (PM) coupling and the other uses a long hollow pipe coupling. Successful stable operation of these two pumps means that radial HTS bearings have the potential to be applied in liquid nitrogen pumps. Test results show that the flow rate is influenced mainly by rotational speed but not by the coupling component. Further designs of the two types of pump for practical applications are described, and their characteristics are analyzed: the pump with a PM coupling has lower heat leakage, whereas the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling can solve the force creep problem of the HTS bearing. The design of the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling is based on the pump that is already in practical use, and therefore has greater feasibility for practical applications. Finally, improvements of the liquid nitrogen pump by improving the structure of the pump and the performance of the radial HTS bearing are discussed.

  13. Temperature stable operation of YCOB crystal for giant-pulse green microlaser.

    PubMed

    Kausas, Arvydas; Loiseau, Pascal; Aka, Gerard; Zheng, Yanqing; Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2017-03-20

    In this work the performance of two yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB) crystals made by Czochralski and Bridgman growth process was measured. By using high peak power, passively Q-switched Nd3+:YAG/Cr4+:YAG microlaser, high conversion second harmonic generation efficiency were obtained. Laser pulses at 532 nm with 1.14 mJ energy and 223 ps duration were obtained with a 15-mm long YCOB crystal that was grown by Bridgman method. The conversion efficiency was 70.2%, comparable with the conversion efficiency of 72.8% that was achieved with 10-mm long lithium triborate (LBO) nonlinear crystal. Also, for the first time, experimental data on temperature tuning in type I YCOB crystal was measured with linear slope in 200°C temperature range equal to -0.057%/°C and -0.064%/°C for the Czochralski and Bridgman grown crystals, respectively. Such YCOB nonlinear crystal can become a serious option for developing laser sources with high-peak power at high repetition rate that can operate in harsh environment.

  14. Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Guan, M. Y.; Korga, G.; Pantic, E.; Razeto, A.; Renshaw, A.; Rossi, B.; Suvorov, Y.; Wang, H.; Yang, C. G.

    2017-02-01

    Rare event search experiments, such as those searching for dark matter and observations of neutrinoless double beta decay, require ultra low levels of radioactive background for unmistakable identification. In order to reduce the radioactive background of detectors used in these types of event searches, low background photosensors are required, as the physical size of these detectors become increasing larger, and hence the number of such photosensors used also increases rapidly. Considering that most dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are turning towards using noble liquids as the target choice, liquid xenon and liquid argon for instance, photosensors that can work well at cryogenic temperatures are required, 165 K and 87 K for liquid xenon and liquid argon, respectively. The Silicon Geiger Hybrid Tube (SiGHT) is a novel photosensor designed specifically for use in ultra low background experiments operating at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on the proven photocathode plus silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) hybrid technology and consists of very few other, but also ultra radio-pure, materials like fused silica and silicon for the SiPM. The introduction of the SiGHT concept, as well as a feasibility study for its production, is reported in this paper.

  15. Fabrication of room temperature continuous-wave operation GaN-based ultraviolet laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Yang, Jing; Liu, Zongshun; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Jianjun; Jiang, Desheng; Shi, Yongsheng; Wang, Hai; Duan, Lihong; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui

    2017-06-01

    Two kinds of continuous-wave GaN-based ultraviolet laser diodes (LDs) operated at room temperature and with different emission wavelengths are demonstrated. The LDs epitaxial layers are grown on GaN substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, with a 10 × 600 μm2 ridge waveguide structure. The electrical and optical characteristics of the ultraviolet LDs are investigated under direct-current injection at room temperature. The stimulated emission peak wavelength of first LD is 392.9 nm, the threshold current density and voltage is 1.5 kA/cm2 and 5.0 V, respectively. The output light power is 80 mW under the 4.0 kA/cm2 injection current density. The stimulated emission peak wavelength of second LD is 381.9 nm, the threshold current density the voltage is 2.8 kA/cm2 and 5.5 V, respectively. The output light power is 14 mW under a 4.0 kA/cm2 injection current density. Projects the supported by the National Key R&D Program of China (Nos. 2016YFB0401801, 2016YFB0400803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61674138, 61674139, 61604145, 61574135, 61574134, 61474142, 61474110, 61377020, 61376089), the Science Challenge Project (No. JCKY2016212A503), and the One Hundred Person Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Preliminary operational results of the low temperature solar industrial process heat field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutscher, C. F.; Davenport, R. L.

    1980-06-01

    Six solar industrial process heat field tests have been in operation for a year or more, three are hot water systems and three are hot air systems. All are low temperature projects (process heat at temperatures below 212 F). Performance results gathered by each contractor's data acquisition system are presented and project costs and problems encountered are summarized. Flat plate, evaluated tube, and line focus collectors are all represented with collector array areas ranging from 2500 to 21,000 sq ft. Collector array efficiencies ranged form 12% to 36% with net system efficiencies from 8% to 33%. Low efficiencies are attributable in some cases to high thermal losses and, for the two projects using air collectors, are due in part to high parasitic power consumptions. Problems included industrial effluents on collectors, glazing and absorber surface failures, excessive thermal losses, freezing and overheating, control problems, and data acquisition system failure. With design and data acquisition costs excluded, costs of the projects ranged from $25/sq ft to $87/ sq ft and $499/(MBtu/yr) to $1537/(MBtu/yr).

  17. Vital roles of nano silica in synthetic based mud for high temperature drilling operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Muhammad Aslam Md; Hanafi, Nor Hazimastura

    2015-07-01

    At high temperature drilling, chemicals degradation occurs which reduce the effectiveness of the drilling fluid. There is a potential that by using nano sized particles which have thermal stability up to 2500°F to be used as a stabilizer to withstand the harsh condition. Therefore, this project aims to identify the performance of synthetic-based mud (SBM) with nano silica for high temperature drilling operation. A conventional SBM performance has been compared with additional percentages of nano silica. 20% and 40% of nano silica out of fluid loss weight has been added into the SBM and analyzed the rheological properties and other drilling fluid properties. The conventional SBM formulation has lost some amount of weighting material or solids in the mud and has been replaced by lighter and smaller size of nanoparticles. It has reduced the rheological properties of the mud but the gelation formed by nano silica material has given higher gel strength. Also, nano silica potentially plugs the porous media, resulted in lower filtration loss measurement and thinner mud cake ranged 20% to 50% respectively.

  18. Short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors operating above room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Lei, Lin; Jiang, Yuchao; Yang, Rui Q.; Klem, John F.; Johnson, Matthew B.

    2016-01-13

    High temperature operation (250–340 K) of short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) with InAs/GaSb/Al0.2In0.8Sb/GaSb superlattice absorbers has been demonstrated with a 50% cutoff wavelength of 2.9 μm at 300 K. Two ICIP structures, one with two and the other with three stages, were designed and grown to explore this multiple-stage architecture. At λ = 2.1 μm, the two- and three-stage ICIPs had Johnson-noise-limited detectivities of 5.1 × 109 and 5.8 ×109 cm Hz1/2/W, respectively, at 300 K. The better device performance of the three-stage ICIP over the two-stage ICIP confirmed the advantage of more stages for this cascade architecture. Furthermore, an Arrhenius activation energy of 450 meV is extracted for the bulk resistance-area product, which indicates the dominance of the diffusion current at these high temperatures.

  19. Short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors operating above room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Lei, Lin; ...

    2016-01-13

    High temperature operation (250–340 K) of short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) with InAs/GaSb/Al0.2In0.8Sb/GaSb superlattice absorbers has been demonstrated with a 50% cutoff wavelength of 2.9 μm at 300 K. Two ICIP structures, one with two and the other with three stages, were designed and grown to explore this multiple-stage architecture. At λ = 2.1 μm, the two- and three-stage ICIPs had Johnson-noise-limited detectivities of 5.1 × 109 and 5.8 ×109 cm Hz1/2/W, respectively, at 300 K. The better device performance of the three-stage ICIP over the two-stage ICIP confirmed the advantage of more stages for this cascade architecture. Furthermore,more » an Arrhenius activation energy of 450 meV is extracted for the bulk resistance-area product, which indicates the dominance of the diffusion current at these high temperatures.« less

  20. Diagnostics comparing sea surface temperature feedbacks from operational hurricane forecasts to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Ian D.; Marchok, Timothy; Vecchi, Gabriel A.

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines the ability of recent versions of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Operational Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM) to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricane intensity and hurricane-induced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) cooling. The analysis was performed by taking a Lagrangian composite of all hurricanes in the North Atlantic from 1998-2009 in observations and 2005-2009 for the GHM. A marked improvement in the intensity-SST relationship for the GHM compared to observations was found between the years 2005 and 2006-2009 due to the introduction of warm-core eddies, a representation of the loop current, and changes to the drag coefficient parameterization for bulk turbulent flux computation. A Conceptual Hurricane Intensity Model illustrates the essential steady-state characteristics of the intensity-SST relationship and is explained by two coupled equations for the atmosphere and ocean. The conceptual model qualitatively matches observations and the 2006-2009 period in the GHM, and presents supporting evidence for the conclusion that weaker upper oceanic thermal stratification in the Gulf of Mexico, caused by the introduction of the loop current and warm core eddies, is crucial to explaining the observed SST-intensity pattern. The diagnostics proposed by the conceptual model offer an independent set of metrics for comparing operational hurricane forecast models to observations.

  1. Computer-Aided Design of Materials for use under High Temperature Operating Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, K. R.; Rao, I. J.

    2010-01-31

    The procedures in place for producing materials in order to optimize their performance with respect to creep characteristics, oxidation resistance, elevation of melting point, thermal and electrical conductivity and other thermal and electrical properties are essentially trial and error experimentation that tend to be tremendously time consuming and expensive. A computational approach has been developed that can replace the trial and error procedures in order that one can efficiently design and engineer materials based on the application in question can lead to enhanced performance of the material, significant decrease in costs and cut down the time necessary to produce such materials. The work has relevance to the design and manufacture of turbine blades operating at high operating temperature, development of armor and missiles heads; corrosion resistant tanks and containers, better conductors of electricity, and the numerous other applications that are envisaged for specially structured nanocrystalline solids. A robust thermodynamic framework is developed within which the computational approach is developed. The procedure takes into account microstructural features such as the dislocation density, lattice mismatch, stacking faults, volume fractions of inclusions, interfacial area, etc. A robust model for single crystal superalloys that takes into account the microstructure of the alloy within the context of a continuum model is developed. Having developed the model, we then implement in a computational scheme using the software ABAQUS/STANDARD. The results of the simulation are compared against experimental data in realistic geometries.

  2. Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes for High Voltage and High Specific Energy Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Hwang, C.; Krause, F. C.; Soler, J.; West, W. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Amine, K.

    2012-01-01

    A number of electrolyte formulations that have been designed to operate over a wide temperature range have been investigated in conjunction with layered-layered metal oxide cathode materials developed at Argonne. In this study, we have evaluated a number of electrolytes in Li-ion cells consisting of Conoco Phillips A12 graphite anodes and Toda HE5050 Li(1.2)Ni(0.15)Co(0.10)Mn(0.55)O2 cathodes. The electrolytes studied consisted of LiPF6 in carbonate-based electrolytes that contain ester co-solvents with various solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) promoting additives, many of which have been demonstrated to perform well in 4V systems. More specifically, we have investigated the performance of a number of methyl butyrate (MB) containing electrolytes (i.e., LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + MB (20:20:60 v/v %) that contain various additives, including vinylene carbonate, lithium oxalate, and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB). When these systems were evaluated at various rates at low temperatures, the methyl butyrate-based electrolytes resulted in improved rate capability compared to cells with all carbonate-based formulations. It was also ascertained that the slow cathode kinetics govern the generally poor rate capability at low temperature in contrast to traditionally used LiNi(0.80)Co(0.15)Al(0.05)O2-based systems, rather than being influenced strongly by the electrolyte type.

  3. Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes for High Voltage and High Specific Energy Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Hwang, C.; Krause, F. C.; Soler, J.; West, W. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Amine, K.

    2012-01-01

    A number of electrolyte formulations that have been designed to operate over a wide temperature range have been investigated in conjunction with layered-layered metal oxide cathode materials developed at Argonne. In this study, we have evaluated a number of electrolytes in Li-ion cells consisting of Conoco Phillips A12 graphite anodes and Toda HE5050 Li(1.2)Ni(0.15)Co(0.10)Mn(0.55)O2 cathodes. The electrolytes studied consisted of LiPF6 in carbonate-based electrolytes that contain ester co-solvents with various solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) promoting additives, many of which have been demonstrated to perform well in 4V systems. More specifically, we have investigated the performance of a number of methyl butyrate (MB) containing electrolytes (i.e., LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + MB (20:20:60 v/v %) that contain various additives, including vinylene carbonate, lithium oxalate, and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB). When these systems were evaluated at various rates at low temperatures, the methyl butyrate-based electrolytes resulted in improved rate capability compared to cells with all carbonate-based formulations. It was also ascertained that the slow cathode kinetics govern the generally poor rate capability at low temperature in contrast to traditionally used LiNi(0.80)Co(0.15)Al(0.05)O2-based systems, rather than being influenced strongly by the electrolyte type.

  4. Force protection in contingency operations: an evaluation of temperature monitoring in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Cole, Catherine; Turnbull, C; Eardley, W; Hunt, P

    2016-06-01

    The deployment of the UK-led Joint Inter-Agency Taskforce to Sierra Leone in September 2014 brought the era of contingency operations into focus. Daily health screening of such deployed personnel forms a key element of medical force protection. We have performed a service evaluation of an existing screening programme and detail the comparison of the two thermometers used in this role. Data from the existing screening programme were used to inform a sample size required to enable statistically and clinically significant differences to be detected between the two interchangeably used thermometer systems in use. A prospective service evaluation on these devices was then carried out over a 10-day period and the data analysed by parametric tools. 10 personnel had their temperature recorded by both devices at the same time by a single operator every day. For the screened population, a mean temperature of 36.55°C and SD of 0.32°C was revealed. Powered to 80% with a two-tailed α of 0.05, the evaluation of the two thermometers revealed no significant difference between recordings taken with either device (p=0.115). The low SD meant that a pyrexial patient (>37.5°C) would require a recording over 3 SD from the population mean. Evaluations of medical force protection will carry increasing consequence as the UK deploy on short notice operations to regions of considerable endemic threat. Presence of pyrexia is a key early indicator of illness affecting deployed personnel, and two different thermometer types are provided for this function. We have shown for the first time with statistical and clinical significance that the two thermometers used in contingency force protection are interchangeable. The narrow variance is reassuring and confirms that the chosen trigger (>37.5°C) would warrant further investigation in the pyrexial patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Advances in III-V bulk and superlattice-based high operating temperature MWIR detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, H.; Roebuck, M.; Terterian, S.; Jenkins, J.; Tu, B.; Strong, W.; De Lyon, T. J.; Rajavel, R. D.; Caulfield, J.; Curzan, J. P.

    2017-02-01

    Barrier detectors based on III-V materials have recently been developed to realize substantial improvements in the performance of mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detectors, enabling FPA performance at high operating temperatures. The relative ease of processing the III-V materials into large-format, small-pitch FPAs offers a cost-effective solution for tactical imaging applications in the MWIR band as an attractive alternative to HgCdTe detectors. In addition, small pixel (5-10μm pitch) detector technology enables a reduction in size of the system components, from the detector and ROIC chips to the focal length of the optics and lens size, resulting in an overall compactness of the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. To exploit the substantial cost advantages, scalability to larger format (2kx2k/10μm) and superior wafer quality of large-area GaAs substrates, we have fabricated antimony based III-V bulk detectors that were metamorphically grown by MBE on GaAs substrates. The electro-optical characterization of fabricated 2kx2k/10μm FPAs shows low median dark current (3 x 10-5 A/cm2 with λco = 5.11μm or 2.2 x 10-6 A/cm2 with λco = 4.6μm) at 150K, high NEdT operability (3x median value) >99.8% and >60% quantum efficiency (non-ARC). In addition, we report our initial result in developing small pixel (5μm pitch), high definition (HD) MWIR detector technology based on superlattice III-V absorbing layers grown by MBE on GaSb substrates. The FPA radiometric result is showing low median dark current (6.3 x 10-6 A/cm2 at 150K with λco = 5.0μm) with 50% quantum efficiency (non-ARC), and low NEdT of 20mK (with averaging) at 150K. The detector and FPA test results that validate the viability of Sb-based bulk and superlattice high operating temperature MWIR FPA technology will be discussed during the presentation.

  6. Analysis of the Impact of Decreasing District Heating Supply Temperature on Combined Heat and Power Plant Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonina, Alona; Bolonins, Genadijs; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2014-12-01

    District heating systems are widely used to supply heat to different groups of heat consumers. The district heating system offers great opportunities for combined heat and power production. In this paper decreasing district heating supply temperature is analysed in the context of combined heat and power plant operation. A mathematical model of a CHP plant is developed using both empirical and theoretical equations. The model is used for analysis of modified CHP plant operation modes with reduced district heating supply temperature. Conclusions on the benefits of new operation modes are introduced.

  7. Effects of Operating Temperature on Droplet Casting of Flexible Polymer/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jin-Chern; Wu, Chin-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Lin, Tse-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the performance of a flexible polymer/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite sensor array as a function of operating temperature. The response magnitudes of a cost-effective flexible gas sensor array equipped with a heater were measured with respect to five different operating temperatures (room temperature, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C) via impedance spectrum measurement and sensing response experiments. The selected polymers that were droplet cast to coat a MWCNT conductive layer to form two-layer polymer/MWCNT composite sensing films included ethyl cellulose (EC), polyethylene oxide (PEO), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Electrical characterization of impedance, sensing response magnitude, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) morphology of each type of polymer/MWCNT composite film was performed at different operating temperatures. With respect to ethanol, the response magnitude of the sensor decreased with increasing operating temperatures. The results indicated that the higher operating temperature could reduce the response and influence the sensitivity of the polymer/MWCNT gas sensor array. The morphology of polymer/MWCNT composite films revealed that there were changes in the porous film after volatile organic compound (VOC) testing. PMID:28025507

  8. High True Ileal Digestibility but Not Postprandial Utilization of Nitrogen from Bovine Meat Protein in Humans Is Moderately Decreased by High-Temperature, Long-Duration Cooking.

    PubMed

    Oberli, Marion; Marsset-Baglieri, Agnès; Airinei, Gheorghe; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Khodorova, Nadezda; Rémond, Didier; Foucault-Simonin, Angélique; Piedcoq, Julien; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles; Benamouzig, Robert; Gaudichon, Claire

    2015-10-01

    Meat protein digestibility can be impaired because of indigestible protein aggregates that form during cooking. When the aggregates are subsequently fermented by the microbiota, they can generate potentially harmful compounds for the colonic mucosa. This study evaluated the quantity of bovine meat protein escaping digestion in the human small intestine and the metabolic fate of exogenous nitrogen, depending on cooking processes. Sixteen volunteers (5 women and 11 men; aged 28 ± 8 y) were equipped with a double lumen intestinal tube positioned at the ileal level. They received a test meal exclusively composed of 120 g of intrinsically (15)N-labeled bovine meat, cooked either at 55°C for 5 min (n = 8) or at 90°C for 30 min (n = 8). Ileal effluents and blood and urine samples were collected over an 8-h period after the meal ingestion, and (15)N enrichments were measured to assess the digestibility of meat proteins and the transfer of dietary nitrogen into the metabolic pools. Proteins tended to be less digestible for the meat cooked at 90°C for 30 min than at 55°C for 5 min (90.1% ± 2.1% vs. 94.1% ± 0.7% of ingested N; P = 0.08). However, the particle number and size in ileal digesta did not differ between groups. The appearance of variable amounts of intact fibers was observed by microscopy. The kinetics of (15)N appearance in plasma proteins, amino acids, and urea were similar between groups. The amount of exogenous nitrogen lost through deamination did not differ between groups (21.2% ± 0.8% of ingested N). Cooking bovine meat at a high temperature for a long time can moderately decrease protein digestibility compared with cooking at a lower temperature for a short time and does not affect postprandial exogenous protein metabolism in young adults. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01685307. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Derivation and evaluation of land surface temperature from the geostationary operational environmental satellite series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have been continuously monitoring the earth surface since 1970, providing valuable and intensive data from a very broad range of wavelengths, day and night. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is currently operating GOES-15 and GOES-13. The design of the GOES series is now heading to the 4 th generation. GOES-R, as a representative of the new generation of the GOES series, is scheduled to be launched in 2015 with higher spatial and temporal resolution images and full-time soundings. These frequent observations provided by GOES Image make them attractive for deriving information on the diurnal land surface temperature (LST) cycle and diurnal temperature range (DTR). These parameters are of great value for research on the Earth's diurnal variability and climate change. Accurate derivation of satellite-based LSTs from thermal infrared data has long been an interesting and challenging research area. To better support the research on climate change, the generation of consistent GOES LST products for both GOES-East and GOES-West from operational dataset as well as historical archive is in great demand. The derivation of GOES LST products and the evaluation of proposed retrieval methods are two major objectives of this study. Literature relevant to satellite-based LST retrieval techniques was reviewed. Specifically, the evolution of two LST algorithm families and LST retrieval methods for geostationary satellites were summarized in this dissertation. Literature relevant to the evaluation of satellite-based LSTs was also reviewed. All the existing methods are a valuable reference to develop the GOES LST product. The primary objective of this dissertation is the development of models for deriving consistent GOES LSTs with high spatial and high temporal coverage. Proper LST retrieval algorithms were studied

  10. High Speed, High Temperature, Fault Tolerant Operation of a Combination Magnetic-Hydrostatic Bearing Rotor Support System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark; Montague, Gerald; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Closed loop operation of a single, high temperature magnetic radial bearing to 30,000 RPM (2.25 million DN) and 540 C (1000 F) is discussed. Also, high temperature, fault tolerant operation for the three axis system is examined. A novel, hydrostatic backup bearing system was employed to attain high speed, high temperature, lubrication free support of the entire rotor system. The hydrostatic bearings were made of a high lubricity material and acted as journal-type backup bearings. New, high temperature displacement sensors were successfully employed to monitor shaft position throughout the entire temperature range and are described in this paper. Control of the system was accomplished through a stand alone, high speed computer controller and it was used to run both the fault-tolerant PID and active vibration control algorithms.

  11. First operational results of a high temperature energy storage with packed bed and integration potential in CSP plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlipf, Dominik; Faust, Eva; Schneider, Guenter; Maier, Hartmut

    2017-06-01

    Since 2015 a large scale demonstration plant of the Storasol High Temperature Thermal Energy Storage (HTTES) is in operation at the University of Bayreuth. With a storage capacity of 1.6 MWhth and a charging capacity of up to 1.8 MW, the system is in operation. In this paper, first operational results of the charging and discharging process are shown, including the operation of a connected ORC-process. Furthermore, the paper shows additional simulation used during the design process of the storage system and integration concept of the HTTES into a CSP-plant.

  12. Effects of Operating Temperatures and Accelerated Environmental Ageing on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass-Vinylester Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasztorny, M.; Nycz, D. B.; Romanowski, R. K.; Gotowicki, P.; Kiczko, A.; Rudnik, D.

    2017-07-01

    Experimental identification of the mechanical properties of a selected glass-vinylester structural composite is developed, performed, and analysed taking into account accelerated environmental ageing and three operating temperatures (-20, 20, and 55°C) corresponding to the operating temperature range for composite footbridges in the Central Europe. The main constituents of the composite fabricated using infusion technology are a bidirectional balanced stitched E-glass fabric and a flame retardant, vinylester resin. After homogenization, the composite reinforced with one fabric forms a single lamina and is modeled as a linear elastic-brittle orthotropic material. Full sets of material constants were identified for the initial and aged composites at the selected operating temperatures. The accelerated environmental ageing of the composite was performed on 4-layer symmetric laminate platelets protected with a 300-mm-thick gelcoat layer, using an ageing chamber and a relevant ageing programme. A comparative analysis was carried out in order to determine the effects of operating temperature and accelerated environmental ageing on the material constants of the GFRP composite. It is found that the composite tested can be modeled as a linear elastic-brittle orthotropic material to the level of 20% of its strength in each strength test. The impact of the accelerated environmental ageing and operating temperature in the range from -20 to 55°C on the elastic/strength/ultimate strain constants of the selected E-glass/vinylester composite can be significant and different for individual constants.

  13. A High-Sensitivity Gas Sensor Toward Methanol Using ZnO Microrods: Effect of Operating Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, M.; Mahapatra, R.; Mondal, B.; Ghosh, R.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, zinc oxide (ZnO) microrods with the average diameter of 350 nm have been synthesized on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate using a hydrothermal reaction process at a low temperature of 90°C. The methanol gas sensing behaviour of as-synthesized ZnO microrods have been studied at different operating temperatures (100-300°C). The gas sensing results show that the ZnO microrods exhibit excellent sensitivity, selectivity, and stability toward methanol gas at 300°C. The as-grown ZnO microrods sensor also shows the good sensitivity for methanol even at a low operating temperature of 100°C. The ultra-high sensitivity of 4.41 × 104% [gas sensitivity, S g = ( I g - I a)/ I a × 100%] and 5.11 × 102% to 100 ppm methanol gas at a temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively, has been observed. A fast response time of 200 ms and 270 ms as well as a recovery time of 120 ms and 1330 ms to methanol gas have also been found at an operating temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively. The response and recovery time decreases with increasing operation temperature of the sensor.

  14. High Operating Temperature Midwave Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The nBn or XBn barrier infrared detector has the advantage of reduced dark current resulting from suppressed Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and surface leakage. High performance detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InAsSb absorber lattice matched to GaSb substrate, with a matching AlAsSb unipolar electron barrier, have been demonstrated. The band gap of lattice-matched InAsSb yields a detector cutoff wavelength of approximately 4.2 ??m when operating at 150K. We report results on extending the cutoff wavelength of midwave barrier infrared detectors by incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the active area of the detector. Using this approach, we were able to extend the detector cutoff wavelength to 6 ?m, allowing the coverage of the full midwave infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD) shows infrared response at temperatures up to 225 K.

  15. The optimal operating temperature of the collector of an irreversible solar-driven refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoxing; Yan, Zijun

    1999-01-01

    A universal irreversible solar-driven refrigerator model is presented, in which not only the irreversibility of heat conduction but also the irreversibilities resulting from the friction, eddies and other irreversible effects inside the working fluid are considered. On the basis of this model and the linear heat-loss model of a solar collector, one of the important parameters, called the optimal operating temperature of the collector of a solar-driven refrigerator, is derived by using the finite-time thermodynamic theory. From the result, the maximum overall coefficient of performance of the refrigerator is determined and some significant problems are discussed. The results obtained here are quite realistic and universal, insofar as all the corresponding results derived by using the reversible and endoreversible models and the model considering only the internal irreversibility cycle can be deduced from them. Thus, they may provide some new theoretical bases for further exploitation of solar-driven refrigerators. Furthermore, some shortcoming in the related literature are pointed out.

  16. OSI-SAF operational NPP/VIIRS sea surface temperature chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Borgne, Pierre; Legendre, Gérard; Marsouin, Anne; Péré, Sonia; Roquet, Hervé

    2013-06-01

    Data of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) have been acquired at Centre de Météorologie Spatiale (CMS) in Lannion (Brittany) in direct readout mode since April 2012. CMS is committed to produce sea surface temperature (SST) products from VIIRS data twice a day over an area covering North-East Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea in the framework of the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI-SAF). A cloud mask has been developed and cloud mask control techniques have been implemented. SST algorithms have been defined, as well as quality level attribution rules. Since mid October 2012 a VIIRS SST chain, similar to that used for processing METOP AVHRR has been run in a preoperational mode. The corresponding bias and standard deviation against drifting buoy measurements (mid October 2012 to mid March 2013) are -0.05 and 0.37 K for nighttime and -0.13 and 0.46 K for daytime, respectively. VIIRS derived SST production is expected operational by mid 2013. The OSI-SAF VIIRS derived SST products are compliant with the Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) GDS V2.0 format.

  17. Photodetector development at Fraunhofer IAF: From LWIR to SWIR operating from cryogenic close to room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daumer, V.; Gramich, V.; Müller, R.; Schmidt, J.; Rutz, F.; Stadelmann, T.; Wörl, A.; Rehm, R.

    2017-02-01

    Photodetectors in the non-visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum are essential for security, defense and space science as well as industrial and scientific applications. The research activities at Fraunhofer IAF cover a broad range in the infrared (IR) regime. Whereas short-wavelength IR (SWIR, <1.7 μm) detectors are realized by InGaAs/InP structures, InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice (T2SL) infrared detectors are developed for the spectral bands from mid- (MWIR, 3-5 μm) to long-wavelength IR (LWIR, 8-12 μm). We report on the extension of the superlattice empirical pseudopotential method (SEPM) to 300 K for the design of LWIR heterostructures for operation near room temperature. Recently, we have also adapted heterostructure concepts to our well established bi-spectral T2SL MWIR detector resulting in a dark current density below 2 × 10-9 A/cm2 for a cut-off wavelength close to 5 μm. Finally, we present first results obtained with a gated viewing system based on our InGaAs/InAlAs/InP avalanche photodiode arrays.

  18. Variation of ADM1 by using temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) operation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Yeol; Suh, Chang-Won; Ahn, Yong-Tae; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) developed by the IWA task group for mathematical modelling of anaerobic process. Lab-scale temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) process were operated continuously, and were fed with co-substrate composed of dog food and flour. The model platform implemented in the simulation was a derivative of the ADM1. Sensitivity analysis showed that k(m.process) (maximum specific uptake rate) and K(S.process) (half saturation value) had high sensitivities to model components. Important parameters including maximum uptake rate for propionate utilisers (k(m.pro)) and half saturation constant for acetate utilisers (K(S.ac)) in the thermophilic digester and maximum uptake rate for acetate utilisers (k(m.ac)) in the mesophilic digester were estimated using iterative methods, which optimized the parameters with experimental results. Simulation with estimated parameters showed good agreement with experimental results in the case of methane production, uptake of acetate, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD). Under these conditions, the model predicted reasonably well the dynamic behavior of the TPAD process for verifying the model.

  19. High Operating Temperature Midwave Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The nBn or XBn barrier infrared detector has the advantage of reduced dark current resulting from suppressed Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and surface leakage. High performance detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InAsSb absorber lattice matched to GaSb substrate, with a matching AlAsSb unipolar electron barrier, have been demonstrated. The band gap of lattice-matched InAsSb yields a detector cutoff wavelength of approximately 4.2 ??m when operating at 150K. We report results on extending the cutoff wavelength of midwave barrier infrared detectors by incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the active area of the detector. Using this approach, we were able to extend the detector cutoff wavelength to 6 ?m, allowing the coverage of the full midwave infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD) shows infrared response at temperatures up to 225 K.

  20. Single-ion polymer electrolyte membranes enable lithium-ion batteries with a broad operating temperature range.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weiwei; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Jing; Sun, Yubao; Cheng, Hansong

    2014-04-01

    Conductive processes involving lithium ions are analyzed in detail from a mechanistic perspective, and demonstrate that single ion polymeric electrolyte (SIPE) membranes can be used in lithium-ion batteries with a wide operating temperature range (25-80 °C) through systematic optimization of electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces, in sharp contrast to other batteries equipped with SIPE membranes that display appreciable operability only at elevated temperatures (>60 °C). The performance is comparable to that of batteries using liquid electrolyte of inorganic salt, and the batteries exhibit excellent cycle life and rate performance. This significant widening of battery operation temperatures coupled with the inherent flexibility and robustness of the SIPE membranes makes it possible to develop thin and flexible Li-ion batteries for a broad range of applications.