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Sample records for moderately halophilic bacteria

  1. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  2. Response surface method optimization of ectoine fermentation medium with moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. T.; Qu, A.; Yuan, X. N.; Tan, F. X.; Li, X. W.; Wang, T.; Zhang, L. H.

    2017-07-01

    Moderate halophilic bacteria are of halophilic bacteria whose suitable growth of NaCl is 5-10%. When the moderate halophilic bacteria response to high osmotic stress, the intracellular will synthesize small organic molecule compatible solutes. Ectoine, which is the major synthetic osmotic compatible solutes for moderate halophilic bacteria, can help microbial enzymes, nucleic acids and the whole cell resist to hypertonic, high temperature, freezing and other inverse environment. In order to increase the Ectoine production of Moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02, the Ectoine fermentation medium component was optimized by Plackett-Burman (PB) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on the principle of non-complete equilibrium The results of PB experiments showed that the three main influencing factors of Moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02 synthesis Ectoine culture medium were C5H8NNaO4 concentration, NaCl concentration and initial pH. According to the center point of the steepest climbing experiment, the central combination design experiment was used to show that the model is consistent with the actual situation. The optimum combination of three influencing factors were C5H8NNaO4 41 g/L, NaCl 87.2 g/L and initial pH 5.9, and the predicted amount of Ectoine was 1835.8 mg/L, increased by 41.6%.

  3. Transposon-mediated random gene disruption with moderate halophilic bacteria and its application for halophilic bacterial siderophore analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Nishino, Tomohiko

    2016-12-01

    Analytical conditions using chromo azurol S was validated for quantification of siderophore in aqueous samples, followed by the characterization of siderophore derived from newly isolated moderately halophilic bacteria. Conditions with good linearity between the absorbance and the siderophore concentration were obtained at a siderophore concentration less than 20 µM, in the wavelength range between 630 and 660 nm with developing time for at least 2 h. Of the halophilic bacteria isolated from Tunisian soil, Halomonas sp., namely strain 21a was selected as siderophore producing halophiles. The strain produced siderophore significantly in the absence of iron in minimal medium. Siderophore-deficient mutant, namely IIa10, of the strain 21a was obtained from gene disruptant library constructed using transposon complex by electroporation. Genomic sequence analysis of the mutant IIa10 revealed that the transposon-inserted gene was TonB-dependent receptor. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Growth of moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from sea water using phenol as the sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, J A; Pérez-Esteban, B; Esteban, M; de la Escalera, S; Gómez, M A; Martínez-Toledo, M V; González-López, J

    2001-01-01

    Moderately halophilic bacteria utilizing phenol as the sole carbon source were isolated by selective enrichment from sea water. The isolate (Gram-negative motile rods) was identified as Deleya venusta. It grew well in the presence of up to 1600 mg/L of phenol and 8% NaCl under aerobic conditions. When the cells were treated with chloramphenicol prior to the addition of phenol they did not utilize added phenol, even after prolonged incubation. Thus, the enzymes necessary for phenol metabolism appeared to be inducible.

  5. Salinity, pressure and heavy-metal stress response of moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from hydrothermal-vent environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, J. Z.; Baross, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    Moderately halophilic bacteria comprised 0.01-10% of the total microbial community in low-temperature hydrothermal emissions and in the overlying water column. The presence of these microorganisms was initially thought to be linked to brines that are produced by super-critical phase separation beneath deep-sea mid-ocean ridges. While there is conclusive evidence that these brines exist at extremely hot (>400°C) temperatures, it is difficult to construct geochemical and fluid-flow models which would delineate extensive subseafloor brine environments in mesophilic to hyperthermophilic temperature ranges. An alternative hypothesis is that halotolerance is actually induced by an environmental stress other than salt. Pressure and heavy metals are likely candidates. Diffuse flow environments at Axial Seamount and the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and along the Southern East Pacific Rise are both elevated in concentrations of heavy metals and under moderate pressure (150-270 atm; higher beneath the seafloor). From these fluids we isolated numerous strains of moderately halophilic bacteria belonging to the genera Halomonas and Marinobacter. At ambient pressure, isolates grew between -1 and 40°C, with up to 25% NaCl, and with 2.0-3.0 mM cadmium. The isolates displayed widely varying pressure maxima and cell yields as a function of temperature and salinity. High pressure and salt (and heavy metals?) may independently induce a stress response that enables these bacteria to cope with all of these stresses. Also in progress are molecular-phylogenetic analyses of moderately halophilic bacterial populations from diffuse flow sites along the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We expect that many of the organisms detected using our novel primers will have been cultured. With the knowledge of their physiologies and how their diversity changes in relation to fluid chemistry, these data may shed light on the dynamic subseafloor hydrothermal system that supports them.

  6. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  7. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  8. Precipitation of minerals by 22 species of moderately halophilic bacteria in artificial marine salts media: influence of salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneyra, M A; Delgado, R; Párraga, J; Ramos-Cormenza, A; Delgado, G

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation of minerals was shown by 22 species of moderately halophilic bacteria in both solid and liquid artificial marine salts media at different concentration and different Mg2+-to-Ca2+ ratio. Precipitation of minerals was observed for all the bacteria used. When salt concentration increased, the quantity and the size of bioliths decreased, the time required for precipitation being increased. The precipitated minerals were calcite, magnesian calcite, aragonite, dolomite, monohydrocalcite, hydromagnesite and struvite in variable proportions, depending on the bacterial species, the salinity and the physical state of the medium; the Mg content of the magnesian calcite also varied according to the same parameters. The precipitated minerals do not correspond exactly to those which could be precipitated inorganically according to the saturation indices. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the formation of the bioliths is initiated by grouping of calcified cells and that the dominant final morphologies were spherulitic with fibrous radiated interiors. It was demonstrated that moderately halophilic bacteria play an active role in the precipitation of carbonates and we hypothesize about this process of biomineralization.

  9. Diversity and phylogeny of the ectoine biosynthesis genes in aerobic, moderately halophilic methylotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina; Lidstrom, Mary; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-11-01

    The genes of ectoine biosynthesis pathway were identified in six species of aerobic, slightly halophilic bacteria utilizing methane, methanol or methylamine. Two types of ectoine gene cluster organization were revealed in the methylotrophs. The gene cluster ectABC coding for diaminobutyric acid (DABA) acetyltransferase (EctA), DABA aminotransferase (EctB) and ectoine synthase (EctC) was found in methanotrophs Methylobacter marinus 7C and Methylomicrobium kenyense AMO1(T). In methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum ML1, methanol-utilizers Methylophaga thalassica 33146(T) , Methylophaga alcalica M8 and methylamine-utilizer Methylarcula marina h1(T), the genes forming the ectABC-ask operon are preceded by ectR, encoding a putative transcriptional regulatory protein EctR. Phylogenetic relationships of the Ect proteins do not correlate with phylogenetic affiliation of the strains, thus implying that the ability of methylotrophs to produce ectoine is most likely the result of a horizontal transfer event.

  10. Carotenoids' production from halophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Moreno, María; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids have received considerable attention due to their interesting industrial applications and, more importantly, their potential beneficial effects on human health. Halophiles comprise a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that need salts for optimal growth. The pigments produced by these halophilic organisms comprise phytoene, β-carotene, lycopene, derivatives of bacterioruberin, and salinixanthin. Here, we describe the procedure to obtain salinixanthin from the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber. Additionally, we describe the expression of the β-carotene biosynthetic genes crtE, crtY, crtI, and crtB from Pantoea agglomerans in the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata obtaining a strain able to produce practically pure β-carotene. Thus, the use of these halophilic microorganisms as a source of carotenoids constitutes an important commercial alternative in the production of carotenoids from biological sources.

  11. Recombinant expression in moderate halophiles.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masao; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko

    2010-04-01

    A novel expression of recombinant proteins was developed using moderate halophiles that accumulate osmolytes and hence provide cytoplasmic environments where osmolyte-driven folding can take place. Promoters and selection marker were developed for high expression of foreign proteins. Examples are given for expression of bacterial nucleoside diphosphate kinase and human serine racemase.

  12. Moderate halophilic bacteria colonizing the phylloplane of halophytes of the subfamily Salicornioideae (Amaranthaceae).

    PubMed

    Mora-Ruiz, Merit del Rocío; Font-Verdera, Francisca; Díaz-Gil, Carlos; Urdiain, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Valdecantos, Gustavo; González, Bernardo; Orfila, Alejandro; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2015-09-01

    Halophytes accumulate large amounts of salt in their tissues, and thus are susceptible to colonization by halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms that might be relevant for the growth and development of the plant. Here, the study of 814 cultured strains and 14,189 sequences obtained by 454 pyrosequencing were combined in order to evaluate the presence, abundance and diversity of halophilic, endophytic and epiphytic microorganisms in the phytosphere of leaves of members of the subfamily Salicornioideae from five locations in Spain and Chile. Cultures were screened by the tandem approach of MALDI-TOF/MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, differential centrifugation was used to enrich endophytes for further DNA isolation, 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing. Culturable and non-culturable data showed strong agreement with a predominance of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The most abundant isolates corresponded to close relatives of the species Chromohalobacter canadensis and Salinicola halophilus that comprised nearly 60% of all isolates and were present in all plants. Up to 66% of the diversity retrieved by pyrosequencing could be brought into pure cultures and the community structures were highly dependent on the compartment where the microorganisms thrived (plant surface or internal tissues). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Are extreme halophiles actually "bacteria"?

    PubMed

    Magrum, L J; Luehrsen, K R; Woese, C R

    1978-05-12

    Comparative cataloging of the 16SrRNA of Halobacterium halobium indicates that the organism did not arise, as a halophilic adaptation, from some typical bacterium. Rather, H. halobium is a member of the Archaebacteria, an ancient group of organisms that are no more related to typical bacteria than they are to eucaryotes.

  14. Are extreme halophiles actually 'bacteria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magrum, L. J.; Luehrsen, K. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Comparative cataloging of the 16S rRNA of Halobacterium halobium indicates that the organism did not arise, as a halophilic adaptation, from some typical bacterium. Rather, H. halobium is a member of the Archaebacteria, an ancient group of organisms that are no more related to typical bacteria than they are to eucaryotes.

  15. Screening and isolation of halophilic bacteria producing industrially important enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Karan, Ram; Kapoor, Sanjay; S P, Singh; S K, Khare

    2012-10-01

    Halophiles are excellent sources of enzymes that are not only salt stable but also can withstand and carry out reactions efficiently under extreme conditions. The aim of the study was to isolate and study the diversity among halophilic bacteria producing enzymes of industrial value. Screening of halophiles from various saline habitats of India led to isolation of 108 halophilic bacteria producing industrially important hydrolases (amylases, lipases and proteases). Characterization of 21 potential isolates by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene analysis found them related to Marinobacter, Virgibacillus, Halobacillus, Geomicrobium, Chromohalobacter, Oceanobacillus, Bacillus, Halomonas and Staphylococcus genera. They belonged to moderately halophilic group of bacteria exhibiting salt requirement in the range of 3-20%. There is significant diversity among halophiles from saline habitats of India. Preliminary characterization of crude hydrolases established them to be active and stable under more than one extreme condition of high salt, pH, temperature and presence of organic solvents. It is concluded that these halophilic isolates are not only diverse in phylogeny but also in their enzyme characteristics. Their enzymes may be potentially useful for catalysis under harsh operational conditions encountered in industrial processes. The solvent stability among halophilic enzymes seems a generic novel feature making them potentially useful in non-aqueous enzymology.

  16. Screening and isolation of halophilic bacteria producing industrially important enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumit; Karan, Ram; Kapoor, Sanjay; S.P., Singh; S.K., Khare

    2012-01-01

    Halophiles are excellent sources of enzymes that are not only salt stable but also can withstand and carry out reactions efficiently under extreme conditions. The aim of the study was to isolate and study the diversity among halophilic bacteria producing enzymes of industrial value. Screening of halophiles from various saline habitats of India led to isolation of 108 halophilic bacteria producing industrially important hydrolases (amylases, lipases and proteases). Characterization of 21 potential isolates by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene analysis found them related to Marinobacter, Virgibacillus, Halobacillus, Geomicrobium, Chromohalobacter, Oceanobacillus, Bacillus, Halomonas and Staphylococcus genera. They belonged to moderately halophilic group of bacteria exhibiting salt requirement in the range of 3–20%. There is significant diversity among halophiles from saline habitats of India. Preliminary characterization of crude hydrolases established them to be active and stable under more than one extreme condition of high salt, pH, temperature and presence of organic solvents. It is concluded that these halophilic isolates are not only diverse in phylogeny but also in their enzyme characteristics. Their enzymes may be potentially useful for catalysis under harsh operational conditions encountered in industrial processes. The solvent stability among halophilic enzymes seems a generic novel feature making them potentially useful in non-aqueous enzymology. PMID:24031991

  17. Heavy metal resistance in halophilic Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Voica, Doriana Mădălina; Bartha, Laszlo; Banciu, Horia Leonard; Oren, Aharon

    2016-07-01

    Heavy metals are dense chemicals with dual biological role as micronutrients and intoxicants. A few hypersaline environmental systems are naturally enriched with heavy metals, while most metal-contaminated sites are a consequence of human activities. Numerous halotolerant and moderately halophilic Bacteria possess metal tolerance, whereas a few archaeal counterparts share similar features. The main mechanisms underlying heavy metal resistance in halophilic Bacteria and Archaea include extracellular metal sequestration by biopolymers, metal efflux mediated by specific transporters and enzymatic detoxification. Biotransformation of metals by halophiles has implications both for trace metal turnover in natural saline ecosystems and for development of novel bioremediation strategies. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Halobacillus profundi sp. nov. and Halobacillus kuroshimensis sp. nov., moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from a deep-sea methane cold seep.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ngoc-Phuc; Kanekiyo, Atsuko; Fujikura, Katsunori; Yasuda, Hisato; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2007-06-01

    Two Gram-positive, rod-shaped, moderately halophilic bacteria were isolated from a deep-sea carbonate rock at a methane cold seep in Kuroshima Knoll, Japan. These bacteria, strains IS-Hb4(T) and IS-Hb7(T), were spore-forming and non-motile. They were able to grow at temperatures as low as 9 degrees C and hydrostatic pressures up to 30 MPa. Based on high sequence similarity of their 16S rRNA genes to those of type strains of the genus Halobacillus, from 96.4 % (strain IS-Hb7(T) to Halobacillus halophilus NCIMB 9251(T)) to 99.4 % (strain IS-Hb4(T) to Halobacillus dabanensis D-8(T)), the strains were shown to belong to this genus. DNA-DNA relatedness values of 49.5 % and 1.0-33.0 %, respectively, were determined between strains IS-Hb4(T) and IS-Hb7(T) and between these strains and other Halobacillus type strains. Both strains showed the major menaquinone MK7 and L-orn-D-Asp cell-wall peptidoglycan type. Straight-chain C(16 : 0), unsaturated C(16 : 1)omega7c alcohol and C(18 : 1)omega7c and cyclopropane C(19 : 0) cyc fatty acids were predominant in both strains. The DNA G+C contents of IS-Hb4(T) and IS-Hb7(T) were respectively 43.3 and 42.1 mol%. Physiological and biochemical analyses combined with DNA-DNA hybridization results allowed us to place strains IS-Hb4(T) (=JCM 14154(T)=DSM 18394(T)) and IS-Hb7(T) (=JCM 14155(T)=DSM 18393(T)) in the genus Halobacillus as the respective type strains of the novel species Halobacillus profundi sp. nov. and Halobacillus kuroshimensis sp. nov.

  19. EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON THE MODERATE HALOPHILE HALOMONAS ELONGATA AND THE EXTREME HALOPHILE HALOBACTERIUM SALINARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both the moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas elongata, and the extremely halophilic archaea, Halobacterium salinarum, can be found in hypersaline environments (e.g., salterns). On complex media, H. elongata grows over a salt range of 0.05-5.2 M, whereas, H. salinarum multi...

  20. EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON THE MODERATE HALOPHILE HALOMONAS ELONGATA AND THE EXTREME HALOPHILE HALOBACTERIUM SALINARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both the moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas elongata, and the extremely halophilic archaea, Halobacterium salinarum, can be found in hypersaline environments (e.g., salterns). On complex media, H. elongata grows over a salt range of 0.05-5.2 M, whereas, H. salinarum multi...

  1. Halophilic bacteria as a source of novel hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Moreno, María; Pérez, Dolores; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2013-01-10

    Hydrolases constitute a class of enzymes widely distributed in nature from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. The halotolerance of many enzymes derived from halophilic bacteria can be exploited wherever enzymatic transformations are required to function under physical and chemical conditions, such as in the presence of organic solvents and extremes in temperature and salt content. In recent years, different screening programs have been performed in saline habitats in order to isolate and characterize novel enzymatic activities with different properties to those of conventional enzymes. Several halophilic hydrolases have been described, including amylases, lipases and proteases, and then used for biotechnological applications. Moreover, the discovery of biopolymer-degrading enzymes offers a new solution for the treatment of oilfield waste, where high temperature and salinity are typically found, while providing valuable information about heterotrophic processes in saline environments. In this work, we describe the results obtained in different screening programs specially focused on the diversity of halophiles showing hydrolytic activities in saline and hypersaline habitats, including the description of enzymes with special biochemical properties. The intracellular lipolytic enzyme LipBL, produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus, showed advantages over other lipases, being an enzyme active over a wide range of pH values and temperatures. The immobilized LipBL derivatives obtained and tested in regio- and enantioselective reactions, showed an excellent behavior in the production of free polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). On the other hand, the extremely halophilic bacterium, Salicola marasensis sp. IC10 showing lipase and protease activities, was studied for its ability to produce promising enzymes in terms of its resistance to temperature and salinity.

  2. Halophilic Bacteria as a Source of Novel Hydrolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    de Lourdes Moreno, María; Pérez, Dolores; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolases constitute a class of enzymes widely distributed in nature from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. The halotolerance of many enzymes derived from halophilic bacteria can be exploited wherever enzymatic transformations are required to function under physical and chemical conditions, such as in the presence of organic solvents and extremes in temperature and salt content. In recent years, different screening programs have been performed in saline habitats in order to isolate and characterize novel enzymatic activities with different properties to those of conventional enzymes. Several halophilic hydrolases have been described, including amylases, lipases and proteases, and then used for biotechnological applications. Moreover, the discovery of biopolymer-degrading enzymes offers a new solution for the treatment of oilfield waste, where high temperature and salinity are typically found, while providing valuable information about heterotrophic processes in saline environments. In this work, we describe the results obtained in different screening programs specially focused on the diversity of halophiles showing hydrolytic activities in saline and hypersaline habitats, including the description of enzymes with special biochemical properties. The intracellular lipolytic enzyme LipBL, produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus, showed advantages over other lipases, being an enzyme active over a wide range of pH values and temperatures. The immobilized LipBL derivatives obtained and tested in regio- and enantioselective reactions, showed an excellent behavior in the production of free polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). On the other hand, the extremely halophilic bacterium, Salicola marasensis sp. IC10 showing lipase and protease activities, was studied for its ability to produce promising enzymes in terms of its resistance to temperature and salinity. PMID:25371331

  3. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  4. Halomonas gomseomensis sp. nov., Halomonas janggokensis sp. nov., Halomonas salaria sp. nov. and Halomonas denitrificans sp. nov., moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from saline water.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Kyu; Jin, Long; Yang, Hee Chan; Lee, Sung-Taik

    2007-04-01

    A total of 34 Halomonas strains were isolated from saline water in Anmyeondo, Korea. Ten of these strains, considered to belong to novel species, were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic investigation. The strains were Gram-negative, moderately halophilic, motile and non-spore-forming rods that contained Q-9 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0) and either summed feature 4 (C(16 : 1)omega7c/C(15 : 0) iso 2-OH) or C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c as the major fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, showed that the ten isolates formed four separate lineages in the genus Halomonas. Combined phenotypic data and DNA-DNA hybridization data supported the conclusion that they represent four novel species in the genus Halomonas, for which the names Halomonas gomseomensis sp. nov. (type strain M12(T)=KCTC 12662(T)=DSM 18042(T)), Halomonas janggokensis sp. nov. (type strain M24(T)=KCTC 12663(T)=DSM 18043(T)), Halomonas salaria sp. nov. (type strain M27(T)=KCTC 12664(T)=DSM 18044(T)) and Halomonas denitrificans sp. nov. (type strain M29(T)=KCTC 12665(T)=DSM 18045(T)) are proposed.

  5. Salt-dependent properties of proteins from extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Based on information concerning the interaction of salts and macromolecules the literature of the enzymes of halophilic bacteria and their constituents is examined. Although in halophilic systems the salt requirement of enzyme activity is variable the enzymes investigated show a time-dependent inactivation at lower salt concentrations especially in the absence of salt. The studies described show that in some halophilic systems the effect of salt may be restricted to a small region on the protein molecule. The concept of the hydrophobic bond to consider certain solvent-dependent phenomena is introduced. It is shown that some halophilic enzymes are unable to maintain their structure without the involvement of hydrophobic interactions that are usually not supported by water. A table lists indices of hydrophobicity and polarity for various halophilic and nonhalophilic proteins.

  6. Salt-dependent properties of proteins from extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Based on information concerning the interaction of salts and macromolecules the literature of the enzymes of halophilic bacteria and their constituents is examined. Although in halophilic systems the salt requirement of enzyme activity is variable the enzymes investigated show a time-dependent inactivation at lower salt concentrations especially in the absence of salt. The studies described show that in some halophilic systems the effect of salt may be restricted to a small region on the protein molecule. The concept of the hydrophobic bond to consider certain solvent-dependent phenomena is introduced. It is shown that some halophilic enzymes are unable to maintain their structure without the involvement of hydrophobic interactions that are usually not supported by water. A table lists indices of hydrophobicity and polarity for various halophilic and nonhalophilic proteins.

  7. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  8. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  9. Magnesium and manganese content of halophilic bacteria. [Halobaterium cutirubrum; Escherichia coli; Halobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    de Medicis, E.; Paquette, J.; Gauthier, J.J.; Shapcott, D.

    1986-09-01

    Magnesium and manganese contents were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in bacteria of several halophilic levels, in Vibrio costicola, a moderately halophilic eubacterium growing in 1 M NaCl, Halobacterium volcanii, a halophilic archaebacterium growing in 2.5 NaCl, Halobacterium cutirubrum, an extremely halophilic archaebacterium growing in 4 M NaCl, and Escherichia coli, a nonhalophilic eubacterium growing in 0.17 M NaCl. Magnesium and manganese contents varied with the growth phase, being maximal at the early log phase. Magnesium and manganese molalities in cell water were shown to increase with the halophilic character of the logarithmically growing bacteria, from 30 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 0.37 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for E. coli to 102 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 1.6 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for H cutirubrum. The intracellular concentrations of manganese were determined independently by a radioactive tracer technique in V. costicola and H. volcanii. The values obtained by /sup 54/Mn loading represented about 70% of the values obtained by atomic absorption. The increase of magnesium and manganese contents associated with the halophilic character of the bacteria suggests that manganese and magnesium play a role in haloadaptation.

  10. Diversity of culturable halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Lysenko, Anatoly M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2006-10-01

    Unexpectedly high culturable diversity of moderately and extremely halophilic obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was discovered in the sediments of various hypersaline habitats, including chloride-sulfate lakes in Mongolia, Russia and Ukraine, a sea saltern in Slovenia and a deep-sea salt brine from the Mediterranean. Six different groups of halophilic SOB, including four new genera, all belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, were found. Two groups of moderately halophilic strictly aerobic SOB dominated at 2 M NaCl, including representatives of the genus Halothiobacillus (in fully aerobic conditions) and Thiomicrospira (in micro-oxic conditions). Under denitrifying conditions at 2 M NaCl, a group of moderately halophilic and facultatively anaerobic SOB was selected, capable of complete denitrification of nitrate. The group represents a new genus with closest relatives among as yet undescribed marine thiodenitrifying isolates. With thiocyanate as a substrate, an enrichment culture at 2 M NaCl yielded a pure culture of moderately halophilic SOB capable of aerobic growth with thiocyanate and thiosulfate at up to 4 M NaCl. Furthermore, this bacterium also grew anaerobically using nitrite as electron acceptor. It formed a new lineage distantly related to the genus Thiomicrospira. Enrichments at 4 M NaCl resulted in the domination of two different, previously unknown, groups of extremely halophilic SOB. Under oxic conditions, they were represented by strictly aerobic spiral-shaped bacteria, related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae, while under denitrifying conditions a group of facultatively anaerobic nitrate-reducing bacteria with long rod-shaped cells was selected, distantly related to the genus Acidithiobacillus.

  11. Culturable diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Aarzoo; Ahmad, Irshad; Kim, Seung Bum

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria are commonly found in natural environments containing significant concentration of NaCl such as inland salt lakes and evaporated sea-shore pools, as well as environments such as curing brines, salted food products and saline soils. Dependence on salt is an important phenotypic characteristic of halophilic bacteria, which can be used in the polyphasic characterization of newly discovered microorganisms. In this study the diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils of Daecheon, Chungnam, and Saemangeum, Jeonbuk, was investigated. Two types of media, namely NA and R2A supplemented with 3%, 5%, 9%, 15%, 20% and 30% NaCl were used. More than 200 halophilic bacteria were isolated and BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis was done for the typing of the isolates. The BLAST identification results showed that isolated strains were composed of 4 phyla, Firmicutes (60%), Proteobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (5%) and Actinobacteria (4%). Isolates were affiliated with 16 genera and 36 species. Bacillus was the dominant genus in the phylum Firmicutes, comprising 24% of the total isolates. Halomonas (12%) and Shewanella (12%) were also found as the main genera. These findings show that the foreshore soil of Daecheon Beach and Saemangeum Sea of Korea represents an untapped source of bacterial biodiversity.

  12. Platinum Recovery from Synthetic Extreme Environments by Halophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maes, Synthia; Props, Ruben; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Smet, Rebecca De; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Metal recycling based on urban mining needs to be established to tackle the increasing supply risk of critical metals such as platinum. Presently, efficient strategies are missing for the recovery of platinum from diluted industrial process streams, often characterized by extremely low pHs and high salt concentrations. In this research, halophilic mixed cultures were employed for the biological recovery of platinum (Pt). Halophilic bacteria were enriched from Artemia cysts, living in salt lakes, in different salt matrices (sea salt mixture and NH4Cl; 20-210 g L(-1) salts) and at low to neutral pH (pH 3-7). The main taxonomic families present in the halophilic cultures were Halomonadaceae, Bacillaceae, and Idiomarinaceae. The halophilic cultures were able to recover >98% Pt(II) and >97% Pt(IV) at pH 2 within 3-21 h (4-453 mg Ptrecovered h(-1) g(-1) biomass). X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the reduction to Pt(0) and transmission electron microscopy revealed both intra- and extracellular Pt precipitates, with median diameters of 9-30 nm and 11-13 nm, for Pt(II) and Pt(IV), respectively. Flow cytometric membrane integrity staining demonstrated the preservation of cell viability during platinum recovery. This study demonstrates the Pt recovery potential of halophilic mixed cultures in acidic saline conditions.

  13. How to be moderately halophilic with a broad salt tolerance: Cluesfrom the genome of chromohalobacter salexigens

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, Aharon; Larimer, Frank; Richardson, Paul; Lapidus, Alla; Csonka, Laszlo N.

    2004-07-01

    There are two strategies that enable microorganisms to grow at high salt concentrations. Some groups balance the high osmolality of their environment with high intracellular concentrations of KCl1-4. Adaptation of all intracellular proteins is then necessary, and this is reflected in a large excess of acidic over basic residues and a low content of hydrophobic amino acids 2,5-7. Other halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms keep their intracellular ion concentrations low and synthesize or accumulate organic osmotic solutes 8. While halotolerance enables organisms to colonize highly saline environments,the ecological advantage for a salt-requirement is less obvious. We analyzed the amino acid composition of different categories of proteins of the moderately halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens, as deduced from its genome sequence. Comparison with non-halophilic bacteria shows only a slight excess of acidic residues in the cytoplasmic proteins, no significant differences in membrane-bound components, but a distinctive halophilic signature of predicted periplasmic proteins, such as the substrate binding proteins of ABC-type transport systems. The salt requirement of proteins located external to the cytoplasmic membrane may thus determine salt requirement and salt tolerance of prokaryotes.

  14. Extremely Halophilic Bacteria in Crystallizer Ponds from Solar Salterns

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Amann, Rudolf

    2000-01-01

    It is generally assumed that hypersaline environments with sodium chloride concentrations close to saturation are dominated by halophilic members of the domain Archaea, while Bacteria are not considered to be relevant in this kind of environment. Here, we report the high abundance and growth of a new group of hitherto-uncultured Bacteria in crystallizer ponds (salinity, from 30 to 37%) from multipond solar salterns. In the present study, these Bacteria constituted from 5 to 25% of the total prokaryotic community and were affiliated with the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Growth was demonstrated in saturated NaCl. A provisional classification of this new bacterial group as “Candidatus Salinibacter gen. nov.” is proposed. The perception that Archaea are the only ecologically relevant prokaryotes in hypersaline aquatic environments should be revised. PMID:10877805

  15. Survival of extremely and moderately halophilic isolates of Tunisian solar salterns after UV-B or oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trigui, Hana; Masmoudi, Salma; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Maalej, Sami; Dukan, Sam

    2011-11-01

    Adaptation to a solar saltern environment requires mechanisms providing tolerance not only to salinity but also to UV radiation (UVR) and to reactive oxygen species (ROS). We cultivated prokaryote halophiles from two different salinity ponds: the concentrator M1 pond (240 g·L(-1) NaCl) and the crystallizer TS pond (380 g·L(-1) NaCl). We then estimated UV-B and hydrogen peroxide resistance according to the optimal salt concentration for growth of the isolates. We observed a higher biodiversity of bacterial isolates in M1 than in TS. All strains isolated from TS appeared to be extremely halophilic Archaea from the genus Halorubrum. Culturable strains isolated from M1 included extremely halophilic Archaea (genera Haloferax, Halobacterium, Haloterrigena, and Halorubrum) and moderately halophilic Bacteria (genera Halovibrio and Salicola). We also found that archaeal strains were more resistant than bacterial strains to exposure to ROS and UV-B. All organisms tested were more resistant to UV-B exposure at the optimum NaCl concentration for their growth, which is not always the case for H(2)O(2). Finally, if these results are extended to other prokaryotes present in a solar saltern, we could speculate that UVR has greater impact than ROS on the control of prokaryote biodiversity in a solar saltern.

  16. Assessing the Pathogenicity of Halophilic Vibrio Bacteria and Other Mircroorganisms for Mammals Held in Captivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-22

    U2 ftSESSINO THE PATHOGENICITY ’OF HALOPHILIC V’lRIO- CTriT ADOHRIRR.) AA UVHOLHATER RESOURCES ESEARCH CENTER A S JUJI R 22 FES SgWC jFIEO, NW4-14-K...Classification) [l Assessing the Pathogenecity of Halophilic Vibrio Bacteria and Other Niicroorganisms for M1arine M0ammals Held in Captivity 12...0381 CONTRACT TITLE: Assessing the Pathogenicity of Halophilic Vibrio Bacteria and Other Microorganisms for Marine Mammals Held in Captivity PRINCIPAL

  17. Unique amino acid composition of proteins in halophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Satoshi; Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Wakayama, Mamoru; Moriguchi, Mitsuaki; Nishikawa, Ken

    2003-03-21

    The amino acid compositions of proteins from halophilic archaea were compared with those from non-halophilic mesophiles and thermophiles, in terms of the protein surface and interior, on a genome-wide scale. As we previously reported for proteins from thermophiles, a biased amino acid composition also exists in halophiles, in which an abundance of acidic residues was found on the protein surface as compared to the interior. This general feature did not seem to depend on the individual protein structures, but was applicable to all proteins encoded within the entire genome. Unique protein surface compositions are common in both halophiles and thermophiles. Statistical tests have shown that significant surface compositional differences exist among halophiles, non-halophiles, and thermophiles, while the interior composition within each of the three types of organisms does not significantly differ. Although thermophilic proteins have an almost equal abundance of both acidic and basic residues, a large excess of acidic residues in halophilic proteins seems to be compensated by fewer basic residues. Aspartic acid, lysine, asparagine, alanine, and threonine significantly contributed to the compositional differences of halophiles from meso- and thermophiles. Among them, however, only aspartic acid deviated largely from the expected amount estimated from the dinucleotide composition of the genomic DNA sequence of the halophile, which has an extremely high G+C content (68%). Thus, the other residues with large deviations (Lys, Ala, etc.) from their non-halophilic frequencies could have arisen merely as "dragging effects" caused by the compositional shift of the DNA, which would have changed to increase principally the fraction of aspartic acid alone.

  18. Growth of Vibrio costicola and other moderate halophiles in a chemically defined minimal medium.

    PubMed

    Kamekura, M; Wallace, R; Hipkiss, A R; Kushner, D J

    1985-09-01

    A simple chemically defined minimal medium consisting of sodium glutamate, glucose, vitamins, and salts was devised to support growth of the moderate halophile, Vibrio costicola, over as wide a range of NaCl concentrations as the complex medium, proteose peptone + tryptone. The lag period at higher NaCl concentrations was longer in the chemically defined minimal medium than in proteose peptone + tryptone. Chemically defined minimal medium also supported the growth of an unidentified moderate halophile, HX, and of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio cholerae. The Mg2+ concentration required for good growth changed with the growth temperature for both V. costicola and HX.

  19. Diversity Analysis and Bioresource Characterization of Halophilic Bacteria Isolated from a South African Saltpan.

    PubMed

    Selvarajan, Ramganesh; Sibanda, Timothy; Tekere, Memory; Nyoni, Hlengilizwe; Meddows-Taylor, Stephen

    2017-04-20

    Though intensive research has been channeled towards the biotechnological applications of halophiles and other extremophilic microbes, these studies have not been, by any means, exhaustive. Saline environments still offer a vast diversity of microbes with potential to produce an array of natural products which can only be unlocked by concerted research efforts. In this study, a combination of culture and molecular approaches were employed to characterize halophilic bacteria from saltpan water samples and profile their potential biotechnological applications. Physicochemical analysis of the water samples showed that pH was alkaline (pH 8.8), with a salinity of 12.8%. 16S rRNA gene targeted amplicon analysis produced 10 bacterial phyla constituting of Bacteroidetes (30.57%), Proteobacteria (15.27%), Actinobacteria (9.05%), Planctomycetes (5.52%) and Cyanobacteria (3.18%). Eighteen strains were identified using sequencing analysis of the culturable bacterial strains. From these, the strains SP7 and SP9 were positive for cellulase production while the strains SP4, SP8 and SP22 were positive for lipase production. Quantitative enzyme assays showed moderate extracellular cellulase activity (1.95 U/mL) and lipase activity (3.71 U/mL) by the isolate SP9 and SP4 respectively. Further, of the six isolates, the isolate SP9 exhibited exploitable potential in the bioremediation of hydrocarbon pollution as demonstrated by its fairly high activity against benzanthracene (70% DCPIP reduction). Elucidation of the isolates secondary metabolites showed the production of the molecules 2,3-butanediol, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl)pyrrole[1,2a]pyrazine-1,4-dione, aziridine, dimethylamine and ethyl acetate (GC-MS) and oxypurinol and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (LC-MS), particularly by the isolate Salinivibrio sp. SP9. Overall, the study showed that the isolated halophiles can produce secondary metabolites with potential industrial and pharmaceutical application.

  20. Diversity of halophilic bacteria isolated from Rambla Salada, Murcia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Luque, Rocío; Béjar, Victoria; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2014-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the diversity of the halophilic bacteria community from Rambla Salada during the years 2006 and 2007. We collected a total of 364 strains, which were then identified by means of phenotypic tests and by the hypervariable V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA sequences (around 500 bp). The ribosomal data showed that the isolates belonged to Proteobacteria (72.5%), Firmicutes (25.8%), Actinobacteria (1.4%), and Bacteroidetes (0.3%) phyla, with Gammaproteobacteria the predominant class. Halomonas was the most abundant genus (41.2% isolates) followed by Marinobacter (12.9% isolates) and Bacillus (12.6% isolates). In addition, 9 strains showed <97% sequence identity with validly described species and may well represent new taxa. The diversity of the bacterial community analyzed with the DOTUR package determined 139 operational taxonomic units at 3% genetic distance level. Rarefaction curves and diversity indexes demonstrated that our collection of isolates adequately represented all the bacterial community at Rambla Salada that can be grown under the conditions used in this work. We found that the sampling season influenced the composition of the bacterial community, and bacterial diversity was higher in 2007; this fact could be related to lower salinity at this sampling time.

  1. Isolation and characterization of halophilic bacteria and archaea from salt ponds in Hangu Saltworks, Tianjin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuangao; Xu, Gaochao; Sui, Liying

    2015-07-01

    A total of 26 isolates were obtained from solar salt ponds of different salinities (100, 150, 200, and 250) in Hangu Saltworks Co. Ltd., Tianjin, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that five bacteria genera Halomonas, Salinicoccus, Oceanobacillus, Gracibacillus, and Salimicrobium and one archaea genera Halorubrum were present. The genus Halomonas was predominant with eight strains distributed in a salinity range of 100-200, followed by Halorubrum with six strains in salinity 250. Based on the genus and original sampling salinity, eight bacterial and two archaeal isolates were selected for further morphological, physiological, and biochemical characterization. All of the bacterial strains were moderately halophilic with the optimal salinity for growth being either 50 or 100, while two archaeal strains were extremely halophilic with an optimal growth salinity of 200. Additionally, we put forth strain SM.200-5 as a new candidate Salimicrobium species based on the phylogenic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and its biochemical characteristics when compared with known related species.

  2. Endospores of halophilic bacteria of the family Bacillaceae isolated from non-saline Japanese soil may be transported by Kosa event (Asian dust storm)

    PubMed Central

    Echigo, Akinobu; Hino, Miki; Fukushima, Tadamasa; Mizuki, Toru; Kamekura, Masahiro; Usami, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Background Generally, extremophiles have been deemed to survive in the extreme environments to which they had adapted to grow. Recently many extremophiles have been isolated from places where they are not expected to grow. Alkaliphilic microorganisms have been isolated from acidic soil samples with pH 4.0, and thermophiles have been isolated from samples of low temperature. Numerous moderately halophilic microorganisms, defined as those that grow optimally in media containing 0.5–2.5 Molar (3–15%) NaCl, and halotolerant microorganisms that are able to grow in media without added NaCl and in the presence of high NaCl have been isolated from saline environments such as salterns, salt lakes and sea sands. It has tacitly been believed that habitats of halophiles able to grow in media containing more than 20% (3.4 M) are restricted to saline environments, and no reports have been published on the isolation of halophiles from ordinary garden soil samples. Results We demonstrated that many halophilic bacteria that are able to grow in the presence of 20% NaCl are inhabiting in non-saline environments such as ordinary garden soils, yards, fields and roadways in an area surrounding Tokyo, Japan. Analyses of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 176 isolates suggested that they were halophiles belonging to genera of the family Bacillaceae, Bacillus (11 isolates), Filobacillus (19 isolates), Gracilibacillus (6 isolates), Halobacillus (102 isolates), Lentibacillus (1 isolate), Paraliobacillus (5 isolates) and Virgibacillus (17 isolates). Sequences of 15 isolates showed similarities less than 92%, suggesting that they may represent novel taxa within the family Bacillaceae. Conclusion The numbers of total bacteria of inland soil samples were in a range from 1.4 × 107/g to 1.1 × 106/g. One tenth of the total bacteria was occupied by endospore-forming bacteria. Only very few of the endospore-forming bacteria, roughly 1 out of 20,000, are halophilic bacteria. Most of the

  3. Characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates accumulated by a moderately halophilic salt pan isolate Bacillus megaterium strain H16.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, B B; Mani, K; Braganca, J M

    2013-05-01

    Characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) accumulated by halophilic bacteria isolated from solar salterns. Twenty-six halophilic isolates were obtained from solar salterns of Goa, India. They were screened for accumulation of PHA by Sudan black B, Nile blue A and Nile red stains. Strains H15, H16 and H26 were selected based on their intensity of Nile blue A/Nile red fluorescence. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characterization, the three isolates were identified as Bacillus megaterium. Growth kinetics and polymer accumulating capacity of strain H16 were studied in E2 mineral media with 2% glucose with/without NaCl. In the absence of NaCl, strain H16 accumulated PHA to 40·0% (w/w) of cell dry weight (CDW) at 42 h of growth, whereas in presence of 5% w/v NaCl, the culture showed longer lag phase of up to 24 h and accumulated a maximum PHA of 39% (w/w) CDW at 54 h of growth. The infrared spectra of both the polymers exhibited peaks at 1733·9 cm(-1) characteristic of C=O. Scans of (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed a doublet at 2·5 ppm corresponding to methylene group (-CH(2)), the signal at 5·3 ppm corresponded to methine group (-CH-), and another signal at 1·3 ppm corresponded to the methyl group (-CH(3)). Scans of (13)C NMR showed prominent peaks at 20, 40, 67-68 and 170 ppm, indicating the polymer to be homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyrates. The polymer is stable up to a temperature of 160°C. Three moderately halophilic isolates (strain H15, H16 and H26) capable of accumulating PHA were isolated from solar salterns of Ribandar Goa, India, and identified as B. megaterium based on phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Strain H16 accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate in the presence and absence of NaCl up to 40% of its CDW. This strain would be better suited for production of PHA at industrial level due to its tolerance to high concentration of NaCl. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Methanotroph Methylohalobius crimeensis Strain 10Ki

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Christine E.; Smirnova, Angela V.; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Bringel, Françoise; Hirayama, Hisako; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Khmelenina, Valentina N.; Klotz, Martin G.; Knief, Claudia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Reshetnikov, Alexander S.; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Shapiro, Nicole; Trotsenko, Yuri A.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Methylohalobius crimeensis strain 10Ki is a moderately halophilic aerobic methanotroph isolated from a hypersaline lake in the Crimean Peninsula, Ukraine. This organism has the highest salt tolerance of any cultured methanotroph. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:26067976

  5. Drastic differences in glycosylation of related S-layer glycoproteins from moderate and extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Mengele, R; Sumper, M

    1992-04-25

    The outer surface of the moderate halophilic archaebacterium Haloferax volcanii (formerly named Halobacterium volcanii) is covered with a hexagonally packed surface (S) layer glycoprotein. The polypeptide (794 amino acid residues) contains 7 N-glycosylation sites. Four of these sites were isolated as glycopeptides and the structure of one of the corresponding saccharides was determined. Oligosaccharides consisting of beta-1,4-linked glucose residues are attached to the protein via the linkage unit asparaginyl-glucose. In the related glycoprotein from the extreme halophile Halobacterium halobium, the glucose residues are replaced by sulfated glucuronic acid residues, causing a drastic increase in surface charge density. This is discussed in terms of a recent model explaining the stability of halophilic proteins.

  6. Biology of halophilic bacteria, Part II. Membrane lipids of extreme halophiles: biosynthesis, function and evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Kates, M

    1993-12-15

    Archaebacteria (archaea) are comprised of three groups of prokaryotes: extreme halophiles, methanogens and thermoacidophiles (extreme thermophiles). Their membrane phospholipids and glycolipids are derived entirely from a saturated, isopranoid glycerol diether, sn-2,3-diphytanylglycerol ('archaeol') and/or its dimer, dibiphytanyldiglyceroltetraether ('caldarchaeol'). In extreme halophiles, the major phospholipid is the archaeol analogue of phosphatidylglycerolmethylphosphate (PGP-Me); the glycolipids are sulfated and/or unsulfated glycosyl archaeols with diverse carbohydrate structure characteristic of taxons on the generic level. Biosynthesis of these archaeol-derived polar lipids occurs in a multienzyme, membrane-bound system that is absolutely dependent on high salt concentration (4 M). The highly complex biosynthetic pathways involve intermediates containing glycerol ether-linked C20-isoprenyl groups which are reduced to phytanyl groups to give the final saturated polar lipids. In methanogens, polar lipids are derived both from archaeol and caldarchaeol, and thermoacidophiles contain essentially only caldarchaeol-derived polar lipids. The function of these membrane polar lipids in maintaining the stability, fluidity and ionic properties of the cell membrane of extreme halophiles, as well as the evolutionary implications of the archaeol and caldarchaeol-derived structures will be discussed.

  7. Workshop on Viability of Halophilic Bacteria in Salt Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The significance of finding viable extreme halophiles in halites associated with Permian-aged sedimentary deposits is considered. Issues related to the microbiology and geochemistry of the halite environment are addressed. Recommendations that related the significance of this phenomenon to NASA's interest in planetary exploration and the early evolution of life are provided.

  8. Role of a moderately halophilic bacterial consortium in the biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Arulazhagan, P; Vasudevan, N

    2009-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous pollutants in the environment, and most high molecular weight PAHs cause mutagenic, teratogenic and potentially carcinogenic effects. While several strains have been identified that degrade PAHs, the present study is focused on the degradation of PAHs in a marine environment by a moderately halophilic bacterial consortium. The bacterial consortium was isolated from a mixture of marine water samples collected from seven different sites in Chennai, India. The low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs phenanthrene and fluorine, and the high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs pyrene and benzo(e)pyrene were selected for the degradation study. The consortium metabolized both LMW and HMW PAHs. The consortium was also able to degrade PAHs present in crude oil-contaminated saline wastewater. The bacterial consortium was able to degrade 80% of HMW PAHs and 100% of LMW PAHs in the saline wastewater. The strains present in the consortium were identified as Ochrobactrum sp., Enterobacter cloacae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This study reveals that these bacteria have the potential to degrade different PAHs in saline wastewater.

  9. The Function of Gas Vesicles in Halophilic Archaeaand Bacteria: Theories and Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2012-01-01

    A few extremely halophilic Archaea (Halobacterium salinarum, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Haloferax mediterranei, Halorubrum vacuolatum, Halogeometricum borinquense, Haloplanus spp.) possess gas vesicles that bestow buoyancy on the cells. Gas vesicles are also produced by the anaerobic endospore-forming halophilic Bacteria Sporohalobacter lortetii and Orenia sivashensis. We have extensive information on the properties of gas vesicles in Hbt. salinarum and Hfx. mediterranei and the regulation of their formation. Different functions were suggested for gas vesicle synthesis: buoying cells towards oxygen-rich surface layers in hypersaline water bodies to prevent oxygen limitation, reaching higher light intensities for the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, positioning the cells optimally for light absorption, light shielding, reducing the cytoplasmic volume leading to a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio (for the Archaea) and dispersal of endospores (for the anaerobic spore-forming Bacteria). Except for Hqr. walsbyi which abounds in saltern crystallizer brines, gas-vacuolate halophiles are not among the dominant life forms in hypersaline environments. There only has been little research on gas vesicles in natural communities of halophilic microorganisms, and the few existing studies failed to provide clear evidence for their possible function. This paper summarizes the current status of the different theories why gas vesicles may provide a selective advantage to some halophilic microorganisms. PMID:25371329

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus succinus Strain CSM-77, a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Triassic Salt Mine

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus succinus strain CSM-77. This moderately halophilic bacterium was isolated from the surface of a halite sample obtained from a Triassic salt mine. PMID:27284152

  11. How-to-Do-It: A Simple DNA Isolation Technique Using Halophilic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Described is a simple technique for isolating DNA from halophilic bacteria. Materials, procedure, and additional experiments are outlined. It is stated that the DNA obtained will be somewhat contaminated with cellular proteins and RNA. Offers a procedure for greater purification. (RT)

  12. How-to-Do-It: A Simple DNA Isolation Technique Using Halophilic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Described is a simple technique for isolating DNA from halophilic bacteria. Materials, procedure, and additional experiments are outlined. It is stated that the DNA obtained will be somewhat contaminated with cellular proteins and RNA. Offers a procedure for greater purification. (RT)

  13. Heavy metal tolerant halophilic bacteria from Vembanad Lake as possible source for bioremediation of lead and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, M; Rejula, M P; Rejith, P G; Mohan, Mahesh; Karuppiah, Makesh; Hatha, A A Mohamed

    2014-07-01

    Microorganisms which can resist high concentration of toxic heavy metals are often considered as effective tools of bioremediation from such pollutants. In the present study, sediment samples from Vembanad Lake were screened for the presence of halophilic bacteria that are tolerant to heavy metals. A total of 35 bacterial strains belonging to different genera such as Alcaligenes, Vibrio, Kurthia, Staphylococcus and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were isolated from 21 sediment samples during February to April, 2008. The salt tolerance and optimum salt concentrations of the isolates revealed that most of them were moderate halophiles followed by halotolerant and extremely halotolerant groups. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against cadmium and lead for each isolate revealed that the isolates showed higher MIC against lead than cadmium. Based on the resistance limit concentration, most of them were more tolerant to lead than cadmium at all the three salt concentrations tested. Heavy metal removal efficiency of selected isolates showed a maximum reduction of 37 and 99% against cadmium and lead respectively. The study reveals the future prospects of halophilic microorganisms in the field of bioremediation.

  14. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-03-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C{sup α} r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior

  15. The amino acid composition of proteins from anaerobic halophilic bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales.

    PubMed

    Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Oren, Aharon

    2012-05-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of the genome sequences of three anaerobic halophilic fermentative bacteria belonging to the order Halanaerobiales: Halanaerobium praevalens, the alkaliphilic "Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans", and the thermophilic Halothermothrix orenii to assess the amino acid composition of their proteins. Members of the Halanaerobiales were earlier shown to accumulate KCl rather than organic compatible solutes for osmotic balance, and therefore the presence of a dominantly acidic proteome was predicted. Past reports indeed showed a large excess of acidic over basic amino acids in whole-cell hydrolysates of selected members of the order. However, the genomic analysis did not show unusually high contents of acidic amino acids or low contents of basic amino acids. The apparent excess of acidic amino acids in these anaerobic halophiles reported earlier is due to the high content in their proteins of glutamine and asparagine, which yield glutamate and aspartate upon acid hydrolysis. It is thus suggested that the proteins of the Halanaerobiales, which are active in the presence of high intracellular KCl concentrations, do not possess the typical acidic signature of the 'halophilic' proteins of the Archaea of the order Halobacteriales or of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter.

  16. Actinide biocolloid formation in brine by halophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1998-12-31

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  17. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  18. ACTINIDE BIOCOLLOID FORMATION IN BRINE BY HALOPHILIC BACTERIA

    SciTech Connect

    GILLOW,J.B.; FRANCIS,A.J.; DODGE,C.J.; HARRIS,R.; BEVERIDGE,T.J.; BRADY,P.B.; PAPENGUTH,H.W.

    1998-11-09

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  19. Distribution and diversity of halophilic bacteria in a subsurface salt formation.

    PubMed

    Vreeland, R H; Piselli, A F; McDonnough, S; Meyers, S S

    1998-08-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a salt mine constructed 650 meters below the ground surface by the United States Department of Energy. The facility will be used for permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. This underground repository has been constructed in the geologically stable Permian age Salado salt formation. Of the wastes to be placed into the facility, 85% will be biodegradable cellulose. A 3-year survey of the bacterial populations existing within the facility was conducted. Bacterial populations were found to be heterogeneously distributed throughout the mine. Populations in some mine areas reached as high as 1.0 x 10(4) colony-forming units per gram of NaCl. The heterogeneous distribution of bacteria within the mine did not follow any recognizable pattern related to either age of the workings or to human activity. A biochemical comparison between ten known species of halophilic bacteria, and strains isolated from both the mine and nearby surface hypersaline lakes, showed the presence of extreme halophiles with wide biochemical diversity, some of which could prove to represent previously undescribed groups. The halophilic bacteria isolated from the mine were found to degrade cellulose and a wide variety of other carbon compounds. When exposed to two types of common laboratory paper, the cellulose-degrading halophiles attached to the substrate within 30 minutes of inoculation. Cultures enriched directly from a brine seep in the mine easily destroyed both papers and produced detectable amounts of oxalacetic and pyruvic acids. The combination of heterogeneity in the distribution of organisms, the presence of a physiologically diverse community, and the relatively slow metabolism of cellulose may explain several long-standing debates about the existence of microorganisms in ancient underground salt formations.

  20. Bacterioruberin and salinixanthin carotenoids of extremely halophilic Archaea and Bacteria: A Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlička, J.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Oren, A.

    2013-04-01

    Laboratory cultures of a number of red extremely halophilic Archaea (Halobacterium salinarum strains NRC-1 and R1, Halorubrum sodomense, Haloarcula valismortis) and of Salinibacter ruber, a red extremely halophilic member of the Bacteria, have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy using 514.5 nm excitation to characterize their carotenoids. The 50-carbon carotenoid α-bacterioruberin was detected as the major carotenoid in all archaeal strains. Raman spectroscopy also detected bacterioruberin as the main pigment in a red pellet of cells collected from a saltern crystallizer pond. Salinibacter contains the C40-carotenoid acyl glycoside salinixanthin (all-E, 2'S)-2'-hydroxy-1'-[6-O-(methyltetradecanoyl)-β-D-glycopyranosyloxy]-3',4'-didehydro-1',2'-dihydro-β,ψ-carotene-4-one), for which the Raman bands assignments of are given here for the first time.

  1. Identification and NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of DnaK and groEL homologues in moderate eubacterial halophiles.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, M; Matsuoka, K; Tokunaga, H

    1997-08-01

    We have identified 2 DnaK and 3 GroEL homologues from moderately halophilic Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Planococcus species by partial purification using an ATP-agarose column and by the analysis and similarity search of these NH2-terminal amino acid sequences. Although these bacteria required 1 to 2M NaCl for growth, these DnaK and GroEL homologues did not require high salt to bind to the ATP column, thus suggesting that these chaperones did not require high salts for their biochemically activities.

  2. Regulation of osmoadaptation in the moderate halophile Halobacillus halophilus: chloride, glutamate and switching osmolyte strategies

    PubMed Central

    Saum, Stephan H; Müller, Volker

    2008-01-01

    The moderate halophile Halobacillus halophilus is the paradigm for chloride dependent growth in prokaryotes. Recent experiments shed light on the molecular basis of the chloride dependence that is reviewed here. In the presence of moderate salinities Halobacillus halophilus mainly accumulates glutamine and glutamate to adjust turgor. The transcription of glnA2 (encoding a glutamine synthetase) as well as the glutamine synthetase activity were identified as chloride dependent steps. Halobacillus halophilus switches its osmolyte strategy and produces proline as the main compatible solute at high salinities. Furthermore, Halobacillus halophilus also shifts its osmolyte strategy at the transition from the exponential to the stationary phase where proline is exchanged by ectoine. Glutamate was found as a “second messenger” essential for proline production. This observation leads to a new model of sensing salinity by sensing the physico-chemical properties of different anions. PMID:18442383

  3. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite. PMID:26048927

  4. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Anderson F.; Valle, Roberta S.; Pacheco, Clarissa A.; Alvarez, Vanessa M.; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L.S.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties. PMID:24688526

  5. The Haloprotease CPI Produced by the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica Is Secreted by the Type II Secretion Pathway▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Mellado, Encarnación; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Francetic, Olivera; Ventosa, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The gene (cpo) encoding the extracellular protease CPI produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica CP76 was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was analyzed. The cpo gene encodes a 733-residue protein showing sequence similarity to metalloproteases of the M4 family. The type II secretion apparatus was shown to be responsible for secretion of the haloprotease CPI. PMID:19376897

  6. [Isolation and characteristic of a moderately halophilic bacterium accumulated ectoine as main compatible solute].

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Wang, Ting; Sun, Ji-Quan; Gu, Li-Feng; Li, Shun-Peng

    2005-12-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium(designated strain I15) was isolated from lawn soil. Based on the analysis of 16S rDNA (GenBank accession number DQ010162), morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain I15 was identified as Virgibacillus marismortuii. This strain was capable of growing under 0% approximately 25% NaCl, and exhibited an optimum NaCl concentration of 10% and an optimum temperature of 30 degrees C and an optimum pH of 7.5 - 8.0 for its growth, respectively. Under hyperosmotic stress, strain 115 accumulated ectoine as the main compatible solute. Under 15% NaCl conditions the intracellar ectoine can reach to 1.608 mmol/(g x cdw), accounted for 89.6% of the total compatible solutes. The biosynthesis of ectoine was under the control of osmotic, and the accumulated ectoine synthesized intraceilularly can released under hypoosmotic shocks and resynthesis under hyperosmotic shock rapidly.

  7. Bacillus shacheensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline-alkali soil.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zuchao; Qiu, Peng; Ye, Renyuan; Tian, Jiewei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun; Tian, Yongqiang

    2014-01-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, strain HNA-14(T), was isolated from a saline-alkali soil sample collected in Shache County, Xinjiang Province. On the basis of the polyphasic taxonomic data, the isolate was considered to be a member of the genus Bacillus. The organism grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 8.0. It was moderately halophilic and its optimum growth occurred at 5-10% NaCl. The diamino acid found in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid and the predominant menaquinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0 and the polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannosides and two unknown phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 48.6 mol%. Strain HNA-14(T) exhibited a low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96% with its nearest neighbors [Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 (96.5%), Bacillus xiaoxiensis DSM 21943(T)(96.2%), Bacillus clausii DSM 8716(T) (96.1%), Bacillus patagoniensis PAT05(T) (96.1%), Bacillus lehensis MLB-2(T) (96.0%), Bacillus oshimensis K11(T) (95.9%) and Bacillus hunanensis DSM 23008(T) (95.8%)] and the phenotypic characteristics indicate that strain HNA-14(T) can be distinguished from them. Therefore, a novel species of the genus Bacillus, Bacillus shacheensis sp. nov. (type strain, HNA-14(T) = KCTC 33145 = DSM 26902) is proposed.

  8. Precipitation of Dolomite in Aerobic Culture Experiments Using Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, M. S.; Vasconcelos, C.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The study of carbonate biomineralization in hypersaline environments provides information about the key role microorganisms have played in global carbon cycling, especially in the Precambrian. Recently, a microbial dolomite model was proposed based on the study of a hypersaline coastal lagoon, Lagoa Vermelha, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). This model suggests that sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate dolomite precipitation by increasing pH and removing the sulfate inhibitor. The anoxic conditions of this system may not, however, apply to all ancient dolomite formation. Dolomite is an abundant carbonate mineral found widespread in the geological record in a variety of environmental settings. Thus, a single microbial dolomite model probably cannot explain its widespread distribution and a broad spectrum of conditions may be linked with its formation. In contrast to Lagoa Vermelha, Brejo do Espinho, a shallow hypersaline lagoon located in the same region, is a dolomite-forming environment with oxic bottom conditions. The sediment comprises primarily high Mg-calcite and Ca-dolomite. Heterotrophic microorganisms have been isolated from algal mats growing in Brejo do Espinho, and biomineralization experiments have been conducted at variable temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40° C) and salinities (sea water and 2x seawater) to simulate the natural environmental conditions. After a 20-day incubation period, several aerobic culture experiments have crystal growth of Ca-dolomite and high Mg-calcite. Our study demonstrates that, under aerobic conditions, heterotrophic microorganisms can mediate dolomite precipitation. These results indicate that microbial dolomite precipitation is not necessarily linked to any particular group of organisms or specific metabolic processes or even a specific environment, i.e., it is not exclusively an anoxic mineral but can be precipitated in the presence of oxygen. This has implications for the distribution of dolomite in the geologic record.

  9. Silicibacter lacuscaerulensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a mesophilic moderately halophilic bacterium characteristic of the Blue Lagoon geothermal lake in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Petursdottir, S K; Kristjansson, J K

    1997-05-01

    Mesophilic, moderately halophilic bacteria were isolated from a silica-rich geothermal lake, the Blue Lagoon in Iceland. The isolates are strictly aerobic, but reduce nitrate to nitrite, and are oxidase- and catalase-positive. The nonsporeforming and nonmotile Gram negative rods are 0.6-0.8 microm in diameter and variable in length (9-18 microm), and contain gas vacuoles. The GC content in their DNA is 66.15%. The minimum, optimum, and maximum temperatures for growth are 22 degrees C, 45 degrees C, and 50 degrees C, respectively. The isolates do not grow without added salt in the medium and can grow at up to 7% NaCl (w/v). The optimal salinity for growth is 3.5%-4% NaCl. The pH range for growth is 6.5-8.5, with the optimal pH at 7.0. At optimal conditions the bacterium has a doubling time of 80 min. The main cytochrome is a membrane-bound cytochrome c with an alpha-peak at 549nm. Sequencing of 16S rRNA from the type strain ITI-1157 revealed it to be a proteobacterium of the alpha-subclass with the closest relatives being Roseobacter litoralis and Paracoccuss kocuri. The new isolates do not contain bacteriochlorophyll a and are considered to represent a new genus and a new species, Silicibacter lacuscaerulensis.

  10. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus

    PubMed Central

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-01-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1). PMID:24031699

  11. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-07-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1).

  12. Cold-active halophilic bacteria from the ice-sealed Lake Vida, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Lindsay J; Asao, Marie; Madigan, Michael T

    2009-10-01

    Lake Vida is a large, permanently ice-covered lake in the Victoria Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica and is unique among Dry Valley lakes because it is ice-sealed, with an ice-cover of nearly 19 m. Enrichment cultures of melt-water from Lake Vida 15.9 m ice yielded five pure cultures of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria. Of these, one strain grew at -8 degrees C and the four others at -4 degrees C. All isolates were either halotolerant or halophilic, with two strains capable of growth at 15% NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Lake Vida isolates to be Gammaproteobacteria, related to species of Psychrobacter and Marinobacter. This is the first report of pure cultures of bacteria from Lake Vida, and the isolates displayed a phenotype consistent with life in a cold hypersaline environment.

  13. Comparison between the polypeptide profile of halophilic bacteria and salt tolerant plants.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; González, C; Flores, P; Prado, B; Campos, V

    1997-12-01

    Changes in the polypeptide profile induced by salt stress in halotolerant and halophilic bacteria, isolated from the Atacama desert (northern Chile), were compared with those in the cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis (Leguminoseae) seedlings, a salt tolerant plant. SDS-PAGE analyses show the presence of four predominant polypeptides, with molecular weights around 78, 70, 60 and 44 kDa respectively, both in bacteria and in cotyledons from P. chilensis seedlings raised under salt stress conditions. Moreover, the 60 and 44 kDa polypeptides seem to be salt responsive, since their concentration increases with increasing NaCl in the growth medium. Our results suggest a common mechanism for salt tolerance in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes.

  14. Diverse antimicrobial interactions of halophilic archaea and bacteria extend over geographical distances and cross the domain barrier.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Nina S; Pietilä, Maija K; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2013-10-01

    The significance of antimicrobial substances, halocins, produced by halophilic archaea and bacteria thriving in hypersaline environments is relatively unknown. It is suggested that their production might increase species diversity and give transient competitive advances to the producer strain. Halocin production is considered to be common among halophilic archaea, but there is a lack of information about halocins produced by bacteria in highly saline environments. We studied the antimicrobial activity of 68 halophilic archaea and 22 bacteria isolated from numerous geographically distant hypersaline environments. Altogether 144 antimicrobial interactions were found between the strains and aside haloarchaea, halophilic bacteria from various genera were identified as halocin producers. Close to 80% of the interactions were detected between microorganisms from different genera and in few cases, even across the domain boundary. Several of the strains produced halocins with a wide inhibitory spectrum as has been observed before. Most of the antimicrobial interactions were found between strains from distant sampling sites indicating that hypersaline environments around the world have similar microorganisms with the potential to produce wide activity range antimicrobials.

  15. Analysis of the genome of the gram-negative moderate halophiles Halomonas and Chromohalobacter by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mellado, E; García, M T; Roldán, E; Nieto, J J; Ventosa, A

    1998-11-01

    The genomes of 11 moderately halophilic bacteria belonging to the genera Halomonas and Chromohalobacter have been analyzed by restriction endonuclease digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By using the infrequently cutting restriction endonucleases SpeI and SwaI, highly characteristic fingerprintings were obtained for each of the isolates studied. On the basis of the lengths of the SpeI and SwaI fragments, separated by PFGE, the genome size of the 11 strains studied was estimated. The genome size for 8 Halomonas strains ranged from 1450 to 2830 kb, whereas for the 3 Chromohalobacter strains studied it ranged from 1770 to 2295 kb. Finally, we show that macrorestriction fingerprints could be a useful tool to elucidate the taxonomic position of bacteria belonging to the Halomonas-Deleya complex.

  16. Membrane fluidity of halophilic ectoine-secreting bacteria related to osmotic and thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Sven; David, Florian; Clark, Wiebke; Wittmann, Christoph; Krull, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    In response to sudden decrease in osmotic pressure, halophilic microorganisms secrete their accumulated osmolytes. This specific stress response, combined with physiochemical responses to the altered environment, influence the membrane properties and integrity of cells, with consequent effects on growth and yields in bioprocesses, such as bacterial milking. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in membrane fluidity and integrity induced by environmental stress in ectoine-secreting organisms. The halophilic ectoine-producing strains Alkalibacillus haloalkaliphilus and Chromohalobacter salexigens were treated hypo- and hyper-osmotically at several temperatures. The steady-state anisotropy of fluorescently labeled cells was measured, and membrane integrity assessed by flow cytometry and ectoine distribution. Strong osmotic downshocks slightly increased the fluidity of the bacterial membranes. As the temperature increased, the increasing membrane fluidity encouraged more ectoine release under the same osmotic shock conditions. On the other hand, combined shock treatments increased the number of disintegrated cells. From the ectoine release and membrane integrity measurements under coupled thermal and osmotic shock conditions, we could optimize the secretion conditions for both bacteria.

  17. Characterization of the basic replicon of pCM1, a narrow-host-range plasmid from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter marismortui.

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, E; Asturias, J A; Nieto, J J; Timmis, K N; Ventosa, A

    1995-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter marismortui contains a 17.5-kb narrow-host-range plasmid, pCM1, which shows interesting properties for the development of cloning vectors for the genetic manipulation of this important group of extremophiles. Plasmid pCM1 can stably replicate and is maintained in most gram-negative moderate halophiles tested. The replication origin has been identified and sequenced, and the minimal pCM1 replicon has been localized to a 1,600-bp region which includes two functionally discrete regions, the oriV region and the repA gene. oriV, located on a 700-bp fragment, contains four iterons 20 bp in length adjacent to a DnaA box that is dispensable but required for efficient replication of pCM1, and it requires trans-acting functions. The repA gene, which encodes a replication protein of 289 residues, is similar to the replication proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7768853

  18. The N-terminal sequence of the ribosomal 'A' protein from two moderate halophiles, Vibrio costicola and an unidentified moderate (NRCC 11227).

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, P; Yaguchi, M; Rollin, C F; Matheson, A T; Wydro, R

    1979-05-23

    The 'A' protein, equivalent to ribosomal protein EL7/L12 from Escherichia coli, has been isolated and purified from two moderate halophiles Vibrio costicola and NRCC 11227. The 'A' protein from V. costicola contained an N-terminal serine and separated into two forms on DEAE-cellulose and two-dimensional electrophoresis while the equivalent protein in NRCC 11227 contained an N-terminal alanine residue and was present in only one form. The amino acid composition and mobility on two-dimensional gels indicated these proteins were very similar to EL7/L12. The first 38 residues of the 'A' proteins were sequenced and compared to the equivalent protein from E. coli and the extreme halophile Halobacterium cutirubrum. The N-terminal region of the 'A' protein from both moderate halophiles showed substantial homology to EL 12 (75--80%) but no evidence of any homology to the equivalent protein from the extreme halophile. The ribosomal proteins equivalent to ES1A in E. coli were also isolated and their amino acid compositions determined.

  19. Biocalcification by halophilic bacteria for remediation of concrete structures in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Roohi; Dhami, Navdeep Kaur; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2016-11-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation has emerged as a promising technology for remediation and restoration of concrete structures. Deterioration of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments is a major concern due to chloride-induced corrosion. In the current study, halophilic bacteria Exiguobacterium mexicanum was isolated from sea water and tested for biomineralization potential under different salt stress conditions. The growth, urease and carbonic anhydrase production significantly increased under salt stress conditions. Maximum calcium carbonate precipitation was recorded at 5 % NaCl concentration. Application of E. mexicanum on concrete specimens significantly increased the compressive strength (23.5 %) and reduced water absorption about five times under 5 % salt stress conditions compared to control specimens. SEM and XRD analysis of bacterial-treated concrete specimens confirmed the precipitation of calcite. The present study results support the potential of this technology for improving the strength and durability properties of building structures in marine environments.

  20. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from the moderate halophile Vibrio costicola. Purification, physicochemical properties and the effect of univalent-cation salts.

    PubMed Central

    Salvarrey, M S; Cannata, J J; Cazzulo, J J

    1989-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was purified to homogeneity from the moderately halophilic bacterium Vibrio costicola. The enzyme is monomeric, with an Mr of 62,000, as determined by the Svedberg equation, by using values of s0(20,w) 4.4 x 10(-13) s, D20,w 6.13 x 10(-7) cm2.s-1 and v 0.719 cm3.g-1. Compared with other, non-halophilic, PEPCKs, the enzyme from V. costicola had a significantly lower total content of hydrophobic amino acids. The contents of glycine and serine were higher in the V. costicola enzyme (16.7 and 10.22% respectively) than in the non-halophilic PEPCKs (6.8-9.6% and 4.67-6.28% respectively). These results resemble those obtained by De Médicis & Rossignol [(1979) Experientia 35, 1546-1547] with the pyruvate kinase from V. costicola, and agree with the proposal by Lanyi [(1974) Bacteriol. Rev. 38, 272-290] of partial replacement of hydrophobic amino acids by glycine and serine to maintain the balance between hydrophobic and hydrophilic forces in halophilic enzymes. In agreement with this 'halophilic' characteristic, the PEPCK was somewhat stabilized by 1 M-KCl or -NaCl and by 20% (v/v) glycerol, and its oxaloacetate-decarboxylation and 14CO2-oxaloacetate-exchange reactions were activated by KCl and NaCl up to 1 M, whereas the fixation of CO2 on PEP had a maximum at 0.025-0.05 M salt. These facts suggest that the salts, at concentrations probably physiological for the bacterium, increase the formation of the complex of oxaloacetate and ATP with the enzyme, and the liberation of the products, PEP and ADP, thus favouring PEP synthesis. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2775185

  1. Genome sequence of the moderately halophilic bacterium Salinicoccus carnicancri type strain Crm(T) (= DSM 23852(T)).

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Whon, Tae Woong; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Joon-Yong; Kim, Pil Soo; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jina; Oh, Sei Joon; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Salinicoccus carnicancri Jung et al. 2010 belongs to the genus Salinicoccus in the family Staphylococcaceae. Members of the Salinicoccus are moderately halophilic and originate from various salty environments. The halophilic features of the Salinicoccus suggest their possible uses in biotechnological applications, such as biodegradation and fermented food production. However, the genus Salinicoccus is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. This study presents the draft genome sequence of S. carnicancri strain Crm(T) and its annotation. The 2,673,309 base pair genome contained 2,700 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 47.93 mol%. It was notable that the strain carried 72 predicted genes associated with osmoregulation, which suggests the presence of beneficial functions that facilitate growth in high-salt environments.

  2. Denitrification in a binary culture and thiocyanate metabolism in Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans gen. nov. sp. nov. - a moderately halophilic chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacterium from hypersaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tourova, Tatjana P; Bezsoudnova, Ekatherina Y; Pol, Arjan; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-06-01

    Anaerobic enrichment culture with thiocyanate as electron donor and nitrate as electron acceptor at 2 M NaCl inoculated with a mixture of sediments from hypersaline lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) resulted in a selection of a binary consortium of moderately halophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) capable of complete denitrification of nitrate with thiosulfate as the electron donor. One consortium member, strain HRhD 3sp, was isolated into pure culture with nitrate and thiosulfate using a density gradient. This strain was responsible for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the consortium, while a second strain, HRhD 2, isolated under microoxic conditions with thiosulfate as substrate, was capable of anaerobic growth with nitrite and thiosulfate. Nitrite, either as substrate or as product, was already toxic at very low concentrations for both strains. As a result, optimal growth under anaerobic conditions could only be achieved within the consortium. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, both organisms were identified as new lineages within the Gammaproteobacteria. As well as thiosulfate, strain HRhD 2 can also use thiocyanate as electron donor, representing a first halophilic SOB capable of growth with thiocyanate at 2-4 M NaCl. Product and enzymatic analysis identified the "carbonyl sulfide (COS) pathway" of primary thiocyanate degradation in this new species. On the basis of phenotypic and genetic analysis, strain HRhD 2 is proposed to be assigned to a new genus and species Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans.

  3. Salt-dependent thermo-reversible α-amylase: cloning and characterization of halophilic α-amylase from moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians, was found to produce active α-amylase (K. varians α-amylase (KVA)). We have observed at least six different forms of α-amylase secreted by this bacterium into the culture medium. Characterization of these KVA forms and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that KVA comprises pre-pro-precursor form of α-amylase catalytic domain followed by the tandem repeats, which show high similarity to each other and to the starch binding domain (SBD) of other α-amylases. The observed six forms were most likely derived by various processing of the protein product. Recombinant KVA protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and was purified with affinity chromatography after cleavage from fusion partner. The highly acidic amino acid composition of KVA and the highly negative electrostatic potential surface map of the modeled structure strongly suggested its halophilic nature. Indeed, KVA showed distinct salt- and time-dependent thermal reversibility: when α-amylase was heat denatured at 85°C for 3 min in the presence of 2 M NaCl, the activity was recovered upon incubation on ice (50% recovery after 15 min incubation). Conversely, KVA denatured in 0.1 M NaCl was not refolded at all, even after prolonged incubation. KVA activity was inhibited by proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitor from Streptomyces nitrosporeus, which had been implicated to inhibit only animal α-amylases. KVA with putative SBD regions was found to digest raw starch.

  4. Haloanaerobium salsugo sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from a subterranean brine

    SciTech Connect

    Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Sharma, P.K.; Tanner, R.S.; McInerney, M.J.; Oren, A.; Woese, C.R.

    1994-07-01

    A strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a highly saline oil field brine. The bacterium was a non-spore-forming, nonmotile rod, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains, and measured 0.3 to 0.4 by 2.6 to 4 {micro}m. The bacterium had a specific requirement for NaCl and grew at NaCl concentrations of between 6 and 24%, with optimal growth at 9% NaCl. The isolate grew at temperatures of between 22 and 51 C and pH values of between 5.6 and 8.0. The doubling time in a complex medium containing 10% NaCl was 9 h. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and penicillin but not by cycloheximide or azide. Fermentable substrates were predominantly carbohydrates. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 16:1}, and C{sub 17:0 cyc} acids. The DNA base composition of the isolate was 34 mol% G+C. Oligonucleotide catalog and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA showed that strain VS-752{sup T} was most closely related to Haloanaerobium praevalens GSL{sup T} (ATCC 33744), the sole member of the genus Haloanaerobium. The authors propose that strain VS-752 (ATCC 51327) by established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium salsugo, in the genus Haloanaerobium. 40 refs., 3 figs, 5 tabs.

  5. Halobacillus mangrovi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from the black mangrove Avicennia germinans.

    PubMed

    Soto-Ramírez, Nelís; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Rosas-Padilla, Soniris; Almodóvar, Karinna; Jiménez, Gina; Machado-Rodríguez, Marlene; Zapata, Magaly; Ventosa, Antonio; Montalvo-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    A moderately halophilic, spore-forming, Gram-positive, short-rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain MS10(T), was isolated from the surface of leaves of the black mangrove Avicennia germinans and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain MS10(T) was able to grow at NaCl concentrations in the range 5-20% (w/v) with optimum growth at 10% (w/v) NaCl. Growth occurred at temperatures of 10-50 degrees C (optimal growth at 33-35 degrees C) and pH 6.0-9.0 (optimal growth at pH 7.0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain MS10(T) fell within the branch encompassing members of the genus Halobacillus and was most closely related to Halobacillus dabanensis JCM 12772(T) (99.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The DNA G+C content of strain MS10(T) was 45.7 mol%, the major respiratory isoprenoid quinone was MK-7 and the cell-wall peptidoglycan was of the L-Orn-D-Asp type, characteristics consistent with its affiliation to the genus Halobacillus. Strain MS10(T) showed a level of DNA-DNA hybridization with H. dabanensis JCM 12772(T) of 29% and levels below 70% were also obtained with respect to other recognized members of the genus Halobacillus. The major fatty acids of strain MS10(T) were iso-C(16:0), anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(14:0) and iso-C(15:0). Overall, the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic results presented in this study demonstrate that strain MS10(T) represents a novel species of the genus Halobacillus, for which the name Halobacillus mangrovi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MS10(T) (=CECT 7206(T)=CCM 7397(T)).

  6. Haloanaerobium salsugo sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from a subterranean brine.

    PubMed

    Bhupathiraju, V K; Oren, A; Sharma, P K; Tanner, R S; Woese, C R; McInerney, M J

    1994-07-01

    A strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a highly saline oil field brine. The bacterium was a non-spore-forming, nonmotile rod, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains, and measured 0.3 to 0.4 by 2.6 to 4 microns. The bacterium had a specific requirement for NaCl and grew at NaCl concentrations of between 6 and 24%, with optimal growth at 9% NaCl. The isolate grew at temperatures of between 22 and 51 degrees C and pH values of between 5.6 and 8.0. The doubling time in a complex medium containing 10% NaCl was 9 h. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and penicillin but not by cycloheximide or azide. Fermentable substrates were predominantly carbohydrates. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, CO2, and H2. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C14:0, C16:0, C16:1, and C17:0 cyc acids. The DNA base composition of the isolate was 34 mol% G+C. Oligonucleotide catalog and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA showed that strain VS-752T was most closely related to Haloanaerobium praevalens GSLT (ATCC 33744), the sole member of the genus Haloanaerobium. We propose that strain VS-752 (ATCC 51327) be established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium salsugo, in the genus Haloanaerobium.

  7. Halomonas huangheensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline-alkali soil.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chaohua; Jia, Fangfang; Wan, Yusong; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min; Jin, Wujun

    2014-03-01

    A novel, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile and moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain BJGMM-B45(T), was isolated from a saline-alkali soil collected from Shandong Province, China. Growth of strain BJGMM-B45(T) occurred at 10-45 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and pH 5.0-12.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) on Luria-Bertani agar medium with 1-20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 7-10 %). The predominant respiratory quinone was Q-9. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were C18 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0, C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, summed feature 3, C12 : 0 3-OH and C12 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content was 57.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain BJGMM-B45(T) belonged to the genus Halomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. The closest relatives were Halomonas cupida DSM 4740(T) (98.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Halomonas denitrificans M29(T) (97.8 %). Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain BJGMM-B45(T) and Halomonas cupida CGMCC 1.2312(T) and Halomonas denitrificans DSM 18045(T) were 57.0 and 58.9 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic features, strain BJGMM-B45(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas huangheensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BJGMM-B45(T) ( = ACCC 05850(T) = KCTC 32409(T)).

  8. Bacillus oryzaecorticis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from rice husks.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Wook; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Kim, Soo-Jin; Kim, Song Yi; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Jong Sung; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Kim, Ae-Jung; Chung, Kun Sub

    2014-08-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, aerobic, endospore-forming, moderately halophilic rod, designated strain R1(T), was isolated from rice husks and subjected to a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach. Strain R1(T) produced spherical or ellipsoidal endospores at a subterminal position in swollen sporangia, and was catalase- and oxidase-positive. The isolate grew optimally at 37 °C and pH 6.0-7.0, and could grow in the presence of up to 9% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain R1(T) belongs to the genus Bacillus. The closest relatives of strain R1(T) were Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis NCIB 3610(T), Bacillus aquimaris TF-12(T), and Bacillus marisflavi TF-11(T), with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.0%, 98.4%, and 98.7%, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness values between the isolate and the reference strains were ≤42±3%. The predominant menaquinones were MK-5 (50%) and MK-7 (50%). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (48.6%) and anteiso-C(15 : 0) (20.6%), and the cell-wall diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics, it is concluded that strain R1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which we propose the name Bacillus oryzaecorticis sp. nov. The type strain is R1(T) ( = KACC 17217(T) = KCCM 90231(T) = JCM 19602(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  9. Diversity and enumeration of halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria in Spanish-style green table-olive fermentations.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Padrós, Helena; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis

    2016-02-01

    The presence and enumeration of halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria in Spanish-style table-olive fermentations was studied. Twenty 10-tonne fermenters at two large manufacturing companies in Spain, previously studied through both culture dependent and independent (PCR-DGGE) methodologies, were selected. Virtually all this microbiota was isolated during the initial fermentation stage. A total of 203 isolates were obtained and identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. They belonged to 13 bacterial species, included in 11 genera. It was noticeable the abundance of halophilic and alkaliphilic lactic acid bacteria (HALAB). These HALAB belonged to the three genera of this group: Alkalibacterium, Marinilactibacillus and Halolactibacillus. Ten bacterial species were isolated for the first time from table olive fermentations, including the genera Amphibacillus, Natronobacillus, Catenococcus and Streptohalobacillus. The isolates were genotyped through RAPD and clustered in a dendrogram where 65 distinct strains were identified. Biodiversity indexes found statistically significant differences between both patios regarding genotype richness, diversity and dominance. However, Jaccard similarity index suggested that the halophilic/alkaliphilic microbiota in both patios was more similar than the overall microbiota at the initial fermentation stage. Thus, up to 7 genotypes of 6 different species were shared, suggesting adaptation of some strains to this fermentation stage. Morisita-Horn similarity index indicated a high level of codominance of the same species in both patios. Halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria, especially HALAB, appeared to be part of the characteristic microbiota at the initial stage of this table-olive fermentation, and they could contribute to the conditioning of the fermenting brines in readiness for growth of common lactic acid bacteria.

  10. Halotolerant and halophilic bacteria in the oceans of the icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, S. I.; Montoya, L.; Avendaño, R.

    2013-05-01

    Halotolerant and halophilic prokaryotes require salt concentrations equal to or higher than those present at terrestrial oceans (Rothschild and Mancinelli, 2001). They are a particular kind of extremophiles and as expected, their halotolerance is mainly expressed in terms of a certain NaCl percentage, at least on Earth. With the discovery of putative salty liquid oceans beneath the iced surfaces of some of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn (Mueller and McKinnon, 1988; Kargel et al., 2000; Zolotov, 2007), information about the impact of other types of salts, different from NaCl, on the growth of complex biological systems is necessary. We have found that when three specific bacteria strains are growing in media enriched with salts containing chaotropic and kosmotropic ions, their specific optimal growth value is modified (Montoya et al., 2010). The changes can be broadly explained in terms of the Hofmeister series (Zhang and Cremer, 2006). These results can be used to infer an extension in the limits of biological activity. For terrestrial organisms there is scarce information to determine the impact of another salt in the growth of an organism. In these sense we have found that when media enriched with magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) at water activity values (aw) similar to those reported as optimal for NaCl, their growth and tolerance is considerably enhanced. On the other hand, the combination of chaotropic and kosmotropic ions result in salts of astrobiological importance such as the sulphate already mentioned, carbonates or chlorides that can tentatively exist in the putative ocean of Europa, Ganymedes, or Enceladus or even at the subsurface of Mars. In this frame, we studied the growth rate of Halomonas halodurans, H. magadiensis and Bacillus pumillus when exposed to media enriched with NaCl, MgSO4, Mg(NO3)2, MgCl2, Na2SO4 and NH4SO4. Equivalent values of water activity (aw) for each salt were compared and correlated with microbial activity (Montoya et al., 2010

  11. Alleviation of salt stress by halotolerant and halophilic plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Orhan, Furkan

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, 18 halotolerant and halophilic bacteria have been investigated for their plant growth promoting abilities in vitro and in a hydroponic culture. The bacterial strains have been investigated for ammonia, indole-3-acetic acid and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate-deaminase production, phosphate solubilisation and nitrogen fixation activities. Of the tested bacteria, eight were inoculated with Triticum aestivum in a hydroponic culture. The investigated bacterial strains were found to have different plant-growth promoting activities in vitro. Under salt stress (200mM NaCl), the investigated bacterial strains significantly increased the root and shoot length and total fresh weight of the plants. The growth rates of the plants inoculated with bacterial strains ranged from 62.2% to 78.1%. Identifying of novel halophilic and halotolerant bacteria that promote plant growth can be used as alternatives for salt sensitive plants. Extensive research has been conducted on several halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains to investigate their plant growth promoting activities. However, to the best of my knowledge, this is the first study to inoculate these bacterial strains with wheat. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Exopolysaccharides produced by the recently described halophilic bacteria Halomonas ventosae and Halomonas anticariensis.

    PubMed

    Mata, Juan Antonio; Béjar, Victoria; Llamas, Inmaculada; Arias, Soledad; Bressollier, Philippe; Tallon, Richard; Urdaci, María C; Quesada, Emilia

    2006-11-01

    We studied exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by Halomonas ventosae and Halomonas anticariensis, two novel species of halophilic bacteria. Under optimum environmental and nutritional conditions, H. ventosae strains Al12(T) and Al16 excreted 28.35 mg and 28.95 mg of EPS per 100 ml of culture medium (34.55 and 38.6 mg of EPS per gram of dry cell weight) respectively. The molecular masses of the polymers were about 50 kDa and their main components were glucose, mannose and galactose. They had high protein fractions and showed emulsifying activity on several hydrophobic substrates. Under optimum environmental and nutritional conditions, H. anticariensis strains FP35(T) and FP36 excreted about 29.65 and 49.95 mg of EPS per 100 ml of culture medium (43.6 and 50.95 mg of EPS per gram of dry cell weight) respectively. The molecular masses of the polymers were about 20 and 46 kDa respectively and were composed mainly of glucose, mannose and galacturonic acid. All EPSs produced solutions of low viscosity and pseudoplastic behaviour. They also had a high capacity for binding cations and incorporated considerable quantities of sulphates, which is highly unusual in bacterial polysaccharides. All strains assayed formed biofilms both in polystyrene wells and borosilicate test tubes.

  13. Halobacillus andaensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from saline and alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaibiao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Meng, Lin; Liu, Henan; Hong, Shan; Huang, Haipeng; Jiang, Juquan

    2015-06-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, moderately halophilic bacterial strain, NEAU-ST10-40T, was isolated from a saline and alkaline soil in Anda City, China. It was strictly aerobic, rod-shaped and motile by peritrichous flagella. It formed light yellow colonies and grew at NaCl concentrations of 3-15 % (w/v) (optimum, 8 %, w/v), at pH 7.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 8.0) and at 4-60 °C (optimum, 30 °C). It contained meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that it belonged to the genus Halobacillus. Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain NEAU-ST10-40T and the type strains of related species of the genus Halobacillus ranged from 98.8 % (Halobacillus alkaliphilus FP5T) to 97.1 % (Halobacillus kuroshimensis IS-Hb7T). DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness values between strain NEAU-ST10-40T and H. alkaliphilus DSM 18525T, Halobacillus campisalis KCTC 13144T, Halobacillus yeomjeoni DSM 17110T, Halobacillus halophilus DSM 2266T, Halobacillus litoralis DSM 10405T, Halobacillus dabanensis DSM 18199T, Halobacillus salinus DSM 18897T, Halobacillus naozhouensis DSM 21183T, Halobacillus trueperi DSM 10404T and Halobacillus salsuginis DSM 21185T were from 43 ± 1 to 19 ± 1 % (mean ± sd). The DNA G+C content was 39.3 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were anteiso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0 and iso-C16:0, the only respiratory quinone detected was MK-7, and polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, two unknown phospholipids and three unknown lipids. On the basis of the data presented, strain NEAU-ST10-40T is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Halobacillus andaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-ST10-40T ( = CGMCC 1.12153T = DSM 25866T).

  14. Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a salt lake.

    PubMed

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Didari, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain H9B(T), was isolated from a mud sample of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain H9B(T) were motile and produced colonies with a yellowish-grey pigment. Growth occurred between 2.5 and 10 % (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of pH 6-10 and 25-45 °C, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain H9B(T) is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus. The closest relative to this strain was Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28(T) with 97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequences similarity. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and this phylogenetically related species was 17 %. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipid pattern of strain H9B(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four phospholipids and an aminolipid. It contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 37.1 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Oceanobacillus limi is strain H9B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10780(T) = KCTC 13823(T) = CECT 7997(T)).

  15. Pistricoccus aurantiacus gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a shark.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Liang, Qi-Yun; Lu, De-Chen; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2016-12-01

    A novel Gram-stain negative, non-motile, moderately halophilic, facultatively anaerobic and spherical bacterium designated strain SS9(T) was isolated from the gill homogenate of a shark. Cells of SS9(T) were observed to be 0.8-1.2 μm in diameter. The strain was found to grow optimally at 33 °C, pH 7.0-8.0 and in the presence of 6.0 % (w/v) NaCl. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, strain SS9(T) can be affiliated with the family Halomonadaceae and is closely related to Chromohalobacter marismortui NBRC 103155(T) (95.6 % sequence similarity), Halomonas ilicicola SP8(T) (95.6 %) and Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043(T) (95.5 %). Multilocus sequence analysis of strain SS9(T) using the housekeeping genes 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and secA revealed the strain's distinct phylogenetic position, separate from other known genera of the family Halomonadaceae. Strain SS9(T) was found to contain ubiquinone-9 (Q-9) as the predominant ubiquinone and C18:1 ω7c, C16:0 and summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH) as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids of strain SS9(T) were identified as phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The DNA G + C content of strain SS9(T) was determined to be 60.4 mol%. It is evident from phylogenetic, genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic results that strain SS9(T) represents a novel species in a new genus, for which the name Pistricoccus aurantiacus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SS9(T) (=KCTC 42586(T) = MCCC 1H00111(T)).

  16. Larsenimonas suaedae sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, endophytic bacterium isolated from the euhalophyte Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi-Jie; Wu, Hong-Zhen; Cui, Chun-Xiao; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Guo-Yan; Wang, Hai-Xia; Dai, Mei-Xue

    2016-08-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-stain-negative, non-endospore-forming endophytic bacterium designated strain ST307T was isolated from the euhalophyte Suaeda salsa in Dongying, China. Strain ST307T was aerobic, rod-shaped, motile and orange-yellow-pigmented. The organism grew at NaCl concentrations of 0.6-20 % (w/v) (optimum 5-6 %, w/v), at temperatures of 5-45 °C (optimum 35 °C) and at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 7-8). It accumulated poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid and produced exopolysaccharides. The major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c. The predominant lipoquinone was ubiquinone Q-9. The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, a glycoaminolipid and a phosphoglycoaminolipid. The DNA G+C content was 60.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated atpA, rpoD and secA gene sequences revealed that the strain represents a member of the genus Larsenimonas. The closest related type strain was Larsenimonas salina M1-18T. Mean DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain ST307T and the related species L. salina M1-18T, Chromohalobacter beijerinckii DSM 7218T, C. canadensis DSM 6769T, C. israelensis DSM 6768T, C. marismortui CGMCC 1.2321T, C. nigrandesensis DSM 14323T, C. salexigens DSM 3043T and C. sarecensis DSM 15547T were 15±2-45±1 %. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular features, strain ST307T clearly represents a novel species of the genus Larsenimonas. The name Larsenimonassuaedae sp. nov. is proposed, with ST307T (=CGMCC 1.8902T=DSM 22428T) as the type strain.

  17. Sporosalibacterium faouarense gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Raja; Ben Ali Gam, Zouhaier; Ben Hamed, Said; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Maaroufi, Abderrazak; Labat, Marc

    2011-01-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic and mesophilic bacterium, designated strain SOL3f37(T), was isolated from a hydrocarbon-polluted soil surrounding a deep petroleum environment located in south Tunisia. Cells of strain SOL3f37(T) stained Gram-positive and were motile, straight and spore-forming. Strain SOL3f37(T) had a typical Gram-positive-type cell-wall structure, unlike the thick, multilayered cell wall of its closest relative Clostridiisalibacter paucivorans. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (41 %), iso-C(14 : 0) 3-OH and/or iso-C(15 : 0) dimethyl acetal (21.6 %), iso-C(13 : 0) (4.4 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (3.9 %) and iso-C(15 : 1) (2.8 %). Strain SOL3f37(T) grew between 20 and 48 °C (optimum 40 °C) and at pH 6.2-8.1 (optimum pH 6.9). Strain SOL3f37(T) required at least 0.5 NaCl l(-1) and grew in the presence of NaCl concentrations up to 150 g l(-1) (optimum 40 g l(-1)). Yeast extract (2 g l(-1)) was required for degradation of pyruvate, fumarate, fructose, glucose and mannitol. Also, strain SOL3f37(T) grew heterotrophically on yeast extract, peptone and bio-Trypticase, but was unable to grow on Casamino acids. Sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate and nitrite were not reduced. The DNA G+C content was 30.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain SOL3f37(T) was a member of the family Clostridiaceae in the order Clostridiales; strain SOL3f37(T) was related to members of various genera of the family Clostridiaceae. It exhibited highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (93.4 %) with Clostridiisalibacter paucivorans 37HS60(T), 91.8 % with Thermohalobacter berrensis CTT3(T) and 91.7 % with Caloranaerobacter azorensis MV1087(T). On the basis of genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic data, it is suggested that strain SOL3f37(T) represents a novel species in a new genus. The name Sporosalibacterium faouarense gen. nov., sp. nov. is

  18. Marinobacter aquaticus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a solar saltern.

    PubMed

    León, María José; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium designated strain M6-53T was isolated from water of a pond from a marine saltern located in Huelva, south-west Spain. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, motile, slightly curved rods, able to grow in media containing 5-25 % (w/v) NaCl (optimal growth at 10 %, w/v), at temperatures from 20 to 40 °C (optimally at 37 °C) and at pH 6.5-9 (optimally at pH 7.0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the new isolate within the genus Marinobacter, with the type strains of the most closely related species being Marinobacter persicus IBRC-M 10445T (98.5 % similarity), Marinobacter oulmenensis Set74T (97.2 %) and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus ATCC 49840T (97.1 %). The major fatty acids present in strain M6-53T were C18 : 1ω9c (29.5 %), C16 : 0 (26.7 %), C12 : 0 3-OH (15.1 %), C18 : 0 (10.2 %) and C16 : ω9c (9.6 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA for this strain was determined to be 56.4 mol%. The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain M6-53T and M. persicus CECT 7991T, M. oulmenensis CECT 7499T and M. hydrocarbonoclasticus DSM 50418 were 8, 41 and 38 %, respectively. These values are lower than the accepted 70 % threshold and showed that the new isolate represented a different species within the genus Marinobacter. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and the phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic features of this new isolate support the placement of strain M6-53T as a representative of a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which we propose the name Marinobacter aquaticus sp. nov., with strain M6-53T (=CECT 9228T=LMG 30006T) as the type strain.

  19. Halobacillus sediminis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern sediment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chan; Han, Song-Ih; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain NGS-2T, was isolated from sediment of a solar saltern pond located in Shinan, Korea. Strain NGS-2T was a strictly aerobic, non-motile rod that grew at pH 5.0-10.0 (optimum, pH 8.0), at 10-30 °C (optimum, 28 °C) and in the presence of 1-20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 10 % NaCl). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain NGS-2T belonged to the genus Halobacillus, with sequence similarity of 98.4-95.8 % to existing type strains, showing the highest sequence similarity to Halobacillus dabanensis D-8T (98.4 %), H. litoralis SL-4T (98.4 %), H. trueperi SL-5T (98.2 %), H. faecis IGA7-4T (98.2 %), H. profundi IS-Hb4T (98.1 %) and H. mangrovi MS10T (98.0 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidyl-N-methylethanolamine and an unknown glycolipid. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was based on l-Orn-d-Asp, the predominant isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7) and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C15: 0 and anteiso-C17: 0. The DNA G+C content of the novel isolate was 45.0 mol%. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain NGS-2T and the type strains of 12 other species of the genus ranged from 32 to 3 %. On the basis of the polyphasic analysis conducted in this study, strain NGS-2T represents a novel species of the genus Halobacillus, for which the name Halobacillus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NGS-2T ( = KACC 18263T = NBRC 110639T).

  20. Halophilic-Psychrophilic Bacteria from Tirich Mir Glacier, Pakistan, as Potential Candidate for Astrobiological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, M. R.; Anesio, A. M. A.; Hayat, M. H.; Zada, S. Z.; Sajjad, W. S.; Shah, A. A. S.; Hasan, F. H.

    2016-09-01

    Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and Himalaya region is referred to as 'third pole' and could be suitable as a terrestrial analog of Mars and increased possibility of finding polyextremophiles. Study is focused on halophilic psychrophiles.

  1. Glycocaulis albus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic dimorphic prosthecate bacterium isolated from petroleum-contaminated saline soil.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiang-Lin; Xie, Bai-Sheng; Cai, Man; Geng, Shuang; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wang, Ya-Nan; Cui, Heng-Lin; Liu, Xue-Ying; Ye, Si-Yuan; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-09-01

    Two novel bacterial strains, SLG210-30A1(T) and SLG210-19A2, which shared 99.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with each other, were isolated from petroleum-contaminated saline soil in Shengli Oilfield, eastern China. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, motile, aerobic, mesophilic and moderately halophilic. They could grow chemoheterotrophically with oxygen as an electron acceptor. Morphologically, cells were typical Caulobacteria-type dimorphic prosthecate bacteria. The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains SLG210-30A1(T) and SLG210-19A2 were 61.8 mol% and 61.6 mol% respectively. Strain SLG210-30A1(T) had Q10 as the predominant respiratory ubiquinone, and C16 : 0 (28.4 %), C17 : 0 (11.6 %), C18 : 0 (22.1 %) and C18 : 1ω7c (14.0 %) as the major cellular fatty acids. The polar lipids of the two isolates were some glycolipids, a lipid, a phospholipid, an aminoglycolipid and an aminophospholipid (all unidentified). The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains SLG210-30A1(T) and SLG210-19A2 showed the highest similarities with Glycocaulis abyssi MCS 33(T) (99.8-99.9 %), but low sequence similarities (<94.7 %) with type strains of other members of the family Hyphomonadaceae. However, the DNA-DNA relatedness of G. abyssi MCS 33(T) to strains SLG210-30A1(T) and SLG210-19A2 was 37.4±4.4 % and 36.1±1.1 %, respectively. Based on different physiological, biochemical, and phylogenetic characteristics, strains SLG210-30A1(T) and SLG210-19A2 represent a novel species of the genus Glycocaulis. The name Glycocaulis albus is therefore proposed with strain SLG210-30A1(T) ( = LMG 27741(T) = CGMCC 1.12766(T)) as the type strain. An emended description of the genus Glycocaulis is also provided. © 2014 IUMS.

  2. L-Asparaginase Activity in Cell Lysates and Culture Media of Halophilic Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Barati, Mahmood; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Nafissi-Varcheh, Nastaran; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Houshdar Tehrani, Mohammad Hassan; Vahidi, Hossein; Adrangi, Sina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate halophilic bacteria with the ability to produce intracellular or extracellular L-asparaginase. A total number of 120 halophilic bacteria were isolated from 17 different saline habitats of Iran including salt lakes, wetlands, brine springs and deserts. Among these, 68 were able to grow in the presence of 1.5 M NaCl and 52 demonstrated the ability to grow in the selection medium containing 3.5 M NaCl. None of the isolates appeared to produce appreciable amounts of extracellular L-asparaginase. Among the isolates that produced intracellular L-asparaginase, 5 moderate and 1 extreme halophiles were selected for further study based on their observed activity level. The moderately halophilic isolates were shown to belong to the genus Halomonas while the extreme halophile was identified as a member of the genus Aidingimonas.

  3. L-Asparaginase Activity in Cell Lysates and Culture Media of Halophilic Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Mahmood; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Nafissi-Varcheh, Nastaran; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Houshdar Tehrani, Mohammad Hassan; Vahidi, Hossein; Adrangi, Sina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate halophilic bacteria with the ability to produce intracellular or extracellular L-asparaginase. A total number of 120 halophilic bacteria were isolated from 17 different saline habitats of Iran including salt lakes, wetlands, brine springs and deserts. Among these, 68 were able to grow in the presence of 1.5 M NaCl and 52 demonstrated the ability to grow in the selection medium containing 3.5 M NaCl. None of the isolates appeared to produce appreciable amounts of extracellular L-asparaginase. Among the isolates that produced intracellular L-asparaginase, 5 moderate and 1 extreme halophiles were selected for further study based on their observed activity level. The moderately halophilic isolates were shown to belong to the genus Halomonas while the extreme halophile was identified as a member of the genus Aidingimonas. PMID:27980578

  4. Halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunte, Hans Jörg; Trüper, Hans G.; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    We consider the different mechanisms of osmoadaptation, the environment of halophiles, especially of subterranean halophilic isolates, and the relevance of microbial survival in high saline environments to astrobiology.

  5. Biotransformation of Direct Blue 1 by a moderately halophilic bacterium Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA and toxicity assessment of degraded metabolites.

    PubMed

    Arun Prasad, A S; Satyanarayana, V S V; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2013-11-15

    The ability of halophiles to survive in the extreme salt concentrations has gained them the importance of being used in the treatment of industrial waste waters. A moderately halophilic bacterial strain with the ability to degrade the complex azo dye Direct Blue-1 (DB-1) was isolated from sea water and identified as Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA. Complete decolorization of DB-1 (100 mg L(-1)) was achieved in 6h at 37 °C, pH 8 and with 70 g L(-1) NaCl. Decolorization was analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The FT-IR spectrum revealed that Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA specifically targeted azo bond (NN) at 1631 cm(-1) to break down Direct Blue-1. Formation of metabolites at different retention times in HPLC indicated degradation. Biotransformation pathway for DB-1 was proposed based on LC-MS. Phytotoxicity study revealed the less toxic nature of the metabolites compared to the dye. Genotoxicity with Allium cepa confirmed the cytotoxic nature of DB-1 by inducing several chromosomal abnormalities compared to the negligible effects of degraded metabolites. The current study is the first report on the detoxification of DB-1 by Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The potential of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria for the production of antineoplastic enzymes: L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Pejman; Asad, Sedigheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase can be effectively used for the treatment of patients who suffer from accute lymphoblastic leukemia and tumor cells. Microbial sources are the best source for the bulk production of these enzymes. However, their long-term administration may cause immunological responses, so screening for new enzymes with novel properties is required. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria with novel enzymatic characteristics can be considered as a potential source for production of enzymes with different immunological properties. In this study, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production by halophilic bacteria isolated from Urmia salt lake was studied. Out of the 85 isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains, 16 (19 %) showed L-asparaginase activity and 3 strains (3.5 %) showed L-glutaminase activity. Strains with the highest activities were selected for further studies. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, it was shown that the selected isolates for L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production belong to the genus Bacillus and Salicola, respectively. Both enzymes were produced extracellularly. The strain with the most L-asparaginase production did not show L-glutaminase production which is medically important. The effects of key parameters including temperature, initial pH of the solution, and concentrations of glucose, asparagine or glutamine, and sodium chloride were evaluated by means of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize enzymes production. Under the obtained optimal conditions, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production was increased up to 1.5 (61.7 unit/mL) and 2.6 fold (46.4 unit/mL), respectively. PMID:27330530

  7. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products. PMID:26885394

  8. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria from river waters and shallow groundwater along the Rouge River of southeastern Michigan.

    PubMed

    Tiquia, S M; Davis, D; Hadid, H; Kasparian, S; Ismail, M; Sahly, R; Shim, J; Singh, S; Murray, K S

    2007-03-01

    The use of sodium chloride to melt highway and road snow is believed to have a significant effect on the groundwater ecosystem of the rivers where the salt from the roads drain. As the river composition changes, the bacterial population also changes to favour those bacteria that are more suited to the higher salt concentrations. In this experiment, we surveyed the cultivable salt-loving organisms (halophiles) on three sites that encompass the Rouge River (Lotz; site 1, Lilly, site; 8, and Ford Field, site 9). A total of 125 isolates were surveyed. Representative isolates of distinct morphologies were subjected to physiological test, using API strips and identified by 16 rDNA sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequences were analyzed and compared with sequences from Genbank. Results indicated that the SSU rRNA sequences of the bacterial isolates were similar to six major genera, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Halobacillus, Paenabacillus, Halomonas, and Clostridium. Half of the isolates sequenced were similar to Bacillus spp. The API assay showed that the majority of the isolates were positive for the enzymes tryptophane deaminase, gelatinase and beta-galactosidase. Indole production, acetoin production and citrate utilization were not observed for any isolates. Fermentation of carbohydrates was observed for very few isolates. The primary enzyme found in all isolates was arginine dihydrolase, which might be an indicator of the presence of such enzyme in halophilic and halotolerant bacteria present in the Rouge River.

  9. A diverse group of halophilic bacteria exist in Lunsu, a natural salt water body of Himachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Srivastava, Malay; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Five halophilic bacterial isolates namely SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5 and SS8 were isolated from soil sediments of Lunsu, a salty water body. All the bacterial isolates showed growth in LB medium containing up to 8.7% NaCl, pH 7-8 and at temperature range of 30-37°C. The bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 require at least 3.8% NaCl for their growth, indicating their strict halophilic nature. Interestingly, bacterial isolates SS2, SS5 and SS8 but not SS1 and SS3 exhibited growth in medium supplemented with KCl. Accordingly, Na(+) and K(+) ions were detected at 1.39 and 0.0035%, respectively in Lunsu water. All the bacterial isolates were analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using four different random primers and produced PCR fragments ranging from 0.1 to 5 kb in size. Phylogenetic tree based on RAPD finger prints showed that SS1 and SS3 formed one group, while SS2 and SS5 formed the second group, whereas SS8 was out group. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA identified SS1 and SS3 as Halobacillus trueperi, SS2 as Shewanella algae, SS5 as Halomonas venusta, and SS8 as Marinomonas sp. were deposited in GenBank with accession numbers of KM260166, KF751761, KF751760, KF751762 and KF751763, respectively. This is the first report on the presence of diverse halophilic bacteria in the foot hills of Himalayas.

  10. Biodegradation of Benzene by Halophilic and Halotolerant Bacteria under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    A. Nicholson, Carla; Z. Fathepure, Babu

    2004-01-01

    A highly enriched halophilic culture was established with benzene as the sole carbon source by using a brine soil obtained from an oil production facility in Oklahoma. The enrichment completely degraded benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes within 1 to 2 weeks. Also, [14C]benzene was converted to 14CO2, suggesting the culture's ability to mineralize benzene. Community structure analysis revealed that Marinobacter spp. were the dominant members of the enrichment. PMID:14766609

  11. Platinum recovery from industrial process streams by halophilic bacteria: Influence of salt species and platinum speciation.

    PubMed

    Maes, Synthia; Claus, Mathias; Verbeken, Kim; Wallaert, Elien; De Smet, Rebecca; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-11-15

    The increased use and criticality of platinum asks for the development of effective low-cost strategies for metal recovery from process and waste streams. Although biotechnological processes can be applied for the valorization of diluted aqueous industrial streams, investigations considering real stream conditions (e.g., high salt levels, acidic pH, metal speciation) are lacking. This study investigated the recovery of platinum by a halophilic microbial community in the presence of increased salt concentrations (10-80 g L(-1)), different salt matrices (phosphate salts, sea salts and NH4Cl) and a refinery process stream. The halophiles were able to recover 79-99% of the Pt at 10-80 g L(-1) salts and at pH 2.3. Transmission electron microscopy suggested a positive correlation between intracellular Pt cluster size and elevated salt concentrations. Furthermore, the halophiles recovered 46-95% of the Pt-amine complex Pt[NH3]4(2+) from a process stream after the addition of an alternative Pt source (K2PtCl4, 0.1-1.0 g L(-1) Pt). Repeated Pt-tetraamine recovery (from an industrial process stream) was obtained after concomitant addition of fresh biomass and harvesting of Pt saturated biomass. This study demonstrates how aqueous Pt streams can be transformed into Pt rich biomass, which would be an interesting feed of a precious metals refinery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacillus oshimensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, non-motile alkaliphile.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Isao; Hirota, Kikue; Goto, Toshitaka; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Nakajima, Kenji

    2005-03-01

    A halophilic and halotolerant, facultatively alkaliphilic strain, K11(T), was isolated from soil obtained from Oshyamanbe, Oshima, Hokkaido, Japan. The isolate grew at pH 7-10. It was non-motile, Gram-positive and aerobic. Cells comprised straight rods and produced ellipsoidal spores. The isolate grew in 0-20 % NaCl, with optimum growth at 7 % NaCl, and hydrolysed casein, gelatin, starch, DNA and Tweens 20, 40, 60 and 80. The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7, and the cellular fatty acid profile consisted of significant amounts of C(15) branched-chain acids, iso C(15 : 0) and anteiso C(15 : 0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that strain K11(T) was a member of group 6 [Nielsen et al., FEMS Microbiol Lett 117 (1994), 61-66] (alkaliphiles) of the genus Bacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization revealed a low relatedness (14 %) of the isolate to its closest phylogenetic neighbour, Bacillus clausii. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, phylogenetic data and DNA-DNA relatedness data, it was concluded that K11(T) (=JCM 12663(T)=NCIMB 14023(T)) merits classification as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Bacillus oshimensis sp. nov. is proposed.

  13. Marinococcus salis sp., nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Vishnuvardhan Reddy, Sultanpuram; Thirumala, Mothe; Farooq, Mohammed; Sasikala, Chintalapati; Venkata Ramana, Chintalapati

    2016-12-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, coccoid-shaped, facultative anaerobic, motile and halophilic bacterium strain 5M(T) was isolated from Surajbari in India. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it was identified as belonging to the genus Marinococcus and was most closely related to Marinococcus luteus KCTC 13214(T) (99.3 %, sequence similarity), Marinococcus halotolerans KCTC 19045(T) (99.0 %), Marinococcus halophilus LMG 17439(T) (98.8 %) and Marinococcus tarijensis LMG 26930(T) (98.7 %). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness of strain 5M(T) with M. luteus KCTC 13214(T), M. halotolerans KCTC 19045(T), M. halophilus LMG 17439(T) and M. tarijensis LMG 26930(T) was 42.6 ± 0.8, 48.6 ± 0.8, 40.9 ± 0.8 and 39.8 ± 0.9 %, respectively. Strain 5M(T) grows optimally at 5 % (w/v) NaCl, pH 7.5-8.5 and 37 °C. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strain 5M(T) contains meso-diaminopimelic acid. Polar lipids of the strain 5M(T) include diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, a phospholipid and two unknown lipids. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. DNA G+C content was 48.9 mol%, and anteiso-C15:0 (40.9 %) was the predominant fatty acid. The results of phylogenetic, biochemical tests and chemotaxonomic allowed a clear differentiation of strain 5M(T) from all of its nearest phylogenetic neighbours, which represents a novel member of the genus Marinococcus, for which the name Marinococcus salis sp., nov., is proposed. The type strain is 5M(T) (=KCTC 33743(T) = LMG 29101(T) = CGMCC 1.15385(T)).

  14. Characterization of Lignocellulolytic Activities from a Moderate Halophile Strain of Aspergillus caesiellus Isolated from a Sugarcane Bagasse Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Miranda, Estefan; Sánchez-Reyes, Ayixón; Cuervo-Soto, Laura; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise; Atriztán-Hernández, Karina; Morales-Herrera, Catalina; Rodríguez-Hernández, Rocío; Folch-Mallol, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    A moderate halophile and thermotolerant fungal strain was isolated from a sugarcane bagasse fermentation in the presence of 2 M NaCl that was set in the laboratory. This strain was identified by polyphasic criteria as Aspergillus caesiellus. The fungus showed an optimal growth rate in media containing 1 M NaCl at 28°C and could grow in media added with up to 2 M NaCl. This strain was able to grow at 37 and 42°C, with or without NaCl. A. caesiellus H1 produced cellulases, xylanases, manganese peroxidase (MnP) and esterases. No laccase activity was detected in the conditions we tested. The cellulase activity was thermostable, halostable, and no differential expression of cellulases was observed in media with different salt concentrations. However, differential band patterns for cellulase and xylanase activities were detected in zymograms when the fungus was grown in different lignocellulosic substrates such as wheat straw, maize stover, agave fibres, sugarcane bagasse and sawdust. Optimal temperature and pH were similar to other cellulases previously described. These results support the potential of this fungus to degrade lignocellulosic materials and its possible use in biotechnological applications. PMID:25162614

  15. Marinimicrobium haloxylanilyticum sp. nov., a new moderately halophilic, polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    PubMed

    Møller, Mette Fogh; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2010-11-01

    A new moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, strain SX15(T), was isolated from hypersaline surface sediment of the southern arm of Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA). The strain grew on a number of carbohydrates and carbohydrate polymers such as xylan, starch, carboxymethyl cellulose and galactomannan. The strain grew at salinities ranging from 2 to 22% NaCl (w/v). Optimal growth occurred in the presence of 7-11% NaCl (w/v) at a temperature of 35°C and a pH of 6.7-8.2. Major whole-cell fatty acids were C16:0 (30.5%), C18:0 (14.8%), C18:1ω7c (13.1%) and C12:0 (7.8%). The G+C content of the DNA was 60 ± 0.5 mol%. By 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain SX15(T) was shown to be affiliated to members of the gammaproteobacterial genus Marinimicrobium with pair wise identity values of 92.9-94.6%. The pheno- and genotypic properties suggest that strain SX15(T) represents a novel species of the genus Marinimicrobium for which the name Marinimicrobium haloxylanilyticum is proposed. The type strain is SX15(T) (= DSM 23100(T) = CCUG 59572(T)).

  16. Virgibacillus ainsalahensis sp. nov., a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from Sediment of a Saline Lake in South of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Amziane, Meriam; Darenfed-Bouanane, Amel; Abderrahmani, Ahmed; Selama, Okba; Jouadi, Lydia; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Nateche, Farida; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2017-02-01

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, endospore-forming bacterium, designated MerV(T), was isolated from a sediment sample of a saline lake located in Ain Salah, south of Algeria. The cells were rod shaped and motile. Isolate MerV(T) grew at salinity interval of 0.5-25% NaCl (optimum, 5-10%), pH 6.0-12.0 (optimum, 8.0), and temperature between 10 and 40 °C (optimum, 30 °C).The polar lipids comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, a glycolipid, a phospholipid, and two lipids, and MK-7 is the predominant menaquinone. The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso C15:0 and anteiso C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 45.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain MerV(T) was most closely related to Virgibacillus halodenitrificans (gene sequence similarity of 97.0%). On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic properties, and phylogenetic analyses, strain MerV(T) (=DSM = 28944(T)) should be placed in the genus Virgibacillus as a novel species, for which the name Virgibacillus ainsalahensis is proposed.

  17. Petrotoga halophila sp. nov., a thermophilic, moderately halophilic, fermentative bacterium isolated from an offshore oil well in Congo.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Tello, Elizabeth; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Joulian, Catherine; Magot, Michel; Thomas, Pierre; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, moderately halophilic, rod-shaped bacterium, strain MET-B(T), with a sheath-like outer structure (toga) was isolated from an offshore oil-producing well in Congo, West Africa. Strain MET-B(T) was a Gram-negative bacterium with the ability to reduce elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite into sulfide. The optimum growth conditions were 60 degrees C, pH 6.7-7.2 and 4-6 % NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 34.6 mol%. Strain MET-B(T) was phylogenetically related to members of the genus Petrotoga; Petrotoga miotherma, Petrotoga olearia and Petrotoga mexicana were the closest relatives, with type strains exhibiting more than 99 % identity in an analysis of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences. The values for DNA-DNA relatedness between the type strains of these three species and strain MET-B(T) were less than 42 %. As MET-B(T) was found to be genetically and physiologically different from other species of the genus Petrotoga, this strain is proposed as representing a novel species, for which the name Petrotoga halophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MET-B(T) (=DSM 16923(T)=CCUG 50214(T)).

  18. Chromohalobacter salarius sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Cabo de Gata, Almeria, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Margarita; Cabrera, Antonio; Incerti, Claudia; Fuentes, Susana; Russell, Nick J; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes

    2007-06-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-negative bacterium (strain CG4.1(T)), which was isolated from a solar saltern at Cabo de Gata, a wildlife reserve located in the province of Almería, southern Spain, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. This organism was an aerobic, motile rod that produced colonies with a yellow pigment. Strain CG4.1(T) grew at salinities of 3-25 % (w/v), at 15-45 degrees C and at pH 5-9. The organism reduced nitrate, hydrolysed starch and had phenylalanine deaminase activity. The major fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0) and C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c. The DNA G+C content was 63.6 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain CG4.1(T) appears to be a member of the genus Chromohalobacter and clustered closely with Chromohalobacter species, with 95-96 % similarity between their 16S rRNA gene sequences. However, DNA-DNA relatedness between the isolate and the type strains of Chromohalobacter species was low. Therefore, it is proposed that strain CG4.1(T) represents a novel species, Chromohalobacter salarius sp. nov. The type strain is strain CG4.1(T) (=CECT 5903(T)=LMG 23626(T)).

  19. Expression and bioconversion of recombinant m- and p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylases from a novel moderate halophile, Chromohalobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonduck; Park, Yu Ri; Im, Seonghun; Kim, Dockyu; Kim, Si Wouk

    2012-09-01

    p-Hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (pobA) and m-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (mobA) genes, from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter sp. HS-2, were expressed and characterized. Solubilities of overexpressed recombinant MobA and PobA were enhanced by the induction of the heat-shock proteins DnaJ and DnaK. Each MobA and PobA maintained stable activity under high NaCl concentrations. V (max) and K (m) values for MobA with m-hydroxybenzoate were 70 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and 81 μM, respectively. Similarly, those of PobA with p-hydroxybenzoate as substrate were 5 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and 129 μM, respectively. The Escherichia coli expression system, including induction of heat shock proteins, was used to convert hydroxybenzoates into protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) and revealed that resting cells harboring mobA converted 15 mM m-hydroxybenzoate to 15 mM protocatechuate while those harboring pobA converted 50 mM p-hydroxybenzoate to 35 mM protocatechuate at 30 °C, respectively.

  20. Glutamate restores growth but not motility in the absence of chloride in the moderate halophile Halobacillus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Saum, Stephan H; Roessler, Markus; Koller, Christiane; Sydow, Jasmin F; Müller, Volker

    2007-09-01

    Halobacillus halophilus is a strictly chloride-dependent, moderately halophilic bacterium that synthesizes glutamate and glutamine as the major compatible solutes at intermediate NaCl concentrations. The key enzyme in production of the compatible solutes glutamine and glutamate, glutamine synthetase, is dependent on chloride on a transcriptional and activity level. This led us to ask whether exogenous supply of glutamate may relief the chloride dependence of growth of H. halophilus. Growth of H. halophilus in minimal medium at 1 M NaCl was stimulated by exogenous glutamate and transport experiments revealed a chloride-independent glutamate uptake by whole cells. Growth was largely impaired in the absence of chloride and, at the same time, glutamate and glutamine pools were reduced by 90%. Exogenous glutamate fully restored growth, and cellular glutamate and glutamine pools were refilled. Although glutamate could restore growth in the absence of chloride, another chloride-dependent process, flagellum synthesis and motility, was not restored by glutamate. The differential effect of glutamate on the two chloride-dependent processes, growth and motility, indicates that glutamate can not substitute chloride in general but apparently bypasses one function of the chloride regulon, the adjustment of pool sizes of compatible solutes.

  1. Kocuria marina BS-15 a biosurfactant producing halophilic bacteria isolated from solar salt works in India

    PubMed Central

    Sarafin, Yesurethinam; Donio, Mariathasan Birdilla Selva; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-01-01

    Biosurfactant screening was made among the eight halophilic bacterial genera isolated from Kovalam solar salt works in Kanyakumari of India. After initial screening, Kocuria sp. (Km), Kurthia sp. (Ku) and Halococcus sp. (Hc) were found to have positive biosurfactant activity. Biosurfactant derived from Kocuria sp. emulsified more than 50% of the crude oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, olive oil and kerosene when compared to the other strains. Further, Kocuria marina BS-15 derived biosurfactant was purified and characterized by TLC, FTIR and GC–MS analysis. The TLC analysis revealed that, the purified biosurfactants belong to the lipopeptide group. The IR spectrum results revealed that functional groups are R2C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 NN, alkenes and N–H. The GC–MS analysis confirmed the compound as Nonanoic acid and Cyclopropane with the retention time of 12.78 and 24.65, respectively. PMID:25473358

  2. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes as a functional marker for chemolithoautotrophic halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    The presence and diversity of the cbb genes encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) (a key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson cycle of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation) were investigated in pure cultures of seven genera of halophilic chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and in sediments from a hypersaline lake in which such bacteria have been recently discovered. All of the halophilic SOB strains (with the exception of Thiohalomonas nitratireducens) possessed the cbbL gene encoding RuBisCO form I, while the cbbM gene encoding RuBisCO form II was detected only in some of the pure cultures. The general topologies of the CbbL/CbbM trees and the 16S rRNA gene tree were different, but both markers showed that the halophilic SOB genera formed independent lineages in the Gammaproteobacteria. In some cases, such as with several strains of the genus Thiohalospira and with Thioalkalibacter halophilus, the cbbL clustering was incongruent with the positions of these strains on the ribosomal tree. In the cbbM tree, the clustering of Thiohalospira and Thiohalorhabdus strains was incongruent with their branching in both cbbL and 16S rRNA gene trees. cbbL and cbbM genes related to those found in the analysed halophilic SOB were also detected in a sediment from a hypersaline lake in Kulunda Steppe (Russia). Most of the cbbL and cbbM genes belonged to members of the genus Thiohalorhabdus. In the cbbL clone library, sequences related to those of Halothiobacillus and Thiohalospira were detected as minor components. Some of the environmental cbbM sequences belonged to as yet unknown phylotypes, representing deep lineages of halophilic autotrophs.

  3. Identification and characterization of salt-inducible polypeptide in Paenibacillus sp., a moderately halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Ashrafaddin; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar

    2005-11-01

    In response to salt, Paenibacillus sp. strain XII expresses a 21.4 kDa polypeptide. N-terminal sequencing and sequence homology analysis indicate homology between the N-terminal sequence of the polypeptide and a segment of the N-terminus of the spore coat associated protein CotN of Oceanobacillus iheyensis, an extremely halotolerant bacteria of the deep-sea.

  4. Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from Lop Nur salt lake in Xinjiang province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Zhou, Yu; Ja, Man; Shi, Rong; Chun-Yu, Wei-Xun; Yang, Ling-Ling; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated YIM 93624(T), was isolated from a salt lake in Xinjiang province of China and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain YIM 93624(T) grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 25-30 °C), 1-17% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 5-10 %, w/v) and pH 4.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0). The predominant menaquinone was found to be MK-7. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0) and C(16:0). The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, a glycolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain YIM 93624(T) was a member of the genus Virgibacillus and exhibited the highest similarity of 97.0 % to Virgibacillus koreensis KCTC 3823(T). However, the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YIM 93624(T) and V. koreensis KCTC 3823(T) was 32.5 %. On the basis of phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analysis data, the isolate is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Virgibacillus, for which the name Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., is proposed, with type strain of YIM 93624(T) (=DSM 23711(T) = JCM 17364(T)).

  5. Halomonas indalinina sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Cabo de Gata, Almeria, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Antonio; Aguilera, Margarita; Fuentes, Susana; Incerti, Claudia; Russell, Nick J; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes

    2007-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, strain CG2.1T, isolated from a solar saltern at Cabo de Gata, a wildlife reserve located in the province of Almería, southern Spain, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. This organism was an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative rod that produced orange-pigmented colonies. Strain CG2.1T was able to grow at salinities of 3-25 % (w/v) and at temperatures of 15-40 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 5-9. Strain CG2.1T was a heterotroph capable of utilizing various carbohydrates as carbon sources. The organism reduced nitrate and showed phenylalanine deaminase activity. The major fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0) and C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c. The DNA G+C content was 60.9 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain CG2.1T appeared to be a member of the genus Halomonas and clustered closely with Halomonas marisflavi (97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). However, the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and the most closely related Halomonas species was low. On the basis of these data, strain CG2.1T represents a novel member of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas indalinina is proposed. The type strain is CG2.1T (=CECT 5902T=LMG 23625T).

  6. Aquisalimonas asiatica gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from an alkaline, saline lake in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Márquez, M C; Carrasco, I J; Xue, Y; Ma, Y; Cowan, D A; Jones, B E; Grant, W D; Ventosa, A

    2007-05-01

    Two novel moderately halophilic, Gram-negative rods (strains CG12(T) and CG13) were isolated from Lake Chagannor in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. They were strictly aerobic and motile. They grew at pH 6.0-10.8 (optimally at pH 7.5-8.5), at 20-50 degrees C (optimally at 37 degrees C) and at salinities of 1-20 % (w/v) total salts (optimally at 7-10 %, w/v). Phylogenetic analysis of the two strains, based on a comparison of their 16S rRNA genes, led to their classification within the class Gammaproteobacteria, the closest recognized type strain being Alkalispirillum mobile DSM 12769(T), with which they were found to share 94.4-94.6 % sequence similarity. On the basis of DNA-DNA hybridization data (showing 100 and 99 % relatedness for each other), the two isolates were found to be members of the same species. The DNA G+C contents of strains CG12(T) and CG13 were found to be 63.6 and 64.0 mol%, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CG12(T), selected as the representative strain, were C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0) and C(12 : 0), and its polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, a phosphoglycolipid and six unidentified phospholipids. On the basis of the polyphasic evidence from this study, strains CG12(T) and CG13 represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Aquisalimonas asiatica gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aquisalimonas asiatica is CG12(T) (=CCM 7368(T)=CECT 7151(T)=CGMCC 1.6291(T)=DSM 18102(T)).

  7. A novel NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter from the moderate halophile and alkaliphile Halomonas alkaliphila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhong; Song, Na; Yang, Lina; Abdel-Motaal, Heba; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenglai; Meng, Fankui; Jiang, Juquan

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene designated Ha-nhaD was obtained by selection of genomic DNA from the moderate halophile and alkaliphile Halomonas alkaliphila in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking 3 major Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. The presence of Ha-NhaD conferred tolerance of E. coli KNabc to NaCl up to 0.6 mol·L(-1) and to LiCl up to 0.2 mol·L(-1) and to an alkaline pH. pH-dependent Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity was detected from everted membrane vesicles prepared from E. coli KNabc/pUC-nhaD but not those of KNabc/pUC18. Ha-NhaD exhibited Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity over a wide pH range from 7.0 to 9.5, with the highest activity at pH 9.0. Protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that Ha-NhaD is significantly different from the 7 known NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, including Dw-NhaD, Dl-NhaD, Vp-NhaD, Vc-NhaD, Aa-NhaD, He-NhaD, and Ha-NhaD1. Although Ha-NhaD showed a closer phylogenetic relationship with Ha-NhaD2, a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile exists between Ha-NhaD and Ha-NhaD2. Taken together, Ha-nhaD encodes a novel pH-dependent NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter.

  8. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the fami- ly Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Alla; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the family Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180813

  10. Purification and characterization of a halophilic α-amylase with increased activity in the presence of organic solvents from the moderately halophilic Nesterenkonia sp. strain F.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mohammad; Ziaee, Abed-Ali; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-07-01

    An extracellular halophilic α-amylase was purified from Nesterenkonia sp. strain F using 80 % ethanol precipitation and Q-Sepharose anion exchange chromatography. The enzyme showed a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 110 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The amylase exhibited maximal activity at pH 7-7.5, being relatively stable at pH 6.5-7.5. Optimal temperature for the amylase activity and stability was 45 °C. The purified enzyme was highly active in the broad range of NaCl concentrations (0-4 M) with optimal activity at 0.25 M NaCl. The amylase was highly stable in the presence of 3-4 M NaCl. Amylase activity was not influenced by Ca²⁺, Rb⁺, Li⁺, Cs⁺, Mg²⁺ and Hg²⁺, whereas Fe³⁺, Cu²⁺, Zn²⁺ and Al³⁺) strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. The α-amylase was inhibited by EDTA, but was not inhibited by PMSF and β-mercaptoethanol. K(m) value of the amylase for soluble starch was 6.6 mg/ml. Amylolytic activity of the enzyme was enhanced not only by 20 % of water-immiscible organic solvents but also by acetone, ethanol and chloroform. Higher concentration (50 %) of the water-miscible organic solvents had no significant effect on the amylase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on increased activity of a microbial α-amylase in the presence of organic solvents.

  11. Isolation and identification of culturable halophilic bacteria with producing hydrolytic enzyme from Incheh Broun hypersaline wetland in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zarparvar, P; Amoozegar, M A; Babavalian, H; Reza Fallahian, M; Tebyanian, H; Shakeri, F

    2016-10-31

    Incheh Broun hypersaline wetland is located near the border of Turkmenistan in thenorth of Iran. This wetland is notable because of salinity (280g/l) and alteration in pH range (2.8 to 6.8). Eastern part of wetland is affected by wastewater of iodine extraction factory.  Samples were taken from soil, water and salt. Totally, 400 bacterial strains were isolated of which 194 strains were Gram-positive bacilli, 184 strains were Gram-negative rod and 22 strains were Gram-positive cocci. According to phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, selected strains were placed in three taxonomic phyla including Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Optimum growth was evaluated for salt and 22 strains were found to be moderate halophile and 33 strains were halotolerant. Production of lipase, amylase, gelatinase and protease was examined. Gram-positive bacilli were the main producers of hydrolytic enzymes. Gelatinase and protease were the most frequent enzymes. Gram-positive cocci were the main producers of lipase but they didn't produce amylase.

  12. Ornithinibacillus halophilus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming bacterium from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Schumann, Peter; Didari, Maryam; Mehrshad, Malihe; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain G8B(T), was isolated from water of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran and characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain G8B(T) were rod-shaped, motile and produced oval endospores at a terminal position in swollen sporangia. Strain G8B(T) was strictly aerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-12.5 % (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 5-7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35-40 °C and pH 7.5-8.0, respectively. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G8B(T) was shown to belong to the genus Ornithinibacillus within the phylum Firmicutes and showed closest phylogenetic similarity with Ornithinibacillus bavariensis WSBC 24001(T) (97.6 %). The DNA G+C content of strain G8B(T) was 36.9 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain G8B(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0, and its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four unknown phospholipids and an unknown aminolipid. The isoprenoid quinones were MK-7 (98 %) and MK-8 (2 %). Strain G8B(T) contained a peptidoglycan of type A4β, l-Orn-d-Asp. All these features confirmed the placement of isolate G8B(T) within the genus Ornithinibacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a low level of relatedness (6 %) between strain G8B(T) and Ornithinibacillus bavariensis DSM 15681(T). On the basis of evidence from this study, a novel species of the genus Ornithinibacillus, Ornithinibacillus halophilus sp. nov., is proposed, with strain G8B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10683(T) = KCTC 13822(T)) as the type strain.

  13. Electron Transport in Halophilic Bacteria: Involvement of a Menaquinone in the Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidative Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Ernest D.; Brodie, Arnold F.

    1970-01-01

    The reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidative pathway of a halophilic bacterium was found to contain a light-sensitive (360 nm) compound, menaquinone-8, which serves as a cofactor in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide+-linked pathway. PMID:4316363

  14. Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic species from a desiccation lagoon in the Cuatro Ciénegas Valley in Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerritos, René; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Alcaraz-Peraza, Luis D; Arvizu-Gómez, Jackeline L; Olmedo, Gabriela; Ramirez, Enrique; Siefert, Janet L; Souza, Valeria

    2008-04-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-positive and rod-shaped bacterium, strain m4-4T, was isolated from a Chihuahuan desert lagoon in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico. Strain m4-4T was found to grow optimally at 30-37 degrees C, pH 7.0-8.0 and 5 % NaCl and to tolerate from 0.5 % to 10 % NaCl. It was shown to be aerobic. The genomic DNA G+C content was about 37 mol%. Strain m4-4T exhibited minimal or no growth on most sugars tested. Its major cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1. Based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences, we observed that the closest relatives of the isolate are moderately halophilic Bacillus species, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity ranging from 96.6 to 97.4 % (Bacillus marisflavi, Bacillus aquimaris and Bacillus vietnamensis). Additionally, using genomic data it was determined that the type strain contains a total of nine rRNA operons with three slightly different sequences. On the basis of phenotypic and molecular properties, strain m4-4T represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain m4-4T (=NRRL B-41737T =CECT 7197T).

  15. Growth phase-dependent switch in osmolyte strategy in a moderate halophile: ectoine is a minor osmolyte but major stationary phase solute in Halobacillus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Saum, Stephan H; Müller, Volker

    2008-03-01

    The moderately halophilic, chloride-dependent bacterium Halobacillus halophilus switches its osmolyte strategy with the salinity in its environment by the production of different compatible solutes. Ectoine is produced predominantly at very high salinities, along with proline. Interestingly, ectoine production is growth phase dependent which led to a more than 1000-fold change in the ectoine : proline ratio from 0.04 in exponential to 27.4 in late stationary phase cultures. The genes encoding the ectoine biosynthesis pathway were identified on the chromosome in the order ectABC. They form an operon that is expressed in a salinity-dependent manner with low-level expression below 1.5 M NaCl but 10-fold and 23-fold increased expression at 2.5 and 3.0 M NaCl respectively. The temporal expression of genes involved in osmoresponse is different with gdh/gln and pro genes being first, followed by ect genes. Chloride had no effect on expression of ect genes, but stimulated cellular EctC synthesis as well as ectoine production. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a growth-phase dependent switch in osmolyte strategy in a moderate halophile and, additionally, represent another piece of the chloride regulon of H. halophilus.

  16. A new lineage of halophilic, wall-less, contractile bacteria from a brine-filled deep of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Antunes, André; Rainey, Fred A; Wanner, Gerhard; Taborda, Marco; Pätzold, Jürgen; Nobre, M Fernanda; da Costa, Milton S; Huber, Robert

    2008-05-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic bacterium designated strain SSD-17B(T) was isolated from the hypersaline brine-sediment interface of the Shaban Deep, Red Sea. Cells were pleomorphic but usually consisted of a central coccoid body with one or two "tentacle-like" protrusions. These protrusions actively alternated between a straight, relaxed form and a contracted, corkscrew-like one. A peptidoglycan layer was not detected by electron microscopy. The organism forms "fried-egg"-like colonies on MM-X medium. The organism is strictly anaerobic and halophilic and has an optimum temperature for growth of about 30 to 37 degrees C and an optimum pH of about 7. Nitrate and nitrite are reduced; lactate is a fermentation product. The fatty acid profile is dominated by straight saturated and unsaturated chain compounds. Menaquinone 4 is the major respiratory quinone. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated strain SSD-17B(T) represents a novel and distinct lineage within the radiation of the domain Bacteria. The branching position of strain SSD-17B(T) was equidistant to the taxa considered to be representative lineages of the phyla Firmicutes and Tenericutes (with its sole class Mollicutes). The phenotypic and phylogenetic data clearly show the distinctiveness of this unusual bacterium, and we therefore propose that strain SSD-17B(T) (= DSM 18853 = JCM 14575) represents a new genus and a new species, for which we recommend the name Haloplasma contractile gen. nov., sp. nov. We are also of the opinion that the organism represents a new order-level taxon, for which we propose the name Haloplasmatales.

  17. Construction of a shuttle expression vector with a promoter functioning in both halophilic Archaea and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jie; Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Chi; Huang, Yuping; Chen, Xiangdong

    2013-12-01

    A shuttle expression vector, designated as pAJ, was constructed based on the Haloferax volcanii-Escherichia coli shuttle vector pSY1. This new construct contains the amyH promoter from Haloarcula hispanica and was able to confer the promoter activity in both Hfx. volcanii and E. coli. pAJ successfully expressed proteins in Hfx. volcanii or E. coli, rendering it feasible to express target proteins in corresponding domains. In addition, pAJ contains a multiple cloning site with 11 restriction sites and a 6×His tag sequence, and the vector size was decreased to 8903 bp. To the best of our knowledge, pAJ is the first reported shuttle expression vector that can express proteins in both Bacteria and Archaea. Importantly, pAJ can even express the haloarchaeal heat shock protein DnaK in both domains. In conclusion, this novel vector only provides researchers with a new means to manipulate genes or express proteins in Haloarchaea but also serves as a convenient tool for the comparative study of the function of some highly conserved genes in Haloarchaea and in Bacteria.

  18. Halophiles and their enzymes: negativity put to good use.

    PubMed

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-06-01

    Halophilic microorganisms possess stable enzymes that function in very high salinity, an extreme condition that leads to denaturation, aggregation, and precipitation of most other proteins. Genomic and structural analyses have established that the enzymes of halophilic Archaea and many halophilic Bacteria are negatively charged due to an excess of acidic over basic residues, and altered hydrophobicity, which enhance solubility and promote function in low water activity conditions. Here, we provide an update on recent bioinformatic analysis of predicted halophilic proteomes as well as experimental molecular studies on individual halophilic enzymes. Recent efforts on discovery and utilization of halophiles and their enzymes for biotechnology, including biofuel applications are also considered.

  19. Halophiles and their enzymes: Negativity put to good use

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms possess stable enzymes that function in very high salinity, an extreme condition that leads to denaturation, aggregation, and precipitation of most other proteins. Genomic and structural analyses have established that the enzymes of halophilic Archaea and many halophilic Bacteria are negatively charged due to an excess of acidic over basic residues, and altered hydrophobicity, which enhance solubility and promote function in low water activity conditions. Here, we provide an update on recent bioinformatic analysis of predicted halophilic proteomes as well as experimental molecular studies on individual halophilic enzymes. On-going efforts on discovery and utilization of halophiles and their enzymes for biotechnology, including biofuel applications are also considered. PMID:26066288

  20. Effect of organic solvents on the structure and activity of moderately halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

    2014-11-01

    Halophilic enzymes have been manifested for their stability and catalytic abilities under harsh operational conditions. These have been documented to withstand denaturation in presence of high temperature, pH, presence of organic solvents and chaotropic agents. The present study aims at understanding the stability and activity of a halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease in organic solvents. The protease was uniquely stable in polar solvents. A clear correlation was evident between the protease function and conformational transitions, validated by CD and fluorescence spectral studies. The study affirms that preservation of protein structure, possibly due to charge screening of the protein surface by Ca(2+) and Na(+) ions provides stability against organic solvents and averts denaturation. Salt was also found to exert a protective effect on dialyzed protease against chaotropism of solvents. Presence of 1 % (w/v) NaCl restored the activity in the dialyzed protease and prevented denaturation in methanol, toluene and n-decane. The work will have further implication on discerning protein folding in saline as well as non-aqueous environments.

  1. Distribution of compatible solutes in the halophilic methanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Meichin Lai; Sowers, K.R.; Gunsalus, R.P. ); Robertson, D.E.; Roberts, M.F. )

    1991-09-01

    Accumulation of compatible solutes, by uptake or de novo synthesis, enables bacteria to reduce the difference between osmotic potentials of the cell cytoplasm and the extracellular environment. To examine this process in the halophilic and halotolerant methanogenic archaebacteria, 14 strains were tested for the accumulation of compatible solutes in response to growth in various extracellular concentrations of NaCl. In external NaCl concentrations of 0.7 to 3.4 M, the halophilic methanogens accumulated K{sup +} ion and low-molecular-weight organic compounds. {beta}-Glutamate was detected in two halotolerant strains that grew below 1.5 M NaCl. Two unusual {beta}-amino acids, N{sub {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine and {beta}-glutamine (3-aminoglutaramic acid), as well as L-{alpha}-glutamate were compatible solutes among all of these strains. De novo synthesis of glycine betaine was also detected in several strains of moderately and extremely halophilic methanogens. The zwitterionic compounds ({beta}-glutamine, N{sub {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine,a nd glycine betaine) and potassium were the predominant compatible solutes among the moderately and extremely halophilic methanogens. This is the first report of {beta}-glutamine as a compatible solute and de novo biosynthesis of glycine betaine in the methanogenic archaebacteria.

  2. Using extremely halophilic bacteria to understand the role of surface charge and surface hydration in protein evolution, folding, and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Deole, Ratnakar; Osu Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Halophilic Archaea accumulate molar concentrations of KCl in their cytoplasm as an osmoprotectant, and have evolved highly acidic proteomes that only function at high salinity. We examine osmoprotection in the photosynthetic Proteobacteria Halorhodospira halophila. We find that H. halophila has an acidic proteome and accumulates molar concentrations of KCl when grown in high salt media. Upon growth of H. halophila in low salt media, its cytoplasmic K + content matches that of Escherichia coli, revealing an acidic proteome that can function in the absence of high cytoplasmic salt concentrations. These findings necessitate a reassessment of two central aspects of theories for understanding extreme halophiles. We conclude that proteome acidity is not driven by stabilizing interactions between K + ions and acidic side chains, but by the need for maintaining sufficient solvation and hydration of the protein surface at high salinity through strongly hydrated carboxylates. We propose that obligate protein halophilicity is a non-adaptive property resulting from genetic drift in which constructive neutral evolution progressively incorporates weakly stabilizing K + binding sites on an increasingly acidic protein surface.

  3. Isolation of Extreme Halophiles from Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Valera, F.; Ruiz-Berraquero, F.; Ramos-Cormenzana, A.

    1979-01-01

    Extreme halophilic bacteria were isolated from the ocean off the coast of Spain. All were gram-negative cocci. One isolate was compared to Halococcus sp. NCMB 757 and was found to have similar characteristics. PMID:16345409

  4. Isolation of extreme halophiles from seawater.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Valera, F; Ruiz-Berraquero, F; Ramos-Cormenzana, A

    1979-07-01

    Extreme halophilic bacteria were isolated from the ocean off the coast of Spain. All were gram-negative cocci. One isolate was compared to Halococcus sp. NCMB 757 and was found to have similar characteristics.

  5. Polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis and simplified polymer recovery by a novel moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Rathi, D-N; Amir, H G; Abed, R M M; Kosugi, A; Arai, T; Sulaiman, O; Hashim, R; Sudesh, K

    2013-02-01

    Halophilic micro-organisms have received much interest because of their potential biotechnological applications, among which is the capability of some strains to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Halomonas sp. SK5, which was isolated from hypersaline microbial mats, accumulated intracellular granules of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] in modified accumulation medium supplemented with 10% (w/v) salinity and 3% (w/v) glucose. A cell density of approximately 3.0 g l(-1) was attained in this culture which yielded 48 wt% P(3HB). The bacterial strain was also capable of synthesizing poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] when cofed with relevant precursors. Feeding with sodium valerate (0.7 mol l(-1) carbon) at various time intervals within 36 h resulted in 3HV molar fractions ranging from 6 up to 54 mol%. Oil palm trunk sap (OPTS) and seawater as the carbon source and culture medium respectively facilitated a significant accumulation of P(3HB). Simplified downstream processing based on osmotic lysis in the presence of alkali/detergent for both dry and wet biomass resulted in approximately 90-100% recovery of polymers with purity as high as 90%. Weight-average molecular weight (M(w) ) of the polymers recovered was in the range of 1-2 × 10(6) . Halomonas sp. SK5 was able to synthesize P(3HB) homopolymer as well as P(3HB-co-3HV) copolymer from various carbon sources. This is the first time a comprehensive study of both production and downstream processing is reported for Halomonas spp. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Morphotypes and pigment profiles of halophilic bacteria: Practical data useful for novelty, taxonomic categorization and for describing novel species or new taxa.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2017-08-01

    Halophilic bacteria were isolated from oil spill samples collected from West-coast of Goa. Bacteria were isolated from oil studded soil, salt marsh and offshore samples (A, A7, CSM, CB and CM) collected along the West coastline in Goa (India) i.e. Arambol beach, Calanguate beach, Candolim beach and Colva beach on Zobell Marine agar, R2A agar, Mannitol salt agar and Blood agar at temperature 22 to 24 °C. Isolates showed growth in the presence of hydrocarbons (1% phenanthrene and 2% bitumen). Diverse profiles of pigments were observed on different nutrient medium. Color of pigments produced on agar media recorded as per standard color chart. All isolates showed different growth pattern. Isolate no 11 (GOACSMMS-11) showed three different morphological features/growth patterns on Zobell Marine Agar and R2A medium in the presence of hydrocarbons. Results obtained yield new information which gives a clear idea about morphological features and pigmented profiles of hydrocarbon resistant morphotypes in the presence different media compositions. The presented datasets will be useful for studies on bacterial species showing high sequence similarity. Hence, generated data serves as a benchmark for to distinguish between genetically similar bacteria and for further research in phenotype based microbial diversity, microbial ecology of microorganisms and microbial systematics and taxonomy in addition to genotype data.

  7. Production of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoic acids by a moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas marina HMA 103 isolated from solar saltern of Orissa, India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Amrita; Patra, A; Paul, A K

    2009-06-01

    Halomonas marina HMA 103 (MTCC 8968), the moderately halophilic bacterium isolated and characterized from the solar saltern of Orissa, India, grows optimally at 10% (w/v) NaCl in culture medium and is able to synthesize poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] during growth. This study is an attempt to optimize the cultural conditions for efficient production of P(3HB) by H. marina in batch cultivation. Growth of the organism under shake-flask culture using 2% (w/v) glucose resulted in P(3HB) accumulation accounting for more than 59% of cell dry weight after 50 h of incubation. The optimum P(3HB) production was attained with a combined supply of NH4Cl and yeast extract as N-source, 0.01% (w/v) phosphate, 1.5% (w/v) sulphate and 10% (w/v) NaCl. Qualitative and quantitative 1HNMR and FT-IR analysis of cells grown in alkanoic acids (C3-C6) as sole source of carbon and co-substrates revealed synthesis of PHA co-polymers composed of 3-hydroxybutyric acid and 3-hydroxyvaleric acid [P(3HB-co-3HV)]. In two-step cultivation, accumulation of the co-polymer was significantly improved (80% CDW) in glucose medium supplemented with valerate (0.1%, w/v) as co-substrate and the polymer contained 88.1 and 12.8 mol% 3HB and 3HV monomers, respectively.

  8. Solar salt lake as natural environmental source for extraction halophilic pigments

    PubMed Central

    Khanafari, A; Khavarinejad, D; Mashinchian, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Halophilic bacteria produce a variety of pigments, which function as immune modulators and have prophylactic action against cancers. In this study, colorful halophilic bacteria were isolated from solar salt lake and their pigments was extracted in optimal environmental conditions and compared with the pigments of Halorubrum sodomense ATCC 33755. Materials and Methods Water samples from the solar salt lake in Imam Khomeini port in southwest of Iran were used as a source for isolation of pigment-producing bacteria. Halorubrum sodomense ATCC 33755 was used as control for pigment production. The conditions for optimum growth and pigment production were established for the isolated bacteria. Pigment were analyzed by spectrophotometer, TLC and NMR assay. The 16S rRNA genes were sequenced and results were used to differentiate haloarchaea from halophilic bacterial strains. Results Among the isolated strains, YS and OS strains and Halorubrum sodomense were recognized as moderate and extremely halophile with maximum growth in the presence of 15% and 30% NaCl concentrations, respectively. Experiments conducted to find out the optimum conditions for growth and pigment production temperature at 25°C, pH = 7.2 and shaking conditions at 120 rpm for three strains. Without shaking, little growth with no pigment production was observed. Total pigment produced by red, yellow and orange strains was measured at 240, 880 and 560 mg per dry cell weight respectively. Amplification yielded bands of to isolated strains only observed with bacteria primers. This result suggesting the YS and OS strains were not haloarchaea. Conclusion The isolated halophilic bacteria produced much higher amounts of pigments than Halorubrum sodomense. Photo intermediates including metarhodopsin II (meta II, λmax=380 nm) were determined as major pigment in Halorubrum sodomense. PMID:22347558

  9. Solar salt lake as natural environmental source for extraction halophilic pigments.

    PubMed

    Khanafari, A; Khavarinejad, D; Mashinchian, A

    2010-06-01

    Halophilic bacteria produce a variety of pigments, which function as immune modulators and have prophylactic action against cancers. In this study, colorful halophilic bacteria were isolated from solar salt lake and their pigments was extracted in optimal environmental conditions and compared with the pigments of Halorubrum sodomense ATCC 33755. Water samples from the solar salt lake in Imam Khomeini port in southwest of Iran were used as a source for isolation of pigment-producing bacteria. Halorubrum sodomense ATCC 33755 was used as control for pigment production. The conditions for optimum growth and pigment production were established for the isolated bacteria. Pigment were analyzed by spectrophotometer, TLC and NMR assay. The 16S rRNA genes were sequenced and results were used to differentiate haloarchaea from halophilic bacterial strains. Among the isolated strains, YS and OS strains and Halorubrum sodomense were recognized as moderate and extremely halophile with maximum growth in the presence of 15% and 30% NaCl concentrations, respectively. Experiments conducted to find out the optimum conditions for growth and pigment production temperature at 25°C, pH = 7.2 and shaking conditions at 120 rpm for three strains. Without shaking, little growth with no pigment production was observed. Total pigment produced by red, yellow and orange strains was measured at 240, 880 and 560 mg per dry cell weight respectively. Amplification yielded bands of to isolated strains only observed with bacteria primers. This result suggesting the YS and OS strains were not haloarchaea. The isolated halophilic bacteria produced much higher amounts of pigments than Halorubrum sodomense. Photo intermediates including metarhodopsin II (meta II, λ(max)=380 nm) were determined as major pigment in Halorubrum sodomense.

  10. The Genome of the Moderate Halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1T Reveals Four Alkane Hydroxylation Systems and Provides Some Clues on the Genetic Basis for Its Adaptation to a Petroleum Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Fang, Hui; Li, Yan; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    The moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1T is the type strain of a novel species in the recently described novel genus Amycolicicoccus, which was isolated from oil mud precipitated from oil produced water. The complete genome of A. subflavus DQS3-9A1T has been sequenced and is characteristic of harboring the genes for adaption to the harsh petroleum environment with salinity, high osmotic pressure, and poor nutrient levels. Firstly, it characteristically contains four types of alkane hydroxylases, including the integral-membrane non-heme iron monooxygenase (AlkB) and cytochrome P450 CYP153, a long-chain alkane monooxygenase (LadA) and propane monooxygenase. It also accommodates complete pathways for the response to osmotic pressure. Physiological tests proved that the strain could grow on n-alkanes ranging from C10 to C36 and propane as the sole carbon sources, with the differential induction of four kinds of alkane hydroxylase coding genes. In addition, the strain could grow in 1–12% NaCl with the putative genes responsible for osmotic stresses induced as expected. These results reveal the effective adaptation of the strain DQS3-9A1T to harsh oil environment and provide a genome platform to investigate the global regulation of different alkane metabolisms in bacteria that are crucially important for petroleum degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the co-existence of such four types of alkane hydroxylases in a bacterial strain. PMID:23967144

  11. The genome of the moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) reveals four alkane hydroxylation systems and provides some clues on the genetic basis for its adaptation to a petroleum environment.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Fang, Hui; Li, Yan; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    The moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) is the type strain of a novel species in the recently described novel genus Amycolicicoccus, which was isolated from oil mud precipitated from oil produced water. The complete genome of A. subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) has been sequenced and is characteristic of harboring the genes for adaption to the harsh petroleum environment with salinity, high osmotic pressure, and poor nutrient levels. Firstly, it characteristically contains four types of alkane hydroxylases, including the integral-membrane non-heme iron monooxygenase (AlkB) and cytochrome P450 CYP153, a long-chain alkane monooxygenase (LadA) and propane monooxygenase. It also accommodates complete pathways for the response to osmotic pressure. Physiological tests proved that the strain could grow on n-alkanes ranging from C10 to C36 and propane as the sole carbon sources, with the differential induction of four kinds of alkane hydroxylase coding genes. In addition, the strain could grow in 1-12% NaCl with the putative genes responsible for osmotic stresses induced as expected. These results reveal the effective adaptation of the strain DQS3-9A1(T) to harsh oil environment and provide a genome platform to investigate the global regulation of different alkane metabolisms in bacteria that are crucially important for petroleum degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the co-existence of such four types of alkane hydroxylases in a bacterial strain.

  12. Factors Determining the Biodiversity of Halophilic Microorganisms on Historic Masonry Buildings.

    PubMed

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Stryszewska, Teresa; Kańka, Stanisław; Gutarowska, Beata

    2017-06-24

    The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the relationship between the chemical (salt content and pH) and physico-mechanical (humidity and compressive strength) properties of mineral-based materials from historic buildings with salt efflorescence and the growth and biodiversity of halophilic microorganisms. Samples were mainly characterized by pH 6.5-8.5 and a moisture content of between 0.12 and 3.3%. Significant variations were also found in the salt content (sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates) of the materials. An SEM/EDS analysis of material surfaces revealed the presence of halite, calcite, gypsum, sodium sulfate, and potassium-sodium sulfate. Culture-dependent and culture-independent (clone library construction) approaches were both applied to detect halophilic microorganisms. Results derived from culturable methods and the materials analysis revealed a correlation between the total halophile count and pH value as well as sulfate content. A correlation was not observed between the concentration of chlorides or nitrates and the number of halophilic microorganisms. The materials studied were inhabited by the culturable halophilic bacteria Halobacillus sp., Virgibacillus sp., and Marinococcus sp. as well as the yeast Sterigmatomyces sp., which was isolated for the first time from mineral materials. Culture-independent techniques revealed the following bacterial species: Salinibacterium, Salinisphaera, Rubrobacter, Rubricoccus, Halomonas, Halorhodospira, Solirubrobacter, Salinicoccus, and Salinibacter. Biodiversity was the highest in materials with high or moderate salinity.

  13. Factors Determining the Biodiversity of Halophilic Microorganisms on Historic Masonry Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Stryszewska, Teresa; Kańka, Stanisław; Gutarowska, Beata

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the relationship between the chemical (salt content and pH) and physico-mechanical (humidity and compressive strength) properties of mineral-based materials from historic buildings with salt efflorescence and the growth and biodiversity of halophilic microorganisms. Samples were mainly characterized by pH 6.5–8.5 and a moisture content of between 0.12 and 3.3%. Significant variations were also found in the salt content (sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates) of the materials. An SEM/EDS analysis of material surfaces revealed the presence of halite, calcite, gypsum, sodium sulfate, and potassium-sodium sulfate. Culture-dependent and culture-independent (clone library construction) approaches were both applied to detect halophilic microorganisms. Results derived from culturable methods and the materials analysis revealed a correlation between the total halophile count and pH value as well as sulfate content. A correlation was not observed between the concentration of chlorides or nitrates and the number of halophilic microorganisms. The materials studied were inhabited by the culturable halophilic bacteria Halobacillus sp., Virgibacillus sp., and Marinococcus sp. as well as the yeast Sterigmatomyces sp., which was isolated for the first time from mineral materials. Culture-independent techniques revealed the following bacterial species: Salinibacterium, Salinisphaera, Rubrobacter, Rubricoccus, Halomonas, Halorhodospira, Solirubrobacter, Salinicoccus, and Salinibacter. Biodiversity was the highest in materials with high or moderate salinity. PMID:28592721

  14. Cloning and identification of Group 1 mrp operon encoding a novel monovalent cation/proton antiporter system from the moderate halophile Halomonas zhaodongensis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lin; Hong, Shan; Liu, Henan; Huang, Haipeng; Sun, Hao; Xu, Tong; Jiang, Juquan

    2014-11-01

    The novel species Halomonas zhaodongensis NEAU-ST10-25(T) recently identified by our group is a moderate halophile which can grow at the range of 0-2.5 M NaCl (optimum 0.5 M) and pH 6-12 (optimum pH 9). To explore its halo-alkaline tolerant mechanism, genomic DNA was screened from NEAU-ST10-25(T) in this study for Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters. One mrp operon could confer tolerance of E. coli KNabc to 0.8 M NaCl and 100 mM LiCl, and an alkaline pH. This operon was previously mainly designated mrp (also mnh, pha or sha) due to its multiple resistance and pH-related activity. Here, we will also use mrp to designate the homolog from H. zhaodongensis (Hz_mrp). Sequence analysis and protein alignment showed that Hz_mrp should belong to Group 1 mrp operons. Further phylogenetic analysis reveals that Hz_Mrp system should represent a novel sub-class of Group 1 Mrp systems. This was confirmed by a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile or the specificity and affinity for the transported monovalent cations between Hz_Mrp system and all the known Mrp systems. Therefore, we propose that Hz_Mrp should be categorized as a novel Group 1 Mrp system.

  15. Halomonas almeriensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, exopolysaccharide-producing bacterium from Cabo de Gata, Almería, south-east Spain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Checa, Fernando; Béjar, Victoria; Martínez-Cánovas, M José; Llamas, Inmaculada; Quesada, Emilia

    2005-09-01

    Halomonas almeriensis sp. nov. is a Gram-negative non-motile rod that was isolated from a saltern in the Cabo de Gata-Níjar wildlife reserve in Almería, south-east Spain. It is moderately halophilic, capable of growth at concentrations of 5-25% w/v sea-salt mixture, the optimum being 7.5% w/v. It is chemo-organotrophic and strictly aerobic, produces catalase but not oxidase, does not produce acid from any sugar and does not synthesize hydrolytic enzymes. The most notable difference between this micro-organism and other Halomonas species is that it is very fastidious in its use of a carbon source. It forms mucoid colonies due to the production of an exopolysaccharide. Its G+C content is 63.5 mol%. A comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed its relationship to Halomonas species. The most closely related species is Halomonas halmophila with 95.8% similarity between their 16S rRNA gene sequences. DNA-DNA hybridization with H. halmophila is 10.1%. Its major fatty acids are 18:1omega7c, 16:0, 16:1omega7c/15:0 iso 2-OH, 12:0 3-OH, 12:0, 11-methyl 18:1omega7c and 10:0. The proposed name is Halomonas almeriensis sp. nov., with strain M8(T) (=CECT 7050(T)=LMG 22904(T)) as the type strain.

  16. Desulfovibrio brasiliensis sp. nov., a moderate halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from Lagoa Vermelha (Brazil) mediating dolomite formation.

    PubMed

    Warthmann, Rolf; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Sass, Henrik; McKenzie, Judith A

    2005-06-01

    A novel halotolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis strain LVform1, was isolated from sediments of a dolomite-forming hypersaline coastal lagoon, Lagoa Vermelha, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The cells are vibrio-shaped and 0.30 to 0.45 microm by 1.0 to 3.5 microm in size. These bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] in culture experiments. The strain was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio in the delta-subclass of the Proteobacteria on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, its physiological and morphological properties. Strain LVform1 is obligate sodium-dependent and grows at NaCl concentrations of up to 15%. The 16S rRNA sequence revealed that this strain is closely related to Desulfovibrio halophilus (96.2% similarity) and to Desulfovibrio oxyclinae (96.8% similarity), which were both isolated from Solar Lake, a hypersaline coastal lake in the Sinai, Egypt. Strain LVform1 is barotolerant, growing under pressures of up to 370 bar (37 MPa). We propose strain LVform1 to be the type strain of a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis (type strain LVform1 = DSMZ No. 15816 and JCM No. 12178). The GenBank/EMBL accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain LVform1 is AJ544687.

  17. Effective rhizoinoculation and biofilm formation by arsenic immobilizing halophilic plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) isolated from mangrove rhizosphere: A step towards arsenic rhizoremediation.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Ivy; Bhattacharyya, Chandrima; Mukherji, Shayantan; Dey, Dhritiman; Sarkar, Somesh Chandra; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal Kumar; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti

    2017-08-25

    Arsenic (As) uptake by plants is largely influenced by the presence of microbial consortia and their interactions with As. In the coastal region of Bengal deltaic plain of Eastern India, the As-contaminated groundwater is frequently used for irrigation purposes resulting in an elevated level of soil As in agricultural lands. The health hazards associated with As necessitates development of cost-effective remediation strategies to reclaim contaminated agricultural lands. Among the available technologies developed in recent times, bioremediation using bacteria has been found to be the most propitious. In this study, two As-resistant halophilic bacterial strains Kocuria flava AB402 and Bacillus vietnamensis AB403 were isolated, identified and characterized from mangrove rhizosphere of Sundarban. The isolates, AB402 and AB403, could tolerate 35mM and 20mM of arsenite, respectively. The effect of As on the exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis, biofilm formation, and root association was evaluated for both the bacterial strains. Arsenic adsorption on the cell surfaces and intracellular accumulation in both the bacterial strains were promising under culture conditions. Moreover, both the strains when used as inoculum, not only promoted the growth of rice seedlings but also decreased As uptake and accumulation in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Marinobacter lacisalsi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from the saline-wetland wildfowl reserve Fuente de Piedra in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Margarita; Jiménez-Pranteda, Maria L; Kharroub, Karima; González-Paredes, Ana; Durban, Juan J; Russell, Nick J; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes

    2009-07-01

    A Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, motile, moderately halophilic, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain FP2.5(T), was isolated from the inland hypersaline lake Fuente de Piedra, a saline-wetland wildfowl reserve located in the province of Málaga in southern Spain. Strain FP2.5(T) was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. It produced colonies with a light-yellow pigment. Strain FP2.5(T) grew at salinities of 3-15 % (w/v) and at temperatures of 20-40 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 5-9. Strain FP2.5(T) was able to utilize various organic acids as sole carbon and energy source. Its major fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega9c and C(16 : 1)omega9c. The DNA G+C content was 58.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain FP2.5(T) appeared to be a member of the genus Marinobacter and clustered closely with the type strains of Marinobacter segnicrescens, Marinobacter bryozoorum and Marinobacter gudaonensis (levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 98.1, 97.4 and 97.2 %, respectively). However, DNA-DNA relatedness between the new isolate and the type strains of its closest related Marinobacter species was low; levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain FP2.5(T) and M. segnicrescens LMG 23928(T), M. bryozoorum DSM 15401(T) and M. gudaonensis DSM 18066(T) were 36.3, 32.1 and 24.9 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, strain FP2.5(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter lacisalsi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FP2.5(T) (=CECT 7297(T)=LMG 24237(T)).

  19. Cloning and identification of a novel NhaD-type Na+/H+ antiporter from metagenomic DNA of the halophilic bacteria in soil samples around Daban Salt Lake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Zhenhui; Wang, Lei; Mu, Ren; Zou, Zhi; Yuan, Kun; Wang, Yuekun; Wu, Haiping; Jiang, Juquan; Yang, Lifu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, metagenomic DNA was screened for the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene from the halophilic bacteria in Daban Salt Lake by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. One gene designated as Hb_nhaD encoding a novel NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter was finally cloned. The presence of Hb_NhaD conferred tolerance of E. coli KNabc to up to 0.5 M NaCl and 0.2 M LiCl, and an alkaline pH. Hb_NhaD has the highest identity (70.6%) with a putative NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter from an uncharacterized Clostridiaceae species, and also has lower identity with known NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporters from Halomonas elongata (20.8%), Alkalimonas amylolytica (19.0%), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (18.9%) and Vibrio cholerae (18.7 %). pH-dependent Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity was detected from everted membrane vesicles prepared from E. coli KNabc carrying Hb_nhaD. Hb_NhaD exhibited very high Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity over a wide pH range from 6.5 to 9.0 with the highest activity at pH 7.0 which is significantly different from those of the above known NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. Also, the apparent K m values of Hb_NhaD for Na(+) and Li(+) at pH 7.0 were determined to be 1.31 and 2.16, respectively. Based on the above results, we proposed that Hb_NhaD should be categorized as a novel NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter.

  20. Isolation and characterization of halophilic lactic acid bacteria isolated from "terasi" shrimp paste: a traditional fermented seafood product in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Michika; Wahyuni, Mita; Kitakado, Toshihide; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Imada, Chiaki; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2003-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria from "terasi" shrimp paste, a highly popular fermented seafood in Indonesia were isolated and characterized. Viable cell counts were 10(4) to 10(6) cfu/g on MRS medium. All the isolates were catalase-negative, gram-positive cocci and were able to grow at 15% NaCl. Numerical phenotypic analysis showed that the isolates clustered into one group. However, they could be classified into two types: the Tetragenococcus halophilus group and the T. muriaticus group as revealed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This study is the first to show that both species of Tetragenococcus are distributed in Indonesian fermented foods.

  1. Control of Sulfide Production in High Salinity Bakken Shale Oil Reservoirs by Halophilic Bacteria Reducing Nitrate to Nitrite.

    PubMed

    An, Biwen A; Shen, Yin; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    Microbial communities in shale oil fields are still poorly known. We obtained samples of injection, produced and facility waters from a Bakken shale oil field in Saskatchewan, Canada with a resident temperature of 60°C. The injection water had a lower salinity (0.7 Meq of NaCl) than produced or facility waters (0.6-3.6 Meq of NaCl). Salinities of the latter decreased with time, likely due to injection of low salinity water, which had 15-30 mM sulfate. Batch cultures of field samples showed sulfate-reducing and nitrate-reducing bacteria activities at different salinities (0, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.5 M NaCl). Notably, at high salinity nitrite accumulated, which was not observed at low salinity, indicating potential for nitrate-mediated souring control at high salinity. Continuous culture chemostats were established in media with volatile fatty acids (a mixture of acetate, propionate and butyrate) or lactate as electron donor and nitrate or sulfate as electron acceptor at 0.5 to 2.5 M NaCl. Microbial community analyses of these cultures indicated high proportions of Halanaerobium, Desulfovermiculus, Halomonas, and Marinobacter in cultures at 2.5 M NaCl, whereas Desulfovibrio, Geoalkalibacter, and Dethiosulfatibacter were dominant at 0.5 M NaCl. Use of bioreactors to study the effect of nitrate injection on sulfate reduction showed that accumulation of nitrite inhibited SRB activity at 2.5 M but not at 0.5 M NaCl. High proportions of Halanaerobium and Desulfovermiculus were found at 2.5 M NaCl in the absence of nitrate, whereas high proportions of Halomonas and no SRB were found in the presence of nitrate. A diverse microbial community dominated by the SRB Desulfovibrio was observed at 0.5 M NaCl both in the presence and absence of nitrate. Our results suggest that nitrate injection can prevent souring provided that the salinity is maintained at a high level. Thus, reinjection of high salinity produced water amended with nitrate maybe be a cost effective method

  2. Control of Sulfide Production in High Salinity Bakken Shale Oil Reservoirs by Halophilic Bacteria Reducing Nitrate to Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    An, Biwen A.; Shen, Yin; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    Microbial communities in shale oil fields are still poorly known. We obtained samples of injection, produced and facility waters from a Bakken shale oil field in Saskatchewan, Canada with a resident temperature of 60°C. The injection water had a lower salinity (0.7 Meq of NaCl) than produced or facility waters (0.6–3.6 Meq of NaCl). Salinities of the latter decreased with time, likely due to injection of low salinity water, which had 15–30 mM sulfate. Batch cultures of field samples showed sulfate-reducing and nitrate-reducing bacteria activities at different salinities (0, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.5 M NaCl). Notably, at high salinity nitrite accumulated, which was not observed at low salinity, indicating potential for nitrate-mediated souring control at high salinity. Continuous culture chemostats were established in media with volatile fatty acids (a mixture of acetate, propionate and butyrate) or lactate as electron donor and nitrate or sulfate as electron acceptor at 0.5 to 2.5 M NaCl. Microbial community analyses of these cultures indicated high proportions of Halanaerobium, Desulfovermiculus, Halomonas, and Marinobacter in cultures at 2.5 M NaCl, whereas Desulfovibrio, Geoalkalibacter, and Dethiosulfatibacter were dominant at 0.5 M NaCl. Use of bioreactors to study the effect of nitrate injection on sulfate reduction showed that accumulation of nitrite inhibited SRB activity at 2.5 M but not at 0.5 M NaCl. High proportions of Halanaerobium and Desulfovermiculus were found at 2.5 M NaCl in the absence of nitrate, whereas high proportions of Halomonas and no SRB were found in the presence of nitrate. A diverse microbial community dominated by the SRB Desulfovibrio was observed at 0.5 M NaCl both in the presence and absence of nitrate. Our results suggest that nitrate injection can prevent souring provided that the salinity is maintained at a high level. Thus, reinjection of high salinity produced water amended with nitrate maybe be a cost effective

  3. Structure of a highly acidic β-lactamase from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter sp. 560 and the discovery of a Cs(+)-selective binding site.

    PubMed

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Okazaki, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Shibazaki, Chie; Shimizu, Rumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Kawamoto, Masahide; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-03-01

    Environmentally friendly absorbents are needed for Sr(2+) and Cs(+), as the removal of the radioactive Sr(2+) and Cs(+) that has leaked from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant is one of the most important problems in Japan. Halophilic proteins are known to have many acidic residues on their surface that can provide specific binding sites for metal ions such as Cs(+) or Sr(2+). The crystal structure of a halophilic β-lactamase from Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined to resolutions of between 1.8 and 2.9 Å in space group P31 using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, the locations of bound Sr(2+) and Cs(+) ions were identified by anomalous X-ray diffraction. The location of one Cs(+)-specific binding site was identified in HaBLA even in the presence of a ninefold molar excess of Na(+) (90 mM Na(+)/10 mM Cs(+)). From an activity assay using isothermal titration calorimetry, the bound Sr(2+) and Cs(+) ions do not significantly affect the enzymatic function of HaBLA. The observation of a selective and high-affinity Cs(+)-binding site provides important information that is useful for the design of artificial Cs(+)-binding sites that may be useful in the bioremediation of radioactive isotopes.

  4. Moderately Thermophilic Magnetotactic Bacteria from Hot Springs in Nevada▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Abreu, Fernanda; Schmidt, Marian L.; Lins, Ulysses; Frankel, Richard B.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    Populations of a moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium were discovered in Great Boiling Springs, Nevada, ranging from 32 to 63°C. Cells were small, Gram-negative, vibrioid to helicoid in morphology, and biomineralized a chain of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. Phylogenetically, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the organism belongs to the phylum Nitrospirae. PMID:20382815

  5. Moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacteria from hot springs in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Abreu, Fernanda; Schmidt, Marian L; Lins, Ulysses; Frankel, Richard B; Hedlund, Brian P; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2010-06-01

    Populations of a moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium were discovered in Great Boiling Springs, Nevada, ranging from 32 to 63 degrees C. Cells were small, Gram-negative, vibrioid to helicoid in morphology, and biomineralized a chain of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. Phylogenetically, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the organism belongs to the phylum Nitrospirae.

  6. Structure of a highly acidic β-lactamase from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter sp. 560 and the discovery of a Cs{sup +}-selective binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Okazaki, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Shibazaki, Chie; Shimizu, Rumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Kawamoto, Masahide; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-03-01

    The tertiary structure of a β-lactamase derived from the halobacterium Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined by X-ray crystallography. Three unique Sr{sup 2+}-binding sites and one Cs{sup +}-binding site were discovered in the HaBLA molecule. Environmentally friendly absorbents are needed for Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +}, as the removal of the radioactive Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} that has leaked from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant is one of the most important problems in Japan. Halophilic proteins are known to have many acidic residues on their surface that can provide specific binding sites for metal ions such as Cs{sup +} or Sr{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of a halophilic β-lactamase from Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined to resolutions of between 1.8 and 2.9 Å in space group P3{sub 1} using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, the locations of bound Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} ions were identified by anomalous X-ray diffraction. The location of one Cs{sup +}-specific binding site was identified in HaBLA even in the presence of a ninefold molar excess of Na{sup +} (90 mM Na{sup +}/10 mM Cs{sup +}). From an activity assay using isothermal titration calorimetry, the bound Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} ions do not significantly affect the enzymatic function of HaBLA. The observation of a selective and high-affinity Cs{sup +}-binding site provides important information that is useful for the design of artificial Cs{sup +}-binding sites that may be useful in the bioremediation of radioactive isotopes.

  7. RNomics and Modomics in the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii: identification of RNA modification genes

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Henri; Gaspin, Christine; Marck, Christian; Decatur, Wayne A; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2008-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring RNAs contain numerous enzymatically altered nucleosides. Differences in RNA populations (RNomics) and pattern of RNA modifications (Modomics) depends on the organism analyzed and are two of the criteria that distinguish the three kingdoms of life. If the genomic sequences of the RNA molecules can be derived from whole genome sequence information, the modification profile cannot and requires or direct sequencing of the RNAs or predictive methods base on the presence or absence of the modifications genes. Results By employing a comparative genomics approach, we predicted almost all of the genes coding for the t+rRNA modification enzymes in the mesophilic moderate halophile Haloferax volcanii. These encode both guide RNAs and enzymes. Some are orthologous to previously identified genes in Archaea, Bacteria or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but several are original predictions. Conclusion The number of modifications in t+rRNAs in the halophilic archaeon is surprisingly low when compared with other Archaea or Bacteria, particularly the hyperthermophilic organisms. This may result from the specific lifestyle of halophiles that require high intracellular salt concentration for survival. This salt content could allow RNA to maintain its functional structural integrity with fewer modifications. We predict that the few modifications present must be particularly important for decoding, accuracy of translation or are modifications that cannot be functionally replaced by the electrostatic interactions provided by the surrounding salt-ions. This analysis also guides future experimental validation work aiming to complete the understanding of the function of RNA modifications in Archaeal translation. PMID:18844986

  8. Microbial culturomics unravels the halophilic microbiota repertoire of table salt: description of Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Awa; Khelaifia, Saber; Armstrong, Nicholas; Labas, Noémie; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier; Million, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Background Microbial culturomics represents an ongoing revolution in the characterization of environmental and human microbiome. Methods By using three media containing high salt concentration (100, 150, and 200 g/L), the halophilic microbial culturome of a commercial table salt was determined. Results Eighteen species belonging to the Terrabacteria group were isolated including eight moderate halophilic and 10 halotolerant bacteria. Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., type strain Awa-1T (=CSUR P1441=DSM 29726), is a moderately halophilic gram-positive, non-spore-forming rod, and is motile by using a flagellum. Strain Awa-1T shows catalase activity but no oxidase activity. It is not only an aerobic bacterium but also able to grow in anaerobic and microaerophilic atmospheres. The draft genome of G. massiliensis is 4,207,226 bp long, composed of 13 scaffolds with 36.05% of G+C content. It contains 3,908 genes (3,839 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes). At least 1,983 (52%) orthologous proteins were not shared with the closest phylogenetic species. Hundred twenty-six genes (3.3%) were identified as ORFans. Conclusions Microbial culturomics can dramatically improve the characterization of the food and environmental microbiota repertoire, deciphering new bacterial species and new genes. Further studies will clarify the geographic specificity and the putative role of these new microbes and their related functional genetic content in environment, health, and disease. PMID:27760679

  9. Halophilic adaptation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Madern, D; Ebel, C; Zaccai, G

    2000-04-01

    It is now clear that the understanding of halophilic adaptation at a molecular level requires a strategy of complementary experiments, combining molecular biology, biochemistry, and cellular approaches with physical chemistry and thermodynamics. In this review, after a discussion of the definition and composition of halophilic enzymes, the effects of salt on their activity, solubility, and stability are reviewed. We then describe how thermodynamic observations, such as parameters pertaining to solvent-protein interactions or enzyme-unfolding kinetics, depend strongly on solvent composition and reveal the important role played by water and ion binding to halophilic proteins. The three high-resolution crystal structures now available for halophilic proteins are analyzed in terms of haloadaptation, and finally cellular response to salt stress is discussed briefly.

  10. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  11. Genomic analysis reveals the biotechnological and industrial potential of levan producing halophilic extremophile, Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T.

    PubMed

    Diken, Elif; Ozer, Tugba; Arikan, Muzaffer; Emrence, Zeliha; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Ustek, Duran; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T is a gram negative, aerobic, and moderately halophilic bacterium, and is known to produce high levels of levan with many potential uses in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its outstanding properties. Here, the whole-genome analysis was performed to gain more insight about the biological mechanisms, and the whole-genome organization of the bacterium. Industrially crucial genes, including the levansucrase, were detected and the genome-scale metabolic model of H. smyrnensis AAD6T was reconstructed. The bacterium was found to have many potential applications in biotechnology not only being a levan producer, but also because of its capacity to produce Pel exopolysaccharide, polyhydroxyalkanoates, and osmoprotectants. The genomic information presented here will not only provide additional information to enhance our understanding of the genetic and metabolic network of halophilic bacteria, but also accelerate the research on systematical design of engineering strategies for biotechnology applications.

  12. Metabolism of halophilic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Falb, Michaela; Müller, Kerstin; Königsmaier, Lisa; Oberwinkler, Tanja; Horn, Patrick; von Gronau, Susanne; Gonzalez, Orland; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2008-01-01

    In spite of their common hypersaline environment, halophilic archaea are surprisingly different in their nutritional demands and metabolic pathways. The metabolic diversity of halophilic archaea was investigated at the genomic level through systematic metabolic reconstruction and comparative analysis of four completely sequenced species: Halobacterium salinarum, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloquadratum walsbyi, and the haloalkaliphile Natronomonas pharaonis. The comparative study reveals different sets of enzyme genes amongst halophilic archaea, e.g. in glycerol degradation, pentose metabolism, and folate synthesis. The carefully assessed metabolic data represent a reliable resource for future system biology approaches as it also links to current experimental data on (halo)archaea from the literature. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00792-008-0138-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18278431

  13. Biodeterioration Risk Threatens the 3100 Year Old Staircase of Hallstatt (Austria): Possible Involvement of Halophilic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Piñar, Guadalupe; Dalnodar, Dennis; Voitl, Christian; Reschreiter, Hans; Sterflinger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background The prosperity of Hallstatt (Salzkammergut region, Austria) is based on the richness of salt in the surrounding mountains and salt mining, which is documented as far back as 1500 years B.C. Substantial archaeological evidence of Bronze and Iron Age salt mining has been discovered, with a wooden staircase (1108 B.C.) being one of the most impressive and well preserved finds. However, after its discovery, fungal mycelia have been observed on the surface of the staircase, most probably due to airborne contamination after its find. Objective As a basis for the further preservation of this valuable object, the active micro-flora was examined to investigate the presence of potentially biodegradative microorganisms. Results Most of the strains isolated from the staircase showed to be halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, due to the saline environment of the mine. Results derived from culture-dependent assays revealed a high fungal diversity, including both halotolerant and halophilic fungi, the most dominant strains being members of the genus Phialosimplex (synonym: Aspergillus). Additionally, some typical cellulose degraders, namely Stachybotrys sp. and Cladosporium sp. were detected. Numerous bacterial strains were isolated and identified as members of 12 different genera, most of them being moderately halophilic species. The most dominant isolates affiliated with species of the genera Halovibrio and Marinococcus. Halophilic archaea were also isolated and identified as species of the genera Halococcus and Halorubrum. Molecular analyses complemented the cultivation assays, enabling the identification of some uncultivable archaea of the genera Halolamina, Haloplanus and Halobacterium. Results derived from fungi and bacteria supported those obtained by cultivation methods, exhibiting the same dominant members in the communities. Conclusion The results clearly showed the presence of some cellulose degraders that may become active if the requirements for

  14. Biodeterioration Risk Threatens the 3100 Year Old Staircase of Hallstatt (Austria): Possible Involvement of Halophilic Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Piñar, Guadalupe; Dalnodar, Dennis; Voitl, Christian; Reschreiter, Hans; Sterflinger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The prosperity of Hallstatt (Salzkammergut region, Austria) is based on the richness of salt in the surrounding mountains and salt mining, which is documented as far back as 1500 years B.C. Substantial archaeological evidence of Bronze and Iron Age salt mining has been discovered, with a wooden staircase (1108 B.C.) being one of the most impressive and well preserved finds. However, after its discovery, fungal mycelia have been observed on the surface of the staircase, most probably due to airborne contamination after its find. As a basis for the further preservation of this valuable object, the active micro-flora was examined to investigate the presence of potentially biodegradative microorganisms. Most of the strains isolated from the staircase showed to be halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, due to the saline environment of the mine. Results derived from culture-dependent assays revealed a high fungal diversity, including both halotolerant and halophilic fungi, the most dominant strains being members of the genus Phialosimplex (synonym: Aspergillus). Additionally, some typical cellulose degraders, namely Stachybotrys sp. and Cladosporium sp. were detected. Numerous bacterial strains were isolated and identified as members of 12 different genera, most of them being moderately halophilic species. The most dominant isolates affiliated with species of the genera Halovibrio and Marinococcus. Halophilic archaea were also isolated and identified as species of the genera Halococcus and Halorubrum. Molecular analyses complemented the cultivation assays, enabling the identification of some uncultivable archaea of the genera Halolamina, Haloplanus and Halobacterium. Results derived from fungi and bacteria supported those obtained by cultivation methods, exhibiting the same dominant members in the communities. The results clearly showed the presence of some cellulose degraders that may become active if the requirements for growth and the environmental conditions

  15. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  16. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-03-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  17. Bioleaching of metals from spent refinery petroleum catalyst using moderately thermophilic bacteria: effect of particle size.

    PubMed

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Singh, Sradhanjali; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won; Heyes, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigated the leaching potential of moderately thermophilic bacteria in the recovery of metals from spent petroleum catalyst of varying particle sizes. The batch bioleaching experiments were conducted by employing a mixed consortium of moderate thermophilic bacteria at 45°C and by using five different particle sizes (from 45 to >2000 μm) of acetone-washed spent catalyst. The elemental mapping by FESEM confirmed the presence of Al, Ni, V and Mo along with sulfur in the spent catalyst. During bioleaching, Ni (92-97%) and V (81-91%) were leached in higher concentrations, whereas leaching yields of Al (23-38%) were found to be lowest in all particle sizes investigated. Decreasing the particle size from >2000 μm to 45-106 μm caused an increase in leaching yields of metals during initial hours. However, the final metals leaching yields were almost independent of particle sizes of catalyst. Leaching kinetics was observed to follow the diffusion-controlled model showing the linearity more close than the chemical control. The results of the present study suggested that bioleaching using moderate thermophilic bacteria was highly effective in removing the metals from spent catalyst. Moreover, bioleaching can be conducted using spent catalyst of higher particle size (>2000 μm), thus saving the grinding cost and making process attractive for larger scale application.

  18. Identification and characterization of ectoine biosynthesis genes and heterologous expression of the ectABC gene cluster from Halomonas sp. QHL1, a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from Qinghai Lake.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Derui; Liu, Jian; Han, Rui; Shen, Guoping; Long, Qifu; Wei, Xiaoxing; Liu, Deli

    2014-02-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. QHL1 was identified as a member of the genus Halomonas by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. HPLC analysis showed that strain QHL1 synthesizes ectoine in its cytoplasm. The genes involved in the ectoine biosynthesis pathway were identified on the chromosome in the order ectABC. Subsequently, the ectB gene from this strain was amplified by PCR, and the entire ectABC gene cluster (3,580 bp) was cloned using genome walking. Analysis showed that the ectA (579 bp), ectB (1269 bp), and ectC (390 bp) genes were organized in a single transcriptional unit and were predicted to encode three peptides of 21.2 kDa, 46.4 kDa, and 14.7 kDa, respectively. Two putative promoters, a δ(70)-dependent promoter and a δ(38)-controlled promoter, as well as several conserved motifs with unknown function were identified. Individual ectA, ectB, and ectC genes, and the entire ectABC gene cluster were inserted into the expression plasmid pET-28a(+) to generate the recombinant plasmids pET-28a(+)-ectA, pET-28a(+)-ectB, pET-28a(+)-ectC and pET-28a(+)-ectABC, respectively. Heterologous expression of these proteins in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The recombinant E. coli strain BL21 (pET-28a (+)-ectABC) displayed a higher salt tolerance than native E. coli cells but produced far less ectoine than the wild-type QHL1 strain.

  19. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Gentisate 1,2-Dioxygenase Gene from a Halophilic Martelella Strain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ling; Hu, Haiyang; Tang, Hongzhi; Liu, Yongdi; Xu, Ping; Shi, Jie; Lin, Kuangfei; Luo, Qishi; Cui, Changzheng

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic Martelella strain AD-3, isolated from highly saline petroleum-contaminated soil, can efficiently degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as phenanthrene and anthracene, in 3–5% salinity. Gentisic acid is a key intermediate in the microbial degradation of PAH compounds. However, there is little information on PAH degradation by moderately halophilic bacteria. In this study, a 1,077-bp long gene encoding gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (GDO) from a halophilic Martelella strain AD-3 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme GDO was purified and characterized in detail. By using the 18O isotope experiment and LC-MS analysis, the sources of the two oxygen atoms added onto maleylpyruvate were identified as H2O and O2, respectively. The Km and kcat values for gentisic acid were determined to be 26.64 μM and 161.29 s−1, respectively. In addition, optimal GDO activity was observed at 30 °C, pH 7.0, and at 12% salinity. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of four highly conserved His residues at positions 155, 157, 167, and 169 for enzyme activity. This finding provides new insights into mechanism and variety of gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase for PAH degradation in high saline conditions. PMID:26394696

  20. Diversity of halophilic archaea in fermented foods and human intestines and their application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung

    2013-12-01

    Archaea are prokaryotic organisms distinct from bacteria in the structural and molecular biological sense, and these microorganisms are known to thrive mostly at extreme environments. In particular, most studies on halophilic archaea have been focused on environmental and ecological researches. However, new species of halophilic archaea are being isolated and identified from high salt-fermented foods consumed by humans, and it has been found that various types of halophilic archaea exist in food products by culture-independent molecular biological methods. In addition, even if the numbers are not quite high, DNAs of various halophilic archaea are being detected in human intestines and much interest is given to their possible roles. This review aims to summarize the types and characteristics of halophilic archaea reported to be present in foods and human intestines and to discuss their application as well.

  1. Halophilic microorganisms in deteriorated historic buildings: insights into their characteristics.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Justyna; Otlewska, Anna; Gutarowska, Beata; Pietrzak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Historic buildings are constantly being exposed to numerous climatic changes such as damp and rainwater. Water migration into and out of the material's pores can lead to salt precipitation and the so-called efflorescence. The structure of the material may be seriously threatened by salt crystallization. A huge pressure is produced when salt hydrates occupy larger spaces, which leads at the end to cracking, detachment and material loss. Halophilic microorganisms have the ability to adapt to high salinity because of the mechanisms of inorganic salt (KCl or NaCl) accumulation in their cells at concentrations isotonic to the environment, or compatible solutes uptake or synthesis. In this study, we focused our attention on the determination of optimal growth conditions of halophilic microorganisms isolated from historical buildings in terms of salinity, pH and temperature ranges, as well as biochemical properties and antagonistic abilities. Halophilic microorganisms studied in this paper could be categorized as a halotolerant group, as they grow in the absence of NaCl, as well as tolerate higher salt concentrations (Staphylococcus succinus, Virgibacillus halodenitrificans). Halophilic microorganisms have been also observed (Halobacillus styriensis, H. hunanensis, H. naozhouensis, H. litoralis, Marinococcus halophilus and yeast Sterigmatomyces halophilus). With respect to their physiological characteristics, cultivation at a temperature of 25-30°C, pH 6-7, NaCl concentration for halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, 0-10% and 15-30%, respectively, provides the most convenient conditions. Halophiles described in this study displayed lipolytic, glycolytic and proteolytic activities. Staphylococcus succinus and Marinococcus halophilus showed strong antagonistic potential towards bacteria from the Bacillus genus, while Halobacillus litoralis displayed an inhibiting ability against other halophiles.

  2. Photoreactivation in pigmented and non-pigmented extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, N; Hepburn, D; Fitt, P S

    1984-06-15

    The sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) and the photoreactivability of four pigmented and three colourless strains of the extremely halophilic bacteria Halobacterium cutirubrum and Halobacterium salinarium have been studied. The results with three pigmented/non-pigmented pairs show that the pigments play an accessory role in photoreactivation at low visible light intensities and confirm that they do not provide passive protection against ultraviolet light. Evidence is presented that photoreactivation plays an unexpected direct role in the resistance of extreme halophiles to ultraviolet radiation and that colourless mutants of H. cutirubrum NRC 34001 only arise in cultures that have been both ultraviolet-irradiated and photoreactivated. None of these extreme halophiles is capable of excision repair of ultraviolet damage to DNA.

  3. [Adaptation strategies of halophilic microorganisms and Debaryomyces hansenii (halophilic yeast)].

    PubMed

    González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Peña, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The term halophile is used for all those organisms belonging to hypersaline habitats; they constitute an interesting class of organisms able to compete successfully in salt water and to resist its denaturing effects. A wide diversity of microorganisms, prokaryotic and eukaryotic belong to this category. Halophile organisms have strategies allowing them not only to withstand osmotic stress, but also to function better in the presence of salt, in spite of maintaining high intracellular concentrations of salt, partly due to the synthesis of compatible solutes that allow them to balance their osmotic pressure. We describe the characteristics of some halophile organisms and D. hansenii (halophile yeast), that allow them to resist high concentrations of salt. The interest to know the great diversity microorganisms living in hypersaline habitats is growing, and has begun to be the center of recent investigations, since halophile organisms produce an wide variety of biomolecules that can be used for different applications. In this review we describe some mechanisms with which some halophile organisms count to resist the high concentration of salts, mainly NaCl.

  4. Bioleaching of chalcopyrite and bornite by moderately thermophilic bacteria: an emphasis on their interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-bo; Wang, Jun; Gan, Xiao-wen; Qin, Wen-qing; Hu, Ming-hao; Qiu, Guan-zhou

    2015-08-01

    Interactions between chalcopyrite and bornite during bioleaching by moderately thermophilic bacteria were investigated mainly by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical measurements performed in conjunction with bioleaching experiments. The results showed that a synergistic effect existed between chalcopyrite and bornite during bioleaching by both Acidithiobacillus caldus and Leptospirillum ferriphilum and that extremely high copper extraction could be achieved when chalcopyrite and bornite coexisted in a bioleaching system. Bornite dissolved preferentially because of its lower corrosion potential, and its dissolution was accelerated by the galvanic current during the initial stage of bioleaching. The galvanic current and optimum redox potential of 390-480 mV vs. Ag/AgCl promoted the reduction of chalcopyrite to chalcocite (Cu2S), thus accelerating its dissolution.

  5. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well. PMID:24339823

  6. Halobacterium saccharovorum sp. nov., a carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1976-01-01

    The previously described extremely halophilic bacterium, strain M6, metabolizes a variety of carbohydrates with the production of acid. In addition, the organism produces nitrite (but no gas) from nitrate, is motile, and grows most rapidly at about 50 C. These characteristics distinguish it from all previously described halophilic bacteria in the genus Halobacterium. It is suggested that it be designated as a new species, Halobacterium saccharovorum.

  7. Antimicrobial potential of Halophilic actinomycetes against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Sana; Sajid, Imran

    2016-03-01

    A collection of forty halophilic actinomycetes isolated from water and mud samples of the saline lake at Kalar Kahar, salt range, Pakistan, was screened to investigate their antimicrobial potential against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens. The isolates exhibited significant tolerance to alkaline conditions and grew well at pH 9-11. The taxonomic status of the isolated strains was determined by morphological, biochemical and physiological characterization and by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. The results revealed that majority of the isolates (90%) belong to the genus Streptomyces. Most of the isolates exhibited remarkable antimicrobial activity up to 20mm zone of inhibition against MDR ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter and Acinetobacter spp. Additionally the isolates showed moderate to high cytotoxicity in the range of 40 to 80% larval mortality against Artemia salina in a micro well cytotoxicity assay. The chemical screening or the so called metabolic fingerprinting of the methanolic extracts of each isolate, by thin layer chromatography (TLC) using various staining reagents and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), indicated an impressive diversity of the compounds produced by these strains. The study reveals that these halophilic actinomycetes are a promising source of bioactive compounds. The preparative scale fermentation, isolation, purification and structure elucidation of the compounds produced by them may yield novel antimicrobial or chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. Serogrouping of Halophilic Bdellovibrios from Chesapeake Bay and Environs by Immunodiffusion and Immunoelectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Schoeffield, Andrew J.; Falkler, William A.; Desai, Darshana; Williams, Henry N.

    1991-01-01

    Little has been reported on the serological relationship of halophilic bdellovibrios (Bd). Immunodiffusion analysis performed with rabbit or mouse Bd antisera developed against eight halophilic Bd isolates and one terrestrial Bd isolate, when reacted with soluble antigen preparations of 45 isolates of halophilic Bd, allowed separation into seven serogroups, which were distinct from the terrestrial isolate. Soluble antigen preparations of prey bacteria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus P-5 (P-5) and Escherichia coli ML 35 (ML 35), exhibited no reactivity with the antisera by immunodiffusion. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of three distinct antigens in homologous reactions and one shared antigen in heterologous Bd reactions. Shared antigens were noted between halophilic and terrestrial Bd, in addition to between halophilic Bd strains, indicating the possible existence of an antigen(s) which may be shared among all Bd. Again, no shared antigen was noted when P-5 or ML 35 was allowed by immunoelectrophoresis to react with the antisera. Prey susceptibility testing of the seven distinct groups of halophilic Bd, using 20 test prey, produced essentially identical spectra for each group, indicating that this was not a useful technique in delineating the Bd. While immunoelectrophoresis was able to demonstrate an antigen common to all Bd tested, immunodiffusion was able to delineate strains on the basis of a “serogroup specific” antigen. This suggests that immunological tools may serve as important means to study the taxonomy of halophilic Bd, as well as in the formation of a clearer taxonomic picture of the genus Bdellovibrio. Images PMID:16348597

  9. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from mono lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, R A; Diaz, M R; Taylor, B F; Roberts, M F

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, Calif., an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress.

  10. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from Mono Lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ciulla, R.A.; Roberts, M.F.; Diaz, M.R.; Taylor, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Generation of PHB from Spent Sulfite Liquor Using Halophilic Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Weissgram, Michaela; Gstöttner, Janina; Lorantfy, Bettina; Tenhaken, Raimund; Herwig, Christoph; Weber, Hedda K

    2015-06-08

    Halophilic microorganisms thrive at elevated concentrations of sodium chloride up to saturation and are capable of growing on a wide variety of carbon sources like various organic acids, hexose and also pentose sugars. Hence, the biotechnological application of these microorganisms can cover many aspects, such as the treatment of hypersaline waste streams of different origin. Due to the fact that the high osmotic pressure of hypersaline environments reduces the risk of contamination, the capacity for cost-effective non-sterile cultivation can make extreme halophilic microorganisms potentially valuable organisms for biotechnological applications. In this contribution, the stepwise use of screening approaches, employing design of experiment (DoE) on model media and subsequently using industrial waste as substrate have been implemented to investigate the applicability of halophiles to generate PHB from the industrial waste stream spent sulfite liquor (SSL). The production of PHB on model media as well as dilutions of industrial substrate in a complex medium has been screened for by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Blue staining. Screening was used to investigate the ability of halophilic microorganisms to withstand the inhibiting substances of the waste stream without negatively affecting PHB production. It could be shown that neither single inhibiting substances nor a mixture thereof inhibited growth in the investigated range, hence, leaving the question on the inhibiting mechanisms open. However, it could be demonstrated that some haloarchaea and halophilic bacteria are able to produce PHB when cultivated on 3.3% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor, whereas H. halophila was even able to thrive on 6.6% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor and still produce PHB.

  12. Generation of PHB from Spent Sulfite Liquor Using Halophilic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Weissgram, Michaela; Gstöttner, Janina; Lorantfy, Bettina; Tenhaken, Raimund; Herwig, Christoph; Weber, Hedda K.

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms thrive at elevated concentrations of sodium chloride up to saturation and are capable of growing on a wide variety of carbon sources like various organic acids, hexose and also pentose sugars. Hence, the biotechnological application of these microorganisms can cover many aspects, such as the treatment of hypersaline waste streams of different origin. Due to the fact that the high osmotic pressure of hypersaline environments reduces the risk of contamination, the capacity for cost-effective non-sterile cultivation can make extreme halophilic microorganisms potentially valuable organisms for biotechnological applications. In this contribution, the stepwise use of screening approaches, employing design of experiment (DoE) on model media and subsequently using industrial waste as substrate have been implemented to investigate the applicability of halophiles to generate PHB from the industrial waste stream spent sulfite liquor (SSL). The production of PHB on model media as well as dilutions of industrial substrate in a complex medium has been screened for by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Blue staining. Screening was used to investigate the ability of halophilic microorganisms to withstand the inhibiting substances of the waste stream without negatively affecting PHB production. It could be shown that neither single inhibiting substances nor a mixture thereof inhibited growth in the investigated range, hence, leaving the question on the inhibiting mechanisms open. However, it could be demonstrated that some haloarchaea and halophilic bacteria are able to produce PHB when cultivated on 3.3% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor, whereas H. halophila was even able to thrive on 6.6% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor and still produce PHB. PMID:27682089

  13. Methanohalophilus zhilinae sp. nov., an alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathrani, I. M.; Boone, D. R.; Mah, R. A.; Fox, G. E.; Lau, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    Methanohalophilus zhilinae, a new alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic species of methanogenic bacteria, is described. Strain WeN5T (T = type strain) from Bosa Lake of the Wadi el Natrun in Egypt was designated the type strain and was further characterized. This strain was nonmotile, able to catabolize dimethylsulfide, and able to grow in medium with a methyl group-containing substrate (such as methanol or trimethylamine) as the sole organic compound added. Sulfide (21 mM) inhibited cultures growing on trimethylamine. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of strain WeN5T was typical of the pattern for archaeobacteria, and the guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid was 38 mol%. Characterization of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequence indicated that strain WeN5T is phylogenetically distinct from members of previously described genera other than Methanohalophilus and supported the partition of halophilic methanogens into their own genus.

  14. Methanohalophilus zhilinae sp. nov., an alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathrani, I. M.; Boone, D. R.; Mah, R. A.; Fox, G. E.; Lau, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    Methanohalophilus zhilinae, a new alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic species of methanogenic bacteria, is described. Strain WeN5T (T = type strain) from Bosa Lake of the Wadi el Natrun in Egypt was designated the type strain and was further characterized. This strain was nonmotile, able to catabolize dimethylsulfide, and able to grow in medium with a methyl group-containing substrate (such as methanol or trimethylamine) as the sole organic compound added. Sulfide (21 mM) inhibited cultures growing on trimethylamine. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of strain WeN5T was typical of the pattern for archaeobacteria, and the guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid was 38 mol%. Characterization of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequence indicated that strain WeN5T is phylogenetically distinct from members of previously described genera other than Methanohalophilus and supported the partition of halophilic methanogens into their own genus.

  15. Halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides from athalassohaline, thalassohaline, and polyhaline environments.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Sarita W; Gonsalves, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus penicillioides is a true halophile, present in diverse econiches - from the hypersaline athalassohaline, and thalassohaline environments, to polyhaline systems, and in different geographical locations. Twenty seven isolates from these environments, were seen to be moderate halophiles, euryhaline in nature. They had an obligate need of a low aw and were unable to grow on a regular defined medium such as Czapek Dox Agar, as well as on varied nutrient rich agar media such as Malt Extract, Potato Dextrose and Sabouraud Agar; however, growth was obtained on all these media when amended with 10% solar salt. In absence of added salt, the conidia either did not germinate, or when germinated, distortions and lysis were seen in the short mycelial forms; on media with salt, the mycelia and vesicles appeared normal.

  16. Halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides from athalassohaline, thalassohaline, and polyhaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Sarita W.; Gonsalves, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus penicillioides is a true halophile, present in diverse econiches – from the hypersaline athalassohaline, and thalassohaline environments, to polyhaline systems, and in different geographical locations. Twenty seven isolates from these environments, were seen to be moderate halophiles, euryhaline in nature. They had an obligate need of a low aw and were unable to grow on a regular defined medium such as Czapek Dox Agar, as well as on varied nutrient rich agar media such as Malt Extract, Potato Dextrose and Sabouraud Agar; however, growth was obtained on all these media when amended with 10% solar salt. In absence of added salt, the conidia either did not germinate, or when germinated, distortions and lysis were seen in the short mycelial forms; on media with salt, the mycelia and vesicles appeared normal. PMID:25140168

  17. Production of 5′ Nucleotide by Using Halophilic Nuclease H Preferentially Adsorbed on Flocculated Cells of the Halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kamekura, Masahiro; Yokoi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Takekazu

    1988-01-01

    A bioreactor with a column of flocculated cells of the moderate halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus which adsorbed the halophilic nuclease H was designed to be used in the production of 5′ nucleotides from RNA. A remarkable characteristic of the flocculated cells was that they preferentially adsorbed much exogenous nuclease, excluding adsorbed 5′ nucleotidase. Furthermore, desalting treatment of the flocculated cells in the presence of 2% MgSO4 · 7H2O gave rise to selective inactivation of 5′ nucleotidase without the loss of nuclease H activity, and 5′-guanylic acid was produced with the bioreactor. PMID:16347767

  18. Halophilic life on Mars ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Holzinger, Anita; Polacsek, Tatjana K.; Legat, Andrea; Grösbacher, Michael; Weigl, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Background: The search for extraterrestrial life has been declared as a goal for the 21th century by several space agencies. Potential candidates are microorganisms on or in the surface of moons and planets, such as Mars. Extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) are of astrobiological interest since viable strains have been isolated from million years old salt deposits (1) and halite has been found in Martian meteorites and in surface pools. Therefore, haloarchaeal responses to simulated and real space conditions were explored. Immuno assays for a potential Life Marker Chip experiment were developed with antisera against the universal enzyme ATP synthase. Methods: The focus of these studies was on the application of fluorescent probes since they provide strong signals, and detection devices are suitable for miniaturization. Viability of haloarchaeal strains (Halococcus dombrowskii and Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1) was probed with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit and the BacLight™ Bacterial Membrane Potential kit. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the DNA, following exposure to simulated and real space conditions (UV irradiation from 200 - 400 nm; 18 months exposure on the International Space Station [ISS] within the ADAPT experiment by Dr. P. Rettberg), were detected with fluorescent Alexa-Fluor-488-coupled antibodies. Immuno assays with antisera against the A-ATPase subunits from Halorubrum saccharovorum were carried out with the highly sensitive Immun-Star ™ WesternC ™ chemiluminescent kit (Bio-Rad). Results: Using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit, the D37 (dose of 37% survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii and Hbt. salinarum NRC-1, following exposure to UV (200-400 nm) was about 400 kJ/m2, when cells were embedded in halite and about 1 kJ/m2, when cells were in liquid cultures. Fluorescent staining indicated a slightly higher cellular activity than that which was derived from the determination of colony forming units. Assessment of viability with the Bac

  19. Hans Georg Trüper (1936–2016) and His Contributions to Halophile Research

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Hans Georg Trüper, one of the most important scientists in the field of halophile research, passed away on 9 March 2016 at the age of 79. I here present a brief obituary with special emphasis on Prof. Trüper’s contributions to our understanding of the halophilic prokaryotes and their adaptations to life in hypersaline environments. He has pioneered the study of the halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria of the Ectothiorhodospira—Halorhodospira group. Some of the species he and his group isolated from hypersaline and haloalkaline environments have become model organisms for the study of the mechanisms of haloadaptation: the functions of three major organic compounds – glycine betaine, ectoine, and trehalose – known to serve as “compatible solutes” in halophilic members of the Bacteria domain, were discovered during studies of these anoxygenic phototrophs. Prof. Trüper’s studies of hypersaline alkaline environments in Egypt also led to the isolation of the first known extremely halophilic archaeon (Natronomonas pharaonis). The guest editors dedicate this special volume of Life to the memory of Prof. Hans Georg Trüper. PMID:27187481

  20. Halophilic microbial communities in deteriorated buildings.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Justyna; Otlewska, Anna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2015-10-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were traditionally isolated from an aquatic environment. There has been little research conducted into halophiles inhabiting the terrestrial environment in which historic monuments deteriorate. Salt efflorescence deposited on the walls is an observed phenomenon on the surface of historic buildings, and would favour the growth of halophiles. However, some conditions have to be fulfilled in order for efflorescence to occur: (1) the presence of salts, (2) porosity, (3) a source of water. Salt crystallization influences the material structure (cracking, detachment, material loss), but active growth of halophilic microorganisms may be a serious threat to historic materials as well, leading to aesthetical changes such as coloured biofilms, orange to pink or even violet stains. This is why it is important to investigate halophilic microorganisms, taking into consideration both the environmental conditions they need to grow in, material characteristics they inhabit, the mechanisms they possess to cope with osmotic stress, and the methods that should be applied for their identification.

  1. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Overholt, Will A; Marks, Kala P; Romero, Isabel C; Hollander, David J; Snell, Terry W; Kostka, Joel E

    2015-11-06

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration.

  2. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov., an extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  3. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov. - an extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, G.A.; Jahnke, L.L.; Hochstein, L.I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production. 33 references.

  4. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov. - An extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  5. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov. - An extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  6. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov., an extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  7. Comparison of Membrane ATPases from Extreme Halophiles Isolated from Ancient Salt Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Sulzner, Michael; Egelseer, Eva; Norton, Cynthia F.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1993-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum with respect to sub unit composition. enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  8. Comparison of membrane ATPases from extreme halophiles isolated from ancient salt deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Sulzner, Michael; Egelseer, Eva; Norton, Cynthia F.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1993-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk-proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum with respect to subunit composition, enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  9. Comparison of membrane ATPases from extreme halophiles isolated from ancient salt deposits.

    PubMed

    Stan-Lotter, H; Sulzner, M; Egelseer, E; Norton, C F; Hochstein, L I

    1993-02-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum with respect to subunit composition, enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  10. Comparison of membrane ATPases from extreme halophiles isolated from ancient salt deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Sulzner, Michael; Egelseer, Eva; Norton, Cynthia F.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1993-02-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme fromHalobacterium saccharovorum with respect to subunit composition, enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  11. Comparison of membrane ATPases from extreme halophiles isolated from ancient salt deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Sulzner, Michael; Egelseer, Eva; Norton, Cynthia F.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1993-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk-proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum with respect to subunit composition, enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  12. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Romero, Isabel C.; Hollander, David J.; Snell, Terry W.

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration. PMID:26546426

  13. Metatranscriptomic analysis of extremely halophilic viral communities

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fernando; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Meseguer, Inmaculada; López, Cristina; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon; Parro, Víctor; Antón, Josefa

    2011-01-01

    Hypersaline environments harbour the highest number of viruses reported for aquatic environments. In crystallizer ponds from solar salterns, haloviruses coexist with extremely halophilic Archaea and Bacteria and present a high diversity although little is known about their activity. In this work, we analyzed the viral expression in one crystallizer using a metatranscriptomic approach in which clones from a metaviromic library were immobilized in a microarray and used as probes against total mRNA extracted from the hypersaline community. This approach has two advantages: (i) it overcomes the fact that there is no straightforward, unambiguous way to extract viral mRNA from bulk mRNAs and (ii) it makes the sequencing of all mRNAs unnecessary. Transcriptomic data indicated that the halovirus assemblage was highly active at the time of sampling and the viral groups with the highest expression levels were those related to high GC content haloarchaea and Salinibacter representatives, which are minor components in the environment. Moreover, the changes in the viral expression pattern and in the numbers of free viral particles were analyzed after submitting the samples to two stress conditions: ultraviolet-radiation and dilution. Results showed that Archaea were more sensitive than Bacteria to these stress conditions. The overexpression in the predicted archaeal virus fraction raised and the total numbers of free viruses increased. Furthermore, we identified some very closely related viral clones, displaying single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which were expressed only under certain conditions. These clones could be part of very closely related virus genomes for which we propose the term ‘ecoviriotypes'. PMID:21490689

  14. Phytostabilization of moderate copper contaminated soils using co-inoculation of Vicia faba with plant growth promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fatnassi, Imen Challougui; Chiboub, Manel; Saadani, Omar; Jebara, Moez; Jebara, Salwa Harzalli

    2015-03-01

    There is a need to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from rhizosphere of plants growing on heavy metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programs. This article suggest a consortium of bacteria combining Rhizobium sp. CCNWSX0481, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas sp. 2(2010) that was examined for the ability to promote Vicia faba.L. growth when cultivated on the vineyard of soil moderately contaminated with copper. Data showed that inoculation was significant in nodulation; it increases the number and the weight of nodules of 50%. Co-inoculation was also found to positively influence growth and seed yield, through increasing fresh shoot and fresh root weights by 33 and 26%, respectively, and through rising numbers of seed per pod and pods per plant. In contrast, co-inoculation produced a significant reduction of accumulated copper in roots attending 35%, however, the treatment revealed no significant effects on the copper contents in pods and seeds. The tested inoculum could be an option to promote V. faba growth and to enhance soil fertilization in moderate copper contaminated soils. Further studies on the influence of co-inoculation practices on copper migration in soil-plant systems are recommended to acquire more information for evaluation of this legume safety.

  15. Halophiles, coming stars for industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jin; Chen, Jin-Chun; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-11-15

    Industrial biotechnology aims to produce chemicals, materials and biofuels to ease the challenges of shortage on petroleum. However, due to the disadvantages of bioprocesses including energy consuming sterilization, high fresh water consumption, discontinuous fermentation to avoid microbial contamination, highly expensive stainless steel fermentation facilities and competing substrates for human consumption, industrial biotechnology is less competitive compared with chemical processes. Recently, halophiles have shown promises to overcome these shortcomings. Due to their unique halophilic properties, some halophiles are able to grow in high pH and high NaCl containing medium under higher temperature, allowing fermentation processes to run contamination free under unsterile conditions and continuous way. At the same time, genetic manipulation methods have been developed for halophiles. So far, halophiles have been used to produce bioplastics polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), ectoines, enzymes, and bio-surfactants. Increasing effects have been made to develop halophiles into a low cost platform for bioprocessing with advantages of low energy, less fresh water consumption, low fixed capital investment, and continuous production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Life at extreme limits: the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophiles.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, Noha M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2008-03-01

    The ability of anaerobic microorganisms to proliferate under extreme conditions is of widespread importance for microbial physiology, remediation, industry, and evolution. The halophilic alkalithermophiles are a novel group of polyextremophiles. Tolerance to alkaline pH, elevated NaCl concentrations, and high temperatures necessitates mechanisms for cytoplasmic pH acidification; permeability control of the cell membrane; and stability of proteins, the cell wall, and other cellular constituents to multiple extreme conditions. Although it is generally assumed that extremophiles growing at more than one extreme combine adaptive mechanisms for each individual extreme, adaptations for individual extremes often counteract each other. However, in alkaline, hypersaline niches heated via intense solar irradiation, culture-independent analyses have revealed the presence of an extensive diversity of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms belonging to Bacteria and Archaea that survive and grow under multiple harsh conditions. Thus, polyextremophiles must have developed novel adaptive strategies enabling them to grow and proliferate under multiple extreme conditions. The recent isolation of two novel anaerobic, halophilic alkalithermophiles, Natranaerobius thermophilus and Halonatronum saccharophilum, will provide a platform for detailed biochemical, genomic, and proteomic experiments, allowing a greater understanding of the novel adaptive mechanisms undoubtedly employed by polyextremophiles. In this review, we highlight growth characteristics, ecology, and phylogeny of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophiles isolated. We also describe the bioenergetic and physiological problems posed by growth at the multiple extreme conditions of alkaline pH, high NaCl concentration, and elevated temperature under anoxic conditions and highlight recent findings and unresolved problems regarding adaptation to multiple extreme conditions.

  17. Purine Salvage in Two Halophilic Archaea: Characterization of Salvage Pathways and Isolation of Mutants Resistant to Purine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Nygaard, Per

    1998-01-01

    In exponentially growing cultures of the extreme halophile Halobacterium halobium and the moderate halophile Haloferax volcanii, growth characteristics including intracellular protein levels, RNA content, and nucleotide pool sizes were analyzed. This is the first report on pool sizes of nucleoside triphosphates, NAD, and PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate) in archaea. The presence of a number of salvage and interconversion enzymes was determined by enzymatic assays. The levels varied significantly between the two organisms. The most significant difference was the absence of GMP reductase activity in H. halobium. The metabolism of exogenous purines was investigated in growing cultures. Both purine bases and nucleosides were readily taken up and were incorporated into nucleic acids. Growth of both organisms was affected by a number of inhibitors of nucleotide synthesis. H. volcanii was more sensitive than H. halobium, and purine base analogs were more toxic than nucleoside analogs. Growth of H. volcanii was inhibited by trimethoprim and sulfathiazole, while these compounds had no effect on the growth of H. halobium. Spontaneous mutants resistant to purine analogs were isolated. The most frequent cause of resistance was a defect in purine phosphoribosyltransferase activity coupled with reduced purine uptake. A single phosphoribosyltransferase seemed to convert guanine as well as hypoxanthine to nucleoside monophosphates, and another phosphoribosyltransferase had specificity towards adenine. The differences in the metabolism of purine bases and nucleosides and the sensitivity to purine analogs between the two halobacteria were reflected in differences in purine enzyme levels. Based on our results, we conclude that purine salvage and interconversion pathways differ just as much between the two archaeal species as among archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. PMID:9457844

  18. UV resistance of a halophilic archaeon in simulated martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Kate, Il; van Sluis, Ca; Selch, F.; Garry, Jrc; Stan-Lotter, H.; van Loosdrecht, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    Mars is thought to have had liquid water at its surface for geologically long periods. The progressive desiccation of the surface would have led to an increase in the salt content of remaining bodies of water. If life had developed on Mars, then some of the mechanisms evolved in terrestrial halophilic bacteria to cope with high salt content may have been similar to those existing in martian organisms. We have exposed samples of the halophilic Natronorubrum sp. strain HG-1 (Nr. strain HG-1) to conditions of ultraviolet radiation (UV) similar to those of the present-day martian environment. Furthermore, the effects of low temperature and low pressure on Nr. strain HG-1 have been investigated. To simulate a more Mars-like environment and investigate the effect of water in the atmosphere Nr. strain HG-1 has been irradiated when placed in a low pressure CO2 environment, static as well as flowing. The results, obtained by monitoring growth curves, indicate that the present UV radiation at the surface of Mars is a significant hazard for this organism. Exposure of the cells to high vacuum inactivates ~50 % of the cells. Freezing to -20 ° C and -80 ° C kills ~80 % of the cells. When desiccated and embedded in a salt crust, cells are somewhat more resistant to UV radiation than when suspended in an aqueous solution. The cell inactivation by UV is wavelength dependent. It cannot be excluded that they can survive when embedded in the soil or buried underneath rocks.

  19. Characterization of Halophilic Bacterial Communities in Turda Salt Mine (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpa, Rahela; Keul, Anca; Muntean, Vasile; Dobrotă, Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Halophilic organisms are having adaptations to extreme salinity, the majority of them being Archaean, which have the ability to grow at extremely high salt concentrations, (from 3 % to 35 %). Level of salinity causes natural fluctuations in the halophilic populations that inhabit this particular habitat, raising problems in maintaining homeostasis of the osmotic pressure. Samples such as salt and water taken from Turda Salt Mine were analyzed in order to identify the eco-physiological bacterial groups. Considering the number of bacteria of each eco-physiological group, the bacterial indicators of salt quality (BISQ) were calculated and studied for each sample. The phosphatase, catalase and dehydrogenases enzymatic activities were quantitatively determined and the enzymatic indicators of salt quality (EISQ) were calculated. Bacterial isolates were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Universal bacterial primers, targeting the consensus region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were used. Analysis of a large fragment, of 1499 bp was performed to improve discrimination at the species level.

  20. Evolution of halophiles: A terrestrial analog for life in Brines on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, R.

    2003-04-01

    Halophiles are salt "loving" organisms that inhabit environments with salt concentrations ranging from 15% to saturation. Representatives of halophiles occur in the Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya. Adaptation to high salt can be achieved by the accumulation of organic osmotic solutes without the need for adaptation of the intracellular proteins. This mechanism is found in all three domains of life. The second mechanism is the intracellular accumulation of high concentrations of KCl, requiring adaptation of intracellular physiology to function in the presence of high ionic concentrations. This mechanism is found in the Archaea and in the Bacteria. The phylogenetic and physiological diversity among the halophiles suggests that it may have arisen more the once during evolution and is not a rarity. Because data from Mars missions suggest that Mars almost certainly had abundant liquid water on its surface at some time in the past. It could have harbored some form of life in its past As Mars lost its atmosphere it not only became cold but also dry due to water evaporation. As the water evaporated the dissolved minerals became more concentrated forming salty brine pockets. Because data from earth suggests that it may be relatively easy for halophilic type organisms to evolve if there were any life on mars in water there should have been some type of osmophile, or halophile. Brine pockets containing high concentrations of dissolved salts would have selected for the survival of halophiles. These brine pockets may either be an "oasis" for an extant Martian biota, or the last refuge of an extinct Martian biota. Eventually near surface brine pockets would have dried to form evaporites. Evaporites are deposits that result from the evaporation water containing salts, on earth consisting primarily of halite (NaCl) gypsum (CaSO_4 . 2H_2O) or anhydrite (CaSO_4). Evaporites containing bacterial and algal assemblages exist on earth today and are well-known in the fossil record.. Data

  1. Efficient utilization of ectoine by halophilic Brevibacterium species and Escherichia coli subjected to osmotic downshock.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Shinichi; Wang, Chenxiang

    2005-01-01

    Halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria subjected to osmotic downshock, from 0.7 M NaCl to deionized water, were examined for their survival, with the uptake and utilization of the cyclic amino acid ectoine, one of the representative compatible solutes, being taken into account. The uptake of ectoine added externally and survival of the cells were monitored as a function of incubation time in the presence and absence of NaCl. The halophilic Brevibacterium sp. JCM 6894 and B. epidermidis JCM 2593 actively accumulated ectoine regardless of the presence of NaCl, which led to cell survival. Brevibacterium casei JCM 2594 belonging to the same Brevibacterium species, however, revealed Na+-dependence of its uptake activity of ectoine. Non-halophilic Escherichia coli K-12 did not accumulate ectoine, and thereby this strain failed to survive irrespective of whether NaCl was present. The physiological meanings of the downshock procedure are discussed in connection with the uptake and the subsequent utilization of ectoine.

  2. Salty sisters: The women of halophiles

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Bonnie K.; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    A history of halophile research reveals the commitment of scientists to uncovering the secrets of the limits of life, in particular life in high salt concentration and under extreme osmotic pressure. During the last 40 years, halophile scientists have indeed made important contributions to extremophile research, and prior international halophiles congresses have documented both the historical and the current work. During this period of salty discoveries, female scientists, in general, have grown in number worldwide. But those who worked in the field when there were small numbers of women sometimes saw their important contributions overshadowed by their male counterparts. Recent studies suggest that modern female scientists experience gender bias in matters such as conference invitations and even representation among full professors. In the field of halophilic microbiology, what is the impact of gender bias? How has the participation of women changed over time? What do women uniquely contribute to this field? What are factors that impact current female scientists to a greater degree? This essay emphasizes the “her story” (not “history”) of halophile discovery. PMID:24926287

  3. Salty sisters: The women of halophiles.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Bonnie K; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    A history of halophile research reveals the commitment of scientists to uncovering the secrets of the limits of life, in particular life in high salt concentration and under extreme osmotic pressure. During the last 40 years, halophile scientists have indeed made important contributions to extremophile research, and prior international halophiles congresses have documented both the historical and the current work. During this period of salty discoveries, female scientists, in general, have grown in number worldwide. But those who worked in the field when there were small numbers of women sometimes saw their important contributions overshadowed by their male counterparts. Recent studies suggest that modern female scientists experience gender bias in matters such as conference invitations and even representation among full professors. In the field of halophilic microbiology, what is the impact of gender bias? How has the participation of women changed over time? What do women uniquely contribute to this field? What are factors that impact current female scientists to a greater degree? This essay emphasizes the "her story" (not "history") of halophile discovery.

  4. Recovery of metallo-tolerant and antibiotic resistant psychrophilic bacteria from Siachen glacier, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Muhammad; Hayat, Muhammad; Anesio, Alexandre M; Jamil, Syed Umair Ullah; Hassan, Noor; Shah, Aamer Ali; Hasan, Fariha

    2017-01-01

    Cultureable bacterial diversity of previously unexplored Siachen glacier, Pakistan, was studied. Out of 50 isolates 33 (66%) were Gram negative and 17 (34%) Gram positive. About half of the isolates were pigment producers and were able to grow at 4-37°C. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed Gram negative bacteria dominated by Proteobacteria (especially γ-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria) and Flavobacteria. The genus Pseudomonas (51.51%, 17) was dominant among γ- proteobacteria. β-proteobacteria constituted 4 (12.12%) Alcaligenes and 4 (12.12%) Janthinobacterium strains. Among Gram positive bacteria, phylum Actinobacteria, Rhodococcus (23.52%, 4) and Arthrobacter (23.52%, 4) were the dominating genra. Other bacteria belonged to Phylum Firmicutes with representative genus Carnobacterium (11.76%, 2) and 4 isolates represented 4 genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Staphylococcus and Planomicrobium. Most of the Gram negative bacteria were moderate halophiles, while most of the Gram positives were extreme halophiles and were able to grow up to 6.12 M of NaCl. More than 2/3 of the isolates showed antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant S. aureus, E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterococcus faecium, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus fumigatus and ATCC strains. Gram positive bacteria (94.11%) were more resistant to heavy metals as compared to Gram negative (78.79%) and showed maximum tolerance against iron and least tolerance against mercury.

  5. The effects of salinity on nitrification using halophilic nitrifiers in a Sequencing Batch Reactor treating hypersaline wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Ding, Jie-Ran; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    With annual increases in the generation and use of saline wastewater, the need to avoid environmental problems such as eutrophication is critical. A previous study identified ways to start up a halophilic sludge domesticated from estuarine sediments to remove nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30 g/L. This investigation expands that work to explore the impact of salinity on nitrogen removal. This study demonstrated that the mixed halophilic consortia removed nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30–85 g/L. A kinetic analysis showed that halophilic nitrifiers selected based on hypersalinity were characterized by low Ks, μmax and specific ammonium oxidization rates. This explains the decrease in ammonium removal efficiency in the high salinity operational phases. Salinity inhibited ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity, as well as the number of dominant AOB, but did not significantly affect the AOB dominant species. Three most dominant AOB lineages in the halophilic sludge were Nitrosomonas marina, Nitrosomonas europaea, and Nitrosococcus mobilis. Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus mobilis were mainly affected by salinity, while nitrite accumulation and ammonia loading played the key role in determining the abundance of Nitrosococcus mobilis and Nitrosococcus europaea. The study contributes insights about shifts in halophilic nitrifying bacterial populations. PMID:27109617

  6. Rapid method for detection of gram-positive and -negative bacteria in milk from cows with moderate or severe clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, S P; Sørum, H; Larsen, H J; Gogstad, G

    2001-09-01

    A rapid method for demonstration of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in milk is described. The technique is based on dilution of the sample in a medium, followed by filtration through a porous polysulfone membrane with a pore size retaining and concentrating bacteria from the sample. The bacteria concentrated on the surface of the membrane are stained with a cationic dye (toluidine blue) that can be visualized by the naked eye. After staining, the membrane is treated with ethanol-acetic acid (pH 2.8 to 3.0), which causes decolorization of gram-negative bacteria, whereas gram-positive bacteria retain the stain. The method does not require heat fixation, electrical power, microscopic examination, or specially trained personnel. The time needed to perform the test is approximately 5 min. The technique was applied to artificially infected milk and milk from cows with moderate or severe clinical mastitis for detection and differentiation of bacteria. The sensitivity of the filtration method was 92 and 100% for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively, compared with traditional bacteriological culture of milk samples. The detection limit was 5 x 10(6) CFU/ml for Staphylococcus aureus and 1 x 10(6) CFU/ml for Escherichia coli in spiked milk samples. The overall specificity of the method was 86%. This diagnostic method can provide on-site guidance to the veterinarian to optimize use of antibiotics in mastitis therapy.

  7. Physiology and Molecular Phylogeny of Bacteria Isolated from Alkaline Distillery Lime.

    PubMed

    Kalwasińska, Agnieszka; Felföldi, Tamàs; Walczak, Maciej; Kosobucki, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the research on the number, taxonomic composition, and biochemical properties of bacterial strains isolated from the alkaline Solvay distillery lime, deposited at the repository in Janikowo (central Poland). Fifteen strains out of 17 were facultative alkaliphiles and moderate halophiles, and two were alkalitolerants and moderate halophiles. The number of aerobic bacteria cultured in alkaline lime was approximately 10(5) CFU ml(-1), and the total number of bacteria was 10(7) cells g(-1). According to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, nine strains belonged to the genus Bacillus, six to the genus Halomonas, one to the genus Planococcus, and one to the genus Microcella. Strains that hydrolyse starch and protein were the most numerous. Esterase (C4) and esterase lipase (C8) were detected in the majority of bacterial strains. Twelve strains exhibited α-glucosidase activity and nine, naphtol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase activity. The present study proves that alkaliphilic bacteria of this type may constitute a source of potentially useful extremozymes.

  8. Regulated Polyploidy in Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Breuert, Sebastian; Allers, Thorsten; Spohn, Gabi; Soppa, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Polyploidy is common in higher eukaryotes, especially in plants, but it is generally assumed that most prokaryotes contain a single copy of a circular chromosome and are therefore monoploid. We have used two independent methods to determine the genome copy number in halophilic archaea, 1) cell lysis in agarose blocks and Southern blot analysis, and 2) Real-Time quantitative PCR. Fast growing H. salinarum cells contain on average about 25 copies of the chromosome in exponential phase, and their ploidy is downregulated to 15 copies in early stationary phase. The chromosome copy number is identical in cultures with a twofold lower growth rate, in contrast to the results reported for several other prokaryotic species. Of three additional replicons of H. salinarum, two have a low copy number that is not growth-phase regulated, while one replicon even shows a higher degree of growth phase-dependent regulation than the main replicon. The genome copy number of H. volcanii is similarly high during exponential phase (on average 18 copies/cell), and it is also downregulated (to 10 copies) as the cells enter stationary phase. The variation of genome copy numbers in the population was addressed by fluorescence microscopy and by FACS analysis. These methods allowed us to verify the growth phase-dependent regulation of ploidy in H. salinarum, and they revealed that there is a wide variation in genome copy numbers in individual cells that is much larger in exponential than in stationary phase. Our results indicate that polyploidy might be more widespread in archaea (or even prokaryotes in general) than previously assumed. Moreover, the presence of so many genome copies in a prokaryote raises questions about the evolutionary significance of this strategy. PMID:17183724

  9. Salt-bridge energetics in halophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Nayek, Arnab; Sen Gupta, Parth Sarthi; Banerjee, Shyamashree; Mondal, Buddhadev; Bandyopadhyay, Amal K

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic proteins have greater abundance of acidic over basic and very low bulky hydrophobic residues. Classical electrostatic stabilization was suggested as the key determinant for halophilic adaptation of protein. However, contribution of specific electrostatic interactions (i.e. salt-bridges) to overall stability of halophilic proteins is yet to be understood. To understand this, we use Adaptive-Poison-Boltzmann-Solver Methods along with our home-built automation to workout net as well as associated component energy terms such as desolvation energy, bridge energy and background energy for 275 salt-bridges from 20 extremely halophilic proteins. We then perform extensive statistical analysis on general and energetic attributes on these salt-bridges. On average, 8 salt-bridges per 150 residues protein were observed which is almost twice than earlier report. Overall contributions of salt-bridges are -3.0 kcal mol-1. Majority (78%) of salt-bridges in our dataset are stable and conserved in nature. Although, average contributions of component energy terms are equal, their individual details vary greatly from one another indicating their sensitivity to local micro-environment. Notably, 35% of salt-bridges in our database are buried and stable. Greater desolvation penalty of these buried salt-bridges are counteracted by stable network salt-bridges apart from favorable equal contributions of bridge and background terms. Recruitment of extensive network salt-bridges (46%) with a net contribution of -5.0 kcal mol-1 per salt-bridge, seems to be a halophilic design wherein favorable average contribution of background term (-10 kcal mol-1) exceeds than that of bridge term (-7 kcal mol-1). Interiors of proteins from halophiles are seen to possess relatively higher abundance of charge and polar side chains than that of mesophiles which seems to be satisfied by cooperative network salt-bridges. Overall, our theoretical analyses provide insight into halophilic signature in its

  10. Synthesis and production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by halophiles: current potential and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Quillaguamán, Jorge; Guzmán, Héctor; Van-Thuoc, Doan; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2010-02-01

    Biodegradable materials with plastic or elastomeric properties are in great demand for a variety of applications. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), polyesters synthesized by microorganisms, possess such desired features. Industrial production of PHAs is currently achieved using recombinant Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, recent research on halophiles, salt requiring microorganisms, has shown a remarkable potential for biotechnological production of PHAs. The halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei accumulates a co-polymer, i.e., poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) in large amounts using glucose, starch, and hydrolyzed whey as carbon sources. Chemical composition and molecular weight of PHAs produced by H. mediterranei can be modified depending on the substrate utilized as precursor. Phylogenetic studies on haloarchaeal enzymes able to polymerize the components of PHAs (i.e., PHA synthases) reveal a novel cluster, with a close relationship with PHA polymerases of bacteria and archaea found in marine-related niches. On the other hand, sequences of PHA synthases of two halophilic bacteria are more closely affiliated to synthases of Proteobacteria. Several bacterial species of the family Halomonadaceae accumulate PHAs. Halomonas boliviensis reached PHA yields and volumetric productivities close to the highest reported so far. Furthermore, H. boliviensis and other Halomonas species are able to co-produce PHA and osmolytes, i.e., ectoines and hydroxyectoine, in one process.

  11. Metabolomic characterization of halophilic bacterial isolates reveals strains synthesizing rare diaminoacids under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Joghee, Nidhya Nadarajan; Jayaraman, Gurunathan

    2014-07-01

    Metabolomics-based approaches to study stress responses in bacteria have received much attention in recent years. In the present study, a metabolomic analysis of the representative halophilic bacterial isolates (Halomonas hydrothermalis VITP9, Bacillus aquimaris VITP4, Planococcus maritimus VITP21 and Virgibacillus dokdonensis VITP14) from a saltern region in India was performed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Chemometric analysis of (1)H NMR spectra revealed salt-dependent increase in the levels of metabolites, mainly from the aspartate and glutamate family, that are directed from the glycolytic pathway, pentose phosphate pathway and citric acid cycle. The composition of the metabolites was found to be different with respect to the species and the type of growth medium. Analysis of the two dimensional NMR data revealed accumulation of two rare diaminoacids, Nε-acetyl-α-lysine and Nδ-acetylornithine (by VITP21 and VITP4 strains respectively) apart from other well known solutes such as ectoine, proline, glutamate and glycine betaine. Metabolite profiles of strains capable of synthesizing Nε-acetyl-α-lysine and Nδ-acetylornithine suggested their biosynthesis from lysine and ornithine using aspartate and glutamate as their precursors, respectively. Further, the cells in moderate salinity (5% w/v NaCl) showed an increase in growth rate along with increase in the levels of nucleotides, whereas at higher salinity (10% w/v NaCl), the levels of aromatic and hydrophobic metabolites dropped, accompanied with a decrease in growth rate, rightly suggesting that at any salt-stress condition provided, cellular homeostasis was favored over growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Genomes of “Spiribacter”, a streamlined, successful halophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thalassosaline waters produced by the concentration of seawater are widespread and common extreme aquatic habitats. Their salinity varies from that of sea water (ca. 3.5%) to saturation for NaCl (ca. 37%). Obviously the microbiota varies dramatically throughout this range. Recent metagenomic analysis of intermediate salinity waters (19%) indicated the presence of an abundant and yet undescribed gamma-proteobacterium. Two strains belonging to this group have been isolated from saltern ponds of intermediate salinity in two Spanish salterns and were named “Spiribacter”. Results The genomes of two isolates of “Spiribacter” have been fully sequenced and assembled. The analysis of metagenomic datasets indicates that microbes of this genus are widespread worldwide in medium salinity habitats representing the first ecologically defined moderate halophile. The genomes indicate that the two isolates belong to different species within the same genus. Both genomes are streamlined with high coding densities, have few regulatory mechanisms and no motility or chemotactic behavior. Metabolically they are heterotrophs with a subgroup II xanthorhodopsin as an additional energy source when light is available. Conclusions This is the first bacterium that has been proven by culture independent approaches to be prevalent in hypersaline habitats of intermediate salinity (half a way between the sea and NaCl saturation). Predictions from the proteome and analysis of transporter genes, together with a complete ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster are consistent with these microbes having the salt-out-organic-compatible solutes type of osmoregulation. All these features are also consistent with a well-adapted fully planktonic microbe while other halophiles with more complex genomes such as Salinibacter ruber might have particle associated microniches. PMID:24225341

  13. Characterization of halophiles isolated from solar salterns in Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sabet, Shereen; Diallo, Lamine; Hays, Lauren; Jung, Woosung; Dillon, Jesse G

    2009-07-01

    Solar salterns are extreme hypersaline environments that are five to ten times saltier than seawater (150-300 g L(-1) salt concentration) and typically contain high numbers of halophiles adapted to tolerate such extreme hypersalinity. Thirty-five halophile cultures of both Bacteria and Archaea were isolated from the Exportadora de Sal saltworks in Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that these cultured isolates included members belonging to the Halorubrum, Haloarcula, Halomonas, Halovibrio, Salicola, and Salinibacter genera and what may represent a new archaeal genus. For the first time, metabolic substrate usage of halophile isolates was evaluated using the non-colorimetric BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArray plates. Unique carbon substrate usage profiles were observed, even for closely related Halorubrum species, with bacterial isolates using more substrates than archaeal cultures. Characterization of these isolates also included morphology and pigmentation analyses, as well as salinity tolerance over a range of 50-300 g L(-1) salt concentration. Salinity optima varied between 50 and 250 g L(-1) and doubling times varied between 1 and 12 h.

  14. Amino Acid Biosynthesis in the Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula hispanica

    PubMed Central

    Hochuli, Michel; Patzelt, Heiko; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Wüthrich, Kurt; Szyperski, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Biosynthesis of proteinogenic amino acids in the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica was explored by using biosynthetically directed fractional 13C labeling with a mixture of 90% unlabeled and 10% uniformly 13C-labeled glycerol. The resulting 13C-labeling patterns in the amino acids were analyzed by two-dimensional 13C,1H correlation spectroscopy. The experimental data provided evidence for a split pathway for isoleucine biosynthesis, with 56% of the total Ile originating from threonine and pyruvate via the threonine pathway and 44% originating from pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A via the pyruvate pathway. In addition, the diaminopimelate pathway involving diaminopimelate dehydrogenase was shown to lead to lysine biosynthesis and an analysis of the 13C-labeling pattern in tyrosine indicated novel biosynthetic pathways that have so far not been further characterized. For the 17 other proteinogenic amino acids, the data were consistent with data for commonly found biosynthetic pathways. A comparison of our data with the amino acid metabolisms of eucarya and bacteria supports the theory that pathways for synthesis of proteinogenic amino acids were established before ancient cells diverged into archaea, bacteria, and eucarya. PMID:10322026

  15. Systematic and biotechnological aspects of halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Javad; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    More than 70 species of halotolerant and halophilic actinomycetes belonging to at least 24 genera have been validly described. Halophilic actinomycetes are a less explored source of actinomycetes for discovery of novel bioactive secondary metabolites. Degradation of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds, detoxification of pollutants, production of new enzymes and other metabolites such as antibiotics, compatible solutes and polymers are other potential industrial applications of halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes. Especially new bioactive secondary metabolites that are derived from only a small fraction of the investigated halophilic actinomycetes, mainly from marine habitats, have revealed the huge capacity of this physiological group in production of new bioactive chemical entities. Combined high metabolic capacities of actinomycetes and unique features related to extremophilic nature of the halophilic actinomycetes have conferred on them an influential role for future biotechnological applications.

  16. Discrimination of Pigments of Microalgae, Bacteria and Yeasts Using Lightweight Handheld Raman Spectrometers: Prospects for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlicka, J.; Osterrothova, K.; Nedbalova, L.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Oren, A.

    2014-06-01

    Handheld Raman instrumentation with 532 nm lasers can be used to distinguish carotenoids of autotrophic microalgae, purple sulfur bacteria, halophilic Archaea and pigmented yeasts. Pigments are proposed as biomarkers for astrobiology of Mars.

  17. Osmoregulation in the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas elongata: A Case Study for Integrative Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Knabe, Nicole; Siedler, Frank; Scheffer, Beatrix; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria use a variety of osmoregulatory methods, such as the accumulation of one or more compatible solutes. The wide diversity of compounds that can act as compatible solute complicates the task of understanding the different strategies that halophilic bacteria use to cope with salt. This is specially challenging when attempting to go beyond the pathway that produces a certain compatible solute towards an understanding of how the metabolic network as a whole addresses the problem. Metabolic reconstruction based on genomic data together with Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a promising tool to gain insight into this problem. However, as more of these reconstructions become available, it becomes clear that processes predicted by genome annotation may not reflect the processes that are active in vivo. As a case in point, E. coli is unable to grow aerobically on citrate in spite of having all the necessary genes to do it. It has also been shown that the realization of this genetic potential into an actual capability to metabolize citrate is an extremely unlikely event under normal evolutionary conditions. Moreover, many marine bacteria seem to have the same pathways to metabolize glucose but each species uses a different one. In this work, a metabolic network inferred from genomic annotation of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata and proteomic profiling experiments are used as a starting point to motivate targeted experiments in order to find out some of the defining features of the osmoregulatory strategies of this bacterium. This new information is then used to refine the network in order to describe the actual capabilities of H. elongata, rather than its genetic potential. PMID:28081159

  18. Salt Adaptation and Evolutionary Implication of a Nah-related PAHs Dioxygenase cloned from a Halophilic Phenanthrene Degrading Consortium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongyang; Guo, Guang; Huang, Yong; Hao, Han; Wang, Hui

    2017-10-02

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollutions often occur in marine and other saline environment, largely due to anthropogenic activities. However, study of the PAHs-degradation genotypes in halophiles is limited, compared with the mesophilic terrestrial PAHs degraders. In this study, a bacterial consortium (CY-1) was enriched from saline soil contaminated with crude oil using phenanthrene as the sole carbon source at 10% salinity. CY-1 was dominated by the moderate halophilic Marinobacter species, and its dominant PAHs ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHD) genotypes shared high identity to the classic nah-related RHDs found in the mesophilic species. Further cloning of a 5.6-kb gene cluster from CY-1 unveiled the existence of a new type of PAHs degradation gene cluster (hpah), which most probably evolves from the nah-related gene clusters. Expression of the RHD in this gene cluster in E. coli lead to the discovery of its prominent salt-tolerant properties compared with two RHDs from mesophiles. As a common structural feature shared by all halophilic and halotolerant enzymes, higher abundance of acidic amino acids was also found on the surface of this RHD than its closest nah-related alleles. These results suggest evolution towards saline adaptation occurred after horizontal transfer of this hpah gene cluster into the halophiles.

  19. Support vector machine with a Pearson VII function kernel for discriminating halophilic and non-halophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangya; Ge, Huihua

    2013-10-01

    Understanding of proteins adaptive to hypersaline environment and identifying them is a challenging task and would help to design stable proteins. Here, we have systematically analyzed the normalized amino acid compositions of 2121 halophilic and 2400 non-halophilic proteins. The results showed that halophilic protein contained more Asp at the expense of Lys, Ile, Cys and Met, fewer small and hydrophobic residues, and showed a large excess of acidic over basic amino acids. Then, we introduce a support vector machine method to discriminate the halophilic and non-halophilic proteins, by using a novel Pearson VII universal function based kernel. In the three validation check methods, it achieved an overall accuracy of 97.7%, 91.7% and 86.9% and outperformed other machine learning algorithms. We also address the influence of protein size on prediction accuracy and found the worse performance for small size proteins might be some significant residues (Cys and Lys) were missing in the proteins.

  20. The occurrence of denitrification in extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of Halobacterium vallismortis, Halobacterium mediterranei and Halobacterium marismortui (Ginzburg strain) to grow anaerobically and denitrify was determined. Each organism grew anaerobically only in the presence of nitrate. H. marismortui produced nitrite and dinitrogen from nitrate during exponential growth. However, as the culture entered stationary phase, dinitrogen production ceased and nitrous oxide was detected. H. vallismortis produced nitrous oxide and dinitrogen during exponential growth, with dinitrogen production ceasing at the onset of stationary phase. H. mediterranei produced dinitrogen during exponential growth and did not produce nitrous oxide. These results confirm the occurrence of denitrification in the halobacteria.

  1. The occurrence of denitrification in extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of Halobacterium vallismortis, Halobacterium mediterranei and Halobacterium marismortui (Ginzburg strain) to grow anaerobically and denitrify was determined. Each organism grew anaerobically only in the presence of nitrate. H. marismortui produced nitrite and dinitrogen from nitrate during exponential growth. However, as the culture entered stationary phase, dinitrogen production ceased and nitrous oxide was detected. H. vallismortis produced nitrous oxide and dinitrogen during exponential growth, with dinitrogen production ceasing at the onset of stationary phase. H. mediterranei produced dinitrogen during exponential growth and did not produce nitrous oxide. These results confirm the occurrence of denitrification in the halobacteria.

  2. Diversity of Extremely Halophilic Archaeal and Bacterial Communities from Commercial Salts

    PubMed Central

    Gibtan, Ashagrie; Park, Kyounghee; Woo, Mingyeong; Shin, Jung-Kue; Lee, Dong-Woo; Sohn, Jae Hak; Song, Minjung; Roh, Seong Woon; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Han-Seung

    2017-01-01

    Salting is one of the oldest food preservation techniques. However, salt is also the source of living halophilic microorganisms that may affect human health. In order to determine the microbial communities of commercial salts, an investigation were done using amplicon sequencing approach in four commercial salts: Ethiopian Afdera salt (EAS), Ethiopian rock salt (ERS), Korean Jangpan salt (KJS), and Korean Topan salt (KTS). Using domain-specific primers, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using a Roche 454 instrument. The results indicated that these microbial communities contained 48.22–61.4% Bacteria, 37.72–51.26% Archaea, 0.51–0.86% Eukarya, and 0.005–0.009% unclassified reads. Among bacteria, the communities in these salts were dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Of the archaea, 91.58% belonged to the class Halobacteria, whereas the remaining 7.58, 0.83, and 0.01% were Nanoarchaea, Methanobacteria, and Thermococci, respectively. This comparison of microbial diversity in salts from two countries showed the presence of many archaeal and bacterial genera that occurred in salt samples from one country but not the other. The bacterial genera Enterobacter and Halovibrio were found only in Korean and Ethiopian salts, respectively. This study indicated the occurrence and diversity of halophilic bacteria and archaea in commercial salts that could be important in the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion. PMID:28539917

  3. Halomonas campisalis sp. nov., a denitrifying, moderately haloalkaliphilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mormile, M R; Romine, M F; Garcia, M T; Ventosa, A; Bailey, T J; Peyton, B M

    1999-12-01

    The isolation and characterization of a denitrifying bacterium that is both moderately halophilic and alkaliphilic is described. The organism was isolated for use in the development of a bioprocess that could potentially reduce the costs of ion exchange resin regenerant disposal. The process of ion exchange, after resin regeneration, produces a briny, alkaline waste that is difficult and expensive to dispose. The biological removal of nitrate and subsequent reuse of these brines can potentially provide a cost-saving alternative to disposing of this waste product. To achieve our objective, a moderately halophilic, alkaliphilic bacterium was isolated from sediment samples taken from the salt plain of Alkali Lake in Washington State (USA). The haloalkaliphilic bacterium, designated strain 4A, is motile with rod-shaped cells that are 3 to 5 microm long and 1 microm wide. Electron acceptors used include oxygen, nitrate, and nitrite. In addition, it has similar specific nitrate reduction rates and biomass yields as non-halophilic denitrifying bacteria. It is capable of using a variety of electron donors. This organism can grow at NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 4.5 M with optimum growth occurring at 1.5 M and pH values ranging from 6 to 12 with 9.5 being the optimum pH. The temperature range for growth of strain 4A is 4-50 degrees C with optimal growth occurring at 30 degrees C. The G + C content is 66 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based upon 16S rDNA gene sequence placed isolate 4A in the genus Halomonas. In addition, DNA-DNA hybridization experiments clearly indicate that it is a unique species. Phenotypic and phylogenetic studies indicate that isolate 4A represents a new species. We propose the name Halomonas campisalis for this species and strain 4A (ATCC 700597) as the type strain. Due to its denitrification ability, broad carbon utilization range and its high salinity and pH tolerance this organism, and similar ones, hold promise for the treatment of saline

  4. Copper extraction from coarsely ground printed circuit boards using moderate thermophilic bacteria in a rotating-drum reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Michael L.M.; Leão, Versiane A.; Gomes, Otavio; Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Copper bioleaching from PCB (20 mm) by moderate thermophiles was demonstrated. • Larger PCB sheets enable a cost reduction due to the elimination of fine grinding. • Crushing generated cracks in PCB increasing the copper extraction. • A pre-treatment step was necessary to remove the lacquer coating. • High copper extractions (85%) were possible with pulp density of up to 25.0 g/L. - Abstract: The current work reports on a new approach for copper bioleaching from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by moderate thermophiles in a rotating-drum reactor. Initially leaching of PCB was carried out in shake flasks to assess the effects of particle size (−208 μm + 147 μm), ferrous iron concentration (1.25–10.0 g/L) and pH (1.5–2.5) on copper leaching using mesophile and moderate thermophile microorganisms. Only at a relatively low solid content (10.0 g/L) complete copper extraction was achieved from the particle size investigated. Conversely, high copper extractions were possible from coarse-ground PCB (20 mm-long) working with increased solids concentration (up to 25.0 g/L). Because there was as the faster leaching kinetics at 50 °C Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was selected for experiments in a rotating-drum reactor with the coarser-sized PCB sheets. Under optimal conditions, copper extraction reached 85%, in 8 days and microscopic observations by SEM–EDS of the on non-leached and leached material suggested that metal dissolution from the internal layers was restricted by the fact that metal surface was not entirely available and accessible for the solution in the case of the 20 mm-size sheets.

  5. Great Salt Lake halophilic microorganisms as models for astrobiology: evidence for desiccation tolerance and ultraviolet irradiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Bonnie K.; Eddington, Breanne; Riddle, Misty R.; Webster, Tabitha N.; Avery, Brian J.

    2007-09-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is home to halophiles, salt-tolerant Bacteria and Archaea, which live at 2-5M NaCl. In addition to salt tolerance, GSL halophiles exhibit resistance to both ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and desiccation. First, to understand desiccation resistance, we sought to determine the diversity of GSL halophiles capable of surviving desiccation in either recently formed GSL halite crystals or GSL Artemia (brine shrimp) cysts. From these desiccated environments, surviving microorganisms were cultured and isolated, and genomic DNA was extracted from the individual species for identification by 16S rRNA gene homology. From the surface-sterilized cysts we also extracted DNA of the whole microbial population for non-cultivation techniques. We amplified the archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA gene from all genomic DNA, cloned the cyst population amplicons, and sequenced. These sequences were compared to gene databases for determination of closest matched species. Interestingly, the isolates from the crystal dissolution are distinct from those previously isolated from GSL brine. The cyst population results reveal species not found in crystals or brine, and may indicate microorganisms that live as endosymbionts of this hypersaline arthropod. Second, we explored UV resistance in a GSL haloarchaea species, "H. salsolis." This strain resists UV irradiation an order of magnitude better than control species, all of which have intact repair systems. To test the hypothesis that halophiles have a photoprotection system, which prevents DNA damage from occurring, we designed an immunoassay to detect thymine dimers following UV irradiation. "H. salsolis" showed remarkable resistance to dimer formation. Evidence for both UV and desiccation resistance in these salt-tolerant GSL halophiles makes them well-suited as models for Astrobiological studies in pursuit of questions about life beyond earth.

  6. Copper extraction from coarsely ground printed circuit boards using moderate thermophilic bacteria in a rotating-drum reactor.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Michael L M; Leão, Versiane A; Gomes, Otavio; Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan

    2015-07-01

    The current work reports on a new approach for copper bioleaching from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by moderate thermophiles in a rotating-drum reactor. Initially leaching of PCB was carried out in shake flasks to assess the effects of particle size (-208μm+147μm), ferrous iron concentration (1.25-10.0g/L) and pH (1.5-2.5) on copper leaching using mesophile and moderate thermophile microorganisms. Only at a relatively low solid content (10.0g/L) complete copper extraction was achieved from the particle size investigated. Conversely, high copper extractions were possible from coarse-ground PCB (20mm-long) working with increased solids concentration (up to 25.0g/L). Because there was as the faster leaching kinetics at 50°C Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was selected for experiments in a rotating-drum reactor with the coarser-sized PCB sheets. Under optimal conditions, copper extraction reached 85%, in 8days and microscopic observations by SEM-EDS of the on non-leached and leached material suggested that metal dissolution from the internal layers was restricted by the fact that metal surface was not entirely available and accessible for the solution in the case of the 20mm-size sheets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Halophilic enzyme activation induced by salts

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Gabriel; Laín, Ana; Tadeo, Xavier; López-Méndez, Blanca; Castaño, David; Millet, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Halophilic archea (halobacteriae) thrive in hypersaline environments, avoiding osmotic shock by increasing the ion concentration of their cytoplasm by up to 3–6 M. To remain folded and active, their constitutive proteins have evolved towards a biased amino acid composition. High salt concentration affects catalytic activity in an enzyme-dependent way and a unified molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have investigated a DNA ligase from Haloferax volcanii (Hv LigN) to show that K+ triggers catalytic activity by preferentially stabilising a specific conformation in the reaction coordinate. Sodium ions, in turn, do not populate such isoform and the enzyme remains inactive in the presence of this co-solute. Our results show that the halophilic amino acid signature enhances the enzyme's thermodynamic stability, with an indirect effect on its catalytic activity. This model has been successfully applied to reengineer Hv LigN into an enzyme that is catalytically active in the presence of NaCl. PMID:22355525

  8. Halophile aldehyde dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Joo, Won-A; Cho, Chang-Won; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2006-01-01

    Halobacterium salinarum is a member of the halophilic archaea. In the present study, H. salinarum was cultured at various NaCl concentrations (3.5, 4.3, and 6.0 M NaCl), and its proteome was determined and identificated via proteomics technique. We detected 14 proteins which were significantly down-regulated in 3.5 M and/or 6 M NaCl. Among the identified protein spots, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was selected for evaluation with regard to its potential applications in industry. The most effective metabolism function exhibited by ALDH is the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. The ALDH gene from H. salinarum (1.5 kb fragment) was amplified by PCR and cloned into the E. coli strain, BL21 (DE3), with the pGEX-KG vector. We subsequently analyzed the enzyme activity of the recombinant ALDH (54 kDa) at a variety of salt concentrations. The purified recombinant ALDH from H. salinarum exhibited the most pronounced activity at 1 M NaCl. Therefore, the ALDH from H.salinarum is a halophilic enzyme, and may prove useful for applications in hypersaline environments.

  9. Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase (Sor) in the Moderately Thermoacidophilic Leaching Bacteria: Studies in Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    PubMed

    Janosch, Claudia; Remonsellez, Francisco; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-10-21

    The sulfur oxygenase reductase (Sor) catalyzes the oxygen dependent disproportionation of elemental sulfur, producing sulfite, thiosulfate and sulfide. Being considered an "archaeal like" enzyme, it is also encoded in the genomes of some acidophilic leaching bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus caldus, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, among others. We measured Sor activity in crude extracts from Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293(T). The optimum temperature for its oxygenase activity was achieved at 75 °C, confirming the "thermophilic" nature of this enzyme. Additionally, a search for genes probably involved in sulfur metabolism in the genome sequence of Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293(T) was done. Interestingly, no sox genes were found. Two sor genes, a complete heterodisulfidereductase (hdr) gene cluster, three tetrathionate hydrolase (tth) genes, three sulfide quinonereductase (sqr), as well as the doxD component of a thiosulfate quinonereductase (tqo) were found. Seven At. caldus strains were tested for Sor activity, which was not detected in any of them. We provide evidence that an earlier reported Sor activity from At. caldus S1 and S2 strains most likely was due to the presence of a Sulfobacillus contaminant.

  10. Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase (Sor) in the Moderately Thermoacidophilic Leaching Bacteria: Studies in Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus

    PubMed Central

    Janosch, Claudia; Remonsellez, Francisco; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The sulfur oxygenase reductase (Sor) catalyzes the oxygen dependent disproportionation of elemental sulfur, producing sulfite, thiosulfate and sulfide. Being considered an “archaeal like” enzyme, it is also encoded in the genomes of some acidophilic leaching bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus caldus, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, among others. We measured Sor activity in crude extracts from Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T. The optimum temperature for its oxygenase activity was achieved at 75 °C, confirming the “thermophilic” nature of this enzyme. Additionally, a search for genes probably involved in sulfur metabolism in the genome sequence of Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T was done. Interestingly, no sox genes were found. Two sor genes, a complete heterodisulfidereductase (hdr) gene cluster, three tetrathionate hydrolase (tth) genes, three sulfide quinonereductase (sqr), as well as the doxD component of a thiosulfate quinonereductase (tqo) were found. Seven At. caldus strains were tested for Sor activity, which was not detected in any of them. We provide evidence that an earlier reported Sor activity from At. caldus S1 and S2 strains most likely was due to the presence of a Sulfobacillus contaminant. PMID:27682113

  11. Extracellular production of beta-amylase by a halophilic isolate, Halobacillus sp. LY9.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Yu, Hui-Ying

    2011-11-01

    A moderately halophilic strain LY9 with high amylolytic activity was isolated from soil sample obtained from Yuncheng, China. Biochemical and physiological characterization along with 16S rRNA sequence analysis placed the isolate in the genus Halobacillus. Amylase production started from the post-exponential phase of bacterial growth and reached a maximum level during the early-stationary phase. The isolate LY9 was found to secrete the amylase, the production of which depended on the salinity of the growth medium. Maximum amylase production was observed in the presence of 10% KCl or 10% NaCl. Maltose was the main product of soluble starch hydrolysis, indicating a β-amylase activity. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 60°C, pH 8.0, and 10-12.5% of NaCl. It was highly active over broad temperature (50-70°C), NaCl concentration (5.0-20.0%), and pH (4.0-12.0) ranges, indicating its thermoactive and alkali-stable nature. However, activity dropped off dramatically at low NaCl concentrations, showing the amylase was halophilic. Ca(2+) was found to stimulate the β-amylase activity, whereas ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), phenylarsine oxide (PAO), and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) strongly inhibited the enzyme, indicating it probably was a metalloenzyme with cysteine and histidine residues located in its active site. Moreover, the enzyme exhibited remarkable stability towards sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100. This is the first report of β-amylase production from moderate halophiles. The present study indicates that the extracellular β-amylase of Halobacillus sp. LY9 may have considerable potential for industrial application owing to its properties.

  12. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of the halophilic marine bacterium Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Hayoung; Ro, Hyun-Joo; Jun, Sangmi; Kwon, Yong Min; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Sang-Jin; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2017-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a Gram-negative halophilic marine bacterium able to utilize several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. In this study, using transmission electron microscopy, we confirmed that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). N. pentaromativorans OMVs (hereafter OMVNovo) are spherical in shape, and the average diameter of OMVNovo is 25-70 nm. Proteomic analysis revealed that outer membrane proteins and periplasmic proteins of N. pentaromativorans are the major protein components of OMVNovo. Comparative proteomic analysis with the membrane-associated protein fraction and correlation analysis demonstrated that the outer membrane proteins of OMVNovo originated from the membrane- associated protein fraction. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize OMV purified from halophilic marine bacteria.

  13. Effect of High Hydrostatic Pressure Combined with Moderate Heat to Inactivate Pressure-Resistant Bacteria in Water-Boiled Salted Duck.

    PubMed

    Ye, Keping; Feng, Yulin; Wang, Kai; Bai, Yun; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of high hydrostatic pressure combined with moderate heat to inactivate pressure-resistant bacteria in water-boiled salted duck meat (WBSDM), and to establish suitable procedures to improve the quality of WBSDM. The conditions (300 MPa/60 °C, 400 MPa/60 °C, and 500 MPa/50 °C) effectively inactivated the pressure-resistant bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus warneri) in WBSDM. Although more pressure-resistant than S. warneri, the above treatment conditions inactivated B. cereus more than 10(7) CFU/mL in buffer, and more than 10(6) CFU/g in WBSDM, and did not cause any changes in color, texture, or moisture content of products. The interaction between pressure and temperature is a more significant factor than only pressure in inactivating both B. cereus and S. warneri, the treatment of WBSDM at 400 MPa/ 60 °C/ 10 min is the most practical condition for postprocess of WBSDM after cooking.

  14. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment.

  15. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on growth and luminescence of a moderately-piezophilic luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum ANT-2200.

    PubMed

    Martini, Séverine; Al Ali, Badr; Garel, Marc; Nerini, David; Grossi, Vincent; Pacton, Muriel; Casalot, Laurence; Cuny, Philippe; Tamburini, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is commonly found in the deep sea and depends on environmental conditions. Photobacterium phosphoreum ANT-2200 has been isolated from the NW Mediterranean Sea at 2200-m depth (in situ temperature of 13°C) close to the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on its growth and luminescence have been investigated under controlled laboratory conditions, using a specifically developed high-pressure bioluminescence system. The growth rate and the maximum population density of the strain were determined at different temperatures (from 4 to 37°C) and pressures (from 0.1 to 40 MPa), using the logistic model to define these two growth parameters. Indeed, using the growth rate only, no optimal temperature and pressure could be determined. However, when both growth rate and maximum population density were jointly taken into account, a cross coefficient was calculated. By this way, the optimum growth conditions for P. phosphoreum ANT-2200 were found to be 30°C and, 10 MPa defining this strain as mesophile and moderately piezophile. Moreover, the ratio of unsaturated vs. saturated cellular fatty acids was found higher at 22 MPa, in agreement with previously described piezophile strains. P. phosphoreum ANT-2200 also appeared to respond to high pressure by forming cell aggregates. Its maximum population density was 1.2 times higher, with a similar growth rate, than at 0.1 MPa. Strain ANT-2200 grown at 22 MPa produced 3 times more bioluminescence. The proposed approach, mimicking, as close as possible, the in situ conditions, could help studying deep-sea bacterial bioluminescence and validating hypotheses concerning its role into the carbon cycle in the deep ocean.

  16. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure on Growth and Luminescence of a Moderately-Piezophilic Luminous Bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum ANT-2200

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Séverine; Al Ali, Badr; Garel, Marc; Nerini, David; Grossi, Vincent; Pacton, Muriel; Casalot, Laurence; Cuny, Philippe; Tamburini, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is commonly found in the deep sea and depends on environmental conditions. Photobacterium phosphoreum ANT-2200 has been isolated from the NW Mediterranean Sea at 2200-m depth (in situ temperature of 13°C) close to the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on its growth and luminescence have been investigated under controlled laboratory conditions, using a specifically developed high-pressure bioluminescence system. The growth rate and the maximum population density of the strain were determined at different temperatures (from 4 to 37°C) and pressures (from 0.1 to 40 MPa), using the logistic model to define these two growth parameters. Indeed, using the growth rate only, no optimal temperature and pressure could be determined. However, when both growth rate and maximum population density were jointly taken into account, a cross coefficient was calculated. By this way, the optimum growth conditions for P. phosphoreum ANT-2200 were found to be 30°C and, 10 MPa defining this strain as mesophile and moderately piezophile. Moreover, the ratio of unsaturated vs. saturated cellular fatty acids was found higher at 22 MPa, in agreement with previously described piezophile strains. P. phosphoreum ANT-2200 also appeared to respond to high pressure by forming cell aggregates. Its maximum population density was 1.2 times higher, with a similar growth rate, than at 0.1 MPa. Strain ANT-2200 grown at 22 MPa produced 3 times more bioluminescence. The proposed approach, mimicking, as close as possible, the in situ conditions, could help studying deep-sea bacterial bioluminescence and validating hypotheses concerning its role into the carbon cycle in the deep ocean. PMID:23818946

  17. Adaptations to High Salt in a Halophilic Protist: Differential Expression and Gene Acquisitions through Duplications and Gene Transfers.

    PubMed

    Harding, Tommy; Roger, Andrew J; Simpson, Alastair G B

    2017-01-01

    The capacity of halophiles to thrive in extreme hypersaline habitats derives partly from the tight regulation of ion homeostasis, the salt-dependent adjustment of plasma membrane fluidity, and the increased capability to manage oxidative stress. Halophilic bacteria, and archaea have been intensively studied, and substantial research has been conducted on halophilic fungi, and the green alga Dunaliella. By contrast, there have been very few investigations of halophiles that are phagotrophic protists, i.e., protozoa. To gather fundamental knowledge about salt adaptation in these organisms, we studied the transcriptome-level response of Halocafeteria seosinensis (Stramenopiles) grown under contrasting salinities. We provided further evolutionary context to our analysis by identifying genes that underwent recent duplications. Genes that were highly responsive to salinity variations were involved in stress response (e.g., chaperones), ion homeostasis (e.g., Na(+)/H(+) transporter), metabolism and transport of lipids (e.g., sterol biosynthetic genes), carbohydrate metabolism (e.g., glycosidases), and signal transduction pathways (e.g., transcription factors). A significantly high proportion (43%) of duplicated genes were also differentially expressed, accentuating the importance of gene expansion in adaptation by H. seosinensis to high salt environments. Furthermore, we found two genes that were lateral acquisitions from bacteria, and were also highly up-regulated and highly expressed at high salt, suggesting that this evolutionary mechanism could also have facilitated adaptation to high salt. We propose that a transition toward high-salt adaptation in the ancestors of H. seosinensis required the acquisition of new genes via duplication, and some lateral gene transfers (LGTs), as well as the alteration of transcriptional programs, leading to increased stress resistance, proper establishment of ion gradients, and modification of cell structure properties like membrane

  18. [Comparative analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) loci in the genomes of halophilic archaea].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Bing; Xiang, Hua; Hu, Songnian

    2009-11-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) is a widespread system that provides acquired resistance against phages in bacteria and archaea. Here we aim to genome-widely analyze the CRISPR in extreme halophilic archaea, of which the whole genome sequences are available at present time. We used bioinformatics methods including alignment, conservation analysis, GC content and RNA structure prediction to analyze the CRISPR structures of 7 haloarchaeal genomes. We identified the CRISPR structures in 5 halophilic archaea and revealed a conserved palindromic motif in the flanking regions of these CRISPR structures. In addition, we found that the repeat sequences of large CRISPR structures in halophilic archaea were greatly conserved, and two types of predicted RNA secondary structures derived from the repeat sequences were likely determined by the fourth base of the repeat sequence. Our results support the proposal that the leader sequence may function as recognition site by having palindromic structures in flanking regions, and the stem-loop secondary structure formed by repeat sequences may function in mediating the interaction between foreign genetic elements and CAS-encoded proteins.

  19. Halophilic archaea cultivated from surface sterilized middle-late eocene rock salt are polyploid.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Salla T; Zerulla, Karolin; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Bamford, Dennis H; Chen, Xiangdong; Soppa, Jörg; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2014-01-01

    Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38-41 million years ago) rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11-14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6-8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment.

  20. The Evolution of Energy-Transducing Systems. Studies with an Extremely Halophilic Archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1997-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria (1). Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaea (formerly called archaebacteria) are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution (2). From studies of members of all three major groups of archaea, the halophiles, methanogens and thermoacidophiles, it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase, which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complex, and possibly a deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  1. Role of Central Metabolism in the Osmoadaptation of the Halophilic Bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens*

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, José M.; Bernal, Vicente; Salvador, Manuel; Argandoña, Montserrat; Vargas, Carmen; Csonka, Laszlo; Sevilla, Ángel; Iborra, José L.; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Cánovas, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial osmoadaptation involves the cytoplasmic accumulation of compatible solutes to counteract extracellular osmolarity. The halophilic and highly halotolerant bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens is able to grow up to 3 m NaCl in a minimal medium due to the de novo synthesis of ectoines. This is an osmoregulated pathway that burdens central metabolic routes by quantitatively drawing off TCA cycle intermediaries. Consequently, metabolism in C. salexigens has adapted to support this biosynthetic route. Metabolism of C. salexigens is more efficient at high salinity than at low salinity, as reflected by lower glucose consumption, lower metabolite overflow, and higher biomass yield. At low salinity, by-products (mainly gluconate, pyruvate, and acetate) accumulate extracellularly. Using [1-13C]-, [2-13C]-, [6-13C]-, and [U-13C6]glucose as carbon sources, we were able to determine the main central metabolic pathways involved in ectoines biosynthesis from glucose. C. salexigens uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rather than the standard glycolytic pathway for glucose catabolism, and anaplerotic activity is high to replenish the TCA cycle with the intermediaries withdrawn for ectoines biosynthesis. Metabolic flux ratios at low and high salinity were similar, revealing a certain metabolic rigidity, probably due to its specialization to support high biosynthetic fluxes and partially explaining why metabolic yields are so highly affected by salinity. This work represents an important contribution to the elucidation of specific metabolic adaptations in compatible solute-accumulating halophilic bacteria. PMID:23615905

  2. Halophilic Archaea Cultivated from Surface Sterilized Middle-Late Eocene Rock Salt Are Polyploid

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Salla T.; Zerulla, Karolin; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Bamford, Dennis H.; Chen, Xiangdong; Soppa, Jörg; Oksanen, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38–41 million years ago) rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11–14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6–8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment. PMID:25338080

  3. The effect of high ionic strength on neptunium (V) adsorption to a halophilic bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Richmann, Michael; Reed, Donald T.

    2013-06-01

    The mobility of neptunium (V) in subsurface high ionic strength aqueous systems may be strongly influenced by adsorption to the cell wall of the halophilic bacteria Chromohalobacter sp. This study is the first to evaluate the adsorption of neptunium (V) to the surface of a halophilic bacterium as a function of pH from approximately 2 to 10 and at ionic strengths of 2 and 4 M. This is also the first study to evaluate the effects of carbonate complexation with neptunium (V) on adsorption to whole bacterial cells under high pH conditions. A thermodynamically-based surface complexation model was adapted to describe experimental adsorption data under high ionic strength conditions where traditional corrections for aqueous ion activity are invalid. Adsorption of neptunium (V) was rapid and reversible under the conditions of the study. Adsorption was significant over the entire pH range evaluated for both ionic strength conditions and was shown to be dependent on the speciation of the sites on the bacterial surface and neptunium (V) in solution. Adsorption behavior was controlled by the relatively strong electrostatic attraction of the positively charged neptunyl ion to the negatively charged bacterial surface at pH below circum-neutral. At pH above circum-neutral, the adsorption behavior was controlled by the presence of negatively charged neptunium (V) carbonate complexes resulting in decreased adsorption, although adsorption was still significant due to the adsorption of negatively charged neptunyl-carbonate species. Adsorption in 4 M NaClO4 was enhanced relative to adsorption in 2 M NaClO4 over the majority of the pH range evaluated, likely due to the effect of increasing aqueous ion activity at high ionic strength. The protonation/deprotonation characteristics of the cell wall of Chromohalobacter sp. were evaluated by potentiometric titrations in 2 and 4 M NaClO4. Bacterial titration results indicated that Chromohalobacter sp. exhibits similar proton buffering

  4. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  5. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  6. Properties of a Purified Halophilic Malic Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, P. K.; Halvorson, H. Orin

    1965-01-01

    Holmes, P. K. (University of Illinois, Urbana), and H. Orin Halvorson. Properties of a purified halophilic malic dehydrogenase. J. Bacteriol. 90:316–326. 1965.—The malic dehydrogenase (MDH) from Halobacterium salinarium required high concentrations of monovalent ions for stability and activity. Studies of inactivation rates at different salt concentrations suggested that approximately 25% NaCl (w/v) is required to stabilize MDH. From 50 to 100% reactivation, depending on the salt concentration present during inactivation, could occur in 2.5 to 5 m NaCl or KCl. The optimal salt concentration for activity of MDH was a function of the pH, and ranged from 1 to 3 m NaCl or KCl. The effect of salt concentration on the pH-activity curves occurred chiefly below pH 7.0. Inactivation of MDH with heat or thiol reagents showed that the enzyme was more labile in the state induced by absence of salt. The activation of MDH by salts was attributed to a decreased rate of dissociation of MDH and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2). The inactivation of the enzyme in the absence of salt could be largely prevented by the presence of NADH2. The S20.w of MDH decreased threefold at low salt concentrations. The enzyme was assumed to be in its native compact configuration only in the presence of a high concentration of salt. PMID:14329442

  7. Complete genome sequence of the halophilic and highly halotolerant Chromohalobacter salexigens type strain (1H11T)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; O'Connor, Kathleen; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Berry, Kerrie W.; Detter, J. Chris; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas S; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Vargas, Carmen; Nieto, Joaquin J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Csonka, Laszlo N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Chromohalobacter salexigens is one of nine currently known species of the genus Chromoha- lobacter in the family Halomonadaceae. It is the most halotolerant of the so-called mod- erately halophilic bacteria currently known and, due to its strong euryhaline phenotype, it is an established model organism for prokaryotic osmoadaptation. C. salexigens strain 1H11T and Halomonas elongata are the first and the second members of the family Halomonada- ceae with a completely sequenced genome. The 3,696,649 bp long chromosome with a total of 3,319 protein-coding and 93 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2004.

  8. Efficient proteolysis and application of an alkaline protease from halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Srivastava, A K; Khare, S K

    2014-10-03

    A salt-stable alkaline protease from moderately halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9, isolated from the western coast of India, is described. This protease was capable of efficiently removing silver from used/waste X-Ray films, as well as hydrolyzing defatted soy flour with 31% degree of hydrolysis (DH). Production of the protease was optimized by using response surface methodology. Ca(2+) and NaCl were the most critical factors in enhancing the yield. Under optimized culture conditions, a maximum of 369 U protease/mL was obtained, which is quite comparable to the yields of commercial proteases. The elevated production level coupled with ability to efficiently hydrolyze protein-laden soy flour and complete recovery of silver from used X-Ray films makes it a prospective industrial enzyme.

  9. Halophilic hydrolases as a new tool for the biotechnological industries.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Mariana; Valdivia-Urdiales, Blanca; Aguilar-González, Cristóbal Noe; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl

    2012-10-01

    Halophilic micro-organisms are able to survive in high salt concentrations because they have developed diverse biochemical, structural and physiological modifications, allowing the catalytic synthesis of proteins with interesting physicochemical and structural properties. The main characteristic of halophilic enzymes that allows them to be considered as a novel alternative for use in the biotechnological industries is their polyextremophilicity, i.e. they have the capacity to be thermostable, tolerate a wide range of pH, withstand denaturation and tolerate high salt concentrations. However, there have been relatively few studies on halophilic enzymes, with some being based on their isolation and others on their characterisation. These enzymes are scarcely researched because attention has been focused on other extremophile micro-organisms. Only a few industrial applications of halophilic enzymes, principally in the fermented food, textile, pharmaceutical and leather industries, have been reported. However, it is important to investigate applications of these enzymes in more biotechnological processes at both the chemical and the molecular level. This review discusses the modifications of these enzymes, their industrial applications and research perspectives in different biotechnological areas. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Halophilic Archaea cultured from ancient halite, Death Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Brian A; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N; Parker, Matthew A

    2010-02-01

    Halophilic Archaea cultured from ancient fluid inclusions in a 90-m-long (0- to 100,000-year-old) salt core from Death Valley, California, demonstrate survival of bacterial cells in subsurface halite for up to 34,000 years. Five enrichment cultures, representing three genera of halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum, Natronomonas and Haloterrigena), were obtained from five surface-sterilized halite crystals exclusively in one section of the core (13.0-17.8 m; 22,000-34,000 years old) containing perennial saline lake deposits. Prokaryote cells were observed microscopically in situ within fluid inclusions from every layer that produced culturable cells. Another 876 crystals analysed from depths of 8.1-86.7 m (10,000-100,000 years old) failed to yield live halophilic Archaea. Considering the number of halite crystals tested (culturing success of 0.6%), microbial survival in fluid inclusions in halite is rare and related to the paleoenvironment, which controls the distribution and abundance of trapped microorganisms. Two cultures from two crystals at 17.8 m that yielded identical 16S rRNA sequences (genus: Haloterrigena) demonstrate intra-laboratory reproducibility. Inter-laboratory reproducibility is shown by two halophilic Archaea (genus: Natronomonas), with 99.3% similarity of 16S rRNA sequences, cultured from the same core interval, but at separate laboratories.

  11. A Novel Halophilic Lipase, LipBL, Showing High Efficiency in the Production of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Dolores; Martín, Sara; Fernández-Lorente, Gloria; Filice, Marco; Guisán, José Manuel; Ventosa, Antonio; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2011-01-01

    Background Among extremophiles, halophiles are defined as microorganisms adapted to live and thrive in diverse extreme saline environments. These extremophilic microorganisms constitute the source of a number of hydrolases with great biotechnological applications. The interest to use extremozymes from halophiles in industrial applications is their resistance to organic solvents and extreme temperatures. Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 is a moderately halophilic bacterium, isolated previously from a saline habitat in South Spain, showing lipolytic activity. Methods and Findings A lipolytic enzyme from the halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 was isolated. This enzyme, designated LipBL, was expressed in Escherichia coli. LipBL is a protein of 404 amino acids with a molecular mass of 45.3 kDa and high identity to class C β-lactamases. LipBL was purified and biochemically characterized. The temperature for its maximal activity was 80°C and the pH optimum determined at 25°C was 7.0, showing optimal activity without sodium chloride, while maintaining 20% activity in a wide range of NaCl concentrations. This enzyme exhibited high activity against short-medium length acyl chain substrates, although it also hydrolyzes olive oil and fish oil. The fish oil hydrolysis using LipBL results in an enrichment of free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), but not docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), relative to its levels present in fish oil. For improving the stability and to be used in industrial processes LipBL was immobilized in different supports. The immobilized derivatives CNBr-activated Sepharose were highly selective towards the release of EPA versus DHA. The enzyme is also active towards different chiral and prochiral esters. Exposure of LipBL to buffer-solvent mixtures showed that the enzyme had remarkable activity and stability in all organic solvents tested. Conclusions In this study we isolated, purified, biochemically characterized and immobilized a lipolytic enzyme from

  12. Euryhaline Halophilic Microorganisms From the Suiyo Seamount Hydrothermal Vents.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Kimura, H.; Maruyama, A.; Naganuma, T.

    2002-12-01

    The euryhaline halophilic microorganisms grow in a wide salinity range from <3% NaCl (seawater equivalent) to >15% NaCl or to even saturation (about 30% NaCl). A number of euryhaline halophiles have been found in a wide range of habitats from oceanic and terrestrial regimes, from deep-sea vents and seeps, and from Antarctic sea ice and terrains. We have isolated the euryhaline strains independently from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge vent fluids and Antarctic terrains are closely related species of the genus Halomonas. Some euryhaline halophiles maintain intracellular osmotic balance by controlling the concentration of compatible solute such as ectoine. This compatible solute not only stabilizes the proteins from denaturation caused by high salt concentration but also serves as a protectant against stresses such as heating, freezing and drying. The sub-seafloor structure of a hydrothermal vent is highly complicated with mosaic heterogeneity of physicochemical parameters such as temperature and salinity. This premise led us to the hypothesis that some euryhaline halophiles including Halomonas species well adapt to a wide salinity-ranged habitat in the sub-vent. To test this hypothesis, isolation and characterization of euryhaline halophiles from the Suiyo Seamount hydrothermal vents were conducted the drill-cored rock samples from the sites APSK-02, 03, and 07 and the filter-trapped fluid particle samples from the sites APSK-01 and 05 were used. For initial cultivation, a heterotrophic bacterial medium of 15% NaCl was used. The samples was added to the medium and incubated under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions at room temperature. A total of 5 euryhaline halophilic strains were obtained and phylogenetically characterized: two strains (both related to Marinobacter) from APSK-02 core section 2; one strain (related to H. meridiana) from APSK-07 core section 3; and two strains (related to H. meridiana and H. variabilis) from APSK-01 trapped particles. In addition, some

  13. Moderately haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes in salt-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    It was found that the population density of actinomycetes in solonchaks and saline desert soils varied from hundreds to tens of thousands of colony-forming units (CFUs) per 1 g of soil depending on soil type and was by 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the number of mycelial bacteria in main soil types. Actinomycetes grow actively in saline soils, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m per 1 g of soil. Domination of moderately halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes, which grow well under 5% NaCl and pH 8-9, is a specific feature of actinomycetal complexes in saline soils. Representatives of Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera were found among the haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes. Micromonospores demonstrated lower (than streptomycetes) adaptability to high salt concentrations. Investigation of the phylogenetic position of isolated dominant haloalkaliphilic strains of streptomycetes performed on the basis of sequencing of the gene 16S rRNA enabled identifying these strains as Streptomyces pluricolorescens and S. prunicolor.

  14. Molecular signature of hypersaline adaptation: insights from genome and proteome composition of halophilic prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sandip; Bag, Sumit K; Das, Sabyasachi; Harvill, Eric T; Dutta, Chitra

    2008-01-01

    Background Halophilic prokaryotes are adapted to thrive in extreme conditions of salinity. Identification and analysis of distinct macromolecular characteristics of halophiles provide insight into the factors responsible for their adaptation to high-salt environments. The current report presents an extensive and systematic comparative analysis of genome and proteome composition of halophilic and non-halophilic microorganisms, with a view to identify such macromolecular signatures of haloadaptation. Results Comparative analysis of the genomes and proteomes of halophiles and non-halophiles reveals some common trends in halophiles that transcend the boundary of phylogenetic relationship and the genomic GC-content of the species. At the protein level, halophilic species are characterized by low hydrophobicity, over-representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, under-representation of Cys, lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil structure. At the DNA level, the dinucleotide abundance profiles of halophilic genomes bear some common characteristics, which are quite distinct from those of non-halophiles, and hence may be regarded as specific genomic signatures for salt-adaptation. The synonymous codon usage in halophiles also exhibits similar patterns regardless of their long-term evolutionary history. Conclusion The generality of molecular signatures for environmental adaptation of extreme salt-loving organisms, demonstrated in the present study, advocates the convergent evolution of halophilic species towards specific genome and amino acid composition, irrespective of their varying GC-bias and widely disparate taxonomic positions. The adapted features of halophiles seem to be related to physical principles governing DNA and protein stability, in response to the extreme environmental conditions under which they thrive. PMID:18397532

  15. Molecular signature of hypersaline adaptation: insights from genome and proteome composition of halophilic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sandip; Bag, Sumit K; Das, Sabyasachi; Harvill, Eric T; Dutta, Chitra

    2008-04-09

    Halophilic prokaryotes are adapted to thrive in extreme conditions of salinity. Identification and analysis of distinct macromolecular characteristics of halophiles provide insight into the factors responsible for their adaptation to high-salt environments. The current report presents an extensive and systematic comparative analysis of genome and proteome composition of halophilic and non-halophilic microorganisms, with a view to identify such macromolecular signatures of haloadaptation. Comparative analysis of the genomes and proteomes of halophiles and non-halophiles reveals some common trends in halophiles that transcend the boundary of phylogenetic relationship and the genomic GC-content of the species. At the protein level, halophilic species are characterized by low hydrophobicity, over-representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, under-representation of Cys, lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil structure. At the DNA level, the dinucleotide abundance profiles of halophilic genomes bear some common characteristics, which are quite distinct from those of non-halophiles, and hence may be regarded as specific genomic signatures for salt-adaptation. The synonymous codon usage in halophiles also exhibits similar patterns regardless of their long-term evolutionary history. The generality of molecular signatures for environmental adaptation of extreme salt-loving organisms, demonstrated in the present study, advocates the convergent evolution of halophilic species towards specific genome and amino acid composition, irrespective of their varying GC-bias and widely disparate taxonomic positions. The adapted features of halophiles seem to be related to physical principles governing DNA and protein stability, in response to the extreme environmental conditions under which they thrive.

  16. The active natural anti-oxidant properties of chamomile, milk thistle, and halophilic bacterial components in human skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mamalis, Andrew; Nguyen, Duc-Huy; Brody, Neil; Jagdeo, Jared

    2013-07-01

    The number of skin cancers continues to rise, accounting for approximately 40% of all cancers reported in the United States and approximately 9,500 deaths per year. Studies have shown reactive oxygen species (ROS) type free radicals are linked to skin cancer and aging. Therefore, it is important for us to identify agents that have anti-oxidant properties to protect skin against free radical damage. The purpose of this research is to investigate the anti-oxidant properties of bisabolol, silymarin, and ectoin that are components from chamomile, milk thistle, and halophilic bacteria, respectively. We measured the ability of bisabolol, silymarin, and ectoin to modulate the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced upregulation of ROS free radicals in normal human skin fibroblasts in vitro. Using a flow cytometry-based assay, we demonstrated that varying concentrations of these natural components were able to inhibit upregulation of H2O2-generated free radicals in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. Our results indicate components of chamomile, milk thistle, and halophilic bacteria exhibit anti-oxidant capabilities and warrant further study in clinical trials to characterize their anti-cancer and anti-aging capabilities.

  17. Psychrobacter submarinus sp. nov. and Psychrobacter marincola sp. nov., psychrophilic halophiles from marine environments.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Schumann, Peter; Rohde, Manfred; Lysenko, Anatoly M; Mikhailov, Valery V; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2002-07-01

    Two novel psychrophilic, halophilic, Psychrobacter-like bacteria, strains KMM 225T and KMM 277T, were isolated from sea water and the internal tissues of an ascidian Polysyncraton sp. specimen, respectively, and characterized using a polyphasic approach, which included phenotypic, genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses. The novel marine isolates were Gram-negative, aerobic, coccoid, oxidase- and catalase-positive, non-pigmented, non-motile, psychrophilic and halophilic and they utilized a restricted spectrum of carbon sources. Strains KMM 225T and KMM 277T required sea water or sodium ions for growth and were tolerant of up to 12-15% (w/v) NaCl. Growth of strains KMM 225T and KMM 277T was observed at 4-35 and 7-35 degrees C, respectively. The DNA G+C contents of KMM 225T and KMM 277T were respectively 46-8 and 50.7 mol %. Comparison of almost complete 16S rDNA sequences of strains KMM 225T and KMM 277T revealed that both strains were phylogenetically most closely related to each other (99.9% sequence similarity) and slightly less related to Psychrobacter glacincola, with 97.2 and 97.8% similarity, respectively. DNA-DNA reassociation between KMM 225T and KMM 277T revealed 15% similarity, whereas similarity to other Psychrobacter species was 14-25%. Strains KMM 225T and KMM 277T differed from one another in their growth temperature, organic substrate utilization, antibiotic sensitivity and DNA G+C content. Both strains examined could be distinguished from all previously described Psychrobacter species by their physiological, genotypic and phylogenetic characteristics. On the basis of the physiological and molecular properties of the novel isolates, the names Psychrobacter submarinus sp. nov. (type strain KMM 225T = DSM 14161T) and Psychrobacter marincola sp. nov. (type strain KMM 277T = DSM 14160T) are proposed.

  18. Adaptation to high salt concentrations in halotolerant/halophilic fungi: a molecular perspective

    PubMed Central

    Plemenitaš, Ana; Lenassi, Metka; Konte, Tilen; Kejžar, Anja; Zajc, Janja; Gostinčar, Cene; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Molecular studies of salt tolerance of eukaryotic microorganisms have until recently been limited to the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a few other moderately halotolerant yeast. Discovery of the extremely halotolerant and adaptable fungus Hortaea werneckii and the obligate halophile Wallemia ichthyophaga introduced two new model organisms into studies on the mechanisms of salt tolerance in eukaryotes. H. werneckii is unique in its adaptability to fluctuations in salt concentrations, as it can grow without NaCl as well as in the presence of up to 5 M NaCl. On the other hand, W. ichthyophaga requires at least 1.5 M NaCl for growth, but also grows in up to 5 M NaCl. Our studies have revealed the novel and intricate molecular mechanisms used by these fungi to combat high salt concentrations, which differ in many aspects between the extremely halotolerant H. werneckii and the halophilic W. ichthyophaga. Specifically, the high osmolarity glycerol signaling pathway that is important for sensing and responding to increased salt concentrations is here compared between H. werneckii and W. ichthyophaga. In both of these fungi, the key signaling components are conserved, but there are structural and regulation differences between these pathways in H. werneckii and W. ichthyophaga. We also address differences that have been revealed from analysis of their newly sequenced genomes. The most striking characteristics associated with H. werneckii are the large genetic redundancy, the expansion of genes encoding metal cation transporters, and a relatively recent whole genome duplication. In contrast, the genome of W. ichthyophaga is very compact, as only 4884 protein-coding genes are predicted, which cover almost three quarters of the sequence. Importantly, there has been a significant increase in their hydrophobins, cell-wall proteins that have multiple cellular functions. PMID:24860557

  19. Structural Diversity of the Membrane Core Lipids of Extreme Halophiles.

    PubMed

    Morita, M; Yamauchi, N; Eguchi, T; Kakinuma, K

    1998-01-01

    The structural diversity of the core lipids of extreme halophiles Haloarcula japonica and Halobacterium halobium was investigated. The most significant difference is that Ha. japonica contains sn-2,3-di-O-phytanylglycerol exclusively as the core lipid, whereas Hb. halobium contains both sn-2,3-di-O-phytanylglycerol and sn-2-O-sesterterpanyl (3,7,11,15,19-pentamethyleicosanyl)-3-O-phytanylglycerol.

  20. Extreme Halophiles and Carbon Monoxide: Looking Through Windows at Earth's Past and Towards a Future on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, G.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon monoxide, which is ubiquitous on Earth, is the 2nd most abundant molecule in the universe. Members of the domain Bacteria have long been known to oxidize it, and activities of CO oxidizers in soils have been known for several decades to contribute to tropospheric CO regulation. Nonetheless, the diversity of CO oxidizers and their evolutionary history remain largely unknown. A molybdenum-dependent dehydrogenase (Mo-CODH) couples CO oxidation by most terrestrial and marine bacteria to either O2 or nitrate. Molybdenum dependence, the requirement for O2 and previous phylogenetic inferences have all supported a relatively late evolution for "aerobic" CO oxidation, presumably after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) about 2.3 Gya. Although conundrums remain, recent discoveries suggest that Mo-CODH might have evolved before the GOE, and prior to the Bacteria-Archaea split. New phylogenetic analyses incorporating sequences from extremely halophilic CO-oxidizing Euryarchaeota isolated from salterns in the Atacama Desert, brines on Hawai`i and from the Bonneville Salt Flat suggest that Mo-CODH was present in an ancestor shared by Bacteria and Archaea. This observation is consistent with results of phylogenetic histories of genes involved in Mo-cofactor synthesis, and findings by others that Mo-nitrogenase was likely active > 3 Gya. Thus, analyses of Mo-dependent CO oxidizers provide a window on the past by raising questions about the availability of Mo and non-O2 electron acceptors. Extremely halophilic CO oxidizers also provide insights relevant for understanding the potential for extraterrestrial life. CO likely occurred at high concentrations in Mars' early atmosphere, and it occurs presently at about 800 ppm. At such high concentrations, CO represents one of the most abundant energy sources available for near-surface regolith. However, use of CO by an extant or transplanted Mars microbiota would require tolerance of low water potentials and high salt concentrations

  1. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms.

  2. Improvement of halophilic cellulase production from locally isolated fungal strain

    PubMed Central

    Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Arbain, Dachyar; Jamal, Parveen; Gumba, Rizo Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic cellulases from the newly isolated fungus, Aspergillus terreus UniMAP AA-6 were found to be useful for in situ saccharification of ionic liquids treated lignocelluloses. Efforts have been taken to improve the enzyme production through statistical optimization approach namely Plackett–Burman design and the Face Centered Central Composite Design (FCCCD). Plackett–Burman experimental design was used to screen the medium components and process conditions. It was found that carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), FeSO4·7H2O, NaCl, MgSO4·7H2O, peptone, agitation speed and inoculum size significantly influence the production of halophilic cellulase. On the other hand, KH2PO4, KOH, yeast extract and temperature had a negative effect on enzyme production. Further optimization through FCCCD revealed that the optimization approach improved halophilic cellulase production from 0.029 U/ml to 0.0625 U/ml, which was approximately 2.2-times greater than before optimization. PMID:26150755

  3. Improvement of halophilic cellulase production from locally isolated fungal strain.

    PubMed

    Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Arbain, Dachyar; Jamal, Parveen; Gumba, Rizo Edwin

    2015-07-01

    Halophilic cellulases from the newly isolated fungus, Aspergillus terreus UniMAP AA-6 were found to be useful for in situ saccharification of ionic liquids treated lignocelluloses. Efforts have been taken to improve the enzyme production through statistical optimization approach namely Plackett-Burman design and the Face Centered Central Composite Design (FCCCD). Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to screen the medium components and process conditions. It was found that carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), FeSO4·7H2O, NaCl, MgSO4·7H2O, peptone, agitation speed and inoculum size significantly influence the production of halophilic cellulase. On the other hand, KH2PO4, KOH, yeast extract and temperature had a negative effect on enzyme production. Further optimization through FCCCD revealed that the optimization approach improved halophilic cellulase production from 0.029 U/ml to 0.0625 U/ml, which was approximately 2.2-times greater than before optimization.

  4. Stoichiometric and kinetic analysis of extreme halophilic Archaea on various substrates in a corrosion resistant bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Seyer, Bernhard; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-25

    Extreme halophilic Archaea are extremophile species which can thrive in hypersaline environments of up to 3-5 M sodium chloride concentration. Although their ecology and physiology are widely identified on the microbiological level, little emphasis has been laid on quantitative bioprocess development with extreme halophiles. The goal of this study was to establish, on the one hand, a methodological basis for quantitative bioprocess analysis of extreme halophilic Archaea with an extreme halophilic strain as an example. Firstly, as a novel usage, a corrosion resistant bioreactor setup for extreme halophiles has been implemented. Then, paying special attention to total bioprocess quantification approaches, an indirect method for biomass quantification using on-line process signals was introduced. Subsequently, robust quantitative data evaluation methods for halophiles could be developed, providing defined and controlled cultivation conditions in the bioreactor and therefore obtaining suitable quality of on-line as well as off-line datasets. On the other hand, new physiological results of extreme halophiles in bioreactor have also been obtained based on the quantitative methodological tools. For the first time, quantitative data on stoichiometry and kinetics were collected and evaluated on different carbon sources. The results on various substrates were interpreted, with proposed metabolic mechanisms, by linking to the reported primary carbon metabolism of extreme halophilic Archaea. Moreover, results of chemostat cultures demonstrated that extreme halophilic organisms show Monod-kinetics on different sole carbon sources. A diauxic growth pattern was described on a mixture of substrates in batch cultivations. In addition, the methodologies presented here enable one to characterize the utilized strain Haloferax mediterranei (HFX) as a potential new host organism. Thus, this study offers a strong methodological basis as well as a fundamental physiological assessment for

  5. Model organisms for genetics in the domain Archaea: methanogens, halophiles, Thermococcales and Sulfolobales.

    PubMed

    Leigh, John A; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Atomi, Haruyuki; Allers, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The tree of life is split into three main branches: eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea. Our knowledge of eukaryotic and bacteria cell biology has been built on a foundation of studies in model organisms, using the complementary approaches of genetics and biochemistry. Archaea have led to some exciting discoveries in the field of biochemistry, but archaeal genetics has been slow to get off the ground, not least because these organisms inhabit some of the more inhospitable places on earth and are therefore believed to be difficult to culture. In fact, many species can be cultivated with relative ease and there has been tremendous progress in the development of genetic tools for both major archaeal phyla, the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota. There are several model organisms available for methanogens, halophiles, and thermophiles; in the latter group, there are genetic systems for Sulfolobales and Thermococcales. In this review, we present the advantages and disadvantages of working with each archaeal group, give an overview of their different genetic systems, and direct the neophyte archaeologist to the most appropriate model organism. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Proteogenomic Elucidation of the Initial Steps in the Benzene Degradation Pathway of a Novel Halophile, Arhodomonas sp. Strain Rozel, Isolated from a Hypersaline Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dalvi, Sonal; Azetsu, Sei; Patrauchan, Marianna A.; Aktas, Deniz F.

    2012-01-01

    Lately, there has been a special interest in understanding the role of halophilic and halotolerant organisms for their ability to degrade hydrocarbons. The focus of this study was to investigate the genes and enzymes involved in the initial steps of the benzene degradation pathway in halophiles. The extremely halophilic bacteria Arhodomonas sp. strain Seminole and Arhodomonas sp. strain Rozel, which degrade benzene and toluene as the sole carbon source at high salinity (0.5 to 4 M NaCl), were isolated from enrichments developed from contaminated hypersaline environments. To obtain insights into the physiology of this novel group of organisms, a draft genome sequence of the Seminole strain was obtained. A cluster of 13 genes predicted to be functional in the hydrocarbon degradation pathway was identified from the sequence. Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to corroborate the role of the predicted open reading frames (ORFs). ORFs 1080 and 1082 were identified as components of a multicomponent phenol hydroxylase complex, and ORF 1086 was identified as catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (2,3-CAT). Based on this analysis, it was hypothesized that benzene is converted to phenol and then to catechol by phenol hydroxylase components. The resulting catechol undergoes ring cleavage via the meta pathway by 2,3-CAT to form 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To substantiate these findings, the Rozel strain was grown on deuterated benzene, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected deuterated phenol as the initial intermediate of benzene degradation. These studies establish the initial steps of the benzene degradation pathway in halophiles. PMID:22885747

  7. Characteristics of phenol degradation in saline conditions of a halophilic strain JS3 isolated from industrial activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu; Shang, Yu; Yang, Xiaojun

    2015-10-15

    Several halophilic bacteria have been reported to degrade phenol. However, there are a few works about salt-tolerant fungi which can utilize phenol as sole source of carbon. In this study, a halophilic strain JS3 which could degrade phenol with high efficiency was separated and identified. The effect of initial phenol concentration on phenol biodegradation was investigated and optimal pH, temperature, as well as salt-tolerance were evaluated. The isolate could degrade less than 800 mg/L phenol completely in 72 h. It grew well when pH, temperature, and salinity were at values of 4.0-9.0, 30-40°C, and 0-7%, respectively. The optimal pH, temperature and salinity were 6.0, 35°C and 0%. More than 99% of 500 mg/L phenol was degraded in the optimal condition within 24h. The tolerance of wide range of pH, temperature and salinity indicated that strain JS3 was effective for phenol removal in hypersaline wastewaters.

  8. Halophilic properties of metal binding protein characterized by high histidine content from Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao

    2012-02-01

    Periplasmic metal binding protein characterized by high histidine content was cloned from moderate halophile, Chromohalobacter salexigens. The protein, termed histidine-rich metal binding protein (HP), was expressed in and purified from E. coli as a native form. HP bound to Ni- and Cu-loaded chelate columns with high affinity, and Co- and Zn-columns with moderate affinity. Although the secondary structure was not grossly altered by the addition of 0.2-2.0 M NaCl, the thermal transition pattern was considerably shifted to higher temperature with increasing salt concentration: melting temperature was raised by ~20 °C at 2.0 M NaCl over the melting temperature at 0.2 M NaCl. HP showed reversible refolding from thermal melting in 0.2-1.15 M NaCl, while it formed irreversible aggregates upon thermal melting at 2 M NaCl. Addition of 0.01-0.1 mM NiSO₄ stabilized HP against thermal melting with high reversibility, while addition above 0.5 mM resulted in irreversible melting due to aggregation.

  9. Carotenoid analysis of halophilic archaea by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig P; Leuko, Stefan; Coyle, Candace M; Walter, Malcolm R; Burns, Brendan P; Neilan, Brett A

    2007-08-01

    Recently, halite and sulfate evaporate rocks have been discovered on Mars by the NASA rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. It is reasonable to propose that halophilic microorganisms could have potentially flourished in these settings. If so, biomolecules found in microorganisms adapted to high salinity and basic pH environments on Earth may be reliable biomarkers for detecting life on Mars. Therefore, we investigated the potential of Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy to detect biomarkers derived from microorganisms adapted to hypersaline environments. RR spectra were acquired using 488.0 and 514.5 nm excitation from a variety of halophilic archaea, including Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Natrinema pallidum. It was clearly demonstrated that RR spectra enhance the chromophore carotenoid molecules in the cell membrane with respect to the various protein and lipid cellular components. RR spectra acquired from all halophilic archaea investigated contained major features at approximately 1000, 1152, and 1505 cm(-1). The bands at 1505 cm(-1) and 1152 cm(-1) are due to in-phase C=C (nu(1) ) and C-C stretching ( nu(2) ) vibrations of the polyene chain in carotenoids. Additionally, in-plane rocking modes of CH(3) groups attached to the polyene chain coupled with C-C bonds occur in the 1000 cm(-1) region. We also investigated the RR spectral differences between bacterioruberin and bacteriorhodopsin as another potential biomarker for hypersaline environments. By comparison, the RR spectrum acquired from bacteriorhodopsin is much more complex and contains modes that can be divided into four groups: the C=C stretches (1600-1500 cm(-1)), the CCH in-plane rocks (1400-1250 cm(-1)), the C-C stretches (1250-1100 cm(-1)), and the hydrogen out-of-plane wags (1000-700 cm(-1)). RR spectroscopy was shown to be a useful tool for the analysis and remote in situ detection of carotenoids from halophilic archaea without the need for large sample sizes and complicated

  10. Flagella of halophilic archaea: differences in supramolecular organization.

    PubMed

    Syutkin, A S; Pyatibratov, M G; Fedorov, O V

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal flagella are similar functionally to bacterial flagella, but structurally they are completely different. Helical archaeal flagellar filaments are formed of protein subunits called flagellins (archaellins). Notwithstanding progress in studies of archaeal flagella achieved in recent years, many problems in this area are still unsolved. In this review, we analyze the formation of these supramolecular structures by the example of flagellar filaments of halophilic archaea. Recent data on the structure of the flagellar filaments demonstrate that their supramolecular organization differs considerably in different haloarchaeal species.

  11. Voltage-dependent absorbance change of carotenoids in halophilic archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Seki, S I; Sasabe, H; Tomioka, H

    1996-10-02

    Membrane vesicles of wild-type Halobacterium sp. mex strain show a wavy absorbance change which has not been so far reported in halophilic archaebacteria. A white mutant strain lacking carotenoids did not show the wavy absorbance change. The wavy absorbance change in the range of 440-590 nm was induced by a red flash (600-640 nm), which photoexcited electrogenic ion pumps, mex bacteriorhodopsin and mex halorhodopsin but not carotenoids. The wavy change was also caused by K+ diffusion potentials without light. These results suggest that the wavy absorbance change in the membrane vesicles is the voltage-dependent absorbance change of the carotenoids.

  12. Useful halophilic, thermostable and ionic liquids tolerant cellulases

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Simmons, Blake A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides for an isolated or recombinant polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 70% identity with the amino acid sequence of a Halorhabdus utahensis cellulase, such as Hu-CBH1, wherein said amino acid sequence has a halophilic thermostable and/or thermophilic cellobiohydrolase (CBH) activity. In some embodiments, the polypeptide has a CBH activity that is resistant to up to about 20% of ionic liquids. The present invention also provides for compositions comprising and methods using the isolated or recombinant polypeptide.

  13. The effects of space relevant environmental factors on halophilic Archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuko, Stefan; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra

    Within the last 50 years, space technology has provided tools for transporting terrestrial (microbial) life beyond Earth's protective shield in order to study its responses to selected conditions of space. Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every environment on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and are true masters in adapting to rapidly changing external conditions. Although microorganisms cannot actively grow under the harsh conditions of outer space or other known planets, some microorganisms might be able to survive for a time in space or other planets as dormant, inactive spores or in similar desiccation-resistant resting states, e.g., enclosed in halite crystals or biofilms. Halite crystals are the realm of halophilic Archaea as they have adapted to life at extreme salt concentrations. They can stay entrapped in such crystals for millions of years without losing viability and therefore the family Halobacteriaceae belongs to the group of microorganisms which may survive space travel or may even be found on other planets. Several members of this family have been utilized in space relevant experiments where they were exposed to detrimental environmental conditions such as UV-C radiation, vacuum, temperature cycles (+60(°) C and -25(°) C) and heavy iron bombardment (150 MeV He, 500 MeV Ar and 500 MeV Fe ions). The viability was evaluated by colony forming unit (cfu) counts as well as with the LIFE/DEAD kit. Results revealed that UV-C radiation (up to 1.000 J/m (2) ) has a considerable effect on the viability, whereas the other tested parameters inflict little damage onto the organisms. Repair of UV-C inflicted damage is efficient and several DNA damage repair genes are up-regulated following exposure. Halophilic archaea display a strong resistance against heavy iron bombardment, with dosages of up to 2.000 Gy 500 MeV Fe ions needed to establish a visible effect on the vitality. Genomic integrity after

  14. Carotenoid Analysis of Halophilic Archaea by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Craig P.; Leuko, Stefan; Coyle, Candace M.; Walter, Malcolm R.; Burns, Brendan P.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2007-08-01

    Recently, halite and sulfate evaporate rocks have been discovered on Mars by the NASA rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. It is reasonable to propose that halophilic microorganisms could have potentially flourished in these settings. If so, biomolecules found in microorganisms adapted to high salinity and basic pH environments on Earth may be reliable biomarkers for detecting life on Mars. Therefore, we investigated the potential of Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy to detect biomarkers derived from microorganisms adapted to hypersaline environments. RR spectra were acquired using 488.0 and 514.5 nm excitation from a variety of halophilic archaea, including Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Natrinema pallidum. It was clearly demonstrated that RR spectra enhance the chromophore carotenoid molecules in the cell membrane with respect to the various protein and lipid cellular components. RR spectra acquired from all halophilic archaea investigated contained major features at approximately 1000, 1152, and 1505 cm-1. The bands at 1505 cm-1 and 1152 cm-1 are due to in-phase C=C (ν1 ) and C-C stretching ( ν2 ) vibrations of the polyene chain in carotenoids. Additionally, in-plane rocking modes of CH3 groups attached to the polyene chain coupled with C-C bonds occur in the 1000 cm-1 region. We also investigated the RR spectral differences between bacterioruberin and bacteriorhodopsin as another potential biomarker for hypersaline environments. By comparison, the RR spectrum acquired from bacteriorhodopsin is much more complex and contains modes that can be divided into four groups: the C=C stretches (1600-1500 cm-1), the CCH in-plane rocks (1400-1250 cm-1), the C-C stretches (1250-1100 cm-1), and the hydrogen out-of-plane wags (1000-700 cm-1). RR spectroscopy was shown to be a useful tool for the analysis and remote in situ detection of carotenoids from halophilic archaea without the need for large sample sizes and complicated extractions, which are

  15. Identification of carotenoids from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yatsunami, Rie; Ando, Ai; Yang, Ying; Takaichi, Shinichi; Kohno, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yuriko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Fukui, Toshiaki; Nakasone, Kaoru; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Mitsuo; Takashina, Tomonori; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The carotenoids produced by extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica were extracted and identified by their chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic characteristics (UV-Vis and mass spectrometry). The composition (mol%) was 68.1% bacterioruberin, 22.5% monoanhydrobacterioruberin, 9.3% bisanhydrobacterioruberin, <0.1% isopentenyldehydrorhodopin, and trace amounts of lycopene and phytoene. The in vitro scavenging capacity of a carotenoid, bacterioruberin, extracted from Haloarcula japonica cells against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was evaluated. The antioxidant capacity of bacterioruberin was much higher than that of β -carotene. PMID:24672517

  16. Archaebacterial class I and class II aldolases from extreme halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterkar, Wijaya; Dhar, Nenoo M.

    1988-03-01

    Both, class I (Schiff-base forming) and class II (metal requiring) fructose biphosphate aldolases were found to be distributed among halophilic archaebacteria. The aldolase activity fromHalobacterium halobium, H. salinarium, H. cutirubrum, H. mediterranei andH. volcanii exhibited properties of a bacterial class II aldolase as it was metal-dependent for activity and therefore inhibited by EDTA. In contrast, aldolase fromH. saccharovorum, Halobacterium R-113, H. vallismortis andHalobacterium CH-1 formed a Schiff-base intermediate with the substrate and therefore resembled to eukaryotic class I type. The type of aldolase did not vary by changes in the growth medium.

  17. Archaebacterial class I and class II aldolases from extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Altekar, W; Dhar, N M

    1988-01-01

    Both, class I (Schiff-base forming) and class II (metal requiring) fructose biphosphate aldolases were found to be distributed among halophilic archaebacteria. The aldolase activity from Halobacteriium halobium, H. salinarium, H. cutirubrum, H. mediterranei and H. volcanii exhibited properties of a bacterial class II aldolase as it was metal-dependent for activity and therefore inhibited by EDTA. In contrast, aldolase from H. saccharovorum, Halobacterium R-113, H. vallismortis and Halobacterium CH-1 formed a Schiff-base intermediate with the substrate and therefore resembled to eukaryotic class I type. The type of aldolase did not vary by changes in the growth medium.

  18. Thiohalorhabdus denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic, sulfur-oxidizing, deep-lineage gammaproteobacterium from hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Galinski, Erwin A; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuenen, J Gijs

    2008-12-01

    Seven strains of extremely halophilic and obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were enriched and isolated at 4 M NaCl from sediments of hypersaline inland lakes in south-eastern Siberia and a Mediterranean sea solar saltern. Cells of the novel isolates were spindle-like, long and non-motile rods with a Gram-negative type of cell wall. They were obligately chemolithoautotrophic SOB using thiosulfate and tetrathionate as electron donors and represent the first example of extremely halophilic chemolithoautotrophs that are able to grow anaerobically with nitrate as electron acceptor. The characteristic feature of the group was the production of large amounts of tetrathionate as an intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate to sulfate. With thiosulfate, the novel strains grew within the pH range from 6.5 to 8.2 (optimum at pH 7.5-7.8) and at NaCl concentrations from 1.5 to 4.0 M (optimum at 3.0 M). Cells grown at 4 M NaCl accumulated extremely high concentrations of glycine betaine as a compatible solute. The dominant cellular fatty acids were 10MeC(16 : 0) and C(16 : 0). Based on the DNA-DNA relatedness values, the isolates consisted of a single genomic species and had a similar phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel bacteria in the class Gammaproteobacteria as an independent lineage with no significant relationship to any other genera in this class. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic analysis, the group is proposed to represent a new genus, Thiohalorhabdus gen. nov., with Thiohalorhabdus denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov. as the type species (type strain HL 19(T)=DSM 15699(T)=UNIQEM U223(T)).

  19. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed "primitive" protein from halophile to mesophile folding.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate "cradle" for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original "prebiotic" set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a "primitive" designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)-having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a "primitive" polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation-identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table.

  20. Arhodomonas aquaeolei gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, halophilic bacterium isolated from a subterranean brine.

    PubMed

    Adkins, J P; Madigan, M T; Mandelco, L; Woese, C R; Tanner, R S

    1993-07-01

    Arhodomonas aquaeolei gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from a petroleum reservoir production fluid, is described. The single isolate was an obligately halophilic, aerobic, gram-negative, oval rod-shaped bacterium that was actively motile by means of a single polar flagellum. It was catalase and oxidase positive. The isolate had a specific requirement for NaCl; growth occurred at NaCl concentrations between 6 and 20%, and optimal growth occurred in the presence of 15% NaCl. This species metabolized primarily organic acids and required biotin for growth. The name Arhodomonas is proposed for the new genus, which was placed in the gamma subclass of the Proteobacteria on the basis of the results of a 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Although A. aquaeolei is most closely related to purple sulfur bacteria (the genera Ectothiorhodospira and Chromatium), it is not a phototrophic microorganism, which is consistent with its isolation from a subterranean environment. The major components of its cellular fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1, C19:0, C16:1, and C18:0 acids. The DNA base composition of the type strain is 67 mol% G+C. The type and only strain is strain HA-1 (= ATCC 49307).

  1. [Screening of epoxy-degrading halophiles and their application in high-salt wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Xu, Zhen; Peng, Shu-Chuan; Xia, Ming-Shan; Yue, Zheng-Bo; Chen, Tian-Hn

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two halophilic bacteria were isolated from activated sludge in the epoxy wastewater treatment system. The strains were identified, and the growth and degradation characteristics were investigated. Strain J1 and J2 was identified respectively by morphological observation and 16S rDNA sequence alignment analysis. It was found that both strains belong to the Bacillus genus (Bacillus sp.) and branch Bacillus (Virgibacillus sp.). The optimized growth condition of strain J1 and J2 in the high salt CM culture medium was as follows: solution temperature 30 degrees C, pH 7.0 and 5-50 g x L(-1) of NaCl. Furthermore, the best degradation condition of the organic epoxy wastewater was: temperature 30 degrees C, pH 7.0 and NaCl concentration 30 g x L(-1). When the volume ratio of bacterial suspension mixture of J1 and J2 was 2:1 and the inoculum size of the composite strains was 10%, the highest COD removal efficiency was achieved in the epoxy wastewater treatment.

  2. Alpha-amylase activity from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, F; Bautista, V; Ferrer, J; Pire, C; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Bonete, M J

    2003-08-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei is able to grow in a minimal medium containing ammonium acetate as a carbon and nitrogen source. When this medium is enriched with starch, alpha-amylase activity is excreted to the medium in low concentration. Here we report methods to concentrate and purify the enzyme. The relative molecular mass of the enzyme, determined by gel filtration, is 50 +/- 4 kDa, and on SDS-PAGE analysis a single band appeared at 58 kDa. These results indicated that the halophilic alpha-amylase is a monomeric enzyme. The enzyme showed a salt requirement for both stability and activity, being stable from 2 to 4 M NaCl, with maximal activity at 3 M NaCl. The enzyme displayed maximal activity at pHs from 7 to 8, and its optimal temperature was in a range from 50 degrees C to 60 degrees C. The results also implicated several prototropic groups in the catalytic reaction.

  3. On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leuko, Stefan; Rettberg, Petra; Pontifex, Ashleigh L.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth’s protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator) have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated. PMID:25370029

  4. On the response of halophilic archaea to space conditions.

    PubMed

    Leuko, Stefan; Rettberg, Petra; Pontifex, Ashleigh L; Burns, Brendan P

    2014-02-21

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth's protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator) have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated.

  5. Insights into head-tailed viruses infecting extremely halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Maija K; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Russell, Daniel A; Ko, Ching-Chung; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Butcher, Sarah J; Bamford, Dennis H; Hendrix, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    Extremophilic archaea, both hyperthermophiles and halophiles, dominate in habitats where rather harsh conditions are encountered. Like all other organisms, archaeal cells are susceptible to viral infections, and to date, about 100 archaeal viruses have been described. Among them, there are extraordinary virion morphologies as well as the common head-tailed viruses. Although approximately half of the isolated archaeal viruses belong to the latter group, no three-dimensional virion structures of these head-tailed viruses are available. Thus, rigorous comparisons with bacteriophages are not yet warranted. In the present study, we determined the genome sequences of two of such viruses of halophiles and solved their capsid structures by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. We show that these viruses are inactivated, yet remain intact, at low salinity and that their infectivity is regained when high salinity is restored. This enabled us to determine their three-dimensional capsid structures at low salinity to a ∼10-Å resolution. The genetic and structural data showed that both viruses belong to the same T-number class, but one of them has enlarged its capsid to accommodate a larger genome than typically associated with a T=7 capsid by inserting an additional protein into the capsid lattice.

  6. Haloanaerobium kushneri sp. nov., an obligately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from an oil brine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhupathiraju, V. K.; McInerney, M. J.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    Three strains, designated VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732, of a strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium were isolated from a highly saline (15-20%) brine from an oil reservoir in central Oklahoma, USA. The optimal concentration of NaCl for growth of these three strains was 2 M (12%), and the strains also grew in the presence of an additional 1 M MgCl2. The strains were mesophilic and grew at a pH range of 6-8. Carbohydrates used by all three strains included glucose, fructose, arabinose, galactose, maltose, mannose, cellobiose, sucrose and inulin. Glucose fermentation products included ethanol, acetate, H2 and CO2, with formate produced by two of the three strains. Differences were noted among strains in the optimal temperature and pH for growth, the maximum and minimum NaCl concentration that supported growth, substrate utilization and cellular fatty acid composition. Despite the phenotypic differences among the three strains, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that these three strains were members of the same genospecies which belonged to the genus Haloanaerobium. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of strains VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732 are different from those of previously described species of Haloanaerobium. It is proposed that strain VS-751T (ATCC 700103T) be established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium kushneri.

  7. Identification of salt-inducible peptide with putative kinase activity in halophilic bacterium Virgibacillus halodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mahmoud-Reza; Sokhansanj, Ashrafaddin; Yoosefi, Mitra; Naghizadeh, Mohammad-Ali

    2007-09-01

    Strain XII, a moderately halophilic bacterium, expressed a peptide in response to saline media. This peptide was designated as salt-inducible factor (Sif-A). The purpose of this study is to describe Sif-A, which might be involved in the osmoresistance mechanism of strain XII. The complete sequence of sif-A was determined using PCR. sif-A codes for a polypeptide of 20.518 kDa. The polypeptide has a putative signal peptide of 27 amino acids (2.667 kDa) preceding the mature protein (17.869 kDa). Motif analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence indicated that there is a p-loop NTPase domain on the C-terminal of the peptide, which might correlate with its function. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene was analyzed phylogenetically to classify strain XII. This organism was found to have the closest association with Virgibacillus halodenitrificans, which was proven by its phenotypic characteristics.

  8. Production and properties of an exopolysaccharide synthesized by the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloterrigena turkmenica.

    PubMed

    Squillaci, Giuseppe; Finamore, Rosario; Diana, Paola; Restaino, Odile Francesca; Schiraldi, Chiara; Arbucci, Salvatore; Ionata, Elena; La Cara, Francesco; Morana, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    We have isolated a novel exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloterrigena turkmenica. Some features, remarkable from an industrial point of view, such as emulsifying and antioxidant properties, were investigated. H. turkmenica excreted 20.68 mg of EPS per 100 ml of culture medium when grown in usual medium supplemented with glucose. The microorganism excreted the biopolymer mainly in the middle exponential growth phase and reached the maximal production in the stationary phase. Analyses by anion exchange chromatography and SEC-TDA Viscotek indicated that the EPS was composed of two main fractions of 801.7 and 206.0 kDa. It was a sulfated heteropolysaccharide containing glucose, galactose, glucosamine, galactosamine, and glucuronic acid. Studies performed utilizing the mixture of EPS anionic fractions showed that the biopolymer had emulsifying activity towards vegetable oils comparable or superior to that exhibited by the controls, moderate antioxidant power when tested with 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(·)), and moisture-retention ability higher than hyaluronic acid (HA). The EPS from H. turkmenica is the first exopolysaccharide produced by an archaea to be characterized in terms of properties that can have potential biotechnological applications.

  9. The hydroxyectoine gene cluster of the non-halophilic acidophile Acidiphilium cryptum.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Katharina D; Amendt, Birgit; Witt, Elisabeth M H J; Galinski, Erwin A

    2015-01-01

    Acidiphilium cryptum is an acidophilic, heterotrophic α-Proteobacterium which thrives in acidic, metal-rich environments (e.g. acid mine drainage). Recently, an ectABCDask gene cluster for biosynthesis of the compatible solutes ectoine and hydroxyectoine was detected in the genome sequence of A. cryptum JF-5. We were able to demonstrate that the type strain A. cryptum DSM 2389(T) is capable of synthesizing the compatible solute hydroxyectoine in response to moderate osmotic stress caused by sodium chloride and aluminium sulphate, respectively. Furthermore, we used the A. cryptum JF-5 sequence to amplify the ectABCDask gene cluster from strain DSM 2389(T) and achieved heterologous expression of the gene cluster in Escherichia coli. Hence, we could for the first time prove metabolic functionality of the genes responsible for hydroxyectoine biosynthesis in the acidophile A. cryptum. In addition, we present information on specific enzyme activity of A. cryptum DSM 2389(T) ectoine synthase (EctC) in vitro. In contrast to EctCs from halophilic microorganisms, the A. cryptum enzyme exhibits a higher isoelectric point, thus a lower acidity, and has maximum specific activity in the absence of sodium chloride.

  10. Haloanaerobium kushneri sp. nov., an obligately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from an oil brine.

    PubMed

    Bhupathiraju, V K; McInerney, M J; Woese, C R; Tanner, R S

    1999-07-01

    Three strains, designated VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732, of a strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium were isolated from a highly saline (15-20%) brine from an oil reservoir in central Oklahoma, USA. The optimal concentration of NaCl for growth of these three strains was 2 M (12%), and the strains also grew in the presence of an additional 1 M MgCl2. The strains were mesophilic and grew at a pH range of 6-8. Carbohydrates used by all three strains included glucose, fructose, arabinose, galactose, maltose, mannose, cellobiose, sucrose and inulin. Glucose fermentation products included ethanol, acetate, H2 and CO2, with formate produced by two of the three strains. Differences were noted among strains in the optimal temperature and pH for growth, the maximum and minimum NaCl concentration that supported growth, substrate utilization and cellular fatty acid composition. Despite the phenotypic differences among the three strains, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that these three strains were members of the same genospecies which belonged to the genus Haloanaerobium. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of strains VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732 are different from those of previously described species of Haloanaerobium. It is proposed that strain VS-751T (ATCC 700103T) be established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium kushneri.

  11. Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Addou, Nariman Ammara; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Fauque, Guy; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    A novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and moderately halophilic bacterium designated strain Nari2A(T) was isolated from soil collected from an Algerian salt lake, Chott Melghir. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, aerobic, catalase-negative and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 50-55 °C, 7-10% (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. The strain exhibited 95.4, 95.4 and 95.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Thalassobacillus devorans G19.1(T), Sediminibacillus halophilus EN8d(T) and Virgibacillus kekensis YIM-kkny16(T), respectively. The major menaquinone was MK-7. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phosphoglycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(17 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 41.9 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain Nari2A(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Bacillaceae , order Bacillales , for which the name Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus is Nari2A(T) ( = DSM 25894(T) = CCUG 62543(T)).

  12. Haloanaerobium kushneri sp. nov., an obligately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from an oil brine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhupathiraju, V. K.; McInerney, M. J.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    Three strains, designated VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732, of a strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium were isolated from a highly saline (15-20%) brine from an oil reservoir in central Oklahoma, USA. The optimal concentration of NaCl for growth of these three strains was 2 M (12%), and the strains also grew in the presence of an additional 1 M MgCl2. The strains were mesophilic and grew at a pH range of 6-8. Carbohydrates used by all three strains included glucose, fructose, arabinose, galactose, maltose, mannose, cellobiose, sucrose and inulin. Glucose fermentation products included ethanol, acetate, H2 and CO2, with formate produced by two of the three strains. Differences were noted among strains in the optimal temperature and pH for growth, the maximum and minimum NaCl concentration that supported growth, substrate utilization and cellular fatty acid composition. Despite the phenotypic differences among the three strains, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that these three strains were members of the same genospecies which belonged to the genus Haloanaerobium. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of strains VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732 are different from those of previously described species of Haloanaerobium. It is proposed that strain VS-751T (ATCC 700103T) be established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium kushneri.

  13. Ignavibacterium album gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from microbial mats at a terrestrial hot spring and proposal of Ignavibacteria classis nov., for a novel lineage at the periphery of green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Mori, Koji; Uchino, Yoshihito; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Harayama, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro

    2010-06-01

    A moderately thermophilic chemoheterotrophic bacterium, strain Mat9-16(T), was isolated from microbial mats developed in hot spring water streams from Yumata, Nagano, Japan. Cells of strain Mat9-16(T) were strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-sporulating, non-motile and short to long rods (2.0-15.5 mum in length). Strain Mat9-16(T) grew fermentatively with optimum growth at 45 degrees C, pH 7.0-7.5 and 1 % NaCl (w/v). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed that strain Mat9-16(T) was affiliated with an uncultivated lineage, and the nearest cultivated neighbours were green sulfur bacteria belonging to the class Chlorobea with 77-83 % sequence similarity. However, strain Mat9-16(T) could not grow phototrophically and did not possess light-harvesting structures, morphologically and genetically, such as the chlorosomes of green sulfur bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic features and phylogenetic position, a novel genus and species are proposed for strain Mat9-16(T), to be named Ignavibacterium album gen. nov., sp. nov. (=NBRC 101810(T) =DSM 19864(T)). We also propose to place the cultivated bacterial lineage accommodating the sole representative Mat9-16(T) in a novel class, Ignavibacteria classis nov. In addition, we present a formal description of the phylum-level taxon 'Chlorobi' as Chlorobi phyl. nov.

  14. Anti-methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Compound Isolation from Halophilic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and Determination of Its Mode of Action Using Electron Microscope and Flow Cytometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeyanthi, Venkadapathi; Velusamy, Palaniyandi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to purify, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive compound against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The anti-MRSA compound was produced by a halophilic bacterial strain designated as MHB1. The MHB1 strain exhibited 99 % similarity to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The culture conditions of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 were optimized using nutritional and environmental parameters for enhanced anti-MRSA compound production. The pure bioactive compound was isolated using silica gel column chromatography and Semi-preparative High-performance liquid chromatography (Semi-preparative HPLC). The Thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton NMR ((1)H NMR) analysis indicated the phenolic nature of the compound. The molecular mass of the purified compound was 507 Da as revealed by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The compound inhibited the growth of MRSA with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 62.5 µg mL(-1). MRSA bacteria exposed to 4× MIC of the compound and the cell viability was determined using flow cytometric analysis. Scanning electron microscope and Transmission electron microscope analysis was used to determine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria. This is the first report on isolation of anti-MRSA compound from halophilic B. amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and could act as a promising biocontrol agent.

  15. d-Xylose Degradation Pathway in the Halophilic Archaeon Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Ulrike; Dambeck, Michael; Zaiss, Henning; Fuhrer, Tobias; Soppa, Jörg; Sauer, Uwe; Schönheit, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pathway of d-xylose degradation in archaea is unknown. In a previous study we identified in Haloarcula marismortui the first enzyme of xylose degradation, an inducible xylose dehydrogenase (Johnsen, U., and Schönheit, P. (2004) J. Bacteriol. 186, 6198–6207). Here we report a comprehensive study of the complete d-xylose degradation pathway in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii. The analyses include the following: (i) identification of the degradation pathway in vivo following 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids after growth on [13C]xylose; (ii) identification of xylose-induced genes by DNA microarray experiments; (iii) characterization of enzymes; and (iv) construction of in-frame deletion mutants and their functional analyses in growth experiments. Together, the data indicate that d-xylose is oxidized exclusively to the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate, involving d-xylose dehydrogenase (HVO_B0028), a novel xylonate dehydratase (HVO_B0038A), 2-keto-3-deoxyxylonate dehydratase (HVO_B0027), and α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (HVO_B0039). The functional involvement of these enzymes in xylose degradation was proven by growth studies of the corresponding in-frame deletion mutants, which all lost the ability to grow on d-xylose, but growth on glucose was not significantly affected. This is the first report of an archaeal d-xylose degradation pathway that differs from the classical d-xylose pathway in most bacteria involving the formation of xylulose 5-phosphate as an intermediate. However, the pathway shows similarities to proposed oxidative pentose degradation pathways to α-ketoglutarate in few bacteria, e.g. Azospirillum brasilense and Caulobacter crescentus, and in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. PMID:19584053

  16. Oceanobacillus arenosus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from marine sand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonyong; Siamphan, Chatuphon; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Sukhoom, Ampaitip

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped, motile, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated CAU 1183(T), was isolated from marine sand and its taxonomic position was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. The bacterium grew optimally at 30 °C, at pH 8.5 and in the presence of 2% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain CAU 1183(T) formed a distinct lineage within the genus Oceanobacillus and exhibited the highest similarity to Oceanobacillus chungangensis CAU 1051(T) (97.6%). The strain contained MK-7 as the predominant isoprenoid quinone and anteiso-C15 : 0 was the major cellular fatty acid. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The polar lipid pattern of strain CAU 1183(T) consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and unidentified lipids, including two phospholipids, two glycolipids, a phosphoglycolipid and two lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.5 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain CAU 1183(T) should be assigned to a novel species in the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus arenosus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CAU 1183(T) ( = KCTC 33037(T) = CECT 8560(T)).

  17. In vitro protein synthesis by the moderate halophile Vibrio costicola: site of action of Cl- ions.

    PubMed

    Choquet, C G; Kamekura, M; Kushner, D J

    1989-02-01

    In vitro protein synthesis in Vibrio costicola [poly(U)-directed incorporation of phenylalanine] was studied. The extent of protein synthesis was limited by the number of ribosomes present. Density gradient centrifugation experiments suggested that, after runoff of ribosomes from the artificial messenger, the 50S subunit was unable to attach to the 30S-messenger complex. As shown previously (M. Kamekura and D. J. Kushner, J. Bacteriol. 160:385-390, 1984), Cl- ions inhibited protein synthesis; indeed, the highest rate of synthesis took place in the lowest attainable Cl- concentration (37 mM). The inhibitory effects were partly reversed by glutamate and betaine, both of which are concentrated within cells of V. costicola. The strongest reversal was seen when both glutamate and betaine were present. Cl- ions can prevent binding of ribosomes to poly(U) and displace ribosomes already bound to this artificial messenger. The effects of Cl- ions on binding were also reversed by glutamate and betaine. Cl- ions did not affect accuracy of translation; they were shown previously (Kamekura and Kushner, J. Bacteriol. 160:385-390, 1984) not to affect phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. It was also found that washing ribosomes with inhibitory NaCl concentrations did not interfere with their ability to carry out protein synthesis later in optimal (low) salt concentrations. On the contrary, these ribosomes were more active than before they were washed. We conclude that the main site of action of Cl- in the system studied is on the binding of ribosomes to the mRNA.

  18. Osmoadaptative Strategy and Its Molecular Signature in Obligately Halophilic Heterotrophic Protists

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Tommy; Brown, Matthew W.; Simpson, Alastair G.B.; Roger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic microbes living in hypersaline environments must counteract the detrimental effects of low water activity and salt interference. Some halophilic prokaryotes equilibrate their intracellular osmotic strength with the extracellular milieu by importing inorganic solutes, mainly potassium. These “salt-in” organisms characteristically have proteins that are highly enriched with acidic and hydrophilic residues. In contrast, “salt-out” halophiles accumulate large amounts of organic solutes like amino acids, sugars and polyols, and lack a strong signature of halophilicity in the amino acid composition of cytoplasmic proteins. Studies to date have examined halophilic prokaryotes, yeasts, or algae, thus virtually nothing is known about the molecular adaptations of the other eukaryotic microbes, that is, heterotrophic protists (protozoa), that also thrive in hypersaline habitats. We conducted transcriptomic investigations to unravel the molecular adaptations of two obligately halophilic protists, Halocafeteria seosinensis and Pharyngomonas kirbyi. Their predicted cytoplasmic proteomes showed increased hydrophilicity compared with marine protists. Furthermore, analysis of reconstructed ancestral sequences suggested that, relative to mesophiles, proteins in halophilic protists have undergone fewer substitutions from hydrophilic to hydrophobic residues since divergence from their closest relatives. These results suggest that these halophilic protists have a higher intracellular salt content than marine protists. However, absence of the acidic signature of salt-in microbes suggests that Haloc. seosinensis and P. kirbyi utilize organic osmolytes to maintain osmotic equilibrium. We detected increased expression of enzymes involved in synthesis and transport of organic osmolytes, namely hydroxyectoine and myo-inositol, at maximal salt concentration for growth in Haloc. seosinensis, suggesting possible candidates for these inferred organic osmolytes. PMID:27412608

  19. Structural Basis for the Aminoacid Composition of Proteins from Halophilic Archea

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, Tamara; Laín, Ana; Castaño, David; Millet, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Proteins from halophilic organisms, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded at very high ionic strengths. The surfaces of halophilic proteins show a biased amino acid composition with a high prevalence of aspartic and glutamic acids, a low frequency of lysine, and a high occurrence of amino acids with a low hydrophobic character. Using extensive mutational studies on the protein surfaces, we show that it is possible to decrease the salt dependence of a typical halophilic protein to the level of a mesophilic form and engineer a protein from a mesophilic organism into an obligate halophilic form. NMR studies demonstrate complete preservation of the three-dimensional structure of extreme mutants and confirm that salt dependency is conferred exclusively by surface residues. In spite of the statistically established fact that most halophilic proteins are strongly acidic, analysis of a very large number of mutants showed that the effect of salt on protein stability is largely independent of the total protein charge. Conversely, we quantitatively demonstrate that halophilicity is directly related to a decrease in the accessible surface area. PMID:20016684

  20. Prospects for robust biocatalysis: engineering of novel specificity in a halophilic amino acid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Nayla; Engel, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Heat- and solvent-tolerant enzymes from halophiles, potentially important industrially, offer a robust framework for protein engineering, but few solved halophilic structures exist to guide this. Homology modelling has guided mutations in glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Halobacterium salinarum to emulate conversion of a mesophilic GDH to a methionine dehydrogenase. Replacement of K89, A163 and S367 by leucine, glycine and alanine converted halophilic GDH into a dehydrogenase accepting L-methionine, L-norleucine and L-norvaline as substrates. Over-expression in the halophilic expression host Haloferax volcanii and three-step purification gave ~98 % pure protein exhibiting maximum activity at pH 10. This enzyme also showed enhanced thermostability and organic solvent tolerance even at 70 °C, offering a biocatalyst resistant to harsh industrial environments. To our knowledge, this is the first reported amino acid specificity change engineered in a halophilic enzyme, encouraging use of mesophilic models to guide engineering of novel halophilic biocatalysts for industrial application. Calibrated gel filtration experiments show that both the mutant and the wild-type enzyme are stable hexamers.

  1. Structural adaptation of extreme halophilic proteins through decrease of conserved hydrophobic contact surface.

    PubMed

    Siglioccolo, Alessandro; Paiardini, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Maria; Pascarella, Stefano

    2011-12-22

    Halophiles are extremophilic microorganisms growing optimally at high salt concentrations. There are two strategies used by halophiles to maintain proper osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm: accumulation of molar concentrations of potassium and chloride with extensive adaptation of the intracellular macromolecules ("salt-in" strategy) or biosynthesis and/or accumulation of organic osmotic solutes ("osmolyte" strategy). Our work was aimed at contributing to the understanding of the shared molecular mechanisms of protein haloadaptation through a detailed and systematic comparison of a sample of several three-dimensional structures of halophilic and non-halophilic proteins. Structural differences observed between the "salt-in" and the mesophilic homologous proteins were contrasted to those observed between the "osmolyte" and mesophilic pairs. The results suggest that haloadaptation strategy in the presence of molar salt concentration, but not of osmolytes, necessitates a weakening of the hydrophobic interactions, in particular at the level of conserved hydrophobic contacts. Weakening of these interactions counterbalances their strengthening by the presence of salts in solution and may help the structure preventing aggregation and/or loss of function in hypersaline environments. Considering the significant increase of biotechnology applications of halophiles, the understanding of halophilicity can provide the theoretical basis for the engineering of proteins of great interest because stable at concentrations of salts that cause the denaturation or aggregation of the majority of macromolecules.

  2. A first record of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the dead sea.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Sarita; Gonsalves, Valerie; Nayak, Shweta

    2012-03-01

    The isolation of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the Dead Sea and the range of salt tolerance of halophilic fungi isolated, are reported here for the first time. The mycobiota of the Dead Sea isolated in this study, was dominated by Aspergillus and Penicillium species; Cladosporium were found in lesser numbers. All three genera were obtained from the water sample; however, Aspergillus was the only genus obtained from the sediment. There was significant difference in growth of each isolate at different salt concentrations and intraspecies analysis revealed dissimilarity in response of strains to different salt concentrations in the growth medium The isolates were euryhaline, with halotolerance up to 20-25% solar salt, Aspergillus and Penicillium species showing a higher level of halotolerance, as compared to that of Cladosporium. Halophilic fungi were found in greater numbers in the sediment sample as compared to that in the water sample. Penicillium and Cladosporium species were exclusively facultative halophiles, while some species of Aspergillus were facultative halophiles. All the obligate halophiles isolated, belonged to the genus Aspergillus and were identified as A. penicillioides and A unguis, the latter being a first record of the species from the Dead Sea.

  3. Extreme halophiles synthesize betaine from glycine by methylation.

    PubMed

    Nyyssola, A; Kerovuo, J; Kaukinen, P; von Weymarn, N; Reinikainen, T

    2000-07-21

    Glycine betaine is a compatible solute, which is able to restore and maintain osmotic balance of living cells. It is synthesized and accumulated in response to abiotic stress. Betaine acts also as a methyl group donor and has a number of important applications including its use as a feed additive. The known biosynthetic pathways of betaine are universal and very well characterized. A number of enzymes catalyzing the two-step oxidation of choline to betaine have been isolated. In this work we have studied a novel betaine biosynthetic pathway in two phylogenically distant extreme halophiles, Actinopolyspora halophila and Ectothiorhodospira halochloris. We have identified a three-step series of methylation reactions from glycine to betaine, which is catalyzed by two methyltransferases, glycine sarcosine methyltransferase and sarcosine dimethylglycine methyltransferase, with partially overlapping substrate specificity. The methyltransferases from the two organisms show high sequence homology. E. halochloris methyltransferase genes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, and betaine accumulation and improved salt tolerance were demonstrated.

  4. Lanthanide behavior in hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico - an environment with halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choumiline, K.; López-Cortés, A.; Grajeda-Muñoz, M.; Shumilin, E.; Sapozhnikov, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lanthanides are known, in some cases, to be sensitive to changes in water column or sediment chemistry, a fact that allows them to be used as environmental fingerprints. Nevertheless, the behavior of these elements in hypersaline environments is insufficiently understood, especially in those colonized by bacteria, archaea and eukarya halophiles. Extreme environments like the mentioned exist in the artificially-controlled ponds of the 'Exportadora de Sal' salt-producing enterprise located in Guerrero Negro (Baja California, Mexico). Sediment cores from various ponds were collected, subsampled and measured by ICP-MS and INAA. This allowed differencing the behavior of lanthanides and trace elements under a water column salinity gradient along the evaporation sequence of ponds. Sediment profiles (30 mm long), obtained in Pond 5, dominated by Ca and Mg precipitation and at the same time rich in organic matter due to bacterial mat presence, showed highs and lows of the shale-normalized patterns along different in-core depths. Two groups of elements could be distinguished with similar trends: set A (La, Ce, Pr and Nd) and set B (Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu). The first 'group A' had two prominent peaks at 15 mm and around 22 mm, whereas the 'group B' showed only slight increase at 15 mm and none at 22 mm. Microscopic analyses of prokaryotic cells of a stratified mat in Pond 5 (collected in 2004) showed filamentous bacteria and cyanobacteria with a cell abundance and morphotype richness maxima of prokaryotic cells in a chemocline from 3 mm to 7 mm depth which co-exists nine morphotypes of aerobic and anaerobic prokaryotes Microcoleus chthonoplastes, Leptolyngbya, Cyanothece, Geitlerinema, Spirulina, Chloroflexus, Beggiatoa, Chromatium and Thioploca. Below the 7 mm depth, oxygenic photosynthesis depletes and sulfur reducing compounds increase. The highs of the shale-normalized lanthanide contents of the 'group A' (at 15 mm depth) seem to correlate with the

  5. Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Dean G; Bizzoco, Richard W; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-06-01

    Hydrothermal vents, known as 'fumaroles', are ubiquitous features of geothermal areas. Although their geology has been extensively characterized, little is known about the subsurface microbial ecology of fumaroles largely because of the difficulty in collecting sufficient numbers of cells from boiling steam water for DNA extraction and culture isolation. Here we describe the first collection, molecular analysis and isolation of microbes from fumarole steam waters in Russia (Kamchatka) and the USA (Hawaii, New Mexico, California and Wyoming). Surprisingly, the steam vent waters from all the fumaroles contained halophilic Archaea closely related to the Haloarcula spp. found in non-geothermal salt mats, saline soils, brine pools and salt lakes around the world. Microscopic cell counting estimated the cell dispersal rate at approximately 1.6 x 10(9) cells year(-1) from a single fumarole. We also managed to enrich microbes in high-salt media from every vent sample, and to isolate Haloarcula from a Yellowstone vent in a 20% salt medium after a month-long incubation, demonstrating both salt tolerance and viability of cells collected from high-temperature steam. Laboratory tests determined that microbes enriched in salt media survived temperatures greater than 75 degrees C for between 5 and 30 min during the collection process. Hawaiian fumaroles proved to contain the greatest diversity of halophilic Archaea with four new lineages that may belong to uncultured haloarchaeal genera. This high diversity may have resulted from the leaching of salts and minerals through the highly porous volcanic rock, creating a chemically complex saline subsurface.

  6. Cadmium resistance in extremely halophilic archaeon Haloferax strain BBK2.

    PubMed

    Das, Deepthi; Salgaonkar, Bhakti B; Mani, Kabilan; Braganca, Judith M

    2014-10-01

    Halophilic archaea are prevalent in highly saline habitats. Haloferax strain BBK2 is an orange pigmented, exopolysaccharide (EPS) producing extremely halophilic archaeon, isolated from solar salterns of Ribandar, Goa, India. It grew in varying pH (5-10) and NaCl concentration (10-30%). The isolate grew well in complex (NTYE) and minimal media (NGSM) in presence of heavy metal cadmium (Cd) up to 4.0 mM (805.28 mg L(-1)) concentration. The optimum growth in the presence and absence of Cd was seen at a pH range of 7-9 and salinity of 15-25%. The growth kinetics of the isolate in NTYE showed a specific growth rate (μmax) of 0.352 with generation time of 1.968 days. In presence of 1mM Cd, the μmax was 0.325 day(-1) and generation time was 2.132 days. In NGSM, the μmax decreased from 0.517 day(-1) (in control) to 0.265 day(-1) in 1mM Cd while, the doubling time increased from 1.34 days in control to 2.615 days in presence of 1 mM Cd. SDS PAGE of the whole cell protein extracts showed overexpressed proteins of 74.14 and 40 kDa. The scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analysis of the intact cells and cells disrupted by dialysis revealed that Cd was bound onto the cells, which was further confirmed by AAS, FTIR and XRD analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic flux analysis of the halophilic archaeon Haladaptatus paucihalophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao; Mo, Tianlu; He, Lian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi; Ding, Wei

    2015-11-27

    This work reports the {sup 13}C-assisted metabolic flux analysis of Haladaptatus paucihalophilus, a halophilic archaeon possessing an intriguing osmoadaption mechanism. We showed that the carbon flow is through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle whereas the reductive TCA cycle is not operative in H. paucihalophilus. In addition, both threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute to isoleucine biosynthesis, whereas lysine is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. Unexpected, the labeling patterns of glycine from the cells grown on [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate and [2-{sup 13}C]pyruvate suggest that, unlike all the organisms investigated so far, in which glycine is produced exclusively from the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) pathway, glycine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus involves different pathways including SHMT, threonine aldolase (TA) and the reverse reaction of glycine cleavage system (GCS), demonstrating for the first time that other pathways instead of SHMT can also make a significant contribution to the cellular glycine pool. Transcriptional analysis confirmed that both TA and GCS genes were transcribed in H. paucihalophilus, and the transcriptional level is independent of salt concentrations in the culture media. This study expands our understanding of amino acid biosynthesis and provides valuable insights into the metabolism of halophilic archaea. - Highlights: • Serine hydroxymethyltransferase, threonine aldolase, and glycine cleavage system all contribute to the glycine pool of H. paucihalophilus. • Threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute equally to the isoleucine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus. • Lysine in H. paucihalophilus is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. • Glycine biosynthesis is likely unrelated to the cell osmoadaption mechanism.

  8. Limits of Detection for Life on Mars: An Example Using IR Spectroscopy of Sulfate Salts and Halophiles from Lakes in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, B. C.; Foster, I. S.; King, P. L.; Southam, G.; Nushaj, D.

    2007-03-01

    Salt lakes in B.C., Canada are Mars analog sites for biology and sulfate formation. We use halophiles from them to show the lower limit of infrared detection of halophiles in salt to be 10-15 wt% halophiles providing constraints for martian study.

  9. A Halophilic Bacterium Inhabiting the Warm, CaCl2-Rich Brine of the Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Tregoning, George S.; Kempher, Megan L.; Jung, Deborah O.; Samarkin, Vladimir A.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered and stratified lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The lake develops a distinct chemocline at about a 50-m depth, where the waters transition from cool, oxic, and fresh to warm, sulfidic, and hypersaline. The bottom water brine is unique, as the highly chaotropic salts CaCl2 and MgCl2 predominate, and CaCl2 levels are the highest of those in any known microbial habitat. Enrichment techniques were used to isolate 15 strains of heterotrophic bacteria from the Lake Vanda brine. Despite direct supplementation of the brine samples with different organic substrates in primary enrichments, the same organism, a relative of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), was isolated from all depths sampled. The Lake Vanda (VAN) strains were obligate aerobes and showed broad pH, salinity, and temperature ranges for growth, consistent with the physicochemical properties of the brine. VAN strains were halophilic and quite CaCl2 tolerant but did not require CaCl2 for growth. The fact that only VAN strain-like organisms appeared in our enrichments hints that the highly chaotropic nature of the Lake Vanda brine may place unusual physiological constraints on the bacterial community that inhabits it. PMID:25576606

  10. A halophilic bacterium inhabiting the warm, CaCl2-rich brine of the perennially ice-covered Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, George S; Kempher, Megan L; Jung, Deborah O; Samarkin, Vladimir A; Joye, Samantha B; Madigan, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered and stratified lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The lake develops a distinct chemocline at about a 50-m depth, where the waters transition from cool, oxic, and fresh to warm, sulfidic, and hypersaline. The bottom water brine is unique, as the highly chaotropic salts CaCl2 and MgCl2 predominate, and CaCl2 levels are the highest of those in any known microbial habitat. Enrichment techniques were used to isolate 15 strains of heterotrophic bacteria from the Lake Vanda brine. Despite direct supplementation of the brine samples with different organic substrates in primary enrichments, the same organism, a relative of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), was isolated from all depths sampled. The Lake Vanda (VAN) strains were obligate aerobes and showed broad pH, salinity, and temperature ranges for growth, consistent with the physicochemical properties of the brine. VAN strains were halophilic and quite CaCl2 tolerant but did not require CaCl2 for growth. The fact that only VAN strain-like organisms appeared in our enrichments hints that the highly chaotropic nature of the Lake Vanda brine may place unusual physiological constraints on the bacterial community that inhabits it. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Subsurface Halophilic Microbial Communities in the Hyperarid Core of the Atacama Desert: An Analog for Possible Subsurface Life in Regolith on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, A.; Warren-Rhodes, K.; Rainey, F. T.; Ewing, S.; McKay, C. P.

    2003-12-01

    The Atacama Desert in its driest portion provides an interesting analog for possible past or present life in the Martian regolith. In the hyperarid core of the Atacama, surface soils are virtually abiotic, with no plants and "near sterile" concentrations of heterotrophic bacteria (i.e., exceedingly low densities of approximately 100 colony forming units per gram soil). The dearth of microbial life at the surface is likely maintained through extremely low water availability, low organic content and the highly oxidizing nature of the soil. In marked contrast to the surface, however, extremely halophilic microorganisms exist in salt layers 1.2-1.5m below the surface. Mineralogical analyses indicate the layers are predominantly halite (70% NaCl) but also contain sodium nitrate (5% NaNO3). Culturing and polar lipid analyses suggest the halophiles are archaeal Halobacterium-like motile rods. Microclimate monitoring at 1m indicates a soil relative humidity of 20% which is stable year-round even during decadal rain events such as that experienced in July 2002. This suggests the layers are isolated from even significant moisture influxes at the surface. Although further research is necessary, important parallels exist between this Earthly desert analog and the possible existence and detection of subsurface life on Mars despite harsh abiotic conditions at the surface.

  12. Opsin-mediated inhibition of bacterioruberin synthesis in halophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Peck, Ronald F; Pleşa, Alexandru M; Graham, Serena M; Angelini, David R; Shaw, Emily L

    2017-08-07

    Halophilic Archaea often inhabit environments with limited oxygen, and many produce ion-pumping rhodopsin complexes that allow them to maintain electrochemical gradients when aerobic respiration is inhibited. Rhodopsins require a protein, opsin, and an organic cofactor, retinal. We have previously demonstrated that, in Halobacterium salinarum, bacterioopsin (BO), when not bound by retinal, inhibits the production of bacterioruberin, a biochemical pathway that shares intermediates with retinal biosynthesis. In this work, we use heterologous expression in a related halophilic Archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, to demonstrate that BO is sufficient to inhibit bacterioruberin synthesis catalyzed by the H. salinarum lycopene elongase (Lye) enzyme. This inhibition was observed both in liquid cultures and in a novel colorimetric assay to quantify bacterioruberin abundance based on the colony color. Addition of retinal to convert BO to the bacteriorhodopsin complex resulted in a partial rescue of bacterioruberin production. To explore if this regulatory mechanism occurs in other organisms, we expressed a Lye homolog and an opsin from Haloarcula vallismortis in H. volcaniiH. vallismortis cruxopsin expression inhibited bacterioruberin synthesis catalyzed by H. vallismortis Lye, but had no effect when bacterioruberin synthesis was catalyzed by H. salinarum or H. volcanii Lye. Conversely, H. salinarum BO did not inhibit H. vallismortis Lye activity. Together, our data suggest that opsin-mediated inhibition of Lye is potentially widespread and represents an elegant regulatory mechanism that allows organisms to efficiently utilize ion-pumping rhodopsins obtained through lateral gene transfer.Importance Many enzymes are complexes of proteins and non-protein organic molecules called cofactors. To ensure efficient formation of functional complexes, organisms must regulate the production of proteins and cofactors. To study this regulation, we use bacteriorhodopsin from the Archaeon

  13. Study on two methylotrophic and halophilic methanogens, Methanosarcina siciliae HI350 and Methanolobus taylorii GS-16

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, S.

    1994-01-01

    Strain HI350, similar to Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] (T = type strain) morphologically and physiologically, was isolated from an oil well in the Gulf of Mexico. Catabolic substrates included methanol, trimethylamine, dimethyl sulfide, and methane thiol, but not H[sub 2]-CO[sub 2], formate, or acetate. Growth was fastest in the presence of 0.4 to 0.6 M Na[sup +], in the presence of 60 to 200 mM Mg[sup 2+], at pH 6.5 to 6.8, and at 40[degrees]C. Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] was closely related to Methanosarcina. Transfer of Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] to the genus Methanosarcina as Methanosarcina siciliae is proposed with strain HI350 as its reference strain. Degradation of dimethyl sulfide or methane thiol by strain HI350 was complete, and stoichiometric quantities of methane and hydrogen sulfide were formed. Studies of cell-free extracts suggested that enzymes for degradation of dimethyl sulfide and methane thiol were inducible, whereas those for the degradation of methanol or trimethylamine were constitutive. Methanolobus taylorii GS-16, a moderately halophilic and alkcaliphilic methanogen, grows over a wide pH range. The key observation indicative of the involvement of K[sup +] transport in cytosolic acidification was that valinomycin (0.8 [mu]M), a K[sup +] uniporter, inhibited the growth of strain GS-16 only at alkaline pH. Experiments with resting cells indicated that, at alkaline pH, valinomycin uncoupled catabolic reactions from ATP synthesis. Thus, a K[sup +]/H[sup +] antiporter was proposed to account for the K[sup +] extrusion and the uncoupling effect of valinomycin at alkaline pH.

  14. Marinobacter halotolerans sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from a saltern crystallizing pond.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Ok; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Han, Song-Ih; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2017-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, moderately halophilic, motile bacterium, designated strain CP12T, was isolated from a crystallizing pond of a saltern of the Yellow Sea in Korea. Cells of strain CP12T were non-spore-forming rods and produced whitish-yellow colonies. Growth was observed at 10-37 °C (optimum 37 °C), at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0), and in the presence of 0.5-20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain CP12T was closely related to Marinobacter flavimaris SW-145T (98.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Marinobacter algicola DG893T (98.2 %), Marinobacter adhaerens HP15T (98.2 %), Marinobacter salsuginis SD-14BT (97.9 %), Marinobacter salarius R9SW1T (97.6 %) and Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19T (97.1 %). DNA-DNA hybridization studies showed values lower than 18.6 % between strain CP12T and any of these species. The predominant respiratory isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 and the major cellular fatty acids of strain CP12T were C16 : 0, C12 : 0 3-OH, C12 : 0, Summed feature 3, C16 : 0 10-methyl and C18 : 1ω9c. On the basis of phenotypic properties, and phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, it is evident that strain CP12T represents a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter halotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CP12T (=KACC 18381T=NBRC 110910T).

  15. Salinithrix halophila gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium in the family Thermoactinomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Zarparvar, Parisa; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    A halophilic actinomycete, strain R4S8(T), was isolated from soil of Inche-Broun hypersaline wetland in the north of Iran. The isolate grew aerobically at temperatures of 30-50 °C (optimum 40 °C), pH 6-10 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 1-15 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3-5 %). It formed short and straight to moderately flexuous aerial mycelium without motile elements. The cell wall of strain R4S8(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diamino acid without any diagnostic sugars. The polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine two unknown phospholipids and one unknown aminophospholipid. It synthesized anteiso-C15 : 0 (44.8 %), iso-C15 : 0 (28.8 %) and iso-C14 : 0 (8.5 %) as major fatty acids. MK-6 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 52.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain R4S8(T) belongs to the family Thermoactinomycetaceae and showed the closest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Desmospora activa IMMIB L-1269(T) (95.5 %) and Marininema mesophilum SCSIO 10219(T) (95.3 %). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics, strain R4S8(T) represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Thermoactinomycetaceae, for which the name Salinithrix halophila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is R4S8(T) ( = IBRC-M 10813(T) = CECT 8506(T)).

  16. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  17. [Biodiversity and functional enzymes of cultured halophilic archaeon in Lop Nur region].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingbing; Tang, Shukun; Ming, Hong; He, Songtao; Nie, Guoxing; Guan, Tongwei; Zhang, Lili; Li, Wenjun

    2011-09-01

    In order to explore the diversity of cultured halophilic archaeon from hypersaline environments in Lop Nur region and their potential application. Total 13 soil samples were collected from Lop Nur regions. Halophilic archaea strains were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In addition, 17 strains were selected based on different branches in pylogenetic tree, and their salt concentration tolerance and amylase, protease, esterase activities were further detected by conventional methods. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 56 selected strains were determined, and the phylogenetic analysis was carried out. These strains were classified into 10 known genera and 5 new potential genera, and the Shannon index was 1.820. The range of salt concentration tolerance of most strains was 10% - 35% (optimum at 20% - 25%). Amylase positive rate was 70.6%, protease positive rate was 35.3% and esterase positive rate was 82.4%. Diverse halophilic archaeon were discovered in Lop Nur regions. The isolation methods that we used were successful for isolating halophilic archaeon from these areas, which provided the technical basis to future explore the resources of halophilic archaeon in Lop Nur regions.

  18. Temperature and pH optima of extremely halophilic archaea: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Karen J; Wiegel, Juergen

    2011-03-01

    Archaeal microorganisms that grow optimally at Na(+) concentrations of 1.7 M, or the equivalent of 10% (w/v) NaCl, and greater are considered to be extreme halophiles. This review encompasses extremely halophilic archaea and their growth characteristics with respect to the correlation between the extent of alkaline pH and elevated temperature optima and the extent of salt tolerance. The focus is on poly-extremophiles, i.e., taxa growing optimally at a Na(+) concentration at or above 1.7 M (approximately 10% w/v NaCl); alkaline pH, at or above 8.5; and elevated temperature optima, at or above 50°C. So far, only a very few extreme halophiles that are able to grow optimally under alkaline conditions as well as at elevated temperatures have been isolated. The distribution of extremely halophilic archaea growing optimally at 3.4 M Na(+) (approximately 20% w/v NaCl) is bifurcated with respect to pH optima, either they are neutrophilic, with a pH(opt) of approximately 7, or strongly alkaliphilic, with pH(opt) at or above 8.5. Amongst these extreme halophiles which have elevated pH optima, only four taxa have an optimum temperature above 50°C: Haloarcula quadrata (52°C), Haloferax elongans (53°C), Haloferax mediterranei (51°C) and Natronolimnobius 'aegyptiacus' (55°C).

  19. Sodium and potassium transport in the halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    González-Hernández, J C; Cárdenas-Monroy, C A; Peña, A

    2004-04-15

    Debaryomyces hansenii, a halophile yeast found in shallow sea waters and salty food products grows optimally in 0.6 M of either NaCl or KCl, accumulating high concentrations of Na(+) or K(+). After growth in NaCl or KCl, a rapid efflux of either accumulated cation was observed if the cells were incubated in the presence of KCl or NaCl, respectively, accompanied by a slower accumulation of the cation present in the incubation medium. However, a similar, rapid efflux was observed if cells were incubated in buffer, in the absence of external cations. This yeast shows a cation uptake activity of both (86)Rb(+) and (22)Na(+) with saturation kinetics, and much higher affinity for (86)Rb(+) than for (22)Na(+). The pH dependence of the kinetics constants was similar for both cations, and although K(m) values were higher at pH 8.0, there was also an increase in the V(max) values. The accumulation of (22)Na(+) was found to be increased in cells grown in the presence of 0.6 M NaCl. (86)Rb(+) was also accumulated more in these cells, but to a slightly greater extent. The inhibition kinetics of the uptake of (22)Na(+) by K(+), and that of (86)Rb(+) by Na(+) was found to be non-competitive. It can be concluded that Na(+) in D. hansenii is not excluded but instead, its metabolic systems must be resistant to high salt concentrations.

  20. Isolation and characterization of halophilic Archaea able to produce biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Kebbouche-Gana, S; Gana, M L; Khemili, S; Fazouane-Naimi, F; Bouanane, N A; Penninckx, M; Hacene, H

    2009-05-01

    Halotolerant microorganisms able to live in saline environments offer a multitude of actual or potential applications in various fields of biotechnology. This is why some strains of Halobacteria from an Algerian culture collection were screened for biosurfactant production in a standard medium using the qualitative drop-collapse test and emulsification activity assay. Five of the Halobacteria strains reduced the growth medium surface tension below 40 mN m(-1), and two of them exhibited high emulsion-stabilizing capacity. Diesel oil-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 35% sodium chloride or up to 25% ethanol in the aqueous phase. Emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. The components of the biosurfactant were determined; it contained sugar, protein and lipid. The two Halobacteria strains with enhanced biosurfactant producers, designated strain A21 and strain D21, were selected to identify by phenotypic, biochemical characteristics and by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The strains have Mg(2+), and salt growth requirements are always above 15% (w/v) salts with an optimal concentration of 15-25%. Analyses of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains suggested that they were halophiles belonging to genera of the family Halobacteriaceae, Halovivax (strain A21) and Haloarcula (strain D21). To our knowledge, this is the first report of biosurfactant production at such a high salt concentration.

  1. Polyester production by halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains obtained from mangrove soil samples located in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Huu-Phong, Tran; Thi-Binh, Nguyen; Thi-Tho, Nguyen; Minh-Lam, Duong; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    This research article reports halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from mangrove forests located in Northern Vietnam. Several of these bacteria were able to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHAs are polyesters stored by microorganisms under the presence of considerable amounts of a carbon source and deficiency of other essential nutrient such as nitrogen or phosphorous. Mangrove forests in Northern Vietnam are saline coastal habitats that have not been microbiologically studied. Mangrove ecosystems are, in general, rich in organic matter, but deficient in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. We have found about 100 microorganisms that have adapted to mangrove forests by accumulating PHAs. The production of polyesters might therefore be an integral part of the carbon cycle in mangrove forests. Three of the strains (ND153, ND97, and QN194) isolated from the Vietnamese forests were identified as Bacillus species, while other five strains (QN187, ND199, ND218, ND240, and QN271) were phylogenetically close related to the α-proteobacterium Yangia pacifica. These strains were found to accumulate PHAs in noticeable amounts. Polymer inclusions and chemical structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Strains ND153, ND97, QN194, QN187, ND240, and QN271 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose, whereas strains ND199 and ND218 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from this carbohydrate. With the exception of strain QN194, the strains accumulated PHBV when a combination of glucose and propionate was included in the culture medium. The polymer yields and cell growth reached by one Bacillus isolate, strain ND153, and one Gram-negative bacterium, strain QN271, were high and worth to be researched further. For experiments performed in shake flasks, strain ND153 reached a maximum PHBV yield of 71 wt% and a cell dry weight

  2. Polyester production by halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains obtained from mangrove soil samples located in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Huu-Phong, Tran; Thi-Binh, Nguyen; Thi-Tho, Nguyen; Minh-Lam, Duong; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This research article reports halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from mangrove forests located in Northern Vietnam. Several of these bacteria were able to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHAs are polyesters stored by microorganisms under the presence of considerable amounts of a carbon source and deficiency of other essential nutrient such as nitrogen or phosphorous. Mangrove forests in Northern Vietnam are saline coastal habitats that have not been microbiologically studied. Mangrove ecosystems are, in general, rich in organic matter, but deficient in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. We have found about 100 microorganisms that have adapted to mangrove forests by accumulating PHAs. The production of polyesters might therefore be an integral part of the carbon cycle in mangrove forests. Three of the strains (ND153, ND97, and QN194) isolated from the Vietnamese forests were identified as Bacillus species, while other five strains (QN187, ND199, ND218, ND240, and QN271) were phylogenetically close related to the α-proteobacterium Yangia pacifica. These strains were found to accumulate PHAs in noticeable amounts. Polymer inclusions and chemical structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Strains ND153, ND97, QN194, QN187, ND240, and QN271 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose, whereas strains ND199 and ND218 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from this carbohydrate. With the exception of strain QN194, the strains accumulated PHBV when a combination of glucose and propionate was included in the culture medium. The polymer yields and cell growth reached by one Bacillus isolate, strain ND153, and one Gram-negative bacterium, strain QN271, were high and worth to be researched further. For experiments performed in shake flasks, strain ND153 reached a maximum PHBV yield of 71 wt% and a cell dry weight

  3. Nucleic acid enzymology of extremely halophilic bacteria. Halobacterium cutirubrum polynucleotide phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Peterkin, Pearl I.; Fitt, P. S.

    1971-01-01

    1. Polynucleotide phosphorylase was purified 200-fold from Halobacterium cutirubrum. 2. It is membrane-associated and can be solubilized by sonication. 3. The purified enzyme requires a high ionic strength for both stability and activity. 4. It is Mn2+-dependent, has all three typical polynucleotide phosphorylase activities and is specific for nucleoside diphosphates. 5. The enzyme is of low molecular weight. PMID:5114973

  4. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  5. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  6. Proposal of six species of moderately thermophilic, acidophilic, endospore-forming bacteria: Alicyclobacillus contaminans sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus fastidiosus sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus kakegawensis sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus macrosporangiidus sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus sacchari sp. nov. and Alicyclobacillus shizuokensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Goto, Keiichi; Mochida, Kaoru; Kato, Yuko; Asahara, Mika; Fujita, Rieko; An, Sun-Young; Kasai, Hiroaki; Yokota, Akira

    2007-06-01

    Moderately thermophilic, acidophilic, spore-forming bacteria (146 strains) were isolated from various beverages and environments. Based on the results of sequence analysis of the hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene, eight of the strains represent novel species of the genus Alicyclobacillus. These strains were designated 3-A191(T), 4-A336(T), 5-A83J(T), 5-A167N, 5-A239-2O-A(T), E-8, RB718(T) and S-TAB(T). Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and DNA gyrase B subunit (gyrB) nucleotide sequences confirmed that the eight strains belonged to the Alicyclobacillus clade. Cells of the eight strains were Gram-positive or Gram-variable, strictly aerobic and rod-shaped. The strains grew well under acidic and moderately thermal conditions, produced acid from various sugars, contained menaquinone 7 as the major isoprenoid quinone and did not produce guaiacol. omega-Alicyclic fatty acids were the predominant lipid component of strains 4-A336(T), 5-A83J(T), 5-A167N, RB718(T) and S-TAB(T). No omega-alicyclic fatty acids were detected in strains 3-A191(T), 5-A239-2O-A(T) or E-8, but iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids and small amounts of straight-chain saturated fatty acids were detected instead. According to the DNA-DNA hybridization data and distinct morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomical and genetic traits, the eight strains represent six novel species within the genus Alicyclobacillus, for which the following names are proposed: Alicyclobacillus contaminans sp. nov. (type strain 3-A191(T)=DSM 17975(T)=IAM 15224(T)), Alicyclobacillus fastidiosus sp. nov. (type strain S-TAB(T)=DSM 17978(T)=IAM 15229(T)), Alicyclobacillus kakegawensis sp. nov. (type strain 5-A83J(T)=DSM 17979(T)=IAM 15227(T)), Alicyclobacillus macrosporangiidus sp. nov. (type strain 5-A239-2O-A(T)=DSM 17980(T)=IAM 15370(T)), Alicyclobacillus sacchari sp. nov. (type strain RB718(T)=DSM 17974(T)=IAM 15230(T)) and Alicyclobacillus shizuokensis sp. nov. (type strain 4-A336(T)=DSM 17981(T)=IAM 15226(T)).

  7. Lateral proton conduction in monolayers of phospholipids from extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Teissié, J; Prats, M; LeMassu, A; Stewart, L C; Kates, M

    1990-01-09

    Studies have been carried out on the lateral proton conductance properties of monolayers of the major and minor phospholipids of extremely halophilic archaebacteria, 2,3-diphytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phospho-3'-sn-glycerol 1'-phosphate (PGP) and 2,3-diphytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phospho-3'-sn-glycerol (PG), respectively, as well as on their respective deoxy analogues: 2,3-diphytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phospho-1'-propanediol 3'-phosphate (dPGP), 2,3-diphytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phospho-1'-1',3'-propanediol (dPG), and 2,3-diphytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phospho-1'-propanol (ddPG). Lateral proton conduction was found to occur with monolayers of all ether phospholipids examined at reduced surface pressure (pi greater than 25 mN/m) on subphases of low (1 mM) and high (4 M) ionic strength. Proton conduction was also detected in highly condensed monolayers (greater than 35 mN/m) of the naturally occurring phospholipids (PGP, PG) but was abruptly terminated in tightly packed monolayers (greater than 35 mN/m) of the corresponding deoxy compounds (dPGP, dPG, ddPG) on subphases with low ionic strength. conduction did occur, however, along monolayers of the deoxy compounds at high surface pressure when spread on a subphase of high ionic strength (4 M). The abrupt termination of conduction with monolayers of the deoxy compounds at low ionic strength cannot be attributed to a lipid phase transition or to changes in the lateral fluidity of the monolayers, nor was the pK of the fluorescent interfacial proton indicator affected at high surface pressures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented.

  9. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed “primitive” protein from halophile to mesophile folding

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate “cradle” for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original “prebiotic” set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a “primitive” designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)—having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a “primitive” polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation—identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table. PMID:25297559

  10. An extreme-halophile archaebacterium possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase characteristic of the Gram-positive eubacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. A.; d'Amato, T. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1988-01-01

    The focal point of phenylalanine biosynthesis is a dehydratase reaction which in different organisms may be prephenate dehydratase, arogenate dehydratase, or cyclohexadienyl dehydratase. Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and cyanobacterial divisions of the eubacterial kingdom exhibit different dehydratase patterns. A new extreme-halophile isolate, which grows on defined medium and is tentatively designated as Halobacterium vallismortis CH-1, possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase present in Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the conventional sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine, the phenomenon of metabolic interlock was exemplified by the sensitivity of prephenate dehydratase to allosteric effects produced by extra-pathway (remote) effectors. Thus, L-tryptophan inhibited activity while L-tyrosine, L-methionine, L-leucine and L-isoleucine activated the enzyme. L-Isoleucine and L-phenylalanine were effective at micromolar levels; other effectors operated at mM levels. A regulatory mutant selected for resistance to growth inhibition caused by beta-2-thienylalanine possessed an altered prephenate dehydratase in which a phenomenon of disproportionately low activity at low enzyme concentration was abolished. Inhibition by L-tryptophan was also lost, and activation by allosteric activators was diminished. Not only was sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine lost, but the mutant enzyme was now activated by this amino acid (a mutation type previously observed in Bacillus subtilis). It remains to be seen whether this type of prephenate dehydratase will prove to be characteristic of all archaebacteria or of some archaebacterial subgroup cluster.

  11. An extreme-halophile archaebacterium possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase characteristic of the Gram-positive eubacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. A.; d'Amato, T. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1988-01-01

    The focal point of phenylalanine biosynthesis is a dehydratase reaction which in different organisms may be prephenate dehydratase, arogenate dehydratase, or cyclohexadienyl dehydratase. Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and cyanobacterial divisions of the eubacterial kingdom exhibit different dehydratase patterns. A new extreme-halophile isolate, which grows on defined medium and is tentatively designated as Halobacterium vallismortis CH-1, possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase present in Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the conventional sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine, the phenomenon of metabolic interlock was exemplified by the sensitivity of prephenate dehydratase to allosteric effects produced by extra-pathway (remote) effectors. Thus, L-tryptophan inhibited activity while L-tyrosine, L-methionine, L-leucine and L-isoleucine activated the enzyme. L-Isoleucine and L-phenylalanine were effective at micromolar levels; other effectors operated at mM levels. A regulatory mutant selected for resistance to growth inhibition caused by beta-2-thienylalanine possessed an altered prephenate dehydratase in which a phenomenon of disproportionately low activity at low enzyme concentration was abolished. Inhibition by L-tryptophan was also lost, and activation by allosteric activators was diminished. Not only was sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine lost, but the mutant enzyme was now activated by this amino acid (a mutation type previously observed in Bacillus subtilis). It remains to be seen whether this type of prephenate dehydratase will prove to be characteristic of all archaebacteria or of some archaebacterial subgroup cluster.

  12. Small-angle neutron scattering study of halophilic glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (hGAPDH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, Christine; Krishnan, Gomathi; Altekar, Wijaya; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    1991-10-01

    hGAPDH has a radius of gyration of 32±0.5 Å in high salt concentration, and a shape similar to an oblate ellipsoid of axial ratio 0.5 but with a much larger specific surface. The enzyme dissociates and unfolds in low salt solutions. These results are discussed in terms of the halophilic character of the protein.

  13. Survival of Halophilic Archaea in the Stratosphere as a Mars Analog: A Transcriptomic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DasSarma, S.; DasSarma, P.; Laye, V.; Harvey, J.; Reid, C.; Shultz, J.; Yarborough, A.; Lamb, A.; Koske-Phillips, A.; Herbst, A.; Molina, F.; Grah, O.; Phillips, T.

    2016-05-01

    On Earth, halophilic Archaea tolerate multiple extreme conditions similar to those on Mars. In order to study their survival, we launched live cultures into Earth’s stratosphere on helium balloons. The effects on survival and transcriptomes were interrogated in the lab.

  14. Isolation of Candida albicans and halophilic Vibrio spp. from aquatic birds in Connecticut and Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, J D

    1990-01-01

    Halophilic vibrios were recovered from feces of six types of aquatic birds (gulls, pelicans, Canada geese, swans, egrets, cormorants) from Connecticut and/or Florida shorelines. Candida albicans was isolated from gulls and Canada geese in Connecticut and from gulls and cormorants in Florida. PMID:2180374

  15. Distribution, abundance and diversity of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Peña, Arantxa; Santos, Fernando; Martínez-García, Manuel; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1998, representatives of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber have been found in many hypersaline environments across the world, including coastal and solar salterns and solar lakes. Here, we review the available information about the distribution, abundance and diversity of this member of the Bacteroidetes. PMID:18957079

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Thiohalobacter thiocyanaticus Strain FOKN1, a Neutrophilic Halophile Capable of Thiocyanate Degradation.

    PubMed

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Kawano, Shuichi; Nakagawa, Junichi

    2017-08-10

    A draft genome sequence of a neutrophilic halophile capable of thiocyanate degradation, Thiohalobacter thiocyanaticus FOKN1, was determined using a PacBio RSII sequencer. A 3.23-Mb circular genome sequence was assembled, in which 3,026 gene-coding sequences, 45 tRNAs, and 1 rrn operon were annotated. Copyright © 2017 Oshiki et al.

  17. Bipyrimidine Signatures as a Photoprotective Genome Strategy in G + C-rich Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic archaea experience high levels of ultraviolet (UV) light in their environments and demonstrate resistance to UV irradiation. DNA repair systems and carotenoids provide UV protection but do not account for the high resistance observed. Herein, we consider genomic signatures as an additional photoprotective strategy. The predominant forms of UV-induced DNA damage are cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, most notoriously thymine dimers (T^Ts), which form at adjacent Ts. We tested whether the high G + C content seen in halophilic archaea serves a photoprotective function through limiting T nucleotides, and thus T^T lesions. However, this speculation overlooks the other bipyrimidine sequences, all of which capable of forming photolesions to varying degrees. Therefore, we designed a program to determine the frequencies of the four bipyrimidine pairs (5’ to 3’: TT, TC, CT, and CC) within genomes of halophilic archaea and four other randomized sample groups for comparison. The outputs for each sampled genome were weighted by the intrinsic photoreactivities of each dinucleotide pair. Statistical methods were employed to investigate intergroup differences. Our findings indicate that the UV-resistance seen in halophilic archaea can be attributed in part to a genomic strategy: high G + C content and the resulting bipyrimidine signature reduces the genomic photoreactivity. PMID:27598206

  18. Cultivation and molecular monitoring of halophilic microorganisms inhabiting an extreme environment presented by a salt-attacked monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettenauer, Jörg; Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years several investigations, based on culture-dependent and -independent techniques, have shown that salt-attacked stone surfaces present a habitat for extremely salt tolerant and moderate halophilic microorganisms. The inner walls of the Chapel of St. Virgil in Vienna (Austria) are an example of this phenomenon. Salt crusts cover most of the wall surfaces and salt crystallization in the porous space of the stone is causing decohesion of material and destruction of the original medieval paintings. The salt, together with the oligotrophic conditions, creates a very special and extreme habitat for halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms. In this study we investigate and monitor the cultivable and non-cultivable members of the microbial community present on the stonework of the medieval Chapel of St. Virgil after several severe disturbances of the microbial environment caused by desalination and disinfection treatments. With this finality, a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques was selected. The genetic diversity of a total of 104 bacterial strains isolated from the stone samples was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Strains were distributed over 29 groups on the basis of their RAPD patterns. Only 19 groups were differentiated by DGGE. Comparative sequence analyses showed that the isolated strains belong to related species of the genera Halobacillus (47.1%), Bacillus (35.6%), Acinetobacter (4.8%), Halomonas (3.9%), Nesterenkonia (2.9%), Paucisalibacillus (2.9%), Paenibacillus (1%), Staphylococcus (1%) and Exiguobacterium (1%). In addition, polymerase chain reaction DGGE fingerprints, in combination with the creation of clone libraries and sequencing analyses, were used to monitor and identify Archaea, the non-cultivable fraction of the microbial community. The detected archaeal sequences were closely related to different

  19. Growth physiology and competitive interaction of obligately chemolithoautotrophic, haloalkaliphilic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Banciu, Horia; van Loosdrecht, Mark; Kuenen, J Gijs

    2003-06-01

    Two different groups of haloalkaliphilic, obligately autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the genera Thioalkalimicrobium and Thioalkalivibrio have recently been discovered in highly alkaline and saline soda lakes. To understand response to their extreme environment and different occurrence in soda lakes, the growth kinetics and competitive behavior of several representatives have been characterized in detail using batch and pH-controlled continuous cultivation. The bacteria belong to the true alkaliphiles, growing within the pH range 7.5-10.6 with maximum growth rate and maximum growth yield at pH 9.5-10. On the basis of their response to salt content, three groups can be identified. All the Thioalkalimicrobium strains and some of the Thioalkalivibrio strains belonged to the moderate halophiles. Some of the Thioalkalivibrio strains from hypersaline soda lakes were extremely salt-tolerant and capable of growth in saturated soda brines. The Thioalkalimicrobium strains demonstrated relatively high specific growth rates, low growth yield, high maintenance, and extremely high rates of thiosulfate and sulfide oxidation. In contrast, the Thioalkalivibrio strains, in general, were slow-growing, high-yield organisms with lower maintenance and much lower rates of oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate. Moreover, the latter survived starvation much better than Thioalkalimicrobium. Different growth characteristics and salt resistance appear to determine the outcome of the enrichment cultures from different soda lakes: Thioalkalimicrobium dominated in the enrichments with freshly obtained samples from diluted soda lakes at low-medium salinity, while Thioalkalivibrio was the predominant organism in enrichments from aged samples and at hypersaline conditions. In mixed thiosulfate-limited chemostat cultures at low salinity, Thioalkalimicrobium strains (mu(max)=0.33 h(-1)) out-competed Thioalkalivibrio strains (mu(max)=0.15 h(-1)) at D>0.02 h(-1). The overall results

  20. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate dependent CO/sub 2/ fixation in the halophilic archaebacterium, Halobacterium mediterranei

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, N.; Kelkar, S.M.; Altekar, W.

    1988-10-14

    The cell extract of Halobacterium mediterranei catalyses incorporation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into 3-phosphoglycerate in the presence of ribulose bisphosphate suggesting the existence of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity in this halophilic archaebacterium.

  1. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi.

    PubMed

    Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Corcelli, Angela

    2008-12-01

    The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylglycerol and sulfated diglycosyl diether lipid. Among cardiolipins, the tetra-phytanyl or dimeric phospholipids, only traces of bisphosphatidylglycerol were detected. When the cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, no changes in the membrane lipid composition occurred. Distinguishing it from other extreme halophiles of the Halobacteriaceae family, the osmotic stress did not induce the neo-synthesis of cardiolipins in H. walsbyi. The difference may depend on the three-laminar structure of the cell wall, which differs significantly from that of other Haloarchaea.

  2. Analysis of protein solvent interactions in glucose dehydrogenase from the extreme halophile Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Britton, K Linda; Baker, Patrick J; Fisher, Martin; Ruzheinikov, Sergey; Gilmour, D James; Bonete, María-José; Ferrer, Juan; Pire, Carmen; Esclapez, Julia; Rice, David W

    2006-03-28

    The structure of glucose dehydrogenase from the extreme halophile Haloferax mediterranei has been solved at 1.6-A resolution under crystallization conditions which closely mimic the "in vivo" intracellular environment. The decoration of the enzyme's surface with acidic residues is only partially neutralized by bound potassium counterions, which also appear to play a role in substrate binding. The surface shows the expected reduction in hydrophobic character, surprisingly not from changes associated with the loss of exposed hydrophobic residues but rather arising from a loss of lysines consistent with the genome wide-reduction of this residue in extreme halophiles. The structure reveals a highly ordered, multilayered solvation shell that can be seen to be organized into one dominant network covering much of the exposed surface accessible area to an extent not seen in almost any other protein structure solved. This finding is consistent with the requirement of the enzyme to form a protective shell in a dehydrating environment.

  3. Structure of starch binding domains of halophilic alpha-amylase at low pH.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The solubility and structural properties of halophilic proteins are ascribed to their abundant acidic residues, resulting in large net negative charges at neutral pH. This study examined the effects of low pH, i.e., reduction of net negative charges on the structural properties of starch binding domain (SBD) of halophilic Kocuria varians α-amylase. Titration to pH 2.1 caused loss of 233 nm peak characteristic of aromatic interactions present in the native SBD at neutral pH and resulted in the spectrum with a 216 nm valley characteristic of β-sheet. The low pH β-sheet structure was stable against heat treatment. The addition of NaCl and trifluoroethanol resulted in decrease and increase of the 216 nm signal, without altering the spectral shape. These structural properties were significantly different from those of the native protein.

  4. Genomic adaptations of the halophilic Dead Sea filamentous fungus Eurotium rubrum.

    PubMed

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Weig, Alfons R; Riley, Robert; Peršoh, Derek; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lipzen, Anna; Wasser, Solomon P; Rambold, Gerhard; Grigoriev, Igor V; Nevo, Eviatar

    2014-05-09

    The Dead Sea is one of the most hypersaline habitats on Earth. The fungus Eurotium rubrum (Eurotiomycetes) is among the few species able to survive there. Here we highlight its adaptive strategies, based on genome analysis and transcriptome profiling. The 26.2 Mb genome of E. rubrum shows, for example, gains in gene families related to stress response and losses with regard to transport processes. Transcriptome analyses under different salt growth conditions revealed, among other things differentially expressed genes encoding ion and metabolite transporters. Our findings suggest that long-term adaptation to salinity requires cellular and metabolic responses that differ from short-term osmotic stress signalling. The transcriptional response indicates that halophilic E. rubrum actively counteracts the salinity stress. Many of its genes encode for proteins with a significantly higher proportion of acidic amino acid residues. This trait is characteristic of the halophilic prokaryotes as well, supporting the theory of convergent evolution under extreme hypersaline stress.

  5. Halophilic Archaea: Life with Desiccation, Radiation and Oligotrophy over Geological Times.

    PubMed

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu

    2015-07-28

    Halophilic archaebacteria (Haloarchaea) can survive extreme desiccation, starvation and radiation, sometimes apparently for millions of years. Several of the strategies that are involved appear specific for Haloarchaea (for example, the formation of halomucin, survival in fluid inclusions of halite), and some are known from other prokaryotes (dwarfing of cells, reduction of ATP). Several newly-discovered haloarchaeal strategies that were inferred to possibly promote long-term survival-halomucin, polyploidy, usage of DNA as a phosphate storage polymer, production of spherical dormant stages-remain to be characterized in detail. More information on potential strategies is desirable, since evidence for the presence of halite on Mars and on several moons in the solar system increased interest in halophiles with respect to the search for extraterrestrial life. This review deals in particular with novel findings and hypotheses on haloarchaeal long-term survival.

  6. Halophiles: biology, adaptation, and their role in decontamination of hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Edbeib, Mohamed Faraj; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul; Huyop, Fahrul

    2016-08-01

    The unique cellular enzymatic machinery of halophilic microbes allows them to thrive in extreme saline environments. That these microorganisms can prosper in hypersaline environments has been correlated with the elevated acidic amino acid content in their proteins, which increase the negative protein surface potential. Because these microorganisms effectively use hydrocarbons as their sole carbon and energy sources, they may prove to be valuable bioremediation agents for the treatment of saline effluents and hypersaline waters contaminated with toxic compounds that are resistant to degradation. This review highlights the various strategies adopted by halophiles to compensate for their saline surroundings and includes descriptions of recent studies that have used these microorganisms for bioremediation of environments contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. The known halotolerant dehalogenase-producing microbes, their dehalogenation mechanisms, and how their proteins are stabilized is also reviewed. In view of their robustness in saline environments, efforts to document their full potential regarding remediation of contaminated hypersaline ecosystems merits further exploration.

  7. Extracellular Ca2(+)-dependent inducible alkaline phosphatase from extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, S; Hecht, K; Eisenberg, H; Mevarech, M

    1990-01-01

    When starved of inorganic phosphate, the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui produces the enzyme alkaline phosphatase and secretes it to the medium. This inducible extracellular enzyme is a glycoprotein whose subunit molecular mass is 160 kDa, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. The native form of the enzyme is heterogeneous and composed of multiple oligomeric forms. The enzymatic activity of the halophilic alkaline phosphatase is maximal at pH 8.5, and the enzyme is inhibited by phosphate. Unlike most alkaline phosphatases, the halobacterial enzyme requires Ca2+ and not Zn2+ ions for its activity. Both calcium ions (in the millimolar range) and NaCl (in the molar range) are required for the stability of the enzyme. Images PMID:2123861

  8. Application of lipopeptide biosurfactant isolated from a halophile: Bacillus tequilensis CH for inhibition of biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun Kumar; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mall, Gangotri; Panda, Himadri Tanaya; Sukla, Lala Behari; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-11-01

    Biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules having hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties produced by various microorganisms. These molecules trigger the reduction of surface tension or interfacial tension in liquids. A biosurfactant-producing halophile was isolated from Lake Chilika, a brackish water lake of Odisha, India (19°41'39″N, 85°18'24″E). The halophile was identified as Bacillus tequilensis CH by biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and assigned accession no. KC851857 by GenBank. The biosurfactant produced by B. tequilensis CH was partially characterized as a lipopeptide using thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The minimum effective concentration of a biosurfactant for inhibition of pathogenic biofilm (Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans) on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was found to be 50 μg ml(-1). This finding has potential for a variety of applications.

  9. Halophilic Archaea: Life with Desiccation, Radiation and Oligotrophy over Geological Times

    PubMed Central

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria (Haloarchaea) can survive extreme desiccation, starvation and radiation, sometimes apparently for millions of years. Several of the strategies that are involved appear specific for Haloarchaea (for example, the formation of halomucin, survival in fluid inclusions of halite), and some are known from other prokaryotes (dwarfing of cells, reduction of ATP). Several newly-discovered haloarchaeal strategies that were inferred to possibly promote long-term survival—halomucin, polyploidy, usage of DNA as a phosphate storage polymer, production of spherical dormant stages—remain to be characterized in detail. More information on potential strategies is desirable, since evidence for the presence of halite on Mars and on several moons in the solar system increased interest in halophiles with respect to the search for extraterrestrial life. This review deals in particular with novel findings and hypotheses on haloarchaeal long-term survival. PMID:26226005

  10. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi

    PubMed Central

    LoBasso, Simona; LoPalco, Patrizia; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Corcelli, Angela

    2008-01-01

    The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylglycerol and sulfated diglycosyl diether lipid. Among cardiolipins, the tetra-phytanyl or dimeric phospholipids, only traces of bisphosphatidylglycerol were detected. When the cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, no changes in the membrane lipid composition occurred. Distinguishing it from other extreme halophiles of the Halobacteriaceae family, the osmotic stress did not induce the neo-synthesis of cardiolipins in H. walsbyi. The difference may depend on the three-laminar structure of the cell wall, which differs significantly from that of other Haloarchaea. PMID:19054744

  11. Strictly anaerobic halophiles isolated from canned Swedish fermented herrings (Surströmming).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kimura, B; Fujii, T

    2000-03-10

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles were isolated from canned Swedish fermented herrings (Surströmming). All isolates were phenotypically uniform with some exceptions and were identified as the genus Haloanaerobium and assigned to either Haloanaerobium praevalens or Haloanaerobiuim alcaliphilum. A comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the representative strain S-8 of the isolates was identical to that of Haloanaerobium praevalens DSM 2228T. Furthermore, this strain exhibited high levels (> 80%) of DNA-DNA homology with Haloanaerobium praevalens DSM 2228T. This is a novel report of halophilic anaerobes isolated from a food product. Such anaerobes may contribute to the intense flavor and the swollen can characteristics of Swedish fermented herring.

  12. Organic compatible solutes of halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mary F

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms that adapt to moderate and high salt environments use a variety of solutes, organic and inorganic, to counter external osmotic pressure. The organic solutes can be zwitterionic, noncharged, or anionic (along with an inorganic cation such as K+). The range of solutes, their diverse biosynthetic pathways, and physical properties of the solutes that effect molecular stability are reviewed. PMID:16176595

  13. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  14. Complete genome sequence of the anaerobic, halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LF.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisuo; Mesbah, Noha M; Dalin, Eileen; Goodwin, Lynne; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikolaos; Wiegel, Juergen

    2011-08-01

    The genome of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus consists of one 3,165,557-bp chromosome and two plasmids (17,207 bp and 8,689 bp). The present study is the first to report the completely sequenced genome of an anaerobic polyextremophile and genes associated with roles in regulation of intracellular osmotic pressure, pH homeostasis, and growth at elevated temperatures.

  15. Halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes from a marine saltern of Goa, India producing anti-bacterial metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ballav, Shuvankar; Kerkar, Savita; Thomas, Sabu; Augustine, Nimmy

    2015-03-01

    Marine salterns are estuarine ecosystems in Goa, receiving inputs from riverine and marine waters. The Salinity fluctuates between 0 and 300 psu which makes it a conducive niche for salt tolerant and salt loving Actinomycetales. Halotolerant and halophilic Actinomycetales producing anti-bacterial metabolites were studied from crystallizer pond sediments of Ribandar saltern, Goa. Three media viz. Starch casein, R2A and Inorganic salt starch agar at four different salinities (35, 50, 75 and 100 psu) were used for isolation. R2A agar at 35 psu was the most preferred by hypersaline actinomycetes. The dominant group was halotolerant Streptomyces spp. others being rare actinomycetes viz. Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora and Kocuria spp. More than 50% of the isolates showed anti-bacterial activity against one or more of the fifteen human pathogens tested. Eight strains from 4 genera showed consistent anti-bacterial activity and studied in detail. Most halotolerant isolates grew from 0 to 75 psu, with optimum antibiotic production at 35 psu whereas halophiles grew at 20 to 100 psu with optimum antibiotic production at 35 psu. Four Streptomyces strains showed multiple inhibition against test organisms while four rare actinomycetes were specific in their inhibitory activity. This is the first report of a halophilic Kocuria sp., Nocardiopsis sp., and halotolerant Micromonospora sp. producing anti-bacterial compound(s) against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus citreus, and Vibrio cholerae, respectively. Sequential extraction with varying polarity of organic solvents showed that the extracts inhibited different test pathogens. These results suggest that halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes from marine salterns are a potential source of anti-bacterial compounds. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation, Taxonomy, and Antagonistic Properties of Halophilic Actinomycetes in Saharan Soils of Algeria ▿

    PubMed Central

    Meklat, Atika; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of a population of 52 halophilic actinomycetes was evaluated by a polyphasic approach, which showed the presence of members of the Actinopolyspora, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora, Streptomonospora, and Saccharopolyspora genera. One strain was considered to be a new member of the last genus, and several other strains seemed to be new species. Furthermore, 50% of strains were active against a broad range of indicators and contained genes encoding polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. PMID:21764956

  17. Isolation, taxonomy, and antagonistic properties of halophilic actinomycetes in Saharan soils of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed

    2011-09-01

    The diversity of a population of 52 halophilic actinomycetes was evaluated by a polyphasic approach, which showed the presence of members of the Actinopolyspora, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora, Streptomonospora, and Saccharopolyspora genera. One strain was considered to be a new member of the last genus, and several other strains seemed to be new species. Furthermore, 50% of strains were active against a broad range of indicators and contained genes encoding polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

  18. Genome sequence of Haloarcula marismortui: A halophilic archaeon from the Dead Sea

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Nitin S.; Bonneau, Richard; Facciotti, Marc T.; Pan, Min; Glusman, Gustavo; Deutsch, Eric W.; Shannon, Paul; Chiu, Yulun; Weng, Rueyhung Sting; Gan, Rueichi Richie; Hung, Pingliang; Date, Shailesh V.; Marcotte, Edward; Hood, Leroy; Ng, Wailap Victor

    2004-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 4,274,642-bp genome of Haloarcula marismortui, a halophilic archaeal isolate from the Dead Sea. The genome is organized into nine circular replicons of varying G+C compositions ranging from 54% to 62%. Comparison of the genome architectures of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and H. marismortui suggests a common ancestor for the two organisms and a genome of significantly reduced size in the former. Both of these halophilic archaea use the same strategy of high surface negative charge of folded proteins as means to circumvent the salting-out phenomenon in a hypersaline cytoplasm. A multitiered annotation approach, including primary sequence similarities, protein family signatures, structure prediction, and a protein function association network, has assigned putative functions for at least 58% of the 4242 predicted proteins, a far larger number than is usually achieved in most newly sequenced microorganisms. Among these assigned functions were genes encoding six opsins, 19 MCP and/or HAMP domain signal transducers, and an unusually large number of environmental response regulators—nearly five times as many as those encoded in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1—suggesting H. marismortui is significantly more physiologically capable of exploiting diverse environments. In comparing the physiologies of the two halophilic archaea, in addition to the expected extensive similarity, we discovered several differences in their metabolic strategies and physiological responses such as distinct pathways for arginine breakdown in each halophile. Finally, as expected from the larger genome, H. marismortui encodes many more functions and seems to have fewer nutritional requirements for survival than does Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. PMID:15520287

  19. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  20. Communities structure of the planktonic halophiles in the solar saltern of Sfax, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2009-01-01

    The composition and distribution of the main planktonic halophilic micro-organisms (heterotrophic and autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, phytoplankton, ciliates) and metazooplankton were investigated in six ponds of increasing salinity in the solar salt works of Sfax, Tunisia, from January to December 2003. Marked changes in the composition and biomass of the communities were found along the salinity gradient, especially at salinities of 150 and 350. Autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates characterized the less salted ponds. Planktonic biomass was the highest at intermediate salinity as a consequence of a bloom of Ochromonas. Species richness of phytoplankton, ciliates and zooplankton greatly decrease above a salinity of 150 and typical halophiles ( Dunaliella salina, cyanobacteria, Fabrea salina and Artemia salina) were found between 150 and 350 salinity. In this environment, F. salina appeared more adapted than the brine shrimp to survive during phytoplankton blooms. The halophilic plankton was however almost entirely composed of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the crystallizers. We thus observed a progressive disappearance of the autotrophic planktonic communities along the salinity gradient. Multivariate analysis of the communities provides evidence that ponds represent discrete aquatic ecosystems within this salt works.

  1. Identification of several intracellular carbohydrate-degrading activities from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, F; Díaz, S; Bautista, V; Pire, C; Bravo, G; Esclapez, J; Zafrilla, B; Bonete, María-José

    2009-07-01

    Three different amylolytic activities, designated AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3 were detected in the cytoplasm of the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei grown in a starch containing medium. This organism had also been reported to excrete an alpha-amylase into the external medium in such conditions. The presence of these different enzymes which are also able to degrade starch may be related to the use of the available carbohydrates and maltodextrins, including the products obtained by the action of the extracellular amylase on starch that may be transported to the cytoplasm of the organism. The behavior of these intracellular hydrolytic enzymes on starch is reported here and compared with their extracellular counterpart. Two of these glycosidic activities (AMY1, AMY3) have also been purified and further characterized. As with other halophilic enzymes, they were salt dependent and displayed maximal activity at 3 M NaCl, and 50 degrees C. The purification steps and molecular masses have also been reported. The other activity (AMY2) was also detected in extracts from cells grown in media with glycerol instead of starch and in a yeast extract medium. This enzyme was able to degrade starch yielding small oligosaccharides and displayed similar halophilic behavior with salt requirement in the range 1.5-3 M NaCl.

  2. A Novel Denitrifying Extreme Halophile That Grows in a Simple Mineral Salts Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Oremland, R. S.; Gherna, R.; Cote, R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An extremely halophilic bacterium (strain CH-1) was isolated from a saltern adjacent to San Francisco Bay. It grew in a mineral salts medium with ammonium and glucose as sole sources of nitrogen and carbon as well as energy, respectively Cells lysed at less than 10% NaCl and growth was most rapid in medium containing 20% NaCl. Cells were pieomorphic ranging from disc to ovoid-shaved and used a variety of carbohydrates as sole carbon sources. the utilization of certain carbon sources was controlled by temperature with some used at 37 degrees but not 45 C. CH-1 grew between 30 degrees and 50 C with the optimum at 45 C in the presence of 20% NaCl. CH-1 contained 2,3-di-O-isoprenyl glcerol diethers and was sensitive to aphidicofin. The major polar lipid was glucosyl-mannosyl-alucosyl diether, which is diagnostic of the Haloarcula. Thus CH-1 is an extreme halophile and a member of this genus. Among the novel characteristics of this organism was its ability to grow anaerobically in synthetic medium when nitrate was present which was only reduced to nitrous oxide. This organism should prove useful for studying denitrification and carbohydrate metabolism in the extreme halophiles; and to be a valuable resource for generic studies.

  3. Extremely halophilic archaea from ancient salt sediments and their long term survival.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, marine solar salterns and alkaline salt lakes; they have also been isolated from rock salt of great geological age (195-250 million years) and some of those strains were described as novel species (1). The cells survived perhaps while being enclosed within small fluid inclusions in the halite. When simulating the embedding process of haloarchaea in laboratory-grown salt crystals, cells accumulated preferentially in fluid inclusions, as could be demonstrated by pre-staining with fluorescent dyes. The issue of extreme long term microbial survival in rock salt has considerable implications for the search for extraterrestrial life. Halite has been found in Martian meteorites, salts are present on the Martian surface and there is good evidence for a salty ocean on the Jovian moon Europa. Therefore the search for halophilic prokaryotic life in such environments appears plausible. The development of detection methods for subsurface haloarchaea, which might also be applicable to samples from future missions to space, is important and some examples such as fluorescence microscopy methods with novel dyes will be described. (1) Fendrihan, S., Legat, A., Gruber, C., Pfaffenhuemer, M., Weidler, G., Gerbl, F., Stan- Lotter, H. (2006) Extremely halophilic archaea and the issue of long term microbial survival. Reviews in Environmental Science and Bio/technology 5, 1569-1605.

  4. A Novel Denitrifying Extreme Halophile That Grows in a Simple Mineral Salts Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Oremland, R. S.; Gherna, R.; Cote, R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An extremely halophilic bacterium (strain CH-1) was isolated from a saltern adjacent to San Francisco Bay. It grew in a mineral salts medium with ammonium and glucose as sole sources of nitrogen and carbon as well as energy, respectively Cells lysed at less than 10% NaCl and growth was most rapid in medium containing 20% NaCl. Cells were pieomorphic ranging from disc to ovoid-shaved and used a variety of carbohydrates as sole carbon sources. the utilization of certain carbon sources was controlled by temperature with some used at 37 degrees but not 45 C. CH-1 grew between 30 degrees and 50 C with the optimum at 45 C in the presence of 20% NaCl. CH-1 contained 2,3-di-O-isoprenyl glcerol diethers and was sensitive to aphidicofin. The major polar lipid was glucosyl-mannosyl-alucosyl diether, which is diagnostic of the Haloarcula. Thus CH-1 is an extreme halophile and a member of this genus. Among the novel characteristics of this organism was its ability to grow anaerobically in synthetic medium when nitrate was present which was only reduced to nitrous oxide. This organism should prove useful for studying denitrification and carbohydrate metabolism in the extreme halophiles; and to be a valuable resource for generic studies.

  5. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0–30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation. PMID:26621792

  6. Global transcriptome analysis of Halolamina sp. to decipher the salt tolerance in extremely halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Kızıldoğan, Aslıhan; Abanoz, Büşra; Okay, Sezer

    2017-02-15

    Extremely halophilic archaea survive in the hypersaline environments such as salt lakes or salt mines. Therefore, these microorganisms are good sources to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance to high salt concentrations. In this study, a global transcriptome analysis was conducted in an extremely halophilic archaeon, Halolamina sp. YKT1, isolated from a salt mine in Turkey. A comparative RNA-seq analysis was performed using YKT1 isolate grown either at 2.7M NaCl or 5.5M NaCl concentrations. A total of 2149 genes were predicted to be up-regulated and 1638 genes were down-regulated in the presence of 5.5M NaCl. The salt tolerance of Halolamina sp. YKT1 involves the up-regulation of genes related with membrane transporters, CRISPR-Cas systems, osmoprotectant solutes, oxidative stress proteins, and iron metabolism. On the other hand, the genes encoding the proteins involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, mismatch and nucleotide excision repair were down-regulated. The RNA-seq data were verified for seven up-regulated genes as well as six down-regulated genes via qRT-PCR analysis. This comprehensive transcriptome analysis showed that the halophilic archaeon canalizes its energy towards keeping the intracellular osmotic balance minimizing the production of nucleic acids and peptides.

  7. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production.

  8. Terrestrial models for extraterrestrial life: methanogens and halophiles at Martian temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. N.; Sparks, W. B.; Lubow, S.; McGrath, M.; Livio, M.; Valenti, J.; Sowers, K. R.; Shukla, H. D.; MacAuley, S.; Miller, T.; Suvanasuthi, R.; Belas, R.; Colman, A.; Robb, F. T.; Dassarma, P.; Müller, J. A.; Coker, J. A.; Cavicchioli, R.; Chen, F.; Dassarma, S.

    2006-08-01

    Cold environments are common throughout the Galaxy. We are conducting a series of experiments designed to probe the low-temperature limits for growth in selected methanogenic and halophilic Archaea. This paper presents initial results for two mesophiles, a methanogen, Methanosarcina acetivorans, and a halophile, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and for two Antarctic cold-adapted Archaea, a methanogen, Methanococcoides burtonii, and a halophile, Halorubrum lacusprofundi. Neither mesophile is active at temperatures below 5 °C, but both cold-adapted microorganisms show significant growth at sub-zero temperatures (-2 °C and -1 °C, respectively), extending previous low-temperature limits for both species by 4 5 °C. At low temperatures, both H. lacusprofundi and M. burtonii form multicellular aggregates, which appear to be embedded in extracellular polymeric substances. This is the first detection of this phenomenon in Antarctic species of Archaea at cold temperatures. The low-temperature limits for both psychrophilic species fall within the temperature range experienced on present-day Mars and could permit survival and growth, particularly in sub-surface environments. We also discuss the results of our experiments in the context of known exoplanet systems, several of which include planets that intersect the Habitable Zone. In most cases, those planets follow orbits with significant eccentricity, leading to substantial temperature excursions. However, a handful of the known gas giant exoplanets could potentially harbour habitable terrestrial moons.

  9. An Extremely Halophilic Proteobacterium Combines a Highly Acidic Proteome with a Low Cytoplasmic Potassium Content*

    PubMed Central

    Deole, Ratnakar; Challacombe, Jean; Raiford, Douglas W.; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic archaea accumulate molar concentrations of KCl in their cytoplasm as an osmoprotectant and have evolved highly acidic proteomes that function only at high salinity. We examined osmoprotection in the photosynthetic Proteobacteria Halorhodospira halophila and Halorhodospira halochloris. Genome sequencing and isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis showed that the proteome of H. halophila is acidic. In line with this finding, H. halophila accumulated molar concentrations of KCl when grown in high salt medium as detected by x-ray microanalysis and plasma emission spectrometry. This result extends the taxonomic range of organisms using KCl as a main osmoprotectant to the Proteobacteria. The closely related organism H. halochloris does not exhibit an acidic proteome, matching its inability to accumulate K+. This observation indicates recent evolutionary changes in the osmoprotection strategy of these organisms. Upon growth of H. halophila in low salt medium, its cytoplasmic K+ content matches that of Escherichia coli, revealing an acidic proteome that can function in the absence of high cytoplasmic salt concentrations. These findings necessitate a reassessment of two central aspects of theories for understanding extreme halophiles. First, we conclude that proteome acidity is not driven by stabilizing interactions between K+ ions and acidic side chains but by the need for maintaining sufficient solvation and hydration of the protein surface at high salinity through strongly hydrated carboxylates. Second, we propose that obligate protein halophilicity is a non-adaptive property resulting from genetic drift in which constructive neutral evolution progressively incorporates weakly stabilizing K+-binding sites on an increasingly acidic protein surface. PMID:23144460

  10. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0-30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+) and Al(3+) and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

  11. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0-30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

  12. The crystal structure of Haloferax volcanii proliferating cell nuclear antigen reveals unique surface charge characteristics due to halophilic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jody A; Christofi, Panayiotis; Morroll, Shaun; Bunting, Karen A

    2009-08-22

    The high intracellular salt concentration required to maintain a halophilic lifestyle poses challenges to haloarchaeal proteins that must stay soluble, stable and functional in this extreme environment. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a fundamental protein involved in maintaining genome integrity, with roles in both DNA replication and repair. To investigate the halophilic adaptation of such a key protein we have crystallised and solved the structure of Haloferax volcanii PCNA (HvPCNA) to a resolution of 2.0 A. The overall architecture of HvPCNA is very similar to other known PCNAs, which are highly structurally conserved. Three commonly observed adaptations in halophilic proteins are higher surface acidity, bound ions and increased numbers of intermolecular ion pairs (in oligomeric proteins). HvPCNA possesses the former two adaptations but not the latter, despite functioning as a homotrimer. Strikingly, the positive surface charge considered key to PCNA's role as a sliding clamp is dramatically reduced in the halophilic protein. Instead, bound cations within the solvation shell of HvPCNA may permit sliding along negatively charged DNA by reducing electrostatic repulsion effects. The extent to which individual proteins adapt to halophilic conditions varies, presumably due to their diverse characteristics and roles within the cell. The number of ion pairs observed in the HvPCNA monomer-monomer interface was unexpectedly low. This may reflect the fact that the trimer is intrinsically stable over a wide range of salt concentrations and therefore additional modifications for trimer maintenance in high salt conditions are not required. Halophilic proteins frequently bind anions and cations and in HvPCNA cation binding may compensate for the remarkable reduction in positive charge in the pore region, to facilitate functional interactions with DNA. In this way, HvPCNA may harness its environment as opposed to simply surviving in extreme halophilic conditions.

  13. Characterization of halophiles in natural MgSO 4 salts and laboratory enrichment samples: Astrobiological implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian S.; King, Penelope L.; Hyde, Brendt C.; Southam, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    The presence of sulfate salts and limited subsurface water (ice) on Mars suggests that any liquid water on Mars today will occur as (magnesium) sulfate-rich brines in regions containing sources of magnesium and sulfur. The Basque Lakes of British Columbia, Canada, represent a hypersaline terrestrial analogue site, which possesses chemical and physical properties similar to those observed on Mars. The Basque Lakes also contain diverse halophilic organisms representing all three Kingdoms of life, growing in surface and near-subsurface environments. Of interest from an astrobiological perspective, crushed magnesium sulfate samples that were analyzed using a modified Lowry protein assay contained biomass in every crystal inspected, with biomass values from 0.078 to 4.21 mg biomass/g salt; average=0.74±0.7 mg biomass/g salt. Bacteria and Archaea cells were easily observed even in low-biomass samples using light microscopy, and bacteria trapped within magnesium sulfate crystals were observed using confocal microscopy. Regions within the salt also contained bacterial pigments, e.g., carotenoids, which were separate from the cells, indicating that cell lysis might have occurred during entrapment within the salt matrix. These biosignatures, cells, and any 'soluble' organic constituents were primarily found trapped within fluid inclusions or fluid-filled void spaces between intergrown crystals. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (reflectance IR) analysis of enrichment cultures, containing cyanobacteria, Archaea, or dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria, highlighted molecular biosignature features between 550-1650 and 2400-3000 cm -1. Spectra from natural salts demonstrated that we can detect biomass within salt crystals using the most sensitive biosignatures, which are the 1530-1570 cm -1, C-N, N-H, -COOH absorptions and the 1030-1050 cm -1 C-OH, C-N, PO 43- bond features. The lowest detection limit for a biosignature absorption feature using

  14. Reversible Activation of Halophilic β-lactamase from Methanol-Induced Inactive Form: Contrast to Irreversible Inactivation of Non-Halophilic Counterpart.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Maeda, Junpei; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2017-06-01

    Effects of a water-miscible organic solvent, methanol, on the structure and activity of halophilic β-lactamase derived from Chromohalobacter sp.560 (HaBla), were investigated by means of circular dichroism (CD) measurement and enzymatic activity determination. Beta-lactamase activity was enhanced about 1.2-fold in the presence of 10-20% methanol. CD measurement of HaBla revealed different structures depending on the methanol concentration: native-like active form (Form I) in 10-20% methanol and methanol-induced inactive form at higher concentration (Form II in 40-60% and Form III in 75-80% methanol). Incubation of HaBla with 40% methanol led to the complete loss of activity within ~80 min accompanied by the formation of Form II, whose activity was recovered promptly up to ~80% of full activity upon dilution of the methanol concentration to 10%. In addition, when the protein concentration was sufficiently high (e.g., 0.7 mg/ml), HaBla activity of Form III in 75% methanol could be recovered in the same way (with slightly slower recovery rate), upon dilution of the methanol concentration. In contrast, non-halophilic β-lactamase from Escherichia coli K12 strain MG1655 (EcBla) was irreversibly denatured in the presence of 40% methanol. HaBla showed remarkable ability to renature from the methanol-induced inactive states.

  15. Large-scale identification of N-terminal peptides in the halophilic archaea Halobacterium salinarum and Natronomonas pharaonis.

    PubMed

    Aivaliotis, Michalis; Gevaert, Kris; Falb, Michaela; Tebbe, Andreas; Konstantinidis, Kosta; Bisle, Birgit; Klein, Christian; Martens, Lennart; Staes, An; Timmerman, Evy; Van Damme, Jozef; Siedler, Frank; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2007-06-01

    Characterization of protein N-terminal peptides supports the quality assessment of data derived from genomic sequences (e.g., the correct assignment of start codons) and hints to in vivo N-terminal modifications such as N-terminal acetylation and removal of the initiator methionine. The current work represents the first large-scale identification of N-terminal peptides from prokaryotes, of the two halophilic euryarchaeota Halobacterium salinarum and Natronomonas pharaonis. Two methods were used that specifically allow the characterization of protein N-terminal peptides: combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) and strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), both known to enrich for N-terminally blocked peptides. In addition to these specific methods, N-terminal peptide identifications were extracted from our previous genome-wide proteomic data. Combining all data, 606 N-terminal peptides from Hbt. salinarum and 328 from Nmn. pharaonis were reliably identified. These results constitute the largest available dataset holding identified and characterized protein N-termini for prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria). They allowed the validation/improvement of start codon assignments as automatic gene finders tend to misassign start codons for GC-rich genomes. In addition, the dataset allowed unravelling N-terminal protein maturation in archaea, showing that 60% of the proteins undergo methionine cleavage and that-in contrast to current knowledge-Nalpha-acetylation is common in the archaeal domain of life with 13-18% of the proteins being Nalpha-acetylated. The protein sets described in this paper are available by FTP and might be used as reference sets to test the performance of new gene finders.

  16. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  17. Novel green sulfur bacteria phylotypes detected in saline environments: ecophysiological characters versus phylogenetic taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Vila, Xavier; Abella, Charles A

    2010-05-01

    The taxonomic significance of salt tolerance or requirements in green sulfur bacteria has been analyzed with environmental populations and enrichment cultures from several saline systems (inland and coastal water bodies) with different salinities (salt composition and concentration). Novel phylotypes of green sulfur bacteria have been found in hypersaline and brackish environments and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated them into phylogenetic groups in which neither halotolerant nor halophilic species have been known to date. Therefore, salt tolerance does not seem to be restricted to members of any specific subgroup but is widespread among all the different phylogenetic branches of the green sulfur bacteria group, and closely-related phylotypes can have dissimilar salt tolerance capacities. Thus the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic structure of the green sulfur bacteria present some incongruities. Phenotypic traits should be studied further in order to determine the ecophysiological features of green sulfur bacteria phylotypes.

  18. Ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine accumulation in the halophile Virgibacillus halodenitrificans PDB-F2 in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ping; Li, Hui; Yu, Yunjiang; Gu, Jidong; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-08-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Virgibacillus halodenitrificans PDB-F2 copes with salinity by synthesizing or taking up compatible solutes. The main compatible solutes in this strain were ectoine and hydroxyectoine, as determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that ectoine was the major solute that was synthesized in response to elevated salinity, while hydroxyectoine was a minor solute. However, the hydroxyectoine/ectoine ratio increased from 0.04 at 3 % NaCl to 0.45 at 15 % NaCl in the late exponential growth phase. A cluster of ectoine biosynthesis genes was identified, including three genes in the order of ectA, ectB, and ectC. The hydroxyectoine biosynthesis gene ectD was not part of the ectABC gene cluster. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reactions (RT-qPCR) showed that the expression of the ect genes was salinity dependent. The expression of ectABC reached a maximum at 12 % NaCl, while ectD expression increased up to 15 % NaCl. Ectoine and hydroxyectoine production was growth phase dependent. The hydroxyectoine/ectoine ratio increased from 0.018 in the early exponential phase to 0.11 in the stationary phase at 5 % NaCl. Hydroxyectoine biosynthesis started much later than ectoine biosynthesis after osmotic shock, and the temporal expression of the ect genes differed under these conditions, with the ectABC genes being expressed first, followed by ectD gene. Increased culture salinity triggered ectoine or hydroxyectoine uptake when they were added to the medium. Hydroxyectoine was accumulated preferentially when both ectoine and hydroxyectoine were provided exogenously.

  19. Bounagaea algeriensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic actinobacterium isolated from a Saharan soil of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Mokrane, Salim; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2015-08-01

    A novel halophilic actinobacterium strain, designated H8(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil sample collected in El-Goléa, South Algeria. Strain H8(T) was identified as representing a new genus using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain H8(T) shared the highest degree of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with 'Mzabimyces algeriensis' DSM 46680(T) (93.0 %), Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis DSM 45606(T) (91.2 %), Halopolyspora alba DSM 45976(T) (90.8 %) and Actinopolyspora mortivallis DSM 44261(T) (90.0 %). The strain was found to grow optimally at 28-35 °C, at pH 6.0-7.0, and in the presence of 15-25 % (w/v) NaCl. The substrate mycelium was observed to be well developed and fragmented in liquid medium and on solid medium. The aerial mycelium was observed to be moderately abundant and to form long chains with non-motile, smooth-surfaced and ovoid or spherical spores at maturity. The cell wall of strain H8(T) was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid. The whole-cell hydrolysates were found to mainly contain arabinose and galactose. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine, and MK-9(H4), MK-9(H2) and MK-10(H2) were found to be the predominant menaquinones. The major cellular fatty acids were determined to be anteiso-C17:0 and iso-C15:0. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain H8(T) was determined to be 71.3 mol%. The genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the strain represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Bounagaea algeriensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain H8(T) (=DSM 45966(T) = CECT 8470(T)).

  20. Approach toward enhancement of halophilic protease production by Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 using statistical design response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chuprom, Julalak; Bovornreungroj, Preeyanuch; Ahmad, Mehraj; Kantachote, Duangporn; Dueramae, Sawitree

    2016-06-01

    A new potent halophilic protease producer, Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 was isolated from salt-fermented fish samples (budu) and identified by phenotypic analysis, and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Thereafter, sequential statistical strategy was used to optimize halophilic protease production from Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 by shake-flask fermentation. The classical one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) approach determined gelatin was the best nitrogen source. Based on Plackett-Burman (PB) experimental design; gelatin, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl and pH significantly influenced the halophilic protease production. Central composite design (CCD) determined the optimum level of medium components. Subsequently, an 8.78-fold increase in corresponding halophilic protease yield (156.22 U/mL) was obtained, compared with that produced in the original medium (17.80 U/mL). Validation experiments proved the adequacy and accuracy of model, and the results showed the predicted value agreed well with the experimental values. An overall 13-fold increase in halophilic protease yield was achieved using a 3 L laboratory fermenter and optimized medium (231.33 U/mL).

  1. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Virgibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from human gut

    PubMed Central

    Khelaifia, S.; Croce, O.; Lagier, J.-C.; Robert, C.; Couderc, C.; Di Pinto, F.; Davoust, B.; Djossou, F.; Raoult, D.; Fournier, P.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Strain Vm-5T was isolated from the stool specimen of a 10-year-old Amazonian boy. This bacterium is a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic rod, motile by a polar flagellum. Here we describe its phenotypic characteristics and complete genome sequence. The 4 353 177 bp long genome exhibits a G + C content of 36.87% and contains 4394 protein-coding and 125 predicted RNA genes. Phylogenetically and genetically, strain Vm-c is a member of the genus Virgibacillus but is distinct enough to be classified as a new species. We propose the creation of V. massiliensis sp. nov., whose type strain is strain Vm-5T (CSUR P971 = DSM 28587). PMID:26649181

  2. Statistical Optimization of the Production of NaCl-Tolerant Proteases by a Moderate Halophile, Virgibacillus sp. SK37

    PubMed Central

    Sinsuwan, Sornchai; Jangchud, Anuvat; Rodtong, Sureelak; Roytrakul, Sittirak

    2015-01-01

    Summary The objectives of this study are to optimize the conditions for providing high yield of NaCl-tolerant extracellular protease from Virgibacillus sp. SK37 based on a fish-based medium and to investigate the effects of the key factors (mass per volume ratios of dried anchovy, yeast extract and NaCl, and initial pH of the medium) on the secretion pattern of proteases. Based on the predicted response model, the optimized medium contained 1.81% of dried anchovy, 0.33% of yeast extract and 1.25% of NaCl at pH=7.8. Under these conditions, a 5.3-fold increase in protease production was achieved, compared with the broth containing only 1.2% of dried anchovy (5% of NaCl at pH=7). The cubic regression adequately described the protease production. Protease activity was determined using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) on the synthetic substrate (Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-AMC). Proteases of molecular masses of 19, 34, 35 and 44 kDa were secreted in the presence of NaCl, whereas those of 22 and 42 kDa were the main proteases detected in the absence of NaCl. In addition, no secreted proteases were detected when initial pH of the medium was pH=6. The peptide mass fingerprint of the medium cultured with 10% NaCl showed a higher abundance of peptides with lower mass of 500–1000 m/z compared with the medium containing 0% NaCl, indicating the higher proteolytic activity of the high-salt medium. The Virgibacillus sp. SK37 proteases showed a marked preference towards Lys, Arg and Tyr in the presence of NaCl and towards Lys and Arg in the absence of NaCl. PMID:27904342

  3. Degradation of corn stover by fungal cellulase cocktail for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by moderate halophile Paracoccus sp. LL1.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Shailesh S; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Kim, Beom Soo

    2015-10-01

    Bioprocessing of lignocellulose as a renewable resource for fuels, chemicals or value added products is a necessity to fulfil demands of petroleum products. This study aims to convert corn stover to polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Corn stover was hydrolyzed to crude sugars by an on-site prepared cellulase cocktail from co-culture of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger. The potent PHA producer, Paracoccus sp. LL1, was isolated from Lonar Lake, India and could accumulate PHA up to 72.4% of its dry cell weight. PHA production reached 9.71 g/L from corn stover hydrolysate containing 40 g/L sugar mixture. The PHA synthase gene (phaC) sequence of the isolate showed 79% identity with the phaC gene of Paracoccus seriniphilus (E71) strain from the NCBI database. The nature/type of PHA was found to be poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  5. Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov., an endospore-forming, Mn-oxidizing, moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from deep subseafloor basaltic crust.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Jason B; Hoffman, Colleen L; Momper, Lily M; Toner, Brandy M; Amend, Jan P; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-06-01

    A facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain 1MBB1T, was isolated from basaltic breccia collected from 341 m below the seafloor by seafloor drilling of Rigil Guyot during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 330. The cells were straight rods, 0.5 μm wide and 1-3 μm long, that occurred singly and in chains. Strain 1MBB1T stained Gram-positive. Catalase and oxidase were produced. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.5, and could grow with up to 12 % (w/v) NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 40.5 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were C16:1ω11c (26.5 %), anteiso-C15:0 (19.5 %), C16:0 (18.7 %) and iso-C15:0 (10.4 %), and the cell-wall diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Endospores of strain 1MBB1T oxidized Mn(II) to Mn(IV), and siderophore production by vegetative cells was positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain 1MBB1T was a member of the family Bacillaceae, with Bacillus foraminis CV53T and Bacillus novalis LMG 21837T being the closest phylogenetic neighbours (96.5 and 96.2 % similarity, respectively). This is the first novel species described from deep subseafloor basaltic crust. On the basis of our polyphasic analysis, we conclude that strain 1MBB1T represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which we propose the name Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov. The type strain is 1MBB1T ( = NCMA B78T = LMG 28275T).

  6. Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) With Halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Takenaka, Y.; Ohnuki, T.; Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    Halophiles live in high ionic strength brine. The mechanisms of metal association with these microorganisms are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the distribution of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on halophiles, Halomonas sp. (WIPP1A) which was isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository in Carlsbad, US., Halomonas elongata (ATCC33173), Halobacterium salinarum (ATCC19700), and Halobacterium halobium (ATCC43214) and examined the coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The cells of Halomonas sp. and H. elongata were grown in media containing 10 - 15 w/v% and 3.5 - 30 w/v% NaCl, respectively. Halobacterium salinarum and H. halobium were grown in media containing 25 w/v% NaCl. The logarithmic distribution coefficient (log Kd) was measured by using the cells at the late exponential phase. After washing the cells with the same concentrations of NaCl, the cells were mixed with 1x10-6 mol dm-3 Eu(III) and 1x10-8 mol dm-3 Cm(III) at pH 5 in the same concentrations of NaCl and log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) was determined. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd was determined as a function of NaCl concentrations. The coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on the cells was estimated by TRLFS. For TRLFS measurements, samples were prepared by adding cells to a solution of 1x10-3 mol dm-3 Eu(III) with the same concentrations of NaCl as the culture media. For Halomonas sp. and H. elongata, log Kd of Cm(III) was apparently larger than that of Eu(III) at all the NaCl concentrations examined. On the other hand, log Kd of Eu(III) and Cm(III) for H. salinarum and H. halobium was almost identical. Our previous study demonstrated that non-halophiles, Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas fluorescens show no preferences between these elements. Chemical properties of Eu(III) and Cm(III) are almost identical. Our findings suggest that the difference in log Kd

  7. Effects of salts on activity of halophilic cellulase with glucomannanase activity isolated from alkaliphilic and halophilic Bacillus sp. BG-CS10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guimin; Li, Shunyi; Xue, Yanfen; Mao, Liangwei; Ma, Yanhe

    2012-01-01

    Alkaliphilic and halophilic Bacillus sp. BG-CS10 was isolated from Zabuye Salt Lake, Tibet. The gene celB, encoding a halophilic cellulase was identified from the genomic library of BG-CS10. CelB belongs to the cellulase superfamily and DUF291 superfamily, with an unknown function domain and less than 58% identity to other cellulases in GenBank. The purified recombinant protein (molecular weight: 62 kDa) can hydrolyze soluble cellulose substrates containing beta-1,4-linkages, such as carboxylmethyl cellulose and konjac glucomannan, but has no exoglucanase and β-glucosidase activities. Thus, CelB is a cellulase with an endo mode of action and glucomannanase activity. Interestingly, the enzyme activity was increased approximately tenfold with 2.5 M NaCl or 3 M KCl. Furthermore, the optimal temperatures were 55°C with 2.5 M NaCl and 35°C without NaCl, respectively. This indicates that NaCl can improve enzyme thermostability. The K ( m ) and k (cat) values of CelB for CMC with 2.5 M NaCl were 3.18 mg mL(-1) and 26 s(-1), while the K ( m ) and k (cat) values of CelB without NaCl were 6.6 mg mL(-1) and 2.1 s(-1). Thus, this thermo-stable, salt and pH-tolerant cellulase is a promising candidate for industrial applications, and provides a new model to study salt effects on the structure of protein.

  8. An Archaeal Chromosomal Autonomously Replicating Sequence Element from an Extreme Halophile, Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1

    PubMed Central

    Berquist, Brian R.; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2003-01-01

    We report on the identification and first cloning of an autonomously replicating sequence element from the chromosome of an archaeon, the extreme halophile Halobacterium strain NRC-1. The putative replication origin was identified by association with the orc7 gene and replication ability in the host strain, demonstrated by cloning into a nonreplicating plasmid. Deletion analysis showed that sequences located up to 750 bp upstream of the orc7 gene translational start, plus the orc7 gene and 50 bp downstream, are sufficient to endow the plasmid with replication ability, as judged by expression of a plasmid-encoded mevinolin resistance selectable marker and plasmid recovery after transformation. Sequences located proximal to the two other chromosomally carried haloarchaeal orc genes (orc6 and orc8) are not able to promote efficient autonomous replication. Located within the 750-bp region upstream of orc7 is a nearly perfect inverted repeat of 31 bp, which flanks an extremely AT-rich (44%) stretch of 189 bp. The replication ability of the plasmid was lost when one copy of the inverted repeat was deleted. Additionally, the inverted repeat structure near orc7 homologs in the genomic sequences of two other halophiles, Haloarcula marismortui and Haloferax volcanii, is highly conserved. Our results indicate that, in halophilic archaea, a chromosomal origin of replication is physically linked to orc7 homologs and that this element is sufficient to promote autonomous replication. We discuss the finding of a functional haloarchaeal origin in relation to the large number of orc1-cdc6 homologs identified in the genomes of all haloarchaea to date. PMID:14526006

  9. Evolutionary and Biotechnological Implications of Robust Hydrogenase Activity in Halophilic Strains of Tetraselmis

    PubMed Central

    D'Adamo, Sarah; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Brown, Susan L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Peters, John W.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water algae (e.g. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), relatively few studies have focused on H2 production and hydrogenase adaptations in marine or halophilic algae. Salt water organisms likely offer several advantages for biotechnological H2 production due to the global abundance of salt water, decreased H2 and O2 solubility in saline and hypersaline systems, and the ability of extracellular NaCl levels to influence metabolism. We screened unialgal isolates obtained from hypersaline ecosystems in the southwest United States and identified two distinct halophilic strains of the genus Tetraselmis (GSL1 and QNM1) that exhibit both robust fermentative and photo H2-production activities. The influence of salinity (3.5%, 5.5% and 7.0% w/v NaCl) on H2 production was examined during anoxic acclimation, with the greatest in vivo H2-production rates observed at 7.0% NaCl. These Tetraselmis strains maintain robust hydrogenase activity even after 24 h of anoxic acclimation and show increased hydrogenase activity relative to C. reinhardtii after extended anoxia. Transcriptional analysis of Tetraselmis GSL1 enabled sequencing of the cDNA encoding the FeFe-hydrogenase structural enzyme (HYDA) and its maturation proteins (HYDE, HYDEF and HYDG). In contrast to freshwater Chlorophyceae, the halophilic Tetraselmis GSL1 strain likely encodes a single HYDA and two copies of HYDE, one of which is fused to HYDF. Phylogenetic analyses of HYDA and concatenated HYDA, HYDE, HYDF and HYDG in Tetraselmis GSL1 fill existing knowledge gaps in the evolution of algal hydrogenases and indicate that the algal hydrogenases sequenced to date are derived from a common ancestor. This is consistent with recent hypotheses that suggest fermentative metabolism in the majority of eukaryotes is derived from a common base set of enzymes that emerged early in eukaryotic evolution with subsequent losses in some organisms. PMID

  10. Characterization of three spiral-shaped purple nonsulfur bacteria isolated from coastal lagoon sediments, saline sulfur springs, and microbial mats: emended description of the genus Roseospira and description of Roseospira marina sp. nov., Roseospira navarrensis sp. nov., and Roseospira thiosulfatophila sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Guyoneaud, Rémy; Mouné, Sophie; Eatock, Claire; Bothorel, Virginie; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Willison, John; Duran, Robert; Liesack, Werner; Herbert, Rodney; Matheron, Robert; Caumette, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Three new spirilloid phototrophic purple nonsulfur bacteria were isolated in pure culture from three different environments: strain CE2105 from a brackish lagoon in the Arcachon Bay (Atlantic coast, France), strain SE3104 from a saline sulfur spring in the Pyrenees (Navarra, Spain), and strain AT2115 a microbial mat (Tetiaroa Atoll, Society Islands). Single cells of the three strains were spiral-shaped and highly motile. Their intracellular photosynthetic membranes were of the vesicular type. Bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the normal spirilloxanthin series were present as photosynthetic pigments. Optimal growth occurred under photoheterotrophic conditions and in the presence of 0.5-4% w/v NaCl. These features are similar to those described for Roseospira mediosalina. Comparative sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes placed these strains within the alpha-subclass of Proteobacteria, in a cluster together with Roseospira mediosalina and Rhodospira trueperi. They form a closely related group of slightly to moderately halophilic spiral-shaped purple nonsulfur bacteria.However, the three new isolates exhibited some differences in their physiology and genetic characteristics. Consequently, we propose that they are members of three new species within the genus Roseospira, Roseospira marina sp. nov., Roseospira navarrensis sp. nov., and Roseospira thiosulfatophila sp. nov., with strains CE2105, SE3104, and AT2115 as the type strains, respectively. As a consequence, an emended description of the genus Roseospira is also given.

  11. Studies of a Halophilic NADH Dehydrogenase. 1: Purification and Properties of the Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    1973-01-01

    An NADH dehydrogenase obtained from an extremely halophilic bacterium was purified 570-fold by a combination of gel filtration, chromatography on hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography on QAE-Sephadex. The purified enzyme appeared to be FAD-linked and bad an apparent molecular weight of 64000. Even though enzyme activity was stimulated by NaCl, considerable activity (430 % of the maximum activity observed in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl) was observed in the absence of added NaCl. The enzyme was unstable when incubated in solutions of low ionic strength. The presence of NADH enhanced the stability of the enzyme.

  12. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  13. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  14. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  15. Spherical particles of halophilic archaea correlate with exposure to low water activity--implications for microbial survival in fluid inclusions of ancient halite.

    PubMed

    Fendrihan, S; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M; Gerbl, F W; Holzinger, A; Grösbacher, M; Briza, P; Erler, A; Gruber, C; Plätzer, K; Stan-Lotter, H

    2012-09-01

    Viable extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) have been isolated from million-year-old salt deposits around the world; however, an explanation of their supposed longevity remains a fundamental challenge. Recently small roundish particles in fluid inclusions of 22 000- to 34 000-year-old halite were identified as haloarchaea capable of proliferation (Schubert BA, Lowenstein TK, Timofeeff MN, Parker MA, 2010, Environmental Microbiology, 12, 440-454). Searching for a method to produce such particles in the laboratory, we exposed rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium species to reduced external water activity (a(w)). Gradual formation of spheres of about 0.4 μm diameter occurred in 4 M NaCl buffer of a(w) ≤ 0.75, but exposure to buffered 4 M LiCl (a(w) ≤ 0.73) split cells into spheres within seconds, with concomitant release of several proteins. From one rod, three or four spheres emerged, which re-grew to normal rods in nutrient media. Biochemical properties of rods and spheres were similar, except for a markedly reduced ATP content (about 50-fold) and an increased lag phase of spheres, as is known from dormant bacteria. The presence of viable particles of similar sizes in ancient fluid inclusions suggested that spheres might represent dormant states of haloarchaea. The easy production of spheres by lowering a(w) should facilitate their investigation and could help to understand the mechanisms for microbial survival over geological times.

  16. The freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum transformed with ApGSMT-DMT exhibited enhanced salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity, but became halophilic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meenakshi; Sharma, Naveen K; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Rai, Ashwani K

    2013-03-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmolyte synthesized in response to different abiotic stresses, including salinity. The two known pathways of GB synthesis involve: 1) two step oxidation of choline (choline → betaine aldehyde → GB), generally found in plants, microbes and animals; and 2) three step methylation of glycine (glycine → sarcosine → dimethylglycine → GB), mainly found in halophilic archaea, sulphur bacteria and the cyanobacterium Aphanothece (Ap.) halophytica. Here, we transformed a salt-sensitive freshwater diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (An.) doliolum with N-methyltransferase genes (ApGSMT-DMT) from Ap. halophytica using the triparental conjugation method. The transformed An. doliolum synthesized and accumulated GB in cells, and showed increased salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity. The salt responsiveness of the transformant was also apparent as GB synthesis increased with increasing concentrations of NaCl in the nutrient solution, and maximal [12.92 µmol (g dry weight)(-1)] in cells growing at 0.5 M NaCl. Therefore, the transformed cyanobacterium has changed its behaviour from preferring freshwater to halophily. This study may have important biotechnological implications for the development of stress tolerant nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria as biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture.

  17. High quality draft genome sequence of the slightly halophilic bacterium Halomonas zhanjiangensis type strain JSM 078169(T) (DSM 21076(T)) from a sea urchin in southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Li, Rui; Gao, Xiao-Yang; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Haynes, Matthew; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N; Rohde, Manfred; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tindall, Brian J; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-06-15

    Halomonas zhanjiangensis Chen et al. 2009 is a member of the genus Halomonas, family Halomonadaceae, class Gammaproteobacteria. Representatives of the genus Halomonas are a group of halophilic bacteria often isolated from salty environments. The type strain H. zhanjiangensis JSM 078169(T) was isolated from a sea urchin (Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus) collected from the South China Sea. The genome of strain JSM 078169(T) is the fourteenth sequenced genome in the genus Halomonas and the fifteenth in the family Halomonadaceae. The other thirteen genomes from the genus Halomonas are H. halocynthiae, H. venusta, H. alkaliphila, H. lutea, H. anticariensis, H. jeotgali, H. titanicae, H. desiderata, H. smyrnensis, H. salifodinae, H. boliviensis, H. elongata and H stevensii. Here, we describe the features of strain JSM 078169(T), together with the complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 21076(T). The 4,060,520 bp long draft genome consists of 17 scaffolds with the 3,659 protein-coding and 80 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  18. Manual annotation, transcriptional analysis, and protein expression studies reveal novel genes in the agl cluster responsible for N glycosylation in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-05-01

    While Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea are all capable of protein N glycosylation, the archaeal version of this posttranslational modification is the least understood. To redress this imbalance, recent studies of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii have identified a gene cluster encoding the Agl proteins involved in the assembly and attachment of a pentasaccharide to select Asn residues of the surface layer glycoprotein in this species. However, because the automated tools used for rapid annotation of genome sequences, including that of H. volcanii, are not always accurate, a reannotation of the agl cluster was undertaken in order to discover genes not previously recognized. In the present report, reanalysis of the gene cluster that includes aglB, aglE, aglF, aglG, aglI, and aglJ, which are known components of the H. volcanii protein N-glycosylation machinery, was undertaken. Using computer-based tools or visual inspection, together with transcriptional analysis and protein expression approaches, genes encoding AglP, AglQ, and AglR are now described.

  19. Spherical particles of halophilic archaea correlate with exposure to low water activity – implications for microbial survival in fluid inclusions of ancient halite

    PubMed Central

    Fendrihan, S; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M; Gerbl, F W; Holzinger, A; Grösbacher, M; Briza, P; Erler, A; Gruber, C; Plätzer, K; Stan-Lotter, H

    2012-01-01

    Viable extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) have been isolated from million-year-old salt deposits around the world; however, an explanation of their supposed longevity remains a fundamental challenge. Recently small roundish particles in fluid inclusions of 22 000- to 34 000-year-old halite were identified as haloarchaea capable of proliferation (Schubert BA, Lowenstein TK, Timofeeff MN, Parker MA, 2010, Environmental Microbiology, 12, 440–454). Searching for a method to produce such particles in the laboratory, we exposed rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium species to reduced external water activity (aw). Gradual formation of spheres of about 0.4 μm diameter occurred in 4 m NaCl buffer of aw ≤ 0.75, but exposure to buffered 4 m LiCl (aw ≤ 0.73) split cells into spheres within seconds, with concomitant release of several proteins. From one rod, three or four spheres emerged, which re-grew to normal rods in nutrient media. Biochemical properties of rods and spheres were similar, except for a markedly reduced ATP content (about 50-fold) and an increased lag phase of spheres, as is known from dormant bacteria. The presence of viable particles of similar sizes in ancient fluid inclusions suggested that spheres might represent dormant states of haloarchaea. The easy production of spheres by lowering aw should facilitate their investigation and could help to understand the mechanisms for microbial survival over geological times. PMID:22804926

  20. High quality draft genome sequence of the slightly halophilic bacterium Halomonas zhanjiangensis type strain JSM 078169T (DSM 21076T) from a sea urchin in southern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Li, Rui; Gao, Xiao-Yang; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Haynes, Matthew; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Rohde, Manfred; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tindall, Brian J.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Halomonas zhanjiangensis Chen et al. 2009 is a member of the genus Halomonas, family Halomonadaceae, class Gammaproteobacteria. Representatives of the genus Halomonas are a group of halophilic bacteria often isolated from salty environments. The type strain H. zhanjiangensis JSM 078169T was isolated from a sea urchin (Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus) collected from the South China Sea. The genome of strain JSM 078169T is the fourteenth sequenced genome in the genus Halomonas and the fifteenth in the family Halomonadaceae. The other thirteen genomes from the genus Halomonas are H. halocynthiae, H. venusta, H. alkaliphila, H. lutea, H. anticariensis, H. jeotgali, H. titanicae, H. desiderata, H. smyrnensis, H. salifodinae, H. boliviensis, H. elongata and H stevensii. Here, we describe the features of strain JSM 078169T, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 21076T. The 4,060,520 bp long draft genome consists of 17 scaffolds with the 3,659 protein-coding and 80 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project. PMID:25197480

  1. Analysis of Carotenoid Production by Halorubrum sp. TBZ126; an Extremely Halophilic Archeon from Urmia Lake

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Davood; Hamidi, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Salar; Tarhriz, Vahideh; Maleki Zanjani, Bahram; Nazemyieh, Hossein; Hejazi, Mohammd Amin; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotenoids are of great interest in many scientific disciplines because of their wide distribution, diverse functions and interesting properties. The present report describes a new natural source for carotenoid production. Methods: Halorubrum sp., TBZ126, an extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from Urmia Lack following culture of water sample on marine agar medium and incubation at 30 °C. Then single colonies were cultivated in broth media. After that the cells were collected and carotenoids were extracted with acetone-methanol (7:3 v/v). The identification of carotenoids was performed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) in the presence of antimony pentachloride (SbCl5). The production profile was analyzed using liquid-chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) techniques. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolate were carried out and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: LC-MS analytical results revealed that produced carotenoids are bacterioruberin, lycopene and β-carotene. Bacterioruberin was found to be the predominant produced carotenoid. 16S rRNA analysis showed that TBZ126 has 100% similarity with Halorubrum chaoviator Halo-G*T (AM048786). Conclusion: Halorubrum sp. TBZ126, isolated from Urmia Lake has high capacity in the production of carotenoids. This extremely halophilic archaeon could be considered as a prokaryotic candidate for carotenoid production source for future studies. PMID:24409411

  2. Characterization and antimicrobial potential of extremely halophilic archaea isolated from hypersaline environments of the Algerian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Inès; Hassani, Imene Ikrame; l'Haridon, Stéphane; Chalopin, Morgane; Hacène, Hocine; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic archaea were isolated from different chotts and sebkha, dry salt lakes and salt flat respectively, of the Algerian Sahara and characterized using phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. From 102 extremely halophilic strains isolated, forty three were selected and studied. These strains were also screened for their antagonistic potential and the production of hydrolytic enzymes. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis allowed the identification of 10 archaeal genera within the class Halobacteria: Natrinema (13 strains), Natrialba (12 strains), Haloarcula (4 strains), Halopiger (4 strains), Haloterrigena (3 strains), Halorubrum (2 strains), Halostagnicola (2 strains), Natronococcus, Halogeometricum and Haloferax (1 strain each). The most common producers of antimicrobial compounds belong to the genus Natrinema while the most hydrolytic isolates, with combined production of several enzymes, belong to the genus Natrialba. The strain affiliated to Halopiger djelfamassilliensis was found to produce some substances of interest (halocins, anti-Candida, enzymes). After partial purification and characterization of one of the strains Natrinema gari QI1, we found similarities between the antimicrobial compound and the halocin C8. Therefore, the gene encoding halocin C8 was amplified and sequenced.

  3. Analysis of protein solvent interactions in glucose dehydrogenase from the extreme halophile Haloferax mediterranei

    PubMed Central

    Britton, K. Linda; Baker, Patrick J.; Fisher, Martin; Ruzheinikov, Sergey; Gilmour, D. James; Bonete, María-José; Ferrer, Juan; Pire, Carmen; Esclapez, Julia; Rice, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of glucose dehydrogenase from the extreme halophile Haloferax mediterranei has been solved at 1.6-Å resolution under crystallization conditions which closely mimic the “in vivo” intracellular environment. The decoration of the enzyme’s surface with acidic residues is only partially neutralized by bound potassium counterions, which also appear to play a role in substrate binding. The surface shows the expected reduction in hydrophobic character, surprisingly not from changes associated with the loss of exposed hydrophobic residues but rather arising from a loss of lysines consistent with the genome wide-reduction of this residue in extreme halophiles. The structure reveals a highly ordered, multilayered solvation shell that can be seen to be organized into one dominant network covering much of the exposed surface accessible area to an extent not seen in almost any other protein structure solved. This finding is consistent with the requirement of the enzyme to form a protective shell in a dehydrating environment. PMID:16551747

  4. Culturable diversity of aerobic halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae) from hypersaline, meromictic Transylvanian lakes.

    PubMed

    Baricz, Andreea; Cristea, Adorján; Muntean, Vasile; Teodosiu, Gabriela; Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Molnár, Imola; Alexe, Mircea; Rakosy-Tican, Elena; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-03-01

    Perennially stratified salt lakes situated in the Transylvanian Basin (Central Romania) were surveyed for the diversity of culturable halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae). The physical and chemical characteristics of the waters indicated that all the investigated lakes were meromictic and neutral hypersaline. Samples collected from upper, intermediate, and deeper water layers and sediments were used for the isolation of halophilic strains followed by 16S rRNA gene-based identification and phenotypic characterization. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all 191 isolates reported in this study and 43 strains previously isolated were affiliated with the family Halobacteriaceae and classified to 18 genera. Haloferax was the most frequently isolated genus (~47 %), followed by Halobacterium spp. (~12 %), and Halorubrum spp. (~11 %). Highest culturable diversity was detected in Brâncoveanu Lake, the oldest and saltiest of all studied lakes, while the opposite was observed in the most stable and least human-impacted Fără Fund Lake. One strain from Ursu Lake might possibly constitute a novel Halorubrum species as shown by phylogenetic analysis. Several haloarchaeal taxa recently described in Asian (i.e., Iran, China) saline systems were also identified as inhabiting the Transylvanian salt lakes thus expanding our knowledege on the geographic distribution of Halobacteriaceae.

  5. Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase: a key enzyme in the assimilation of starch by the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Vanesa; Esclapez, Julia; Pérez-Pomares, Francisco; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Camacho, Mónica; Bonete, María José

    2012-01-01

    A cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase, EC 2.4.1.19) was successfully isolated and characterized from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei. The enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 77 kDa and optimum activity at 55°C, pH 7.5 and 1.5 M NaCl. The enzyme displayed many activities related to the degradation and transformation of starch. Cyclization was found to be the predominant activity, yielding a mixture of cyclodextrins, mainly α-CD, followed by hydrolysis and to a lesser extent coupling and disproportionation activities. Gene encoding H. mediterranei CGTase was cloned and heterologously overexpressed. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 2142 bp that encodes a protein of 713 amino acids. The amino acid sequence displayed high homology with those belonging to the α-amylase family. The CGTase is secreted to the extracellular medium by the Tat pathway. Upstream of the CGTase gene, four maltose ABC transporter genes have been sequenced (malE, malF, malG, malK). The expression of the CGTase gene yielded a fully active CGTase with similar kinetic behavior to the wild-type enzyme. The H. mediterranei CGTase is the first halophilic archaeal CGTase characterized, sequenced and expressed.

  6. [An efficient genetic knockout system based on linear DNA fragment homologous recombination for halophilic archaea].

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Wang; Chuang, Jiang; Jianhua, Liu; Xipeng, Liu

    2015-04-01

    With the development of functional genomics, gene-knockout is becoming an important tool to elucidate gene functions in vivo. As a good model strain for archaeal genetics, Haloferax volcanii has received more attention. Although several genetic manipulation systems have been developed for some halophilic archaea, it is time-consuming because of the low percentage of positive clones during the second-recombination selection. These classical gene knockout methods are based on DNA recombination between the genomic homologous sequence and the circular suicide plasmid, which carries a pyrE selection marker and two DNA fragments homologous to the upstream and downstream fragments of the target gene. Many wild-type clones are obtained through a reverse recombination between the plasmid and genome in the classic gene knockout method. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient gene knockout system to increase the positive clone percentage. Here we report an improved gene knockout method using a linear DNA cassette consisting of upstream and downstream homologous fragments, and the pyrE marker. Gene deletions were subsequently detected by colony PCR analysis. We determined the efficiency of our knockout method by deleting the xpb2 gene from the H. volcanii genome, with the percentage of positive clones higher than 50%. Our method provides an efficient gene knockout strategy for halophilic archaea.

  7. Halophilic archaea on Earth and in space: growth and survival under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-13

    Salts are abundant on Mars, and any liquid water that is present or may have been present on the planet is expected to be hypersaline. Halophilic archaea (family Halobacteriaceae) are the microorganisms best adapted to life at extremes of salinity on Earth. This paper reviews the properties of the Halobacteriaceae that may make the group good candidates for life also on Mars. Many species resist high UV and gamma radiation levels; one species has survived exposure to vacuum and radiation during a space flight; and there is at least one psychrotolerant species. Halophilic archaea may survive for millions of years within brine inclusions in salt crystals. Many species have different modes of anaerobic metabolism, and some can use light as an energy source using the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. They are also highly tolerant to perchlorate, recently shown to be present in Martian soils, and some species can even use perchlorate as an electron acceptor to support anaerobic growth. The presence of characteristic carotenoid pigments (α-bacterioruberin and derivatives) makes the Halobacteriaceae easy to identify by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, if present on Mars, such organisms may be detected by Raman instrumentation planned to explore Mars during the upcoming ExoMars mission.

  8. Characterisation and purification of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from heterotrophically grown halophilic archaebacterium, Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, R; Altekar, W

    1994-04-15

    The CO2-fixing enzyme of Calvin cycle ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase has been isolated from a halophilic bacterium, Haloferax mediterranei grown heterotrophically. A homogeneous preparation was obtained from sonicated extract of the cells by three steps, resulting in a specific activity of 52 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1. The physicochemical and catalytic properties of the enzyme were studied. The halobacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase is an oligomer of 54-kDa and 14-kDa subunits as detected by SDS/PAGE. By sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated as approximately 500 kDa indicating a hexadecameric nature. No evidence for an additional form of the enzyme devoid of small subunits was obtained. The enzyme required Mg2+ for activity, KCl for activity and stability, and an optimal pH of 7.8. In contrast to many halophilic proteins, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from H. mediterranei is not an acidic protein. From the comparison of amino acid composition of halobacterial enzyme with its counterparts from a few eukaryotic and eubacterial sources, the S delta Q values showed that these proteins share some compositional similarities.

  9. The evolution of energy-transducing systems. Studies with an extremely halophilic archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1992-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of eubacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaebacteria are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution. From studies of members of all three major groups of archaebacteria - the halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles - it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. Amino acid sequences of critical regions of the enzyme were to be determined, as well as immunoreactions of single subunits in the search for common epitopes. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complexes, and possibly deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  10. Transcription-coupled repair of UV damage in the halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Stantial, Nicole; Dumpe, Jarrod; Pietrosimone, Kathryn; Baltazar, Felicia; Crowley, David J

    2016-05-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in which excision repair proteins are targeted to RNA polymerase-arresting lesions located in the transcribed strand of active genes. TCR has been documented in a variety of bacterial and eukaryotic organisms but has yet to be observed in the Archaea. We used Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloferax volcanii to determine if TCR occurs in the halophilic archaea. Following UV irradiation of exponentially growing cultures, we quantified the rate of repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the two strands of the rpoB2B1A1A2 and the trpDFEG operons of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and the pts operon of H. volcanii through the use of a Southern blot assay and strand-specific probes. TCR was observed in all three operons and was dependent on the NER gene uvrA in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, but not in H. volcanii. The halophilic archaea likely employ a novel mechanism for TCR in which an as yet unknown coupling factor recognizes the arrested archaeal RNA polymerase complex and recruits certain NER proteins to complete the process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oren, A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

  12. Endolithic Halophiles Found in Evaporite Salts on Tibet Plateau as a Potential Analog for Martian Life in Saline Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, F. J.; Zheng, M. P.; Wang, A. L.; Ma, N. N.

    2009-03-01

    Mg-sulfates was found within salt deposits of the Da Langtan playa on Tibet plateau, similar as those found on Mars. Halophiles were isolated from the evaporative salts in the environment for analogs of the search for martian life in subsurface.

  13. Phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA identification of culturable non-obligate halophilic bacterial communities from a hypersaline lake, La Sal del Rey, in extreme South Texas (USA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background La Sal del Rey ("the King's Salt") is one of several naturally-occurring salt lakes in Hidalgo County, Texas and is part of the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. The research objective was to isolate and characterize halophilic microorganisms from La Sal del Rey. Water samples were collected from the lake and a small creek that feeds into the lake. Soil samples were collected from land adjacent to the water sample locations. Sample salinity was determined using a refractometer. Samples were diluted and cultured on a synthetic saline medium to grow halophilic bacteria. The density of halophiles was estimated by viable plate counts. A collection of isolates was selected, gram-stained, tested for catalase, and characterized using API 20E® test strips. Isolates were putatively identified by sequencing the 16S rDNA. Carbon source utilization by the microbial community from each sample site was examined using EcoPlate™ assays and the carbon utilization total activity of the community was determined. Results Results showed that salinity ranged from 4 parts per thousand (ppt) at the lake water source to 420 ppt in water samples taken just along the lake shore. The density of halophilic bacteria in water samples ranged from 1.2 × 102 - 5.2 × 103 colony forming units per ml (cfu ml-1) whereas the density in soil samples ranged from 4.0 × 105 - 2.5 × 106 colony forming units per gram (cfu g-1). In general, as salinity increased the density of the bacterial community decreased. Microbial communities from water and soil samples were able to utilize 12 - 31 carbon substrates. The greatest number of substrates utilized was by water-borne communities compared to soil-based communities, especially at lower salinities. The majority of bacteria isolated were gram-negative, catalase-positive, rods. Biochemical profiles constructed from API 20E® test strips showed that bacterial isolates from low-salinity water samples (4 ppt) showed the greatest

  14. Characterization of detergent compatible protease of a halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9: differential role of metal ions in stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

    2013-10-01

    A moderately halophilic protease producer, Bacillus sp. strain isolated from sea water is described. The protease is purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate precipitation and CM cellulose chromatography. The serine protease has a molecular mass of 29 kDa. Enzymatic characterization of protease revealed K(m) 2.22 mg mL(-1), Vmax 1111.11 U mL(-1), pH optimum 9.0, t1/2 190 min at 60°C and salt optima 1% (w/v) NaCl. The protease is remarkably stable in hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents at high concentrations. The purified preparation is unstable at room temperature. Ca(2+) ions are required for preventing this loss of activity. Interestingly, the activity and stability are modulated differentially. Whereas, divalent cation Ca(2+) are involved in maintaining stability in solution at room temperature by preventing unfolding, monovalent Na(+) and K(+) ions participate in regulating the activity and assist in refolding of the enzyme. Application of the protease is shown in efficient removal of blood stain.

  15. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  16. Egicoccus halophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic, alkalitolerant actinobacterium and proposal of Egicoccaceae fam. nov. and Egicoccales ord. nov.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Ji-Yue; Wang, Hong-Fei; Xiao, Min; Yang, Ling-Ling; Guo, Jian-Wei; Zhou, En-Min; Zhang, Yuan-Min; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-02-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, non-motile, moderately halophilic and alkalitolerant actinobacterium, designated EGI 80432T, was isolated from a saline-alkaline soil of Xinjiang province, north-west China. Cells were non-endospore-forming cocci with a diameter of 0.5-0.8 μm. Strain EGI 80432T grew in the presence of 0-9 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum at 3-5 %), and also grew within the pH range 6.0-10.0 (optimum at pH 8.0-9.0) on marine 2216E medium. The peptidoglycan type was A1γ. The whole-cell hydrolysates contained glucose, galactose, mannose and three unknown sugars as major sugars. The predominant menaquinone was MK-9(H4). The major fatty acids were C17 : 1ω8c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c), C18 : 1ω9c and iso-C15 : 0 The polar lipids comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phosphoglycolipid, three unknown phospholipids and four unknown polar lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 75.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain EGI 80432T clustered within the radius of the class Nitriliruptoria. Levels of sequence similarity between strain EGI 80432T and its phylogenetic neighbours Nitriliruptor alkaliphilus ANL-iso2T and Euzebya tangerina F10T were 94.1 and 88.1 %, respectively. Based on morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic analysis, a novel species of a new genus, Egicoccus halophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed, within the new family and new order Egicoccaceae fam. nov. and Egicoccales ord. nov. in the class Nitriliruptoria. The type strain of Egicoccus halophilus is EGI 80432T ( = CGMCC 1.14988T = KCTC 33612T).

  17. Heterologous overexpression of glucose dehydrogenase from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei, an enzyme of the medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase family.

    PubMed

    Pire, C; Esclapez, J; Ferrer, J; Bonete, M J

    2001-06-25

    The first gene encoding a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from a halophilic organism has been sequenced. Amino acid sequence alignments of GDH from Haloferax mediterranei show a high degree of homology with the thermoacidophilic GDHs and with other enzymes from the medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Heterologous overexpression using the mesophilic organism Escherichia coli as the host has been performed and the expression product was obtained as inclusion bodies. To obtain the halophilic enzyme in its native form refolding and reactivation in a saline environment were required. A pure and highly concentrated sample of the enzyme was obtained using a purification procedure based on the protein's halophilicity. This method may be useful as a general procedure for purifying other halophilic proteins from mesophilic hosts.

  18. Light energy transduction by the purple membrane of halophilic bacteria; Proceedings of the Symposium, San Francisco, Calif., June 6, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Several aspects of bacteriorhodopsin, the retinal protein component of the purple membranes of Halobacterium halobium, are discussed. Structural studies are presented. Photochemical properties of the protein complex and of its chromophore are described. Proton translocation of bacteriorhodopsin is compared to that of a protein from a thermophilic bacterium. Ionophore activity of bacteriorhodopsin is considered with attention to conformational changes, light dependency, and electrical potential. Amino acid transport is also examined and the light-energy budget is investigated. Bacteriorhodopsin is of interest because of its similarity to rhodopsin, which plays a major role in mammalian vision, and also because its attainability and distinctive characteristics will facilitate studies of certain bacterial physiological functions, such as ion transport and membrane organization.

  19. Gammasphaerolipovirus, a newly proposed bacteriophage genus, unifies viruses of halophilic archaea and thermophilic bacteria within the novel family Sphaerolipoviridae.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Alice; Rissanen, Ilona; Bamford, Jaana K H; Krupovic, Mart; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2014-06-01

    A new family of viruses named Sphaerolipoviridae has been proposed recently. It comprises icosahedral, tailless haloarchaeal viruses with an internal lipid membrane located between the protein capsid and the dsDNA genome. The proposed family Sphaerolipoviridae was divided into two genera: Alphasphaerolipovirus, including Haloarcula hispanica viruses SH1, PH1 and HHIV-2, and Betasphaerolipovirus, including Natrinema virus SNJ1. Here, we propose to expand the family Sphaerolipoviridae to include a group of bacteriophages infecting extreme thermophilic Thermus thermophilus and sharing a number of structural and genomic properties with archaeal sphaerolipoviruses. This new group comprises two members, lytic phage P23-77 and temperate phage IN93, as well as putative members P23-72 and P23-65H. In addition, several related proviruses have been discovered as integrated elements in bacterial genomes of the families Thermus and Meiothermus. Morphology of the virus particles and the overall capsid architecture of these bacteriophages resembles that of archaeal members of the Sphaerolipoviridae, including an unusual capsid arrangement in a T = 28 dextro lattice. Alpha- and betasphaerolipoviruses share with P23-77-like bacteriophages a conserved block of core genes that encode a putative genome-packaging ATPase and the two major capsid proteins (MCPs). The recently determined X-ray structure of the small and large MCPs of P23-77 revealed a single beta-barrel (jelly-roll) fold that is superimposable with the cryo-EM density maps of the SH1 capsomers. Given the common features of these viruses, we propose to include the so far unclassified P23-77-like bacteriophages into a new genus, "Gammasphaerolipovirus", within the family Sphaerolipoviridae.

  20. Light energy transduction by the purple membrane of halophilic bacteria; Proceedings of the Symposium, San Francisco, Calif., June 6, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Several aspects of bacteriorhodopsin, the retinal protein component of the purple membranes of Halobacterium halobium, are discussed. Structural studies are presented. Photochemical properties of the protein complex and of its chromophore are described. Proton translocation of bacteriorhodopsin is compared to that of a protein from a thermophilic bacterium. Ionophore activity of bacteriorhodopsin is considered with attention to conformational changes, light dependency, and electrical potential. Amino acid transport is also examined and the light-energy budget is investigated. Bacteriorhodopsin is of interest because of its similarity to rhodopsin, which plays a major role in mammalian vision, and also because its attainability and distinctive characteristics will facilitate studies of certain bacterial physiological functions, such as ion transport and membrane organization.

  1. Extremely halophilic archaea from ancient salt sediments and their possible survival in halite fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, H.; Fendrihan, S.; Gerbl, F. W.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Frethem, C.

    2008-09-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, marine solar salterns and alkaline salt lakes; they have also been isolated from ancient subsurface salt sediments of great geological age (195-280 million years) and some of those strains were described as novel species (1). The cells survived perhaps while being enclosed within small fluid inclusions in the halite. The characterization of subsurface microbial life is of astrobiological relevance since extraterrestrial halite has been detected and since microbial life on Mars, if existent, may have retreated into the subsurface. We attempted to simulate the embedding process of extremely halophilic archaea and to analyse any cellular changes which might occur. When enclosing haloarchaea in laboratory grown halite, cells accumulated preferentially in fluid inclusions, as could be demonstrated by pre-staining with fluorescent dyes. With increased time of embedding, rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium salinarum strains were found to assume roundish morphologies. Upon dissolution of the salt crystals, these spheres were stable and viable for months when kept in buffers containing 4 M NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation with glutaraldehyde suggested a potentially gradual transformation from rods to spheres. This notion was supported by fluorescence microscopy of Halobacterium cells, following embedding in halite and staining with SYTO 9. One-dimensional protein patterns of rods and spheres, following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were similar except that the S-layer protein appeared reduced by about 15 - 20 % in spheres. The reddish-orange pigmentation of spheres was much lighter compared to that of rod-shaped cells, suggesting lowered concentrations of carotenoids; this was confirmed by extraction and spectrometry of pigments. The data suggested that Halobacterium cells are capable of forming specific

  2. Modern Aspects of Halophilism: The Edmond de Rothschild School in Molecular Biophysics (12th) Held in Israel on March 26-April 5, 1989. Program and Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    THE HALOPHILIC ARCHAEBACTERIUM Haloferax mediterranei Paola Londei, Ricardo Amils 1 and M.Emma Sancheza Dpt.Biopatologia Umana, Sez. Biologia ...Copy THE TWELFTH EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD SCHOOL IN MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS MODERN ASPECTS I CRAMSDTIC TAB 1 OF HALOPHILISM u .............. PROGRAM Dist...special ABSTRACTS A- 1 MARCH 26 to APRIL 5, 1989 ISRAEL SPONSORED BY THE INSTITUT DE BIOLOGIE PHYSICO-CHIMIQUE (Fondation Edmond do Rothschild, Paris) THE

  3. Involvement of EupR, a response regulator of the NarL/FixJ family, in the control of the uptake of the compatible solutes ectoines by the halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moya, Javier; Argandoña, Montserrat; Reina-Bueno, Mercedes; Nieto, Joaquín J; Iglesias-Guerra, Fernando; Jebbar, Mohamed; Vargas, Carmen

    2010-10-13

    Osmosensing and associated signal transduction pathways have not yet been described in obligately halophilic bacteria. Chromohalobacter salexigens is a halophilic bacterium with a broad range of salt tolerance. In response to osmotic stress, it synthesizes and accumulates large amounts of the compatible solutes ectoine and hydroxyectoine. In a previous work, we showed that ectoines can be also accumulated upon transport from the external medium, and that they can be used as carbon sources at optimal, but not at low salinity. This was related to an insufficient ectoine(s) transport under these conditions. A C. salexigens Tn1732-induced mutant (CHR95) showed a delayed growth with glucose at low and optimal salinities, could not grow at high salinity, and was able to use ectoines as carbon sources at low salinity. CHR95 was affected in the transport and/or metabolism of glucose, and showed a deregulated ectoine uptake at any salinity, but it was not affected in ectoine metabolism. Transposon insertion in CHR95 caused deletion of three genes, Csal0865-Csal0867: acs, encoding an acetyl-CoA synthase, mntR, encoding a transcriptional regulator of the DtxR/MntR family, and eupR, encoding a putative two-component response regulator with a LuxR_C-like DNA-binding helix-turn-helix domain. A single mntR mutant was sensitive to manganese, suggesting that mntR encodes a manganese-dependent transcriptional regulator. Deletion of eupR led to salt-sensitivity and enabled the mutant strain to use ectoines as carbon source at low salinity. Domain analysis included EupR as a member of the NarL/FixJ family of two component response regulators. Finally, the protein encoded by Csal869, located three genes downstream of eupR was suggested to be the cognate histidine kinase of EupR. This protein was predicted to be a hybrid histidine kinase with one transmembrane and one cytoplasmic sensor domain. This work represents the first example of the involvement of a two-component response

  4. Flocculating performances of exopolysaccharides produced by a halophilic bacterial strain cultivated on agro-industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Sam, Serdar; Kucukasik, Faruk; Yenigun, Orhan; Nicolaus, Barbara; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Yukselen, Mehmet Ali

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the first systematic investigation of the flocculation dynamics of exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by a halophilic bacterial strain grown on pretreated molasses as fermentation substrate. The potential use of these EPSs as an easily biodegradable, natural alternative for synthetic polyelectrolytes which are widely used and contain toxic and carcinogenic monomers was investigated. Flocculating activities of the EPS samples in synthetic water, synthetic sea water and natural sea water media which were used as model raw waters were monitored via the Photometric Dispersion Analyser (PDA 2000) instrument and removals were determined by measuring residual turbidities. One of the six EPS specimens, which formed the largest flocs thus performed highest turbidity removal, exhibited flocculation performance and particle removal efficiency comparable with commercial cationic, nonionic and anionic synthetic polyelectrolytes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chaoxiang; Junaid, Muhammad; Lu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Houjin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme. PMID:26562160

  6. Extremely halophilic archaea and the issue of long-term microbial survival

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, the Dead Sea, alkaline salt lakes and marine solar salterns; they have also been isolated from rock salt of great geological age (195–250 million years). An overview of their taxonomy, including novel isolates from rock salt, is presented here; in addition, some of their unique characteristics and physiological adaptations to environments of low water activity are reviewed. The issue of extreme long-term microbial survival is considered and its implications for the search for extraterrestrial life. The development of detection methods for subterranean haloarchaea, which might also be applicable to samples from future missions to space, is presented. PMID:21984879

  7. Halogeometricum borinquense gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel halophilic archaeon from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Rodríguez, R; Vreeland, R H; Oren, A; Kessel, M; Betancourt, C; López-Garriga, J

    1998-10-01

    A novel extremely halophilic archaeon was isolated from the solar salterns of Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico. The organism is very pleomorphic, motile and requires at least 8% (w/v) NaCl to grow. Polar lipid composition revealed the presence of a novel non-sulfate-containing glycolipid and the absence of the glycerol diether analogue of phosphatidylglycerosulfate. The G + C content of the DNA is 59 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence data, the new isolate cannot be classified in one of the recognized genera, but occupies a position that is distantly related to the genus Haloferax. All these features justify the creation of a new genus and a new species for the family Halobacteriaceae, order Halobacteriales. The name Halogeometricum borinquense gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ATCC 700274T.

  8. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from halophilic archaebacteria: purification and properties of the enzyme from halobacterium halobium

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, J.J.; McQuattie, A.; Stevenson, K.J.

    1986-07-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria possess dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity but apparently lack the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of which it is usually an integral component. In this paper, the purification of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Halobacterium halobium is reported. The enzyme is a dimer with a polypeptide chain M/sub r/ of 58,000 (+/-3000). The amino acid composition of the enzyme is compared with those of the eubacterial and eukaryotic dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, and evidence is presented to suggest that the N-terminal amino acid of the H. halobium enzyme is blocked. Chemical modification with the trivalent arsenical reagent (p-aminophenyl)dichloroarsine indicates the involvement of a reversibly reducible disulfide bond in the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. The possible metabolic role of this dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in the absence of 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes is discussed.

  9. Actinopolyspora algeriensis sp. nov., a novel halophilic actinomycete isolated from a Saharan soil.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2012-09-01

    A halophilic actinomycete strain designated H19(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil in the Bamendil region (Ouargla province, South Algeria) and was characterized taxonomically by using a polyphasic approach. The morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics of the strain were consistent with those of members of the genus Actinopolyspora, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis confirmed that strain H19(T) was a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora. DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain H19(T) and the nearest Actinopolyspora species, A. halophila, was clearly below the 70 % threshold. The genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the organism represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora for which the name Actinopolyspora algeriensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain H19(T) (= DSM 45476(T) = CCUG 62415(T)).

  10. Bacillus chungangensis sp. nov., a halophilic species isolated from sea sand.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Lim; Jung, Min Young; Park, Mi-Hak; Kim, Wonyong

    2010-06-01

    The taxonomic position of a Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, halophilic strain, designated CAU 348(T), isolated from sea sand was investigated using a polyphasic approach. Colony morphology, biochemical tests and chemotaxonomic investigations revealed that strain CAU 348(T) had the characteristics of the genus Bacillus. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the organism formed a hitherto unknown subline within the genus Bacillus. Sequence divergence values of more than 4.3 % from other described Bacillus species, together with phenotypic differences, showed that the unidentified bacterium represents a previously unrecognized member of this genus. The genotypic and phenotypic data indicated that strain CAU 348(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus chungangensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CAU 348(T) (=KCTC 13566(T) =CCUG 57835(T)).

  11. Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase) from a halophilic archaebacterium, Haloarcula vallismortis: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, V; Altekar, W

    1994-01-01

    Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase [EC 2.7.1.3]), detected for the first time in a prokaryote, i.e., the extreme halophile Haloarcula vallismortis, was isolated and characterized from the same archaebacterium. This enzyme was characterized with respect to its molecular mass, amino acid composition, salt dependency, immunological cross-reactivity, and kinetic properties. Gel filtration and sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed a native molecular mass of 100 kDa for halobacterial ketohexokinase, which is larger than its mammalian counterpart. The enzyme could be labeled by UV irradiation in the presence of [ gamma-32P]ATP, suggesting the involvement of a phosphoenzyme intermediate. Other catalytic features of the enzyme were similar to those of its mammalian counterparts. No antigenic cross-reactivity could be detected between the H. vallismortis ketohexokinase and the ketohexokinases from different rat tissues. Images PMID:8071229

  12. On the isolation of halophilic microorganisms from salt deposits of great geological age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Denner, Ewald

    1993-01-01

    From salt sediments of Triassic or Permian age from various locations in the world halophilic microorganisms were isolated. Molecular characteristics of several of the isolates suggested they belong to the archaebacteria. One group appears to represent novel strains; several properties of one such isolate, strain BIp, are described here. The existence of viable microorganisms in ancient sediment would have great implications with respect to our notions on evolution, the research for life in extraterrestrial environments, and the longterm survival of functional biological structures. Of crucial importance is thus the question if these microorganisms existed in the salt since the time of deposition or invaded at some later date. Some suggestions to address these issues experimentally are discussed.

  13. On the Isolation of Halophilic Microorganisms from Salt Deposits of Great Geological Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Denner, Ewald; Orans, Robin (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    From salt sediments of Triassic or Permian ace from various locations in the world halophilic microorganisms were isolated. Molecular characteristics of several of the isolates suggested they belong to the archaebacteriae. One group appears to represent novel strains; several properties or one such isolate, strain BIp, are described here. The existence of viable microorganisms in ancient sediments would have great implications with respect to our notions on evolution, the search for life in extraterrestrial environments and the long- term survival of functional biological structures. Of crucial importance is thus the question if these microorganisms existed in the salt since the time of deposition or invaded at some later date. Some suggestions to address these issues experimentally are discussed.

  14. Actinopolyspora biskrensis sp. nov., a novel halophilic actinomycete isolated from Northern Sahara.

    PubMed

    Saker, Rafika; Bouras, Noureddine; Meklat, Atika; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2015-03-01

    A novel halophilic, filamentous actinomycete, designated H254(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil sample collected from Biskra (Northern Sahara), and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic characterization. The strain is Gram-positive, aerobic, and halophilic, and the optimum NaCl concentration for growth is 15-20 % (w/v). The cell-wall hydrolysate contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, and the diagnostic whole-cell sugars were arabinose and galactose. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine, and MK-9(H4) was the predominant menaquinone. The major fatty acid profiles were anteiso-C17:0 (32.8 %), C15:0 (28 %), and iso-C17:0 (12.3 %). Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strain H254(T) formed a well-separated sub-branch within the radiation of the genus Actinopolyspora, and the microorganism was most closely related to Actinopolyspora saharensis DSM 45459(T) (99.2 %), Actinopolyspora halophila DSM 43834(T) (99.1 %), and Actinopolyspora algeriensis DSM 45476(T) (99.0 %). Nevertheless, the strain had relatively lower mean values for DNA-DNA relatedness with the above strains (57.2, 68.4, and 45.6 %, respectively). Based on phenotypic features and phylogenetic position, we propose that strain H254(T) represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora, for which the name Actinopolyspora biskrensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. biskrensis is strain H254(T) (=DSM 46684(T) =CECT 8576(T)).

  15. Development of an enhanced chromosomal expression system based on porin synthesis operon for halophile Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jin; Fu, Xiao-Zhi; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2014-11-01

    Since halophile Halomonas spp. can grow contamination free in seawater under unsterile and continuous conditions, it holds great promise for industrial biotechnology to produce low-cost chemicals in an economic way. Yet, metabolic engineering methods are urgently needed for Halomonas spp. It is commonly known that chromosomal expression is more stable yet weaker than plasmid one is. To overcome this challenge, a novel chromosomal expression method was developed for halophile Halomonas TD01 and its derivatives based on a strongly expressed porin gene as a site for external gene integration. The gene of interest was inserted downstream the porin gene, forming an artificial operon porin-inserted gene. This chromosome expression system was proven functional by some examples: First, chromosomal expression of heterologous polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase gene phaC Re from Ralstonia eutropha completely restored the PHB accumulation level in endogenous phaC knockout mutant of Halomonas TD01. The integrated phaC Re was expressed at the highest level when inserted at the locus of porin compared with insertions in other chromosome locations. Second, an inducible expression system was constructed in phaC-deleted Halomonas TD01 by integrating the lac repressor gene (lacI) into the porin site in the host chromosome. The native porin promoter was inserted with the key 21 bp DNA of lac operator (lacO) sequence to become an inducible promoter encoded in a plasmid. This inducible system allowed on-off switch of gene expression in Halomonas TD strains. Thus, the stable and strong chromosomal expression method in Halomonas TD spp. was established.

  16. Halophilic class I aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: some salt-dependent structural features.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, G; Altekar, W

    1993-01-26

    Aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula vallismortis are stable only in high concentrations of KCl present within the physiological environment. Data concerning the structural changes in the two enzymes as a result of lowering of salt concentration and changes in pH were obtained by monitoring the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of quenchers. When the KCl concentrations were lowered below 2 M or in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, the emission maximum shifted to a longer wavelength, indicating enhanced exposure of tryptophyl residues to the solvent. The spectral characteristics of the two proteins in guanidine hydrochloride and 0.4 M KCl were identical. However, these denatured states appear to be different than those observed after acid denaturation. Further perturbation of fluorescence was observed due to I-, and application of the Stern-Volmer law showed that the total fluorescence was available to the quenchers only in 0.4 M KCl solutions. The unfolding of proteins in 0.4 M KCl was a gradual process which was accompanied by a time-dependent loss in enzyme activity. The activity loss was complete within 30 min for aldolase whereas in the case of GAPDH nearly 3 h was required for the destruction of activity. For both enzymes, inactivation and protein denaturation were strongly correlated. The data on activity and thermostability measurements of the two enzymes in varying concentrations of KCl and potassium phosphate revealed that though both proteins are halophilic, the forces in the maintenance of their stability could be different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Ureases of extreme halophiles of the genus Haloarcula with a unique structure of gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Mizuki, Toru; Kamekura, Masahiro; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Fukushima, Tadamasa; Usami, Ron; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Horikoshi, Koki

    2004-02-01

    We searched for urease activities in 71 strains of extreme halophiles by a urea-phenol red-agar plate method. Positive strains were further investigated by measuring the ammonia released from urea in cell-free extracts. Only 4 strains of the genus Haloarcula, Har. aidinensis, Har. hispanica, Har. japonica, and Har. marismortui were finally shown as the urease producers. A partially purified urease from Har. hispanica was a typical halophilic enzyme in that it showed maximum activity at 18-23% NaCl and lost the activity irreversibly in the absence of NaCl. Partial genes (1596 bp) of the urease encoding from upstream of the beta subunit down to the N-terminal 139 amino acids of the alpha subunit, were PCR amplified from the four strains, as well as from five urease-negative Haloarcula strains. Strains of other genera, which were urease-negative, did not yield PCR products. The deduced amino acid sequences of the beta subunit and partial alpha subunit were similar to each other (92-100% similarities) and to those from other organisms. Analysis of the draft genome sequence of Har. marismortui, however, suggested that the order of the genes encoding the three subunits (with the total number of amino acids of 834) and four accessory proteins was beta-alpha-gamma-UreG-UreD-UreE-UreF. This order is quite unique, since in other microorganisms the order is gamma-beta-alpha-UreE-UreF-UreG-UreD in most cases. No open reading frames were detected in the PCR-amplified upstream of the beta subunit, suggesting that all Haloarcula species have the same unique structure of the urease gene cluster.

  18. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  19. Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A

    2012-06-11

    Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

  20. Immobilization of halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease on functionalized silica nanoparticles and application in whey protein hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

    2015-04-01

    The present work targets the fabrication of an active, stable, reusable enzyme preparation using functionalized silica nanoparticles as an effective enzyme support for crude halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease. The immobilization efficiency under optimized conditions was 60%. Characterization of the immobilized preparation revealed marked increase in pH and thermal stability. It retained 80% of its original activity at 70 °C while t 1/2 at 50 °C showed a five-fold enhancement over that for the free protease. Kinetic constants K m and V max were indicative of a higher reaction velocity along with decreased affinity for substrate. The preparation could be efficiently reused up to 6 times and successfully hydrolysed whey proteins with high degree of hydrolysis. Immobilization of a crude halophilic protease on a nanobased scaffold makes the process cost effective and simple.

  1. Draft genome sequence of Halapricum salinum CBA1105(T), an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from solar salt.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye Seon; Lee, Hae-Won; Yim, Kyung June; Nam, Young-Do; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Hak-Jong; Seo, Myung-Ji; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kim, Daekyung; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Roh, Seong Woon

    2014-12-01

    Halapricum salinum CBA1105(T) (=KCTC 4202(T), JCM 19729(T)) is an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from solar salt in the Republic of Korea. We present the draft genome of CBA1105(T), which is assembled into 3 contigs containing 3,451,492bp with a G+C content of 63.7%. This is the first genome that has been sequenced in the genus Halapricum.

  2. Sequence, organization, transcription and evolution of RNA polymerase subunit genes from the archaebacterial extreme halophiles Halobacterium halobium and Halococcus morrhuae.

    PubMed

    Leffers, H; Gropp, F; Lottspeich, F; Zillig, W; Garrett, R A

    1989-03-05

    The genes for the four largest subunits, A, B', B" and C, of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase were cloned from the extreme halophile Halobacterium halobium and sequenced and their transcription was analyzed. The downstream half of this gene cluster from another extreme halophile Halococcus morrhuae was also cloned, sequenced and its transcription products characterized. The H. halobium genes were transcribed into a common transcript from an upstream promoter in the order B", B', A and C. They are flanked by, and co-transcribed with, two smaller genes coding for 75 and 139 amino acid residues, respectively. Immediately downstream from these genes were two open reading frames that are homologous to ribosomal proteins S12 and S7 from Escherichia coli. In both extreme halophiles these genes were transcribed from their own promoter, but in Hc. morrhuae there was also considerable read-through from the RNA polymerase genes. Sequence alignment studies showed that the combined B" + B' subunits are equivalent to the B subunits of the eukaryotic polymerases I and II and to the eubacterial beta subunit, while the combined A + C subunits correspond to the A subunits of eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II and III and to the eubacterial beta' subunit. The sequence similarity to the eukaryotic subunits was always much higher than to the eubacterial subunits. Conserved sequence regions within the individual subunits were located which are likely to constitute functionally important domains; they include sites associated with rifampicin and alpha-amanitin binding and two possible zinc binding fingers. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequence alignments confirmed that the extreme halophiles belong to the archaebacterial kingdom.

  3. Thermophile bacteria in permafrost: model for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilichinsky, D.; Rivkina, E.; Shcherbakova, V.; Laurinavichius, K.; Kholodov, A.; Abramov, A.

    2003-04-01

    According the NASA point of view, one way to have liquid water on Mars at shallow depths would be through subglacial volcanism. Such volcano-ice interactions could be going on beneath the polar caps of Mars today, or even within the adjacent permafrost around the margins of the ice caps. This is why one of the Earth's models, close to extraterrestrial environment, represented by active volcanoes in permafrost areas and the main question is - does such econishes as volcanoes and associated environment contain recently microbial communities? The first step of this study was carried out on volcano Stromboli (Italy), using the marine water samples extracted from the borehole near the island marine coast, surrounding the volcano. According the temperatures (45^oC), this thermal water has the hydraulic connection with volcano. Microscopy analyses of studied water shown the presence of different morphological types of microorganisms: small mobile roads, coccoid and sarcina-like organisms and long fixed roads, as well as rest forms (spores and cysts). To separate this community on marine and volcano microorganisms, the common mineral media with added CO_2, acetate or glucose-peptone as a source of carbon were used for culturing, and Fe3+, S^o, SO_42- were added as a electron acceptors. We attempt to isolate thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms of different metabolic groups - methanogens, acetogens, iron-, sulfur- and sulfate-reducers, and to test each group of microorganisms on the presence of halophilic forms. After 24 hours of incubation at temperatures varied 55 to 85^o, the grow relatively the control media was observed at CO_2+H_2 and glucose-peptone media. Microscopy study of preparations showed small coccus of irregular shape that was unable to reduce S^o or SO_42-. During the subsequent re-seeding were obtained the enrichment cultures of themophilic bacteria, genetically closed to genera Thermococcus: heterotrophic, growing up to 95^oC with the growth optimum at

  4. DNA Binding in High Salt: Analysing the Salt Dependence of Replication Protein A3 from the Halophile Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jody A.; Patoli, Bushra; Bunting, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Halophilic archaea maintain intracellular salt concentrations close to saturation to survive in high-salt environments and their cellular processes have adapted to function under these conditions. Little is known regarding halophilic adaptation of the DNA processing machinery, particularly intriguing since protein-DNA interactions are classically salt sensitive. To investigate such adaptation, we characterised the DNA-binding capabilities of recombinant RPA3 from Haloferax volcanii (HvRPA3). Under physiological salt conditions (3 M KCl), HvRPA3 is monomeric, binding 18 nucleotide ssDNA with nanomolar affinity, demonstrating that RPAs containing the single OB-fold/zinc finger architecture bind with broadly comparable affinity to two OB-fold/zinc finger RPAs. Reducing the salt concentration to 1 M KCl induces dimerisation of the protein, which retains its ability to bind DNA. On circular ssDNA, two concentration-dependent binding modes are observed. Conventionally, increased salt concentration adversely affects DNA binding but HvRPA3 does not bind DNA in 0.2 M KCl, although multimerisation may occlude the binding site. The single N-terminal OB-fold is competent to bind DNA in the absence of the C-terminal zinc finger, albeit with reduced affinity. This study represents the first quantitative characterisation of DNA binding in a halophilic protein in extreme salt concentrations. PMID:22973163

  5. MutS and MutL are dispensable for maintenance of the genomic mutation rate in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

    PubMed

    Busch, Courtney R; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2010-02-04

    The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 encodes for homologs of MutS and MutL, which are key proteins of a DNA mismatch repair pathway conserved in Bacteria and Eukarya. Mismatch repair is essential for retaining the fidelity of genetic information and defects in this pathway result in the deleterious accumulation of mutations and in hereditary diseases in humans. We calculated the spontaneous genomic mutation rate of H. salinarum NRC-1 using fluctuation tests targeting genes of the uracil monophosphate biosynthesis pathway. We found that H. salinarum NRC-1 has a low incidence of mutation suggesting the presence of active mechanisms to control spontaneous mutations during replication. The spectrum of mutational changes found in H. salinarum NRC-1, and in other archaea, appears to be unique to this domain of life and might be a consequence of their adaption to extreme environmental conditions. In-frame targeted gene deletions of H. salinarum NRC-1 mismatch repair genes and phenotypic characterization of the mutants demonstrated that the mutS and mutL genes are not required for maintenance of the observed mutation rate. We established that H. salinarum NRC-1 mutS and mutL genes are redundant to an alternative system that limits spontaneous mutation in this organism. This finding leads to the puzzling question of what mechanism is responsible for maintenance of the low genomic mutation rates observed in the Archaea, which for the most part do not have MutS and MutL homologs.

  6. MutS and MutL Are Dispensable for Maintenance of the Genomic Mutation Rate in the Halophilic Archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 encodes for homologs of MutS and MutL, which are key proteins of a DNA mismatch repair pathway conserved in Bacteria and Eukarya. Mismatch repair is essential for retaining the fidelity of genetic information and defects in this pathway result in the deleterious accumulation of mutations and in hereditary diseases in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We calculated the spontaneous genomic mutation rate of H. salinarum NRC-1 using fluctuation tests targeting genes of the uracil monophosphate biosynthesis pathway. We found that H. salinarum NRC-1 has a low incidence of mutation suggesting the presence of active mechanisms to control spontaneous mutations during replication. The spectrum of mutational changes found in H. salinarum NRC-1, and in other archaea, appears to be unique to this domain of life and might be a consequence of their adaption to extreme environmental conditions. In-frame targeted gene deletions of H. salinarum NRC-1 mismatch repair genes and phenotypic characterization of the mutants demonstrated that the mutS and mutL genes are not required for maintenance of the observed mutation rate. Conclusions/Significance We established that H. salinarum NRC-1 mutS and mutL genes are redundant to an alternative system that limits spontaneous mutation in this organism. This finding leads to the puzzling question of what mechanism is responsible for maintenance of the low genomic mutation rates observed in the Archaea, which for the most part do not have MutS and MutL homologs. PMID:20140215

  7. Effect of Biowaste Sludge Maturation on the Diversity of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea in an Anaerobic Reactor▿

    PubMed Central

    Goberna, M.; Insam, H.; Franke-Whittle, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Prokaryotic diversity was investigated near the inlet and outlet of a plug-flow reactor. After analyzing 800 clones, 50 bacterial and 3 archaeal phylogenetic groups were defined. Clostridia (>92%) dominated among bacteria and Methanoculleus (>90%) among archaea. Significant changes in pH and volatile fatty acids did not invoke a major shift in the phylogenetic groups. We suggest that the environmental filter imposed by the saline conditions (20 g liter−1) selected a stable community of halotolerant and halophilic prokaryotes. PMID:19218417

  8. Pressure inactivation of microorganisms at moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, P.; Ludwig, H.

    1986-05-01

    The inactivation of bacteria, bacterial spores, yeasts and molds by high hydrostatic pressure was investigated over a pressure range up to 3000 bar. Survival curves were measured as a function of temperature and pressure applied on the microorganisms. Conditions are looked for under which heat or radiation sensitive pharmaceutical preparations can be sterilized by high pressure treatment at moderate temperatures. All organisms tested can be inactivated in the range of 2000-2500 bar and between 40-60 degrees.

  9. Purification and Characterization of a Polyextremophilic α-Amylase from an Obligate Halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides Isolate and Its Potential for Souse with Detergents

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran; Anwar, Mohammad; Prasongsuk, Sehanat; Lotrakul, Pongtharin; Punnapayak, Hunsa

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular α-amylase from the obligate halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides TISTR3639 strain was produced and enriched to apparent homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sephadex G100 gel filtration column chromatography. The mass of the purified amylase was estimated to be 42 kDa by SDS-PAGE. With soluble starch as the substrate it had a specific activity of 118.42 U·mg−1 and V max⁡ and K m values of 1.05 µmol·min−1·mg−1 and 5.41 mg·mL−1, respectively. The enzyme was found to have certain polyextremophilic characteristics, with an optimum activity at pH 9, 80°C, and 300 g·L−1 NaCl. The addition of CaCl2 at 2 mM was found to slightly enhance the amylase activity, while ZnCl2, FeCl2, or EDTA at 2 mM was strongly or moderately inhibitory, respectively, suggesting the requirement for a (non-Fe2+ or Zn2+) divalent cation. The enzyme retained more than 80% of its activity when incubated with three different laundry detergents and had a better performance compared to a commercial amylase and three detergents in the presence of increasing NaCl concentrations up to 300 g·L−1. Accordingly, it has a good potential for use as an α-amylase in a low water activity (high salt concentration) and at high pH and temperatures. PMID:26180787

  10. Purification and Characterization of a Polyextremophilic α -Amylase from an Obligate Halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides Isolate and Its Potential for Souse with Detergents.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Akbar, Ali; Anwar, Mohammad; Prasongsuk, Sehanat; Lotrakul, Pongtharin; Punnapayak, Hunsa

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular α-amylase from the obligate halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides TISTR3639 strain was produced and enriched to apparent homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sephadex G100 gel filtration column chromatography. The mass of the purified amylase was estimated to be 42 kDa by SDS-PAGE. With soluble starch as the substrate it had a specific activity of 118.42 U · mg(-1) and Vmax and Km values of 1.05 µmol · min(-1) · mg(-1) and 5.41 mg · mL(-1), respectively. The enzyme was found to have certain polyextremophilic characteristics, with an optimum activity at pH 9, 80 °C, and 300 g · L(-1) NaCl. The addition of CaCl2 at 2 mM was found to slightly enhance the amylase activity, while ZnCl2, FeCl2, or EDTA at 2 mM was strongly or moderately inhibitory, respectively, suggesting the requirement for a (non-Fe(2+) or Zn(2+)) divalent cation. The enzyme retained more than 80% of its activity when incubated with three different laundry detergents and had a better performance compared to a commercial amylase and three detergents in the presence of increasing NaCl concentrations up to 300 g · L(-1). Accordingly, it has a good potential for use as an α-amylase in a low water activity (high salt concentration) and at high pH and temperatures.

  11. Life-style changes of a halophilic archaeon analyzed by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Tebbe, Andreas; Schmidt, Alexander; Konstantinidis, Kosta; Falb, Michaela; Bisle, Birgit; Klein, Christian; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Kellermann, Josef; Siedler, Frank; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2009-08-01

    Quantitative proteomics based on isotopic labeling has become the method of choice to accurately determine changes in protein abundance in highly complex mixtures. Isotope-coded protein labeling (ICPL), which is based on the nicotinoylation of proteins at lysine residues and free N-termini was used as a simple, reliable and fast method for the comparative analysis of three different cellular states of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum through pairwise comparison. The labeled proteins were subjected to SDS-PAGE, in-gel digested and the proteolytic peptides were separated by LC and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Automated quantitation was performed by comparing the MS peptide signals of (12)C and (13)C nicotinoylated isotopic peptide pairs. The transitions between (i) aerobic growth in complex versus synthetic medium and (ii) aerobic versus anaerobic/phototrophic growth, both in complex medium, provide a wide span in nutrient and energy supply for the cell and thus allowed optimal studies of proteome changes. In these two studies, 559 and 643 proteins, respectively, could be quantified allowing a detailed analysis of the adaptation of H. salinarum to changes of its living conditions. The subtle cellular response to a wide variation of nutrient and energy supply demonstrates a fine tuning of the cellular protein inventory.

  12. Deciphering the Translation Initiation Factor 5A Modification Pathway in Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Michael; Blaby, Ian K.; Makkay, Andrea M.; Starosta, Agata L.; Papke, R. Thane; Oshima, Tairo; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation factor 5A (IF5A) is essential and highly conserved in Eukarya (eIF5A) and Archaea (aIF5A). The activity of IF5A requires hypusine, a posttranslational modification synthesized in Eukarya from the polyamine precursor spermidine. Intracellular polyamine analyses revealed that agmatine and cadaverine were the main polyamines produced in Haloferax volcanii in minimal medium, raising the question of how hypusine is synthesized in this halophilic Archaea. Metabolic reconstruction led to a tentative picture of polyamine metabolism and aIF5A modification in Hfx. volcanii that was experimentally tested. Analysis of aIF5A from Hfx. volcanii by LC-MS/MS revealed it was exclusively deoxyhypusinylated. Genetic studies confirmed the role of the predicted arginine decarboxylase gene (HVO_1958) in agmatine synthesis. The agmatinase-like gene (HVO_2299) was found to be essential, consistent with a role in aIF5A modification predicted by physical clustering evidence. Recombinant deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) from S. cerevisiae was shown to transfer 4-aminobutyl moiety from spermidine to aIF5A from Hfx. volcanii in vitro. However, at least under conditions tested, this transfer was not observed with the Hfx. volcanii DHS. Furthermore, the growth of Hfx. volcanii was not inhibited by the classical DHS inhibitor GC7. We propose a model of deoxyhypusine synthesis in Hfx. volcanii that differs from the canonical eukaryotic pathway, paving the way for further studies. PMID:28053595

  13. Accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates by halophilic archaea isolated from traditional solar salterns of India.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, Bhakti B; Mani, Kabilan; Bragança, Judith Maria

    2013-09-01

    Extremely halophilic archaeal isolates obtained from brine and sediment samples of solar salterns of Goa and Tamil Nadu, India were screened for accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Seven polymer accumulating haloarchaeal strains (TN4, TN5, TN6, TN7, TN9, TN10 and BBK2) were selected based on their growth and intensity of fluorescence when grown on 20 % NaCl synthetic medium supplemented with 2 % glucose and incorporated with Nile red dye. The polymer was quantified by conversion of PHA to crotonic acid which gave a characteristic absorption maxima at 235 nm. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characterization the cultures TN4, TN5, TN6, TN7, TN10 and BBK2 were grouped under genus Haloferax whereas isolate TN9 was grouped under the genus Halogeometricum. Growth kinetics and polymer accumulation studies revealed that the culture Halogeometricum borinquense strain TN9 accumulates PHA maximally at the mid-log phase, i.e. 5th day of growth (approx. 14 wt% PHA of CDW). Analysis of the polymer by IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR confirmed it to be a homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  14. Low water activity induces the production of bioactive metabolites in halophilic and halotolerant fungi.

    PubMed

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2010-12-27

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  15. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M.; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 “prebiotic” α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a “foldable set”—that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides? If so, what (if any) characteristic properties might such polypeptides exhibit? To investigate these questions, two “primitive” versions of an extant protein fold (the β-trefoil) were produced by top-down symmetric deconstruction, resulting in a reduced alphabet size of 12 or 13 amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a substantial acidification of pI and require high salt concentrations for cooperative folding. The results suggest that the prebiotic amino acids do comprise a foldable set within the halophile environment. PMID:23341608

  16. Haloferax larsenii sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a solar saltern.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue-Wei; Wu, Yue-Hong; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Oren, Aharon; Zhou, Pei-Jin; Wu, Min

    2007-04-01

    Three strains of Gram-negative, aerobic, neutrophilic, extremely halophilic archaea, designated ZJ206(T), ZJ203 and ZJ204, were isolated from a solar saltern in Zhe-Jiang Province, China. Phenotypically and on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the strains were very similar. Comparative 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed 96.4-97.4 % sequence similarity to members of the genus Haloferax. The major polar lipids were C(20)C(20) derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, diglycosyl glycerol diether and sulfated diglycosyl diether. The DNA G+C content of strain ZJ206(T) was 62.2 mol%. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of the isolates from closely related species. Therefore the isolates should be classified as members of a novel species, for which the name Haloferax larsenii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ZJ206(T) (=CGMCC 1.5347(T)=JCM 13917(T)).

  17. Resistance of extremely halophilic archaea to zinc and zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Bhakti B.; Das, Deepthi; Bragança, Judith Maria

    2016-02-01

    Industrialization as well as other anthropogenic activities have resulted in addition of high loads of metal and/or metal nanoparticles to the environment. In this study, the effect of one of the widely used heavy metal, zinc (Zn) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on extremely halophilic archaea was evaluated. One representative member from four genera namely Halococcus, Haloferax, Halorubrum and Haloarcula of the family Halobacteriaceae was taken as the model organism. All the haloarchaeal genera investigated were resistant to both ZnCl2 and ZnO NPs at varying concentrations. Halococcus strain BK6 and Haloferax strain BBK2 showed the highest resistance in complex/minimal medium of up to 2.0/1.0 mM ZnCl2 and 2.0/1.0-0.5 mM ZnO NP. Accumulation of ZnCl2/ZnO NPs was seen as Haloferax strain BBK2 (287.2/549.6 mg g-1) > Halococcus strain BK6 (165.9/388.5 mg g-1) > Haloarcula strain BS2 (93.2/28.5 mg g-1) > Halorubrum strain BS17 (29.9/16.2 mg g-1). Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analysis revealed that bulk ZnCl2 was sorbed at a higher concentration (21.77 %) on the cell surface of Haloferax strain BBK2 as compared to the ZnO NPs (14.89 %).

  18. Growth Kinetics of Extremely Halophilic Archaea (Family Halobacteriaceae) as Revealed by Arrhenius Plots

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jessie L.; Pyzyna, Brandy; Atrasz, Rachelle G.; Henderson, Christine A.; Morrill, Kira L.; Burd, Anna Mae; DeSoucy, Erik; Fogleman, Rex E.; Naylor, John B.; Steele, Sarah M.; Elliott, Dawn R.; Leyva, Kathryn J.; Shand, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    Members of the family Halobacteriaceae in the domain Archaea are obligate extreme halophiles. They occupy a variety of hypersaline environments, and their cellular biochemistry functions in a nearly saturated salty milieu. Despite extensive study, a detailed analysis of their growth kinetics is missing. To remedy this, Arrhenius plots for 14 type species of the family were generated. These organisms had maximum growth temperatures ranging from 49 to 58°C. Nine of the organisms exhibited a single temperature optimum, while five grew optimally at more than one temperature. Generation times at these optimal temperatures ranged from 1.5 h (Haloterrigena turkmenica) to 3.0 h (Haloarcula vallismortis and Halorubrum saccharovorum). All shared an inflection point at 31 ± 4°C, and the temperature characteristics for 12 of the 14 type species were nearly parallel. The other two species (Natronomonas pharaonis and Natronorubrum bangense) had significantly different temperature characteristics, suggesting that the physiology of these strains is different. In addition, these data show that the type species for the family Halobacteriaceae share similar growth kinetics and are capable of much faster growth at higher temperatures than those previously reported. PMID:15659670

  19. Haloferax sulfurifontis sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon isolated from a sulfide- and sulfur-rich spring.

    PubMed

    Elshahed, Mostafa S; Savage, Kristen N; Oren, Aharon; Gutierrez, M Carmen; Ventosa, Antonio; Krumholz, Lee R

    2004-11-01

    A pleomorphic, extremely halophilic archaeon (strain M6(T)) was isolated from a sulfide- and sulfur-rich spring in south-western Oklahoma (USA). It formed small (0.8-1.0 mm), salmon pink, elevated colonies on agar medium. The strain grew in a wide range of NaCl concentrations (6 % to saturation) and required at least 1 mM Mg(2+) for growth. Strain M6(T) was able to reduce sulfur to sulfide anaerobically. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain M6(T) belongs to the family Halobacteriaceae, genus Haloferax; it showed 96.7-98.0 % similarity to other members of the genus with validly published names and 89 % similarity to Halogeometricum borinquense, its closest relative outside the genus Haloferax. Polar lipid analysis and DNA G+C content further supported placement of strain M6(T) in the genus Haloferax. DNA-DNA hybridization values, as well as biochemical and physiological characterization, allowed strain M6(T) to be differentiated from other members of the genus Haloferax. A novel species, Haloferax sulfurifontis sp. nov., is therefore proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is M6(T) (=JCM 12327(T)=CCM 7217(T)=DSM 16227(T)=CIP 108334(T)).

  20. Bactericidal effect of lactoferrin and lactoferrin chimera against halophilic Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; de la Garza, Mireya; Reyes-Lopez, Magda; Zazueta-Beltran, Jorge; Nazmi, Kamran; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Bolscher, Jan G

    2009-01-01

    Infections caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an halophilic member of the genus Vibrio, have increased globally in the last 5 years. Diarrhea caused by V. parahaemolyticus results from eating raw or undercooked seafood. The aim of this work was to investigate whether lactoferrin and some lactoferrin-peptides have bactericidal activity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802, the pandemic strain O3:K6, and the multidrug resistant isolate 727, as well as against Vibrio cholerae strains O1 and non-O1. Whereas both peptides lactoferricin (17-30) and lactoferrampin (265-284) did not have bactericidal activity, 40 microM of lactoferrin chimera (a fusion of the two peptides) inhibited the growth of all Vibrio tested to the same extent as the antibiotic gentamicin. The cidal effect of LFchimera showed a clear concentration response in contrast to bovine lactoferrin which showed higher inhibition at 10 microM than at 40 microM. FITC-labeled LFchimera bound to the bacterial membranes. Moreover LFchimera permeabilized bacterial cells and membranes were seriously damaged. Finally, in experiments with the multidrug resistant isolate 727, sub-lethal doses of LFchimera strongly reduced the concentrations of ampicillin, gentamicin or kanamicin needed to reach more than 95% growth inhibition, suggesting synergistic effects. These data indicate that LFchimera is a potential candidate to combat the multidrug resistant pathogenic Vibrio species.

  1. Low Water Activity Induces the Production of Bioactive Metabolites in Halophilic and Halotolerant Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:21339946

  2. Thermostable alkaline halophilic-protease production by Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18.

    PubMed

    Selim, Samy; Hagagy, Nashwa; Abdel Aziz, Mohamed; El-Meleigy, El Syaed; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the production and biochemical characterisation of a thermostable alkaline halophilic protease from Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18 (HQ658997), isolated from soda Lake of Wadi An-Natrun, Egypt. The enzyme was concentrated by spinning through a centriplus, centrifugal ultrafiltration Millipore membrane with a total yield of 25%. The relative molecular mass of this protease determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ranged from 67 to 43 kDa. The extracellular protease of N. innermongolicus WN18 was dependent on high salt concentrations for activity and stability, and it had an optimum temperature of 60°C in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl. This enzyme was stable in a broad pH range (6-12) with an optimum pH of 9-10 for azocasein hydrolysis. This extr