Science.gov

Sample records for moderately halophilic bacteria

  1. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  2. Transposon-mediated random gene disruption with moderate halophilic bacteria and its application for halophilic bacterial siderophore analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Nishino, Tomohiko

    2016-12-01

    Analytical conditions using chromo azurol S was validated for quantification of siderophore in aqueous samples, followed by the characterization of siderophore derived from newly isolated moderately halophilic bacteria. Conditions with good linearity between the absorbance and the siderophore concentration were obtained at a siderophore concentration less than 20 µM, in the wavelength range between 630 and 660 nm with developing time for at least 2 h. Of the halophilic bacteria isolated from Tunisian soil, Halomonas sp., namely strain 21a was selected as siderophore producing halophiles. The strain produced siderophore significantly in the absence of iron in minimal medium. Siderophore-deficient mutant, namely IIa10, of the strain 21a was obtained from gene disruptant library constructed using transposon complex by electroporation. Genomic sequence analysis of the mutant IIa10 revealed that the transposon-inserted gene was TonB-dependent receptor.

  3. Growth of moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from sea water using phenol as the sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, J A; Pérez-Esteban, B; Esteban, M; de la Escalera, S; Gómez, M A; Martínez-Toledo, M V; González-López, J

    2001-01-01

    Moderately halophilic bacteria utilizing phenol as the sole carbon source were isolated by selective enrichment from sea water. The isolate (Gram-negative motile rods) was identified as Deleya venusta. It grew well in the presence of up to 1600 mg/L of phenol and 8% NaCl under aerobic conditions. When the cells were treated with chloramphenicol prior to the addition of phenol they did not utilize added phenol, even after prolonged incubation. Thus, the enzymes necessary for phenol metabolism appeared to be inducible.

  4. Precipitation of minerals by 22 species of moderately halophilic bacteria in artificial marine salts media: influence of salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneyra, M A; Delgado, R; Párraga, J; Ramos-Cormenza, A; Delgado, G

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation of minerals was shown by 22 species of moderately halophilic bacteria in both solid and liquid artificial marine salts media at different concentration and different Mg2+-to-Ca2+ ratio. Precipitation of minerals was observed for all the bacteria used. When salt concentration increased, the quantity and the size of bioliths decreased, the time required for precipitation being increased. The precipitated minerals were calcite, magnesian calcite, aragonite, dolomite, monohydrocalcite, hydromagnesite and struvite in variable proportions, depending on the bacterial species, the salinity and the physical state of the medium; the Mg content of the magnesian calcite also varied according to the same parameters. The precipitated minerals do not correspond exactly to those which could be precipitated inorganically according to the saturation indices. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the formation of the bioliths is initiated by grouping of calcified cells and that the dominant final morphologies were spherulitic with fibrous radiated interiors. It was demonstrated that moderately halophilic bacteria play an active role in the precipitation of carbonates and we hypothesize about this process of biomineralization.

  5. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  6. Diversity and phylogeny of the ectoine biosynthesis genes in aerobic, moderately halophilic methylotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina; Lidstrom, Mary; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-11-01

    The genes of ectoine biosynthesis pathway were identified in six species of aerobic, slightly halophilic bacteria utilizing methane, methanol or methylamine. Two types of ectoine gene cluster organization were revealed in the methylotrophs. The gene cluster ectABC coding for diaminobutyric acid (DABA) acetyltransferase (EctA), DABA aminotransferase (EctB) and ectoine synthase (EctC) was found in methanotrophs Methylobacter marinus 7C and Methylomicrobium kenyense AMO1(T). In methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum ML1, methanol-utilizers Methylophaga thalassica 33146(T) , Methylophaga alcalica M8 and methylamine-utilizer Methylarcula marina h1(T), the genes forming the ectABC-ask operon are preceded by ectR, encoding a putative transcriptional regulatory protein EctR. Phylogenetic relationships of the Ect proteins do not correlate with phylogenetic affiliation of the strains, thus implying that the ability of methylotrophs to produce ectoine is most likely the result of a horizontal transfer event.

  7. Halobacillus profundi sp. nov. and Halobacillus kuroshimensis sp. nov., moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from a deep-sea methane cold seep.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ngoc-Phuc; Kanekiyo, Atsuko; Fujikura, Katsunori; Yasuda, Hisato; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2007-06-01

    Two Gram-positive, rod-shaped, moderately halophilic bacteria were isolated from a deep-sea carbonate rock at a methane cold seep in Kuroshima Knoll, Japan. These bacteria, strains IS-Hb4(T) and IS-Hb7(T), were spore-forming and non-motile. They were able to grow at temperatures as low as 9 degrees C and hydrostatic pressures up to 30 MPa. Based on high sequence similarity of their 16S rRNA genes to those of type strains of the genus Halobacillus, from 96.4 % (strain IS-Hb7(T) to Halobacillus halophilus NCIMB 9251(T)) to 99.4 % (strain IS-Hb4(T) to Halobacillus dabanensis D-8(T)), the strains were shown to belong to this genus. DNA-DNA relatedness values of 49.5 % and 1.0-33.0 %, respectively, were determined between strains IS-Hb4(T) and IS-Hb7(T) and between these strains and other Halobacillus type strains. Both strains showed the major menaquinone MK7 and L-orn-D-Asp cell-wall peptidoglycan type. Straight-chain C(16 : 0), unsaturated C(16 : 1)omega7c alcohol and C(18 : 1)omega7c and cyclopropane C(19 : 0) cyc fatty acids were predominant in both strains. The DNA G+C contents of IS-Hb4(T) and IS-Hb7(T) were respectively 43.3 and 42.1 mol%. Physiological and biochemical analyses combined with DNA-DNA hybridization results allowed us to place strains IS-Hb4(T) (=JCM 14154(T)=DSM 18394(T)) and IS-Hb7(T) (=JCM 14155(T)=DSM 18393(T)) in the genus Halobacillus as the respective type strains of the novel species Halobacillus profundi sp. nov. and Halobacillus kuroshimensis sp. nov.

  8. EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON THE MODERATE HALOPHILE HALOMONAS ELONGATA AND THE EXTREME HALOPHILE HALOBACTERIUM SALINARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both the moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas elongata, and the extremely halophilic archaea, Halobacterium salinarum, can be found in hypersaline environments (e.g., salterns). On complex media, H. elongata grows over a salt range of 0.05-5.2 M, whereas, H. salinarum multi...

  9. Halophilic Bacteria as a Source of Novel Hydrolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    de Lourdes Moreno, María; Pérez, Dolores; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolases constitute a class of enzymes widely distributed in nature from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. The halotolerance of many enzymes derived from halophilic bacteria can be exploited wherever enzymatic transformations are required to function under physical and chemical conditions, such as in the presence of organic solvents and extremes in temperature and salt content. In recent years, different screening programs have been performed in saline habitats in order to isolate and characterize novel enzymatic activities with different properties to those of conventional enzymes. Several halophilic hydrolases have been described, including amylases, lipases and proteases, and then used for biotechnological applications. Moreover, the discovery of biopolymer-degrading enzymes offers a new solution for the treatment of oilfield waste, where high temperature and salinity are typically found, while providing valuable information about heterotrophic processes in saline environments. In this work, we describe the results obtained in different screening programs specially focused on the diversity of halophiles showing hydrolytic activities in saline and hypersaline habitats, including the description of enzymes with special biochemical properties. The intracellular lipolytic enzyme LipBL, produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus, showed advantages over other lipases, being an enzyme active over a wide range of pH values and temperatures. The immobilized LipBL derivatives obtained and tested in regio- and enantioselective reactions, showed an excellent behavior in the production of free polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). On the other hand, the extremely halophilic bacterium, Salicola marasensis sp. IC10 showing lipase and protease activities, was studied for its ability to produce promising enzymes in terms of its resistance to temperature and salinity. PMID:25371331

  10. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  11. Salt-dependent properties of proteins from extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Based on information concerning the interaction of salts and macromolecules the literature of the enzymes of halophilic bacteria and their constituents is examined. Although in halophilic systems the salt requirement of enzyme activity is variable the enzymes investigated show a time-dependent inactivation at lower salt concentrations especially in the absence of salt. The studies described show that in some halophilic systems the effect of salt may be restricted to a small region on the protein molecule. The concept of the hydrophobic bond to consider certain solvent-dependent phenomena is introduced. It is shown that some halophilic enzymes are unable to maintain their structure without the involvement of hydrophobic interactions that are usually not supported by water. A table lists indices of hydrophobicity and polarity for various halophilic and nonhalophilic proteins.

  12. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  13. How to be moderately halophilic with a broad salt tolerance: Cluesfrom the genome of chromohalobacter salexigens

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, Aharon; Larimer, Frank; Richardson, Paul; Lapidus, Alla; Csonka, Laszlo N.

    2004-07-01

    There are two strategies that enable microorganisms to grow at high salt concentrations. Some groups balance the high osmolality of their environment with high intracellular concentrations of KCl1-4. Adaptation of all intracellular proteins is then necessary, and this is reflected in a large excess of acidic over basic residues and a low content of hydrophobic amino acids 2,5-7. Other halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms keep their intracellular ion concentrations low and synthesize or accumulate organic osmotic solutes 8. While halotolerance enables organisms to colonize highly saline environments,the ecological advantage for a salt-requirement is less obvious. We analyzed the amino acid composition of different categories of proteins of the moderately halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens, as deduced from its genome sequence. Comparison with non-halophilic bacteria shows only a slight excess of acidic residues in the cytoplasmic proteins, no significant differences in membrane-bound components, but a distinctive halophilic signature of predicted periplasmic proteins, such as the substrate binding proteins of ABC-type transport systems. The salt requirement of proteins located external to the cytoplasmic membrane may thus determine salt requirement and salt tolerance of prokaryotes.

  14. Culturable diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Aarzoo; Ahmad, Irshad; Kim, Seung Bum

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria are commonly found in natural environments containing significant concentration of NaCl such as inland salt lakes and evaporated sea-shore pools, as well as environments such as curing brines, salted food products and saline soils. Dependence on salt is an important phenotypic characteristic of halophilic bacteria, which can be used in the polyphasic characterization of newly discovered microorganisms. In this study the diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils of Daecheon, Chungnam, and Saemangeum, Jeonbuk, was investigated. Two types of media, namely NA and R2A supplemented with 3%, 5%, 9%, 15%, 20% and 30% NaCl were used. More than 200 halophilic bacteria were isolated and BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis was done for the typing of the isolates. The BLAST identification results showed that isolated strains were composed of 4 phyla, Firmicutes (60%), Proteobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (5%) and Actinobacteria (4%). Isolates were affiliated with 16 genera and 36 species. Bacillus was the dominant genus in the phylum Firmicutes, comprising 24% of the total isolates. Halomonas (12%) and Shewanella (12%) were also found as the main genera. These findings show that the foreshore soil of Daecheon Beach and Saemangeum Sea of Korea represents an untapped source of bacterial biodiversity.

  15. Platinum Recovery from Synthetic Extreme Environments by Halophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maes, Synthia; Props, Ruben; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Smet, Rebecca De; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Metal recycling based on urban mining needs to be established to tackle the increasing supply risk of critical metals such as platinum. Presently, efficient strategies are missing for the recovery of platinum from diluted industrial process streams, often characterized by extremely low pHs and high salt concentrations. In this research, halophilic mixed cultures were employed for the biological recovery of platinum (Pt). Halophilic bacteria were enriched from Artemia cysts, living in salt lakes, in different salt matrices (sea salt mixture and NH4Cl; 20-210 g L(-1) salts) and at low to neutral pH (pH 3-7). The main taxonomic families present in the halophilic cultures were Halomonadaceae, Bacillaceae, and Idiomarinaceae. The halophilic cultures were able to recover >98% Pt(II) and >97% Pt(IV) at pH 2 within 3-21 h (4-453 mg Ptrecovered h(-1) g(-1) biomass). X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the reduction to Pt(0) and transmission electron microscopy revealed both intra- and extracellular Pt precipitates, with median diameters of 9-30 nm and 11-13 nm, for Pt(II) and Pt(IV), respectively. Flow cytometric membrane integrity staining demonstrated the preservation of cell viability during platinum recovery. This study demonstrates the Pt recovery potential of halophilic mixed cultures in acidic saline conditions.

  16. Extremely Halophilic Bacteria in Crystallizer Ponds from Solar Salterns

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Amann, Rudolf

    2000-01-01

    It is generally assumed that hypersaline environments with sodium chloride concentrations close to saturation are dominated by halophilic members of the domain Archaea, while Bacteria are not considered to be relevant in this kind of environment. Here, we report the high abundance and growth of a new group of hitherto-uncultured Bacteria in crystallizer ponds (salinity, from 30 to 37%) from multipond solar salterns. In the present study, these Bacteria constituted from 5 to 25% of the total prokaryotic community and were affiliated with the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Growth was demonstrated in saturated NaCl. A provisional classification of this new bacterial group as “Candidatus Salinibacter gen. nov.” is proposed. The perception that Archaea are the only ecologically relevant prokaryotes in hypersaline aquatic environments should be revised. PMID:10877805

  17. Isolation and characterization of halophilic bacteria from Urmia Lake in Iran.

    PubMed

    Vahed, Sepideh Zununi; Forouhandeh, Haleh; Hassanzadeh, Salar; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2011-01-01

    Urmia Lake is one of the most permanent hypersaline lakes in the world which is threatened by hypersalinity and serious dryness. In spite of its importance no paper has been published regarding bacterial community of this lake. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the halophilic bacteria in the aforementioned lake. In so doing, thirty seven strains were isolated on six different culture media. The isolated strains were characterized using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Growth of the strains occurred at 2535 degrees C, pH 6-9 and 7 to 20% (w/v) NaCl indicating that most of the isolates were moderately halophiles. Catalase, oxidase and urease activities were found to be positive for the majority of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolated bacteria belonged to two major taxa: Gammaproteobacteria (92%, including Salicola [46%], Pseudomonas [13.5%], Marinobacter [ 11%], Idiomarina [11%], and Halomonas [8%]) and Firmicutes (8%, including Bacillus [5%] and Halobacillus [3%]). In addition, a novel bacterium whose 16S rRNA gene sequence showed almost 98% sequence identity with the taxonomically troubled DSM 3050T, Halovibrio denitrificans HGD 3T and Halospina denitrificans HGD 1-3T, each, was isolated. 16S rRNA gene similarity levels along with phenotypic characteristics suggest that some of the isolated strains could be regarded as potential type strain for novel species, on which further studies are recommended.

  18. Diversity of halophilic bacteria isolated from Rambla Salada, Murcia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Luque, Rocío; Béjar, Victoria; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2014-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the diversity of the halophilic bacteria community from Rambla Salada during the years 2006 and 2007. We collected a total of 364 strains, which were then identified by means of phenotypic tests and by the hypervariable V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA sequences (around 500 bp). The ribosomal data showed that the isolates belonged to Proteobacteria (72.5%), Firmicutes (25.8%), Actinobacteria (1.4%), and Bacteroidetes (0.3%) phyla, with Gammaproteobacteria the predominant class. Halomonas was the most abundant genus (41.2% isolates) followed by Marinobacter (12.9% isolates) and Bacillus (12.6% isolates). In addition, 9 strains showed <97% sequence identity with validly described species and may well represent new taxa. The diversity of the bacterial community analyzed with the DOTUR package determined 139 operational taxonomic units at 3% genetic distance level. Rarefaction curves and diversity indexes demonstrated that our collection of isolates adequately represented all the bacterial community at Rambla Salada that can be grown under the conditions used in this work. We found that the sampling season influenced the composition of the bacterial community, and bacterial diversity was higher in 2007; this fact could be related to lower salinity at this sampling time.

  19. Isolation and characterization of halophilic bacteria and archaea from salt ponds in Hangu Saltworks, Tianjin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuangao; Xu, Gaochao; Sui, Liying

    2015-07-01

    A total of 26 isolates were obtained from solar salt ponds of different salinities (100, 150, 200, and 250) in Hangu Saltworks Co. Ltd., Tianjin, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that five bacteria genera Halomonas, Salinicoccus, Oceanobacillus, Gracibacillus, and Salimicrobium and one archaea genera Halorubrum were present. The genus Halomonas was predominant with eight strains distributed in a salinity range of 100-200, followed by Halorubrum with six strains in salinity 250. Based on the genus and original sampling salinity, eight bacterial and two archaeal isolates were selected for further morphological, physiological, and biochemical characterization. All of the bacterial strains were moderately halophilic with the optimal salinity for growth being either 50 or 100, while two archaeal strains were extremely halophilic with an optimal growth salinity of 200. Additionally, we put forth strain SM.200-5 as a new candidate Salimicrobium species based on the phylogenic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and its biochemical characteristics when compared with known related species.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Methanotroph Methylohalobius crimeensis Strain 10Ki

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Christine E.; Smirnova, Angela V.; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Bringel, Françoise; Hirayama, Hisako; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Khmelenina, Valentina N.; Klotz, Martin G.; Knief, Claudia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Reshetnikov, Alexander S.; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Shapiro, Nicole; Trotsenko, Yuri A.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Methylohalobius crimeensis strain 10Ki is a moderately halophilic aerobic methanotroph isolated from a hypersaline lake in the Crimean Peninsula, Ukraine. This organism has the highest salt tolerance of any cultured methanotroph. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:26067976

  1. Drastic differences in glycosylation of related S-layer glycoproteins from moderate and extreme halophiles.

    PubMed

    Mengele, R; Sumper, M

    1992-04-25

    The outer surface of the moderate halophilic archaebacterium Haloferax volcanii (formerly named Halobacterium volcanii) is covered with a hexagonally packed surface (S) layer glycoprotein. The polypeptide (794 amino acid residues) contains 7 N-glycosylation sites. Four of these sites were isolated as glycopeptides and the structure of one of the corresponding saccharides was determined. Oligosaccharides consisting of beta-1,4-linked glucose residues are attached to the protein via the linkage unit asparaginyl-glucose. In the related glycoprotein from the extreme halophile Halobacterium halobium, the glucose residues are replaced by sulfated glucuronic acid residues, causing a drastic increase in surface charge density. This is discussed in terms of a recent model explaining the stability of halophilic proteins.

  2. Role of a moderately halophilic bacterial consortium in the biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Arulazhagan, P; Vasudevan, N

    2009-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous pollutants in the environment, and most high molecular weight PAHs cause mutagenic, teratogenic and potentially carcinogenic effects. While several strains have been identified that degrade PAHs, the present study is focused on the degradation of PAHs in a marine environment by a moderately halophilic bacterial consortium. The bacterial consortium was isolated from a mixture of marine water samples collected from seven different sites in Chennai, India. The low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs phenanthrene and fluorine, and the high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs pyrene and benzo(e)pyrene were selected for the degradation study. The consortium metabolized both LMW and HMW PAHs. The consortium was also able to degrade PAHs present in crude oil-contaminated saline wastewater. The bacterial consortium was able to degrade 80% of HMW PAHs and 100% of LMW PAHs in the saline wastewater. The strains present in the consortium were identified as Ochrobactrum sp., Enterobacter cloacae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This study reveals that these bacteria have the potential to degrade different PAHs in saline wastewater.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus succinus Strain CSM-77, a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Triassic Salt Mine

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus succinus strain CSM-77. This moderately halophilic bacterium was isolated from the surface of a halite sample obtained from a Triassic salt mine. PMID:27284152

  4. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-03-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C{sup α} r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior

  5. Workshop on Viability of Halophilic Bacteria in Salt Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The significance of finding viable extreme halophiles in halites associated with Permian-aged sedimentary deposits is considered. Issues related to the microbiology and geochemistry of the halite environment are addressed. Recommendations that related the significance of this phenomenon to NASA's interest in planetary exploration and the early evolution of life are provided.

  6. How-to-Do-It: A Simple DNA Isolation Technique Using Halophilic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Described is a simple technique for isolating DNA from halophilic bacteria. Materials, procedure, and additional experiments are outlined. It is stated that the DNA obtained will be somewhat contaminated with cellular proteins and RNA. Offers a procedure for greater purification. (RT)

  7. Actinide biocolloid formation in brine by halophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1998-12-31

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  8. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Brady, P.V.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-28

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  9. ACTINIDE BIOCOLLOID FORMATION IN BRINE BY HALOPHILIC BACTERIA

    SciTech Connect

    GILLOW,J.B.; FRANCIS,A.J.; DODGE,C.J.; HARRIS,R.; BEVERIDGE,T.J.; BRADY,P.B.; PAPENGUTH,H.W.

    1998-11-09

    The authors examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WIPP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited solubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellularly as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide.

  10. Distribution and diversity of halophilic bacteria in a subsurface salt formation.

    PubMed

    Vreeland, R H; Piselli, A F; McDonnough, S; Meyers, S S

    1998-08-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a salt mine constructed 650 meters below the ground surface by the United States Department of Energy. The facility will be used for permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. This underground repository has been constructed in the geologically stable Permian age Salado salt formation. Of the wastes to be placed into the facility, 85% will be biodegradable cellulose. A 3-year survey of the bacterial populations existing within the facility was conducted. Bacterial populations were found to be heterogeneously distributed throughout the mine. Populations in some mine areas reached as high as 1.0 x 10(4) colony-forming units per gram of NaCl. The heterogeneous distribution of bacteria within the mine did not follow any recognizable pattern related to either age of the workings or to human activity. A biochemical comparison between ten known species of halophilic bacteria, and strains isolated from both the mine and nearby surface hypersaline lakes, showed the presence of extreme halophiles with wide biochemical diversity, some of which could prove to represent previously undescribed groups. The halophilic bacteria isolated from the mine were found to degrade cellulose and a wide variety of other carbon compounds. When exposed to two types of common laboratory paper, the cellulose-degrading halophiles attached to the substrate within 30 minutes of inoculation. Cultures enriched directly from a brine seep in the mine easily destroyed both papers and produced detectable amounts of oxalacetic and pyruvic acids. The combination of heterogeneity in the distribution of organisms, the presence of a physiologically diverse community, and the relatively slow metabolism of cellulose may explain several long-standing debates about the existence of microorganisms in ancient underground salt formations.

  11. Regulation of osmoadaptation in the moderate halophile Halobacillus halophilus: chloride, glutamate and switching osmolyte strategies

    PubMed Central

    Saum, Stephan H; Müller, Volker

    2008-01-01

    The moderate halophile Halobacillus halophilus is the paradigm for chloride dependent growth in prokaryotes. Recent experiments shed light on the molecular basis of the chloride dependence that is reviewed here. In the presence of moderate salinities Halobacillus halophilus mainly accumulates glutamine and glutamate to adjust turgor. The transcription of glnA2 (encoding a glutamine synthetase) as well as the glutamine synthetase activity were identified as chloride dependent steps. Halobacillus halophilus switches its osmolyte strategy and produces proline as the main compatible solute at high salinities. Furthermore, Halobacillus halophilus also shifts its osmolyte strategy at the transition from the exponential to the stationary phase where proline is exchanged by ectoine. Glutamate was found as a “second messenger” essential for proline production. This observation leads to a new model of sensing salinity by sensing the physico-chemical properties of different anions. PMID:18442383

  12. Bacterioruberin and salinixanthin carotenoids of extremely halophilic Archaea and Bacteria: A Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlička, J.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Oren, A.

    2013-04-01

    Laboratory cultures of a number of red extremely halophilic Archaea (Halobacterium salinarum strains NRC-1 and R1, Halorubrum sodomense, Haloarcula valismortis) and of Salinibacter ruber, a red extremely halophilic member of the Bacteria, have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy using 514.5 nm excitation to characterize their carotenoids. The 50-carbon carotenoid α-bacterioruberin was detected as the major carotenoid in all archaeal strains. Raman spectroscopy also detected bacterioruberin as the main pigment in a red pellet of cells collected from a saltern crystallizer pond. Salinibacter contains the C40-carotenoid acyl glycoside salinixanthin (all-E, 2'S)-2'-hydroxy-1'-[6-O-(methyltetradecanoyl)-β-D-glycopyranosyloxy]-3',4'-didehydro-1',2'-dihydro-β,ψ-carotene-4-one), for which the Raman bands assignments of are given here for the first time.

  13. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Anderson F.; Valle, Roberta S.; Pacheco, Clarissa A.; Alvarez, Vanessa M.; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L.S.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties. PMID:24688526

  14. [Isolation and characteristic of a moderately halophilic bacterium accumulated ectoine as main compatible solute].

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Wang, Ting; Sun, Ji-Quan; Gu, Li-Feng; Li, Shun-Peng

    2005-12-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium(designated strain I15) was isolated from lawn soil. Based on the analysis of 16S rDNA (GenBank accession number DQ010162), morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain I15 was identified as Virgibacillus marismortuii. This strain was capable of growing under 0% approximately 25% NaCl, and exhibited an optimum NaCl concentration of 10% and an optimum temperature of 30 degrees C and an optimum pH of 7.5 - 8.0 for its growth, respectively. Under hyperosmotic stress, strain 115 accumulated ectoine as the main compatible solute. Under 15% NaCl conditions the intracellar ectoine can reach to 1.608 mmol/(g x cdw), accounted for 89.6% of the total compatible solutes. The biosynthesis of ectoine was under the control of osmotic, and the accumulated ectoine synthesized intraceilularly can released under hypoosmotic shocks and resynthesis under hyperosmotic shock rapidly.

  15. Bacillus shacheensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline-alkali soil.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zuchao; Qiu, Peng; Ye, Renyuan; Tian, Jiewei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun; Tian, Yongqiang

    2014-01-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, strain HNA-14(T), was isolated from a saline-alkali soil sample collected in Shache County, Xinjiang Province. On the basis of the polyphasic taxonomic data, the isolate was considered to be a member of the genus Bacillus. The organism grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 8.0. It was moderately halophilic and its optimum growth occurred at 5-10% NaCl. The diamino acid found in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid and the predominant menaquinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0 and the polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannosides and two unknown phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 48.6 mol%. Strain HNA-14(T) exhibited a low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96% with its nearest neighbors [Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 (96.5%), Bacillus xiaoxiensis DSM 21943(T)(96.2%), Bacillus clausii DSM 8716(T) (96.1%), Bacillus patagoniensis PAT05(T) (96.1%), Bacillus lehensis MLB-2(T) (96.0%), Bacillus oshimensis K11(T) (95.9%) and Bacillus hunanensis DSM 23008(T) (95.8%)] and the phenotypic characteristics indicate that strain HNA-14(T) can be distinguished from them. Therefore, a novel species of the genus Bacillus, Bacillus shacheensis sp. nov. (type strain, HNA-14(T) = KCTC 33145 = DSM 26902) is proposed.

  16. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite. PMID:26048927

  17. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus

    PubMed Central

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-01-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1). PMID:24031699

  18. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-07-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1).

  19. Characterization of the basic replicon of pCM1, a narrow-host-range plasmid from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter marismortui.

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, E; Asturias, J A; Nieto, J J; Timmis, K N; Ventosa, A

    1995-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter marismortui contains a 17.5-kb narrow-host-range plasmid, pCM1, which shows interesting properties for the development of cloning vectors for the genetic manipulation of this important group of extremophiles. Plasmid pCM1 can stably replicate and is maintained in most gram-negative moderate halophiles tested. The replication origin has been identified and sequenced, and the minimal pCM1 replicon has been localized to a 1,600-bp region which includes two functionally discrete regions, the oriV region and the repA gene. oriV, located on a 700-bp fragment, contains four iterons 20 bp in length adjacent to a DnaA box that is dispensable but required for efficient replication of pCM1, and it requires trans-acting functions. The repA gene, which encodes a replication protein of 289 residues, is similar to the replication proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7768853

  20. Comparison between the polypeptide profile of halophilic bacteria and salt tolerant plants.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; González, C; Flores, P; Prado, B; Campos, V

    1997-12-01

    Changes in the polypeptide profile induced by salt stress in halotolerant and halophilic bacteria, isolated from the Atacama desert (northern Chile), were compared with those in the cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis (Leguminoseae) seedlings, a salt tolerant plant. SDS-PAGE analyses show the presence of four predominant polypeptides, with molecular weights around 78, 70, 60 and 44 kDa respectively, both in bacteria and in cotyledons from P. chilensis seedlings raised under salt stress conditions. Moreover, the 60 and 44 kDa polypeptides seem to be salt responsive, since their concentration increases with increasing NaCl in the growth medium. Our results suggest a common mechanism for salt tolerance in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes.

  1. Cold-active halophilic bacteria from the ice-sealed Lake Vida, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Lindsay J; Asao, Marie; Madigan, Michael T

    2009-10-01

    Lake Vida is a large, permanently ice-covered lake in the Victoria Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica and is unique among Dry Valley lakes because it is ice-sealed, with an ice-cover of nearly 19 m. Enrichment cultures of melt-water from Lake Vida 15.9 m ice yielded five pure cultures of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria. Of these, one strain grew at -8 degrees C and the four others at -4 degrees C. All isolates were either halotolerant or halophilic, with two strains capable of growth at 15% NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Lake Vida isolates to be Gammaproteobacteria, related to species of Psychrobacter and Marinobacter. This is the first report of pure cultures of bacteria from Lake Vida, and the isolates displayed a phenotype consistent with life in a cold hypersaline environment.

  2. Diverse antimicrobial interactions of halophilic archaea and bacteria extend over geographical distances and cross the domain barrier.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Nina S; Pietilä, Maija K; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2013-10-01

    The significance of antimicrobial substances, halocins, produced by halophilic archaea and bacteria thriving in hypersaline environments is relatively unknown. It is suggested that their production might increase species diversity and give transient competitive advances to the producer strain. Halocin production is considered to be common among halophilic archaea, but there is a lack of information about halocins produced by bacteria in highly saline environments. We studied the antimicrobial activity of 68 halophilic archaea and 22 bacteria isolated from numerous geographically distant hypersaline environments. Altogether 144 antimicrobial interactions were found between the strains and aside haloarchaea, halophilic bacteria from various genera were identified as halocin producers. Close to 80% of the interactions were detected between microorganisms from different genera and in few cases, even across the domain boundary. Several of the strains produced halocins with a wide inhibitory spectrum as has been observed before. Most of the antimicrobial interactions were found between strains from distant sampling sites indicating that hypersaline environments around the world have similar microorganisms with the potential to produce wide activity range antimicrobials.

  3. Membrane fluidity of halophilic ectoine-secreting bacteria related to osmotic and thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Sven; David, Florian; Clark, Wiebke; Wittmann, Christoph; Krull, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    In response to sudden decrease in osmotic pressure, halophilic microorganisms secrete their accumulated osmolytes. This specific stress response, combined with physiochemical responses to the altered environment, influence the membrane properties and integrity of cells, with consequent effects on growth and yields in bioprocesses, such as bacterial milking. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in membrane fluidity and integrity induced by environmental stress in ectoine-secreting organisms. The halophilic ectoine-producing strains Alkalibacillus haloalkaliphilus and Chromohalobacter salexigens were treated hypo- and hyper-osmotically at several temperatures. The steady-state anisotropy of fluorescently labeled cells was measured, and membrane integrity assessed by flow cytometry and ectoine distribution. Strong osmotic downshocks slightly increased the fluidity of the bacterial membranes. As the temperature increased, the increasing membrane fluidity encouraged more ectoine release under the same osmotic shock conditions. On the other hand, combined shock treatments increased the number of disintegrated cells. From the ectoine release and membrane integrity measurements under coupled thermal and osmotic shock conditions, we could optimize the secretion conditions for both bacteria.

  4. Genome sequence of the moderately halophilic bacterium Salinicoccus carnicancri type strain Crm(T) (= DSM 23852(T)).

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Whon, Tae Woong; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Joon-Yong; Kim, Pil Soo; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jina; Oh, Sei Joon; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Salinicoccus carnicancri Jung et al. 2010 belongs to the genus Salinicoccus in the family Staphylococcaceae. Members of the Salinicoccus are moderately halophilic and originate from various salty environments. The halophilic features of the Salinicoccus suggest their possible uses in biotechnological applications, such as biodegradation and fermented food production. However, the genus Salinicoccus is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. This study presents the draft genome sequence of S. carnicancri strain Crm(T) and its annotation. The 2,673,309 base pair genome contained 2,700 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 47.93 mol%. It was notable that the strain carried 72 predicted genes associated with osmoregulation, which suggests the presence of beneficial functions that facilitate growth in high-salt environments.

  5. Biocalcification by halophilic bacteria for remediation of concrete structures in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Roohi; Dhami, Navdeep Kaur; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2016-11-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation has emerged as a promising technology for remediation and restoration of concrete structures. Deterioration of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments is a major concern due to chloride-induced corrosion. In the current study, halophilic bacteria Exiguobacterium mexicanum was isolated from sea water and tested for biomineralization potential under different salt stress conditions. The growth, urease and carbonic anhydrase production significantly increased under salt stress conditions. Maximum calcium carbonate precipitation was recorded at 5 % NaCl concentration. Application of E. mexicanum on concrete specimens significantly increased the compressive strength (23.5 %) and reduced water absorption about five times under 5 % salt stress conditions compared to control specimens. SEM and XRD analysis of bacterial-treated concrete specimens confirmed the precipitation of calcite. The present study results support the potential of this technology for improving the strength and durability properties of building structures in marine environments.

  6. Salt-dependent thermo-reversible α-amylase: cloning and characterization of halophilic α-amylase from moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians, was found to produce active α-amylase (K. varians α-amylase (KVA)). We have observed at least six different forms of α-amylase secreted by this bacterium into the culture medium. Characterization of these KVA forms and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that KVA comprises pre-pro-precursor form of α-amylase catalytic domain followed by the tandem repeats, which show high similarity to each other and to the starch binding domain (SBD) of other α-amylases. The observed six forms were most likely derived by various processing of the protein product. Recombinant KVA protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and was purified with affinity chromatography after cleavage from fusion partner. The highly acidic amino acid composition of KVA and the highly negative electrostatic potential surface map of the modeled structure strongly suggested its halophilic nature. Indeed, KVA showed distinct salt- and time-dependent thermal reversibility: when α-amylase was heat denatured at 85°C for 3 min in the presence of 2 M NaCl, the activity was recovered upon incubation on ice (50% recovery after 15 min incubation). Conversely, KVA denatured in 0.1 M NaCl was not refolded at all, even after prolonged incubation. KVA activity was inhibited by proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitor from Streptomyces nitrosporeus, which had been implicated to inhibit only animal α-amylases. KVA with putative SBD regions was found to digest raw starch.

  7. Halobacillus mangrovi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from the black mangrove Avicennia germinans.

    PubMed

    Soto-Ramírez, Nelís; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Rosas-Padilla, Soniris; Almodóvar, Karinna; Jiménez, Gina; Machado-Rodríguez, Marlene; Zapata, Magaly; Ventosa, Antonio; Montalvo-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    A moderately halophilic, spore-forming, Gram-positive, short-rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain MS10(T), was isolated from the surface of leaves of the black mangrove Avicennia germinans and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain MS10(T) was able to grow at NaCl concentrations in the range 5-20% (w/v) with optimum growth at 10% (w/v) NaCl. Growth occurred at temperatures of 10-50 degrees C (optimal growth at 33-35 degrees C) and pH 6.0-9.0 (optimal growth at pH 7.0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain MS10(T) fell within the branch encompassing members of the genus Halobacillus and was most closely related to Halobacillus dabanensis JCM 12772(T) (99.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The DNA G+C content of strain MS10(T) was 45.7 mol%, the major respiratory isoprenoid quinone was MK-7 and the cell-wall peptidoglycan was of the L-Orn-D-Asp type, characteristics consistent with its affiliation to the genus Halobacillus. Strain MS10(T) showed a level of DNA-DNA hybridization with H. dabanensis JCM 12772(T) of 29% and levels below 70% were also obtained with respect to other recognized members of the genus Halobacillus. The major fatty acids of strain MS10(T) were iso-C(16:0), anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(14:0) and iso-C(15:0). Overall, the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic results presented in this study demonstrate that strain MS10(T) represents a novel species of the genus Halobacillus, for which the name Halobacillus mangrovi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MS10(T) (=CECT 7206(T)=CCM 7397(T)).

  8. Halomonas huangheensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline-alkali soil.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chaohua; Jia, Fangfang; Wan, Yusong; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min; Jin, Wujun

    2014-03-01

    A novel, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile and moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain BJGMM-B45(T), was isolated from a saline-alkali soil collected from Shandong Province, China. Growth of strain BJGMM-B45(T) occurred at 10-45 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and pH 5.0-12.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) on Luria-Bertani agar medium with 1-20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 7-10 %). The predominant respiratory quinone was Q-9. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were C18 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0, C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, summed feature 3, C12 : 0 3-OH and C12 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content was 57.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain BJGMM-B45(T) belonged to the genus Halomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. The closest relatives were Halomonas cupida DSM 4740(T) (98.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Halomonas denitrificans M29(T) (97.8 %). Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain BJGMM-B45(T) and Halomonas cupida CGMCC 1.2312(T) and Halomonas denitrificans DSM 18045(T) were 57.0 and 58.9 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic features, strain BJGMM-B45(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas huangheensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BJGMM-B45(T) ( = ACCC 05850(T) = KCTC 32409(T)).

  9. Haloanaerobium salsugo sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from a subterranean brine

    SciTech Connect

    Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Sharma, P.K.; Tanner, R.S.; McInerney, M.J.; Oren, A.; Woese, C.R.

    1994-07-01

    A strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a highly saline oil field brine. The bacterium was a non-spore-forming, nonmotile rod, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains, and measured 0.3 to 0.4 by 2.6 to 4 {micro}m. The bacterium had a specific requirement for NaCl and grew at NaCl concentrations of between 6 and 24%, with optimal growth at 9% NaCl. The isolate grew at temperatures of between 22 and 51 C and pH values of between 5.6 and 8.0. The doubling time in a complex medium containing 10% NaCl was 9 h. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and penicillin but not by cycloheximide or azide. Fermentable substrates were predominantly carbohydrates. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 16:1}, and C{sub 17:0 cyc} acids. The DNA base composition of the isolate was 34 mol% G+C. Oligonucleotide catalog and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA showed that strain VS-752{sup T} was most closely related to Haloanaerobium praevalens GSL{sup T} (ATCC 33744), the sole member of the genus Haloanaerobium. The authors propose that strain VS-752 (ATCC 51327) by established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium salsugo, in the genus Haloanaerobium. 40 refs., 3 figs, 5 tabs.

  10. Diversity and enumeration of halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria in Spanish-style green table-olive fermentations.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Padrós, Helena; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis

    2016-02-01

    The presence and enumeration of halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria in Spanish-style table-olive fermentations was studied. Twenty 10-tonne fermenters at two large manufacturing companies in Spain, previously studied through both culture dependent and independent (PCR-DGGE) methodologies, were selected. Virtually all this microbiota was isolated during the initial fermentation stage. A total of 203 isolates were obtained and identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. They belonged to 13 bacterial species, included in 11 genera. It was noticeable the abundance of halophilic and alkaliphilic lactic acid bacteria (HALAB). These HALAB belonged to the three genera of this group: Alkalibacterium, Marinilactibacillus and Halolactibacillus. Ten bacterial species were isolated for the first time from table olive fermentations, including the genera Amphibacillus, Natronobacillus, Catenococcus and Streptohalobacillus. The isolates were genotyped through RAPD and clustered in a dendrogram where 65 distinct strains were identified. Biodiversity indexes found statistically significant differences between both patios regarding genotype richness, diversity and dominance. However, Jaccard similarity index suggested that the halophilic/alkaliphilic microbiota in both patios was more similar than the overall microbiota at the initial fermentation stage. Thus, up to 7 genotypes of 6 different species were shared, suggesting adaptation of some strains to this fermentation stage. Morisita-Horn similarity index indicated a high level of codominance of the same species in both patios. Halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria, especially HALAB, appeared to be part of the characteristic microbiota at the initial stage of this table-olive fermentation, and they could contribute to the conditioning of the fermenting brines in readiness for growth of common lactic acid bacteria.

  11. Halotolerant and halophilic bacteria in the oceans of the icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, S. I.; Montoya, L.; Avendaño, R.

    2013-05-01

    Halotolerant and halophilic prokaryotes require salt concentrations equal to or higher than those present at terrestrial oceans (Rothschild and Mancinelli, 2001). They are a particular kind of extremophiles and as expected, their halotolerance is mainly expressed in terms of a certain NaCl percentage, at least on Earth. With the discovery of putative salty liquid oceans beneath the iced surfaces of some of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn (Mueller and McKinnon, 1988; Kargel et al., 2000; Zolotov, 2007), information about the impact of other types of salts, different from NaCl, on the growth of complex biological systems is necessary. We have found that when three specific bacteria strains are growing in media enriched with salts containing chaotropic and kosmotropic ions, their specific optimal growth value is modified (Montoya et al., 2010). The changes can be broadly explained in terms of the Hofmeister series (Zhang and Cremer, 2006). These results can be used to infer an extension in the limits of biological activity. For terrestrial organisms there is scarce information to determine the impact of another salt in the growth of an organism. In these sense we have found that when media enriched with magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) at water activity values (aw) similar to those reported as optimal for NaCl, their growth and tolerance is considerably enhanced. On the other hand, the combination of chaotropic and kosmotropic ions result in salts of astrobiological importance such as the sulphate already mentioned, carbonates or chlorides that can tentatively exist in the putative ocean of Europa, Ganymedes, or Enceladus or even at the subsurface of Mars. In this frame, we studied the growth rate of Halomonas halodurans, H. magadiensis and Bacillus pumillus when exposed to media enriched with NaCl, MgSO4, Mg(NO3)2, MgCl2, Na2SO4 and NH4SO4. Equivalent values of water activity (aw) for each salt were compared and correlated with microbial activity (Montoya et al., 2010

  12. Alleviation of salt stress by halotolerant and halophilic plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Orhan, Furkan

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, 18 halotolerant and halophilic bacteria have been investigated for their plant growth promoting abilities in vitro and in a hydroponic culture. The bacterial strains have been investigated for ammonia, indole-3-acetic acid and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate-deaminase production, phosphate solubilisation and nitrogen fixation activities. Of the tested bacteria, eight were inoculated with Triticum aestivum in a hydroponic culture. The investigated bacterial strains were found to have different plant-growth promoting activities in vitro. Under salt stress (200mM NaCl), the investigated bacterial strains significantly increased the root and shoot length and total fresh weight of the plants. The growth rates of the plants inoculated with bacterial strains ranged from 62.2% to 78.1%. Identifying of novel halophilic and halotolerant bacteria that promote plant growth can be used as alternatives for salt sensitive plants. Extensive research has been conducted on several halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains to investigate their plant growth promoting activities. However, to the best of my knowledge, this is the first study to inoculate these bacterial strains with wheat.

  13. Larsenimonas suaedae sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, endophytic bacterium isolated from the euhalophyte Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi-Jie; Wu, Hong-Zhen; Cui, Chun-Xiao; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Guo-Yan; Wang, Hai-Xia; Dai, Mei-Xue

    2016-08-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-stain-negative, non-endospore-forming endophytic bacterium designated strain ST307T was isolated from the euhalophyte Suaeda salsa in Dongying, China. Strain ST307T was aerobic, rod-shaped, motile and orange-yellow-pigmented. The organism grew at NaCl concentrations of 0.6-20 % (w/v) (optimum 5-6 %, w/v), at temperatures of 5-45 °C (optimum 35 °C) and at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 7-8). It accumulated poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid and produced exopolysaccharides. The major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c. The predominant lipoquinone was ubiquinone Q-9. The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, a glycoaminolipid and a phosphoglycoaminolipid. The DNA G+C content was 60.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated atpA, rpoD and secA gene sequences revealed that the strain represents a member of the genus Larsenimonas. The closest related type strain was Larsenimonas salina M1-18T. Mean DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain ST307T and the related species L. salina M1-18T, Chromohalobacter beijerinckii DSM 7218T, C. canadensis DSM 6769T, C. israelensis DSM 6768T, C. marismortui CGMCC 1.2321T, C. nigrandesensis DSM 14323T, C. salexigens DSM 3043T and C. sarecensis DSM 15547T were 15±2-45±1 %. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular features, strain ST307T clearly represents a novel species of the genus Larsenimonas. The name Larsenimonassuaedae sp. nov. is proposed, with ST307T (=CGMCC 1.8902T=DSM 22428T) as the type strain.

  14. Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a salt lake.

    PubMed

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Didari, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain H9B(T), was isolated from a mud sample of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain H9B(T) were motile and produced colonies with a yellowish-grey pigment. Growth occurred between 2.5 and 10 % (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of pH 6-10 and 25-45 °C, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain H9B(T) is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus. The closest relative to this strain was Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28(T) with 97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequences similarity. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and this phylogenetically related species was 17 %. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipid pattern of strain H9B(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four phospholipids and an aminolipid. It contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 37.1 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Oceanobacillus limi is strain H9B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10780(T) = KCTC 13823(T) = CECT 7997(T)).

  15. Halobacillus sediminis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern sediment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chan; Han, Song-Ih; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain NGS-2T, was isolated from sediment of a solar saltern pond located in Shinan, Korea. Strain NGS-2T was a strictly aerobic, non-motile rod that grew at pH 5.0-10.0 (optimum, pH 8.0), at 10-30 °C (optimum, 28 °C) and in the presence of 1-20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 10 % NaCl). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain NGS-2T belonged to the genus Halobacillus, with sequence similarity of 98.4-95.8 % to existing type strains, showing the highest sequence similarity to Halobacillus dabanensis D-8T (98.4 %), H. litoralis SL-4T (98.4 %), H. trueperi SL-5T (98.2 %), H. faecis IGA7-4T (98.2 %), H. profundi IS-Hb4T (98.1 %) and H. mangrovi MS10T (98.0 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidyl-N-methylethanolamine and an unknown glycolipid. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was based on l-Orn-d-Asp, the predominant isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7) and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C15: 0 and anteiso-C17: 0. The DNA G+C content of the novel isolate was 45.0 mol%. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain NGS-2T and the type strains of 12 other species of the genus ranged from 32 to 3 %. On the basis of the polyphasic analysis conducted in this study, strain NGS-2T represents a novel species of the genus Halobacillus, for which the name Halobacillus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NGS-2T ( = KACC 18263T = NBRC 110639T).

  16. Exopolysaccharides produced by the recently described halophilic bacteria Halomonas ventosae and Halomonas anticariensis.

    PubMed

    Mata, Juan Antonio; Béjar, Victoria; Llamas, Inmaculada; Arias, Soledad; Bressollier, Philippe; Tallon, Richard; Urdaci, María C; Quesada, Emilia

    2006-11-01

    We studied exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by Halomonas ventosae and Halomonas anticariensis, two novel species of halophilic bacteria. Under optimum environmental and nutritional conditions, H. ventosae strains Al12(T) and Al16 excreted 28.35 mg and 28.95 mg of EPS per 100 ml of culture medium (34.55 and 38.6 mg of EPS per gram of dry cell weight) respectively. The molecular masses of the polymers were about 50 kDa and their main components were glucose, mannose and galactose. They had high protein fractions and showed emulsifying activity on several hydrophobic substrates. Under optimum environmental and nutritional conditions, H. anticariensis strains FP35(T) and FP36 excreted about 29.65 and 49.95 mg of EPS per 100 ml of culture medium (43.6 and 50.95 mg of EPS per gram of dry cell weight) respectively. The molecular masses of the polymers were about 20 and 46 kDa respectively and were composed mainly of glucose, mannose and galacturonic acid. All EPSs produced solutions of low viscosity and pseudoplastic behaviour. They also had a high capacity for binding cations and incorporated considerable quantities of sulphates, which is highly unusual in bacterial polysaccharides. All strains assayed formed biofilms both in polystyrene wells and borosilicate test tubes.

  17. L-Asparaginase Activity in Cell Lysates and Culture Media of Halophilic Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Mahmood; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Nafissi-Varcheh, Nastaran; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Houshdar Tehrani, Mohammad Hassan; Vahidi, Hossein; Adrangi, Sina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate halophilic bacteria with the ability to produce intracellular or extracellular L-asparaginase. A total number of 120 halophilic bacteria were isolated from 17 different saline habitats of Iran including salt lakes, wetlands, brine springs and deserts. Among these, 68 were able to grow in the presence of 1.5 M NaCl and 52 demonstrated the ability to grow in the selection medium containing 3.5 M NaCl. None of the isolates appeared to produce appreciable amounts of extracellular L-asparaginase. Among the isolates that produced intracellular L-asparaginase, 5 moderate and 1 extreme halophiles were selected for further study based on their observed activity level. The moderately halophilic isolates were shown to belong to the genus Halomonas while the extreme halophile was identified as a member of the genus Aidingimonas. PMID:27980578

  18. L-Asparaginase Activity in Cell Lysates and Culture Media of Halophilic Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Barati, Mahmood; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Nafissi-Varcheh, Nastaran; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Houshdar Tehrani, Mohammad Hassan; Vahidi, Hossein; Adrangi, Sina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate halophilic bacteria with the ability to produce intracellular or extracellular L-asparaginase. A total number of 120 halophilic bacteria were isolated from 17 different saline habitats of Iran including salt lakes, wetlands, brine springs and deserts. Among these, 68 were able to grow in the presence of 1.5 M NaCl and 52 demonstrated the ability to grow in the selection medium containing 3.5 M NaCl. None of the isolates appeared to produce appreciable amounts of extracellular L-asparaginase. Among the isolates that produced intracellular L-asparaginase, 5 moderate and 1 extreme halophiles were selected for further study based on their observed activity level. The moderately halophilic isolates were shown to belong to the genus Halomonas while the extreme halophile was identified as a member of the genus Aidingimonas.

  19. Halophilic-Psychrophilic Bacteria from Tirich Mir Glacier, Pakistan, as Potential Candidate for Astrobiological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, M. R.; Anesio, A. M. A.; Hayat, M. H.; Zada, S. Z.; Sajjad, W. S.; Shah, A. A. S.; Hasan, F. H.

    2016-09-01

    Hindu Kush, Karakoram, and Himalaya region is referred to as 'third pole' and could be suitable as a terrestrial analog of Mars and increased possibility of finding polyextremophiles. Study is focused on halophilic psychrophiles.

  20. The potential of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria for the production of antineoplastic enzymes: L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase.

    PubMed

    Shirazian, Pejman; Asad, Sedigheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase can be effectively used for the treatment of patients who suffer from accute lymphoblastic leukemia and tumor cells. Microbial sources are the best source for the bulk production of these enzymes. However, their long-term administration may cause immunological responses, so screening for new enzymes with novel properties is required. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria with novel enzymatic characteristics can be considered as a potential source for production of enzymes with different immunological properties. In this study, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production by halophilic bacteria isolated from Urmia salt lake was studied. Out of the 85 isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains, 16 (19 %) showed L-asparaginase activity and 3 strains (3.5 %) showed L-glutaminase activity. Strains with the highest activities were selected for further studies. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, it was shown that the selected isolates for L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production belong to the genus Bacillus and Salicola, respectively. Both enzymes were produced extracellularly. The strain with the most L-asparaginase production did not show L-glutaminase production which is medically important. The effects of key parameters including temperature, initial pH of the solution, and concentrations of glucose, asparagine or glutamine, and sodium chloride were evaluated by means of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize enzymes production. Under the obtained optimal conditions, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production was increased up to 1.5 (61.7 unit/mL) and 2.6 fold (46.4 unit/mL), respectively.

  1. The potential of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria for the production of antineoplastic enzymes: L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Pejman; Asad, Sedigheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase can be effectively used for the treatment of patients who suffer from accute lymphoblastic leukemia and tumor cells. Microbial sources are the best source for the bulk production of these enzymes. However, their long-term administration may cause immunological responses, so screening for new enzymes with novel properties is required. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria with novel enzymatic characteristics can be considered as a potential source for production of enzymes with different immunological properties. In this study, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production by halophilic bacteria isolated from Urmia salt lake was studied. Out of the 85 isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains, 16 (19 %) showed L-asparaginase activity and 3 strains (3.5 %) showed L-glutaminase activity. Strains with the highest activities were selected for further studies. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, it was shown that the selected isolates for L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production belong to the genus Bacillus and Salicola, respectively. Both enzymes were produced extracellularly. The strain with the most L-asparaginase production did not show L-glutaminase production which is medically important. The effects of key parameters including temperature, initial pH of the solution, and concentrations of glucose, asparagine or glutamine, and sodium chloride were evaluated by means of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize enzymes production. Under the obtained optimal conditions, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production was increased up to 1.5 (61.7 unit/mL) and 2.6 fold (46.4 unit/mL), respectively. PMID:27330530

  2. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria from river waters and shallow groundwater along the Rouge River of southeastern Michigan.

    PubMed

    Tiquia, S M; Davis, D; Hadid, H; Kasparian, S; Ismail, M; Sahly, R; Shim, J; Singh, S; Murray, K S

    2007-03-01

    The use of sodium chloride to melt highway and road snow is believed to have a significant effect on the groundwater ecosystem of the rivers where the salt from the roads drain. As the river composition changes, the bacterial population also changes to favour those bacteria that are more suited to the higher salt concentrations. In this experiment, we surveyed the cultivable salt-loving organisms (halophiles) on three sites that encompass the Rouge River (Lotz; site 1, Lilly, site; 8, and Ford Field, site 9). A total of 125 isolates were surveyed. Representative isolates of distinct morphologies were subjected to physiological test, using API strips and identified by 16 rDNA sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequences were analyzed and compared with sequences from Genbank. Results indicated that the SSU rRNA sequences of the bacterial isolates were similar to six major genera, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Halobacillus, Paenabacillus, Halomonas, and Clostridium. Half of the isolates sequenced were similar to Bacillus spp. The API assay showed that the majority of the isolates were positive for the enzymes tryptophane deaminase, gelatinase and beta-galactosidase. Indole production, acetoin production and citrate utilization were not observed for any isolates. Fermentation of carbohydrates was observed for very few isolates. The primary enzyme found in all isolates was arginine dihydrolase, which might be an indicator of the presence of such enzyme in halophilic and halotolerant bacteria present in the Rouge River.

  3. Bacillus oshimensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, non-motile alkaliphile.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Isao; Hirota, Kikue; Goto, Toshitaka; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Nakajima, Kenji

    2005-03-01

    A halophilic and halotolerant, facultatively alkaliphilic strain, K11(T), was isolated from soil obtained from Oshyamanbe, Oshima, Hokkaido, Japan. The isolate grew at pH 7-10. It was non-motile, Gram-positive and aerobic. Cells comprised straight rods and produced ellipsoidal spores. The isolate grew in 0-20 % NaCl, with optimum growth at 7 % NaCl, and hydrolysed casein, gelatin, starch, DNA and Tweens 20, 40, 60 and 80. The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7, and the cellular fatty acid profile consisted of significant amounts of C(15) branched-chain acids, iso C(15 : 0) and anteiso C(15 : 0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that strain K11(T) was a member of group 6 [Nielsen et al., FEMS Microbiol Lett 117 (1994), 61-66] (alkaliphiles) of the genus Bacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization revealed a low relatedness (14 %) of the isolate to its closest phylogenetic neighbour, Bacillus clausii. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, phylogenetic data and DNA-DNA relatedness data, it was concluded that K11(T) (=JCM 12663(T)=NCIMB 14023(T)) merits classification as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Bacillus oshimensis sp. nov. is proposed.

  4. A diverse group of halophilic bacteria exist in Lunsu, a natural salt water body of Himachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Srivastava, Malay; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Five halophilic bacterial isolates namely SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5 and SS8 were isolated from soil sediments of Lunsu, a salty water body. All the bacterial isolates showed growth in LB medium containing up to 8.7% NaCl, pH 7-8 and at temperature range of 30-37°C. The bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 require at least 3.8% NaCl for their growth, indicating their strict halophilic nature. Interestingly, bacterial isolates SS2, SS5 and SS8 but not SS1 and SS3 exhibited growth in medium supplemented with KCl. Accordingly, Na(+) and K(+) ions were detected at 1.39 and 0.0035%, respectively in Lunsu water. All the bacterial isolates were analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using four different random primers and produced PCR fragments ranging from 0.1 to 5 kb in size. Phylogenetic tree based on RAPD finger prints showed that SS1 and SS3 formed one group, while SS2 and SS5 formed the second group, whereas SS8 was out group. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA identified SS1 and SS3 as Halobacillus trueperi, SS2 as Shewanella algae, SS5 as Halomonas venusta, and SS8 as Marinomonas sp. were deposited in GenBank with accession numbers of KM260166, KF751761, KF751760, KF751762 and KF751763, respectively. This is the first report on the presence of diverse halophilic bacteria in the foot hills of Himalayas.

  5. Biodegradation of Benzene by Halophilic and Halotolerant Bacteria under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    A. Nicholson, Carla; Z. Fathepure, Babu

    2004-01-01

    A highly enriched halophilic culture was established with benzene as the sole carbon source by using a brine soil obtained from an oil production facility in Oklahoma. The enrichment completely degraded benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes within 1 to 2 weeks. Also, [14C]benzene was converted to 14CO2, suggesting the culture's ability to mineralize benzene. Community structure analysis revealed that Marinobacter spp. were the dominant members of the enrichment. PMID:14766609

  6. Virgibacillus ainsalahensis sp. nov., a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from Sediment of a Saline Lake in South of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Amziane, Meriam; Darenfed-Bouanane, Amel; Abderrahmani, Ahmed; Selama, Okba; Jouadi, Lydia; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Nateche, Farida; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2017-02-01

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, endospore-forming bacterium, designated MerV(T), was isolated from a sediment sample of a saline lake located in Ain Salah, south of Algeria. The cells were rod shaped and motile. Isolate MerV(T) grew at salinity interval of 0.5-25% NaCl (optimum, 5-10%), pH 6.0-12.0 (optimum, 8.0), and temperature between 10 and 40 °C (optimum, 30 °C).The polar lipids comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, a glycolipid, a phospholipid, and two lipids, and MK-7 is the predominant menaquinone. The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso C15:0 and anteiso C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 45.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain MerV(T) was most closely related to Virgibacillus halodenitrificans (gene sequence similarity of 97.0%). On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic properties, and phylogenetic analyses, strain MerV(T) (=DSM = 28944(T)) should be placed in the genus Virgibacillus as a novel species, for which the name Virgibacillus ainsalahensis is proposed.

  7. Marinimicrobium haloxylanilyticum sp. nov., a new moderately halophilic, polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    PubMed

    Møller, Mette Fogh; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2010-11-01

    A new moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, strain SX15(T), was isolated from hypersaline surface sediment of the southern arm of Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA). The strain grew on a number of carbohydrates and carbohydrate polymers such as xylan, starch, carboxymethyl cellulose and galactomannan. The strain grew at salinities ranging from 2 to 22% NaCl (w/v). Optimal growth occurred in the presence of 7-11% NaCl (w/v) at a temperature of 35°C and a pH of 6.7-8.2. Major whole-cell fatty acids were C16:0 (30.5%), C18:0 (14.8%), C18:1ω7c (13.1%) and C12:0 (7.8%). The G+C content of the DNA was 60 ± 0.5 mol%. By 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain SX15(T) was shown to be affiliated to members of the gammaproteobacterial genus Marinimicrobium with pair wise identity values of 92.9-94.6%. The pheno- and genotypic properties suggest that strain SX15(T) represents a novel species of the genus Marinimicrobium for which the name Marinimicrobium haloxylanilyticum is proposed. The type strain is SX15(T) (= DSM 23100(T) = CCUG 59572(T)).

  8. Characterization of Lignocellulolytic Activities from a Moderate Halophile Strain of Aspergillus caesiellus Isolated from a Sugarcane Bagasse Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Miranda, Estefan; Sánchez-Reyes, Ayixón; Cuervo-Soto, Laura; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise; Atriztán-Hernández, Karina; Morales-Herrera, Catalina; Rodríguez-Hernández, Rocío; Folch-Mallol, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    A moderate halophile and thermotolerant fungal strain was isolated from a sugarcane bagasse fermentation in the presence of 2 M NaCl that was set in the laboratory. This strain was identified by polyphasic criteria as Aspergillus caesiellus. The fungus showed an optimal growth rate in media containing 1 M NaCl at 28°C and could grow in media added with up to 2 M NaCl. This strain was able to grow at 37 and 42°C, with or without NaCl. A. caesiellus H1 produced cellulases, xylanases, manganese peroxidase (MnP) and esterases. No laccase activity was detected in the conditions we tested. The cellulase activity was thermostable, halostable, and no differential expression of cellulases was observed in media with different salt concentrations. However, differential band patterns for cellulase and xylanase activities were detected in zymograms when the fungus was grown in different lignocellulosic substrates such as wheat straw, maize stover, agave fibres, sugarcane bagasse and sawdust. Optimal temperature and pH were similar to other cellulases previously described. These results support the potential of this fungus to degrade lignocellulosic materials and its possible use in biotechnological applications. PMID:25162614

  9. Petrotoga halophila sp. nov., a thermophilic, moderately halophilic, fermentative bacterium isolated from an offshore oil well in Congo.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Tello, Elizabeth; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Joulian, Catherine; Magot, Michel; Thomas, Pierre; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, moderately halophilic, rod-shaped bacterium, strain MET-B(T), with a sheath-like outer structure (toga) was isolated from an offshore oil-producing well in Congo, West Africa. Strain MET-B(T) was a Gram-negative bacterium with the ability to reduce elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite into sulfide. The optimum growth conditions were 60 degrees C, pH 6.7-7.2 and 4-6 % NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 34.6 mol%. Strain MET-B(T) was phylogenetically related to members of the genus Petrotoga; Petrotoga miotherma, Petrotoga olearia and Petrotoga mexicana were the closest relatives, with type strains exhibiting more than 99 % identity in an analysis of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences. The values for DNA-DNA relatedness between the type strains of these three species and strain MET-B(T) were less than 42 %. As MET-B(T) was found to be genetically and physiologically different from other species of the genus Petrotoga, this strain is proposed as representing a novel species, for which the name Petrotoga halophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MET-B(T) (=DSM 16923(T)=CCUG 50214(T)).

  10. Chromohalobacter salarius sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Cabo de Gata, Almeria, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Margarita; Cabrera, Antonio; Incerti, Claudia; Fuentes, Susana; Russell, Nick J; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes

    2007-06-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-negative bacterium (strain CG4.1(T)), which was isolated from a solar saltern at Cabo de Gata, a wildlife reserve located in the province of Almería, southern Spain, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. This organism was an aerobic, motile rod that produced colonies with a yellow pigment. Strain CG4.1(T) grew at salinities of 3-25 % (w/v), at 15-45 degrees C and at pH 5-9. The organism reduced nitrate, hydrolysed starch and had phenylalanine deaminase activity. The major fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0) and C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c. The DNA G+C content was 63.6 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain CG4.1(T) appears to be a member of the genus Chromohalobacter and clustered closely with Chromohalobacter species, with 95-96 % similarity between their 16S rRNA gene sequences. However, DNA-DNA relatedness between the isolate and the type strains of Chromohalobacter species was low. Therefore, it is proposed that strain CG4.1(T) represents a novel species, Chromohalobacter salarius sp. nov. The type strain is strain CG4.1(T) (=CECT 5903(T)=LMG 23626(T)).

  11. Marinococcus salis sp., nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Vishnuvardhan Reddy, Sultanpuram; Thirumala, Mothe; Farooq, Mohammed; Sasikala, Chintalapati; Venkata Ramana, Chintalapati

    2016-12-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, coccoid-shaped, facultative anaerobic, motile and halophilic bacterium strain 5M(T) was isolated from Surajbari in India. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it was identified as belonging to the genus Marinococcus and was most closely related to Marinococcus luteus KCTC 13214(T) (99.3 %, sequence similarity), Marinococcus halotolerans KCTC 19045(T) (99.0 %), Marinococcus halophilus LMG 17439(T) (98.8 %) and Marinococcus tarijensis LMG 26930(T) (98.7 %). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness of strain 5M(T) with M. luteus KCTC 13214(T), M. halotolerans KCTC 19045(T), M. halophilus LMG 17439(T) and M. tarijensis LMG 26930(T) was 42.6 ± 0.8, 48.6 ± 0.8, 40.9 ± 0.8 and 39.8 ± 0.9 %, respectively. Strain 5M(T) grows optimally at 5 % (w/v) NaCl, pH 7.5-8.5 and 37 °C. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strain 5M(T) contains meso-diaminopimelic acid. Polar lipids of the strain 5M(T) include diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, a phospholipid and two unknown lipids. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. DNA G+C content was 48.9 mol%, and anteiso-C15:0 (40.9 %) was the predominant fatty acid. The results of phylogenetic, biochemical tests and chemotaxonomic allowed a clear differentiation of strain 5M(T) from all of its nearest phylogenetic neighbours, which represents a novel member of the genus Marinococcus, for which the name Marinococcus salis sp., nov., is proposed. The type strain is 5M(T) (=KCTC 33743(T) = LMG 29101(T) = CGMCC 1.15385(T)).

  12. Identification and characterization of salt-inducible polypeptide in Paenibacillus sp., a moderately halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Ashrafaddin; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar

    2005-11-01

    In response to salt, Paenibacillus sp. strain XII expresses a 21.4 kDa polypeptide. N-terminal sequencing and sequence homology analysis indicate homology between the N-terminal sequence of the polypeptide and a segment of the N-terminus of the spore coat associated protein CotN of Oceanobacillus iheyensis, an extremely halotolerant bacteria of the deep-sea.

  13. Aquisalimonas asiatica gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from an alkaline, saline lake in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Márquez, M C; Carrasco, I J; Xue, Y; Ma, Y; Cowan, D A; Jones, B E; Grant, W D; Ventosa, A

    2007-05-01

    Two novel moderately halophilic, Gram-negative rods (strains CG12(T) and CG13) were isolated from Lake Chagannor in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. They were strictly aerobic and motile. They grew at pH 6.0-10.8 (optimally at pH 7.5-8.5), at 20-50 degrees C (optimally at 37 degrees C) and at salinities of 1-20 % (w/v) total salts (optimally at 7-10 %, w/v). Phylogenetic analysis of the two strains, based on a comparison of their 16S rRNA genes, led to their classification within the class Gammaproteobacteria, the closest recognized type strain being Alkalispirillum mobile DSM 12769(T), with which they were found to share 94.4-94.6 % sequence similarity. On the basis of DNA-DNA hybridization data (showing 100 and 99 % relatedness for each other), the two isolates were found to be members of the same species. The DNA G+C contents of strains CG12(T) and CG13 were found to be 63.6 and 64.0 mol%, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CG12(T), selected as the representative strain, were C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0) and C(12 : 0), and its polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, a phosphoglycolipid and six unidentified phospholipids. On the basis of the polyphasic evidence from this study, strains CG12(T) and CG13 represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Aquisalimonas asiatica gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aquisalimonas asiatica is CG12(T) (=CCM 7368(T)=CECT 7151(T)=CGMCC 1.6291(T)=DSM 18102(T)).

  14. Halomonas indalinina sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Cabo de Gata, Almeria, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Antonio; Aguilera, Margarita; Fuentes, Susana; Incerti, Claudia; Russell, Nick J; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes

    2007-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, strain CG2.1T, isolated from a solar saltern at Cabo de Gata, a wildlife reserve located in the province of Almería, southern Spain, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. This organism was an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative rod that produced orange-pigmented colonies. Strain CG2.1T was able to grow at salinities of 3-25 % (w/v) and at temperatures of 15-40 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 5-9. Strain CG2.1T was a heterotroph capable of utilizing various carbohydrates as carbon sources. The organism reduced nitrate and showed phenylalanine deaminase activity. The major fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0) and C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c. The DNA G+C content was 60.9 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain CG2.1T appeared to be a member of the genus Halomonas and clustered closely with Halomonas marisflavi (97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). However, the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and the most closely related Halomonas species was low. On the basis of these data, strain CG2.1T represents a novel member of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas indalinina is proposed. The type strain is CG2.1T (=CECT 5902T=LMG 23625T).

  15. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the fami- ly Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Alla; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the family Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180813

  17. Kocuria marina BS-15 a biosurfactant producing halophilic bacteria isolated from solar salt works in India

    PubMed Central

    Sarafin, Yesurethinam; Donio, Mariathasan Birdilla Selva; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-01-01

    Biosurfactant screening was made among the eight halophilic bacterial genera isolated from Kovalam solar salt works in Kanyakumari of India. After initial screening, Kocuria sp. (Km), Kurthia sp. (Ku) and Halococcus sp. (Hc) were found to have positive biosurfactant activity. Biosurfactant derived from Kocuria sp. emulsified more than 50% of the crude oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, olive oil and kerosene when compared to the other strains. Further, Kocuria marina BS-15 derived biosurfactant was purified and characterized by TLC, FTIR and GC–MS analysis. The TLC analysis revealed that, the purified biosurfactants belong to the lipopeptide group. The IR spectrum results revealed that functional groups are R2C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 NN, alkenes and N–H. The GC–MS analysis confirmed the compound as Nonanoic acid and Cyclopropane with the retention time of 12.78 and 24.65, respectively. PMID:25473358

  18. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes as a functional marker for chemolithoautotrophic halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    The presence and diversity of the cbb genes encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) (a key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson cycle of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation) were investigated in pure cultures of seven genera of halophilic chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and in sediments from a hypersaline lake in which such bacteria have been recently discovered. All of the halophilic SOB strains (with the exception of Thiohalomonas nitratireducens) possessed the cbbL gene encoding RuBisCO form I, while the cbbM gene encoding RuBisCO form II was detected only in some of the pure cultures. The general topologies of the CbbL/CbbM trees and the 16S rRNA gene tree were different, but both markers showed that the halophilic SOB genera formed independent lineages in the Gammaproteobacteria. In some cases, such as with several strains of the genus Thiohalospira and with Thioalkalibacter halophilus, the cbbL clustering was incongruent with the positions of these strains on the ribosomal tree. In the cbbM tree, the clustering of Thiohalospira and Thiohalorhabdus strains was incongruent with their branching in both cbbL and 16S rRNA gene trees. cbbL and cbbM genes related to those found in the analysed halophilic SOB were also detected in a sediment from a hypersaline lake in Kulunda Steppe (Russia). Most of the cbbL and cbbM genes belonged to members of the genus Thiohalorhabdus. In the cbbL clone library, sequences related to those of Halothiobacillus and Thiohalospira were detected as minor components. Some of the environmental cbbM sequences belonged to as yet unknown phylotypes, representing deep lineages of halophilic autotrophs.

  19. Growth phase-dependent switch in osmolyte strategy in a moderate halophile: ectoine is a minor osmolyte but major stationary phase solute in Halobacillus halophilus.

    PubMed

    Saum, Stephan H; Müller, Volker

    2008-03-01

    The moderately halophilic, chloride-dependent bacterium Halobacillus halophilus switches its osmolyte strategy with the salinity in its environment by the production of different compatible solutes. Ectoine is produced predominantly at very high salinities, along with proline. Interestingly, ectoine production is growth phase dependent which led to a more than 1000-fold change in the ectoine : proline ratio from 0.04 in exponential to 27.4 in late stationary phase cultures. The genes encoding the ectoine biosynthesis pathway were identified on the chromosome in the order ectABC. They form an operon that is expressed in a salinity-dependent manner with low-level expression below 1.5 M NaCl but 10-fold and 23-fold increased expression at 2.5 and 3.0 M NaCl respectively. The temporal expression of genes involved in osmoresponse is different with gdh/gln and pro genes being first, followed by ect genes. Chloride had no effect on expression of ect genes, but stimulated cellular EctC synthesis as well as ectoine production. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a growth-phase dependent switch in osmolyte strategy in a moderate halophile and, additionally, represent another piece of the chloride regulon of H. halophilus.

  20. Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic species from a desiccation lagoon in the Cuatro Ciénegas Valley in Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerritos, René; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Alcaraz-Peraza, Luis D; Arvizu-Gómez, Jackeline L; Olmedo, Gabriela; Ramirez, Enrique; Siefert, Janet L; Souza, Valeria

    2008-04-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-positive and rod-shaped bacterium, strain m4-4T, was isolated from a Chihuahuan desert lagoon in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico. Strain m4-4T was found to grow optimally at 30-37 degrees C, pH 7.0-8.0 and 5 % NaCl and to tolerate from 0.5 % to 10 % NaCl. It was shown to be aerobic. The genomic DNA G+C content was about 37 mol%. Strain m4-4T exhibited minimal or no growth on most sugars tested. Its major cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1. Based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences, we observed that the closest relatives of the isolate are moderately halophilic Bacillus species, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity ranging from 96.6 to 97.4 % (Bacillus marisflavi, Bacillus aquimaris and Bacillus vietnamensis). Additionally, using genomic data it was determined that the type strain contains a total of nine rRNA operons with three slightly different sequences. On the basis of phenotypic and molecular properties, strain m4-4T represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain m4-4T (=NRRL B-41737T =CECT 7197T).

  1. Isolation and identification of culturable halophilic bacteria with producing hydrolytic enzyme from Incheh Broun hypersaline wetland in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zarparvar, P; Amoozegar, M A; Babavalian, H; Reza Fallahian, M; Tebyanian, H; Shakeri, F

    2016-10-31

    Incheh Broun hypersaline wetland is located near the border of Turkmenistan in thenorth of Iran. This wetland is notable because of salinity (280g/l) and alteration in pH range (2.8 to 6.8). Eastern part of wetland is affected by wastewater of iodine extraction factory.  Samples were taken from soil, water and salt. Totally, 400 bacterial strains were isolated of which 194 strains were Gram-positive bacilli, 184 strains were Gram-negative rod and 22 strains were Gram-positive cocci. According to phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, selected strains were placed in three taxonomic phyla including Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Optimum growth was evaluated for salt and 22 strains were found to be moderate halophile and 33 strains were halotolerant. Production of lipase, amylase, gelatinase and protease was examined. Gram-positive bacilli were the main producers of hydrolytic enzymes. Gelatinase and protease were the most frequent enzymes. Gram-positive cocci were the main producers of lipase but they didn't produce amylase.

  2. Halophiles and their enzymes: negativity put to good use.

    PubMed

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-06-01

    Halophilic microorganisms possess stable enzymes that function in very high salinity, an extreme condition that leads to denaturation, aggregation, and precipitation of most other proteins. Genomic and structural analyses have established that the enzymes of halophilic Archaea and many halophilic Bacteria are negatively charged due to an excess of acidic over basic residues, and altered hydrophobicity, which enhance solubility and promote function in low water activity conditions. Here, we provide an update on recent bioinformatic analysis of predicted halophilic proteomes as well as experimental molecular studies on individual halophilic enzymes. Recent efforts on discovery and utilization of halophiles and their enzymes for biotechnology, including biofuel applications are also considered.

  3. Halophiles and their enzymes: Negativity put to good use

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms possess stable enzymes that function in very high salinity, an extreme condition that leads to denaturation, aggregation, and precipitation of most other proteins. Genomic and structural analyses have established that the enzymes of halophilic Archaea and many halophilic Bacteria are negatively charged due to an excess of acidic over basic residues, and altered hydrophobicity, which enhance solubility and promote function in low water activity conditions. Here, we provide an update on recent bioinformatic analysis of predicted halophilic proteomes as well as experimental molecular studies on individual halophilic enzymes. On-going efforts on discovery and utilization of halophiles and their enzymes for biotechnology, including biofuel applications are also considered. PMID:26066288

  4. Construction of a shuttle expression vector with a promoter functioning in both halophilic Archaea and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jie; Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Chi; Huang, Yuping; Chen, Xiangdong

    2013-12-01

    A shuttle expression vector, designated as pAJ, was constructed based on the Haloferax volcanii-Escherichia coli shuttle vector pSY1. This new construct contains the amyH promoter from Haloarcula hispanica and was able to confer the promoter activity in both Hfx. volcanii and E. coli. pAJ successfully expressed proteins in Hfx. volcanii or E. coli, rendering it feasible to express target proteins in corresponding domains. In addition, pAJ contains a multiple cloning site with 11 restriction sites and a 6×His tag sequence, and the vector size was decreased to 8903 bp. To the best of our knowledge, pAJ is the first reported shuttle expression vector that can express proteins in both Bacteria and Archaea. Importantly, pAJ can even express the haloarchaeal heat shock protein DnaK in both domains. In conclusion, this novel vector only provides researchers with a new means to manipulate genes or express proteins in Haloarchaea but also serves as a convenient tool for the comparative study of the function of some highly conserved genes in Haloarchaea and in Bacteria.

  5. Distribution of compatible solutes in the halophilic methanogenic archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Meichin Lai; Sowers, K.R.; Gunsalus, R.P. ); Robertson, D.E.; Roberts, M.F. )

    1991-09-01

    Accumulation of compatible solutes, by uptake or de novo synthesis, enables bacteria to reduce the difference between osmotic potentials of the cell cytoplasm and the extracellular environment. To examine this process in the halophilic and halotolerant methanogenic archaebacteria, 14 strains were tested for the accumulation of compatible solutes in response to growth in various extracellular concentrations of NaCl. In external NaCl concentrations of 0.7 to 3.4 M, the halophilic methanogens accumulated K{sup +} ion and low-molecular-weight organic compounds. {beta}-Glutamate was detected in two halotolerant strains that grew below 1.5 M NaCl. Two unusual {beta}-amino acids, N{sub {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine and {beta}-glutamine (3-aminoglutaramic acid), as well as L-{alpha}-glutamate were compatible solutes among all of these strains. De novo synthesis of glycine betaine was also detected in several strains of moderately and extremely halophilic methanogens. The zwitterionic compounds ({beta}-glutamine, N{sub {var epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine,a nd glycine betaine) and potassium were the predominant compatible solutes among the moderately and extremely halophilic methanogens. This is the first report of {beta}-glutamine as a compatible solute and de novo biosynthesis of glycine betaine in the methanogenic archaebacteria.

  6. The Genome of the Moderate Halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1T Reveals Four Alkane Hydroxylation Systems and Provides Some Clues on the Genetic Basis for Its Adaptation to a Petroleum Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Fang, Hui; Li, Yan; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    The moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1T is the type strain of a novel species in the recently described novel genus Amycolicicoccus, which was isolated from oil mud precipitated from oil produced water. The complete genome of A. subflavus DQS3-9A1T has been sequenced and is characteristic of harboring the genes for adaption to the harsh petroleum environment with salinity, high osmotic pressure, and poor nutrient levels. Firstly, it characteristically contains four types of alkane hydroxylases, including the integral-membrane non-heme iron monooxygenase (AlkB) and cytochrome P450 CYP153, a long-chain alkane monooxygenase (LadA) and propane monooxygenase. It also accommodates complete pathways for the response to osmotic pressure. Physiological tests proved that the strain could grow on n-alkanes ranging from C10 to C36 and propane as the sole carbon sources, with the differential induction of four kinds of alkane hydroxylase coding genes. In addition, the strain could grow in 1–12% NaCl with the putative genes responsible for osmotic stresses induced as expected. These results reveal the effective adaptation of the strain DQS3-9A1T to harsh oil environment and provide a genome platform to investigate the global regulation of different alkane metabolisms in bacteria that are crucially important for petroleum degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the co-existence of such four types of alkane hydroxylases in a bacterial strain. PMID:23967144

  7. The genome of the moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) reveals four alkane hydroxylation systems and provides some clues on the genetic basis for its adaptation to a petroleum environment.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Fang, Hui; Li, Yan; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    The moderate halophile Amycolicicoccus subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) is the type strain of a novel species in the recently described novel genus Amycolicicoccus, which was isolated from oil mud precipitated from oil produced water. The complete genome of A. subflavus DQS3-9A1(T) has been sequenced and is characteristic of harboring the genes for adaption to the harsh petroleum environment with salinity, high osmotic pressure, and poor nutrient levels. Firstly, it characteristically contains four types of alkane hydroxylases, including the integral-membrane non-heme iron monooxygenase (AlkB) and cytochrome P450 CYP153, a long-chain alkane monooxygenase (LadA) and propane monooxygenase. It also accommodates complete pathways for the response to osmotic pressure. Physiological tests proved that the strain could grow on n-alkanes ranging from C10 to C36 and propane as the sole carbon sources, with the differential induction of four kinds of alkane hydroxylase coding genes. In addition, the strain could grow in 1-12% NaCl with the putative genes responsible for osmotic stresses induced as expected. These results reveal the effective adaptation of the strain DQS3-9A1(T) to harsh oil environment and provide a genome platform to investigate the global regulation of different alkane metabolisms in bacteria that are crucially important for petroleum degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the co-existence of such four types of alkane hydroxylases in a bacterial strain.

  8. Cloning and identification of Group 1 mrp operon encoding a novel monovalent cation/proton antiporter system from the moderate halophile Halomonas zhaodongensis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lin; Hong, Shan; Liu, Henan; Huang, Haipeng; Sun, Hao; Xu, Tong; Jiang, Juquan

    2014-11-01

    The novel species Halomonas zhaodongensis NEAU-ST10-25(T) recently identified by our group is a moderate halophile which can grow at the range of 0-2.5 M NaCl (optimum 0.5 M) and pH 6-12 (optimum pH 9). To explore its halo-alkaline tolerant mechanism, genomic DNA was screened from NEAU-ST10-25(T) in this study for Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters. One mrp operon could confer tolerance of E. coli KNabc to 0.8 M NaCl and 100 mM LiCl, and an alkaline pH. This operon was previously mainly designated mrp (also mnh, pha or sha) due to its multiple resistance and pH-related activity. Here, we will also use mrp to designate the homolog from H. zhaodongensis (Hz_mrp). Sequence analysis and protein alignment showed that Hz_mrp should belong to Group 1 mrp operons. Further phylogenetic analysis reveals that Hz_Mrp system should represent a novel sub-class of Group 1 Mrp systems. This was confirmed by a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile or the specificity and affinity for the transported monovalent cations between Hz_Mrp system and all the known Mrp systems. Therefore, we propose that Hz_Mrp should be categorized as a novel Group 1 Mrp system.

  9. Halomonas almeriensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, exopolysaccharide-producing bacterium from Cabo de Gata, Almería, south-east Spain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Checa, Fernando; Béjar, Victoria; Martínez-Cánovas, M José; Llamas, Inmaculada; Quesada, Emilia

    2005-09-01

    Halomonas almeriensis sp. nov. is a Gram-negative non-motile rod that was isolated from a saltern in the Cabo de Gata-Níjar wildlife reserve in Almería, south-east Spain. It is moderately halophilic, capable of growth at concentrations of 5-25% w/v sea-salt mixture, the optimum being 7.5% w/v. It is chemo-organotrophic and strictly aerobic, produces catalase but not oxidase, does not produce acid from any sugar and does not synthesize hydrolytic enzymes. The most notable difference between this micro-organism and other Halomonas species is that it is very fastidious in its use of a carbon source. It forms mucoid colonies due to the production of an exopolysaccharide. Its G+C content is 63.5 mol%. A comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed its relationship to Halomonas species. The most closely related species is Halomonas halmophila with 95.8% similarity between their 16S rRNA gene sequences. DNA-DNA hybridization with H. halmophila is 10.1%. Its major fatty acids are 18:1omega7c, 16:0, 16:1omega7c/15:0 iso 2-OH, 12:0 3-OH, 12:0, 11-methyl 18:1omega7c and 10:0. The proposed name is Halomonas almeriensis sp. nov., with strain M8(T) (=CECT 7050(T)=LMG 22904(T)) as the type strain.

  10. Desulfovibrio brasiliensis sp. nov., a moderate halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from Lagoa Vermelha (Brazil) mediating dolomite formation.

    PubMed

    Warthmann, Rolf; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Sass, Henrik; McKenzie, Judith A

    2005-06-01

    A novel halotolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis strain LVform1, was isolated from sediments of a dolomite-forming hypersaline coastal lagoon, Lagoa Vermelha, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The cells are vibrio-shaped and 0.30 to 0.45 microm by 1.0 to 3.5 microm in size. These bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] in culture experiments. The strain was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio in the delta-subclass of the Proteobacteria on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, its physiological and morphological properties. Strain LVform1 is obligate sodium-dependent and grows at NaCl concentrations of up to 15%. The 16S rRNA sequence revealed that this strain is closely related to Desulfovibrio halophilus (96.2% similarity) and to Desulfovibrio oxyclinae (96.8% similarity), which were both isolated from Solar Lake, a hypersaline coastal lake in the Sinai, Egypt. Strain LVform1 is barotolerant, growing under pressures of up to 370 bar (37 MPa). We propose strain LVform1 to be the type strain of a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis (type strain LVform1 = DSMZ No. 15816 and JCM No. 12178). The GenBank/EMBL accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain LVform1 is AJ544687.

  11. Marinobacter lacisalsi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from the saline-wetland wildfowl reserve Fuente de Piedra in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Margarita; Jiménez-Pranteda, Maria L; Kharroub, Karima; González-Paredes, Ana; Durban, Juan J; Russell, Nick J; Ramos-Cormenzana, Alberto; Monteoliva-Sánchez, Mercedes

    2009-07-01

    A Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, motile, moderately halophilic, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain FP2.5(T), was isolated from the inland hypersaline lake Fuente de Piedra, a saline-wetland wildfowl reserve located in the province of Málaga in southern Spain. Strain FP2.5(T) was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. It produced colonies with a light-yellow pigment. Strain FP2.5(T) grew at salinities of 3-15 % (w/v) and at temperatures of 20-40 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 5-9. Strain FP2.5(T) was able to utilize various organic acids as sole carbon and energy source. Its major fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega9c and C(16 : 1)omega9c. The DNA G+C content was 58.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain FP2.5(T) appeared to be a member of the genus Marinobacter and clustered closely with the type strains of Marinobacter segnicrescens, Marinobacter bryozoorum and Marinobacter gudaonensis (levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 98.1, 97.4 and 97.2 %, respectively). However, DNA-DNA relatedness between the new isolate and the type strains of its closest related Marinobacter species was low; levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain FP2.5(T) and M. segnicrescens LMG 23928(T), M. bryozoorum DSM 15401(T) and M. gudaonensis DSM 18066(T) were 36.3, 32.1 and 24.9 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, strain FP2.5(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter lacisalsi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FP2.5(T) (=CECT 7297(T)=LMG 24237(T)).

  12. Cloning and identification of a novel NhaD-type Na+/H+ antiporter from metagenomic DNA of the halophilic bacteria in soil samples around Daban Salt Lake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Zhenhui; Wang, Lei; Mu, Ren; Zou, Zhi; Yuan, Kun; Wang, Yuekun; Wu, Haiping; Jiang, Juquan; Yang, Lifu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, metagenomic DNA was screened for the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene from the halophilic bacteria in Daban Salt Lake by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. One gene designated as Hb_nhaD encoding a novel NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter was finally cloned. The presence of Hb_NhaD conferred tolerance of E. coli KNabc to up to 0.5 M NaCl and 0.2 M LiCl, and an alkaline pH. Hb_NhaD has the highest identity (70.6%) with a putative NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter from an uncharacterized Clostridiaceae species, and also has lower identity with known NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporters from Halomonas elongata (20.8%), Alkalimonas amylolytica (19.0%), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (18.9%) and Vibrio cholerae (18.7 %). pH-dependent Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity was detected from everted membrane vesicles prepared from E. coli KNabc carrying Hb_nhaD. Hb_NhaD exhibited very high Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity over a wide pH range from 6.5 to 9.0 with the highest activity at pH 7.0 which is significantly different from those of the above known NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. Also, the apparent K m values of Hb_NhaD for Na(+) and Li(+) at pH 7.0 were determined to be 1.31 and 2.16, respectively. Based on the above results, we proposed that Hb_NhaD should be categorized as a novel NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter.

  13. Isolation and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant halophilic bacteria from shrimp farm effluents of Parangipettai coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Sundaramanickam, Arumugam; Kumar, Poominathan Suresh; Kumaresan, Saravanan; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug resistance of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from an aquaculture farm effluent in Parangipettai, at the southeastern coast of India, was investigated. In the initial screening, 27 antibiotic-resistant strains were isolated. All the strains were tested for antibiotic susceptibility against chloramphenicol with varying concentrations. From these, two highly resistant strains, i.e. S1 and S5, were isolated. The selected strains were identified by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequencing techniques and confirmed as Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus flexus. Both the antibiotic-resistant strains were further utilized for multidrug susceptibility test by using various antibiotics. These two strains showed antibiotic resistance to 14 of 17 antibiotics tested. Both microdilution assay and well assay methods were used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the sensitive strains. Both the tests were shown to be almost similar. Our study highlights the occurrence of multidrug-resistant bacteria in the shrimp farm effluents.

  14. Isolation and characterization of halophilic lactic acid bacteria isolated from "terasi" shrimp paste: a traditional fermented seafood product in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Michika; Wahyuni, Mita; Kitakado, Toshihide; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Imada, Chiaki; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2003-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria from "terasi" shrimp paste, a highly popular fermented seafood in Indonesia were isolated and characterized. Viable cell counts were 10(4) to 10(6) cfu/g on MRS medium. All the isolates were catalase-negative, gram-positive cocci and were able to grow at 15% NaCl. Numerical phenotypic analysis showed that the isolates clustered into one group. However, they could be classified into two types: the Tetragenococcus halophilus group and the T. muriaticus group as revealed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This study is the first to show that both species of Tetragenococcus are distributed in Indonesian fermented foods.

  15. Moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacteria from hot springs in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Abreu, Fernanda; Schmidt, Marian L; Lins, Ulysses; Frankel, Richard B; Hedlund, Brian P; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2010-06-01

    Populations of a moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium were discovered in Great Boiling Springs, Nevada, ranging from 32 to 63 degrees C. Cells were small, Gram-negative, vibrioid to helicoid in morphology, and biomineralized a chain of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes. Phylogenetically, based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the organism belongs to the phylum Nitrospirae.

  16. Structure of a highly acidic β-lactamase from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter sp. 560 and the discovery of a Cs(+)-selective binding site.

    PubMed

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Okazaki, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Shibazaki, Chie; Shimizu, Rumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Kawamoto, Masahide; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-03-01

    Environmentally friendly absorbents are needed for Sr(2+) and Cs(+), as the removal of the radioactive Sr(2+) and Cs(+) that has leaked from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant is one of the most important problems in Japan. Halophilic proteins are known to have many acidic residues on their surface that can provide specific binding sites for metal ions such as Cs(+) or Sr(2+). The crystal structure of a halophilic β-lactamase from Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined to resolutions of between 1.8 and 2.9 Å in space group P31 using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, the locations of bound Sr(2+) and Cs(+) ions were identified by anomalous X-ray diffraction. The location of one Cs(+)-specific binding site was identified in HaBLA even in the presence of a ninefold molar excess of Na(+) (90 mM Na(+)/10 mM Cs(+)). From an activity assay using isothermal titration calorimetry, the bound Sr(2+) and Cs(+) ions do not significantly affect the enzymatic function of HaBLA. The observation of a selective and high-affinity Cs(+)-binding site provides important information that is useful for the design of artificial Cs(+)-binding sites that may be useful in the bioremediation of radioactive isotopes.

  17. Structure of a highly acidic β-lactamase from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter sp. 560 and the discovery of a Cs{sup +}-selective binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Okazaki, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Shibazaki, Chie; Shimizu, Rumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Kawamoto, Masahide; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-03-01

    The tertiary structure of a β-lactamase derived from the halobacterium Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined by X-ray crystallography. Three unique Sr{sup 2+}-binding sites and one Cs{sup +}-binding site were discovered in the HaBLA molecule. Environmentally friendly absorbents are needed for Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +}, as the removal of the radioactive Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} that has leaked from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant is one of the most important problems in Japan. Halophilic proteins are known to have many acidic residues on their surface that can provide specific binding sites for metal ions such as Cs{sup +} or Sr{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of a halophilic β-lactamase from Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined to resolutions of between 1.8 and 2.9 Å in space group P3{sub 1} using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, the locations of bound Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} ions were identified by anomalous X-ray diffraction. The location of one Cs{sup +}-specific binding site was identified in HaBLA even in the presence of a ninefold molar excess of Na{sup +} (90 mM Na{sup +}/10 mM Cs{sup +}). From an activity assay using isothermal titration calorimetry, the bound Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} ions do not significantly affect the enzymatic function of HaBLA. The observation of a selective and high-affinity Cs{sup +}-binding site provides important information that is useful for the design of artificial Cs{sup +}-binding sites that may be useful in the bioremediation of radioactive isotopes.

  18. RNomics and Modomics in the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii: identification of RNA modification genes

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Henri; Gaspin, Christine; Marck, Christian; Decatur, Wayne A; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2008-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring RNAs contain numerous enzymatically altered nucleosides. Differences in RNA populations (RNomics) and pattern of RNA modifications (Modomics) depends on the organism analyzed and are two of the criteria that distinguish the three kingdoms of life. If the genomic sequences of the RNA molecules can be derived from whole genome sequence information, the modification profile cannot and requires or direct sequencing of the RNAs or predictive methods base on the presence or absence of the modifications genes. Results By employing a comparative genomics approach, we predicted almost all of the genes coding for the t+rRNA modification enzymes in the mesophilic moderate halophile Haloferax volcanii. These encode both guide RNAs and enzymes. Some are orthologous to previously identified genes in Archaea, Bacteria or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but several are original predictions. Conclusion The number of modifications in t+rRNAs in the halophilic archaeon is surprisingly low when compared with other Archaea or Bacteria, particularly the hyperthermophilic organisms. This may result from the specific lifestyle of halophiles that require high intracellular salt concentration for survival. This salt content could allow RNA to maintain its functional structural integrity with fewer modifications. We predict that the few modifications present must be particularly important for decoding, accuracy of translation or are modifications that cannot be functionally replaced by the electrostatic interactions provided by the surrounding salt-ions. This analysis also guides future experimental validation work aiming to complete the understanding of the function of RNA modifications in Archaeal translation. PMID:18844986

  19. Microbial culturomics unravels the halophilic microbiota repertoire of table salt: description of Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Awa; Khelaifia, Saber; Armstrong, Nicholas; Labas, Noémie; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier; Million, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Background Microbial culturomics represents an ongoing revolution in the characterization of environmental and human microbiome. Methods By using three media containing high salt concentration (100, 150, and 200 g/L), the halophilic microbial culturome of a commercial table salt was determined. Results Eighteen species belonging to the Terrabacteria group were isolated including eight moderate halophilic and 10 halotolerant bacteria. Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., type strain Awa-1T (=CSUR P1441=DSM 29726), is a moderately halophilic gram-positive, non-spore-forming rod, and is motile by using a flagellum. Strain Awa-1T shows catalase activity but no oxidase activity. It is not only an aerobic bacterium but also able to grow in anaerobic and microaerophilic atmospheres. The draft genome of G. massiliensis is 4,207,226 bp long, composed of 13 scaffolds with 36.05% of G+C content. It contains 3,908 genes (3,839 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes). At least 1,983 (52%) orthologous proteins were not shared with the closest phylogenetic species. Hundred twenty-six genes (3.3%) were identified as ORFans. Conclusions Microbial culturomics can dramatically improve the characterization of the food and environmental microbiota repertoire, deciphering new bacterial species and new genes. Further studies will clarify the geographic specificity and the putative role of these new microbes and their related functional genetic content in environment, health, and disease. PMID:27760679

  20. Halophilic adaptation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Madern, D; Ebel, C; Zaccai, G

    2000-04-01

    It is now clear that the understanding of halophilic adaptation at a molecular level requires a strategy of complementary experiments, combining molecular biology, biochemistry, and cellular approaches with physical chemistry and thermodynamics. In this review, after a discussion of the definition and composition of halophilic enzymes, the effects of salt on their activity, solubility, and stability are reviewed. We then describe how thermodynamic observations, such as parameters pertaining to solvent-protein interactions or enzyme-unfolding kinetics, depend strongly on solvent composition and reveal the important role played by water and ion binding to halophilic proteins. The three high-resolution crystal structures now available for halophilic proteins are analyzed in terms of haloadaptation, and finally cellular response to salt stress is discussed briefly.

  1. Metabolism of halophilic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Falb, Michaela; Müller, Kerstin; Königsmaier, Lisa; Oberwinkler, Tanja; Horn, Patrick; von Gronau, Susanne; Gonzalez, Orland; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2008-01-01

    In spite of their common hypersaline environment, halophilic archaea are surprisingly different in their nutritional demands and metabolic pathways. The metabolic diversity of halophilic archaea was investigated at the genomic level through systematic metabolic reconstruction and comparative analysis of four completely sequenced species: Halobacterium salinarum, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloquadratum walsbyi, and the haloalkaliphile Natronomonas pharaonis. The comparative study reveals different sets of enzyme genes amongst halophilic archaea, e.g. in glycerol degradation, pentose metabolism, and folate synthesis. The carefully assessed metabolic data represent a reliable resource for future system biology approaches as it also links to current experimental data on (halo)archaea from the literature. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00792-008-0138-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18278431

  2. Biodeterioration Risk Threatens the 3100 Year Old Staircase of Hallstatt (Austria): Possible Involvement of Halophilic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Piñar, Guadalupe; Dalnodar, Dennis; Voitl, Christian; Reschreiter, Hans; Sterflinger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background The prosperity of Hallstatt (Salzkammergut region, Austria) is based on the richness of salt in the surrounding mountains and salt mining, which is documented as far back as 1500 years B.C. Substantial archaeological evidence of Bronze and Iron Age salt mining has been discovered, with a wooden staircase (1108 B.C.) being one of the most impressive and well preserved finds. However, after its discovery, fungal mycelia have been observed on the surface of the staircase, most probably due to airborne contamination after its find. Objective As a basis for the further preservation of this valuable object, the active micro-flora was examined to investigate the presence of potentially biodegradative microorganisms. Results Most of the strains isolated from the staircase showed to be halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms, due to the saline environment of the mine. Results derived from culture-dependent assays revealed a high fungal diversity, including both halotolerant and halophilic fungi, the most dominant strains being members of the genus Phialosimplex (synonym: Aspergillus). Additionally, some typical cellulose degraders, namely Stachybotrys sp. and Cladosporium sp. were detected. Numerous bacterial strains were isolated and identified as members of 12 different genera, most of them being moderately halophilic species. The most dominant isolates affiliated with species of the genera Halovibrio and Marinococcus. Halophilic archaea were also isolated and identified as species of the genera Halococcus and Halorubrum. Molecular analyses complemented the cultivation assays, enabling the identification of some uncultivable archaea of the genera Halolamina, Haloplanus and Halobacterium. Results derived from fungi and bacteria supported those obtained by cultivation methods, exhibiting the same dominant members in the communities. Conclusion The results clearly showed the presence of some cellulose degraders that may become active if the requirements for

  3. Identification and characterization of ectoine biosynthesis genes and heterologous expression of the ectABC gene cluster from Halomonas sp. QHL1, a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from Qinghai Lake.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Derui; Liu, Jian; Han, Rui; Shen, Guoping; Long, Qifu; Wei, Xiaoxing; Liu, Deli

    2014-02-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. QHL1 was identified as a member of the genus Halomonas by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. HPLC analysis showed that strain QHL1 synthesizes ectoine in its cytoplasm. The genes involved in the ectoine biosynthesis pathway were identified on the chromosome in the order ectABC. Subsequently, the ectB gene from this strain was amplified by PCR, and the entire ectABC gene cluster (3,580 bp) was cloned using genome walking. Analysis showed that the ectA (579 bp), ectB (1269 bp), and ectC (390 bp) genes were organized in a single transcriptional unit and were predicted to encode three peptides of 21.2 kDa, 46.4 kDa, and 14.7 kDa, respectively. Two putative promoters, a δ(70)-dependent promoter and a δ(38)-controlled promoter, as well as several conserved motifs with unknown function were identified. Individual ectA, ectB, and ectC genes, and the entire ectABC gene cluster were inserted into the expression plasmid pET-28a(+) to generate the recombinant plasmids pET-28a(+)-ectA, pET-28a(+)-ectB, pET-28a(+)-ectC and pET-28a(+)-ectABC, respectively. Heterologous expression of these proteins in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The recombinant E. coli strain BL21 (pET-28a (+)-ectABC) displayed a higher salt tolerance than native E. coli cells but produced far less ectoine than the wild-type QHL1 strain.

  4. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  5. Diversity of halophilic archaea in fermented foods and human intestines and their application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung

    2013-12-01

    Archaea are prokaryotic organisms distinct from bacteria in the structural and molecular biological sense, and these microorganisms are known to thrive mostly at extreme environments. In particular, most studies on halophilic archaea have been focused on environmental and ecological researches. However, new species of halophilic archaea are being isolated and identified from high salt-fermented foods consumed by humans, and it has been found that various types of halophilic archaea exist in food products by culture-independent molecular biological methods. In addition, even if the numbers are not quite high, DNAs of various halophilic archaea are being detected in human intestines and much interest is given to their possible roles. This review aims to summarize the types and characteristics of halophilic archaea reported to be present in foods and human intestines and to discuss their application as well.

  6. Bioleaching of chalcopyrite and bornite by moderately thermophilic bacteria: an emphasis on their interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-bo; Wang, Jun; Gan, Xiao-wen; Qin, Wen-qing; Hu, Ming-hao; Qiu, Guan-zhou

    2015-08-01

    Interactions between chalcopyrite and bornite during bioleaching by moderately thermophilic bacteria were investigated mainly by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical measurements performed in conjunction with bioleaching experiments. The results showed that a synergistic effect existed between chalcopyrite and bornite during bioleaching by both Acidithiobacillus caldus and Leptospirillum ferriphilum and that extremely high copper extraction could be achieved when chalcopyrite and bornite coexisted in a bioleaching system. Bornite dissolved preferentially because of its lower corrosion potential, and its dissolution was accelerated by the galvanic current during the initial stage of bioleaching. The galvanic current and optimum redox potential of 390-480 mV vs. Ag/AgCl promoted the reduction of chalcopyrite to chalcocite (Cu2S), thus accelerating its dissolution.

  7. [Adaptation strategies of halophilic microorganisms and Debaryomyces hansenii (halophilic yeast)].

    PubMed

    González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Peña, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The term halophile is used for all those organisms belonging to hypersaline habitats; they constitute an interesting class of organisms able to compete successfully in salt water and to resist its denaturing effects. A wide diversity of microorganisms, prokaryotic and eukaryotic belong to this category. Halophile organisms have strategies allowing them not only to withstand osmotic stress, but also to function better in the presence of salt, in spite of maintaining high intracellular concentrations of salt, partly due to the synthesis of compatible solutes that allow them to balance their osmotic pressure. We describe the characteristics of some halophile organisms and D. hansenii (halophile yeast), that allow them to resist high concentrations of salt. The interest to know the great diversity microorganisms living in hypersaline habitats is growing, and has begun to be the center of recent investigations, since halophile organisms produce an wide variety of biomolecules that can be used for different applications. In this review we describe some mechanisms with which some halophile organisms count to resist the high concentration of salts, mainly NaCl.

  8. Antimicrobial potential of Halophilic actinomycetes against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Sana; Sajid, Imran

    2016-03-01

    A collection of forty halophilic actinomycetes isolated from water and mud samples of the saline lake at Kalar Kahar, salt range, Pakistan, was screened to investigate their antimicrobial potential against multi drug resistant (MDR) ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacterial pathogens. The isolates exhibited significant tolerance to alkaline conditions and grew well at pH 9-11. The taxonomic status of the isolated strains was determined by morphological, biochemical and physiological characterization and by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. The results revealed that majority of the isolates (90%) belong to the genus Streptomyces. Most of the isolates exhibited remarkable antimicrobial activity up to 20mm zone of inhibition against MDR ventilator associated pneumonia causing bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter and Acinetobacter spp. Additionally the isolates showed moderate to high cytotoxicity in the range of 40 to 80% larval mortality against Artemia salina in a micro well cytotoxicity assay. The chemical screening or the so called metabolic fingerprinting of the methanolic extracts of each isolate, by thin layer chromatography (TLC) using various staining reagents and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), indicated an impressive diversity of the compounds produced by these strains. The study reveals that these halophilic actinomycetes are a promising source of bioactive compounds. The preparative scale fermentation, isolation, purification and structure elucidation of the compounds produced by them may yield novel antimicrobial or chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well. PMID:24339823

  10. Halobacterium saccharovorum sp. nov., a carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1976-01-01

    The previously described extremely halophilic bacterium, strain M6, metabolizes a variety of carbohydrates with the production of acid. In addition, the organism produces nitrite (but no gas) from nitrate, is motile, and grows most rapidly at about 50 C. These characteristics distinguish it from all previously described halophilic bacteria in the genus Halobacterium. It is suggested that it be designated as a new species, Halobacterium saccharovorum.

  11. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from mono lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, R A; Diaz, M R; Taylor, B F; Roberts, M F

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, Calif., an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress.

  12. Serogrouping of Halophilic Bdellovibrios from Chesapeake Bay and Environs by Immunodiffusion and Immunoelectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Schoeffield, Andrew J.; Falkler, William A.; Desai, Darshana; Williams, Henry N.

    1991-01-01

    Little has been reported on the serological relationship of halophilic bdellovibrios (Bd). Immunodiffusion analysis performed with rabbit or mouse Bd antisera developed against eight halophilic Bd isolates and one terrestrial Bd isolate, when reacted with soluble antigen preparations of 45 isolates of halophilic Bd, allowed separation into seven serogroups, which were distinct from the terrestrial isolate. Soluble antigen preparations of prey bacteria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus P-5 (P-5) and Escherichia coli ML 35 (ML 35), exhibited no reactivity with the antisera by immunodiffusion. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of three distinct antigens in homologous reactions and one shared antigen in heterologous Bd reactions. Shared antigens were noted between halophilic and terrestrial Bd, in addition to between halophilic Bd strains, indicating the possible existence of an antigen(s) which may be shared among all Bd. Again, no shared antigen was noted when P-5 or ML 35 was allowed by immunoelectrophoresis to react with the antisera. Prey susceptibility testing of the seven distinct groups of halophilic Bd, using 20 test prey, produced essentially identical spectra for each group, indicating that this was not a useful technique in delineating the Bd. While immunoelectrophoresis was able to demonstrate an antigen common to all Bd tested, immunodiffusion was able to delineate strains on the basis of a “serogroup specific” antigen. This suggests that immunological tools may serve as important means to study the taxonomy of halophilic Bd, as well as in the formation of a clearer taxonomic picture of the genus Bdellovibrio. Images PMID:16348597

  13. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from Mono Lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ciulla, R.A.; Roberts, M.F.; Diaz, M.R.; Taylor, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Anaerobic activities of bacteria and fungi in moderately acidic conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Drake, Harold L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2002-07-01

    Abstract The litter layer of forest soils harbors high amounts of labile organic matter, and anaerobic decomposition processes can be initiated when oxygen is consumed more rapidly than it is supplied by diffusion. In this study, two adjacent moderately acidic forest sites, a spruce and a beech-oak forest, were selected to compare the anaerobic bacterial and fungal activities and populations of conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Most probable number (MPN) estimates of general heterotrophic aerobes and anaerobes from conifer litter equaled those from deciduous leaf litter. H(2), ethanol, formate, and lactate were initially produced with similar rates in both anoxic conifer and deciduous leaf litter microcosms. These products were rapidly consumed in deciduous leaf but not in conifer litter microcosms. Supplemental ethanol and H(2) were consumed only by deciduous leaf litter and yielded additional amounts of acetate in stoichiometries indicative of ethanol- or H(2)-dependent acetogenesis. The negligible turnover of primary fermentation products in conifer litter might be due to the low numbers of acetogens and secondary fermenters present in conifer litter compared to deciduous leaf litter. Fungi capable of anaerobic growth made up only 0.01-0.1% of the total anaerobic microorganisms cultured from conifer and deciduous leaf litter, respectively. Metabolic product profiles obtained from the highest anoxic, growth-positive MPN dilutions supplemented with antibacterial agents indicated that the dominant population of fungi, apparently mainly yeast-like cells, produced H(2), ethanol, acetate, and lactate both in conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Thus, despite acidic conditions, bacteria appear to dominate in the decomposition of carbon in anoxic microsites of both conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

  15. Generation of PHB from Spent Sulfite Liquor Using Halophilic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Weissgram, Michaela; Gstöttner, Janina; Lorantfy, Bettina; Tenhaken, Raimund; Herwig, Christoph; Weber, Hedda K.

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms thrive at elevated concentrations of sodium chloride up to saturation and are capable of growing on a wide variety of carbon sources like various organic acids, hexose and also pentose sugars. Hence, the biotechnological application of these microorganisms can cover many aspects, such as the treatment of hypersaline waste streams of different origin. Due to the fact that the high osmotic pressure of hypersaline environments reduces the risk of contamination, the capacity for cost-effective non-sterile cultivation can make extreme halophilic microorganisms potentially valuable organisms for biotechnological applications. In this contribution, the stepwise use of screening approaches, employing design of experiment (DoE) on model media and subsequently using industrial waste as substrate have been implemented to investigate the applicability of halophiles to generate PHB from the industrial waste stream spent sulfite liquor (SSL). The production of PHB on model media as well as dilutions of industrial substrate in a complex medium has been screened for by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Blue staining. Screening was used to investigate the ability of halophilic microorganisms to withstand the inhibiting substances of the waste stream without negatively affecting PHB production. It could be shown that neither single inhibiting substances nor a mixture thereof inhibited growth in the investigated range, hence, leaving the question on the inhibiting mechanisms open. However, it could be demonstrated that some haloarchaea and halophilic bacteria are able to produce PHB when cultivated on 3.3% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor, whereas H. halophila was even able to thrive on 6.6% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor and still produce PHB. PMID:27682089

  16. Generation of PHB from Spent Sulfite Liquor Using Halophilic Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Weissgram, Michaela; Gstöttner, Janina; Lorantfy, Bettina; Tenhaken, Raimund; Herwig, Christoph; Weber, Hedda K

    2015-06-08

    Halophilic microorganisms thrive at elevated concentrations of sodium chloride up to saturation and are capable of growing on a wide variety of carbon sources like various organic acids, hexose and also pentose sugars. Hence, the biotechnological application of these microorganisms can cover many aspects, such as the treatment of hypersaline waste streams of different origin. Due to the fact that the high osmotic pressure of hypersaline environments reduces the risk of contamination, the capacity for cost-effective non-sterile cultivation can make extreme halophilic microorganisms potentially valuable organisms for biotechnological applications. In this contribution, the stepwise use of screening approaches, employing design of experiment (DoE) on model media and subsequently using industrial waste as substrate have been implemented to investigate the applicability of halophiles to generate PHB from the industrial waste stream spent sulfite liquor (SSL). The production of PHB on model media as well as dilutions of industrial substrate in a complex medium has been screened for by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Blue staining. Screening was used to investigate the ability of halophilic microorganisms to withstand the inhibiting substances of the waste stream without negatively affecting PHB production. It could be shown that neither single inhibiting substances nor a mixture thereof inhibited growth in the investigated range, hence, leaving the question on the inhibiting mechanisms open. However, it could be demonstrated that some haloarchaea and halophilic bacteria are able to produce PHB when cultivated on 3.3% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor, whereas H. halophila was even able to thrive on 6.6% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor and still produce PHB.

  17. Methanohalophilus zhilinae sp. nov., an alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathrani, I. M.; Boone, D. R.; Mah, R. A.; Fox, G. E.; Lau, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    Methanohalophilus zhilinae, a new alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic species of methanogenic bacteria, is described. Strain WeN5T (T = type strain) from Bosa Lake of the Wadi el Natrun in Egypt was designated the type strain and was further characterized. This strain was nonmotile, able to catabolize dimethylsulfide, and able to grow in medium with a methyl group-containing substrate (such as methanol or trimethylamine) as the sole organic compound added. Sulfide (21 mM) inhibited cultures growing on trimethylamine. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of strain WeN5T was typical of the pattern for archaeobacteria, and the guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid was 38 mol%. Characterization of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequence indicated that strain WeN5T is phylogenetically distinct from members of previously described genera other than Methanohalophilus and supported the partition of halophilic methanogens into their own genus.

  18. Halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides from athalassohaline, thalassohaline, and polyhaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Sarita W.; Gonsalves, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus penicillioides is a true halophile, present in diverse econiches – from the hypersaline athalassohaline, and thalassohaline environments, to polyhaline systems, and in different geographical locations. Twenty seven isolates from these environments, were seen to be moderate halophiles, euryhaline in nature. They had an obligate need of a low aw and were unable to grow on a regular defined medium such as Czapek Dox Agar, as well as on varied nutrient rich agar media such as Malt Extract, Potato Dextrose and Sabouraud Agar; however, growth was obtained on all these media when amended with 10% solar salt. In absence of added salt, the conidia either did not germinate, or when germinated, distortions and lysis were seen in the short mycelial forms; on media with salt, the mycelia and vesicles appeared normal. PMID:25140168

  19. Production of 5′ Nucleotide by Using Halophilic Nuclease H Preferentially Adsorbed on Flocculated Cells of the Halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kamekura, Masahiro; Yokoi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Takekazu

    1988-01-01

    A bioreactor with a column of flocculated cells of the moderate halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus which adsorbed the halophilic nuclease H was designed to be used in the production of 5′ nucleotides from RNA. A remarkable characteristic of the flocculated cells was that they preferentially adsorbed much exogenous nuclease, excluding adsorbed 5′ nucleotidase. Furthermore, desalting treatment of the flocculated cells in the presence of 2% MgSO4 · 7H2O gave rise to selective inactivation of 5′ nucleotidase without the loss of nuclease H activity, and 5′-guanylic acid was produced with the bioreactor. PMID:16347767

  20. Halophilic life on Mars ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Holzinger, Anita; Polacsek, Tatjana K.; Legat, Andrea; Grösbacher, Michael; Weigl, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Background: The search for extraterrestrial life has been declared as a goal for the 21th century by several space agencies. Potential candidates are microorganisms on or in the surface of moons and planets, such as Mars. Extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) are of astrobiological interest since viable strains have been isolated from million years old salt deposits (1) and halite has been found in Martian meteorites and in surface pools. Therefore, haloarchaeal responses to simulated and real space conditions were explored. Immuno assays for a potential Life Marker Chip experiment were developed with antisera against the universal enzyme ATP synthase. Methods: The focus of these studies was on the application of fluorescent probes since they provide strong signals, and detection devices are suitable for miniaturization. Viability of haloarchaeal strains (Halococcus dombrowskii and Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1) was probed with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit and the BacLight™ Bacterial Membrane Potential kit. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the DNA, following exposure to simulated and real space conditions (UV irradiation from 200 - 400 nm; 18 months exposure on the International Space Station [ISS] within the ADAPT experiment by Dr. P. Rettberg), were detected with fluorescent Alexa-Fluor-488-coupled antibodies. Immuno assays with antisera against the A-ATPase subunits from Halorubrum saccharovorum were carried out with the highly sensitive Immun-Star ™ WesternC ™ chemiluminescent kit (Bio-Rad). Results: Using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit, the D37 (dose of 37% survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii and Hbt. salinarum NRC-1, following exposure to UV (200-400 nm) was about 400 kJ/m2, when cells were embedded in halite and about 1 kJ/m2, when cells were in liquid cultures. Fluorescent staining indicated a slightly higher cellular activity than that which was derived from the determination of colony forming units. Assessment of viability with the Bac

  1. Hans Georg Trüper (1936–2016) and His Contributions to Halophile Research

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Hans Georg Trüper, one of the most important scientists in the field of halophile research, passed away on 9 March 2016 at the age of 79. I here present a brief obituary with special emphasis on Prof. Trüper’s contributions to our understanding of the halophilic prokaryotes and their adaptations to life in hypersaline environments. He has pioneered the study of the halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria of the Ectothiorhodospira—Halorhodospira group. Some of the species he and his group isolated from hypersaline and haloalkaline environments have become model organisms for the study of the mechanisms of haloadaptation: the functions of three major organic compounds – glycine betaine, ectoine, and trehalose – known to serve as “compatible solutes” in halophilic members of the Bacteria domain, were discovered during studies of these anoxygenic phototrophs. Prof. Trüper’s studies of hypersaline alkaline environments in Egypt also led to the isolation of the first known extremely halophilic archaeon (Natronomonas pharaonis). The guest editors dedicate this special volume of Life to the memory of Prof. Hans Georg Trüper. PMID:27187481

  2. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Overholt, Will A; Marks, Kala P; Romero, Isabel C; Hollander, David J; Snell, Terry W; Kostka, Joel E

    2015-11-06

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration.

  3. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Romero, Isabel C.; Hollander, David J.; Snell, Terry W.

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration. PMID:26546426

  4. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov. - An extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  5. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov., an extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  6. Comparison of membrane ATPases from extreme halophiles isolated from ancient salt deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Sulzner, Michael; Egelseer, Eva; Norton, Cynthia F.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1993-02-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme fromHalobacterium saccharovorum with respect to subunit composition, enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  7. Comparison of Membrane ATPases from Extreme Halophiles Isolated from Ancient Salt Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Sulzner, Michael; Egelseer, Eva; Norton, Cynthia F.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1993-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum with respect to sub unit composition. enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  8. Comparison of membrane ATPases from extreme halophiles isolated from ancient salt deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Sulzner, Michael; Egelseer, Eva; Norton, Cynthia F.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1993-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms were isolated from Triassic and Permian salt deposits. Two were rods and grew as red colonies; another was a coccus and produced pink colonies. The rods lysed in solutions that lacked added sodium chloride. Growth of all isolates was inhibited by aphidicolin and their bulk-proteins were acidic as judged from isoelectric focusing. Therefore, these organisms were tentatively identified as extreme halophiles. Whole cell proteins patterns of the isolates following gel electrophoresis were distinct and differed from those of representative type strains of halophilic bacteria. The membrane ATPases from the rods were similar to the enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum with respect to subunit composition, enzymatic properties and immunological cross-reaction, but differed slightly in amino acid composition. If the age of the microbial isolated is similar to that of the salt deposits, they can be considered repositories of molecular information of great evolutionary interest.

  9. Phytostabilization of moderate copper contaminated soils using co-inoculation of Vicia faba with plant growth promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fatnassi, Imen Challougui; Chiboub, Manel; Saadani, Omar; Jebara, Moez; Jebara, Salwa Harzalli

    2015-03-01

    There is a need to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from rhizosphere of plants growing on heavy metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programs. This article suggest a consortium of bacteria combining Rhizobium sp. CCNWSX0481, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas sp. 2(2010) that was examined for the ability to promote Vicia faba.L. growth when cultivated on the vineyard of soil moderately contaminated with copper. Data showed that inoculation was significant in nodulation; it increases the number and the weight of nodules of 50%. Co-inoculation was also found to positively influence growth and seed yield, through increasing fresh shoot and fresh root weights by 33 and 26%, respectively, and through rising numbers of seed per pod and pods per plant. In contrast, co-inoculation produced a significant reduction of accumulated copper in roots attending 35%, however, the treatment revealed no significant effects on the copper contents in pods and seeds. The tested inoculum could be an option to promote V. faba growth and to enhance soil fertilization in moderate copper contaminated soils. Further studies on the influence of co-inoculation practices on copper migration in soil-plant systems are recommended to acquire more information for evaluation of this legume safety.

  10. Metatranscriptomic analysis of extremely halophilic viral communities

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fernando; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Meseguer, Inmaculada; López, Cristina; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon; Parro, Víctor; Antón, Josefa

    2011-01-01

    Hypersaline environments harbour the highest number of viruses reported for aquatic environments. In crystallizer ponds from solar salterns, haloviruses coexist with extremely halophilic Archaea and Bacteria and present a high diversity although little is known about their activity. In this work, we analyzed the viral expression in one crystallizer using a metatranscriptomic approach in which clones from a metaviromic library were immobilized in a microarray and used as probes against total mRNA extracted from the hypersaline community. This approach has two advantages: (i) it overcomes the fact that there is no straightforward, unambiguous way to extract viral mRNA from bulk mRNAs and (ii) it makes the sequencing of all mRNAs unnecessary. Transcriptomic data indicated that the halovirus assemblage was highly active at the time of sampling and the viral groups with the highest expression levels were those related to high GC content haloarchaea and Salinibacter representatives, which are minor components in the environment. Moreover, the changes in the viral expression pattern and in the numbers of free viral particles were analyzed after submitting the samples to two stress conditions: ultraviolet-radiation and dilution. Results showed that Archaea were more sensitive than Bacteria to these stress conditions. The overexpression in the predicted archaeal virus fraction raised and the total numbers of free viruses increased. Furthermore, we identified some very closely related viral clones, displaying single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which were expressed only under certain conditions. These clones could be part of very closely related virus genomes for which we propose the term ‘ecoviriotypes'. PMID:21490689

  11. Halophiles, coming stars for industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jin; Chen, Jin-Chun; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-11-15

    Industrial biotechnology aims to produce chemicals, materials and biofuels to ease the challenges of shortage on petroleum. However, due to the disadvantages of bioprocesses including energy consuming sterilization, high fresh water consumption, discontinuous fermentation to avoid microbial contamination, highly expensive stainless steel fermentation facilities and competing substrates for human consumption, industrial biotechnology is less competitive compared with chemical processes. Recently, halophiles have shown promises to overcome these shortcomings. Due to their unique halophilic properties, some halophiles are able to grow in high pH and high NaCl containing medium under higher temperature, allowing fermentation processes to run contamination free under unsterile conditions and continuous way. At the same time, genetic manipulation methods have been developed for halophiles. So far, halophiles have been used to produce bioplastics polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), ectoines, enzymes, and bio-surfactants. Increasing effects have been made to develop halophiles into a low cost platform for bioprocessing with advantages of low energy, less fresh water consumption, low fixed capital investment, and continuous production.

  12. Characterization of Halophilic Bacterial Communities in Turda Salt Mine (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpa, Rahela; Keul, Anca; Muntean, Vasile; Dobrotă, Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Halophilic organisms are having adaptations to extreme salinity, the majority of them being Archaean, which have the ability to grow at extremely high salt concentrations, (from 3 % to 35 %). Level of salinity causes natural fluctuations in the halophilic populations that inhabit this particular habitat, raising problems in maintaining homeostasis of the osmotic pressure. Samples such as salt and water taken from Turda Salt Mine were analyzed in order to identify the eco-physiological bacterial groups. Considering the number of bacteria of each eco-physiological group, the bacterial indicators of salt quality (BISQ) were calculated and studied for each sample. The phosphatase, catalase and dehydrogenases enzymatic activities were quantitatively determined and the enzymatic indicators of salt quality (EISQ) were calculated. Bacterial isolates were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Universal bacterial primers, targeting the consensus region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were used. Analysis of a large fragment, of 1499 bp was performed to improve discrimination at the species level.

  13. UV resistance of a halophilic archaeon in simulated martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Kate, Il; van Sluis, Ca; Selch, F.; Garry, Jrc; Stan-Lotter, H.; van Loosdrecht, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    Mars is thought to have had liquid water at its surface for geologically long periods. The progressive desiccation of the surface would have led to an increase in the salt content of remaining bodies of water. If life had developed on Mars, then some of the mechanisms evolved in terrestrial halophilic bacteria to cope with high salt content may have been similar to those existing in martian organisms. We have exposed samples of the halophilic Natronorubrum sp. strain HG-1 (Nr. strain HG-1) to conditions of ultraviolet radiation (UV) similar to those of the present-day martian environment. Furthermore, the effects of low temperature and low pressure on Nr. strain HG-1 have been investigated. To simulate a more Mars-like environment and investigate the effect of water in the atmosphere Nr. strain HG-1 has been irradiated when placed in a low pressure CO2 environment, static as well as flowing. The results, obtained by monitoring growth curves, indicate that the present UV radiation at the surface of Mars is a significant hazard for this organism. Exposure of the cells to high vacuum inactivates ~50 % of the cells. Freezing to -20 ° C and -80 ° C kills ~80 % of the cells. When desiccated and embedded in a salt crust, cells are somewhat more resistant to UV radiation than when suspended in an aqueous solution. The cell inactivation by UV is wavelength dependent. It cannot be excluded that they can survive when embedded in the soil or buried underneath rocks.

  14. Efficient utilization of ectoine by halophilic Brevibacterium species and Escherichia coli subjected to osmotic downshock.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Shinichi; Wang, Chenxiang

    2005-01-01

    Halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria subjected to osmotic downshock, from 0.7 M NaCl to deionized water, were examined for their survival, with the uptake and utilization of the cyclic amino acid ectoine, one of the representative compatible solutes, being taken into account. The uptake of ectoine added externally and survival of the cells were monitored as a function of incubation time in the presence and absence of NaCl. The halophilic Brevibacterium sp. JCM 6894 and B. epidermidis JCM 2593 actively accumulated ectoine regardless of the presence of NaCl, which led to cell survival. Brevibacterium casei JCM 2594 belonging to the same Brevibacterium species, however, revealed Na+-dependence of its uptake activity of ectoine. Non-halophilic Escherichia coli K-12 did not accumulate ectoine, and thereby this strain failed to survive irrespective of whether NaCl was present. The physiological meanings of the downshock procedure are discussed in connection with the uptake and the subsequent utilization of ectoine.

  15. Salty sisters: The women of halophiles

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Bonnie K.; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    A history of halophile research reveals the commitment of scientists to uncovering the secrets of the limits of life, in particular life in high salt concentration and under extreme osmotic pressure. During the last 40 years, halophile scientists have indeed made important contributions to extremophile research, and prior international halophiles congresses have documented both the historical and the current work. During this period of salty discoveries, female scientists, in general, have grown in number worldwide. But those who worked in the field when there were small numbers of women sometimes saw their important contributions overshadowed by their male counterparts. Recent studies suggest that modern female scientists experience gender bias in matters such as conference invitations and even representation among full professors. In the field of halophilic microbiology, what is the impact of gender bias? How has the participation of women changed over time? What do women uniquely contribute to this field? What are factors that impact current female scientists to a greater degree? This essay emphasizes the “her story” (not “history”) of halophile discovery. PMID:24926287

  16. Rapid method for detection of gram-positive and -negative bacteria in milk from cows with moderate or severe clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, S P; Sørum, H; Larsen, H J; Gogstad, G

    2001-09-01

    A rapid method for demonstration of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in milk is described. The technique is based on dilution of the sample in a medium, followed by filtration through a porous polysulfone membrane with a pore size retaining and concentrating bacteria from the sample. The bacteria concentrated on the surface of the membrane are stained with a cationic dye (toluidine blue) that can be visualized by the naked eye. After staining, the membrane is treated with ethanol-acetic acid (pH 2.8 to 3.0), which causes decolorization of gram-negative bacteria, whereas gram-positive bacteria retain the stain. The method does not require heat fixation, electrical power, microscopic examination, or specially trained personnel. The time needed to perform the test is approximately 5 min. The technique was applied to artificially infected milk and milk from cows with moderate or severe clinical mastitis for detection and differentiation of bacteria. The sensitivity of the filtration method was 92 and 100% for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively, compared with traditional bacteriological culture of milk samples. The detection limit was 5 x 10(6) CFU/ml for Staphylococcus aureus and 1 x 10(6) CFU/ml for Escherichia coli in spiked milk samples. The overall specificity of the method was 86%. This diagnostic method can provide on-site guidance to the veterinarian to optimize use of antibiotics in mastitis therapy.

  17. The effects of salinity on nitrification using halophilic nitrifiers in a Sequencing Batch Reactor treating hypersaline wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Ding, Jie-Ran; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    With annual increases in the generation and use of saline wastewater, the need to avoid environmental problems such as eutrophication is critical. A previous study identified ways to start up a halophilic sludge domesticated from estuarine sediments to remove nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30 g/L. This investigation expands that work to explore the impact of salinity on nitrogen removal. This study demonstrated that the mixed halophilic consortia removed nitrogen from wastewater with a salinity of 30–85 g/L. A kinetic analysis showed that halophilic nitrifiers selected based on hypersalinity were characterized by low Ks, μmax and specific ammonium oxidization rates. This explains the decrease in ammonium removal efficiency in the high salinity operational phases. Salinity inhibited ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity, as well as the number of dominant AOB, but did not significantly affect the AOB dominant species. Three most dominant AOB lineages in the halophilic sludge were Nitrosomonas marina, Nitrosomonas europaea, and Nitrosococcus mobilis. Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus mobilis were mainly affected by salinity, while nitrite accumulation and ammonia loading played the key role in determining the abundance of Nitrosococcus mobilis and Nitrosococcus europaea. The study contributes insights about shifts in halophilic nitrifying bacterial populations. PMID:27109617

  18. Regulated Polyploidy in Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Breuert, Sebastian; Allers, Thorsten; Spohn, Gabi; Soppa, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Polyploidy is common in higher eukaryotes, especially in plants, but it is generally assumed that most prokaryotes contain a single copy of a circular chromosome and are therefore monoploid. We have used two independent methods to determine the genome copy number in halophilic archaea, 1) cell lysis in agarose blocks and Southern blot analysis, and 2) Real-Time quantitative PCR. Fast growing H. salinarum cells contain on average about 25 copies of the chromosome in exponential phase, and their ploidy is downregulated to 15 copies in early stationary phase. The chromosome copy number is identical in cultures with a twofold lower growth rate, in contrast to the results reported for several other prokaryotic species. Of three additional replicons of H. salinarum, two have a low copy number that is not growth-phase regulated, while one replicon even shows a higher degree of growth phase-dependent regulation than the main replicon. The genome copy number of H. volcanii is similarly high during exponential phase (on average 18 copies/cell), and it is also downregulated (to 10 copies) as the cells enter stationary phase. The variation of genome copy numbers in the population was addressed by fluorescence microscopy and by FACS analysis. These methods allowed us to verify the growth phase-dependent regulation of ploidy in H. salinarum, and they revealed that there is a wide variation in genome copy numbers in individual cells that is much larger in exponential than in stationary phase. Our results indicate that polyploidy might be more widespread in archaea (or even prokaryotes in general) than previously assumed. Moreover, the presence of so many genome copies in a prokaryote raises questions about the evolutionary significance of this strategy. PMID:17183724

  19. Genomes of “Spiribacter”, a streamlined, successful halophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thalassosaline waters produced by the concentration of seawater are widespread and common extreme aquatic habitats. Their salinity varies from that of sea water (ca. 3.5%) to saturation for NaCl (ca. 37%). Obviously the microbiota varies dramatically throughout this range. Recent metagenomic analysis of intermediate salinity waters (19%) indicated the presence of an abundant and yet undescribed gamma-proteobacterium. Two strains belonging to this group have been isolated from saltern ponds of intermediate salinity in two Spanish salterns and were named “Spiribacter”. Results The genomes of two isolates of “Spiribacter” have been fully sequenced and assembled. The analysis of metagenomic datasets indicates that microbes of this genus are widespread worldwide in medium salinity habitats representing the first ecologically defined moderate halophile. The genomes indicate that the two isolates belong to different species within the same genus. Both genomes are streamlined with high coding densities, have few regulatory mechanisms and no motility or chemotactic behavior. Metabolically they are heterotrophs with a subgroup II xanthorhodopsin as an additional energy source when light is available. Conclusions This is the first bacterium that has been proven by culture independent approaches to be prevalent in hypersaline habitats of intermediate salinity (half a way between the sea and NaCl saturation). Predictions from the proteome and analysis of transporter genes, together with a complete ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster are consistent with these microbes having the salt-out-organic-compatible solutes type of osmoregulation. All these features are also consistent with a well-adapted fully planktonic microbe while other halophiles with more complex genomes such as Salinibacter ruber might have particle associated microniches. PMID:24225341

  20. Amino Acid Biosynthesis in the Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula hispanica

    PubMed Central

    Hochuli, Michel; Patzelt, Heiko; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Wüthrich, Kurt; Szyperski, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Biosynthesis of proteinogenic amino acids in the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica was explored by using biosynthetically directed fractional 13C labeling with a mixture of 90% unlabeled and 10% uniformly 13C-labeled glycerol. The resulting 13C-labeling patterns in the amino acids were analyzed by two-dimensional 13C,1H correlation spectroscopy. The experimental data provided evidence for a split pathway for isoleucine biosynthesis, with 56% of the total Ile originating from threonine and pyruvate via the threonine pathway and 44% originating from pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A via the pyruvate pathway. In addition, the diaminopimelate pathway involving diaminopimelate dehydrogenase was shown to lead to lysine biosynthesis and an analysis of the 13C-labeling pattern in tyrosine indicated novel biosynthetic pathways that have so far not been further characterized. For the 17 other proteinogenic amino acids, the data were consistent with data for commonly found biosynthetic pathways. A comparison of our data with the amino acid metabolisms of eucarya and bacteria supports the theory that pathways for synthesis of proteinogenic amino acids were established before ancient cells diverged into archaea, bacteria, and eucarya. PMID:10322026

  1. Copper extraction from coarsely ground printed circuit boards using moderate thermophilic bacteria in a rotating-drum reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Michael L.M.; Leão, Versiane A.; Gomes, Otavio; Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Copper bioleaching from PCB (20 mm) by moderate thermophiles was demonstrated. • Larger PCB sheets enable a cost reduction due to the elimination of fine grinding. • Crushing generated cracks in PCB increasing the copper extraction. • A pre-treatment step was necessary to remove the lacquer coating. • High copper extractions (85%) were possible with pulp density of up to 25.0 g/L. - Abstract: The current work reports on a new approach for copper bioleaching from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by moderate thermophiles in a rotating-drum reactor. Initially leaching of PCB was carried out in shake flasks to assess the effects of particle size (−208 μm + 147 μm), ferrous iron concentration (1.25–10.0 g/L) and pH (1.5–2.5) on copper leaching using mesophile and moderate thermophile microorganisms. Only at a relatively low solid content (10.0 g/L) complete copper extraction was achieved from the particle size investigated. Conversely, high copper extractions were possible from coarse-ground PCB (20 mm-long) working with increased solids concentration (up to 25.0 g/L). Because there was as the faster leaching kinetics at 50 °C Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was selected for experiments in a rotating-drum reactor with the coarser-sized PCB sheets. Under optimal conditions, copper extraction reached 85%, in 8 days and microscopic observations by SEM–EDS of the on non-leached and leached material suggested that metal dissolution from the internal layers was restricted by the fact that metal surface was not entirely available and accessible for the solution in the case of the 20 mm-size sheets.

  2. Systematic and biotechnological aspects of halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Javad; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    More than 70 species of halotolerant and halophilic actinomycetes belonging to at least 24 genera have been validly described. Halophilic actinomycetes are a less explored source of actinomycetes for discovery of novel bioactive secondary metabolites. Degradation of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds, detoxification of pollutants, production of new enzymes and other metabolites such as antibiotics, compatible solutes and polymers are other potential industrial applications of halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes. Especially new bioactive secondary metabolites that are derived from only a small fraction of the investigated halophilic actinomycetes, mainly from marine habitats, have revealed the huge capacity of this physiological group in production of new bioactive chemical entities. Combined high metabolic capacities of actinomycetes and unique features related to extremophilic nature of the halophilic actinomycetes have conferred on them an influential role for future biotechnological applications.

  3. Osmoregulation in the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas elongata: A Case Study for Integrative Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Knabe, Nicole; Siedler, Frank; Scheffer, Beatrix; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria use a variety of osmoregulatory methods, such as the accumulation of one or more compatible solutes. The wide diversity of compounds that can act as compatible solute complicates the task of understanding the different strategies that halophilic bacteria use to cope with salt. This is specially challenging when attempting to go beyond the pathway that produces a certain compatible solute towards an understanding of how the metabolic network as a whole addresses the problem. Metabolic reconstruction based on genomic data together with Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a promising tool to gain insight into this problem. However, as more of these reconstructions become available, it becomes clear that processes predicted by genome annotation may not reflect the processes that are active in vivo. As a case in point, E. coli is unable to grow aerobically on citrate in spite of having all the necessary genes to do it. It has also been shown that the realization of this genetic potential into an actual capability to metabolize citrate is an extremely unlikely event under normal evolutionary conditions. Moreover, many marine bacteria seem to have the same pathways to metabolize glucose but each species uses a different one. In this work, a metabolic network inferred from genomic annotation of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata and proteomic profiling experiments are used as a starting point to motivate targeted experiments in order to find out some of the defining features of the osmoregulatory strategies of this bacterium. This new information is then used to refine the network in order to describe the actual capabilities of H. elongata, rather than its genetic potential. PMID:28081159

  4. Discrimination of Pigments of Microalgae, Bacteria and Yeasts Using Lightweight Handheld Raman Spectrometers: Prospects for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlicka, J.; Osterrothova, K.; Nedbalova, L.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Oren, A.

    2014-06-01

    Handheld Raman instrumentation with 532 nm lasers can be used to distinguish carotenoids of autotrophic microalgae, purple sulfur bacteria, halophilic Archaea and pigmented yeasts. Pigments are proposed as biomarkers for astrobiology of Mars.

  5. Copper extraction from coarsely ground printed circuit boards using moderate thermophilic bacteria in a rotating-drum reactor.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Michael L M; Leão, Versiane A; Gomes, Otavio; Lambert, Fanny; Bastin, David; Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan

    2015-07-01

    The current work reports on a new approach for copper bioleaching from Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by moderate thermophiles in a rotating-drum reactor. Initially leaching of PCB was carried out in shake flasks to assess the effects of particle size (-208μm+147μm), ferrous iron concentration (1.25-10.0g/L) and pH (1.5-2.5) on copper leaching using mesophile and moderate thermophile microorganisms. Only at a relatively low solid content (10.0g/L) complete copper extraction was achieved from the particle size investigated. Conversely, high copper extractions were possible from coarse-ground PCB (20mm-long) working with increased solids concentration (up to 25.0g/L). Because there was as the faster leaching kinetics at 50°C Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was selected for experiments in a rotating-drum reactor with the coarser-sized PCB sheets. Under optimal conditions, copper extraction reached 85%, in 8days and microscopic observations by SEM-EDS of the on non-leached and leached material suggested that metal dissolution from the internal layers was restricted by the fact that metal surface was not entirely available and accessible for the solution in the case of the 20mm-size sheets.

  6. Support vector machine with a Pearson VII function kernel for discriminating halophilic and non-halophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangya; Ge, Huihua

    2013-10-01

    Understanding of proteins adaptive to hypersaline environment and identifying them is a challenging task and would help to design stable proteins. Here, we have systematically analyzed the normalized amino acid compositions of 2121 halophilic and 2400 non-halophilic proteins. The results showed that halophilic protein contained more Asp at the expense of Lys, Ile, Cys and Met, fewer small and hydrophobic residues, and showed a large excess of acidic over basic amino acids. Then, we introduce a support vector machine method to discriminate the halophilic and non-halophilic proteins, by using a novel Pearson VII universal function based kernel. In the three validation check methods, it achieved an overall accuracy of 97.7%, 91.7% and 86.9% and outperformed other machine learning algorithms. We also address the influence of protein size on prediction accuracy and found the worse performance for small size proteins might be some significant residues (Cys and Lys) were missing in the proteins.

  7. Great Salt Lake halophilic microorganisms as models for astrobiology: evidence for desiccation tolerance and ultraviolet irradiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Bonnie K.; Eddington, Breanne; Riddle, Misty R.; Webster, Tabitha N.; Avery, Brian J.

    2007-09-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is home to halophiles, salt-tolerant Bacteria and Archaea, which live at 2-5M NaCl. In addition to salt tolerance, GSL halophiles exhibit resistance to both ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and desiccation. First, to understand desiccation resistance, we sought to determine the diversity of GSL halophiles capable of surviving desiccation in either recently formed GSL halite crystals or GSL Artemia (brine shrimp) cysts. From these desiccated environments, surviving microorganisms were cultured and isolated, and genomic DNA was extracted from the individual species for identification by 16S rRNA gene homology. From the surface-sterilized cysts we also extracted DNA of the whole microbial population for non-cultivation techniques. We amplified the archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA gene from all genomic DNA, cloned the cyst population amplicons, and sequenced. These sequences were compared to gene databases for determination of closest matched species. Interestingly, the isolates from the crystal dissolution are distinct from those previously isolated from GSL brine. The cyst population results reveal species not found in crystals or brine, and may indicate microorganisms that live as endosymbionts of this hypersaline arthropod. Second, we explored UV resistance in a GSL haloarchaea species, "H. salsolis." This strain resists UV irradiation an order of magnitude better than control species, all of which have intact repair systems. To test the hypothesis that halophiles have a photoprotection system, which prevents DNA damage from occurring, we designed an immunoassay to detect thymine dimers following UV irradiation. "H. salsolis" showed remarkable resistance to dimer formation. Evidence for both UV and desiccation resistance in these salt-tolerant GSL halophiles makes them well-suited as models for Astrobiological studies in pursuit of questions about life beyond earth.

  8. The occurrence of denitrification in extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of Halobacterium vallismortis, Halobacterium mediterranei and Halobacterium marismortui (Ginzburg strain) to grow anaerobically and denitrify was determined. Each organism grew anaerobically only in the presence of nitrate. H. marismortui produced nitrite and dinitrogen from nitrate during exponential growth. However, as the culture entered stationary phase, dinitrogen production ceased and nitrous oxide was detected. H. vallismortis produced nitrous oxide and dinitrogen during exponential growth, with dinitrogen production ceasing at the onset of stationary phase. H. mediterranei produced dinitrogen during exponential growth and did not produce nitrous oxide. These results confirm the occurrence of denitrification in the halobacteria.

  9. Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase (Sor) in the Moderately Thermoacidophilic Leaching Bacteria: Studies in Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus

    PubMed Central

    Janosch, Claudia; Remonsellez, Francisco; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The sulfur oxygenase reductase (Sor) catalyzes the oxygen dependent disproportionation of elemental sulfur, producing sulfite, thiosulfate and sulfide. Being considered an “archaeal like” enzyme, it is also encoded in the genomes of some acidophilic leaching bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus caldus, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, among others. We measured Sor activity in crude extracts from Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T. The optimum temperature for its oxygenase activity was achieved at 75 °C, confirming the “thermophilic” nature of this enzyme. Additionally, a search for genes probably involved in sulfur metabolism in the genome sequence of Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T was done. Interestingly, no sox genes were found. Two sor genes, a complete heterodisulfidereductase (hdr) gene cluster, three tetrathionate hydrolase (tth) genes, three sulfide quinonereductase (sqr), as well as the doxD component of a thiosulfate quinonereductase (tqo) were found. Seven At. caldus strains were tested for Sor activity, which was not detected in any of them. We provide evidence that an earlier reported Sor activity from At. caldus S1 and S2 strains most likely was due to the presence of a Sulfobacillus contaminant. PMID:27682113

  10. Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase (Sor) in the Moderately Thermoacidophilic Leaching Bacteria: Studies in Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    PubMed

    Janosch, Claudia; Remonsellez, Francisco; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-10-21

    The sulfur oxygenase reductase (Sor) catalyzes the oxygen dependent disproportionation of elemental sulfur, producing sulfite, thiosulfate and sulfide. Being considered an "archaeal like" enzyme, it is also encoded in the genomes of some acidophilic leaching bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus caldus, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, among others. We measured Sor activity in crude extracts from Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293(T). The optimum temperature for its oxygenase activity was achieved at 75 °C, confirming the "thermophilic" nature of this enzyme. Additionally, a search for genes probably involved in sulfur metabolism in the genome sequence of Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293(T) was done. Interestingly, no sox genes were found. Two sor genes, a complete heterodisulfidereductase (hdr) gene cluster, three tetrathionate hydrolase (tth) genes, three sulfide quinonereductase (sqr), as well as the doxD component of a thiosulfate quinonereductase (tqo) were found. Seven At. caldus strains were tested for Sor activity, which was not detected in any of them. We provide evidence that an earlier reported Sor activity from At. caldus S1 and S2 strains most likely was due to the presence of a Sulfobacillus contaminant.

  11. Effect of High Hydrostatic Pressure Combined with Moderate Heat to Inactivate Pressure-Resistant Bacteria in Water-Boiled Salted Duck.

    PubMed

    Ye, Keping; Feng, Yulin; Wang, Kai; Bai, Yun; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of high hydrostatic pressure combined with moderate heat to inactivate pressure-resistant bacteria in water-boiled salted duck meat (WBSDM), and to establish suitable procedures to improve the quality of WBSDM. The conditions (300 MPa/60 °C, 400 MPa/60 °C, and 500 MPa/50 °C) effectively inactivated the pressure-resistant bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus warneri) in WBSDM. Although more pressure-resistant than S. warneri, the above treatment conditions inactivated B. cereus more than 10(7) CFU/mL in buffer, and more than 10(6) CFU/g in WBSDM, and did not cause any changes in color, texture, or moisture content of products. The interaction between pressure and temperature is a more significant factor than only pressure in inactivating both B. cereus and S. warneri, the treatment of WBSDM at 400 MPa/ 60 °C/ 10 min is the most practical condition for postprocess of WBSDM after cooking.

  12. Halophilic enzyme activation induced by salts

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Gabriel; Laín, Ana; Tadeo, Xavier; López-Méndez, Blanca; Castaño, David; Millet, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Halophilic archea (halobacteriae) thrive in hypersaline environments, avoiding osmotic shock by increasing the ion concentration of their cytoplasm by up to 3–6 M. To remain folded and active, their constitutive proteins have evolved towards a biased amino acid composition. High salt concentration affects catalytic activity in an enzyme-dependent way and a unified molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have investigated a DNA ligase from Haloferax volcanii (Hv LigN) to show that K+ triggers catalytic activity by preferentially stabilising a specific conformation in the reaction coordinate. Sodium ions, in turn, do not populate such isoform and the enzyme remains inactive in the presence of this co-solute. Our results show that the halophilic amino acid signature enhances the enzyme's thermodynamic stability, with an indirect effect on its catalytic activity. This model has been successfully applied to reengineer Hv LigN into an enzyme that is catalytically active in the presence of NaCl. PMID:22355525

  13. Extracellular production of beta-amylase by a halophilic isolate, Halobacillus sp. LY9.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Yu, Hui-Ying

    2011-11-01

    A moderately halophilic strain LY9 with high amylolytic activity was isolated from soil sample obtained from Yuncheng, China. Biochemical and physiological characterization along with 16S rRNA sequence analysis placed the isolate in the genus Halobacillus. Amylase production started from the post-exponential phase of bacterial growth and reached a maximum level during the early-stationary phase. The isolate LY9 was found to secrete the amylase, the production of which depended on the salinity of the growth medium. Maximum amylase production was observed in the presence of 10% KCl or 10% NaCl. Maltose was the main product of soluble starch hydrolysis, indicating a β-amylase activity. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 60°C, pH 8.0, and 10-12.5% of NaCl. It was highly active over broad temperature (50-70°C), NaCl concentration (5.0-20.0%), and pH (4.0-12.0) ranges, indicating its thermoactive and alkali-stable nature. However, activity dropped off dramatically at low NaCl concentrations, showing the amylase was halophilic. Ca(2+) was found to stimulate the β-amylase activity, whereas ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), phenylarsine oxide (PAO), and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) strongly inhibited the enzyme, indicating it probably was a metalloenzyme with cysteine and histidine residues located in its active site. Moreover, the enzyme exhibited remarkable stability towards sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100. This is the first report of β-amylase production from moderate halophiles. The present study indicates that the extracellular β-amylase of Halobacillus sp. LY9 may have considerable potential for industrial application owing to its properties.

  14. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment.

  15. The Evolution of Energy-Transducing Systems. Studies with an Extremely Halophilic Archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1997-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria (1). Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaea (formerly called archaebacteria) are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution (2). From studies of members of all three major groups of archaea, the halophiles, methanogens and thermoacidophiles, it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase, which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complex, and possibly a deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  16. Role of Central Metabolism in the Osmoadaptation of the Halophilic Bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens*

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, José M.; Bernal, Vicente; Salvador, Manuel; Argandoña, Montserrat; Vargas, Carmen; Csonka, Laszlo; Sevilla, Ángel; Iborra, José L.; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Cánovas, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial osmoadaptation involves the cytoplasmic accumulation of compatible solutes to counteract extracellular osmolarity. The halophilic and highly halotolerant bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens is able to grow up to 3 m NaCl in a minimal medium due to the de novo synthesis of ectoines. This is an osmoregulated pathway that burdens central metabolic routes by quantitatively drawing off TCA cycle intermediaries. Consequently, metabolism in C. salexigens has adapted to support this biosynthetic route. Metabolism of C. salexigens is more efficient at high salinity than at low salinity, as reflected by lower glucose consumption, lower metabolite overflow, and higher biomass yield. At low salinity, by-products (mainly gluconate, pyruvate, and acetate) accumulate extracellularly. Using [1-13C]-, [2-13C]-, [6-13C]-, and [U-13C6]glucose as carbon sources, we were able to determine the main central metabolic pathways involved in ectoines biosynthesis from glucose. C. salexigens uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rather than the standard glycolytic pathway for glucose catabolism, and anaplerotic activity is high to replenish the TCA cycle with the intermediaries withdrawn for ectoines biosynthesis. Metabolic flux ratios at low and high salinity were similar, revealing a certain metabolic rigidity, probably due to its specialization to support high biosynthetic fluxes and partially explaining why metabolic yields are so highly affected by salinity. This work represents an important contribution to the elucidation of specific metabolic adaptations in compatible solute-accumulating halophilic bacteria. PMID:23615905

  17. Halophilic Archaea Cultivated from Surface Sterilized Middle-Late Eocene Rock Salt Are Polyploid

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Salla T.; Zerulla, Karolin; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Bamford, Dennis H.; Chen, Xiangdong; Soppa, Jörg; Oksanen, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38–41 million years ago) rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11–14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6–8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment. PMID:25338080

  18. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  19. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  20. The effect of high ionic strength on neptunium (V) adsorption to a halophilic bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Richmann, Michael; Reed, Donald T.

    2013-06-01

    The mobility of neptunium (V) in subsurface high ionic strength aqueous systems may be strongly influenced by adsorption to the cell wall of the halophilic bacteria Chromohalobacter sp. This study is the first to evaluate the adsorption of neptunium (V) to the surface of a halophilic bacterium as a function of pH from approximately 2 to 10 and at ionic strengths of 2 and 4 M. This is also the first study to evaluate the effects of carbonate complexation with neptunium (V) on adsorption to whole bacterial cells under high pH conditions. A thermodynamically-based surface complexation model was adapted to describe experimental adsorption data under high ionic strength conditions where traditional corrections for aqueous ion activity are invalid. Adsorption of neptunium (V) was rapid and reversible under the conditions of the study. Adsorption was significant over the entire pH range evaluated for both ionic strength conditions and was shown to be dependent on the speciation of the sites on the bacterial surface and neptunium (V) in solution. Adsorption behavior was controlled by the relatively strong electrostatic attraction of the positively charged neptunyl ion to the negatively charged bacterial surface at pH below circum-neutral. At pH above circum-neutral, the adsorption behavior was controlled by the presence of negatively charged neptunium (V) carbonate complexes resulting in decreased adsorption, although adsorption was still significant due to the adsorption of negatively charged neptunyl-carbonate species. Adsorption in 4 M NaClO4 was enhanced relative to adsorption in 2 M NaClO4 over the majority of the pH range evaluated, likely due to the effect of increasing aqueous ion activity at high ionic strength. The protonation/deprotonation characteristics of the cell wall of Chromohalobacter sp. were evaluated by potentiometric titrations in 2 and 4 M NaClO4. Bacterial titration results indicated that Chromohalobacter sp. exhibits similar proton buffering

  1. Moderately haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes in salt-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    It was found that the population density of actinomycetes in solonchaks and saline desert soils varied from hundreds to tens of thousands of colony-forming units (CFUs) per 1 g of soil depending on soil type and was by 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the number of mycelial bacteria in main soil types. Actinomycetes grow actively in saline soils, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m per 1 g of soil. Domination of moderately halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes, which grow well under 5% NaCl and pH 8-9, is a specific feature of actinomycetal complexes in saline soils. Representatives of Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera were found among the haloalkaliphilic actinomycetes. Micromonospores demonstrated lower (than streptomycetes) adaptability to high salt concentrations. Investigation of the phylogenetic position of isolated dominant haloalkaliphilic strains of streptomycetes performed on the basis of sequencing of the gene 16S rRNA enabled identifying these strains as Streptomyces pluricolorescens and S. prunicolor.

  2. Efficient proteolysis and application of an alkaline protease from halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Srivastava, A K; Khare, S K

    2014-10-03

    A salt-stable alkaline protease from moderately halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9, isolated from the western coast of India, is described. This protease was capable of efficiently removing silver from used/waste X-Ray films, as well as hydrolyzing defatted soy flour with 31% degree of hydrolysis (DH). Production of the protease was optimized by using response surface methodology. Ca(2+) and NaCl were the most critical factors in enhancing the yield. Under optimized culture conditions, a maximum of 369 U protease/mL was obtained, which is quite comparable to the yields of commercial proteases. The elevated production level coupled with ability to efficiently hydrolyze protein-laden soy flour and complete recovery of silver from used X-Ray films makes it a prospective industrial enzyme.

  3. Halophilic Archaea cultured from ancient halite, Death Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Brian A; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N; Parker, Matthew A

    2010-02-01

    Halophilic Archaea cultured from ancient fluid inclusions in a 90-m-long (0- to 100,000-year-old) salt core from Death Valley, California, demonstrate survival of bacterial cells in subsurface halite for up to 34,000 years. Five enrichment cultures, representing three genera of halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum, Natronomonas and Haloterrigena), were obtained from five surface-sterilized halite crystals exclusively in one section of the core (13.0-17.8 m; 22,000-34,000 years old) containing perennial saline lake deposits. Prokaryote cells were observed microscopically in situ within fluid inclusions from every layer that produced culturable cells. Another 876 crystals analysed from depths of 8.1-86.7 m (10,000-100,000 years old) failed to yield live halophilic Archaea. Considering the number of halite crystals tested (culturing success of 0.6%), microbial survival in fluid inclusions in halite is rare and related to the paleoenvironment, which controls the distribution and abundance of trapped microorganisms. Two cultures from two crystals at 17.8 m that yielded identical 16S rRNA sequences (genus: Haloterrigena) demonstrate intra-laboratory reproducibility. Inter-laboratory reproducibility is shown by two halophilic Archaea (genus: Natronomonas), with 99.3% similarity of 16S rRNA sequences, cultured from the same core interval, but at separate laboratories.

  4. Euryhaline Halophilic Microorganisms From the Suiyo Seamount Hydrothermal Vents.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Kimura, H.; Maruyama, A.; Naganuma, T.

    2002-12-01

    The euryhaline halophilic microorganisms grow in a wide salinity range from <3% NaCl (seawater equivalent) to >15% NaCl or to even saturation (about 30% NaCl). A number of euryhaline halophiles have been found in a wide range of habitats from oceanic and terrestrial regimes, from deep-sea vents and seeps, and from Antarctic sea ice and terrains. We have isolated the euryhaline strains independently from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge vent fluids and Antarctic terrains are closely related species of the genus Halomonas. Some euryhaline halophiles maintain intracellular osmotic balance by controlling the concentration of compatible solute such as ectoine. This compatible solute not only stabilizes the proteins from denaturation caused by high salt concentration but also serves as a protectant against stresses such as heating, freezing and drying. The sub-seafloor structure of a hydrothermal vent is highly complicated with mosaic heterogeneity of physicochemical parameters such as temperature and salinity. This premise led us to the hypothesis that some euryhaline halophiles including Halomonas species well adapt to a wide salinity-ranged habitat in the sub-vent. To test this hypothesis, isolation and characterization of euryhaline halophiles from the Suiyo Seamount hydrothermal vents were conducted the drill-cored rock samples from the sites APSK-02, 03, and 07 and the filter-trapped fluid particle samples from the sites APSK-01 and 05 were used. For initial cultivation, a heterotrophic bacterial medium of 15% NaCl was used. The samples was added to the medium and incubated under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions at room temperature. A total of 5 euryhaline halophilic strains were obtained and phylogenetically characterized: two strains (both related to Marinobacter) from APSK-02 core section 2; one strain (related to H. meridiana) from APSK-07 core section 3; and two strains (related to H. meridiana and H. variabilis) from APSK-01 trapped particles. In addition, some

  5. Adaptation to high salt concentrations in halotolerant/halophilic fungi: a molecular perspective

    PubMed Central

    Plemenitaš, Ana; Lenassi, Metka; Konte, Tilen; Kejžar, Anja; Zajc, Janja; Gostinčar, Cene; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Molecular studies of salt tolerance of eukaryotic microorganisms have until recently been limited to the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a few other moderately halotolerant yeast. Discovery of the extremely halotolerant and adaptable fungus Hortaea werneckii and the obligate halophile Wallemia ichthyophaga introduced two new model organisms into studies on the mechanisms of salt tolerance in eukaryotes. H. werneckii is unique in its adaptability to fluctuations in salt concentrations, as it can grow without NaCl as well as in the presence of up to 5 M NaCl. On the other hand, W. ichthyophaga requires at least 1.5 M NaCl for growth, but also grows in up to 5 M NaCl. Our studies have revealed the novel and intricate molecular mechanisms used by these fungi to combat high salt concentrations, which differ in many aspects between the extremely halotolerant H. werneckii and the halophilic W. ichthyophaga. Specifically, the high osmolarity glycerol signaling pathway that is important for sensing and responding to increased salt concentrations is here compared between H. werneckii and W. ichthyophaga. In both of these fungi, the key signaling components are conserved, but there are structural and regulation differences between these pathways in H. werneckii and W. ichthyophaga. We also address differences that have been revealed from analysis of their newly sequenced genomes. The most striking characteristics associated with H. werneckii are the large genetic redundancy, the expansion of genes encoding metal cation transporters, and a relatively recent whole genome duplication. In contrast, the genome of W. ichthyophaga is very compact, as only 4884 protein-coding genes are predicted, which cover almost three quarters of the sequence. Importantly, there has been a significant increase in their hydrophobins, cell-wall proteins that have multiple cellular functions. PMID:24860557

  6. Extreme Halophiles and Carbon Monoxide: Looking Through Windows at Earth's Past and Towards a Future on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, G.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon monoxide, which is ubiquitous on Earth, is the 2nd most abundant molecule in the universe. Members of the domain Bacteria have long been known to oxidize it, and activities of CO oxidizers in soils have been known for several decades to contribute to tropospheric CO regulation. Nonetheless, the diversity of CO oxidizers and their evolutionary history remain largely unknown. A molybdenum-dependent dehydrogenase (Mo-CODH) couples CO oxidation by most terrestrial and marine bacteria to either O2 or nitrate. Molybdenum dependence, the requirement for O2 and previous phylogenetic inferences have all supported a relatively late evolution for "aerobic" CO oxidation, presumably after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) about 2.3 Gya. Although conundrums remain, recent discoveries suggest that Mo-CODH might have evolved before the GOE, and prior to the Bacteria-Archaea split. New phylogenetic analyses incorporating sequences from extremely halophilic CO-oxidizing Euryarchaeota isolated from salterns in the Atacama Desert, brines on Hawai`i and from the Bonneville Salt Flat suggest that Mo-CODH was present in an ancestor shared by Bacteria and Archaea. This observation is consistent with results of phylogenetic histories of genes involved in Mo-cofactor synthesis, and findings by others that Mo-nitrogenase was likely active > 3 Gya. Thus, analyses of Mo-dependent CO oxidizers provide a window on the past by raising questions about the availability of Mo and non-O2 electron acceptors. Extremely halophilic CO oxidizers also provide insights relevant for understanding the potential for extraterrestrial life. CO likely occurred at high concentrations in Mars' early atmosphere, and it occurs presently at about 800 ppm. At such high concentrations, CO represents one of the most abundant energy sources available for near-surface regolith. However, use of CO by an extant or transplanted Mars microbiota would require tolerance of low water potentials and high salt concentrations

  7. Improvement of halophilic cellulase production from locally isolated fungal strain

    PubMed Central

    Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Arbain, Dachyar; Jamal, Parveen; Gumba, Rizo Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic cellulases from the newly isolated fungus, Aspergillus terreus UniMAP AA-6 were found to be useful for in situ saccharification of ionic liquids treated lignocelluloses. Efforts have been taken to improve the enzyme production through statistical optimization approach namely Plackett–Burman design and the Face Centered Central Composite Design (FCCCD). Plackett–Burman experimental design was used to screen the medium components and process conditions. It was found that carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), FeSO4·7H2O, NaCl, MgSO4·7H2O, peptone, agitation speed and inoculum size significantly influence the production of halophilic cellulase. On the other hand, KH2PO4, KOH, yeast extract and temperature had a negative effect on enzyme production. Further optimization through FCCCD revealed that the optimization approach improved halophilic cellulase production from 0.029 U/ml to 0.0625 U/ml, which was approximately 2.2-times greater than before optimization. PMID:26150755

  8. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms.

  9. Characteristics of phenol degradation in saline conditions of a halophilic strain JS3 isolated from industrial activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu; Shang, Yu; Yang, Xiaojun

    2015-10-15

    Several halophilic bacteria have been reported to degrade phenol. However, there are a few works about salt-tolerant fungi which can utilize phenol as sole source of carbon. In this study, a halophilic strain JS3 which could degrade phenol with high efficiency was separated and identified. The effect of initial phenol concentration on phenol biodegradation was investigated and optimal pH, temperature, as well as salt-tolerance were evaluated. The isolate could degrade less than 800 mg/L phenol completely in 72 h. It grew well when pH, temperature, and salinity were at values of 4.0-9.0, 30-40°C, and 0-7%, respectively. The optimal pH, temperature and salinity were 6.0, 35°C and 0%. More than 99% of 500 mg/L phenol was degraded in the optimal condition within 24h. The tolerance of wide range of pH, temperature and salinity indicated that strain JS3 was effective for phenol removal in hypersaline wastewaters.

  10. Halophilic properties of metal binding protein characterized by high histidine content from Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao

    2012-02-01

    Periplasmic metal binding protein characterized by high histidine content was cloned from moderate halophile, Chromohalobacter salexigens. The protein, termed histidine-rich metal binding protein (HP), was expressed in and purified from E. coli as a native form. HP bound to Ni- and Cu-loaded chelate columns with high affinity, and Co- and Zn-columns with moderate affinity. Although the secondary structure was not grossly altered by the addition of 0.2-2.0 M NaCl, the thermal transition pattern was considerably shifted to higher temperature with increasing salt concentration: melting temperature was raised by ~20 °C at 2.0 M NaCl over the melting temperature at 0.2 M NaCl. HP showed reversible refolding from thermal melting in 0.2-1.15 M NaCl, while it formed irreversible aggregates upon thermal melting at 2 M NaCl. Addition of 0.01-0.1 mM NiSO₄ stabilized HP against thermal melting with high reversibility, while addition above 0.5 mM resulted in irreversible melting due to aggregation.

  11. Chloride Activated Halophilic α-Amylase from Marinobacter sp. EMB8: Production Optimization and Nanoimmobilization for Efficient Starch Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumit; Khare, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Halophiles have been perceived as potential source of novel enzymes in recent years. The interest emanates from their ability to catalyze efficiently under high salt and organic solvents. Present work encompasses production optimization and nanoimmobilization of an α-amylase from moderately halophilic Marinobacter sp. EMB8. Media ingredients and culture conditions were optimized by “one-at-a-time approach.” Starch was found to be the best carbon source at 5% (w/v) concentration. Glucose acted as catabolic repressor for amylase production. Salt proved critical for amylase production and maximum production was attained at 5% (w/v) NaCl. Optimization of various culture parameters resulted in 48.0 IU/mL amylase production, a 12-fold increase over that of unoptimized condition (4.0 IU/mL). α-Amylase was immobilized on 3-aminopropyl functionalized silica nanoparticles using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent. Optimization of various parameters resulted in 96% immobilization efficiency. Starch hydrolyzing efficiency of immobilized enzyme was comparatively better. Immobilized α-amylase retained 75% of its activity after 5th cycle of repeated use. PMID:25667773

  12. Identification of carotenoids from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yatsunami, Rie; Ando, Ai; Yang, Ying; Takaichi, Shinichi; Kohno, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yuriko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Fukui, Toshiaki; Nakasone, Kaoru; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Mitsuo; Takashina, Tomonori; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The carotenoids produced by extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica were extracted and identified by their chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic characteristics (UV-Vis and mass spectrometry). The composition (mol%) was 68.1% bacterioruberin, 22.5% monoanhydrobacterioruberin, 9.3% bisanhydrobacterioruberin, <0.1% isopentenyldehydrorhodopin, and trace amounts of lycopene and phytoene. The in vitro scavenging capacity of a carotenoid, bacterioruberin, extracted from Haloarcula japonica cells against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was evaluated. The antioxidant capacity of bacterioruberin was much higher than that of β -carotene. PMID:24672517

  13. Useful halophilic, thermostable and ionic liquids tolerant cellulases

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Simmons, Blake A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides for an isolated or recombinant polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 70% identity with the amino acid sequence of a Halorhabdus utahensis cellulase, such as Hu-CBH1, wherein said amino acid sequence has a halophilic thermostable and/or thermophilic cellobiohydrolase (CBH) activity. In some embodiments, the polypeptide has a CBH activity that is resistant to up to about 20% of ionic liquids. The present invention also provides for compositions comprising and methods using the isolated or recombinant polypeptide.

  14. Flagella of halophilic archaea: differences in supramolecular organization.

    PubMed

    Syutkin, A S; Pyatibratov, M G; Fedorov, O V

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal flagella are similar functionally to bacterial flagella, but structurally they are completely different. Helical archaeal flagellar filaments are formed of protein subunits called flagellins (archaellins). Notwithstanding progress in studies of archaeal flagella achieved in recent years, many problems in this area are still unsolved. In this review, we analyze the formation of these supramolecular structures by the example of flagellar filaments of halophilic archaea. Recent data on the structure of the flagellar filaments demonstrate that their supramolecular organization differs considerably in different haloarchaeal species.

  15. Voltage-dependent absorbance change of carotenoids in halophilic archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Seki, S I; Sasabe, H; Tomioka, H

    1996-10-02

    Membrane vesicles of wild-type Halobacterium sp. mex strain show a wavy absorbance change which has not been so far reported in halophilic archaebacteria. A white mutant strain lacking carotenoids did not show the wavy absorbance change. The wavy absorbance change in the range of 440-590 nm was induced by a red flash (600-640 nm), which photoexcited electrogenic ion pumps, mex bacteriorhodopsin and mex halorhodopsin but not carotenoids. The wavy change was also caused by K+ diffusion potentials without light. These results suggest that the wavy absorbance change in the membrane vesicles is the voltage-dependent absorbance change of the carotenoids.

  16. The effects of space relevant environmental factors on halophilic Archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuko, Stefan; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra

    Within the last 50 years, space technology has provided tools for transporting terrestrial (microbial) life beyond Earth's protective shield in order to study its responses to selected conditions of space. Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every environment on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and are true masters in adapting to rapidly changing external conditions. Although microorganisms cannot actively grow under the harsh conditions of outer space or other known planets, some microorganisms might be able to survive for a time in space or other planets as dormant, inactive spores or in similar desiccation-resistant resting states, e.g., enclosed in halite crystals or biofilms. Halite crystals are the realm of halophilic Archaea as they have adapted to life at extreme salt concentrations. They can stay entrapped in such crystals for millions of years without losing viability and therefore the family Halobacteriaceae belongs to the group of microorganisms which may survive space travel or may even be found on other planets. Several members of this family have been utilized in space relevant experiments where they were exposed to detrimental environmental conditions such as UV-C radiation, vacuum, temperature cycles (+60(°) C and -25(°) C) and heavy iron bombardment (150 MeV He, 500 MeV Ar and 500 MeV Fe ions). The viability was evaluated by colony forming unit (cfu) counts as well as with the LIFE/DEAD kit. Results revealed that UV-C radiation (up to 1.000 J/m (2) ) has a considerable effect on the viability, whereas the other tested parameters inflict little damage onto the organisms. Repair of UV-C inflicted damage is efficient and several DNA damage repair genes are up-regulated following exposure. Halophilic archaea display a strong resistance against heavy iron bombardment, with dosages of up to 2.000 Gy 500 MeV Fe ions needed to establish a visible effect on the vitality. Genomic integrity after

  17. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed "primitive" protein from halophile to mesophile folding.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate "cradle" for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original "prebiotic" set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a "primitive" designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)-having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a "primitive" polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation-identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table.

  18. Ignavibacterium album gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from microbial mats at a terrestrial hot spring and proposal of Ignavibacteria classis nov., for a novel lineage at the periphery of green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Mori, Koji; Uchino, Yoshihito; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Harayama, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro

    2010-06-01

    A moderately thermophilic chemoheterotrophic bacterium, strain Mat9-16(T), was isolated from microbial mats developed in hot spring water streams from Yumata, Nagano, Japan. Cells of strain Mat9-16(T) were strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-sporulating, non-motile and short to long rods (2.0-15.5 mum in length). Strain Mat9-16(T) grew fermentatively with optimum growth at 45 degrees C, pH 7.0-7.5 and 1 % NaCl (w/v). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed that strain Mat9-16(T) was affiliated with an uncultivated lineage, and the nearest cultivated neighbours were green sulfur bacteria belonging to the class Chlorobea with 77-83 % sequence similarity. However, strain Mat9-16(T) could not grow phototrophically and did not possess light-harvesting structures, morphologically and genetically, such as the chlorosomes of green sulfur bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic features and phylogenetic position, a novel genus and species are proposed for strain Mat9-16(T), to be named Ignavibacterium album gen. nov., sp. nov. (=NBRC 101810(T) =DSM 19864(T)). We also propose to place the cultivated bacterial lineage accommodating the sole representative Mat9-16(T) in a novel class, Ignavibacteria classis nov. In addition, we present a formal description of the phylum-level taxon 'Chlorobi' as Chlorobi phyl. nov.

  19. [Screening of epoxy-degrading halophiles and their application in high-salt wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Xu, Zhen; Peng, Shu-Chuan; Xia, Ming-Shan; Yue, Zheng-Bo; Chen, Tian-Hn

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two halophilic bacteria were isolated from activated sludge in the epoxy wastewater treatment system. The strains were identified, and the growth and degradation characteristics were investigated. Strain J1 and J2 was identified respectively by morphological observation and 16S rDNA sequence alignment analysis. It was found that both strains belong to the Bacillus genus (Bacillus sp.) and branch Bacillus (Virgibacillus sp.). The optimized growth condition of strain J1 and J2 in the high salt CM culture medium was as follows: solution temperature 30 degrees C, pH 7.0 and 5-50 g x L(-1) of NaCl. Furthermore, the best degradation condition of the organic epoxy wastewater was: temperature 30 degrees C, pH 7.0 and NaCl concentration 30 g x L(-1). When the volume ratio of bacterial suspension mixture of J1 and J2 was 2:1 and the inoculum size of the composite strains was 10%, the highest COD removal efficiency was achieved in the epoxy wastewater treatment.

  20. On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leuko, Stefan; Rettberg, Petra; Pontifex, Ashleigh L.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth’s protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator) have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated. PMID:25370029

  1. On the response of halophilic archaea to space conditions.

    PubMed

    Leuko, Stefan; Rettberg, Petra; Pontifex, Ashleigh L; Burns, Brendan P

    2014-02-21

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth's protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator) have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated.

  2. Insights into Head-Tailed Viruses Infecting Extremely Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Pietilä, Maija K.; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Russell, Daniel A.; Ko, Ching-Chung; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Extremophilic archaea, both hyperthermophiles and halophiles, dominate in habitats where rather harsh conditions are encountered. Like all other organisms, archaeal cells are susceptible to viral infections, and to date, about 100 archaeal viruses have been described. Among them, there are extraordinary virion morphologies as well as the common head-tailed viruses. Although approximately half of the isolated archaeal viruses belong to the latter group, no three-dimensional virion structures of these head-tailed viruses are available. Thus, rigorous comparisons with bacteriophages are not yet warranted. In the present study, we determined the genome sequences of two of such viruses of halophiles and solved their capsid structures by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. We show that these viruses are inactivated, yet remain intact, at low salinity and that their infectivity is regained when high salinity is restored. This enabled us to determine their three-dimensional capsid structures at low salinity to a ∼10-Å resolution. The genetic and structural data showed that both viruses belong to the same T-number class, but one of them has enlarged its capsid to accommodate a larger genome than typically associated with a T=7 capsid by inserting an additional protein into the capsid lattice. PMID:23283946

  3. Production and properties of an exopolysaccharide synthesized by the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloterrigena turkmenica.

    PubMed

    Squillaci, Giuseppe; Finamore, Rosario; Diana, Paola; Restaino, Odile Francesca; Schiraldi, Chiara; Arbucci, Salvatore; Ionata, Elena; La Cara, Francesco; Morana, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    We have isolated a novel exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloterrigena turkmenica. Some features, remarkable from an industrial point of view, such as emulsifying and antioxidant properties, were investigated. H. turkmenica excreted 20.68 mg of EPS per 100 ml of culture medium when grown in usual medium supplemented with glucose. The microorganism excreted the biopolymer mainly in the middle exponential growth phase and reached the maximal production in the stationary phase. Analyses by anion exchange chromatography and SEC-TDA Viscotek indicated that the EPS was composed of two main fractions of 801.7 and 206.0 kDa. It was a sulfated heteropolysaccharide containing glucose, galactose, glucosamine, galactosamine, and glucuronic acid. Studies performed utilizing the mixture of EPS anionic fractions showed that the biopolymer had emulsifying activity towards vegetable oils comparable or superior to that exhibited by the controls, moderate antioxidant power when tested with 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(·)), and moisture-retention ability higher than hyaluronic acid (HA). The EPS from H. turkmenica is the first exopolysaccharide produced by an archaea to be characterized in terms of properties that can have potential biotechnological applications.

  4. Haloanaerobium kushneri sp. nov., an obligately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from an oil brine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhupathiraju, V. K.; McInerney, M. J.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    Three strains, designated VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732, of a strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium were isolated from a highly saline (15-20%) brine from an oil reservoir in central Oklahoma, USA. The optimal concentration of NaCl for growth of these three strains was 2 M (12%), and the strains also grew in the presence of an additional 1 M MgCl2. The strains were mesophilic and grew at a pH range of 6-8. Carbohydrates used by all three strains included glucose, fructose, arabinose, galactose, maltose, mannose, cellobiose, sucrose and inulin. Glucose fermentation products included ethanol, acetate, H2 and CO2, with formate produced by two of the three strains. Differences were noted among strains in the optimal temperature and pH for growth, the maximum and minimum NaCl concentration that supported growth, substrate utilization and cellular fatty acid composition. Despite the phenotypic differences among the three strains, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that these three strains were members of the same genospecies which belonged to the genus Haloanaerobium. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of strains VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732 are different from those of previously described species of Haloanaerobium. It is proposed that strain VS-751T (ATCC 700103T) be established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium kushneri.

  5. Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Addou, Nariman Ammara; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Fauque, Guy; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    A novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and moderately halophilic bacterium designated strain Nari2A(T) was isolated from soil collected from an Algerian salt lake, Chott Melghir. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, aerobic, catalase-negative and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 50-55 °C, 7-10% (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. The strain exhibited 95.4, 95.4 and 95.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Thalassobacillus devorans G19.1(T), Sediminibacillus halophilus EN8d(T) and Virgibacillus kekensis YIM-kkny16(T), respectively. The major menaquinone was MK-7. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phosphoglycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(17 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 41.9 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain Nari2A(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Bacillaceae , order Bacillales , for which the name Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus is Nari2A(T) ( = DSM 25894(T) = CCUG 62543(T)).

  6. Identification of salt-inducible peptide with putative kinase activity in halophilic bacterium Virgibacillus halodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mahmoud-Reza; Sokhansanj, Ashrafaddin; Yoosefi, Mitra; Naghizadeh, Mohammad-Ali

    2007-09-01

    Strain XII, a moderately halophilic bacterium, expressed a peptide in response to saline media. This peptide was designated as salt-inducible factor (Sif-A). The purpose of this study is to describe Sif-A, which might be involved in the osmoresistance mechanism of strain XII. The complete sequence of sif-A was determined using PCR. sif-A codes for a polypeptide of 20.518 kDa. The polypeptide has a putative signal peptide of 27 amino acids (2.667 kDa) preceding the mature protein (17.869 kDa). Motif analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence indicated that there is a p-loop NTPase domain on the C-terminal of the peptide, which might correlate with its function. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene was analyzed phylogenetically to classify strain XII. This organism was found to have the closest association with Virgibacillus halodenitrificans, which was proven by its phenotypic characteristics.

  7. Anti-methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Compound Isolation from Halophilic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and Determination of Its Mode of Action Using Electron Microscope and Flow Cytometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeyanthi, Venkadapathi; Velusamy, Palaniyandi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to purify, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive compound against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The anti-MRSA compound was produced by a halophilic bacterial strain designated as MHB1. The MHB1 strain exhibited 99 % similarity to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The culture conditions of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 were optimized using nutritional and environmental parameters for enhanced anti-MRSA compound production. The pure bioactive compound was isolated using silica gel column chromatography and Semi-preparative High-performance liquid chromatography (Semi-preparative HPLC). The Thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton NMR ((1)H NMR) analysis indicated the phenolic nature of the compound. The molecular mass of the purified compound was 507 Da as revealed by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The compound inhibited the growth of MRSA with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 62.5 µg mL(-1). MRSA bacteria exposed to 4× MIC of the compound and the cell viability was determined using flow cytometric analysis. Scanning electron microscope and Transmission electron microscope analysis was used to determine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria. This is the first report on isolation of anti-MRSA compound from halophilic B. amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and could act as a promising biocontrol agent.

  8. d-Xylose Degradation Pathway in the Halophilic Archaeon Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Ulrike; Dambeck, Michael; Zaiss, Henning; Fuhrer, Tobias; Soppa, Jörg; Sauer, Uwe; Schönheit, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pathway of d-xylose degradation in archaea is unknown. In a previous study we identified in Haloarcula marismortui the first enzyme of xylose degradation, an inducible xylose dehydrogenase (Johnsen, U., and Schönheit, P. (2004) J. Bacteriol. 186, 6198–6207). Here we report a comprehensive study of the complete d-xylose degradation pathway in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii. The analyses include the following: (i) identification of the degradation pathway in vivo following 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids after growth on [13C]xylose; (ii) identification of xylose-induced genes by DNA microarray experiments; (iii) characterization of enzymes; and (iv) construction of in-frame deletion mutants and their functional analyses in growth experiments. Together, the data indicate that d-xylose is oxidized exclusively to the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate, involving d-xylose dehydrogenase (HVO_B0028), a novel xylonate dehydratase (HVO_B0038A), 2-keto-3-deoxyxylonate dehydratase (HVO_B0027), and α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (HVO_B0039). The functional involvement of these enzymes in xylose degradation was proven by growth studies of the corresponding in-frame deletion mutants, which all lost the ability to grow on d-xylose, but growth on glucose was not significantly affected. This is the first report of an archaeal d-xylose degradation pathway that differs from the classical d-xylose pathway in most bacteria involving the formation of xylulose 5-phosphate as an intermediate. However, the pathway shows similarities to proposed oxidative pentose degradation pathways to α-ketoglutarate in few bacteria, e.g. Azospirillum brasilense and Caulobacter crescentus, and in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. PMID:19584053

  9. Osmoadaptative Strategy and Its Molecular Signature in Obligately Halophilic Heterotrophic Protists

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Tommy; Brown, Matthew W.; Simpson, Alastair G.B.; Roger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic microbes living in hypersaline environments must counteract the detrimental effects of low water activity and salt interference. Some halophilic prokaryotes equilibrate their intracellular osmotic strength with the extracellular milieu by importing inorganic solutes, mainly potassium. These “salt-in” organisms characteristically have proteins that are highly enriched with acidic and hydrophilic residues. In contrast, “salt-out” halophiles accumulate large amounts of organic solutes like amino acids, sugars and polyols, and lack a strong signature of halophilicity in the amino acid composition of cytoplasmic proteins. Studies to date have examined halophilic prokaryotes, yeasts, or algae, thus virtually nothing is known about the molecular adaptations of the other eukaryotic microbes, that is, heterotrophic protists (protozoa), that also thrive in hypersaline habitats. We conducted transcriptomic investigations to unravel the molecular adaptations of two obligately halophilic protists, Halocafeteria seosinensis and Pharyngomonas kirbyi. Their predicted cytoplasmic proteomes showed increased hydrophilicity compared with marine protists. Furthermore, analysis of reconstructed ancestral sequences suggested that, relative to mesophiles, proteins in halophilic protists have undergone fewer substitutions from hydrophilic to hydrophobic residues since divergence from their closest relatives. These results suggest that these halophilic protists have a higher intracellular salt content than marine protists. However, absence of the acidic signature of salt-in microbes suggests that Haloc. seosinensis and P. kirbyi utilize organic osmolytes to maintain osmotic equilibrium. We detected increased expression of enzymes involved in synthesis and transport of organic osmolytes, namely hydroxyectoine and myo-inositol, at maximal salt concentration for growth in Haloc. seosinensis, suggesting possible candidates for these inferred organic osmolytes. PMID:27412608

  10. Structural Basis for the Aminoacid Composition of Proteins from Halophilic Archea

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, Tamara; Laín, Ana; Castaño, David; Millet, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Proteins from halophilic organisms, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded at very high ionic strengths. The surfaces of halophilic proteins show a biased amino acid composition with a high prevalence of aspartic and glutamic acids, a low frequency of lysine, and a high occurrence of amino acids with a low hydrophobic character. Using extensive mutational studies on the protein surfaces, we show that it is possible to decrease the salt dependence of a typical halophilic protein to the level of a mesophilic form and engineer a protein from a mesophilic organism into an obligate halophilic form. NMR studies demonstrate complete preservation of the three-dimensional structure of extreme mutants and confirm that salt dependency is conferred exclusively by surface residues. In spite of the statistically established fact that most halophilic proteins are strongly acidic, analysis of a very large number of mutants showed that the effect of salt on protein stability is largely independent of the total protein charge. Conversely, we quantitatively demonstrate that halophilicity is directly related to a decrease in the accessible surface area. PMID:20016684

  11. A first record of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the dead sea.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Sarita; Gonsalves, Valerie; Nayak, Shweta

    2012-03-01

    The isolation of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the Dead Sea and the range of salt tolerance of halophilic fungi isolated, are reported here for the first time. The mycobiota of the Dead Sea isolated in this study, was dominated by Aspergillus and Penicillium species; Cladosporium were found in lesser numbers. All three genera were obtained from the water sample; however, Aspergillus was the only genus obtained from the sediment. There was significant difference in growth of each isolate at different salt concentrations and intraspecies analysis revealed dissimilarity in response of strains to different salt concentrations in the growth medium The isolates were euryhaline, with halotolerance up to 20-25% solar salt, Aspergillus and Penicillium species showing a higher level of halotolerance, as compared to that of Cladosporium. Halophilic fungi were found in greater numbers in the sediment sample as compared to that in the water sample. Penicillium and Cladosporium species were exclusively facultative halophiles, while some species of Aspergillus were facultative halophiles. All the obligate halophiles isolated, belonged to the genus Aspergillus and were identified as A. penicillioides and A unguis, the latter being a first record of the species from the Dead Sea.

  12. Lanthanide behavior in hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico - an environment with halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choumiline, K.; López-Cortés, A.; Grajeda-Muñoz, M.; Shumilin, E.; Sapozhnikov, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lanthanides are known, in some cases, to be sensitive to changes in water column or sediment chemistry, a fact that allows them to be used as environmental fingerprints. Nevertheless, the behavior of these elements in hypersaline environments is insufficiently understood, especially in those colonized by bacteria, archaea and eukarya halophiles. Extreme environments like the mentioned exist in the artificially-controlled ponds of the 'Exportadora de Sal' salt-producing enterprise located in Guerrero Negro (Baja California, Mexico). Sediment cores from various ponds were collected, subsampled and measured by ICP-MS and INAA. This allowed differencing the behavior of lanthanides and trace elements under a water column salinity gradient along the evaporation sequence of ponds. Sediment profiles (30 mm long), obtained in Pond 5, dominated by Ca and Mg precipitation and at the same time rich in organic matter due to bacterial mat presence, showed highs and lows of the shale-normalized patterns along different in-core depths. Two groups of elements could be distinguished with similar trends: set A (La, Ce, Pr and Nd) and set B (Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu). The first 'group A' had two prominent peaks at 15 mm and around 22 mm, whereas the 'group B' showed only slight increase at 15 mm and none at 22 mm. Microscopic analyses of prokaryotic cells of a stratified mat in Pond 5 (collected in 2004) showed filamentous bacteria and cyanobacteria with a cell abundance and morphotype richness maxima of prokaryotic cells in a chemocline from 3 mm to 7 mm depth which co-exists nine morphotypes of aerobic and anaerobic prokaryotes Microcoleus chthonoplastes, Leptolyngbya, Cyanothece, Geitlerinema, Spirulina, Chloroflexus, Beggiatoa, Chromatium and Thioploca. Below the 7 mm depth, oxygenic photosynthesis depletes and sulfur reducing compounds increase. The highs of the shale-normalized lanthanide contents of the 'group A' (at 15 mm depth) seem to correlate with the

  13. Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Dean G; Bizzoco, Richard W; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-06-01

    Hydrothermal vents, known as 'fumaroles', are ubiquitous features of geothermal areas. Although their geology has been extensively characterized, little is known about the subsurface microbial ecology of fumaroles largely because of the difficulty in collecting sufficient numbers of cells from boiling steam water for DNA extraction and culture isolation. Here we describe the first collection, molecular analysis and isolation of microbes from fumarole steam waters in Russia (Kamchatka) and the USA (Hawaii, New Mexico, California and Wyoming). Surprisingly, the steam vent waters from all the fumaroles contained halophilic Archaea closely related to the Haloarcula spp. found in non-geothermal salt mats, saline soils, brine pools and salt lakes around the world. Microscopic cell counting estimated the cell dispersal rate at approximately 1.6 x 10(9) cells year(-1) from a single fumarole. We also managed to enrich microbes in high-salt media from every vent sample, and to isolate Haloarcula from a Yellowstone vent in a 20% salt medium after a month-long incubation, demonstrating both salt tolerance and viability of cells collected from high-temperature steam. Laboratory tests determined that microbes enriched in salt media survived temperatures greater than 75 degrees C for between 5 and 30 min during the collection process. Hawaiian fumaroles proved to contain the greatest diversity of halophilic Archaea with four new lineages that may belong to uncultured haloarchaeal genera. This high diversity may have resulted from the leaching of salts and minerals through the highly porous volcanic rock, creating a chemically complex saline subsurface.

  14. Study on two methylotrophic and halophilic methanogens, Methanosarcina siciliae HI350 and Methanolobus taylorii GS-16

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, S.

    1994-01-01

    Strain HI350, similar to Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] (T = type strain) morphologically and physiologically, was isolated from an oil well in the Gulf of Mexico. Catabolic substrates included methanol, trimethylamine, dimethyl sulfide, and methane thiol, but not H[sub 2]-CO[sub 2], formate, or acetate. Growth was fastest in the presence of 0.4 to 0.6 M Na[sup +], in the presence of 60 to 200 mM Mg[sup 2+], at pH 6.5 to 6.8, and at 40[degrees]C. Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] was closely related to Methanosarcina. Transfer of Methanolobus siciliae T4/M[sup T] to the genus Methanosarcina as Methanosarcina siciliae is proposed with strain HI350 as its reference strain. Degradation of dimethyl sulfide or methane thiol by strain HI350 was complete, and stoichiometric quantities of methane and hydrogen sulfide were formed. Studies of cell-free extracts suggested that enzymes for degradation of dimethyl sulfide and methane thiol were inducible, whereas those for the degradation of methanol or trimethylamine were constitutive. Methanolobus taylorii GS-16, a moderately halophilic and alkcaliphilic methanogen, grows over a wide pH range. The key observation indicative of the involvement of K[sup +] transport in cytosolic acidification was that valinomycin (0.8 [mu]M), a K[sup +] uniporter, inhibited the growth of strain GS-16 only at alkaline pH. Experiments with resting cells indicated that, at alkaline pH, valinomycin uncoupled catabolic reactions from ATP synthesis. Thus, a K[sup +]/H[sup +] antiporter was proposed to account for the K[sup +] extrusion and the uncoupling effect of valinomycin at alkaline pH.

  15. Salinithrix halophila gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium in the family Thermoactinomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Zarparvar, Parisa; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    A halophilic actinomycete, strain R4S8(T), was isolated from soil of Inche-Broun hypersaline wetland in the north of Iran. The isolate grew aerobically at temperatures of 30-50 °C (optimum 40 °C), pH 6-10 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 1-15 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3-5 %). It formed short and straight to moderately flexuous aerial mycelium without motile elements. The cell wall of strain R4S8(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diamino acid without any diagnostic sugars. The polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine two unknown phospholipids and one unknown aminophospholipid. It synthesized anteiso-C15 : 0 (44.8 %), iso-C15 : 0 (28.8 %) and iso-C14 : 0 (8.5 %) as major fatty acids. MK-6 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 52.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain R4S8(T) belongs to the family Thermoactinomycetaceae and showed the closest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Desmospora activa IMMIB L-1269(T) (95.5 %) and Marininema mesophilum SCSIO 10219(T) (95.3 %). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics, strain R4S8(T) represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Thermoactinomycetaceae, for which the name Salinithrix halophila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is R4S8(T) ( = IBRC-M 10813(T) = CECT 8506(T)).

  16. A Halophilic Bacterium Inhabiting the Warm, CaCl2-Rich Brine of the Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Tregoning, George S.; Kempher, Megan L.; Jung, Deborah O.; Samarkin, Vladimir A.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered and stratified lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The lake develops a distinct chemocline at about a 50-m depth, where the waters transition from cool, oxic, and fresh to warm, sulfidic, and hypersaline. The bottom water brine is unique, as the highly chaotropic salts CaCl2 and MgCl2 predominate, and CaCl2 levels are the highest of those in any known microbial habitat. Enrichment techniques were used to isolate 15 strains of heterotrophic bacteria from the Lake Vanda brine. Despite direct supplementation of the brine samples with different organic substrates in primary enrichments, the same organism, a relative of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), was isolated from all depths sampled. The Lake Vanda (VAN) strains were obligate aerobes and showed broad pH, salinity, and temperature ranges for growth, consistent with the physicochemical properties of the brine. VAN strains were halophilic and quite CaCl2 tolerant but did not require CaCl2 for growth. The fact that only VAN strain-like organisms appeared in our enrichments hints that the highly chaotropic nature of the Lake Vanda brine may place unusual physiological constraints on the bacterial community that inhabits it. PMID:25576606

  17. Proposal of six species of moderately thermophilic, acidophilic, endospore-forming bacteria: Alicyclobacillus contaminans sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus fastidiosus sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus kakegawensis sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus macrosporangiidus sp. nov., Alicyclobacillus sacchari sp. nov. and Alicyclobacillus shizuokensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Goto, Keiichi; Mochida, Kaoru; Kato, Yuko; Asahara, Mika; Fujita, Rieko; An, Sun-Young; Kasai, Hiroaki; Yokota, Akira

    2007-06-01

    Moderately thermophilic, acidophilic, spore-forming bacteria (146 strains) were isolated from various beverages and environments. Based on the results of sequence analysis of the hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene, eight of the strains represent novel species of the genus Alicyclobacillus. These strains were designated 3-A191(T), 4-A336(T), 5-A83J(T), 5-A167N, 5-A239-2O-A(T), E-8, RB718(T) and S-TAB(T). Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and DNA gyrase B subunit (gyrB) nucleotide sequences confirmed that the eight strains belonged to the Alicyclobacillus clade. Cells of the eight strains were Gram-positive or Gram-variable, strictly aerobic and rod-shaped. The strains grew well under acidic and moderately thermal conditions, produced acid from various sugars, contained menaquinone 7 as the major isoprenoid quinone and did not produce guaiacol. omega-Alicyclic fatty acids were the predominant lipid component of strains 4-A336(T), 5-A83J(T), 5-A167N, RB718(T) and S-TAB(T). No omega-alicyclic fatty acids were detected in strains 3-A191(T), 5-A239-2O-A(T) or E-8, but iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids and small amounts of straight-chain saturated fatty acids were detected instead. According to the DNA-DNA hybridization data and distinct morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomical and genetic traits, the eight strains represent six novel species within the genus Alicyclobacillus, for which the following names are proposed: Alicyclobacillus contaminans sp. nov. (type strain 3-A191(T)=DSM 17975(T)=IAM 15224(T)), Alicyclobacillus fastidiosus sp. nov. (type strain S-TAB(T)=DSM 17978(T)=IAM 15229(T)), Alicyclobacillus kakegawensis sp. nov. (type strain 5-A83J(T)=DSM 17979(T)=IAM 15227(T)), Alicyclobacillus macrosporangiidus sp. nov. (type strain 5-A239-2O-A(T)=DSM 17980(T)=IAM 15370(T)), Alicyclobacillus sacchari sp. nov. (type strain RB718(T)=DSM 17974(T)=IAM 15230(T)) and Alicyclobacillus shizuokensis sp. nov. (type strain 4-A336(T)=DSM 17981(T)=IAM 15226(T)).

  18. Polyester production by halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains obtained from mangrove soil samples located in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Huu-Phong, Tran; Thi-Binh, Nguyen; Thi-Tho, Nguyen; Minh-Lam, Duong; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This research article reports halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from mangrove forests located in Northern Vietnam. Several of these bacteria were able to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHAs are polyesters stored by microorganisms under the presence of considerable amounts of a carbon source and deficiency of other essential nutrient such as nitrogen or phosphorous. Mangrove forests in Northern Vietnam are saline coastal habitats that have not been microbiologically studied. Mangrove ecosystems are, in general, rich in organic matter, but deficient in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. We have found about 100 microorganisms that have adapted to mangrove forests by accumulating PHAs. The production of polyesters might therefore be an integral part of the carbon cycle in mangrove forests. Three of the strains (ND153, ND97, and QN194) isolated from the Vietnamese forests were identified as Bacillus species, while other five strains (QN187, ND199, ND218, ND240, and QN271) were phylogenetically close related to the α-proteobacterium Yangia pacifica. These strains were found to accumulate PHAs in noticeable amounts. Polymer inclusions and chemical structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Strains ND153, ND97, QN194, QN187, ND240, and QN271 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose, whereas strains ND199 and ND218 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from this carbohydrate. With the exception of strain QN194, the strains accumulated PHBV when a combination of glucose and propionate was included in the culture medium. The polymer yields and cell growth reached by one Bacillus isolate, strain ND153, and one Gram-negative bacterium, strain QN271, were high and worth to be researched further. For experiments performed in shake flasks, strain ND153 reached a maximum PHBV yield of 71 wt% and a cell dry weight

  19. Polyester production by halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains obtained from mangrove soil samples located in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Huu-Phong, Tran; Thi-Binh, Nguyen; Thi-Tho, Nguyen; Minh-Lam, Duong; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    This research article reports halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from mangrove forests located in Northern Vietnam. Several of these bacteria were able to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHAs are polyesters stored by microorganisms under the presence of considerable amounts of a carbon source and deficiency of other essential nutrient such as nitrogen or phosphorous. Mangrove forests in Northern Vietnam are saline coastal habitats that have not been microbiologically studied. Mangrove ecosystems are, in general, rich in organic matter, but deficient in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. We have found about 100 microorganisms that have adapted to mangrove forests by accumulating PHAs. The production of polyesters might therefore be an integral part of the carbon cycle in mangrove forests. Three of the strains (ND153, ND97, and QN194) isolated from the Vietnamese forests were identified as Bacillus species, while other five strains (QN187, ND199, ND218, ND240, and QN271) were phylogenetically close related to the α-proteobacterium Yangia pacifica. These strains were found to accumulate PHAs in noticeable amounts. Polymer inclusions and chemical structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Strains ND153, ND97, QN194, QN187, ND240, and QN271 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose, whereas strains ND199 and ND218 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from this carbohydrate. With the exception of strain QN194, the strains accumulated PHBV when a combination of glucose and propionate was included in the culture medium. The polymer yields and cell growth reached by one Bacillus isolate, strain ND153, and one Gram-negative bacterium, strain QN271, were high and worth to be researched further. For experiments performed in shake flasks, strain ND153 reached a maximum PHBV yield of 71 wt% and a cell dry weight

  20. Sodium and potassium transport in the halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    González-Hernández, J C; Cárdenas-Monroy, C A; Peña, A

    2004-04-15

    Debaryomyces hansenii, a halophile yeast found in shallow sea waters and salty food products grows optimally in 0.6 M of either NaCl or KCl, accumulating high concentrations of Na(+) or K(+). After growth in NaCl or KCl, a rapid efflux of either accumulated cation was observed if the cells were incubated in the presence of KCl or NaCl, respectively, accompanied by a slower accumulation of the cation present in the incubation medium. However, a similar, rapid efflux was observed if cells were incubated in buffer, in the absence of external cations. This yeast shows a cation uptake activity of both (86)Rb(+) and (22)Na(+) with saturation kinetics, and much higher affinity for (86)Rb(+) than for (22)Na(+). The pH dependence of the kinetics constants was similar for both cations, and although K(m) values were higher at pH 8.0, there was also an increase in the V(max) values. The accumulation of (22)Na(+) was found to be increased in cells grown in the presence of 0.6 M NaCl. (86)Rb(+) was also accumulated more in these cells, but to a slightly greater extent. The inhibition kinetics of the uptake of (22)Na(+) by K(+), and that of (86)Rb(+) by Na(+) was found to be non-competitive. It can be concluded that Na(+) in D. hansenii is not excluded but instead, its metabolic systems must be resistant to high salt concentrations.

  1. Isolation and characterization of halophilic Archaea able to produce biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Kebbouche-Gana, S; Gana, M L; Khemili, S; Fazouane-Naimi, F; Bouanane, N A; Penninckx, M; Hacene, H

    2009-05-01

    Halotolerant microorganisms able to live in saline environments offer a multitude of actual or potential applications in various fields of biotechnology. This is why some strains of Halobacteria from an Algerian culture collection were screened for biosurfactant production in a standard medium using the qualitative drop-collapse test and emulsification activity assay. Five of the Halobacteria strains reduced the growth medium surface tension below 40 mN m(-1), and two of them exhibited high emulsion-stabilizing capacity. Diesel oil-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 35% sodium chloride or up to 25% ethanol in the aqueous phase. Emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. The components of the biosurfactant were determined; it contained sugar, protein and lipid. The two Halobacteria strains with enhanced biosurfactant producers, designated strain A21 and strain D21, were selected to identify by phenotypic, biochemical characteristics and by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The strains have Mg(2+), and salt growth requirements are always above 15% (w/v) salts with an optimal concentration of 15-25%. Analyses of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains suggested that they were halophiles belonging to genera of the family Halobacteriaceae, Halovivax (strain A21) and Haloarcula (strain D21). To our knowledge, this is the first report of biosurfactant production at such a high salt concentration.

  2. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  3. Assessing the Pathogenicity of Halophilic Vibrio Bacteria and Other Mircroorganisms for Mammals Held in Captivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-22

    immediately after capture and for several weeks after capture. The predominant bacterial flora of the blowholes from these dolphins was Pseudomonas spp... of the blowholes of dolphins at NOSC, Hawaii may be a good indicator of the health and well being of dolphins. XIV. Recovery of Staphylococcus Aureus...of dolphins which appeared to be ill by their behavior or by their blood chemistry results. These results suggest that monitoring the bacterial flora

  4. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  5. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented.

  6. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed “primitive” protein from halophile to mesophile folding

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate “cradle” for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original “prebiotic” set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a “primitive” designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)—having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a “primitive” polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation—identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table. PMID:25297559

  7. An extreme-halophile archaebacterium possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase characteristic of the Gram-positive eubacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. A.; d'Amato, T. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1988-01-01

    The focal point of phenylalanine biosynthesis is a dehydratase reaction which in different organisms may be prephenate dehydratase, arogenate dehydratase, or cyclohexadienyl dehydratase. Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and cyanobacterial divisions of the eubacterial kingdom exhibit different dehydratase patterns. A new extreme-halophile isolate, which grows on defined medium and is tentatively designated as Halobacterium vallismortis CH-1, possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase present in Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the conventional sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine, the phenomenon of metabolic interlock was exemplified by the sensitivity of prephenate dehydratase to allosteric effects produced by extra-pathway (remote) effectors. Thus, L-tryptophan inhibited activity while L-tyrosine, L-methionine, L-leucine and L-isoleucine activated the enzyme. L-Isoleucine and L-phenylalanine were effective at micromolar levels; other effectors operated at mM levels. A regulatory mutant selected for resistance to growth inhibition caused by beta-2-thienylalanine possessed an altered prephenate dehydratase in which a phenomenon of disproportionately low activity at low enzyme concentration was abolished. Inhibition by L-tryptophan was also lost, and activation by allosteric activators was diminished. Not only was sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine lost, but the mutant enzyme was now activated by this amino acid (a mutation type previously observed in Bacillus subtilis). It remains to be seen whether this type of prephenate dehydratase will prove to be characteristic of all archaebacteria or of some archaebacterial subgroup cluster.

  8. Isolation of Candida albicans and halophilic Vibrio spp. from aquatic birds in Connecticut and Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, J D

    1990-01-01

    Halophilic vibrios were recovered from feces of six types of aquatic birds (gulls, pelicans, Canada geese, swans, egrets, cormorants) from Connecticut and/or Florida shorelines. Candida albicans was isolated from gulls and Canada geese in Connecticut and from gulls and cormorants in Florida. PMID:2180374

  9. Bipyrimidine Signatures as a Photoprotective Genome Strategy in G + C-rich Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic archaea experience high levels of ultraviolet (UV) light in their environments and demonstrate resistance to UV irradiation. DNA repair systems and carotenoids provide UV protection but do not account for the high resistance observed. Herein, we consider genomic signatures as an additional photoprotective strategy. The predominant forms of UV-induced DNA damage are cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, most notoriously thymine dimers (T^Ts), which form at adjacent Ts. We tested whether the high G + C content seen in halophilic archaea serves a photoprotective function through limiting T nucleotides, and thus T^T lesions. However, this speculation overlooks the other bipyrimidine sequences, all of which capable of forming photolesions to varying degrees. Therefore, we designed a program to determine the frequencies of the four bipyrimidine pairs (5’ to 3’: TT, TC, CT, and CC) within genomes of halophilic archaea and four other randomized sample groups for comparison. The outputs for each sampled genome were weighted by the intrinsic photoreactivities of each dinucleotide pair. Statistical methods were employed to investigate intergroup differences. Our findings indicate that the UV-resistance seen in halophilic archaea can be attributed in part to a genomic strategy: high G + C content and the resulting bipyrimidine signature reduces the genomic photoreactivity. PMID:27598206

  10. Survival of Halophilic Archaea in the Stratosphere as a Mars Analog: A Transcriptomic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DasSarma, S.; DasSarma, P.; Laye, V.; Harvey, J.; Reid, C.; Shultz, J.; Yarborough, A.; Lamb, A.; Koske-Phillips, A.; Herbst, A.; Molina, F.; Grah, O.; Phillips, T.

    2016-05-01

    On Earth, halophilic Archaea tolerate multiple extreme conditions similar to those on Mars. In order to study their survival, we launched live cultures into Earth’s stratosphere on helium balloons. The effects on survival and transcriptomes were interrogated in the lab.

  11. Distribution, abundance and diversity of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Peña, Arantxa; Santos, Fernando; Martínez-García, Manuel; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1998, representatives of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber have been found in many hypersaline environments across the world, including coastal and solar salterns and solar lakes. Here, we review the available information about the distribution, abundance and diversity of this member of the Bacteroidetes. PMID:18957079

  12. Cultivation and molecular monitoring of halophilic microorganisms inhabiting an extreme environment presented by a salt-attacked monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettenauer, Jörg; Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years several investigations, based on culture-dependent and -independent techniques, have shown that salt-attacked stone surfaces present a habitat for extremely salt tolerant and moderate halophilic microorganisms. The inner walls of the Chapel of St. Virgil in Vienna (Austria) are an example of this phenomenon. Salt crusts cover most of the wall surfaces and salt crystallization in the porous space of the stone is causing decohesion of material and destruction of the original medieval paintings. The salt, together with the oligotrophic conditions, creates a very special and extreme habitat for halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms. In this study we investigate and monitor the cultivable and non-cultivable members of the microbial community present on the stonework of the medieval Chapel of St. Virgil after several severe disturbances of the microbial environment caused by desalination and disinfection treatments. With this finality, a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques was selected. The genetic diversity of a total of 104 bacterial strains isolated from the stone samples was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Strains were distributed over 29 groups on the basis of their RAPD patterns. Only 19 groups were differentiated by DGGE. Comparative sequence analyses showed that the isolated strains belong to related species of the genera Halobacillus (47.1%), Bacillus (35.6%), Acinetobacter (4.8%), Halomonas (3.9%), Nesterenkonia (2.9%), Paucisalibacillus (2.9%), Paenibacillus (1%), Staphylococcus (1%) and Exiguobacterium (1%). In addition, polymerase chain reaction DGGE fingerprints, in combination with the creation of clone libraries and sequencing analyses, were used to monitor and identify Archaea, the non-cultivable fraction of the microbial community. The detected archaeal sequences were closely related to different

  13. Growth physiology and competitive interaction of obligately chemolithoautotrophic, haloalkaliphilic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Banciu, Horia; van Loosdrecht, Mark; Kuenen, J Gijs

    2003-06-01

    Two different groups of haloalkaliphilic, obligately autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the genera Thioalkalimicrobium and Thioalkalivibrio have recently been discovered in highly alkaline and saline soda lakes. To understand response to their extreme environment and different occurrence in soda lakes, the growth kinetics and competitive behavior of several representatives have been characterized in detail using batch and pH-controlled continuous cultivation. The bacteria belong to the true alkaliphiles, growing within the pH range 7.5-10.6 with maximum growth rate and maximum growth yield at pH 9.5-10. On the basis of their response to salt content, three groups can be identified. All the Thioalkalimicrobium strains and some of the Thioalkalivibrio strains belonged to the moderate halophiles. Some of the Thioalkalivibrio strains from hypersaline soda lakes were extremely salt-tolerant and capable of growth in saturated soda brines. The Thioalkalimicrobium strains demonstrated relatively high specific growth rates, low growth yield, high maintenance, and extremely high rates of thiosulfate and sulfide oxidation. In contrast, the Thioalkalivibrio strains, in general, were slow-growing, high-yield organisms with lower maintenance and much lower rates of oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate. Moreover, the latter survived starvation much better than Thioalkalimicrobium. Different growth characteristics and salt resistance appear to determine the outcome of the enrichment cultures from different soda lakes: Thioalkalimicrobium dominated in the enrichments with freshly obtained samples from diluted soda lakes at low-medium salinity, while Thioalkalivibrio was the predominant organism in enrichments from aged samples and at hypersaline conditions. In mixed thiosulfate-limited chemostat cultures at low salinity, Thioalkalimicrobium strains (mu(max)=0.33 h(-1)) out-competed Thioalkalivibrio strains (mu(max)=0.15 h(-1)) at D>0.02 h(-1). The overall results

  14. Halophilic Archaea: Life with Desiccation, Radiation and Oligotrophy over Geological Times.

    PubMed

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu

    2015-07-28

    Halophilic archaebacteria (Haloarchaea) can survive extreme desiccation, starvation and radiation, sometimes apparently for millions of years. Several of the strategies that are involved appear specific for Haloarchaea (for example, the formation of halomucin, survival in fluid inclusions of halite), and some are known from other prokaryotes (dwarfing of cells, reduction of ATP). Several newly-discovered haloarchaeal strategies that were inferred to possibly promote long-term survival-halomucin, polyploidy, usage of DNA as a phosphate storage polymer, production of spherical dormant stages-remain to be characterized in detail. More information on potential strategies is desirable, since evidence for the presence of halite on Mars and on several moons in the solar system increased interest in halophiles with respect to the search for extraterrestrial life. This review deals in particular with novel findings and hypotheses on haloarchaeal long-term survival.

  15. Extracellular Ca2(+)-dependent inducible alkaline phosphatase from extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, S; Hecht, K; Eisenberg, H; Mevarech, M

    1990-01-01

    When starved of inorganic phosphate, the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui produces the enzyme alkaline phosphatase and secretes it to the medium. This inducible extracellular enzyme is a glycoprotein whose subunit molecular mass is 160 kDa, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. The native form of the enzyme is heterogeneous and composed of multiple oligomeric forms. The enzymatic activity of the halophilic alkaline phosphatase is maximal at pH 8.5, and the enzyme is inhibited by phosphate. Unlike most alkaline phosphatases, the halobacterial enzyme requires Ca2+ and not Zn2+ ions for its activity. Both calcium ions (in the millimolar range) and NaCl (in the molar range) are required for the stability of the enzyme. Images PMID:2123861

  16. Genomic adaptations of the halophilic Dead Sea filamentous fungus Eurotium rubrum.

    PubMed

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Weig, Alfons R; Riley, Robert; Peršoh, Derek; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lipzen, Anna; Wasser, Solomon P; Rambold, Gerhard; Grigoriev, Igor V; Nevo, Eviatar

    2014-05-09

    The Dead Sea is one of the most hypersaline habitats on Earth. The fungus Eurotium rubrum (Eurotiomycetes) is among the few species able to survive there. Here we highlight its adaptive strategies, based on genome analysis and transcriptome profiling. The 26.2 Mb genome of E. rubrum shows, for example, gains in gene families related to stress response and losses with regard to transport processes. Transcriptome analyses under different salt growth conditions revealed, among other things differentially expressed genes encoding ion and metabolite transporters. Our findings suggest that long-term adaptation to salinity requires cellular and metabolic responses that differ from short-term osmotic stress signalling. The transcriptional response indicates that halophilic E. rubrum actively counteracts the salinity stress. Many of its genes encode for proteins with a significantly higher proportion of acidic amino acid residues. This trait is characteristic of the halophilic prokaryotes as well, supporting the theory of convergent evolution under extreme hypersaline stress.

  17. Halophilic Archaea: Life with Desiccation, Radiation and Oligotrophy over Geological Times

    PubMed Central

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria (Haloarchaea) can survive extreme desiccation, starvation and radiation, sometimes apparently for millions of years. Several of the strategies that are involved appear specific for Haloarchaea (for example, the formation of halomucin, survival in fluid inclusions of halite), and some are known from other prokaryotes (dwarfing of cells, reduction of ATP). Several newly-discovered haloarchaeal strategies that were inferred to possibly promote long-term survival—halomucin, polyploidy, usage of DNA as a phosphate storage polymer, production of spherical dormant stages—remain to be characterized in detail. More information on potential strategies is desirable, since evidence for the presence of halite on Mars and on several moons in the solar system increased interest in halophiles with respect to the search for extraterrestrial life. This review deals in particular with novel findings and hypotheses on haloarchaeal long-term survival. PMID:26226005

  18. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi.

    PubMed

    Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Corcelli, Angela

    2008-12-01

    The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylglycerol and sulfated diglycosyl diether lipid. Among cardiolipins, the tetra-phytanyl or dimeric phospholipids, only traces of bisphosphatidylglycerol were detected. When the cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, no changes in the membrane lipid composition occurred. Distinguishing it from other extreme halophiles of the Halobacteriaceae family, the osmotic stress did not induce the neo-synthesis of cardiolipins in H. walsbyi. The difference may depend on the three-laminar structure of the cell wall, which differs significantly from that of other Haloarchaea.

  19. Structure of starch binding domains of halophilic alpha-amylase at low pH.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The solubility and structural properties of halophilic proteins are ascribed to their abundant acidic residues, resulting in large net negative charges at neutral pH. This study examined the effects of low pH, i.e., reduction of net negative charges on the structural properties of starch binding domain (SBD) of halophilic Kocuria varians α-amylase. Titration to pH 2.1 caused loss of 233 nm peak characteristic of aromatic interactions present in the native SBD at neutral pH and resulted in the spectrum with a 216 nm valley characteristic of β-sheet. The low pH β-sheet structure was stable against heat treatment. The addition of NaCl and trifluoroethanol resulted in decrease and increase of the 216 nm signal, without altering the spectral shape. These structural properties were significantly different from those of the native protein.

  20. Application of lipopeptide biosurfactant isolated from a halophile: Bacillus tequilensis CH for inhibition of biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun Kumar; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mall, Gangotri; Panda, Himadri Tanaya; Sukla, Lala Behari; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-11-01

    Biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules having hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties produced by various microorganisms. These molecules trigger the reduction of surface tension or interfacial tension in liquids. A biosurfactant-producing halophile was isolated from Lake Chilika, a brackish water lake of Odisha, India (19°41'39″N, 85°18'24″E). The halophile was identified as Bacillus tequilensis CH by biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and assigned accession no. KC851857 by GenBank. The biosurfactant produced by B. tequilensis CH was partially characterized as a lipopeptide using thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The minimum effective concentration of a biosurfactant for inhibition of pathogenic biofilm (Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans) on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was found to be 50 μg ml(-1). This finding has potential for a variety of applications.

  1. Isolation, Taxonomy, and Antagonistic Properties of Halophilic Actinomycetes in Saharan Soils of Algeria ▿

    PubMed Central

    Meklat, Atika; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of a population of 52 halophilic actinomycetes was evaluated by a polyphasic approach, which showed the presence of members of the Actinopolyspora, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora, Streptomonospora, and Saccharopolyspora genera. One strain was considered to be a new member of the last genus, and several other strains seemed to be new species. Furthermore, 50% of strains were active against a broad range of indicators and contained genes encoding polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. PMID:21764956

  2. Isolation, taxonomy, and antagonistic properties of halophilic actinomycetes in Saharan soils of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed

    2011-09-01

    The diversity of a population of 52 halophilic actinomycetes was evaluated by a polyphasic approach, which showed the presence of members of the Actinopolyspora, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora, Streptomonospora, and Saccharopolyspora genera. One strain was considered to be a new member of the last genus, and several other strains seemed to be new species. Furthermore, 50% of strains were active against a broad range of indicators and contained genes encoding polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the anaerobic, halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LF.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisuo; Mesbah, Noha M; Dalin, Eileen; Goodwin, Lynne; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikolaos; Wiegel, Juergen

    2011-08-01

    The genome of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus consists of one 3,165,557-bp chromosome and two plasmids (17,207 bp and 8,689 bp). The present study is the first to report the completely sequenced genome of an anaerobic polyextremophile and genes associated with roles in regulation of intracellular osmotic pressure, pH homeostasis, and growth at elevated temperatures.

  4. Genome sequence of Haloarcula marismortui: A halophilic archaeon from the Dead Sea

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Nitin S.; Bonneau, Richard; Facciotti, Marc T.; Pan, Min; Glusman, Gustavo; Deutsch, Eric W.; Shannon, Paul; Chiu, Yulun; Weng, Rueyhung Sting; Gan, Rueichi Richie; Hung, Pingliang; Date, Shailesh V.; Marcotte, Edward; Hood, Leroy; Ng, Wailap Victor

    2004-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 4,274,642-bp genome of Haloarcula marismortui, a halophilic archaeal isolate from the Dead Sea. The genome is organized into nine circular replicons of varying G+C compositions ranging from 54% to 62%. Comparison of the genome architectures of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and H. marismortui suggests a common ancestor for the two organisms and a genome of significantly reduced size in the former. Both of these halophilic archaea use the same strategy of high surface negative charge of folded proteins as means to circumvent the salting-out phenomenon in a hypersaline cytoplasm. A multitiered annotation approach, including primary sequence similarities, protein family signatures, structure prediction, and a protein function association network, has assigned putative functions for at least 58% of the 4242 predicted proteins, a far larger number than is usually achieved in most newly sequenced microorganisms. Among these assigned functions were genes encoding six opsins, 19 MCP and/or HAMP domain signal transducers, and an unusually large number of environmental response regulators—nearly five times as many as those encoded in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1—suggesting H. marismortui is significantly more physiologically capable of exploiting diverse environments. In comparing the physiologies of the two halophilic archaea, in addition to the expected extensive similarity, we discovered several differences in their metabolic strategies and physiological responses such as distinct pathways for arginine breakdown in each halophile. Finally, as expected from the larger genome, H. marismortui encodes many more functions and seems to have fewer nutritional requirements for survival than does Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. PMID:15520287

  5. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  6. Halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes from a marine saltern of Goa, India producing anti-bacterial metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ballav, Shuvankar; Kerkar, Savita; Thomas, Sabu; Augustine, Nimmy

    2015-03-01

    Marine salterns are estuarine ecosystems in Goa, receiving inputs from riverine and marine waters. The Salinity fluctuates between 0 and 300 psu which makes it a conducive niche for salt tolerant and salt loving Actinomycetales. Halotolerant and halophilic Actinomycetales producing anti-bacterial metabolites were studied from crystallizer pond sediments of Ribandar saltern, Goa. Three media viz. Starch casein, R2A and Inorganic salt starch agar at four different salinities (35, 50, 75 and 100 psu) were used for isolation. R2A agar at 35 psu was the most preferred by hypersaline actinomycetes. The dominant group was halotolerant Streptomyces spp. others being rare actinomycetes viz. Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora and Kocuria spp. More than 50% of the isolates showed anti-bacterial activity against one or more of the fifteen human pathogens tested. Eight strains from 4 genera showed consistent anti-bacterial activity and studied in detail. Most halotolerant isolates grew from 0 to 75 psu, with optimum antibiotic production at 35 psu whereas halophiles grew at 20 to 100 psu with optimum antibiotic production at 35 psu. Four Streptomyces strains showed multiple inhibition against test organisms while four rare actinomycetes were specific in their inhibitory activity. This is the first report of a halophilic Kocuria sp., Nocardiopsis sp., and halotolerant Micromonospora sp. producing anti-bacterial compound(s) against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus citreus, and Vibrio cholerae, respectively. Sequential extraction with varying polarity of organic solvents showed that the extracts inhibited different test pathogens. These results suggest that halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes from marine salterns are a potential source of anti-bacterial compounds.

  7. An Extremely Halophilic Proteobacterium Combines a Highly Acidic Proteome with a Low Cytoplasmic Potassium Content*

    PubMed Central

    Deole, Ratnakar; Challacombe, Jean; Raiford, Douglas W.; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic archaea accumulate molar concentrations of KCl in their cytoplasm as an osmoprotectant and have evolved highly acidic proteomes that function only at high salinity. We examined osmoprotection in the photosynthetic Proteobacteria Halorhodospira halophila and Halorhodospira halochloris. Genome sequencing and isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis showed that the proteome of H. halophila is acidic. In line with this finding, H. halophila accumulated molar concentrations of KCl when grown in high salt medium as detected by x-ray microanalysis and plasma emission spectrometry. This result extends the taxonomic range of organisms using KCl as a main osmoprotectant to the Proteobacteria. The closely related organism H. halochloris does not exhibit an acidic proteome, matching its inability to accumulate K+. This observation indicates recent evolutionary changes in the osmoprotection strategy of these organisms. Upon growth of H. halophila in low salt medium, its cytoplasmic K+ content matches that of Escherichia coli, revealing an acidic proteome that can function in the absence of high cytoplasmic salt concentrations. These findings necessitate a reassessment of two central aspects of theories for understanding extreme halophiles. First, we conclude that proteome acidity is not driven by stabilizing interactions between K+ ions and acidic side chains but by the need for maintaining sufficient solvation and hydration of the protein surface at high salinity through strongly hydrated carboxylates. Second, we propose that obligate protein halophilicity is a non-adaptive property resulting from genetic drift in which constructive neutral evolution progressively incorporates weakly stabilizing K+-binding sites on an increasingly acidic protein surface. PMID:23144460

  8. A Novel Denitrifying Extreme Halophile That Grows in a Simple Mineral Salts Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Oremland, R. S.; Gherna, R.; Cote, R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An extremely halophilic bacterium (strain CH-1) was isolated from a saltern adjacent to San Francisco Bay. It grew in a mineral salts medium with ammonium and glucose as sole sources of nitrogen and carbon as well as energy, respectively Cells lysed at less than 10% NaCl and growth was most rapid in medium containing 20% NaCl. Cells were pieomorphic ranging from disc to ovoid-shaved and used a variety of carbohydrates as sole carbon sources. the utilization of certain carbon sources was controlled by temperature with some used at 37 degrees but not 45 C. CH-1 grew between 30 degrees and 50 C with the optimum at 45 C in the presence of 20% NaCl. CH-1 contained 2,3-di-O-isoprenyl glcerol diethers and was sensitive to aphidicofin. The major polar lipid was glucosyl-mannosyl-alucosyl diether, which is diagnostic of the Haloarcula. Thus CH-1 is an extreme halophile and a member of this genus. Among the novel characteristics of this organism was its ability to grow anaerobically in synthetic medium when nitrate was present which was only reduced to nitrous oxide. This organism should prove useful for studying denitrification and carbohydrate metabolism in the extreme halophiles; and to be a valuable resource for generic studies.

  9. Terrestrial models for extraterrestrial life: methanogens and halophiles at Martian temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. N.; Sparks, W. B.; Lubow, S.; McGrath, M.; Livio, M.; Valenti, J.; Sowers, K. R.; Shukla, H. D.; MacAuley, S.; Miller, T.; Suvanasuthi, R.; Belas, R.; Colman, A.; Robb, F. T.; Dassarma, P.; Müller, J. A.; Coker, J. A.; Cavicchioli, R.; Chen, F.; Dassarma, S.

    2006-08-01

    Cold environments are common throughout the Galaxy. We are conducting a series of experiments designed to probe the low-temperature limits for growth in selected methanogenic and halophilic Archaea. This paper presents initial results for two mesophiles, a methanogen, Methanosarcina acetivorans, and a halophile, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and for two Antarctic cold-adapted Archaea, a methanogen, Methanococcoides burtonii, and a halophile, Halorubrum lacusprofundi. Neither mesophile is active at temperatures below 5 °C, but both cold-adapted microorganisms show significant growth at sub-zero temperatures (-2 °C and -1 °C, respectively), extending previous low-temperature limits for both species by 4 5 °C. At low temperatures, both H. lacusprofundi and M. burtonii form multicellular aggregates, which appear to be embedded in extracellular polymeric substances. This is the first detection of this phenomenon in Antarctic species of Archaea at cold temperatures. The low-temperature limits for both psychrophilic species fall within the temperature range experienced on present-day Mars and could permit survival and growth, particularly in sub-surface environments. We also discuss the results of our experiments in the context of known exoplanet systems, several of which include planets that intersect the Habitable Zone. In most cases, those planets follow orbits with significant eccentricity, leading to substantial temperature excursions. However, a handful of the known gas giant exoplanets could potentially harbour habitable terrestrial moons.

  10. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production.

  11. Extremely halophilic archaea from ancient salt sediments and their long term survival.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, marine solar salterns and alkaline salt lakes; they have also been isolated from rock salt of great geological age (195-250 million years) and some of those strains were described as novel species (1). The cells survived perhaps while being enclosed within small fluid inclusions in the halite. When simulating the embedding process of haloarchaea in laboratory-grown salt crystals, cells accumulated preferentially in fluid inclusions, as could be demonstrated by pre-staining with fluorescent dyes. The issue of extreme long term microbial survival in rock salt has considerable implications for the search for extraterrestrial life. Halite has been found in Martian meteorites, salts are present on the Martian surface and there is good evidence for a salty ocean on the Jovian moon Europa. Therefore the search for halophilic prokaryotic life in such environments appears plausible. The development of detection methods for subsurface haloarchaea, which might also be applicable to samples from future missions to space, is important and some examples such as fluorescence microscopy methods with novel dyes will be described. (1) Fendrihan, S., Legat, A., Gruber, C., Pfaffenhuemer, M., Weidler, G., Gerbl, F., Stan- Lotter, H. (2006) Extremely halophilic archaea and the issue of long term microbial survival. Reviews in Environmental Science and Bio/technology 5, 1569-1605.

  12. Communities structure of the planktonic halophiles in the solar saltern of Sfax, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2009-01-01

    The composition and distribution of the main planktonic halophilic micro-organisms (heterotrophic and autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, phytoplankton, ciliates) and metazooplankton were investigated in six ponds of increasing salinity in the solar salt works of Sfax, Tunisia, from January to December 2003. Marked changes in the composition and biomass of the communities were found along the salinity gradient, especially at salinities of 150 and 350. Autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates characterized the less salted ponds. Planktonic biomass was the highest at intermediate salinity as a consequence of a bloom of Ochromonas. Species richness of phytoplankton, ciliates and zooplankton greatly decrease above a salinity of 150 and typical halophiles ( Dunaliella salina, cyanobacteria, Fabrea salina and Artemia salina) were found between 150 and 350 salinity. In this environment, F. salina appeared more adapted than the brine shrimp to survive during phytoplankton blooms. The halophilic plankton was however almost entirely composed of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the crystallizers. We thus observed a progressive disappearance of the autotrophic planktonic communities along the salinity gradient. Multivariate analysis of the communities provides evidence that ponds represent discrete aquatic ecosystems within this salt works.

  13. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0–30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation. PMID:26621792

  14. Global transcriptome analysis of Halolamina sp. to decipher the salt tolerance in extremely halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Kızıldoğan, Aslıhan; Abanoz, Büşra; Okay, Sezer

    2017-02-15

    Extremely halophilic archaea survive in the hypersaline environments such as salt lakes or salt mines. Therefore, these microorganisms are good sources to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance to high salt concentrations. In this study, a global transcriptome analysis was conducted in an extremely halophilic archaeon, Halolamina sp. YKT1, isolated from a salt mine in Turkey. A comparative RNA-seq analysis was performed using YKT1 isolate grown either at 2.7M NaCl or 5.5M NaCl concentrations. A total of 2149 genes were predicted to be up-regulated and 1638 genes were down-regulated in the presence of 5.5M NaCl. The salt tolerance of Halolamina sp. YKT1 involves the up-regulation of genes related with membrane transporters, CRISPR-Cas systems, osmoprotectant solutes, oxidative stress proteins, and iron metabolism. On the other hand, the genes encoding the proteins involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, mismatch and nucleotide excision repair were down-regulated. The RNA-seq data were verified for seven up-regulated genes as well as six down-regulated genes via qRT-PCR analysis. This comprehensive transcriptome analysis showed that the halophilic archaeon canalizes its energy towards keeping the intracellular osmotic balance minimizing the production of nucleic acids and peptides.

  15. Isolation and characterization of two novel halotolerant Catechol 2, 3-dioxygenases from a halophilic bacterial consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Chongyang; Huang, Yong; Tian, Fang; Cui, Qijia; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Study of enzymes in halophiles will help to understand the mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbons degradation in saline environment. In this study, two novel catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23O1 and C23O2) were cloned and overexpressed from a halophilic bacterial consortium enriched from an oil-contaminated saline soil. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the novel C23Os and their relatives formed a new branch in subfamily I.2.A of extradiol dioxygenases and the sequence differences were further analyzed by amino acid sequence alignment. Two enzymes with the halotolerant feature were active over a range of 0-30% salinity and they performed more stable at high salinity than in the absence of salt. Surface electrostatic potential and amino acids composition calculation suggested high acidic residues content, accounting for their tolerance to high salinity. Moreover, two enzymes were further characterized. The enzymes activity both increased in the presence of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+ and Al3+ and showed no significant inhibition by other tested metal ions. The optimal temperatures for the C23Os were 40 °C and 60 °C and their best substrates were catechol and 4-methylcatechol respectively. As the firstly isolated and characterized catechol dioxygenases from halophiles, the two halotolerant C23Os presented novel characteristics suggesting their potential application in aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

  16. Characterization of halophiles in natural MgSO 4 salts and laboratory enrichment samples: Astrobiological implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian S.; King, Penelope L.; Hyde, Brendt C.; Southam, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    The presence of sulfate salts and limited subsurface water (ice) on Mars suggests that any liquid water on Mars today will occur as (magnesium) sulfate-rich brines in regions containing sources of magnesium and sulfur. The Basque Lakes of British Columbia, Canada, represent a hypersaline terrestrial analogue site, which possesses chemical and physical properties similar to those observed on Mars. The Basque Lakes also contain diverse halophilic organisms representing all three Kingdoms of life, growing in surface and near-subsurface environments. Of interest from an astrobiological perspective, crushed magnesium sulfate samples that were analyzed using a modified Lowry protein assay contained biomass in every crystal inspected, with biomass values from 0.078 to 4.21 mg biomass/g salt; average=0.74±0.7 mg biomass/g salt. Bacteria and Archaea cells were easily observed even in low-biomass samples using light microscopy, and bacteria trapped within magnesium sulfate crystals were observed using confocal microscopy. Regions within the salt also contained bacterial pigments, e.g., carotenoids, which were separate from the cells, indicating that cell lysis might have occurred during entrapment within the salt matrix. These biosignatures, cells, and any 'soluble' organic constituents were primarily found trapped within fluid inclusions or fluid-filled void spaces between intergrown crystals. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (reflectance IR) analysis of enrichment cultures, containing cyanobacteria, Archaea, or dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria, highlighted molecular biosignature features between 550-1650 and 2400-3000 cm -1. Spectra from natural salts demonstrated that we can detect biomass within salt crystals using the most sensitive biosignatures, which are the 1530-1570 cm -1, C-N, N-H, -COOH absorptions and the 1030-1050 cm -1 C-OH, C-N, PO 43- bond features. The lowest detection limit for a biosignature absorption feature using

  17. Bounagaea algeriensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic actinobacterium isolated from a Saharan soil of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Mokrane, Salim; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2015-08-01

    A novel halophilic actinobacterium strain, designated H8(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil sample collected in El-Goléa, South Algeria. Strain H8(T) was identified as representing a new genus using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain H8(T) shared the highest degree of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with 'Mzabimyces algeriensis' DSM 46680(T) (93.0 %), Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis DSM 45606(T) (91.2 %), Halopolyspora alba DSM 45976(T) (90.8 %) and Actinopolyspora mortivallis DSM 44261(T) (90.0 %). The strain was found to grow optimally at 28-35 °C, at pH 6.0-7.0, and in the presence of 15-25 % (w/v) NaCl. The substrate mycelium was observed to be well developed and fragmented in liquid medium and on solid medium. The aerial mycelium was observed to be moderately abundant and to form long chains with non-motile, smooth-surfaced and ovoid or spherical spores at maturity. The cell wall of strain H8(T) was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid. The whole-cell hydrolysates were found to mainly contain arabinose and galactose. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine, and MK-9(H4), MK-9(H2) and MK-10(H2) were found to be the predominant menaquinones. The major cellular fatty acids were determined to be anteiso-C17:0 and iso-C15:0. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain H8(T) was determined to be 71.3 mol%. The genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the strain represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Bounagaea algeriensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain H8(T) (=DSM 45966(T) = CECT 8470(T)).

  18. Ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine accumulation in the halophile Virgibacillus halodenitrificans PDB-F2 in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ping; Li, Hui; Yu, Yunjiang; Gu, Jidong; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-08-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Virgibacillus halodenitrificans PDB-F2 copes with salinity by synthesizing or taking up compatible solutes. The main compatible solutes in this strain were ectoine and hydroxyectoine, as determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that ectoine was the major solute that was synthesized in response to elevated salinity, while hydroxyectoine was a minor solute. However, the hydroxyectoine/ectoine ratio increased from 0.04 at 3 % NaCl to 0.45 at 15 % NaCl in the late exponential growth phase. A cluster of ectoine biosynthesis genes was identified, including three genes in the order of ectA, ectB, and ectC. The hydroxyectoine biosynthesis gene ectD was not part of the ectABC gene cluster. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reactions (RT-qPCR) showed that the expression of the ect genes was salinity dependent. The expression of ectABC reached a maximum at 12 % NaCl, while ectD expression increased up to 15 % NaCl. Ectoine and hydroxyectoine production was growth phase dependent. The hydroxyectoine/ectoine ratio increased from 0.018 in the early exponential phase to 0.11 in the stationary phase at 5 % NaCl. Hydroxyectoine biosynthesis started much later than ectoine biosynthesis after osmotic shock, and the temporal expression of the ect genes differed under these conditions, with the ectABC genes being expressed first, followed by ectD gene. Increased culture salinity triggered ectoine or hydroxyectoine uptake when they were added to the medium. Hydroxyectoine was accumulated preferentially when both ectoine and hydroxyectoine were provided exogenously.

  19. Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov., an endospore-forming, Mn-oxidizing, moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from deep subseafloor basaltic crust.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Jason B; Hoffman, Colleen L; Momper, Lily M; Toner, Brandy M; Amend, Jan P; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-06-01

    A facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain 1MBB1T, was isolated from basaltic breccia collected from 341 m below the seafloor by seafloor drilling of Rigil Guyot during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 330. The cells were straight rods, 0.5 μm wide and 1-3 μm long, that occurred singly and in chains. Strain 1MBB1T stained Gram-positive. Catalase and oxidase were produced. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.5, and could grow with up to 12 % (w/v) NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 40.5 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were C16:1ω11c (26.5 %), anteiso-C15:0 (19.5 %), C16:0 (18.7 %) and iso-C15:0 (10.4 %), and the cell-wall diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Endospores of strain 1MBB1T oxidized Mn(II) to Mn(IV), and siderophore production by vegetative cells was positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain 1MBB1T was a member of the family Bacillaceae, with Bacillus foraminis CV53T and Bacillus novalis LMG 21837T being the closest phylogenetic neighbours (96.5 and 96.2 % similarity, respectively). This is the first novel species described from deep subseafloor basaltic crust. On the basis of our polyphasic analysis, we conclude that strain 1MBB1T represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which we propose the name Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov. The type strain is 1MBB1T ( = NCMA B78T = LMG 28275T).

  20. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  1. Statistical Optimization of the Production of NaCl-Tolerant Proteases by a Moderate Halophile, Virgibacillus sp. SK37

    PubMed Central

    Sinsuwan, Sornchai; Jangchud, Anuvat; Rodtong, Sureelak; Roytrakul, Sittirak

    2015-01-01

    Summary The objectives of this study are to optimize the conditions for providing high yield of NaCl-tolerant extracellular protease from Virgibacillus sp. SK37 based on a fish-based medium and to investigate the effects of the key factors (mass per volume ratios of dried anchovy, yeast extract and NaCl, and initial pH of the medium) on the secretion pattern of proteases. Based on the predicted response model, the optimized medium contained 1.81% of dried anchovy, 0.33% of yeast extract and 1.25% of NaCl at pH=7.8. Under these conditions, a 5.3-fold increase in protease production was achieved, compared with the broth containing only 1.2% of dried anchovy (5% of NaCl at pH=7). The cubic regression adequately described the protease production. Protease activity was determined using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) on the synthetic substrate (Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-AMC). Proteases of molecular masses of 19, 34, 35 and 44 kDa were secreted in the presence of NaCl, whereas those of 22 and 42 kDa were the main proteases detected in the absence of NaCl. In addition, no secreted proteases were detected when initial pH of the medium was pH=6. The peptide mass fingerprint of the medium cultured with 10% NaCl showed a higher abundance of peptides with lower mass of 500–1000 m/z compared with the medium containing 0% NaCl, indicating the higher proteolytic activity of the high-salt medium. The Virgibacillus sp. SK37 proteases showed a marked preference towards Lys, Arg and Tyr in the presence of NaCl and towards Lys and Arg in the absence of NaCl. PMID:27904342

  2. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Virgibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from human gut

    PubMed Central

    Khelaifia, S.; Croce, O.; Lagier, J.-C.; Robert, C.; Couderc, C.; Di Pinto, F.; Davoust, B.; Djossou, F.; Raoult, D.; Fournier, P.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Strain Vm-5T was isolated from the stool specimen of a 10-year-old Amazonian boy. This bacterium is a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic rod, motile by a polar flagellum. Here we describe its phenotypic characteristics and complete genome sequence. The 4 353 177 bp long genome exhibits a G + C content of 36.87% and contains 4394 protein-coding and 125 predicted RNA genes. Phylogenetically and genetically, strain Vm-c is a member of the genus Virgibacillus but is distinct enough to be classified as a new species. We propose the creation of V. massiliensis sp. nov., whose type strain is strain Vm-5T (CSUR P971 = DSM 28587). PMID:26649181

  3. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  4. Novel green sulfur bacteria phylotypes detected in saline environments: ecophysiological characters versus phylogenetic taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Vila, Xavier; Abella, Charles A

    2010-05-01

    The taxonomic significance of salt tolerance or requirements in green sulfur bacteria has been analyzed with environmental populations and enrichment cultures from several saline systems (inland and coastal water bodies) with different salinities (salt composition and concentration). Novel phylotypes of green sulfur bacteria have been found in hypersaline and brackish environments and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated them into phylogenetic groups in which neither halotolerant nor halophilic species have been known to date. Therefore, salt tolerance does not seem to be restricted to members of any specific subgroup but is widespread among all the different phylogenetic branches of the green sulfur bacteria group, and closely-related phylotypes can have dissimilar salt tolerance capacities. Thus the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic structure of the green sulfur bacteria present some incongruities. Phenotypic traits should be studied further in order to determine the ecophysiological features of green sulfur bacteria phylotypes.

  5. Characterization of three spiral-shaped purple nonsulfur bacteria isolated from coastal lagoon sediments, saline sulfur springs, and microbial mats: emended description of the genus Roseospira and description of Roseospira marina sp. nov., Roseospira navarrensis sp. nov., and Roseospira thiosulfatophila sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Guyoneaud, Rémy; Mouné, Sophie; Eatock, Claire; Bothorel, Virginie; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Willison, John; Duran, Robert; Liesack, Werner; Herbert, Rodney; Matheron, Robert; Caumette, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Three new spirilloid phototrophic purple nonsulfur bacteria were isolated in pure culture from three different environments: strain CE2105 from a brackish lagoon in the Arcachon Bay (Atlantic coast, France), strain SE3104 from a saline sulfur spring in the Pyrenees (Navarra, Spain), and strain AT2115 a microbial mat (Tetiaroa Atoll, Society Islands). Single cells of the three strains were spiral-shaped and highly motile. Their intracellular photosynthetic membranes were of the vesicular type. Bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the normal spirilloxanthin series were present as photosynthetic pigments. Optimal growth occurred under photoheterotrophic conditions and in the presence of 0.5-4% w/v NaCl. These features are similar to those described for Roseospira mediosalina. Comparative sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes placed these strains within the alpha-subclass of Proteobacteria, in a cluster together with Roseospira mediosalina and Rhodospira trueperi. They form a closely related group of slightly to moderately halophilic spiral-shaped purple nonsulfur bacteria.However, the three new isolates exhibited some differences in their physiology and genetic characteristics. Consequently, we propose that they are members of three new species within the genus Roseospira, Roseospira marina sp. nov., Roseospira navarrensis sp. nov., and Roseospira thiosulfatophila sp. nov., with strains CE2105, SE3104, and AT2115 as the type strains, respectively. As a consequence, an emended description of the genus Roseospira is also given.

  6. Evolutionary and Biotechnological Implications of Robust Hydrogenase Activity in Halophilic Strains of Tetraselmis

    PubMed Central

    D'Adamo, Sarah; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Brown, Susan L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Peters, John W.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water algae (e.g. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), relatively few studies have focused on H2 production and hydrogenase adaptations in marine or halophilic algae. Salt water organisms likely offer several advantages for biotechnological H2 production due to the global abundance of salt water, decreased H2 and O2 solubility in saline and hypersaline systems, and the ability of extracellular NaCl levels to influence metabolism. We screened unialgal isolates obtained from hypersaline ecosystems in the southwest United States and identified two distinct halophilic strains of the genus Tetraselmis (GSL1 and QNM1) that exhibit both robust fermentative and photo H2-production activities. The influence of salinity (3.5%, 5.5% and 7.0% w/v NaCl) on H2 production was examined during anoxic acclimation, with the greatest in vivo H2-production rates observed at 7.0% NaCl. These Tetraselmis strains maintain robust hydrogenase activity even after 24 h of anoxic acclimation and show increased hydrogenase activity relative to C. reinhardtii after extended anoxia. Transcriptional analysis of Tetraselmis GSL1 enabled sequencing of the cDNA encoding the FeFe-hydrogenase structural enzyme (HYDA) and its maturation proteins (HYDE, HYDEF and HYDG). In contrast to freshwater Chlorophyceae, the halophilic Tetraselmis GSL1 strain likely encodes a single HYDA and two copies of HYDE, one of which is fused to HYDF. Phylogenetic analyses of HYDA and concatenated HYDA, HYDE, HYDF and HYDG in Tetraselmis GSL1 fill existing knowledge gaps in the evolution of algal hydrogenases and indicate that the algal hydrogenases sequenced to date are derived from a common ancestor. This is consistent with recent hypotheses that suggest fermentative metabolism in the majority of eukaryotes is derived from a common base set of enzymes that emerged early in eukaryotic evolution with subsequent losses in some organisms. PMID

  7. Studies of a Halophilic NADH Dehydrogenase. 1: Purification and Properties of the Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    1973-01-01

    An NADH dehydrogenase obtained from an extremely halophilic bacterium was purified 570-fold by a combination of gel filtration, chromatography on hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography on QAE-Sephadex. The purified enzyme appeared to be FAD-linked and bad an apparent molecular weight of 64000. Even though enzyme activity was stimulated by NaCl, considerable activity (430 % of the maximum activity observed in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl) was observed in the absence of added NaCl. The enzyme was unstable when incubated in solutions of low ionic strength. The presence of NADH enhanced the stability of the enzyme.

  8. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  9. The freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum transformed with ApGSMT-DMT exhibited enhanced salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity, but became halophilic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Meenakshi; Sharma, Naveen K; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Rai, Ashwani K

    2013-03-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmolyte synthesized in response to different abiotic stresses, including salinity. The two known pathways of GB synthesis involve: 1) two step oxidation of choline (choline → betaine aldehyde → GB), generally found in plants, microbes and animals; and 2) three step methylation of glycine (glycine → sarcosine → dimethylglycine → GB), mainly found in halophilic archaea, sulphur bacteria and the cyanobacterium Aphanothece (Ap.) halophytica. Here, we transformed a salt-sensitive freshwater diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (An.) doliolum with N-methyltransferase genes (ApGSMT-DMT) from Ap. halophytica using the triparental conjugation method. The transformed An. doliolum synthesized and accumulated GB in cells, and showed increased salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity. The salt responsiveness of the transformant was also apparent as GB synthesis increased with increasing concentrations of NaCl in the nutrient solution, and maximal [12.92 µmol (g dry weight)(-1)] in cells growing at 0.5 M NaCl. Therefore, the transformed cyanobacterium has changed its behaviour from preferring freshwater to halophily. This study may have important biotechnological implications for the development of stress tolerant nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria as biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture.

  10. High quality draft genome sequence of the slightly halophilic bacterium Halomonas zhanjiangensis type strain JSM 078169T (DSM 21076T) from a sea urchin in southern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Li, Rui; Gao, Xiao-Yang; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Haynes, Matthew; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Rohde, Manfred; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tindall, Brian J.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Halomonas zhanjiangensis Chen et al. 2009 is a member of the genus Halomonas, family Halomonadaceae, class Gammaproteobacteria. Representatives of the genus Halomonas are a group of halophilic bacteria often isolated from salty environments. The type strain H. zhanjiangensis JSM 078169T was isolated from a sea urchin (Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus) collected from the South China Sea. The genome of strain JSM 078169T is the fourteenth sequenced genome in the genus Halomonas and the fifteenth in the family Halomonadaceae. The other thirteen genomes from the genus Halomonas are H. halocynthiae, H. venusta, H. alkaliphila, H. lutea, H. anticariensis, H. jeotgali, H. titanicae, H. desiderata, H. smyrnensis, H. salifodinae, H. boliviensis, H. elongata and H stevensii. Here, we describe the features of strain JSM 078169T, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 21076T. The 4,060,520 bp long draft genome consists of 17 scaffolds with the 3,659 protein-coding and 80 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project. PMID:25197480

  11. High quality draft genome sequence of the slightly halophilic bacterium Halomonas zhanjiangensis type strain JSM 078169(T) (DSM 21076(T)) from a sea urchin in southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Li, Rui; Gao, Xiao-Yang; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Haynes, Matthew; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N; Rohde, Manfred; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tindall, Brian J; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-06-15

    Halomonas zhanjiangensis Chen et al. 2009 is a member of the genus Halomonas, family Halomonadaceae, class Gammaproteobacteria. Representatives of the genus Halomonas are a group of halophilic bacteria often isolated from salty environments. The type strain H. zhanjiangensis JSM 078169(T) was isolated from a sea urchin (Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus) collected from the South China Sea. The genome of strain JSM 078169(T) is the fourteenth sequenced genome in the genus Halomonas and the fifteenth in the family Halomonadaceae. The other thirteen genomes from the genus Halomonas are H. halocynthiae, H. venusta, H. alkaliphila, H. lutea, H. anticariensis, H. jeotgali, H. titanicae, H. desiderata, H. smyrnensis, H. salifodinae, H. boliviensis, H. elongata and H stevensii. Here, we describe the features of strain JSM 078169(T), together with the complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 21076(T). The 4,060,520 bp long draft genome consists of 17 scaffolds with the 3,659 protein-coding and 80 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  12. Manual annotation, transcriptional analysis, and protein expression studies reveal novel genes in the agl cluster responsible for N glycosylation in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-05-01

    While Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea are all capable of protein N glycosylation, the archaeal version of this posttranslational modification is the least understood. To redress this imbalance, recent studies of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii have identified a gene cluster encoding the Agl proteins involved in the assembly and attachment of a pentasaccharide to select Asn residues of the surface layer glycoprotein in this species. However, because the automated tools used for rapid annotation of genome sequences, including that of H. volcanii, are not always accurate, a reannotation of the agl cluster was undertaken in order to discover genes not previously recognized. In the present report, reanalysis of the gene cluster that includes aglB, aglE, aglF, aglG, aglI, and aglJ, which are known components of the H. volcanii protein N-glycosylation machinery, was undertaken. Using computer-based tools or visual inspection, together with transcriptional analysis and protein expression approaches, genes encoding AglP, AglQ, and AglR are now described.

  13. Spherical particles of halophilic archaea correlate with exposure to low water activity--implications for microbial survival in fluid inclusions of ancient halite.

    PubMed

    Fendrihan, S; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M; Gerbl, F W; Holzinger, A; Grösbacher, M; Briza, P; Erler, A; Gruber, C; Plätzer, K; Stan-Lotter, H

    2012-09-01

    Viable extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) have been isolated from million-year-old salt deposits around the world; however, an explanation of their supposed longevity remains a fundamental challenge. Recently small roundish particles in fluid inclusions of 22 000- to 34 000-year-old halite were identified as haloarchaea capable of proliferation (Schubert BA, Lowenstein TK, Timofeeff MN, Parker MA, 2010, Environmental Microbiology, 12, 440-454). Searching for a method to produce such particles in the laboratory, we exposed rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium species to reduced external water activity (a(w)). Gradual formation of spheres of about 0.4 μm diameter occurred in 4 M NaCl buffer of a(w) ≤ 0.75, but exposure to buffered 4 M LiCl (a(w) ≤ 0.73) split cells into spheres within seconds, with concomitant release of several proteins. From one rod, three or four spheres emerged, which re-grew to normal rods in nutrient media. Biochemical properties of rods and spheres were similar, except for a markedly reduced ATP content (about 50-fold) and an increased lag phase of spheres, as is known from dormant bacteria. The presence of viable particles of similar sizes in ancient fluid inclusions suggested that spheres might represent dormant states of haloarchaea. The easy production of spheres by lowering a(w) should facilitate their investigation and could help to understand the mechanisms for microbial survival over geological times.

  14. The evolution of energy-transducing systems. Studies with an extremely halophilic archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1992-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of eubacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaebacteria are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution. From studies of members of all three major groups of archaebacteria - the halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles - it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. Amino acid sequences of critical regions of the enzyme were to be determined, as well as immunoreactions of single subunits in the search for common epitopes. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complexes, and possibly deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  15. [An efficient genetic knockout system based on linear DNA fragment homologous recombination for halophilic archaea].

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Wang; Chuang, Jiang; Jianhua, Liu; Xipeng, Liu

    2015-04-01

    With the development of functional genomics, gene-knockout is becoming an important tool to elucidate gene functions in vivo. As a good model strain for archaeal genetics, Haloferax volcanii has received more attention. Although several genetic manipulation systems have been developed for some halophilic archaea, it is time-consuming because of the low percentage of positive clones during the second-recombination selection. These classical gene knockout methods are based on DNA recombination between the genomic homologous sequence and the circular suicide plasmid, which carries a pyrE selection marker and two DNA fragments homologous to the upstream and downstream fragments of the target gene. Many wild-type clones are obtained through a reverse recombination between the plasmid and genome in the classic gene knockout method. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient gene knockout system to increase the positive clone percentage. Here we report an improved gene knockout method using a linear DNA cassette consisting of upstream and downstream homologous fragments, and the pyrE marker. Gene deletions were subsequently detected by colony PCR analysis. We determined the efficiency of our knockout method by deleting the xpb2 gene from the H. volcanii genome, with the percentage of positive clones higher than 50%. Our method provides an efficient gene knockout strategy for halophilic archaea.

  16. Halophilic archaea on Earth and in space: growth and survival under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-13

    Salts are abundant on Mars, and any liquid water that is present or may have been present on the planet is expected to be hypersaline. Halophilic archaea (family Halobacteriaceae) are the microorganisms best adapted to life at extremes of salinity on Earth. This paper reviews the properties of the Halobacteriaceae that may make the group good candidates for life also on Mars. Many species resist high UV and gamma radiation levels; one species has survived exposure to vacuum and radiation during a space flight; and there is at least one psychrotolerant species. Halophilic archaea may survive for millions of years within brine inclusions in salt crystals. Many species have different modes of anaerobic metabolism, and some can use light as an energy source using the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. They are also highly tolerant to perchlorate, recently shown to be present in Martian soils, and some species can even use perchlorate as an electron acceptor to support anaerobic growth. The presence of characteristic carotenoid pigments (α-bacterioruberin and derivatives) makes the Halobacteriaceae easy to identify by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, if present on Mars, such organisms may be detected by Raman instrumentation planned to explore Mars during the upcoming ExoMars mission.

  17. Characterisation and purification of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from heterotrophically grown halophilic archaebacterium, Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, R; Altekar, W

    1994-04-15

    The CO2-fixing enzyme of Calvin cycle ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase has been isolated from a halophilic bacterium, Haloferax mediterranei grown heterotrophically. A homogeneous preparation was obtained from sonicated extract of the cells by three steps, resulting in a specific activity of 52 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1. The physicochemical and catalytic properties of the enzyme were studied. The halobacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase is an oligomer of 54-kDa and 14-kDa subunits as detected by SDS/PAGE. By sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated as approximately 500 kDa indicating a hexadecameric nature. No evidence for an additional form of the enzyme devoid of small subunits was obtained. The enzyme required Mg2+ for activity, KCl for activity and stability, and an optimal pH of 7.8. In contrast to many halophilic proteins, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from H. mediterranei is not an acidic protein. From the comparison of amino acid composition of halobacterial enzyme with its counterparts from a few eukaryotic and eubacterial sources, the S delta Q values showed that these proteins share some compositional similarities.

  18. Analysis of Carotenoid Production by Halorubrum sp. TBZ126; an Extremely Halophilic Archeon from Urmia Lake

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Davood; Hamidi, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Salar; Tarhriz, Vahideh; Maleki Zanjani, Bahram; Nazemyieh, Hossein; Hejazi, Mohammd Amin; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotenoids are of great interest in many scientific disciplines because of their wide distribution, diverse functions and interesting properties. The present report describes a new natural source for carotenoid production. Methods: Halorubrum sp., TBZ126, an extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from Urmia Lack following culture of water sample on marine agar medium and incubation at 30 °C. Then single colonies were cultivated in broth media. After that the cells were collected and carotenoids were extracted with acetone-methanol (7:3 v/v). The identification of carotenoids was performed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) in the presence of antimony pentachloride (SbCl5). The production profile was analyzed using liquid-chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) techniques. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolate were carried out and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: LC-MS analytical results revealed that produced carotenoids are bacterioruberin, lycopene and β-carotene. Bacterioruberin was found to be the predominant produced carotenoid. 16S rRNA analysis showed that TBZ126 has 100% similarity with Halorubrum chaoviator Halo-G*T (AM048786). Conclusion: Halorubrum sp. TBZ126, isolated from Urmia Lake has high capacity in the production of carotenoids. This extremely halophilic archaeon could be considered as a prokaryotic candidate for carotenoid production source for future studies. PMID:24409411

  19. Characterization and antimicrobial potential of extremely halophilic archaea isolated from hypersaline environments of the Algerian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Inès; Hassani, Imene Ikrame; l'Haridon, Stéphane; Chalopin, Morgane; Hacène, Hocine; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic archaea were isolated from different chotts and sebkha, dry salt lakes and salt flat respectively, of the Algerian Sahara and characterized using phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. From 102 extremely halophilic strains isolated, forty three were selected and studied. These strains were also screened for their antagonistic potential and the production of hydrolytic enzymes. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis allowed the identification of 10 archaeal genera within the class Halobacteria: Natrinema (13 strains), Natrialba (12 strains), Haloarcula (4 strains), Halopiger (4 strains), Haloterrigena (3 strains), Halorubrum (2 strains), Halostagnicola (2 strains), Natronococcus, Halogeometricum and Haloferax (1 strain each). The most common producers of antimicrobial compounds belong to the genus Natrinema while the most hydrolytic isolates, with combined production of several enzymes, belong to the genus Natrialba. The strain affiliated to Halopiger djelfamassilliensis was found to produce some substances of interest (halocins, anti-Candida, enzymes). After partial purification and characterization of one of the strains Natrinema gari QI1, we found similarities between the antimicrobial compound and the halocin C8. Therefore, the gene encoding halocin C8 was amplified and sequenced.

  20. Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oren, A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

  1. Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase: a key enzyme in the assimilation of starch by the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Vanesa; Esclapez, Julia; Pérez-Pomares, Francisco; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Camacho, Mónica; Bonete, María José

    2012-01-01

    A cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase, EC 2.4.1.19) was successfully isolated and characterized from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei. The enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 77 kDa and optimum activity at 55°C, pH 7.5 and 1.5 M NaCl. The enzyme displayed many activities related to the degradation and transformation of starch. Cyclization was found to be the predominant activity, yielding a mixture of cyclodextrins, mainly α-CD, followed by hydrolysis and to a lesser extent coupling and disproportionation activities. Gene encoding H. mediterranei CGTase was cloned and heterologously overexpressed. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 2142 bp that encodes a protein of 713 amino acids. The amino acid sequence displayed high homology with those belonging to the α-amylase family. The CGTase is secreted to the extracellular medium by the Tat pathway. Upstream of the CGTase gene, four maltose ABC transporter genes have been sequenced (malE, malF, malG, malK). The expression of the CGTase gene yielded a fully active CGTase with similar kinetic behavior to the wild-type enzyme. The H. mediterranei CGTase is the first halophilic archaeal CGTase characterized, sequenced and expressed.

  2. Characterization of detergent compatible protease of a halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9: differential role of metal ions in stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

    2013-10-01

    A moderately halophilic protease producer, Bacillus sp. strain isolated from sea water is described. The protease is purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate precipitation and CM cellulose chromatography. The serine protease has a molecular mass of 29 kDa. Enzymatic characterization of protease revealed K(m) 2.22 mg mL(-1), Vmax 1111.11 U mL(-1), pH optimum 9.0, t1/2 190 min at 60°C and salt optima 1% (w/v) NaCl. The protease is remarkably stable in hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents at high concentrations. The purified preparation is unstable at room temperature. Ca(2+) ions are required for preventing this loss of activity. Interestingly, the activity and stability are modulated differentially. Whereas, divalent cation Ca(2+) are involved in maintaining stability in solution at room temperature by preventing unfolding, monovalent Na(+) and K(+) ions participate in regulating the activity and assist in refolding of the enzyme. Application of the protease is shown in efficient removal of blood stain.

  3. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  4. Phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA identification of culturable non-obligate halophilic bacterial communities from a hypersaline lake, La Sal del Rey, in extreme South Texas (USA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background La Sal del Rey ("the King's Salt") is one of several naturally-occurring salt lakes in Hidalgo County, Texas and is part of the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. The research objective was to isolate and characterize halophilic microorganisms from La Sal del Rey. Water samples were collected from the lake and a small creek that feeds into the lake. Soil samples were collected from land adjacent to the water sample locations. Sample salinity was determined using a refractometer. Samples were diluted and cultured on a synthetic saline medium to grow halophilic bacteria. The density of halophiles was estimated by viable plate counts. A collection of isolates was selected, gram-stained, tested for catalase, and characterized using API 20E® test strips. Isolates were putatively identified by sequencing the 16S rDNA. Carbon source utilization by the microbial community from each sample site was examined using EcoPlate™ assays and the carbon utilization total activity of the community was determined. Results Results showed that salinity ranged from 4 parts per thousand (ppt) at the lake water source to 420 ppt in water samples taken just along the lake shore. The density of halophilic bacteria in water samples ranged from 1.2 × 102 - 5.2 × 103 colony forming units per ml (cfu ml-1) whereas the density in soil samples ranged from 4.0 × 105 - 2.5 × 106 colony forming units per gram (cfu g-1). In general, as salinity increased the density of the bacterial community decreased. Microbial communities from water and soil samples were able to utilize 12 - 31 carbon substrates. The greatest number of substrates utilized was by water-borne communities compared to soil-based communities, especially at lower salinities. The majority of bacteria isolated were gram-negative, catalase-positive, rods. Biochemical profiles constructed from API 20E® test strips showed that bacterial isolates from low-salinity water samples (4 ppt) showed the greatest

  5. Extremely halophilic archaea from ancient salt sediments and their possible survival in halite fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, H.; Fendrihan, S.; Gerbl, F. W.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Frethem, C.

    2008-09-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, marine solar salterns and alkaline salt lakes; they have also been isolated from ancient subsurface salt sediments of great geological age (195-280 million years) and some of those strains were described as novel species (1). The cells survived perhaps while being enclosed within small fluid inclusions in the halite. The characterization of subsurface microbial life is of astrobiological relevance since extraterrestrial halite has been detected and since microbial life on Mars, if existent, may have retreated into the subsurface. We attempted to simulate the embedding process of extremely halophilic archaea and to analyse any cellular changes which might occur. When enclosing haloarchaea in laboratory grown halite, cells accumulated preferentially in fluid inclusions, as could be demonstrated by pre-staining with fluorescent dyes. With increased time of embedding, rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium salinarum strains were found to assume roundish morphologies. Upon dissolution of the salt crystals, these spheres were stable and viable for months when kept in buffers containing 4 M NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation with glutaraldehyde suggested a potentially gradual transformation from rods to spheres. This notion was supported by fluorescence microscopy of Halobacterium cells, following embedding in halite and staining with SYTO 9. One-dimensional protein patterns of rods and spheres, following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were similar except that the S-layer protein appeared reduced by about 15 - 20 % in spheres. The reddish-orange pigmentation of spheres was much lighter compared to that of rod-shaped cells, suggesting lowered concentrations of carotenoids; this was confirmed by extraction and spectrometry of pigments. The data suggested that Halobacterium cells are capable of forming specific

  6. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  7. Gammasphaerolipovirus, a newly proposed bacteriophage genus, unifies viruses of halophilic archaea and thermophilic bacteria within the novel family Sphaerolipoviridae.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Alice; Rissanen, Ilona; Bamford, Jaana K H; Krupovic, Mart; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2014-06-01

    A new family of viruses named Sphaerolipoviridae has been proposed recently. It comprises icosahedral, tailless haloarchaeal viruses with an internal lipid membrane located between the protein capsid and the dsDNA genome. The proposed family Sphaerolipoviridae was divided into two genera: Alphasphaerolipovirus, including Haloarcula hispanica viruses SH1, PH1 and HHIV-2, and Betasphaerolipovirus, including Natrinema virus SNJ1. Here, we propose to expand the family Sphaerolipoviridae to include a group of bacteriophages infecting extreme thermophilic Thermus thermophilus and sharing a number of structural and genomic properties with archaeal sphaerolipoviruses. This new group comprises two members, lytic phage P23-77 and temperate phage IN93, as well as putative members P23-72 and P23-65H. In addition, several related proviruses have been discovered as integrated elements in bacterial genomes of the families Thermus and Meiothermus. Morphology of the virus particles and the overall capsid architecture of these bacteriophages resembles that of archaeal members of the Sphaerolipoviridae, including an unusual capsid arrangement in a T = 28 dextro lattice. Alpha- and betasphaerolipoviruses share with P23-77-like bacteriophages a conserved block of core genes that encode a putative genome-packaging ATPase and the two major capsid proteins (MCPs). The recently determined X-ray structure of the small and large MCPs of P23-77 revealed a single beta-barrel (jelly-roll) fold that is superimposable with the cryo-EM density maps of the SH1 capsomers. Given the common features of these viruses, we propose to include the so far unclassified P23-77-like bacteriophages into a new genus, "Gammasphaerolipovirus", within the family Sphaerolipoviridae.

  8. Actinopolyspora algeriensis sp. nov., a novel halophilic actinomycete isolated from a Saharan soil.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2012-09-01

    A halophilic actinomycete strain designated H19(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil in the Bamendil region (Ouargla province, South Algeria) and was characterized taxonomically by using a polyphasic approach. The morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics of the strain were consistent with those of members of the genus Actinopolyspora, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis confirmed that strain H19(T) was a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora. DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain H19(T) and the nearest Actinopolyspora species, A. halophila, was clearly below the 70 % threshold. The genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the organism represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora for which the name Actinopolyspora algeriensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain H19(T) (= DSM 45476(T) = CCUG 62415(T)).

  9. Biodegradation of nitrobenzene in a lysogeny broth medium by a novel halophilic bacterium Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Deng, Xinping; Wang, Jinjun; Chen, Yucheng; He, Lin; Sun, Yuchuan; Song, Caixia; Zhou, Zhifeng

    2014-12-15

    The Bacillus licheniformis strain YX2, a novel nitrobenzene-degrading halophilic bacterium, was isolated from active sludge obtained from a pesticide factory. Strain YX2 can withstand highly acidic and alkaline conditions and high temperatures. Degradation of nitrobenzene (200mgL(-1)) by YX2 exceeded 70% after 72h in lysogeny broth medium (pH 4-9). Under optimal degradation conditions (33°C, pH 7 in LB medium) YX2 degraded 50, 100, 200, and 600mgL(-1) nitrobenzene within 36, 36, 72, and 156h, respectively. Even in the presence of benzene, phenol or aniline, strain YX2 efficiently degraded nitrobenzene. Furthermore, strain YX2 completely degraded 600mgL(-1) nitrobenzene in 7% NaCl (w/w). Thus, our data show that strain YX2 may have promise for removing nitrobenzene from complex wastewaters with high salinity and variable pH.

  10. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chaoxiang; Junaid, Muhammad; Lu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Houjin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme. PMID:26562160

  11. On the Isolation of Halophilic Microorganisms from Salt Deposits of Great Geological Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Denner, Ewald; Orans, Robin (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    From salt sediments of Triassic or Permian ace from various locations in the world halophilic microorganisms were isolated. Molecular characteristics of several of the isolates suggested they belong to the archaebacteriae. One group appears to represent novel strains; several properties or one such isolate, strain BIp, are described here. The existence of viable microorganisms in ancient sediments would have great implications with respect to our notions on evolution, the search for life in extraterrestrial environments and the long- term survival of functional biological structures. Of crucial importance is thus the question if these microorganisms existed in the salt since the time of deposition or invaded at some later date. Some suggestions to address these issues experimentally are discussed.

  12. On the isolation of halophilic microorganisms from salt deposits of great geological age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Denner, Ewald

    1993-01-01

    From salt sediments of Triassic or Permian age from various locations in the world halophilic microorganisms were isolated. Molecular characteristics of several of the isolates suggested they belong to the archaebacteria. One group appears to represent novel strains; several properties of one such isolate, strain BIp, are described here. The existence of viable microorganisms in ancient sediment would have great implications with respect to our notions on evolution, the research for life in extraterrestrial environments, and the longterm survival of functional biological structures. Of crucial importance is thus the question if these microorganisms existed in the salt since the time of deposition or invaded at some later date. Some suggestions to address these issues experimentally are discussed.

  13. Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase) from a halophilic archaebacterium, Haloarcula vallismortis: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, V; Altekar, W

    1994-01-01

    Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase [EC 2.7.1.3]), detected for the first time in a prokaryote, i.e., the extreme halophile Haloarcula vallismortis, was isolated and characterized from the same archaebacterium. This enzyme was characterized with respect to its molecular mass, amino acid composition, salt dependency, immunological cross-reactivity, and kinetic properties. Gel filtration and sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed a native molecular mass of 100 kDa for halobacterial ketohexokinase, which is larger than its mammalian counterpart. The enzyme could be labeled by UV irradiation in the presence of [ gamma-32P]ATP, suggesting the involvement of a phosphoenzyme intermediate. Other catalytic features of the enzyme were similar to those of its mammalian counterparts. No antigenic cross-reactivity could be detected between the H. vallismortis ketohexokinase and the ketohexokinases from different rat tissues. Images PMID:8071229

  14. Bacillus chungangensis sp. nov., a halophilic species isolated from sea sand.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Lim; Jung, Min Young; Park, Mi-Hak; Kim, Wonyong

    2010-06-01

    The taxonomic position of a Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, halophilic strain, designated CAU 348(T), isolated from sea sand was investigated using a polyphasic approach. Colony morphology, biochemical tests and chemotaxonomic investigations revealed that strain CAU 348(T) had the characteristics of the genus Bacillus. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the organism formed a hitherto unknown subline within the genus Bacillus. Sequence divergence values of more than 4.3 % from other described Bacillus species, together with phenotypic differences, showed that the unidentified bacterium represents a previously unrecognized member of this genus. The genotypic and phenotypic data indicated that strain CAU 348(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus chungangensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CAU 348(T) (=KCTC 13566(T) =CCUG 57835(T)).

  15. Actinopolyspora biskrensis sp. nov., a novel halophilic actinomycete isolated from Northern Sahara.

    PubMed

    Saker, Rafika; Bouras, Noureddine; Meklat, Atika; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2015-03-01

    A novel halophilic, filamentous actinomycete, designated H254(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil sample collected from Biskra (Northern Sahara), and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic characterization. The strain is Gram-positive, aerobic, and halophilic, and the optimum NaCl concentration for growth is 15-20 % (w/v). The cell-wall hydrolysate contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, and the diagnostic whole-cell sugars were arabinose and galactose. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine, and MK-9(H4) was the predominant menaquinone. The major fatty acid profiles were anteiso-C17:0 (32.8 %), C15:0 (28 %), and iso-C17:0 (12.3 %). Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strain H254(T) formed a well-separated sub-branch within the radiation of the genus Actinopolyspora, and the microorganism was most closely related to Actinopolyspora saharensis DSM 45459(T) (99.2 %), Actinopolyspora halophila DSM 43834(T) (99.1 %), and Actinopolyspora algeriensis DSM 45476(T) (99.0 %). Nevertheless, the strain had relatively lower mean values for DNA-DNA relatedness with the above strains (57.2, 68.4, and 45.6 %, respectively). Based on phenotypic features and phylogenetic position, we propose that strain H254(T) represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora, for which the name Actinopolyspora biskrensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. biskrensis is strain H254(T) (=DSM 46684(T) =CECT 8576(T)).

  16. Halophilic class I aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: some salt-dependent structural features.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, G; Altekar, W

    1993-01-26

    Aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula vallismortis are stable only in high concentrations of KCl present within the physiological environment. Data concerning the structural changes in the two enzymes as a result of lowering of salt concentration and changes in pH were obtained by monitoring the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of quenchers. When the KCl concentrations were lowered below 2 M or in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, the emission maximum shifted to a longer wavelength, indicating enhanced exposure of tryptophyl residues to the solvent. The spectral characteristics of the two proteins in guanidine hydrochloride and 0.4 M KCl were identical. However, these denatured states appear to be different than those observed after acid denaturation. Further perturbation of fluorescence was observed due to I-, and application of the Stern-Volmer law showed that the total fluorescence was available to the quenchers only in 0.4 M KCl solutions. The unfolding of proteins in 0.4 M KCl was a gradual process which was accompanied by a time-dependent loss in enzyme activity. The activity loss was complete within 30 min for aldolase whereas in the case of GAPDH nearly 3 h was required for the destruction of activity. For both enzymes, inactivation and protein denaturation were strongly correlated. The data on activity and thermostability measurements of the two enzymes in varying concentrations of KCl and potassium phosphate revealed that though both proteins are halophilic, the forces in the maintenance of their stability could be different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Development of an enhanced chromosomal expression system based on porin synthesis operon for halophile Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jin; Fu, Xiao-Zhi; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2014-11-01

    Since halophile Halomonas spp. can grow contamination free in seawater under unsterile and continuous conditions, it holds great promise for industrial biotechnology to produce low-cost chemicals in an economic way. Yet, metabolic engineering methods are urgently needed for Halomonas spp. It is commonly known that chromosomal expression is more stable yet weaker than plasmid one is. To overcome this challenge, a novel chromosomal expression method was developed for halophile Halomonas TD01 and its derivatives based on a strongly expressed porin gene as a site for external gene integration. The gene of interest was inserted downstream the porin gene, forming an artificial operon porin-inserted gene. This chromosome expression system was proven functional by some examples: First, chromosomal expression of heterologous polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase gene phaC Re from Ralstonia eutropha completely restored the PHB accumulation level in endogenous phaC knockout mutant of Halomonas TD01. The integrated phaC Re was expressed at the highest level when inserted at the locus of porin compared with insertions in other chromosome locations. Second, an inducible expression system was constructed in phaC-deleted Halomonas TD01 by integrating the lac repressor gene (lacI) into the porin site in the host chromosome. The native porin promoter was inserted with the key 21 bp DNA of lac operator (lacO) sequence to become an inducible promoter encoded in a plasmid. This inducible system allowed on-off switch of gene expression in Halomonas TD strains. Thus, the stable and strong chromosomal expression method in Halomonas TD spp. was established.

  18. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  19. Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A

    2012-06-11

    Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

  20. Immobilization of halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease on functionalized silica nanoparticles and application in whey protein hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

    2015-04-01

    The present work targets the fabrication of an active, stable, reusable enzyme preparation using functionalized silica nanoparticles as an effective enzyme support for crude halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease. The immobilization efficiency under optimized conditions was 60%. Characterization of the immobilized preparation revealed marked increase in pH and thermal stability. It retained 80% of its original activity at 70 °C while t 1/2 at 50 °C showed a five-fold enhancement over that for the free protease. Kinetic constants K m and V max were indicative of a higher reaction velocity along with decreased affinity for substrate. The preparation could be efficiently reused up to 6 times and successfully hydrolysed whey proteins with high degree of hydrolysis. Immobilization of a crude halophilic protease on a nanobased scaffold makes the process cost effective and simple.

  1. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  2. Draft genome sequence of Halapricum salinum CBA1105(T), an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from solar salt.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye Seon; Lee, Hae-Won; Yim, Kyung June; Nam, Young-Do; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Hak-Jong; Seo, Myung-Ji; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kim, Daekyung; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Roh, Seong Woon

    2014-12-01

    Halapricum salinum CBA1105(T) (=KCTC 4202(T), JCM 19729(T)) is an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from solar salt in the Republic of Korea. We present the draft genome of CBA1105(T), which is assembled into 3 contigs containing 3,451,492bp with a G+C content of 63.7%. This is the first genome that has been sequenced in the genus Halapricum.

  3. Moderate views of abortion.

    PubMed

    Sumner, L W

    1997-01-01

    This essay offers a moderate view of abortion that imposes a time limit for unrestricted abortion and specific indications for later abortions. The introduction notes that the discussion will provide a defense for this policy based on a moral analysis but that other options for moderates, especially options provided by freestanding views (the defense of which does not rest on any prior commitment about the morality of abortion), will also be considered. The next section considers the moral status of the fetus grounded in a criterion of moral standing that stipulates the necessary characteristics to achieve moral standing. This discussion concludes that a fetus acquires moral standing only when it becomes sentient. Section 3 moves the argument from ethics to politics to prove that a moderate policy must place no limitations on abortion before the time the fetus becomes sentient because before that time the fetus has no interest for the state to protect. The final section notes that some pro-choice advocates may be happier with the moderate policy proposed than with its controversial defense based on the moral status of the fetus and that another defense of a moderate policy could be based on a finding that the ethical issue can not be decided and that no view about abortion ethics is more reasonable than any other. The essay concludes that the ethical debate is ultimately unavoidable.

  4. Purification and Characterization of a Polyextremophilic α -Amylase from an Obligate Halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides Isolate and Its Potential for Souse with Detergents.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Akbar, Ali; Anwar, Mohammad; Prasongsuk, Sehanat; Lotrakul, Pongtharin; Punnapayak, Hunsa

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular α-amylase from the obligate halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides TISTR3639 strain was produced and enriched to apparent homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sephadex G100 gel filtration column chromatography. The mass of the purified amylase was estimated to be 42 kDa by SDS-PAGE. With soluble starch as the substrate it had a specific activity of 118.42 U · mg(-1) and Vmax and Km values of 1.05 µmol · min(-1) · mg(-1) and 5.41 mg · mL(-1), respectively. The enzyme was found to have certain polyextremophilic characteristics, with an optimum activity at pH 9, 80 °C, and 300 g · L(-1) NaCl. The addition of CaCl2 at 2 mM was found to slightly enhance the amylase activity, while ZnCl2, FeCl2, or EDTA at 2 mM was strongly or moderately inhibitory, respectively, suggesting the requirement for a (non-Fe(2+) or Zn(2+)) divalent cation. The enzyme retained more than 80% of its activity when incubated with three different laundry detergents and had a better performance compared to a commercial amylase and three detergents in the presence of increasing NaCl concentrations up to 300 g · L(-1). Accordingly, it has a good potential for use as an α-amylase in a low water activity (high salt concentration) and at high pH and temperatures.

  5. Purification and Characterization of a Polyextremophilic α-Amylase from an Obligate Halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides Isolate and Its Potential for Souse with Detergents

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran; Akbar, Ali; Anwar, Mohammad; Prasongsuk, Sehanat; Lotrakul, Pongtharin; Punnapayak, Hunsa

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular α-amylase from the obligate halophilic Aspergillus penicillioides TISTR3639 strain was produced and enriched to apparent homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sephadex G100 gel filtration column chromatography. The mass of the purified amylase was estimated to be 42 kDa by SDS-PAGE. With soluble starch as the substrate it had a specific activity of 118.42 U·mg−1 and Vmax⁡ and Km values of 1.05 µmol·min−1·mg−1 and 5.41 mg·mL−1, respectively. The enzyme was found to have certain polyextremophilic characteristics, with an optimum activity at pH 9, 80°C, and 300 g·L−1 NaCl. The addition of CaCl2 at 2 mM was found to slightly enhance the amylase activity, while ZnCl2, FeCl2, or EDTA at 2 mM was strongly or moderately inhibitory, respectively, suggesting the requirement for a (non-Fe2+ or Zn2+) divalent cation. The enzyme retained more than 80% of its activity when incubated with three different laundry detergents and had a better performance compared to a commercial amylase and three detergents in the presence of increasing NaCl concentrations up to 300 g·L−1. Accordingly, it has a good potential for use as an α-amylase in a low water activity (high salt concentration) and at high pH and temperatures. PMID:26180787

  6. Effect of Biowaste Sludge Maturation on the Diversity of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea in an Anaerobic Reactor▿

    PubMed Central

    Goberna, M.; Insam, H.; Franke-Whittle, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Prokaryotic diversity was investigated near the inlet and outlet of a plug-flow reactor. After analyzing 800 clones, 50 bacterial and 3 archaeal phylogenetic groups were defined. Clostridia (>92%) dominated among bacteria and Methanoculleus (>90%) among archaea. Significant changes in pH and volatile fatty acids did not invoke a major shift in the phylogenetic groups. We suggest that the environmental filter imposed by the saline conditions (20 g liter−1) selected a stable community of halotolerant and halophilic prokaryotes. PMID:19218417

  7. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Tudor, J.J.

    1963-08-01

    An improved moderator structure for nuclear reactors consists of moderator blocks arranged in horizontal layers to form a multiplicity of vertically stacked columns of blocks. The blocks in each vertical column are keyed together, and a ceramic grid is disposed between each horizontal layer of blocks. Pressure plates cover- the lateral surface of the moderator structure in abutting relationship with the peripheral terminal lengths of the ceramic grids. Tubular springs are disposed between the pressure plates and a rigid external support. The tubular springs have their axes vertically disposed to facilitate passage of coolant gas through the springs and are spaced apart a selected distance such that at sonae preselected point of spring deflection, the sides of the springs will contact adjacent springs thereby causing a large increase in resistance to further spring deflection. (AEC)

  8. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  9. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  10. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  11. Moderators and Subgroups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, William A.

    1978-01-01

    The author suggests that it is more efficient to cluster subjects on the basis of their profiles across several dimensions of significance and to seek "between" subgroup correlates, than to search for a moderator variable "within" levels of which criterion relationships may vary in nonrandom fashion. (Author/RK)

  12. Role of trehalose in salinity and temperature tolerance in the model halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens.

    PubMed

    Reina-Bueno, Mercedes; Argandoña, Montserrat; Salvador, Manuel; Rodríguez-Moya, Javier; Iglesias-Guerra, Fernando; Csonka, Laszlo N; Nieto, Joaquín J; Vargas, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The disaccharide trehalose is considered as a universal stress molecule, protecting cells and biomolecules from injuries imposed by high osmolarity, heat, oxidation, desiccation and freezing. Chromohalobacter salexigens is a halophilic and extremely halotolerant γ-proteobacterium of the family Halomonadaceae. In this work, we have investigated the role of trehalose as a protectant against salinity, temperature and desiccation in C. salexigens. A mutant deficient in the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene (otsA::Ω) was not affected in its salt or heat tolerance, but double mutants ectoine- and trehalose-deficient, or hydroxyectoine-reduced and trehalose-deficient, displayed an osmo- and thermosensitive phenotype, respectively. This suggests a role of trehalose as a secondary solute involved in osmo- (at least at low salinity) and thermoprotection of C. salexigens. Interestingly, trehalose synthesis was osmoregulated at the transcriptional level, and thermoregulated at the post-transcriptional level, suggesting that C. salexigens cells need to be pre-conditioned by osmotic stress, in order to be able to quickly synthesize trehalose in response to heat stress. C. salexigens was more sensitive to desiccation than E. coli and desiccation tolerance was slightly improved when cells were grown at high temperature. Under these conditions, single mutants affected in the synthesis of trehalose or hydroxyectoine were more sensitive to desiccation than the wild-type strain. However, given the low survival rates of the wild type, the involvement of trehalose and hydroxyectoine in C. salexigens response to desiccation could not be firmly established.

  13. Actinopolyspora mzabensis sp. nov., a halophilic actinomycete isolated from an Algerian Saharan soil.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2013-10-01

    A halophilic actinomycete strain, designated H55(T), was isolated from Saharan soil sampled in the Mzab region (Ghardaïa, southern Algeria) and was characterized in a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach. The cell wall was determined to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid and the characteristic whole-cell sugars were arabinose and galactose. The predominant menaquinones were found to be MK-10(H4) and MK-9(H4). The predominant cellular fatty acids were determined to be anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine. The morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics of the strain were consistent with those of members of the genus Actinopolyspora, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis confirmed that strain H55(T) was a member of this genus. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain H55(T) and the type strains of the nearest species of the genus Actinopolyspora, Actinopolyspora erythraea and A. alba, were clearly below the 70 % threshold. The genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the organism represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora, for which the name Actinopolyspora mzabensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain H55(T) ( = DSM 45460(T) = CCUG 62965(T)).

  14. Characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH12) from Haloarcula marismortui, an extreme halophile from the Dead Sea.

    PubMed

    Timpson, Leanne M; Alsafadi, Diya; Mac Donnchadha, Cillín; Liddell, Susan; Sharkey, Michael A; Paradisi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Haloarchaeal alcohol dehydrogenases are of increasing interest as biocatalysts in the field of white biotechnology. In this study, the gene adh12 from the extreme halophile Haloarcula marismortui (HmADH12), encoding a 384 residue protein, was cloned into two vectors: pRV1 and pTA963. The resulting constructs were used to transform host strains Haloferax volcanii (DS70) and (H1209), respectively. Overexpressed His-tagged recombinant HmADH12 was purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). The His-tagged protein was visualized by SDS-PAGE, with a subunit molecular mass of 41.6 kDa, and its identity was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Purified HmADH12 catalyzed the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes and ketones, being optimally active in the presence of 2 M KCl. It was thermoactive, with maximum activity registered at 60°C. The NADP(H) dependent enzyme was haloalkaliphilic for the oxidative reaction with optimum activity at pH 10.0. It favored a slightly acidic pH of 6.0 for catalysis of the reductive reaction. HmADH12 was significantly more tolerant than mesophilic ADHs to selected organic solvents, making it a much more suitable biocatalyst for industrial application.

  15. Phenol degradation by halophilic fungal isolate JS4 and evaluation of its tolerance of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Shang, Yu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-02-01

    Phenol is one of the most common pollutants in many kinds of industrial wastewater, some of which are in high salinity, resulting in more difficulties of biodegradation. In this work, a halophilic strain capable of utilizing phenol as sole source of carbon and energy in both hypersaline and no-salt media was isolated and identified as genus Debaryomyces. The optimization of environmental parameters including phenol concentration, pH, dissolved oxygen as well as salinity was carried out and tolerance of heavy metals by the strain was evaluated. The strain Debaryomyces sp. was able to grow in culture when initial phenol concentration, pH, agitation and salinity were at wide ranges (0-1200 mg L(-1), 4.0-10.0, 50-200 rpm, 0 %-15 %, respectively). High removal efficiency was hardly affected in the presence of 5 mM of Zn (II) and Mn (II). Under optimal conditions (pH 6.0, 200 rpm, 1 % of salinity without heavy metals), 500 mg L(-1) of phenol could be completely degraded within 32 h. The high removal efficiency of phenol by the strain with significant variations of process parameters might contribute to the bioremediation of phenol-polluted environments under hypersaline or no-salt conditions.

  16. Production and Characterization of α-Amylase from an Extremely Halophilic Archaeon, Haloferax sp. HA10

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Bhakti; Chaudhary, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Haloarchaea are found at very high concentrations in salt-conditioned environments, hence produce enzymes which are able to catalyze reactions under harsh conditions, typical of many industrial processes. In the present study, culture conditions for extracellular amylase production from Haloarchaea isolated from a solar saltern were optimized and the purified enzyme was characterized. Haloferax sp. HA10 showed maximum amylase production at 3 M NaCl, 37 °C, pH=7 and 1% starch content. Purified α-amylase was a calcium-dependent enzyme with an estimated molecular mass of about 66 kDa and many industrially useful properties. It was found to be stable in a broad range of pH (from 5 to 9) and NaCl concentrations (from 0.5 to 3.0 M), retaining 48% activity even at 4 M. The optimal temperature for Haloferax sp. HA10 amylase activity was 55 °C (99% activity), and 57% activity was retained at 80 °C, which dropped to 44% with the increase of temperature to 90 or 100 °C. It was able to sustain various surfactants and detergents. To the best of our knowledge the detergent-stable α-amylases from halophilic archaeon have not been reported yet. PMID:27904327

  17. Mutations in DNA gyrase result in novobiocin resistance in halophilic archaebacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, M L; Dyall-Smith, M L

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a cloning vector for use in halophilic archaebacteria which has a novobiocin resistance determinant as a selectable marker. The resistance determinant, which was derived from the genome of a resistant mutant strain, was mapped to a site within a 6.7-kb DNA clone by using a recombination assay and was sequenced. An open reading frame of 1.920 nucleotides (640 amino acids) was identified, with the predicted protein being highly homologous to the DNA gyrase B subunit (i.e., GyrB) of eubacteria. Three mutations were identified in the GyrB protein of the resistant mutant compared with the wild type (at amino acids 82, 122, and 137) which together enable Haloferax cells to grow in concentrations of novobiocin some 1,000 times higher than that possible for cells carrying only the wild-type enzyme. One base beyond the stop codon of gyrB was the start of gyrA, coding for the gyrase A subunit. Images PMID:1846146

  18. Comparative Proteomic Insights into the Lactate Responses of Halophilic Salinicoccus roseus W12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Limin; Yang, Han; Cai, Yumeng; Sun, Lifan; Xue, Yanfen; Yu, Bo; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Extremophiles use adaptive mechanisms to survive in extreme environments, which is of great importance for several biotechnological applications. A halophilic strain, Salinicoccus roseus W12, was isolated from salt lake in Inner Mongolia, China in this study. The ability of the strain to survive under high sodium conditions (including 20% sodium lactate or 25% sodium chloride, [w/v]) made it an ideal host to screen for key factors related to sodium lactate resistance. The proteomic responses to lactate were studied using W12 cells cultivated with or without lactate stress. A total of 1,656 protein spots in sodium lactate-treated culture and 1,843 spots in NaCl-treated culture were detected by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and 32 of 120 significantly altered protein spots (fold change > 2, p < 0.05) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among 21 successfully identified spots, 19 proteins were upregulated and 2 were downregulated. The identified proteins are mainly involved in metabolism, cellular processes and signaling, and information storage and processing. Transcription studies confirmed that most of the encoding genes were upregulated after the cells were exposed to lactate in 10 min. Cross-protecting and energy metabolism-related proteins played an important role in lactate tolerance for S. roseus W12. PMID:26358621

  19. Accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates by halophilic archaea isolated from traditional solar salterns of India.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, Bhakti B; Mani, Kabilan; Bragança, Judith Maria

    2013-09-01

    Extremely halophilic archaeal isolates obtained from brine and sediment samples of solar salterns of Goa and Tamil Nadu, India were screened for accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Seven polymer accumulating haloarchaeal strains (TN4, TN5, TN6, TN7, TN9, TN10 and BBK2) were selected based on their growth and intensity of fluorescence when grown on 20 % NaCl synthetic medium supplemented with 2 % glucose and incorporated with Nile red dye. The polymer was quantified by conversion of PHA to crotonic acid which gave a characteristic absorption maxima at 235 nm. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characterization the cultures TN4, TN5, TN6, TN7, TN10 and BBK2 were grouped under genus Haloferax whereas isolate TN9 was grouped under the genus Halogeometricum. Growth kinetics and polymer accumulation studies revealed that the culture Halogeometricum borinquense strain TN9 accumulates PHA maximally at the mid-log phase, i.e. 5th day of growth (approx. 14 wt% PHA of CDW). Analysis of the polymer by IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR confirmed it to be a homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  20. Low water activity induces the production of bioactive metabolites in halophilic and halotolerant fungi.

    PubMed

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2010-12-27

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  1. Resistance of extremely halophilic archaea to zinc and zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Bhakti B.; Das, Deepthi; Bragança, Judith Maria

    2016-02-01

    Industrialization as well as other anthropogenic activities have resulted in addition of high loads of metal and/or metal nanoparticles to the environment. In this study, the effect of one of the widely used heavy metal, zinc (Zn) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on extremely halophilic archaea was evaluated. One representative member from four genera namely Halococcus, Haloferax, Halorubrum and Haloarcula of the family Halobacteriaceae was taken as the model organism. All the haloarchaeal genera investigated were resistant to both ZnCl2 and ZnO NPs at varying concentrations. Halococcus strain BK6 and Haloferax strain BBK2 showed the highest resistance in complex/minimal medium of up to 2.0/1.0 mM ZnCl2 and 2.0/1.0-0.5 mM ZnO NP. Accumulation of ZnCl2/ZnO NPs was seen as Haloferax strain BBK2 (287.2/549.6 mg g-1) > Halococcus strain BK6 (165.9/388.5 mg g-1) > Haloarcula strain BS2 (93.2/28.5 mg g-1) > Halorubrum strain BS17 (29.9/16.2 mg g-1). Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analysis revealed that bulk ZnCl2 was sorbed at a higher concentration (21.77 %) on the cell surface of Haloferax strain BBK2 as compared to the ZnO NPs (14.89 %).

  2. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M.; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 “prebiotic” α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a “foldable set”—that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides? If so, what (if any) characteristic properties might such polypeptides exhibit? To investigate these questions, two “primitive” versions of an extant protein fold (the β-trefoil) were produced by top-down symmetric deconstruction, resulting in a reduced alphabet size of 12 or 13 amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a substantial acidification of pI and require high salt concentrations for cooperative folding. The results suggest that the prebiotic amino acids do comprise a foldable set within the halophile environment. PMID:23341608

  3. Haloferax larsenii sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a solar saltern.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue-Wei; Wu, Yue-Hong; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Oren, Aharon; Zhou, Pei-Jin; Wu, Min

    2007-04-01

    Three strains of Gram-negative, aerobic, neutrophilic, extremely halophilic archaea, designated ZJ206(T), ZJ203 and ZJ204, were isolated from a solar saltern in Zhe-Jiang Province, China. Phenotypically and on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the strains were very similar. Comparative 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed 96.4-97.4 % sequence similarity to members of the genus Haloferax. The major polar lipids were C(20)C(20) derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, diglycosyl glycerol diether and sulfated diglycosyl diether. The DNA G+C content of strain ZJ206(T) was 62.2 mol%. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of the isolates from closely related species. Therefore the isolates should be classified as members of a novel species, for which the name Haloferax larsenii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ZJ206(T) (=CGMCC 1.5347(T)=JCM 13917(T)).

  4. Low Water Activity Induces the Production of Bioactive Metabolites in Halophilic and Halotolerant Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:21339946

  5. Bactericidal effect of lactoferrin and lactoferrin chimera against halophilic Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; de la Garza, Mireya; Reyes-Lopez, Magda; Zazueta-Beltran, Jorge; Nazmi, Kamran; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Bolscher, Jan G

    2009-01-01

    Infections caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an halophilic member of the genus Vibrio, have increased globally in the last 5 years. Diarrhea caused by V. parahaemolyticus results from eating raw or undercooked seafood. The aim of this work was to investigate whether lactoferrin and some lactoferrin-peptides have bactericidal activity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802, the pandemic strain O3:K6, and the multidrug resistant isolate 727, as well as against Vibrio cholerae strains O1 and non-O1. Whereas both peptides lactoferricin (17-30) and lactoferrampin (265-284) did not have bactericidal activity, 40 microM of lactoferrin chimera (a fusion of the two peptides) inhibited the growth of all Vibrio tested to the same extent as the antibiotic gentamicin. The cidal effect of LFchimera showed a clear concentration response in contrast to bovine lactoferrin which showed higher inhibition at 10 microM than at 40 microM. FITC-labeled LFchimera bound to the bacterial membranes. Moreover LFchimera permeabilized bacterial cells and membranes were seriously damaged. Finally, in experiments with the multidrug resistant isolate 727, sub-lethal doses of LFchimera strongly reduced the concentrations of ampicillin, gentamicin or kanamicin needed to reach more than 95% growth inhibition, suggesting synergistic effects. These data indicate that LFchimera is a potential candidate to combat the multidrug resistant pathogenic Vibrio species.

  6. Deciphering the Translation Initiation Factor 5A Modification Pathway in Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Michael; Blaby, Ian K.; Makkay, Andrea M.; Starosta, Agata L.; Papke, R. Thane; Oshima, Tairo; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation factor 5A (IF5A) is essential and highly conserved in Eukarya (eIF5A) and Archaea (aIF5A). The activity of IF5A requires hypusine, a posttranslational modification synthesized in Eukarya from the polyamine precursor spermidine. Intracellular polyamine analyses revealed that agmatine and cadaverine were the main polyamines produced in Haloferax volcanii in minimal medium, raising the question of how hypusine is synthesized in this halophilic Archaea. Metabolic reconstruction led to a tentative picture of polyamine metabolism and aIF5A modification in Hfx. volcanii that was experimentally tested. Analysis of aIF5A from Hfx. volcanii by LC-MS/MS revealed it was exclusively deoxyhypusinylated. Genetic studies confirmed the role of the predicted arginine decarboxylase gene (HVO_1958) in agmatine synthesis. The agmatinase-like gene (HVO_2299) was found to be essential, consistent with a role in aIF5A modification predicted by physical clustering evidence. Recombinant deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) from S. cerevisiae was shown to transfer 4-aminobutyl moiety from spermidine to aIF5A from Hfx. volcanii in vitro. However, at least under conditions tested, this transfer was not observed with the Hfx. volcanii DHS. Furthermore, the growth of Hfx. volcanii was not inhibited by the classical DHS inhibitor GC7. We propose a model of deoxyhypusine synthesis in Hfx. volcanii that differs from the canonical eukaryotic pathway, paving the way for further studies. PMID:28053595

  7. Thermostable alkaline halophilic-protease production by Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18.

    PubMed

    Selim, Samy; Hagagy, Nashwa; Abdel Aziz, Mohamed; El-Meleigy, El Syaed; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the production and biochemical characterisation of a thermostable alkaline halophilic protease from Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18 (HQ658997), isolated from soda Lake of Wadi An-Natrun, Egypt. The enzyme was concentrated by spinning through a centriplus, centrifugal ultrafiltration Millipore membrane with a total yield of 25%. The relative molecular mass of this protease determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ranged from 67 to 43 kDa. The extracellular protease of N. innermongolicus WN18 was dependent on high salt concentrations for activity and stability, and it had an optimum temperature of 60°C in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl. This enzyme was stable in a broad pH range (6-12) with an optimum pH of 9-10 for azocasein hydrolysis. This extracellular protease, therefore, could be defined as thermostable and haloalkaliphilic with distinct properties that make the enzyme applicable for different industrial purposes.

  8. Haloferax sulfurifontis sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon isolated from a sulfide- and sulfur-rich spring.

    PubMed

    Elshahed, Mostafa S; Savage, Kristen N; Oren, Aharon; Gutierrez, M Carmen; Ventosa, Antonio; Krumholz, Lee R

    2004-11-01

    A pleomorphic, extremely halophilic archaeon (strain M6(T)) was isolated from a sulfide- and sulfur-rich spring in south-western Oklahoma (USA). It formed small (0.8-1.0 mm), salmon pink, elevated colonies on agar medium. The strain grew in a wide range of NaCl concentrations (6 % to saturation) and required at least 1 mM Mg(2+) for growth. Strain M6(T) was able to reduce sulfur to sulfide anaerobically. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain M6(T) belongs to the family Halobacteriaceae, genus Haloferax; it showed 96.7-98.0 % similarity to other members of the genus with validly published names and 89 % similarity to Halogeometricum borinquense, its closest relative outside the genus Haloferax. Polar lipid analysis and DNA G+C content further supported placement of strain M6(T) in the genus Haloferax. DNA-DNA hybridization values, as well as biochemical and physiological characterization, allowed strain M6(T) to be differentiated from other members of the genus Haloferax. A novel species, Haloferax sulfurifontis sp. nov., is therefore proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is M6(T) (=JCM 12327(T)=CCM 7217(T)=DSM 16227(T)=CIP 108334(T)).

  9. The sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA confirms the specific relationship between the extreme halophiles and the Methanomicrobiales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Ching, A.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the sequence of the 23S rRNA from the methanogenic archaeon Methanospirillum hungatei. This is the first such sequence from a member of the Methanomicrobiales. Moreover, it brings additional evidence to bear on the possible specific relationship between this particular group of methanogens and the extreme halophiles. Such evidence is critical in that several new (and relatively untested) methods of phylogenetic inference have lead to the controversial conclusion that the extreme halophiles are either not related to the archaea, or are only peripherally so. Analysis of the Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA sequence shows the Methanomicrobiales are indeed a sister group of the extreme halophiles, further strengthening the conclusions reached from analysis of 16S rRNA sequences.

  10. Neptunium(V) Adsorption to Bacteria at Low and High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, D.; Swanson, J. S.; Reed, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO2+ aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, interacts weakly with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface containment. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO2+) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacteria/Np mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria used were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. The observed adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities and differences in the characteristics of the moieties between the cell walls of common gram-negative soil and halophilic bacteria. Moreover, differences in adsorption behavior may also reflect ionic

  11. Investigating the Effects of Simulated Space conditions on Novel Extremely Halophilic Archaea: Halovarius Luteus gen. nov., sp. nov.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshangsaz, Niloofar; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Nazmi, Kamran; Semsarha, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Studying halophiles from different environments of Earth provide new insights into our search for life in the universe. Haloarchaea show some unique characteristics and physiological adaptations like acidic proteins against harsh environments such as natural brine with salt concentration approaching saturation (5 M) and regions with low active water. These properties make haloarchaea interesting candidate for astrobiological studies. Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov. a novel extremely halophilic archaeon from Urmia salt lake, in Iran has been chosen to explore its resistance against a series of extreme conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the resistance of strain DA50T under the effects of simulated space conditions like simulated microgravity, hypergravity, and desiccation. In this paper we will discuss the results of these studies where we specifically focus on changes in carotenoid pigments production and whole cell proteome. This is the first report of very novel Iranian archaea in response to extreme space conditions. The pigments were extracted by acetone and methanol. Pigments were analyzed by scanning the absorbance spectrum in the UV-VIS spectrophotometer. And they were separated by TLC. Whole protein from cell lysate supernatant was extracted after lysis with Bacterial Protein Extraction Reagent and fractionated by RP-HPLC using C18 column. Proteome analyzed by electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and MALDI-TOF. Carotenoid pigments are formed under different extreme conditions such as dry environment and gravitational changes. Also the protein composition exhibits alterations after exposure to the same conditions. Our conclusion is that pigments and proteins formation depend on the growth circumstances. Halophiles use this as an adaptation to survive under different environmental conditions.

  12. Complete Biosynthetic Pathway of the C50 Carotenoid Bacterioruberin from Lycopene in the Extremely Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Ando, Ai; Miyoko, Nobuhiro; Fukui, Toshiaki; Takaichi, Shinichi; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon that requires high concentrations of NaCl for growth, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). By homology analysis, a gene cluster, including c0507, c0506, and c0505, was found and predicted to be involved in the synthesis of bacterioruberin. To elucidate the function of the encoded enzymes, we constructed Ha. japonica mutants of these genes and analyzed carotenoids produced by the mutants. Our research showed that c0507, c0506, and c0505 encoded a carotenoid 3,4-desaturase (CrtD), a bifunctional lycopene elongase and 1,2-hydratase (LyeJ), and a C50 carotenoid 2″,3″-hydratase (CruF), respectively. The above three carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes catalyze the reactions that convert lycopene to bacterioruberin in Ha. japonica. This is the first identification of functional CrtD and CruF in archaea and elucidation of the complete biosynthetic pathway of bacterioruberin from lycopene. IMPORTANCE Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). In this study, we have identified three BR biosynthetic enzymes and have elucidated their functions. Among them, two enzymes were found in an archaeon for the first time. Our results revealed the biosynthetic pathway responsible for production of BR in Ha. japonica and provide a basis for investigating carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in other extremely halophilic archaea. Elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in Ha. japonica may also prove useful for producing the C50 carotenoid BR efficiently by employing genetically modified haloarchaeal strains. PMID:25712483

  13. Investigating the Effects of Simulated Martian Ultraviolet Radiation on Halococcus dombrowskii and Other Extremely Halophilic Archaebacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Bérces, Attila; Lammer, Helmut; Musso, Maurizio; Rontó, György; Polacsek, Tatjana K.; Holzinger, Anita; Kolb, Christoph; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2011-01-01

    The isolation of viable extremely halophilic archaea from 250-million-year-old rock salt suggests the possibility of their long-term survival under desiccation. Since halite has been found on Mars and in meteorites, haloarchaeal survival of martian surface conditions is being explored. Halococcus dombrowskii H4 DSM 14522T was exposed to UV doses over a wavelength range of 200–400 nm to simulate martian UV flux. Cells embedded in a thin layer of laboratory-grown halite were found to accumulate preferentially within fluid inclusions. Survival was assessed by staining with the LIVE/DEAD kit dyes, determining colony-forming units, and using growth tests. Halite-embedded cells showed no loss of viability after exposure to about 21 kJ/m2, and they resumed growth in liquid medium with lag phases of 12 days or more after exposure up to 148 kJ/m2. The estimated D37 (dose of 37 % survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii was ≥ 400 kJ/m2. However, exposure of cells to UV flux while in liquid culture reduced D37 by 2 orders of magnitude (to about 1 kJ/m2); similar results were obtained with Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 and Haloarcula japonica. The absorption of incoming light of shorter wavelength by color centers resulting from defects in the halite crystal structure likely contributed to these results. Under natural conditions, haloarchaeal cells become embedded in salt upon evaporation; therefore, dispersal of potential microscopic life within small crystals, perhaps in dust, on the surface of Mars could resist damage by UV radiation. PMID:19215203

  14. Actinopolyspora righensis sp. nov., a novel halophilic actinomycete isolated from Saharan soil in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2013-09-01

    A novel halophilic actinomycete strain, H23(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil sample collected in Djamâa (Oued Righ region), El-Oued province, South Algeria. Strain H23(T) was identified as a member of the genus Actinopolyspora by a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis showed that strain H23(T) had 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities ranging from 97.8 % (Actinopolyspora xinjiangensis TRM 40136(T)) to 94.8 % (Actinopolyspora mortivallis DSM 44261(T)). The strain grew optimally at pH 6.0-7.0, 28-32 °C and in the presence of 15-25 % (w/v) NaCl. The substrate mycelium was well developed and fragmented with age. The aerial mycelium produced long, straight or flexuous spore chains with non-motile, smooth-surfaced and rod-shaped spores. Strain H23(T) had MK-10 (H4) and MK-9 (H4) as the predominant menaquinones. The whole micro-organism hydrolysates mainly consisted of meso-diaminopimelic acid, galactose and arabinose. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C17:0 (37.4 %), iso-C17:0 (14.8 %), iso-C15:0 (14.2 %), and iso-C16:0 (13.9 %). The genotypic and phenotypic data show that the strain represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora, for which the name Actinopolyspora righensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain H23(T) (=DSM 45501(T) = CCUG 63368(T) = MTCC 11562(T)).

  15. Actinopolyspora saharensis sp. nov., a novel halophilic actinomycete isolated from a Saharan soil of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2013-04-01

    A novel halophilic actinomycete, strain H32(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil sample collected in El-Oued province, south Algeria. The isolate was characterized by means of polyphasic taxonomy. Optimal growth was determined to occur at 28-32 °C, pH 6.0-7.0 and in the presence of 15-25 % (w/v) NaCl. The strain was observed to produce abundant aerial mycelium, which formed long chains of rod-shaped spores at maturity, and fragmented substrate mycelium. The cell wall was determined to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid and the characteristic whole-cell sugars were arabinose and galactose. The predominant menaquinones were found to be MK-10(H4) and MK-9(H4). The predominant cellular fatty acids were determined to be anteiso C17:0, iso-C15:0 and iso-C16:0. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that this strain formed a distinct phyletic line within the radiation of the genus Actinopolyspora. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity indicated that strain H32(T) was most closely related to 'Actinopolyspora algeriensis' DSM 45476(T) (98.8 %) and Actinopolyspora halophila DSM 43834(T) (98.5 %). Furthermore, the result of DNA-DNA hybridization between strain H32(T) and the type strains 'A. algeriensis' DSM 45476(T), A. halophila DSM 43834(T) and Actinopolyspora mortivallis DSM 44261(T) demonstrated that this isolate represents a different genomic species in the genus Actinopolyspora. Moreover, the physiological and biochemical data allowed the differentiation of strain H32(T) from its closest phylogenetic neighbours. Therefore, it is proposed that strain H32(T) represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora, for which the name Actinopolyspora saharensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H32(T) (=DSM 45459(T)=CCUG 62966(T)).

  16. Streptomonospora algeriensis sp. nov., a halophilic actinomycete isolated from soil in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Riba, Amar; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Rohde, Manfred; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2014-08-01

    A halophilic actinomycete strain, designated H27(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from a hypersaline habitat in Djelfa Province (North-Central Algeria), and then investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The strain was observed to produce poor aerial mycelium, which formed short chains of oval to cylindrical-shaped spores at maturity, and non fragmented substrate mycelium. The optimum NaCl concentration for growth was found to be 10-15 % (w/v) and the optimum growth temperature and pH were found to be 28-37 °C and 6-7, respectively. The diagnostic diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was identified as meso-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant menaquinones of strain H27(T) were identified as MK-11 (H4) and MK-10 (H6). The major fatty acids were found to be iso-C16:0, anteiso-C17:0, 10 methyl C17:0 and 10 methyl C16:0. The diagnostic phospholipids detected were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The chemotaxonomic properties of strain H27(T) are consistent with those shared by members of the genus Streptomonospora. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain H27(T) is most closely related to Streptomonospora alba DSM 44588(T) (98.8 %) and Streptomonospora flavalba DSM 45155(T) (98.7 %) whereas the DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain H27(T) and the two type strains were 17.1 and 57.9 %, respectively. Based on the combined genotypic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that strain H27(T) should be classified as representative of a novel species, for which the name Streptomonospora algeriensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H27(T) (=DSM 45604(T) =CCUG 63369(T) =MTCC 11563(T)).

  17. Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis sp. nov., an extremely halophilic actinomycete isolated from Algerian Saharan soil.

    PubMed

    Meklat, Atika; Bouras, Noureddine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Mathieu, Florence; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-04-01

    A novel halophilic actinomycete, strain designated H53(T), was isolated from a Saharan soil sample collected from Chaâbet Ntissa, Béni-isguen, Ghardaïa (South of Algeria) and was characterized taxonomically by means of polyphasic approach. Optimal growth was found to occur at 30-35 °C, pH 6-7 and in the presence of 15-25% (w/v) NaCl. The strain was observed to produce abundant aerial mycelium, which formed long chains of rod-shaped spores at maturity, and well developed and fragmented substrate mycelium. The cell wall was determined to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid; the diagnostic whole-cell sugars were arabinose and galactose. The predominant menaquinones were found to be MK-9(H₄) and MK-9(H₆). The predominant cellular fatty acids were determined to be iso- and anteiso-C17:0, iso-C15:0, and cis9 iso-C17:1. The diagnostic phospholipid detected was phosphatidylcholine. The morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics of the strain were consistent with those of members of the genus Saccharopolyspora. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence showed that this strain formed a distinct phyletic line within the radiation of the genus Saccharopolyspora. The 16S rRNA sequence similarities between strain H53(T) and other members of the genus Saccharopolyspora ranged from 92.1 to 94.3%. The DNA G+C content of strain H53(T) was 72.6%. The genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the strain H53(T) represents a novel species of the genus Saccharopolyspora, for which the name Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain H53(T) (=DSM 45606(T)=CCUG 63370(T)=CECT 8304(T)).

  18. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from the halophilic cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Asami, S; Takabe, T; Akazawa, T; Codd, G A

    1983-09-01

    Various structural and functional properties of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) isolated from the halophilic cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Aphanothece halophytica were reexamined. The ready dissociation of this algal RuBisCO during sedimentation in a linear sucrose density gradient was observed. Low NaCl concentrations promote the dissociation of small subunit (B) from the original native enzyme molecule as evidenced by the sucrose density gradient centrifugation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It is thus possible that the intracellular osmoticum of A. halophytica might influence the structural integrity and activity of RuBisCO. The low residual carboxylase activity ascribed to the catalytic core, an oligomer form of the large subunit (A) apparently deficient in small subunit (B), was found to be markedly stimulated by a protein component which appears identical to subunit B. The purification and structural characterization of the catalytic core and subunit B were attempted by step-wise column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Utrogel AcA 34, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite, and at the final stage each component was purified to near homogeneity, although the catalytic core is still associated with a small quantity of subunit B. The addition of subunit B to the catalytic core does not alter the Km (HCO-3, RuBP) values, but Vmax values are markedly enhanced. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation gave a value of 16 S for the catalytic core. The molecular weights of the monomeric forms of the catalytic core (subunit A) and subunit B were 5.0 X 10(4) and 1.4 X 10(4), respectively.

  19. Amycolatopsis flava sp. nov., a halophilic actinomycete isolated from Dead Sea.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaomin; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Xiu; Jiang, Yi; Lai, Hangxian

    2015-10-01

    A novel halophilic, filamentous actinomycete, designated strain AFM 10111(T), was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Dead Sea of Israel and its taxonomic position was established by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The isolate grew at 20-35 °C, pH 5-12 and with 1-30 % NaCl. The substrate mycelium is white or yellow, well developed, branched and fragments into squarish, rod-like elements. The isolate contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as cell-wall diamino acid, and arabinose and galactose as whole-cell sugars. The major menaquinone was MK-9(H4). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine phosphatidylmethylethanolamine and one unidentified phospholipid. Major fatty acids were iso-C16:0, iso-C16:1 H, C17:1 ω6c. The DNA G + C content was 67.7 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain AFM 10111(T) belongs to the genus Amycolatopsis, and formed a distinct clade with Amycolatopsis marina CGMCC 4.3568(T) and Amycolatopsis palatopharyngis CGMCC 4.1729(T), with the sequence similarity 98.4 and 98.6 %. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the strain AFM 10111(T) and A. marina CGMCC 4.3568(T) and A. palatopharyngis CGMCC 4.1729(T) were 46.9 ± 3.08 and 49.4 ± 1.25 %. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data indicate that strain AFM 10111(T) represents a novel species of the genus Amycolatopsis, for which the name Amycolatopsis flava sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AFM 10111(T) (= DSM 46658(T) = CGMCC 4.7123(T)).

  20. Deciphering the role of multiple betaine-carnitine-choline transporters in the Halophile Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Ongagna-Yhombi, Serge Y; McDonald, Nathan D; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophile that is the predominant cause of bacterial seafood-related gastroenteritis worldwide. To survive in the marine environment, V. parahaemolyticus must have adaptive strategies to cope with salinity changes. Six putative compatible solute (CS) transport systems were previously predicted from the genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633. In this study, we determined the role of the four putative betaine-carnitine-choline transporter (BCCT) homologues VP1456, VP1723, VP1905, and VPA0356 in the NaCl stress response. Expression analysis of the four BCCTs subjected to NaCl upshock showed that VP1456, VP1905, and VPA0356, but not VP1723, were induced. We constructed in-frame single-deletion mutant strains for all four BCCTs, all of which behaved similarly to the wild-type strain, demonstrating a redundancy of the systems. Growth analysis of a quadruple mutant and four BCCT triple mutants demonstrated the requirement for at least one BCCT for efficient CS uptake. We complemented Escherichia coli MHK13, a CS synthesis- and transporter-negative strain, with each BCCT and examined CS uptake by growth analysis and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses. These data demonstrated that VP1456 had the most diverse substrate transport ability, taking up glycine betaine (GB), proline, choline, and ectoine. VP1456 was the sole ectoine transporter. In addition, the data demonstrated that VP1723 can transport GB, proline, and choline, whereas VP1905 and VPA0356 transported only GB. Overall, the data showed that the BCCTs are functional and that there is redundancy among them.

  1. Investigating the effects of simulated martian ultraviolet radiation on Halococcus dombrowskii and other extremely halophilic archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Bérces, Attila; Lammer, Helmut; Musso, Maurizio; Rontó, György; Polacsek, Tatjana K; Holzinger, Anita; Kolb, Christoph; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2009-01-01

    The isolation of viable extremely halophilic archaea from 250-million-year-old rock salt suggests the possibility of their long-term survival under desiccation. Since halite has been found on Mars and in meteorites, haloarchaeal survival of martian surface conditions is being explored. Halococcus dombrowskii H4 DSM 14522(T) was exposed to UV doses over a wavelength range of 200-400 nm to simulate martian UV flux. Cells embedded in a thin layer of laboratory-grown halite were found to accumulate preferentially within fluid inclusions. Survival was assessed by staining with the LIVE/DEAD kit dyes, determining colony-forming units, and using growth tests. Halite-embedded cells showed no loss of viability after exposure to about 21 kJ/m(2), and they resumed growth in liquid medium with lag phases of 12 days or more after exposure up to 148 kJ/m(2). The estimated D(37) (dose of 37 % survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii was > or = 400 kJ/m(2). However, exposure of cells to UV flux while in liquid culture reduced D(37) by 2 orders of magnitude (to about 1 kJ/m(2)); similar results were obtained with Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 and Haloarcula japonica. The absorption of incoming light of shorter wavelength by color centers resulting from defects in the halite crystal structure likely contributed to these results. Under natural conditions, haloarchaeal cells become embedded in salt upon evaporation; therefore, dispersal of potential microscopic life within small crystals, perhaps in dust, on the surface of Mars could resist damage by UV radiation.

  2. Lentibacillus kimchii sp. nov., an extremely halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented vegetable.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Lee, Jong Hee; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Roh, Seong Woon; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile and extremely halophilic bacterial strain, designated K9(T), was isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented food. The strain was observed as endospore-forming rod-shaped cells showing oxidase and catalase activity. It was found to grow at 10.0-30.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 15.0-20.0 %), pH 7.0-8.0 (optimum, pH 7.5) and 15-40 °C (optimum, 30 °C). The polar lipids of strain K9(T) were identified as phosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids and an unidentified glycolipid. The isoprenoid quinone was identified as menaquinone-7. The major cellular fatty acids (>20 % of the total) were found to be anteisio-C15:0 and anteisio-C17:0. The cell wall peptidoglycan composition was determined to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G + C content of genomic DNA was determined to be 48.2 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the isolated strain is closely related to Lentibacillus salinarum AHS-1(T) (96.7 % sequence similarity). Based on its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain K9(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Lentibacillus, for which the name Lentibacillus kimchii sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is K9(T) (=KACC 18490(T) = JCM 30234(T)).

  3. Structural characterization of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating glycoproteins of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Lin, Chia-Wei; Aebi, Markus; Eichler, Jerry; Guerardel, Yann

    2016-07-01

    N-Glycosylation is a post-translational modification performed in all three domains of life. In the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii, glycoproteins such as the S-layer glycoprotein are modified by an N-linked pentasaccharide assembled by a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins. In the present study, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to define the structure of this glycan attached to at least four of the seven putative S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation sites, namely Asn-13, Asn-83, Asn-274 and Asn-279. Such approaches detected a trisaccharide corresponding to glucuronic acid (GlcA)-β1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, a tetrasaccharide corresponding to methyl-O-4-GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, and a pentasaccharide corresponding to hexose-1,2-[methyl-O-4-]GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, with previous MS and radiolabeling experiments showing the hexose at the non-reducing end of the pentasaccharide to be mannose. The present analysis thus corrects the earlier assignment of the penultimate sugar as a methyl ester of a hexuronic acid, instead revealing this sugar to be a methylated GlcA. The assignments made here are in good agreement with what was already known of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway from previous genetic and biochemical efforts while providing new insight into the process.

  4. Halobellus rarus sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon from an inland salt lake of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Han, Dong; Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Mou, Yun-Zhuang; Cui, Heng-Lin; Li, Zheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC21(T) and YC77, were isolated from an inland salt lake of China. Both have pleomorphic rod-shaped cells that lyse in distilled water, stain Gram-negative and form red-pigmented colonies. They are neutrophilic, require at least 2.1 M NaCl for growth under the optimum growth temperature of 37 °C. The major polar lipids of the two strains were phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me), phosphatidylglycerol sulfate (PGS), two major glycolipids (GL1 and GL2) chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-DGD-1) and mannosyl glucosyl diether (DGD-1), respectively. Trace amounts of two unidentified lipids (GL0-1 and GL0-2) were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains are 99.9 % identical, show 94.0-98.9 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene similarity between strains YC21(T) and YC77 is 99.8 % and show 90.3-95.3 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus. The DNA G+C content of strains YC21(T) and YC77 were 66.1 and 66.2 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain YC77 was 89 %, and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with Halobellus limi TBN53(T), the most related member of Halobellus. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC21(T) and YC77 represent a novel species of the genus Halobellus, for which the name Halobellus rarus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC21(T) (=CGMCC 1.12121(T) = JCM 18362(T)).

  5. Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a salt lake.

    PubMed

    Mehrshad, Maliheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi, Ali; Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Asadi, Basaer; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, strain DA50T, was isolated from a brine sample of Urmia lake, a hypersaline environment in north-west Iran. Strain DA50T was orange-pigmented, motile, pleomorphic and required at least 2.5 M NaCl but not MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4.0 M NaCl and 0.3 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 45 °C, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-8.0 and a temperature range of 25-50 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain DA50T is a member of the family Halobacteriaceae, showing a low level of similarity with other members of this family. Highest similarities, 94.4, 94.0 and 93.9 %, were obtained with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the type strains of Natrialba aegyptia, Halobiforma lacisalsi and Halovivax asiaticus, respectively. Polar lipid analyses revealed that strain DA50T contains phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. Four unidentified glycolipids and two minor phospholipids were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H2). The G+C content of its DNA was 62.3 mol%. On the basis of the data obtained, the new isolate could not be classified in any recognized genus. Strain DA50T is thus considered to represent a novel species of a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, order Halobacteriales, for which the name Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halovarius luteus is DA50T ( = IBRC-M 10912T = CECT 8510T).

  6. Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanism of Inhibition of Silver Nanoparticles against Extreme Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Thombre, Rebecca S.; Shinde, Vinaya; Thaiparambil, Elvina; Zende, Samruddhi; Mehta, Sourabh

    2016-01-01

    Haloarchaea are salt-loving halophilic microorganisms that inhabit marine environments, sea water, salterns, and lakes. The resistance of haloarchaea to physical extremities that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitous. Metal and antibiotic resistance of haloarchaea has been on an upsurge due to the exposure of these organisms to metal sinks and drug resistance genes augmented in their natural habitats due to anthropogenic activities and environmental pollution. The efficacy of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) as a potent and broad spectrum inhibitory agent is known, however, there are no reports on the inhibitory activity of SNPs against haloarchaea. In the present study, we have investigated the antimicrobial potentials of SNPs synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Cinnamomum tamala against antibiotic resistant haloarchaeal isolates Haloferax prahovense RR8, Haloferax lucentense RR15, Haloarcula argentinensis RR10 and Haloarcula tradensis RR13. The synthesized SNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SNPs demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the haloarchaea with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300–400 μg/ml. Growth kinetics of haloarchaea in the presence of SNPs was studied by employing the Baranyi mathematical model for microbial growth using the DMFit curve fitting program. The C. tamala SNPs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A540) and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The mechanism of inhibition of haloarchaea by the SNPs was investigated. The plausible mechanism proposed is the alterations and disruption of haloarchaeal membrane permeability by turbulence, inhibition of respiratory dehydrogenases and lipid peroxidation causing cellular and DNA damage resulting in cell death. PMID:27679615

  7. Mechanism of Dissolution of Envelopes of the Extreme Halophile Halobacterium cutirubrum1

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, H.; Kushner, D. J.

    1966-01-01

    Onishi, H. (National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada), and D. J. Kushner. Mechanism of dissolution of envelopes of the extreme halophile Halobacterium cutirubrum. J. Bacteriol. 91:646–652. 1966.—Envelopes of Halobacterium cutirubrum dissolved rapidly in media of low ionic strength. Heating partially inhibited breakdown, probably because of nonspecific protein coagulation rather than inactivation of a lytic enzyme(s). Dissolution of envelopes in water did not involve splitting of peptide bonds or protein-lipid bonds, or any extensive breakdown of carbohydrate polymers. Dissolution was increased by alcohols and urea, even at high salt concentrations, but was not affected by metabolic inhibitors. Thus, no evidence was found for a dilution-activated lytic enzyme that contributes to envelope breakdown. Cells of H. cutirubrum were stable in 2 m NaCl, but lysis occurred in 2 m KCl or NH4Cl. This lysis did not involve an extensive breakdown of the envelope. No evidence for different sites of Na+, K+, and NH4+ action was obtained from the pattern of release of envelope constituents in different concentrations of these salts. Ultracentrifugation studies showed that adding salts to envelopes that had been dissolved in water led to a nonspecific reaggregation of envelope material. No difference was seen between the effects of KCl and NaCl, except at 3 to 4 m concentrations where KCl caused more aggregation. The preferential effect of Na+ on intact cells is probably due to its ability specifically to prevent leakage rather than to an overall effect on envelope integrity. Images PMID:5883109

  8. Purification and characterization of a mesohalic catalase from the halophilic bacterium Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Peterson, N J; Salin, M L

    1995-01-01

    When subjected to the stress of growth in a relatively low-salt environment (1.25 M NaCl), the halophilic bacterium Halobacterium halobium induces a catalase. The protein has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and has an M(r) of 240,000 and a subunit size of approximately 62,000. The enzyme is active over a broad pH range of 6.5 to 10.0, with a peak in activity at pH 7.0. It has an isoelectric point of 4.0. This catalse, which is not readily reduced by dithionite, shows a Soret peak at 406 nm. Cyanide and azide inhibit the enzyme at micromolar concentrations, whereas maleimide is without effect. The addition of 20 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole results in a 33% inhibition in enzymatic activity. The tetrameric protein binds NADP in a 1:1 ratio but does not peroxidize NADPH, NADH, or ascorbate. Although the enzymatic activity is maximal when assayed in a 50 mM potassium phosphate buffer with no NaCl, prolonged incubation in a buffer lacking NaCl results in inactive enzyme. Moreover, purification must be performed in the presence of 2 M NaCl. Equally as effective in retaining enzymatic function are NaCl, LiCl, KCl, CsCl, and NH4Cl, whereas divalent salts such as MgCl2 and CaCl2 result in the immediate loss of activity. The catalase is stained by pararosaniline, which is indicative of a glycosidic linkage. The Km for H2O2 is 60 mM, with inhibition observed at concentrations in excess of 90 mM. Thus, the mesohalic catalase purified from H. halobium seems to be similar to other catalases, except for the salt requirements, but differs markedly from the constitutive halobacterial hydroperoxidase. PMID:7814327

  9. Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov., a halophilic member of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from a wetland.

    PubMed

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahinpei, Azadeh; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Seyedmahdi, Shima Sadat; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated GBPy5(T), was isolated from aquatic plants of the Gomishan wetland, Iran. Cells of strain GBPy5(T) were motile. Growth occurred with between 1 and 10% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0 and a temperature range of 4-35 °C. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain GBPy5(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas forming a monophyletic branch. The novel strain exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.4% with type strains of Pseudomonas guariconensis PCAVU11(T) and Pseudomonas sabulinigri J64(T), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C18:1ω7c (37.8%), C16:0 (14.9%), C16:1ω7c (12.9%), C12:0 3-OH (7.1%) and C12:0 (7.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain GBPy5(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain GBPy5(T) was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain GBPY5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GBPy5(T) ( = IBRC-M 10762(T) = CECT 8338(T)).

  10. Resistance of the Extreme Halophile Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 to Multiple Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gygli, Patrick E.; Prajapati, Surendra; DeVeaux, Linda C.; DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya; Mestari, Mohammed Amine; Wells, Douglas P.

    2009-03-01

    The model Archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 is an extreme halophile known for its resistance to multiple stressors, including electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation. It is a well-developed system with a completely sequenced genome and extensive post-genomic tools for the study of a variety of biological processes. To further understand the mechanisms of Halobacterium's, radiation resistance, we previously reported the selection for multiple independent highly resistant mutants using repeated exposure to high doses of 18-20 MeV electrons using a medical S-band Linac. Molecular analysis of the transcriptional profile of several of these mutants revealed a single common change: upregulation of the rfa3 operon. These genes encode proteins homologous to the subunits of eukaryotic Replication Protein A (RPA), a DNA binding protein with major roles in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. This operon has also been implicated in a somewhat lesser role in resistance of wild type Halobacterium to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting common mechanisms for resistance. To further understand the mechanism of radiation resistance in the mutant strains, we measured the survival after exposure to both electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation, UV-A, B, and C All mutant strains showed increased resistance to electrons when compared with the parent. However, the mutant strains do not display increased UV resistance, and in one case is more sensitive than the parent strain. Thus, the protective role of increased RPA expression within a cell may be specific to the DNA damage caused by the different physical effects induced by high energy electron-beam radiation.

  11. High Metabolomic Microdiversity within Co-Occurring Isolates of the Extremely Halophilic Bacterium Salinibacter ruber

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Lucio, Marianna; Peña, Arantxa; Cifuentes, Ana; Brito-Echeverría, Jocelyn; Moritz, Franco; Tziotis, Dimitrios; López, Cristina; Urdiain, Mercedes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Salinibacter ruber is an extremely halophilic member of the Bacteroidetes that thrives in crystallizer ponds worldwide. Here, we have analyzed two sets of 22 and 35 co-occurring S. ruber strains, newly isolated respectively, from 100 microliters water samples from crystalizer ponds in Santa Pola and Mallorca, located in coastal and inland Mediterranean Spain and 350 km apart from each other. A set of old strains isolated from the same setting were included in the analysis. Genomic and taxonomy relatedness of the strains were analyzed by means of PFGE and MALDI-TOF, respectively, while their metabolomic potential was explored with high resolution ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS). Overall our results show a phylogenetically very homogeneous species expressing a very diverse metabolomic pool. The combination of MALDI-TOF and PFGE provides, for the newly isolated strains, the same scenario presented by the previous studies of intra-specific diversity of S. ruber using a more restricted number of strains: the species seems to be very homogeneous at the ribosomal level while the genomic diversity encountered was rather high since no identical genome patterns could be retrieved from each of the samples. The high analytical mass resolution of ICR-FT/MS enabled the description of thousands of putative metabolites from which to date only few can be annotated in databases. Some metabolomic differences, mainly related to lipid metabolism and antibiotic-related compounds, provided enough specificity to delineate different clusters within the co-occurring strains. In addition, metabolomic differences were found between old and new strains isolated from the same ponds that could be related to extended exposure to laboratory conditions. PMID:23741374

  12. Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanism of Inhibition of Silver Nanoparticles against Extreme Halophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Thombre, Rebecca S; Shinde, Vinaya; Thaiparambil, Elvina; Zende, Samruddhi; Mehta, Sourabh

    2016-01-01

    Haloarchaea are salt-loving halophilic microorganisms that inhabit marine environments, sea water, salterns, and lakes. The resistance of haloarchaea to physical extremities that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitous. Metal and antibiotic resistance of haloarchaea has been on an upsurge due to the exposure of these organisms to metal sinks and drug resistance genes augmented in their natural habitats due to anthropogenic activities and environmental pollution. The efficacy of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) as a potent and broad spectrum inhibitory agent is known, however, there are no reports on the inhibitory activity of SNPs against haloarchaea. In the present study, we have investigated the antimicrobial potentials of SNPs synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Cinnamomum tamala against antibiotic resistant haloarchaeal isolates Haloferax prahovense RR8, Haloferax lucentense RR15, Haloarcula argentinensis RR10 and Haloarcula tradensis RR13. The synthesized SNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SNPs demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the haloarchaea with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300-400 μg/ml. Growth kinetics of haloarchaea in the presence of SNPs was studied by employing the Baranyi mathematical model for microbial growth using the DMFit curve fitting program. The C. tamala SNPs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A540) and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The mechanism of inhibition of haloarchaea by the SNPs was investigated. The plausible mechanism proposed is the alterations and disruption of haloarchaeal membrane permeability by turbulence, inhibition of respiratory dehydrogenases and lipid peroxidation causing cellular and DNA damage resulting in cell death.

  13. Relative role of anions and cations in the stabilization of halophilic malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ebel, C; Faou, P; Kernel, B; Zaccai, G

    1999-07-13

    Halophilic malate dehydrogenase unfolds at low salt, and increasing the salt concentration stabilizes, first, the folded form and then, in some cases, destabilizes it. From inactivation and fluorescence measurements performed on the protein after its incubation in the presence of various salts in a large range of concentrations, the apparent effects of anions and cations were found to superimpose. A large range of ions was examined, including conditions that are in general not of physiological relevance, to explore the physical chemistry driving adaptation to extreme environments. The order of efficiency of cations and anions to maintain the folded form is, for the low-salt transition, Ca(2+) approximately Mg(2+) > Li(+) approximately NH(4)(+) approximately Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+), and SO(4)(2)(-) approximately OAc(-) approximately F(-) > Cl(-), and for the high-salt transition, NH(4)(+) approximately Na(+) approximately K(+) approximately Cs(+) > Li(+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+), and SO(4)(2)(-) approximately OAc(-) approximately F(-) > Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-). If a cation or anion is very stabilizing, the effect of the salt ion of opposite charge is limited. Anions of high charge density are always the most efficient to stabilize the folded form, in accordance with the order found in the Hofmeister series, while cations of high charge density are the most efficient only at the lower salt concentrations and tend to denature the protein at higher salt concentrations. The stabilizing efficiency of cations and anions can be related in a minor way to their effect on the surface tension of the solution, but the interaction of ions with sites only present in the folded protein has also to be taken into account. Unfolding at high salt concentrations corresponds to interactions of anions of low charge density and cations of high charge density with the peptide bond, as found for nonhalophilic proteins.

  14. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  15. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn; Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Stumpf, Thorsten; Cherkouk, Andrea

    2017-04-05

    The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  16. Characterization of halophilic C50 carotenoid-producing archaea isolated from solar saltworks in Bohai Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liying; Liu, Liangsen; Deng, Yuangao

    2014-11-01

    Halophilic archaea comprise the majority of microorganisms found in hypersaline environments. C50 carotenoids accumulated in archaea cells are considered potential biotechnological products and possess a number of biological functions. Ten red colonies were isolated from brine water in a saltern crystallizer pond of the Hangu Saltworks, China. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the colonies belonged to the extremely halophilic archaea genera Halobacterium and Halorubrum. Two representative strains, Halobacterium strain SP-2 and Halorubrum strain SP-4, were selected for further study on the phenotypic characteristics and effects of salinity and pH on accumulation and composition of pigments in their cells. The archaeal strains were isolated and grown in a culture medium prepared by dissolving yeast extract (10 g/L) and acid-hydrolyzed casein (7.5 g/L) into brine water obtained from a local salt pond. Their optimum salinity and pH for growth were 250 and 7, respectively, although pigment accumulation (OD490 / mL broth) was highest at pH 8. In addition, at 150-300 salinity, increasing salinity resulted in decreasing pigment accumulation. Analysis of the UV-Vis spectrum, TLC and HLPC chromatograms showed that C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin is the major pigment in both strains.

  17. Halophilic Microorganisms Are Responsible for the Rosy Discolouration of Saline Environments in Three Historical Buildings with Mural Paintings

    PubMed Central

    Ettenauer, Jörg D.; Jurado, Valme; Piñar, Guadalupe; Miller, Ana Z.; Santner, Markus; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    A number of mural paintings and building materials from monuments located in central and south Europe are characterized by the presence of an intriguing rosy discolouration phenomenon. Although some similarities were observed among the bacterial and archaeal microbiota detected in these monuments, their origin and nature is still unknown. In order to get a complete overview of this biodeterioration process, we investigated the microbial communities in saline environments causing the rosy discolouration of mural paintings in three Austrian historical buildings using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques as well as microscopic techniques. The bacterial communities were dominated by halophilic members of Actinobacteria, mainly of the genus Rubrobacter. Representatives of the Archaea were also detected with the predominating genera Halobacterium, Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus. Furthermore, halophilic bacterial strains, mainly of the phylum Firmicutes, could be retrieved from two monuments using special culture media. Inoculation of building materials (limestone and gypsum plaster) with selected isolates reproduced the unaesthetic rosy effect and biodeterioration in the laboratory. PMID:25084531

  18. FLUID MODERATED REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-10-22

    A reactor which utilizes fissionable fuel elements in rod form immersed in a moderator or heavy water and a means of circulating the heavy water so that it may also function as a coolant to remove the heat generated by the fission of the fuel are described. In this design, the clad fuel elements are held in vertical tubes immersed in heavy water in a tank. The water is circulated in a closed system by entering near the tops of the tubes, passing downward through the tubes over the fuel elements and out into the tank, where it is drawn off at the bottom, passed through heat exchangers to give up its heat and then returned to the tops of the tubes for recirculation.

  19. A UPF0118 family protein with uncharacterized function from the moderate halophile Halobacillus andaensis represents a novel class of Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ping; Wang, Lidan; Song, Na; Yang, Lina; Chen, Jin; Yan, Mingxue; Chen, Huiwen; Zhang, Rui; Li, Jincheng; Abdel-Motaal, Heba; Jiang, Juquan

    2017-04-04

    In this study, genomic DNA was screened from Halobacillus andaensis NEAU-ST10-40(T) by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. One gene designated upf0118 exhibiting Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity was finally cloned. Protein alignment showed that UPF0118 shares the highest identity of 81.5% with an unannotated gene encoding a protein with uncharacterized protein function belonging to UPF0118 family from H. kuroshimensis, but shares no identity with all known specific Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes or genes with Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity. Growth test, western blot and Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport assay revealed that UPF0118 as a transmembrane protein exhibits pH-dependent Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that UPF0118 clustered with all its homologs belonging to UPF0118 family at a wide range of 22-82% identities with the bootstrap value of 92%, which was significantly distant with all known specific single-gene Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters and single-gene proteins with the Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity. Taken together, we propose that UPF0118 should represent a novel class of Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the functional analysis of a protein with uncharacterized protein function as a representative of UPF0118 family containing the domain of unknown function, DUF20.

  20. A UPF0118 family protein with uncharacterized function from the moderate halophile Halobacillus andaensis represents a novel class of Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ping; Wang, Lidan; Song, Na; Yang, Lina; Chen, Jin; Yan, Mingxue; Chen, Huiwen; Zhang, Rui; Li, Jincheng; Abdel-motaal, Heba; Jiang, Juquan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, genomic DNA was screened from Halobacillus andaensis NEAU-ST10-40T by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na+/H+ antiporters. One gene designated upf0118 exhibiting Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity was finally cloned. Protein alignment showed that UPF0118 shares the highest identity of 81.5% with an unannotated gene encoding a protein with uncharacterized protein function belonging to UPF0118 family from H. kuroshimensis, but shares no identity with all known specific Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter genes or genes with Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity. Growth test, western blot and Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport assay revealed that UPF0118 as a transmembrane protein exhibits pH-dependent Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that UPF0118 clustered with all its homologs belonging to UPF0118 family at a wide range of 22–82% identities with the bootstrap value of 92%, which was significantly distant with all known specific single-gene Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporters and single-gene proteins with the Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport activity. Taken together, we propose that UPF0118 should represent a novel class of Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the functional analysis of a protein with uncharacterized protein function as a representative of UPF0118 family containing the domain of unknown function, DUF20. PMID:28374790

  1. Halomonas stenophila sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium that produces sulphate exopolysaccharides with biological activity.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Inmaculada; Béjar, Victoria; Martínez-Checa, Fernando; Martínez-Cánovas, María José; Molina, Ignacio; Quesada, Emilia

    2011-10-01

    We have undertaken a polyphasic taxonomic study of two halophilic, Gram-negative bacterial strains, N12(T) and B-100, that produce sulphated exopolysaccharides with biological activity. They were isolated from two different saline soil samples. Both strains grow at NaCl concentrations within the range 3-15 % (w/v) [optimum 5-10 % (w/v)], at 15-37 °C (optimum 20-32 °C) and at pH 6-8 (optimum pH 7-8). Their 16S rRNA gene sequences indicate that they belong to the genus Halomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. Their closest relative is Halomonas nitroreducens, to which our strains show maximum 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 98.7 % (N12(T)) and 98.3 % (B-100). Their DNA G+C contents are 61.9 and 63.8 mol%, respectively. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations showed 43.9 % relatedness between strain N12(T) and H. nitroreducens CECT 7281(T), 30.5 % between N12(T) and Halomonas ventosae CECT 5797(T), 39.2 % between N12(T) and Halomonas fontilapidosi CECT 7341(T), 46.3 % between N12(T) and Halomonas maura CECT 5298(T), 52.9 % between N12(T) and Halomonas saccharevitans LMG 23976(T), 51.3 % between N12(T) and Halomonas koreensis JCM 12237(T) and 100 % between strains N12(T) and B-100. The major fatty acids of strain N12(T) are C(12 : 0) 3-OH (5.42 %), C(15 : 0) iso 2-OH/C(16 : 1)ω7c (17.37 %), C(16 : 0) (21.62 %) and C(18 : 1)ω7c (49.19 %). The proposed name for the novel species is Halomonas stenophila sp. nov. Strain N12(T) ( = CECT 7744(T)  = LMG 25812(T)) is the type strain.

  2. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of the halophilic fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga: haloadaptations present and absent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The basidomycete Wallemia ichthyophaga from the phylogenetically distinct class Wallemiomycetes is the most halophilic fungus known to date. It requires at least 10% NaCl and thrives in saturated salt solution. To investigate the genomic basis of this exceptional phenotype, we obtained a de-novo genome sequence of the species type-strain and analysed its transcriptomic response to conditions close to the limits of its lower and upper salinity range. Results The unusually compact genome is 9.6 Mb large and contains 1.67% repetitive sequences. Only 4884 predicted protein coding genes cover almost three quarters of the sequence. Of 639 differentially expressed genes, two thirds are more expressed at lower salinity. Phylogenomic analysis based on the largest dataset used to date (whole proteomes) positions Wallemiomycetes as a 250-million-year-old sister group of Agaricomycotina. Contrary to the closely related species Wallemia sebi, W. ichthyophaga appears to have lost the ability for sexual reproduction. Several protein families are significantly expanded or contracted in the genome. Among these, there are the P-type ATPase cation transporters, but not the sodium/ hydrogen exchanger family. Transcription of all but three cation transporters is not salt dependent. The analysis also reveals a significant enrichment in hydrophobins, which are cell-wall proteins with multiple cellular functions. Half of these are differentially expressed, and most contain an unusually large number of acidic amino acids. This discovery is of particular interest due to the numerous applications of hydrophobines from other fungi in industry, pharmaceutics and medicine. Conclusions W. ichthyophaga is an extremophilic specialist that shows only low levels of adaptability and genetic recombination. This is reflected in the characteristics of its genome and its transcriptomic response to salt. No unusual traits were observed in common salt-tolerance mechanisms, such as transport of

  3. Characterization of Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov., an anaerobic, halophilic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Manel; Karray, Fatma; Mhiri, Najla; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-02-01

    Halophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative bacterial strains were isolated from a sediment sample taken from under the salt crust of El-Jerid hypersaline lake in southern Tunisia by using tryptone or glucose as the substrate. One strain, CEJFT1B(T), was characterized phenotypically and phylogenetically. Cells were non-motile, non-spore-forming, short rods. Strain CEJFT1B(T) was able to grow in the presence of 5-30 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 20 %) and at 30-60 °C (optimum 45 °C). It grew at pH 5.5-7.8 and the optimum pH for growth was 6.8. The isolate required yeast extract for growth. Substrates utilized by strain CEJFT1B(T) as the sole carbon source included glucose, fructose, sucrose, pyruvate, Casamino acids and starch. Individual amino acids such as glutamate, lysine, methionine, serine, tyrosine, and amino acid mixtures formed by the Stickland reaction such as alanine-glycine, valine-proline, leucine-proline, isoleucine-proline were also utilized. Products of glucose fermentation were acetate (major product), butyrate, H2 and CO2. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CEJFT1B(T) was 32.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CEJFT1B(T) should be assigned to the genus Sporohalobacter. The sequence similarity between strain CEJFT1B(T) and Sporohalobacter lortetii was 98.5 %, but DNA-DNA hybridization between the two strains revealed a relatedness value of 56.4 %, indicating that they are not related at the species level. The combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization data, and differences in substrate utilization support the view that strain CEJFT1B(T) represents a novel species of the genus Sporohalobacter, for which the name Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CEJFT1B(T) ( = DSM 26781(T) = JCM 19279(T)).

  4. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  5. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  6. Interaction of hexa-His tag with acidic amino acids results in facilitated refolding of halophilic nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Ida, Keiko; Tatsuda, Shuhei; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-11-01

    We have previously reported that amino-terminal extension sequence containing hexa-His facilitated refolding and assembly of hexameric nucleoside diphosphate kinase from extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum (NDK). In this study, we made various mutations in both the tag sequence and within NDK molecule. SerNDK, in which hexa-His was replaced with hexa-Ser, showed no facilitated folding. In addition, HisD58GD63G, in which both Asp58 and Asp63 in NDK were replaced with Gly, also showed no refolding enhancement. These results suggest that hexa-His in His-tag interact cooperatively with either Asp58 or Asp63 or both. Furthermore, G114D mutant, which formed a dimer in low salt solution, was strongly stabilized by His-tag to form a stable hexamer.

  7. Different glycosyltransferases are involved in lipid glycosylation and protein N-glycosylation in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Naparstek, Shai; Vinagradov, Evguenii; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-07-01

    Both the lipid and the protein components of biological membranes can be modified by the covalent addition of polysaccharides. Whereas eukaryal and bacterial pathways of lipid and protein glycosylation are relatively well defined, considerably less is known of the parallel processes in Archaea. Recent efforts have identified glycosyltransferases involved in N-glycosylation of the surface-layer glycoprotein of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii. In the present study, the involvement of these same glycosyltransferases in the biosynthesis of Hfx. volcanii glycolipids was considered by performing nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the glycolipid fraction of Hfx. volcanii cells deleted of genes encoding those glycosyltransferases, as well as the oligosaccharyltransferase, AglB. The results reveal that different glycosyltransferases are involved in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycoproteins and glycolipids in Archaea.

  8. Experimental pathogenicity and mortality in ligated ileal loop studies of the newly reported halophilic lactose-positive Vibrio sp.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M D; Oliver, J D

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory animals were challenged subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, and intravenously with the halophilic lactose-positive Vibrio. Intraperitoneal inocula of 10(8) organisms proved to be rapidly lethal in mice, rats, and hamsters. The 50% lethal doese in ICR strain mice was estimatd to be 8 X 10(5) live cells, injected intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Subtaneous inocula in mice resulted in severe local infections, characterized by gross edema, and for those animals surviving longer than 48 h, tissue necrosis. Intravenous, intraperitoneal, and subcutaneous injections of 10(8) cells in mice resulted in death within 3 to 6 h. These animals rapidly developed Vibrio bacteremia after injections. V. parahaemolyticus, studied for comparative purposes, produced no morbidity or mortality when injected subcutaneously. Injections of live lactose-positive Vibrio into ligated ileal loops in rats and rabbits consistently proved to be lethal with a high-density bacteremia resulting. PMID:669787

  9. Carbon monoxide as a metabolic energy source for extremely halophilic microbes: Implications for microbial activity in Mars regolith

    PubMed Central

    King, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide occurs at relatively high concentrations (≥800 parts per million) in Mars’ atmosphere, where it represents a potentially significant energy source that could fuel metabolism by a localized putative surface or near-surface microbiota. However, the plausibility of CO oxidation under conditions relevant for Mars in its past or at present has not been evaluated. Results from diverse terrestrial brines and saline soils provide the first documentation, to our knowledge, of active CO uptake at water potentials (−41 MPa to −117 MPa) that might occur in putative brines at recurrent slope lineae (RSL) on Mars. Results from two extremely halophilic isolates complement the field observations. Halorubrum str. BV1, isolated from the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah (to our knowledge, the first documented extremely halophilic CO-oxidizing member of the Euryarchaeota), consumed CO in a salt-saturated medium with a water potential of −39.6 MPa; activity was reduced by only 28% relative to activity at its optimum water potential of −11 MPa. A proteobacterial isolate from hypersaline Mono Lake, California, Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii MLHE-1, also oxidized CO at low water potentials (−19 MPa), at temperatures within ranges reported for RSL, and under oxic, suboxic (0.2% oxygen), and anoxic conditions (oxygen-free with nitrate). MLHE-1 was unaffected by magnesium perchlorate or low atmospheric pressure (10 mbar). These results collectively establish the potential for microbial CO oxidation under conditions that might obtain at local scales (e.g., RSL) on contemporary Mars and at larger spatial scales earlier in Mars’ history. PMID:25831529

  10. Carbon monoxide as a metabolic energy source for extremely halophilic microbes: implications for microbial activity in Mars regolith.

    PubMed

    King, Gary M

    2015-04-07

    Carbon monoxide occurs at relatively high concentrations (≥800 parts per million) in Mars' atmosphere, where it represents a potentially significant energy source that could fuel metabolism by a localized putative surface or near-surface microbiota. However, the plausibility of CO oxidation under conditions relevant for Mars in its past or at present has not been evaluated. Results from diverse terrestrial brines and saline soils provide the first documentation, to our knowledge, of active CO uptake at water potentials (-41 MPa to -117 MPa) that might occur in putative brines at recurrent slope lineae (RSL) on Mars. Results from two extremely halophilic isolates complement the field observations. Halorubrum str. BV1, isolated from the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah (to our knowledge, the first documented extremely halophilic CO-oxidizing member of the Euryarchaeota), consumed CO in a salt-saturated medium with a water potential of -39.6 MPa; activity was reduced by only 28% relative to activity at its optimum water potential of -11 MPa. A proteobacterial isolate from hypersaline Mono Lake, California, Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii MLHE-1, also oxidized CO at low water potentials (-19 MPa), at temperatures within ranges reported for RSL, and under oxic, suboxic (0.2% oxygen), and anoxic conditions (oxygen-free with nitrate). MLHE-1 was unaffected by magnesium perchlorate or low atmospheric pressure (10 mbar). These results collectively establish the potential for microbial CO oxidation under conditions that might obtain at local scales (e.g., RSL) on contemporary Mars and at larger spatial scales earlier in Mars' history.

  11. Halanaerobium sehlinense sp. nov., an extremely halophilic, fermentative, strictly anaerobic bacterium from sediments of the hypersaline lake Sehline Sebkha.

    PubMed

    Abdeljabbar, Hedi; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Sadfi, Najla; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic, extremely halophilic, Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from the hypersaline (>20% NaCl) surface sediments of Sehline Sebkha in Tunisia. The strain, designated 1Sehel(T), was strictly halophilic and proliferated at NaCl concentrations of between 5% and 30% (saturation), with optimal growth at 20% NaCl. Strain 1Sehel(T) was non-spore-forming, non-motile, appearing singly or in pairs, or occasionally as long chains and measured 0.5-0.8 µm by 3-10 µm. Strain 1Sehel(T) grew optimally at pH values of 7.4 but had a very broad pH range for growth (pH 5.2-9.4). It grew at temperatures between 20 and 50 °C with an optimum at 43 °C. Strain 1Sehel(T) required yeast extract for growth. The isolate fermented glucose, galactose, fructose, glycerol, mannose, maltose, ribose, pyruvate and sucrose. The fermentation products from glucose utilization were lactate, acetate, formate, ethanol, CO2 and H2. The G+C ratio of the DNA was 32.7 mol%. The major fatty acids were C15:1ω6c/7c, C16:1ω7c, C16:0 and C15:0. On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological properties, strain 1Sehel(T) (=DSM 25582(T)=JCM 18213(T)) is proposed as the type strain of Halanaerobium sehlinense sp. nov., within the family Halanaerobiaceae.

  12. Bacteria Inactivation During Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sol Quintero, María; Mora, Ulises; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mues, Enrique; Castaño, Eduardo; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2006-09-01

    The influence of extracorporeal and intracorporeal lithotripsy on the viability of bacteria contained inside artificial kidney stones was investigated in vitro. Two different bacteria were exposed to the action of one extracorporeal shock wave generator and four intracorporeal lithotripters.

  13. Halorubrum rubrum sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a Chinese salt lake.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Han, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Cui, Heng-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC87(T) and YCA11, were isolated from Yuncheng salt lake in Shanxi, China. Cells of the two strains were observed to be pleomorphic rod-shaped, stained Gram-negative and produced red-pigmented colonies. Strain YC87(T) was able to grow at 20-50 °C (optimum 37 °C), at 1.4-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 2.1 M NaCl), at 0.05-1.0 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.3 M MgCl2) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0) while strain YCA11 was able to grow at 20-50 °C (optimum 37 °C), at 2.1-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 3.1 M NaCl), at 0.01-0.7 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.1 M MgCl2) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.5). The cells of both isolates were observed to lyse in distilled water. The minimum NaCl concentrations that prevented cell lysis were determined to be 8 % (w/v) for strain YC87(T) and 12 % (w/v) for strain YCA11. The major polar lipids of the two strains were identified as phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and one major glycolipid chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether; another major glycolipid and trace amounts of several unidentified lipids were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains were 99.8 % identical, showing 93.2-98.2 % similarity to members of the genus Halorubrum of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene similarity between strains YC87(T) and YCA11 was 99.3 % and showed 87.5-95.2 % similarity to the closest relative members of the genus Halorubrum. The DNA G+C content of strains YC87(T) and YCA11 were determined to be 64.9 and 64.5 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain YC77 was 87 % and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with Halorubrum cibi JCM 15757(T) and Halorubrum aquaticum CGMCC 1.6377(T), the most related members of the genus Halorubrum. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC87(T) and YCA11 represent a novel species of the

  14. Diversity of anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the microbial mats of the Ebro Delta: a combined morphological and molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Van Bleijswijk, Judith; Gaju, Núria; Muyzer, Gerard

    2005-05-01

    The diversity of purple and green sulfur bacteria in the multilayered sediments of the Ebro Delta was investigated. Specific oligonucleotide primers for these groups were used for the selective amplification of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Subsequently, amplification products were separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequenced, which yielded a total of 32 sequences. Six of the sequences were related to different cultivated members of the green sulfur bacteria assemblage, whereas seven fell into the cluster of marine or halophilic Chromatiaceae. Six sequences were clustered with the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, three of the six being closely related to chemotrophic bacteria grouped together with Halorhodospira genus, and the other three forming a group related to the genus Ectothiorhodospira. The last thirteen sequences constituted a cluster where no molecular isolate from microbial mats has so far been reported. Our results indicate that the natural diversity in the ecosystem studied has been significantly underestimated in the past and point out the presence of novel species not related to all known purple sulfur bacteria. Furthermore, the detection of green sulfur bacteria, after only an initial step of enrichment, suggests that -- with the appropriate methodology -- several genera, such as Prosthecochloris, could be established as regular members of marine microbial mats.

  15. Facilitating Moderate Drinking on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBrien, Robert J.

    1980-01-01

    By identifying the environmental conditions associated with alcohol abuse and alcohol use in moderation, staff can help students develop effective strategies for change. Stimulus control methods are recommended as effective behavioral change strategies. (RC)

  16. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  17. Halotolerant bacteria in the São Paulo Zoo composting process and their hydrolases and bioproducts

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Lilian C.G.; Ramos, Patricia Locosque; Marem, Alyne; Kondo, Marcia Y.; Rocha, Rafael C.S.; Bertolini, Thiago; Silveira, Marghuel A.V.; da Cruz, João Batista; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto; Juliano, Luiz; Okamoto, Debora N.

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are able to grow in the presence of salt and are also excellent source of enzymes and biotechnological products, such as exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Salt-tolerant bacteria were screened in the Organic Composting Production Unit (OCPU) of São Paulo Zoological Park Foundation, which processes 4 ton/day of organic residues including plant matter from the Atlantic Rain Forest, animal manure and carcasses and mud from water treatment. Among the screened microorganisms, eight halotolerant bacteria grew at NaCl concentrations up to 4 M. These cultures were classified based on phylogenetic characteristics and comparative partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Brevibacterium. The results of this study describe the ability of these halotolerant bacteria to produce some classes of hydrolases, namely, lipases, proteases, amylases and cellulases, and biopolymers. The strain characterized as of Brevibacterium avium presented cellulase and amylase activities up to 4 M NaCl and also produced EPSs and PHAs. These results indicate the biotechnological potential of certain microorganisms recovered from the composting process, including halotolerant species, which have the ability to produce enzymes and biopolymers, offering new perspectives for environmental and industrial applications. PMID:26273248

  18. Bacteria associated with Artemia spp. along the salinity gradient of the solar salterns at Eilat (Israel).

    PubMed

    Tkavc, Rok; Ausec, Luka; Oren, Aharon; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2011-08-01

    The crustacean genus Artemia naturally inhabits various saline and hypersaline environments and is the most frequently laboratory-hatched animal for live feed in mari- and aquaculture. Because of its high economic importance, Artemia-bacteria interactions were so far studied mostly in laboratory strains. In this study, we focused our attention on the Artemia-associated microbiota in its natural environment in the solar salterns of Eilat, Israel. We applied a culture-independent method (clone libraries) to investigate the bacterial community structure associated with Artemia in five evaporation ponds with salinities from slightly above seawater (5%) to the point of saturation (32%), in two different developmental stages: in nauplii and in the intestine of adult animals. Bacteria found in naupliar and adult stages were classified within the Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria. The halophilic proteobacterial genera Halomonas spp. and Salinivibrio spp. dominated the Artemia microbiota in both stages in all ponds. We also analysed a clone library of entire adult animals, revealing a novel bacterial phylogenetic lineage. This is the first molecular study of bacteria associated with two developmental stages of Artemia along a salinity gradient.

  19. New insight in the structural features of haloadaptation in α-amylases from halophilic Archaea following homology modeling strategy: folded and stable conformation maintained through low hydrophobicity and highly negative charged surface.

    PubMed

    Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Patron, Kevin; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-07-01

    Proteins from halophilic archaea, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded, active and stable at very high ionic strengths. Understanding the mechanism of haloadaptation is the first step toward engineering of halostable biomolecules. Amylases are one of the main enzymes used in industry. Yet, no three-dimensional structure has been experimentally resolved for α-amylases from halophilic archaea. In this study, homology structure modeling of α-amylases from the halophilic archaea Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula hispanica, and Halalkalicoccus jeotgali were performed. The resulting models were subjected to energy minimization, evaluation, and structural analysis. Calculations of the amino acid composition, salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were also performed and compared to a set of non-halophilic counterparts. It clearly appeared that haloarchaeal α-amylases exhibited lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil-forming regions. Furthermore, they could maintain a folded and stable conformation in high salt concentration through highly negative charged surface with over representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, and low hydrophobicity with increase of salt bridges and decrease in hydrophobic interactions on the protein surface. This study sheds some light on the stability of α-amylases from halophilic archaea and provides strong basis not only to understand haloadaptation mechanisms of proteins in microorganisms from hypersalines environments but also for biotechnological applications.

  20. New insight in the structural features of haloadaptation in α-amylases from halophilic Archaea following homology modeling strategy: folded and stable conformation maintained through low hydrophobicity and highly negative charged surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Patron, Kevin; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-07-01

    Proteins from halophilic archaea, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded, active and stable at very high ionic strengths. Understanding the mechanism of haloadaptation is the first step toward engineering of halostable biomolecules. Amylases are one of the main enzymes used in industry. Yet, no three-dimensional structure has been experimentally resolved for α-amylases from halophilic archaea. In this study, homology structure modeling of α-amylases from the halophilic archaea Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula hispanica, and Halalkalicoccus jeotgali were performed. The resulting models were subjected to energy minimization, evaluation, and structural analysis. Calculations of the amino acid composition, salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were also performed and compared to a set of non-halophilic counterparts. It clearly appeared that haloarchaeal α-amylases exhibited lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil-forming regions. Furthermore, they could maintain a folded and stable conformation in high salt concentration through highly negative charged surface with over representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, and low hydrophobicity with increase of salt bridges and decrease in hydrophobic interactions on the protein surface. This study sheds some light on the stability of α-amylases from halophilic archaea and provides strong basis not only to understand haloadaptation mechanisms of proteins in microorganisms from hypersalines environments but also for biotechnological applications.

  1. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  2. Some bacteria are beneficial!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Most people would agree that bacteria usually spell trouble where the quality of drinking water is con cerned. However, recent studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program have shown that some bacteria can improve the quality of water.

  3. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  4. Graphite moderated (252)Cf source.

    PubMed

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Barros, Haydn; Greaves, Eduardo D; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    The Thorium molten-salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid-fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a (252)Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the (252)Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator.

  5. Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Abrevaya, Hayim

    1991-01-01

    The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

  6. [Study on the treatment of oilfield produced wastewater with different salinities using halophile enhanced biological activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xun-jie; Yang, Yu-nan; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Wei; Dong, Jian

    2007-10-01

    The treatment of oilfield produced wastewater with different qualities and different salinities were carried out using halophile enhanced biological activated carbon. COD, UV254 were detected as the index to indicate the efficiency of oilfield produced wastewater treatment. Oxygen Uptake Rate (OUR) was used to determine the activity of biofilm living in the activated carbon. The activity of biofilm presents a trend that is from reducing, resuming, to stabilizing with increasing of the proportion of oilfield produced wastewater. With HRT of 5 h, the removal rate of COD of Le'an and Xianhe oilfield produced wastewater achieves 64.86% and 53.62%, respectively. UV254 is partly removed, too. For Le'an oilfield produced wastewater with different salinities from 1.0% to 3.0%, the removal rates of COD are between 64.86% and 66.67%. The results illuminate that for the successfully domesticated microorganisms, only salinity's changing will not make distinct impact on them if the qualities of wastewater are not changed. The difference of COD in oilfield produced wastewater is the primary factor that makes influence on treatment effect for the different water quality.

  7. Partial purification and characterization of extracellular protease from a halophilic and thermotolerant strain Streptomyces pseudogrisiolus NRC-15.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hassan M; Mostafa, El-Sayed E; Saad, Moataza M; Selim, Mohsen H; Hassan, Helmy M

    2013-08-01

    An alkaline protease was purified from a halophilic and thermotolerant potent alkaline protease-producing strain Streptomyces pseudogrisiolus NRC-15 using ammonium sulphate precipitation and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The enzyme was purified to 77.24-folds with a yield of 91.8% and the specific activity was 112 U/mg of protein. The protease showed a single band on SDS-PAGE with its molecular mass at 20 kDa and exhibited a maximum relative activity of 100% using casein as a substrate and. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 9.5 and displayed optimum activity at 50 degrees C. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF, suggesting the presence of serine residue in the active site. The enzyme activity was increased by the metal ions Ca2+, Co2+, K+ and Mg2+. The enzyme significantly enhanced the removal of stains when used with wheel detergent, indicating the potential of the enzyme for using as a laundry detergent additive to improve the performance of heavy-duty laundry detergent.

  8. Comparison of the compatible solute pool of two slightly halophilic planctomycetes species, Gimesia maris and Rubinisphaera brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Catarina; Soares, Ana R; Lamosa, Pedro; Santos, Manuel A; da Costa, Milton S

    2016-11-01

    Gimesia maris and Rubinisphaera brasiliensis are slightly halophilic representatives of the deep-branching phylum Planctomycetes. For osmoadaptation both species accumulated α-glutamate, sucrose, ectoine and hydroxyectoine. A major role was found for ectoine, hydroxyectoine as well as sucrose under hyper-osmotic shock conditions. Nevertheless, the levels of sucrose were up-regulated by the increased salinity levels and also by low nitrogen availability. Additionally, G. maris accumulated glucosylglycerate (GG) as major solute specifically under low nitrogen levels, which prompted us to analyse the transcript abundance of two homologues genes known for the biosynthesis of GG, namely glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS) and glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate phosphatase (GpgP). By qPCR using a suitable reference gene selected in this study, the transcript abundance of the biosynthetic genes was quantified in G. maris cells under hyper-osmotic shock or under low nitrogen conditions. The gpgS gene was induced under nitrogen-limiting conditions suggesting that GG synthesis is regulated primarily at the transcription level. Moreover, the expression of a gene coding for a putative sucrose-phosphorylase (Spase) located upstream the gpgS and gpgP genes was up-regulated, predicting a metabolic role of Spase probably related to GG synthesis.

  9. Production, purification and characterization of halophilic organic solvent tolerant protease from marine crustacean shell wastes and its efficacy on deproteinization.

    PubMed

    Maruthiah, Thirumalai; Somanath, Beena; Jasmin, Jebamonydhas Vijila; Immanuel, Grasian; Palavesam, Arunachalam

    2016-12-01

    The quantum of marine fish wastes produced by fish processing industries has necessitated to search new methods for its disposal. Hence, this study is focused on production and purification of halophilic organic solvent tolerant protease (HOSP) from marine Alcaligenes faecalis APCMST-MKW6 using marine shell wastes as substrate. The candidate bacterium was isolated from the marine sediment of Manakudi coast and identified as A. faecalis APCMST-MKW6. The purified protease showed 16.39-fold purity, 70.34 U/mg specific activity with 21.67 % yield. The molecular weight of the purified alkaline protease was 49 kDa. This purified protease registered maximum activity at pH 9 and it was stable between pH 8-9 after 1.30 h of incubation. The optimum temperature registered was 60 °C and it was stable between 50 and 60 °C even after 1.30 h of incubation. This enzyme also showed maximum activity at 20 % NaCl concentration. Further, manganese chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and barium chloride influenced this enzyme activity remarkably and it was also found to be enhanced by many of the tested surfactants and solvents. The candidate bacterium effectively deproteinized the shrimp shell waste compared to the other tested crustaceans shell wastes and also attained maximum antioxidant activity.

  10. A predicted geranylgeranyl reductase reduces the ω-position isoprene of dolichol phosphate in the halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Naparstek, Shai; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2012-06-01

    In N-glycosylation in both Eukarya and Archaea, N-linked oligosaccharides are assembled on dolichol phosphate prior to transfer of the glycan to the protein target. However, whereas only the α-position isoprene subunit is saturated in eukaryal dolichol phosphate, both the α- and ω-position isoprene subunits are reduced in the archaeal lipid. The agents responsible for dolichol phosphate saturation remain largely unknown. The present study sought to identify dolichol phosphate reductases in the halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii. Homology-based searches recognize HVO_1799 as a geranylgeranyl reductase. Mass spectrometry revealed that cells deleted of HVO_1799 fail to fully reduce the isoprene chains of H. volcanii membrane phospholipids and glycolipids. Likewise, the absence of HVO_1799 led to a loss of saturation of the ω-position isoprene subunit of C(55) and C(60) dolichol phosphate, with the effect of HVO_1799 deletion being more pronounced with C(60) dolichol phosphate than with C(55) dolichol phosphate. Glycosylation of dolichol phosphate in the deletion strain occurred preferentially on that version of the lipid saturated at both the α- and ω-position isoprene subunits.

  11. Reverse micelles in organic solvents: a medium for the biotechnological use of extreme halophilic enzymes at low salt concentration

    PubMed Central

    Marhuenda-Egea, Frutos C.; Piera-Velázquez, Sonsoles; Cadenas, Chiquinquirá; Cadenas, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    Alkaline p-nitrophenylphosphate phosphatase (pNPPase) from the halophilic archaeobacterium Halobacterium salinarum (previously halobium) was solubilized at low salt concentration in reverse micelles of hexadecyltrimethylammoniumbromide in cyclohexane with 1-butanol as cosurfactant. The enzyme maintained its catalytic properties under these conditions. The thermodynamic “solvation–stabilization hypothesis” has been used to explain the bell-shaped dependence of pNPPase activity on the water content of reverse micelles, in terms of protein–solvent interactions. According to this model, the stability of the folded protein depends on a network of hydrated ions associated with acidic residues at the protein surface. At low salt concentration and low water content (the ratio of water concentration to surfactant concentration; w0), the network of hydrated ions within the reverse micelles may involve the cationic heads of the surfactant. The bell-shaped profile of the relationship between enzyme activity and w0 varied depending on the concentrations of NaCl and Mn2+. PMID:15803648

  12. Amino Acid Substitutions in Cold-Adapted Proteins from Halorubrum lacusprofundi, an Extremely Halophilic Microbe from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; Capes, Melinda D.; Karan, Ram; DasSarma, Priya

    2013-01-01

    The halophilic Archaeon Halorubrum lacusprofundi, isolated from the perennially cold and hypersaline Deep Lake in Antarctica, was recently sequenced and compared to 12 Haloarchaea from temperate climates by comparative genomics. Amino acid substitutions for 604 H. lacusprofundi proteins belonging to conserved haloarchaeal orthologous groups (cHOGs) were determined and found to occur at 7.85% of positions invariant in proteins from mesophilic Haloarchaea. The following substitutions were observed most frequently: (a) glutamic acid with aspartic acid or alanine; (b) small polar residues with other small polar or non-polar amino acids; (c) small non-polar residues with other small non-polar residues; (d) aromatic residues, especially tryptophan, with other aromatic residues; and (e) some larger polar residues with other similar residues. Amino acid substitutions for a cold-active H. lacusprofundi β-galactosidase were then examined in the context of a homology modeled structure at residues invariant in homologous enzymes from mesophilic Haloarchaea. Similar substitutions were observed as in the genome-wide approach, with the surface accessible regions of β-galactosidase displaying reduced acidity and increased hydrophobicity, and internal regions displaying mainly subtle changes among smaller non-polar and polar residues. These findings are consistent with H. lacusprofundi proteins displaying amino acid substitutions that increase structural flexibility and protein function at low temperature. We discuss the likely mechanisms of protein adaptation to a cold, hypersaline environment on Earth, with possible relevance to life elsewhere. PMID:23536799

  13. Effects of OLRs and HRTs on hydrogen production from high salinity substrate by halophilic hydrogen producing bacterium (HHPB).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan; Lee, Yunhee; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-08-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) on hydrogen production were investigated with glucose medium containing 2% NaCl. Halophilic hydrogen producing bacterium (HHPB) Clostridium bifermentans 3AT-ma, which can survive under high salt conditions, was used. Sponge media were used as 20% of working volume. The OLR and HRT were varied in 10-60 g-glucose/L-reactor/day and 24-6h. With OLR of 20 g-glucose/L/day, shorter HRT resulted in higher hydrogen producing rate and yield. When the OLR was increased from 20 to 60 g-glucose/L-reactor/day at HRT 6h, the hydrogen production rate increased, while the hydrogen production yield decreased due to the increase and accumulation of volatile fatty acids. Biohydrogen production was possible from the salinity substrate using HHPB, and the maximum hydrogen production yield was 1.1 mol-H₂/mol-glucose with optimal conditions of OLR of 20 g-glucose/L/day and HRT of 12h.

  14. A predicted geranylgeranyl reductase reduces the ω-position isoprene of dolichol phosphate in the halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Naparstek, Shai; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    In N-glycosylation in both Eukarya and Archaea, N-linked oligosaccharides are assembled on dolichol phosphate prior to transfer of the glycan to the protein target. However, whereas only the α-position isoprene subunit is saturated in eukaryal dolichol phosphate, both the α- and ω-position isoprene subunits are reduced in the archaeal lipid. The agents responsible for dolichol phosphate saturation remain largely unknown. The present study sought to identify dolichol phosphate reductases in the halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii. Homology-based searches recognize HVO_1799 as a geranylgeranyl reductase. Mass spectrometry revealed that cells deleted of HVO_1799 fail to fully reduce the isoprene chains of Hfx. volcanii membrane phospholipids and glycolipids. Likewise, the absence of HVO_1799 led to a loss of saturation of the ω-position isoprene subunit of C55 and C60 dolichol phosphate, with the effect of HVO_1799 deletion being more pronounced with C60 dolichol phosphate than with C55 dolichol phosphate. Glycosylation of dolichol phosphate in the deletion strain occurred preferentially on that version of the lipid saturated at both the α- and ω-position isoprene subunits. PMID:22469971

  15. A Ribosomal Protein AgRPS3aE from Halophilic Aspergillus glaucus Confers Salt Tolerance in Heterologous Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xilong; Liu, Yiling; Xie, Lixia; Liu, Xiaodan; Wei, Yi; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    High salt in soils is one of the abiotic stresses that significantly reduces crop yield, although saline lands are considered potential resources arable for agriculture. Currently, genetic engineering for enhancing salt tolerance is being tested as an efficient and viable strategy for crop improvement. We previously characterized a large subunit of the ribosomal protein RPL44, which is involved in osmotic stress in the extremely halophilic fungus Aspergillus glaucus. Here, we screened another ribosomal protein (AgRPS3aE) that also produced high-salt tolerance in yeast. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that AgRPS3aE encodes a 29.2 kDa small subunit of a ribosomal protein belonging to the RPS3Ae family in eukaryotes. To further confirm its protective function against salinity, we expressed AgRPS3aE in three heterologous systems, the filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and two model plants Arabidopsis and tobacco. Overexpression of AgRPS3aE in all tested transformants significantly alleviated stress symptoms compared with controls, suggesting that AgRPS3aE functions not only in fungi but also in plants. Considering that ribosomal proteins are housekeeping components in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, we propose that AgRPS3aE is one of the optimal genes for improving high-salt tolerance in crops. PMID:25642759

  16. The evolution of energy-transducing systems. Studies with an extremely halophilic archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1991-01-01

    The halobacterial ATPase was labeled with C-14-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and subunit 2 of the enzyme was prepared by electroelution. Subunit 2 was cleaved by several chemical and enzymatic procedures for further preparation of peptides. Immunoreactions (Western blotting) of halobacterial membranes were performed with an antiserum against subunit A of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa. A 85 K band (subunit 1) from the membranes of H saccharovorum and from two halobacterial isolates, which were isolated from Permian salt sediments, reacted strongly with the antiserum. The ATPase from the latter isolates resembled the ATPase from H saccharovorum, but had a higher content of acidic amino acids. If it can be verified that the age of the bacterial isolates is in the same range as when deposition of salt occurred, an extremely interesting system for the study of evolutionary questions would be available, since the salt-embedded bacteria presumably did not undergo mutational and selectional events.

  17. Effect of autochthonous bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis on bacterial population dynamics and growth of halotolerant bacteria in Brazilian charqui.

    PubMed

    Biscola, Vanessa; Abriouel, Hikmate; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Capuano, Verena Sant'Anna Cabral; Gálvez, Antonio; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo

    2014-12-01

    Charqui is a fermented, salted and sun-dried meat product, widely consumed in Brazil and exported to several countries. Growth of microorganisms in this product is unlikely due to reduced Aw, but halophilic and halotolerant bacteria may grow and cause spoilage. Charqui is a good source of lactic acid bacteria able to produce antimicrobial bacteriocins. In this study, an autochthonous bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 69), isolated from charqui, was added to the meat used for charqui manufacture and evaluated for its capability to prevent the growth of spoilage bacteria during storage up to 45 days. The influence of L. lactis 69 on the bacterial diversity during the manufacturing of the product was also studied, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). L. lactis 69 did not affect the counts and diversity of lactic acid bacteria during manufacturing and storage, but influenced negatively the populations of halotolerant microorganisms, reducing the spoilage potential. The majority of tested virulence genes was absent, evidencing the safety and potential technological application of this strain as an additional hurdle to inhibit undesirable microbial growth in this and similar fermented meat products.

  18. The universe at moderate redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Report on the universe at moderate redshift covering the period from 1 Mar. 1988 to 28 Feb. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included: galaxy formation and large-scale structure; intergalactic medium and background radiation fields; quasar statistics and evolution; and gravitational lenses.

  19. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  20. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  1. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Fein, Jeremy B

    2010-12-08

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than

  2. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  3. Gastric spiral bacteria in small felids.

    PubMed

    Kinsel, M J; Kovarik, P; Murnane, R D

    1998-06-01

    Nine small cats, including one bobcat (Felis rufus), one Pallas cat (F. manul), one Canada lynx (F. lynx canadensis), two fishing cats (F. viverrina), two margays (F. wiedii), and two sand cats (F. margarita), necropsied between June 1995 and March 1997 had large numbers of gastric spiral bacteria, whereas five large cats, including one African lion (Panthera leo), two snow leopards (P. uncia), one Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica), and one jaguar (P. onca), necropsied during the same period had none. All of the spiral organisms from the nine small cats were histologically and ultrastructurally similar. Histologically, the spiral bacteria were 5-14 microm long with five to nine coils per organism and were located both extracellularly within gastric glands and surface mucus, and intracellularly in parietal cells. Spiral bacteria in gastric mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx, one fishing cat, and the two sand cats were gram negative and had corkscrewlike to tumbling motility when viewed with phase contrast microscopy. The bacteria were 0.5-0.7 microm wide, with a periodicity of 0.65-1.1 microm in all cats. Bipolar sheathed flagella were occasionally observed, and no periplasmic fibrils were seen. The bacteria were extracellular in parietal cell canaliculi and intracellular within parietal cells. Culture of mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx and sand cats was unsuccessful. Based on morphology, motility, and cellular tropism, the bacteria were probably Helicobacter-like organisms. Although the two margays had moderate lymphoplasmacytic gastritis, the other cats lacked or had only mild gastric lymphoid infiltrates, suggesting that these organisms are either commensals or opportunistic pathogens.

  4. Causal Moderation Analysis Using Propensity Score Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on previous studies in applying propensity score methods to study multiple treatment variables to examine the causal moderator effect. The propensity score methods will be demonstrated in a case study to examine the causal moderator effect, where the moderators are categorical and continuous variables. Moderation analysis is an…

  5. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  6. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  7. The moderators of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jessie L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which Department of Defense (DOD) active duty patient sociodemographic, health status, geographic location, and utilization factors, predict overall patient satisfaction with health care in military facilities. A theoretical framework developed from patient satisfaction and social identity theories and from previous empirical findings was used to develop a model to predict patient satisfaction and delineate moderating variables. The major finding indicated in this study was the significance of patients' characteristics in moderating their satisfaction. Principal components factor analysis and hierarchical linear regression revealed that patient specific factors predicted patients' satisfaction after controlling for factors depicting patients' evaluations of health system characteristics. Patient specific factors provided added, although very minimal, explanatory value to the determination of patients' satisfaction. The study findings can aid in the development of targeted, objectively prioritized programs of improvement and marketing by ranking variables using patients' passively derived importance schema.

  8. HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1958-04-29

    A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

  9. Cryogenic moderator simulations : confronting reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-06

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities.

  10. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefère, Christopher T.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth's geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  11. BASE COMPOSITION OF THE DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA.

    PubMed

    SIGAL, N; SENEZ, J C; LEGALL, J; SEBALD, M

    1963-06-01

    Sigal, Nicole (Laboratoire de Chimie Bactérienne du CNRS, Marseille, France), Jacques C. Senez, Jean Le Gall, and Madeleine Sebald. Base composition of the deoxyribonucleic acid of sulfate-reducing bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 85:1315-1318. 1963-The deoxyribonucleic acid constitution of several strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria has been analytically determined. The results of these studies show that this group of microorganisms includes at least four subgroups characterized by significantly different values of the adenine plus thymine to guanine plus cytosine ratio. The nonsporulated forms with polar flagellation, containing both cytochrome c(3) and desulfoviridin, are divided into two subgroups. One includes the fresh-water, nonhalophilic strains with base ratio from 0.54 to 0.59, and the other includes the halophilic or halotolerant strains with base ratio from 0.74 to 0.77. The sporulated, peritrichous strains without cytochrome and desulfoviridin ("nigrificans" and "orientis") are distinct from the above two types and differ from each other, having base ratios of 1.20 and 1.43, respectively.

  12. Ultrastructure and phylogenetic placement within Heterolobosea of the previously unclassified, extremely halophilic heterotrophic flagellate Pleurostomum flabellatum (Ruinen 1938).

    PubMed

    Park, Jong S; Simpson, Alastair G B; Lee, Won J; Cho, Byung C

    2007-07-01

    optimally at 300 per thousand salinity and fails to grow below 200 per thousand salinity, indicating that it is an 'extreme halophile'. The optimal salinity for growth is the highest for any eukaryote examined to date.

  13. Purification, Characterization, and Genetic Analysis of Cu-Containing Dissimilatory Nitrite Reductase from a Denitrifying Halophilic Archaeon, Haloarcula marismortui

    PubMed Central

    Ichiki, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yoko; Mochizuki, Kiyotaka; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Sakurai, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2001-01-01

    Cu-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase (CuNiR) was purified from denitrifying cells of a halophilic archaeon, Haloarcula marismortui. The purified CuNiR appeared blue in the oxidized state, possessing absorption peaks at 600 and 465 nm in the visible region. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy suggested the presence of type 1 Cu (gII = 2.232; AII = 4.4 mT) and type 2 Cu centers (gII = 2.304; AII = 13.3 mT) in the enzyme. The enzyme contained two subunits, whose apparent molecular masses were 46 and 42 kDa, according to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis indicated that the two subunits were identical, except that the 46-kDa subunit was 16 amino acid residues longer than the 42-kDa subunit in the N-terminal region. A nirK gene encoding the CuNiR was cloned and sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequence with a residual length of 361 amino acids was homologous (30 to 41%) with bacterial counterparts. Cu-liganding residues His-133, Cys-174, His-182, and Met-187 (for type 1 Cu) and His-138, His-173, and His-332 (for type 2 Cu) were conserved in the enzyme. As generally observed in the halobacterial enzymes, the enzymatic activity of the purified CuNiR was enhanced during increasing salt concentration and reached its maximum in the presence of 2 M NaCl with the value of 960 μM NO2− · min−1 · mg−1. PMID:11418554

  14. Osmoadaptation Strategy of the Most Halophilic Fungus, Wallemia ichthyophaga, Growing Optimally at Salinities above 15% NaCl

    PubMed Central

    Zajc, Janja; Kogej, Tina; Galinski, Erwin A.; Ramos, José

    2014-01-01

    Wallemia ichthyophaga is a fungus from the ancient basidiomycetous genus Wallemia (Wallemiales, Wallemiomycetes) that grows only at salinities between 10% (wt/vol) NaCl and saturated NaCl solution. This obligate halophily is unique among fungi. The main goal of this study was to determine the optimal salinity range for growth of the halophilic W. ichthyophaga and to unravel its osmoadaptation strategy. Our results showed that growth on solid growth media was extremely slow and resulted in small colonies. On the other hand, in the liquid batch cultures, the specific growth rates of W. ichthyophaga were higher, and the biomass production increased with increasing salinities. The optimum salinity range for growth of W. ichthyophaga was between 15 and 20% (wt/vol) NaCl. At 10% NaCl, the biomass production and the growth rate were by far the lowest among all tested salinities. Furthermore, the cell wall content in the dry biomass was extremely high at salinities above 10%. Our results also showed that glycerol was the major osmotically regulated solute, since its accumulation increased with salinity and was diminished by hypo-osmotic shock. Besides glycerol, smaller amounts of arabitol and trace amounts of mannitol were also detected. In addition, W. ichthyophaga maintained relatively small intracellular amounts of potassium and sodium at constant salinities, but during hyperosmotic shock, the amounts of both cations increased significantly. Given our results and the recent availability of the genome sequence, W. ichthyophaga should become well established as a novel model organism for studies of halophily in eukaryotes. PMID:24162565

  15. Halobacillus alkaliphilus sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt lake in Fuente de Piedra, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ida; Finore, Ilaria; Nicolaus, Giancarlo; Huertas, F Javier; Lama, Licia; Nicolaus, Barbara; Poli, Annarita

    2008-04-01

    A Gram-positive, spore-forming, halophilic bacterial strain, FP5T, was isolated from a salt lake in southern Spain and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain FP5T was strictly aerobic. Cells were coccoidal, occurring singly or in clusters. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type of strain FP5T was A4 beta based on l-Orn-d-Asp. Strain FP5T was characterized chemotaxonomically by having MK-7 as the major menaquinone and anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0 as the main fatty acids. The isolate grew optimally at 37 degrees C and in presence of 10 % NaCl; no growth was observed in the absence of NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 43.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain FP5T falls within the evolutionary radiation of species of the genus Halobacillus. Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain FP5T and the type strains of nine recognized Halobacillus species were in the range 97.0-99.0 %. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness indicated that strain FP5T represents a genomic species that is distinct from recognized Halobacillus species. Strain FP5T could be differentiated from recognized Halobacillus species based on several phenotypic characteristics. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic data, strain FP5T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Halobacillus, for which the name Halobacillus alkaliphilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FP5T (=DSM 18525T =ATCC BAA-1361T).

  16. Co-metabolic degradation of benzo(e)pyrene by halophilic bacterial consortium at different saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Arulazhagan, P; Sivaraman, C; Kumar, S Adish; Aslam, M; Banu, J Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with high molecular weight (more than three benzene rings) were difficult to degrade in saline environment. The present study details about the bacterial consortium enriched from industrial sludge from salt manufacturing company, Tuticorin, Tamilnadu (India), which was capable of degrading 1, 4 dioxane (Emerging micropollutant) and also phenanthrene as sole carbon source under saline condition. The halophilic bacterial consortium was able to degrade low molecular weight (LMW) phenanthrene, but unable to degrade high molecular weight (HMW) benzo(e)pyrene. To overcome this problem, phenanthrene was added as co-substrate along with benzo(e)pyrene which enhanced the biodegradation process by co-metabolism under saline conditions. The consortium potentially degraded 80% and 99% of benzo(e)pyrene in 7 days and phenanthrene in 5 days at 30 g l⁻¹ of NaCl concentration. When the saline concentration increased to 60 g l⁻¹, degradation of phenanthrene (97% in 8 days) and benzo(e)pyrene (65% in 10 days) was observed. Further increase in saline concentration to 90 g I⁻¹ of NaCI showed reduction in the percent degradation of phenanthrene and benzo(e)pyrene leads to 30.3% and 9% respectively in 6 days. Potential bacterial strains, present in PAHs degrading bacterial consortium were identified as Achromobacter sp. AYS3 (JQ419751), Marinobacter sp. AYS4 (JQ419752) and Rhodanobacter sp. AYS5 (JQ419753). The present study details about the effect of salinity on PAHs degradation and vital role of co-metabolism on biodegradation of benzo(e)pyrene with phenanthrene under saline conditions.

  17. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing osmolyte glycine betaine synthesizing enzymes from halophilic methanogen promote tolerance to drought and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shu-Jung; Lai, Mei-Chin; Lee, Ren-Jye; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Yen, Hungchen Emilie

    2014-07-01

    Glycine betaine (betaine) has the highest cellular osmoprotective efficiency which does not accumulate in most glycophytes. The biosynthetic pathway for betaine in higher plants is derived from the oxidation of low-accumulating metabolite choline that limiting the ability of most plants to produce betaine. Halophilic methanoarchaeon Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1(T) is a model anaerobic methanogen to study the acclimation of water-deficit stresses which de novo synthesize betaine by the stepwise methylation of glycine, catalyzed by glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) and sarcosine dimethylglycine N-methyltransferase. In this report, genes encoding these betaine biosynthesizing enzymes, Mpgsmt and Mpsdmt, were introduced into Arabidopsis. The homozygous Mpgsmt (G), Mpsdmt (S), and their cross, Mpgsmt and Mpsdmt (G × S) plants showed increased accumulation of betaine. Water loss from detached leaves was slower in G, S, and G × S lines than wild-type (WT). Pot-grown transgenic plants showed better growth than WT after 9 days of withholding water or irrigating with 300 mM NaCl. G, S, G × S lines also maintained higher relative water content and photosystem II activity than WT under salt stress. This suggests heterologously expressed Mpgsmt and Mpsdmt could enhance tolerance to drought and salt stress in Arabidopsis. We also found a twofold increase in quaternary ammonium compounds in salt-stressed leaves of G lines, presumably due to the activation of GSMT activity by high salinity. This study demonstrates that introducing stress-activated enzymes is a way of avoiding the divergence of primary metabolites under normal growing conditions, while also providing protection in stressful environments.

  18. Biological treatment of produced water in a sequencing batch reactor by a consortium of isolated halophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pendashteh, A R; Fakhru'l-Razi, A; Chuah, T G; Radiah, A B Dayang; Madaeni, S S; Zurina, Z A

    2010-10-01

    Produced water or oilfield wastewater is the largest volume ofa waste stream associated with oil and gas production. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological pretreatment of synthetic and real produced water in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to remove hydrocarbon compounds. The SBR was inoculated with isolated tropical halophilic microorganisms capable of degrading crude oil. A total sequence of 24 h (60 min filling phase; 21 h aeration; 60 min settling and 60 min decant phase) was employed and studied. Synthetic produced water was treated with various organic loading rates (OLR) (0.9 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), 1.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and 3.6 kg COD m(-3) d(-1)) and different total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration (35,000 mg L(-1), 100,000 mg L(-1), 150,000 mg L(-1), 200,000 mg L(-1) and 250,000 mg L(-1)). It was found that with an OLR of 0.9 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and 1.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), average oil and grease (O&G) concentrations in the effluent were 7 mg L(-1) and 12 mg L(-1), respectively. At TDS concentration of 35,000 mg L(-1) and at an OLR of 1.8 kg COD m(-3)d(-1), COD and O&G removal efficiencies were more than 90%. However, with increase in salt content to 250,000 mg L(-1), COD and O&G removal efficiencies decreased to 74% and 63%, respectively. The results of biological treatment of real produced water showed that the removal rates of the main pollutants of wastewater, such as COD, TOC and O&G, were above 81%, 83%, and 85%, respectively.

  19. Modeling heterotrophic bacteria in plumbing system of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Al-Zahrani, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated occurrences of heterotrophic (HPC) bacteria and developed predictive models for HPC bacteria in plumbing pipes (PP) and hot water tanks (HWT) of two houses in Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Heterotrophic bacteria in PP and HWT were observed to be 2.4 to 5.3 and 0.4 to 5.9 times the HPC bacteria in water distribution system (WDS), respectively. Three linear, one nonlinear, and one neural network models were investigated to predict HPC bacteria in PP and HWT. Significant factors for bacteria regrowth in PP and HWT were identified through numerical and graphical techniques. The R2 values of the models varied between 0.57 and 0.96, indicating moderate to excellent predictive ability for HPC bacteria in PP and HWT. The models were found to be statistically significant, which were also validated using additional data. These models can be used to predict HPC bacteria regrowth from WDS to PP and HWT, and could help to predict exposure and risks.

  20. The fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  1. Identification and analysis of the metabolic functions of a high-salt-tolerant halophilic aromatic yeast Candida etchellsii for soy sauce production.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Li-Min; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2012-04-01

    Salt-tolerant yeasts are very important for the flavor formation in soy sauce fermentation production. A halophilic aromatic yeast was isolated on the basis of the molecular biological and metabolic functions from soy sauce. The ITS nucleotide sequence alignment method was used to identify the strain as Candida etchellsii by subjecting the sequence to NCBI-BLAST in comparison with that of the C. etchellsii strain Miso 0208 (a typical high-salt-tolerant halophilic aromatic yeast strain). Organic acids, amino acids and volatile flavor compounds were produced by the yeast strain which were analyzed by HPLC and SPME-GC/MS methods. Tartaric acid (0.979 ± 0.040 g/l), formic acid (0.636 ± 0.030 g/l), lactic acid (2.80 ± 0.10 g/l), α-alkone glutaric acid (0.132 ± 0.015 g/l), citric acid (2.59 ± 0.10 g/l) and succinic acid (3.03 ± 0.20 g/l) were detected at 72 h of fermentation, respectively. Free and acid hydrolyzed amino acids at levels of 3.7355 ± 0.0027 and 11.5604 ± 0.0037 g/l, respectively, 4-ethyl guaiacols as well as other volatile flavor compounds were also detected.

  2. Hypersaline conditions induce changes in cell-wall melanization and colony structure in a halophilic and a xerophilic black yeast species of the genus Trimmatostroma.

    PubMed

    Kogej, Tina; Gorbushina, Anna A; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2006-06-01

    Melanized yeast-like meristematic fungi are characteristic inhabitants of highly stressed environments and are rare eukaryotic extremophiles. Therefore, they are attractive organisms for studies of adaptations. In this study we compared two meristematic species of the genus Trimmatostroma on media of differing water potentials isolated from distinct water-stressed environments: T. salinum from the hypersaline water of a solar saltern, and T. abietis from a marble monument in Crimea. The morphology and melanization of both isolates in response to sodium chloride-induced water stress were investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. We describe and compare the colony form and structure, ultrastructure, and degree of cell-wall melanization of both species in reaction to salinity and to inhibited melanin synthesis. The halophilic T. salinum responded to changed salinity conditions on the level of individual cell ultrastructure and degree of cell wall melanization, whereas the xerophilic rock-inhabiting T. abietis responded with modification of its colony structure. Surprisingly, both the halophilic and the xerophilic Trimmatostroma species were able to adapt to hypersaline growth conditions, although their growth patterns show distinct adaptation of each species to their natural ecological niches.

  3. Raman spectroscopy as a potentialmethod for the detection of extremely halophilic archaea embedded in halite in terrestrial and possibly extraterrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Musso, Maurizio; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2009-12-01

    Evidence for the widespread occurrence of extraterrestrial halite, particularly on Mars, has led to speculations on the possibility of halophilic microbial forms of life; these ideas have been strengthened by reports of viable haloarchaea from sediments of geological age (millions of years). Raman spectroscopy, being a sensitive detection method for future astrobiological investigations onsite, has been used in the current study for the detection of nine different extremely halophilic archaeal strains which had been embedded in laboratory-made halite crystals in order to simulate evaporitic conditions. The cells accumulated preferentially in tiny fluid inclusions, in simulation of the precipitation of salt in natural brines. FT-Raman spectroscopy using laser excitation at 1064 nm and dispersive micro Raman spectroscopy at 514.5 nm were applied. The spectra showed prominent peaks at 1507, 1152 and 1002 cm(-1) which are attributed to haloarchaeal C(50) carotenoid compounds (mainly bacterioruberins). Their intensity varied from strain to strain at 1064-nm laser excitation. Other distinguishable features were peaks due to peptide bonds (amide I, amide III) and to nucleic acids. No evidence for fatty acids was detected, consistent with their general absence in all archaea.These results contribute to a growing database on Raman spectra of terrestrial microorganisms from hypersaline environments and highlight the influence of the different macromolecular composition of diverse strains on these spectra.

  4. Characterization of an organic solvent-tolerant thermostable glucoamylase from a halophilic isolate, Halolactibacillus sp. SK71 and its application in raw starch hydrolysis for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Ying; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A halophilic bacterium Halolactibacillus sp. SK71 producing extracellular glucoamylase was isolated from saline soil of Yuncheng Salt Lake, China. Enzyme production was strongly influenced by the salinity of growth medium with maximum in the presence of 5% NaCl. The glucoamylase was purified to homogeneity with a molecular mass of 78.5 kDa. It showed broad substrate specificity and raw starch hydrolyzing activity. Analysis of hydrolysis products from soluble starch by thin-layer chromatography revealed that glucose was the sole end-product, indicating the enzyme was a true glucoamylase. Optimal enzyme activity was found to be at 70°C, pH 8.0, and 7.5% NaCl. In addition, it was highly active and stable over broad ranges of temperature (0-100°C), pH (7.0-12.0), and NaCl concentration (0-20%), showing excellent thermostable, alkali stable, and halotolerant properties. Furthermore, it displayed high stability in the presence of hydrophobic organic solvents. The purified glucoamylase was applied for raw corn starch hydrolysis and subsequent bioethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yield in terms of grams of ethanol produced per gram of sugar consumed was 0.365 g/g, with 71.6% of theoretical yield from raw corn starch. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using enzymes from halophiles for further application in bioenergy production.

  5. Raman spectroscopy as a potentialmethod for the detection of extremely halophilic archaea embedded in halite in terrestrial and possibly extraterrestrial samples

    PubMed Central

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Musso, Maurizio; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for the widespread occurrence of extraterrestrial halite, particularly on Mars, has led to speculations on the possibility of halophilic microbial forms of life; these ideas have been strengthened by reports of viable haloarchaea from sediments of geological age (millions of years). Raman spectroscopy, being a sensitive detection method for future astrobiological investigations onsite, has been used in the current study for the detection of nine different extremely halophilic archaeal strains which had been embedded in laboratory-made halite crystals in order to simulate evaporitic conditions. The cells accumulated preferentially in tiny fluid inclusions, in simulation of the precipitation of salt in natural brines. FT-Raman spectroscopy using laser excitation at 1064 nm and dispersive micro Raman spectroscopy at 514.5 nm were applied. The spectra showed prominent peaks at 1507, 1152 and 1002 cm−1 which are attributed to haloarchaeal C50 carotenoid compounds (mainly bacterioruberins). Their intensity varied from strain to strain at 1064-nm laser excitation. Other distinguishable features were peaks due to peptide bonds (amide I, amide III) and to nucleic acids. No evidence for fatty acids was detected, consistent with their general absence in all archaea. These results contribute to a growing database on Raman spectra of terrestrial microorganisms from hypersaline environments and highlight the influence of the different macromolecular composition of diverse strains on these spectra. PMID:22058585

  6. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  7. [Methanotrophic bacteria of acid sphagnum bogs].

    PubMed

    Dedysh, S N

    2002-01-01

    Acid sphagnum bogs cover a considerable part of the territory of Russia and are an important natural source of biogenic methane, which is formed in their anaerobic layers. A considerable portion of this methane is consumed in the aerobic part of the bog profile by acidophilic methanotrophic bacteria, which comprise the methane filter of sphagnum bogs and decrease CH4 emission to the atmosphere. For a long time, these bacteria escaped isolation, which became possible only after the elucidation of the optimal conditions of their functioning in situ: pH 4.5 to 5.5; temperature, from 15 to 20 degrees C; and low salt concentration in the solution. Reproduction of these conditions and rejection of earlier used media with a high content of biogenic elements allowed methanotrophic bacteria of two new genera and species--Methylocella palustris and Methylocapsa acidophila--to be isolated from the peat of sphagnum bogs of the northern part of European Russia and West Siberia. These bacteria are well adapted to the conditions in cold, acid, oligotrophic sphagnum bogs. They grow in a pH range of 4.2-7.5 with an optimum at 5.0-5.5, prefer moderate temperatures (15-25 degrees C) and media with a low content of mineral salts (200-500 mg/l), and are capable of active nitrogen fixation. Design of fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for the detection of Methylocella palustris and Methylocapsa acidophila and their application to the analysis of sphagnum peat samples showed that these bacteria represent dominant populations of methanotrophs with a density of 10(5)-10(6) cells/g peat. In addition to Methylocella and Methylocapsa populations, one more abundant population of methanotrophs was revealed (10(6) cells/g peat), which were phylogenetically close to the genus Methylocystis.

  8. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  9. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  10. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  11. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  13. Enteric bacteria mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Edney, Timothy; Jaques, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    Osteomyelitis of the mandible is a relatively rare inflammatory disease that usually stems from the odontogenic polymicrobial flora of the oral cavity. We are reporting 2 unusual cases of mandibular osteomyelitis resulting from enteric bacteria infection. In one patient, abundant clinical evidence suggested a diagnosis of a chronic factitious disease, whereas in the second patient no obvious etiology was found.

  14. Bacteria-surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field. PMID:23930134

  15. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, J Del [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Hau-Riege, Stefan [Fremont, CA; Walton, Chris [Oakland, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  16. Interaction of Extreme Halophilic Archaea With the Evaporites of the Solar Salterns Guerrero Negro Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez, P.; Lopez-Cortés, A.

    2008-12-01

    Hypersaline environments have been significant reservoirs for the long-term evolution of specifically adapted microorganisms. Characterized to have higher salt concentrations (up to 35 g/L), they are worldwide distributed and have a commercial significance. Exportadora de Sal, Guerrero Negro, Mexico has a multipond salterns system designed to harvest common salt (NaCl) from sea water. To achieve this purpose, sea water is pumped through a set of shallow ponds where water evaporates and salts concentrate. Sequential precipitation of CaCO3, CaSO4 2H2O and NaCl occurs in a mineral formations call it evaporites. In the interior of those gypsum-encrusted and halite-encrusted minerals, communities of extremely salt-loving archaea prosper. Previous studies have showed the influence of Haloarchaeal cells in the formation of larger fluid inclusions than crystals formed in sterile salt solutions. S-layer envelopes and cells of Haloarcula strain SP8807 contributed to the nucleation of new crystals of NaCl. Given the significance of the scope in phylogenetic archaeal diversity research, this study had a polyphasic approach. SEM micrographs from a 21- 31% (w/v) gradient salt multipond system evaporites, gave an insight profile of the extreme halophilic archaeal communities thriving in the surface of the gypsum and halite evaporites. Halite crystals were form after 21 days of incubation in solid medium with archaeal cells. Both culture and non-culture dependent methods, Nested-PCR-DGGE analysis and sequencing of 16S rDNA amplified fragment genes from environmental samples and isolated strains were used for this purpose. We isolate three strains from Pond 9 (21.07% total salt concentration) and one strain from Cristallizer 20 (25.15% total salt concentration). 16S rDNA signaling gave 99% of similarity with Halogeometricum borinquense, sequence AF002984, two other strains were 99% of similarity with Halobacterium salinarum, sequence AJ496185 these strains shown different colony

  17. An efficient thermotolerant and halophilic biosurfactant-producing bacterium isolated from Dagang oil field for MEOR application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Langping; Richnow, Hans; Yao, Jun; Jain, Anil

    2014-05-01

    Dagang Oil field (Petro China Company Limited) is one of the most productive oil fields in China. In this study, 34 biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated and cultured from petroleum reservoir of Dagang oil field, using haemolytic assay and the qualitative oil-displacement test. On the basis of 16S rDNA analysis, the isolates were closely related to the species in genus Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Bacillus. One of the isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis BS2 were selected for further study. This bacterium was able to produce a type of biosurfactant with excessive foam-forming properties at 37ºC as well as at higher temperature of 55ºC. The biosurfactant produced by the strain BS2 could reduce the surface tension of the culture broth from 70.87 mN/m to 28.97 mN/m after 8 days of incubation at 37ºC and to 36.15 mN/m after 20 days of incubation at 55ºC, respectively. The biosurfactant showed stability at high temperature (up to 120ºC), a wide range of pH (2 to 12) and salt concentrations (up to 12%) offering potential for biotechnology. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of extracted biosurfactant tentatively characterized the produced biosurfactant as glycolipid derivative. Elemental analysis of the biosurfactant by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the biosurfactant was anionic in nature. 15 days of biodegradation of crude oil suggested a preferential usage of n-alkane upon microbial metabolism of BS2 as a carbon substrate and consequently also for the synthesis of biosurfactants. Core flood studies for oil release indicated 9.6% of additional oil recovery over water flooding at 37ºC and 7.2% of additional oil recovery at 55 ºC. Strain BS2 was characterized as an efficient biosurfactant-producing, thermotolerant and halophillic bacterium and has the potential for application for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) through water flooding in China's oil fields even in situ as adapted to reservoir chemistry and

  18. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  19. Standards for moderate thermal environments.

    PubMed

    Christensen, N K; Olesen, B W

    1985-06-01

    Recently two Draft International Standards dealing with specifications of the conditions for thermal comfort (ISO DIS 7730) and measurement procedures (ISO DIS 7726) have been approved by the International Stadardisation Organisation (ISO). The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has made a standard with similar requirements for the thermal environment (ASHRAE, 1981). To verify the requirements, measurements of different thermal parameters have to be performed. Guidelines as to how and where to measure are also given in the standards. The present paper deals mainly with the requirements and measurements that are relevant for moderate thermal environments in places of residence, offices, hospitals and light industry. For evaluation of very hot or very cold surroundings, other methods are required. Only measurements of parameters that influence the perception of the thermal surroundings are included.

  20. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2009-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  1. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2002-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  2. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  3. Computation by Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-03

    inversion symmetry and time reversal symmetry by dissipat - ing energy , and breaking both these symmetries allows ratcheting. The ability of...durations. All of these devices take advantage of the conversion of chemical energy into propulsion that occurs within bacteria. These devices break spatial...micromachines relying on energy that microorganisms would dissipate “anyway” even in the absence of ratchet structures suggests that researchers could

  4. Shelf-Life and Safety Enhancement of Processed Meat by Hydrostatic Pressure in Combination with Moderate Temperature and Biopreservatives, Phase IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cells/g of four pathogens and four spoilage bacteria along with pediocin AcH or one of two bacteriocin -based biopreservatives . After vacuum-packaging...The effectiveness of a moderate hydrostatic pressure in combination with moderate temperature and biopreservatives to reduce high populations of

  5. Biocide tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortega Morente, Elena; Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Abriouel, Hikmate; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Biocides have been employed for centuries, so today a wide range of compounds showing different levels of antimicrobial activity have become available. At the present time, understanding the mechanisms of action of biocides has also become an important issue with the emergence of bacterial tolerance to biocides and the suggestion that biocide and antibiotic resistance in bacteria might be linked. While most of the mechanisms providing antibiotic resistance are agent specific, providing resistance to a single antimicrobial or class of antimicrobial, there are currently numerous examples of efflux systems that accommodate and, thus, provide tolerance to a broad range of structurally unrelated antimicrobials, both antibiotics and biocides. If biocide tolerance becomes increasingly common and it is linked to antibiotic resistance, not only resistant (even multi-resistant) bacteria could be passed along the food chain, but also there are resistance determinants that can spread and lead to the emergence of new resistant microorganisms, which can only be detected and monitored when the building blocks of resistance traits are understood on the molecular level. This review summarizes the main advances reached in understanding the mechanism of action of biocides, the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to both biocides and antibiotics, and the incidence of biocide tolerance in bacteria of concern to human health and the food industry.

  6. How honey kills bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Paulus H S; te Velde, Anje A; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2010-07-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria tested, including Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, were killed by 10-20% (v/v) honey, whereas > or = 40% (v/v) of a honey-equivalent sugar solution was required for similar activity. Honey accumulated up to 5.62 +/- 0.54 mM H(2)O(2) and contained 0.25 +/- 0.01 mM methylglyoxal (MGO). After enzymatic neutralization of these two compounds, honey retained substantial activity. Using B. subtilis for activity-guided isolation of the additional antimicrobial factors, we discovered bee defensin-1 in honey. After combined neutralization of H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1, 20% honey had only minimal activity left, and subsequent adjustment of the pH of this honey from 3.3 to 7.0 reduced the activity to that of sugar alone. Activity against all other bacteria tested depended on sugar, H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1. Thus, we fully characterized the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey.

  7. Haloplanus natans gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic, gas-vacuolate archaeon isolated from Dead Sea-Red Sea water mixtures in experimental outdoor ponds.

    PubMed

    Bardavid, Rahel Elevi; Mana, Lily; Oren, Aharon

    2007-04-01

    To study biological phenomena in the Dead Sea and to simulate the effects of mixing Dead Sea water with Red Sea water, experimental mesocosms were operated at the Dead Sea Works at Sedom, Israel. Dense communities of red halophilic archaea developed in mesocosms filled with 80 % Dead Sea water and 20 % Red Sea water after enrichment with phosphate. The most common type of colonies isolated from these brines belonged to the genus Halorubrum. A few white-pinkish opaque colonies contained pleomorphic flat cells with gas vesicles. Three strains isolated from the latter colonies were characterized in depth. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences showed only 91 % similarity to the closest cultured relative (Haloferax mediterranei), indicating that the new strains represent a novel species of a new genus. The name Haloplanus natans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this novel organism. The type strain of Haloplanus natans is RE-101(T) (=DSM 17983(T)=JCM 14081(T)).

  8. Moderately luminous Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Pastorello, A.; Turatto, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Botticella, M. T.; Bufano, F.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Harutyunyan, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.; Zampieri, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Core-collapse Supernovae (CC-SNe) descend from progenitors more massive than about 8 M⊙. Because of the young age of the progenitors, the ejecta may eventually interact with the circumstellar medium (CSM) via highly energetic processes detectable in the radio, X-ray, ultraviolet (UV) and, sometimes, in the optical domains. Aims: In this paper we present ultraviolet, optical and near infrared observations of five Type II SNe, namely SNe 2009dd, 2007pk, 2010aj, 1995ad, and 1996W. Together with few other SNe they form a group of moderately luminous Type II events. We investigate the photometric similarities and differences among these bright objects. We also attempt to characterise them by analysing the spectral evolutions, in order to find some traces of CSM-ejecta interaction. Methods: We collected photometry and spectroscopy with several telescopes in order to construct well-sampled light curves and spectral evolutions from the photospheric to the nebular phases. Both photometry and spectroscopy indicate a degree of heterogeneity in this sample. Modelling the data of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad allows us to constrain the explosion parameters and the properties of the progenitor stars. Results: The light curves have luminous peak magnitudes (-16.95 < MB < -18.70). The ejected masses of 56Ni for three SNe span a wide range of values (2.8 × 10-2 M⊙ < M(56Ni)< 1.4 × 10-1 M⊙), while for a fourth (SN 2010aj) we could determine a stringent upper limit (7 × 10-3 M⊙). Clues of interaction, such as the presence of high velocity (HV) features of the Balmer lines, are visible in the photospheric spectra of SNe 2009dd and 1996W. For SN 2007pk we observe a spectral transition from a Type IIn to a standard Type II SN. Modelling the observations of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad with radiation hydrodynamics codes, we infer kinetic plus thermal energies of about 0.2-0.5 foe, initial radii of 2-5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of ~5.0-9.5 M⊙. Conclusions: These

  9. High motility reduces grazing mortality of planktonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matz, Carsten; Jürgens, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    We tested the impact of bacterial swimming speed on the survival of planktonic bacteria in the presence of protozoan grazers. Grazing experiments with three common bacterivorous nanoflagellates revealed low clearance rates for highly motile bacteria. High-resolution video microscopy demonstrated that the number of predator-prey contacts increased with bacterial swimming speed, but ingestion rates dropped at speeds of >25 microm s(-1) as a result of handling problems with highly motile cells. Comparative studies of a moderately motile strain (<25 microm s(-1)) and a highly motile strain (>45 microm s(-1)) further revealed changes in the bacterial swimming speed distribution due to speed-selective flagellate grazing. Better long-term survival of the highly motile strain was indicated by fourfold-higher bacterial numbers in the presence of grazing compared to the moderately motile strain. Putative constraints of maintaining high swimming speeds were tested at high growth rates and under starvation with the following results: (i) for two out of three strains increased growth rate resulted in larger and slower bacterial cells, and (ii) starved cells became smaller but maintained their swimming speeds. Combined data sets for bacterial swimming speed and cell size revealed highest grazing losses for moderately motile bacteria with a cell size between 0.2 and 0.4 microm(3). Grazing mortality was lowest for cells of >0.5 microm(3) and small, highly motile bacteria. Survival efficiencies of >95% for the ultramicrobacterial isolate CP-1 (< or =0.1 microm(3), >50 microm s(-1)) illustrated the combined protective action of small cell size and high motility. Our findings suggest that motility has an important adaptive function in the survival of planktonic bacteria during protozoan grazing.

  10. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Cécile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  11. Novel bacteria associated with Arctic seashore lichens have potential roles in nutrient scavenging.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsdóttir, Margrét Auður; Heiðmarsson, Starri; Jónsdóttir, Anna Rut; Vilhelmsson, Oddur

    2014-05-01

    While generally described as a bipartite mutualistic association between fungi and algae or cyanobacteria, lichens also host diverse and heretofore little explored communities of nonphototrophic endolichenic bacteria. The composition and possible roles of these bacterial communities in the lichen symbiotic association constitute an emerging field of research. Saxicolous (rock-dwelling) seashore lichens present an unusual environment, characterized by rapid fluctuations in temperature, salinity, exposure to solar radiation, etc. The present study focuses on the bacterial biota associated with 4 species of crustose, halophilic, saxicolous seashore lichens found in northern Iceland. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis based characterization of the composition of the lichen-associated microbiotas indicated that they are markedly lichen-species-specific and clearly distinguishable from the environmental microbiota represented by control sampling. A collection of bacterial strains was investigated and partially identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains were found to belong to 7 classes: Alphaproteobacteria, Bacilli, Actinobacteria, Flavobacteria, Cytophagia, Sphingobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Several isolates display only a modest level of similarity to their nearest relatives found in GenBank, suggesting that they comprise previously undescribed taxa. Selected strains were tested for inorganic phosphate solubilization and biodegradation of several biopolymers, such as barley β-glucan, xylan, chitosan, and lignin. The results support a nutrient-scavenging role of the associate microbiota in the seashore lichen symbiotic association.

  12. Joint Workshop on Aspects of Halophilism Held in Jerusalem, March 23-28, 1986. Program/Abstracts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-30

    are usually huihly eutrophic due to primary productivity by eukaryotic algae in some cases, or anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in othes cases...analysis of the pigments produced by strains and the amounts of other cellular isoprenoids is being carried out. The isoprene -based carotenoids represent

  13. Bacteria in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2015-02-15

    Even in clonal bacterial cultures, individual bacteria can show substantial stochastic variation, leading to pitfalls in the interpretation of data derived from millions of cells in a culture. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, as part of their study on osmoadaptation in a cyanobacterium, Nanatani et al. describe employing an ingenious microfluidic device that gently cages individual cells (J Bacteriol 197:676-687, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02276-14). The device is a welcome addition to the toolkit available to probe the responses of individual cells to environmental cues.

  14. Surface layers of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T J; Graham, L L

    1991-01-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance of the results in terms of our perception of the makeup and function of bacterial surfaces and their interaction with the surrounding environment. Images PMID:1723487

  15. Patient moderator interaction in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients' visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients' information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care.

  16. Patient Moderator Interaction in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W.; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients’ visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients’ information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care. PMID:24551364

  17. Isolation and characterization of spirilloid purple phototrophic bacteria forming red layers in microbial mats of Mediterranean salterns: description of Halorhodospira neutriphila sp. nov. and emendation of the genus Halorhodospira.

    PubMed

    Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Matheron, Robert; Riffaud, Christine; Mouné, Sophie; Eatock, Claire; Herbert, Rodney A; Willison, John C; Caumette, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Microbial mats developing in the hypersaline lagoons of a commercial saltern in the Salin-de-Giraud (Rhône delta) were found to contain a red layer fully dominated by spirilloid phototrophic purple bacteria underlying a cyanobacterial layer. From this layer four strains of spirilloid purple bacteria were isolated, all of which were extremely halophilic. All strains were isolated by using the same medium under halophilic photolithoheterotrophic conditions. One of them, strain SG 3105 was a purple non-sulfur bacterial strain closely related to Rhodovibrio sodomensis with a 16S rDNA sequence similarity of 98.8%. The three other isolated strains, SG 3301T, SG 3302 and SG 3304, were purple sulfur bacteria and were found to be very similar. The cells were motile by a polar tuft of flagella. Photosynthetic intracytoplasmic membranes of the lamellar stack type contained BChl a and spirilloxanthin as the major carotenoid. Phototrophic growth with sulfide as electron donor was poor; globules of elemental sulfur were present outside the cells. In the presence of sulfide and CO2 good growth occurred with organic substrates. Optimum growth occurred in the presence of 9-12% (w/v) NaCl at neutral pH (optimal pH 6.8-7) and at 30-35 degrees C. The DNA base composition of strains SG 3301T and SG 3304 were 74.5 and 74.1 mol% G + C, respectively. According to the 16S rDNA sequences, strains SG 3301T and SG 3304 belonged to the genus Halorhodospira, but they were sufficiently separated morphologically, physiologically and genetically from other recognized Halorhodospira species to be described as a new species of the genus. They are, therefore, described as Halorhodospira neutriphila sp. nov. with strain SG 3301T as the type strain (=DSM 15116T).

  18. Bioenergetics of halophiles

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, Janos K.; Balashov, Sergei

    2016-02-26

    In the last grant period we explored the Na+ binding site of the recently discovered light-driven sodium ion pump. The rationale was that comparison of this novel system to the similar proton pumps and chloride ion pumps would reveal the amazingly (and unexpectedly) wide variety of structural features that govern conversion of light-energy into biologically useful transmembrane gradients and thus production of biomass. A thorough description of this system would establish the basis for continuing our funded research on these proteins.

  19. Bioleaching of multiple metals from contaminated sediment by moderate thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Gan, Min; Jie, Shiqi; Li, Mingming; Zhu, Jianyu; Liu, Xinxing

    2015-08-15

    A moderately thermophilic consortium was applied in bioleaching multiple metals from contaminated sediment. The consortium got higher acidification and metals soubilization efficiency than that of the pure strains. The synergistic effect of the thermophilic consortium accelerated substrates utilization. The utilization of substrate started with sulfur in the early stage, and then the pH declined, giving rise to making use of the pyrite. Community dynamic showed that A. caldus was the predominant bacteria during the whole bioleaching process while the abundance of S. thermotolerans increased together with pyrite utilization. Solubilization efficiency of Zn, Cu, Mn and Cd reached 98%, 94%, 95%, and 89% respectively, while As, Hg, Pb was only 45%, 34%, 22%. Logistic model was used to simulate the bioleaching process, whose fitting degree was higher than 90%. Correlation analysis revealed that metal leaching was mainly an acid solubilization process. Fraction analysis revealed that metals decreased in mobility and bioavailability.

  20. Chemical communication in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  1. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  2. Diversification and niche adaptations of Nitrospina-like bacteria in the polyextreme interfaces of Red Sea brines

    PubMed Central

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Blom, Jochen; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) of the genus Nitrospina have exclusively been found in marine environments. In the brine–seawater interface layer of Atlantis II Deep (Red Sea), Nitrospina-like bacteria constitute up to one-third of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. This is much higher compared with that reported in other marine habitats (~10% of all bacteria), and was unexpected because no NOB culture has been observed to grow above 4.0% salinity, presumably due to the low net energy gained from their metabolism that is insufficient for both growth and osmoregulation. Using phylogenetics, single-cell genomics and metagenomic fragment recruitment approaches, we document here that these Nitrospina-like bacteria, designated as Candidatus Nitromaritima RS, are not only highly diverged from the type species Nitrospina gracilis (pairwise genome identity of 69%) but are also ubiquitous in the deeper, highly saline interface layers (up to 11.2% salinity) with temperatures of up to 52 °C. Comparative pan-genome analyses revealed that less than half of the predicted proteome of Ca. Nitromaritima RS is shared with N. gracilis. Interestingly, the capacity for nitrite oxidation is also conserved in both genomes. Although both lack acidic proteomes synonymous with extreme halophiles, the pangenome of Ca. Nitromaritima RS specifically encodes enzymes with osmoregulatory and thermoprotective roles (i.e., ectoine/hydroxyectoine biosynthesis) and of thermodynamic importance (i.e., nitrate and nitrite reductases). Ca. Nitromaritima RS also possesses many hallmark traits of microaerophiles and high-affinity NOB. The abundance of the uncultured Ca. Nitromaritima lineage in marine oxyclines suggests their unrecognized ecological significance in deoxygenated areas of the global ocean. PMID:26657763

  3. Assessing Moderator Variables: Two Computer Simulation Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Craig A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for conceptualizing moderating relationships based on their type (strictly correlational and classically correlational) and form, whether continuous, noncontinuous, logistic, or quantum. Results of computer simulations comparing three statistical approaches for assessing moderator variables are presented, and advantages of…

  4. Best Practices in Online Conference Moderation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Schutter, Adrienne; Fahrni, Patricia; Rudolph, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Facilitation by a moderator is crucial to a purposeful and productive conference. The moderator keeps the session focused, and ensures that all participants receive feedback regarding their contributions to the discussion. These functions are particularly important in the otherwise impersonal context of online discussion. The current report…

  5. Integrating Mediators and Moderators in Research Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, David P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe mediating variables and moderating variables and provide reasons for integrating them in outcome studies. Separate sections describe examples of moderating and mediating variables and the simplest statistical model for investigating each variable. The strengths and limitations of incorporating mediating…

  6. Biotechnology of Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a diverse collection of organisms that are defined by their ability to grow using energy from light without evolving oxygen. The dominant groups are purple sulfur bacteria, purple nonsulfur bacteria, green sulfur bacteria, and green and red filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. They represent several bacterial phyla but they all have bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids and photochemical reaction centers which generate ATP and cellular reductants used for CO2 fixation. They typically have an anaerobic lifestyle in the light, although some grow aerobically in the dark. Some of them oxidize inorganic sulfur compounds for light-dependent CO2 fixation; this ability can be exploited for photobiological removal of hydrogen sulfide from wastewater and biogas. The anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria also perform bioremediation of recalcitrant dyes, pesticides, and heavy metals under anaerobic conditions. Finally, these organisms may be useful for overexpression of membrane proteins and photobiological production of H2 and other valuable compounds.

  7. Development of an expression system for eukarytoic proteins in methylotropic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this project was to develop an expression vector for methylotrophic bacteria for use in the production of C{sup 13} and H{sup 2} labelled eukaryotic proteins by growing methylotrophic bacteria on labelled methanol or methylamine. The eukaryotic proteins calmodulin and troponin C were chosen as test cases. Genes encoding both proteins were cloned into different constructions and tested for expression. Moderate amounts of troponin C were found with one of the constructions.

  8. Halosimplex carlsbadense gen. nov., sp. nov., a unique halophilic archaeon, with three 16S rRNA genes, that grows only in defined medium with glycerol and acetate or pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Vreeland, Russell H; Straight, Scott; Krammes, Jessica; Dougherty, Kevin; Rosenzweig, William D; Kamekura, Masahiro

    2002-12-01

    A halophilic archaeon has been isolated from unsterilized salt crystals taken from the 250-million-year-old Salado formation in southeastern New Mexico. This microorganism grows only on defined media supplemented with either a combination of acetate and glycerol, glycerol and pyruvate, or pyruvate alone. The archaeon is unable to grow on complex media or to use carbohydrates, amino acids, fats, proteins, or nucleic acids for growth. Unlike other halophilic microbes, this organism possesses four glycolipids, two of which may be novel. The microbe is unique in that it has three dissimilar 16S rRNA genes. Two of the three genes show only 97% similarity to one another, while the third gene possesses only 92%-93% similarity to the other two. Inferred phylogenies indicate that the organism belongs to a deep branch in the line of Haloarcula and Halorhabdus. All three lines of taxonomic evidence: phenotype, lipid patterns, and phylogeny, support creation of a new genus and species within the halophilic Archaea. The name suggested for this new genus and species is Halosimplex carlsbadense. The type strain is 2-9-1(T) (= ATCC BAA-75 and JCM 11222) as written in the formal description.

  9. Kin Recognition in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wall, Daniel

    2016-09-08

    The ability of bacteria to recognize kin provides a means to form social groups. In turn these groups can lead to cooperative behaviors that surpass the ability of the individual. Kin recognition involves specific biochemical interactions between a receptor(s) and an identification molecule(s). Recognition specificity, ensuring that nonkin are excluded and kin are included, is critical and depends on the number of loci and polymorphisms involved. After recognition and biochemical perception, the common ensuing cooperative behaviors include biofilm formation, quorum responses, development, and swarming motility. Although kin recognition is a fundamental mechanism through which cells might interact, microbiologists are only beginning to explore the topic. This review considers both molecular and theoretical aspects of bacterial kin recognition. Consideration is also given to bacterial diversity, genetic relatedness, kin selection theory, and mechanisms of recognition.

  10. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  11. Phosphonate utilization by bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, A M; Daughton, C G; Alexander, M

    1978-01-01

    Bacteria able to use at least one of 13 ionic alkylphosphonates of O-alkyl or O,O-dialkyl alkylphosphonates as phosphorus sources were isolated from sewage and soil. Four of these isolates used 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid (AEP) as a sole carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus source. None of the other phosphonates served as a carbon source for the organisms. One isolate, identified as Pseudomonas putida, grew with AEP as its sole carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus source and released nearly all of the organic phosphorus as orthophosphate and 72% of the AEP nitrogen as ammonium. This is the first demonstration of utilization of a phosphonoalkyl moiety as a sole carbon source. Cell-free extracts of P. putida contained an inducible enzyme system that required pyruvate and pyridoxal phosphate to release orthophosphate from AEP; acetaldehyde was tentatively identified as a second product. Phosphite inhibited the enzyme system. PMID:618850

  12. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Profiling of Moderate and Severe COPD Sputum in Taiwanese Han Males

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory lung disorder characterized by the progressive obstruction of airflow and is currently the fourth leading cause of death in the world. The pathogenesis of COPD is thought to involve bacterial infections and inflammations. Owing to advancement in sequencing technology, evidence is emerging that supports an association between the lung microbiome and COPD. However, few studies have looked into the expression profile of the bacterial communities in the COPD lungs. In this study, we analyzed the sputum microbiome of four moderate and four severe COPD male patients both at the DNA and RNA level, using next generation sequencing technology. We found that bacterial composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing may not directly translate to the set of actively expressing bacteria as defined by transcriptome sequencing. The two sequencing data agreed on Prevotella, Rothia, Neisseria, Porphyromonas, Veillonella, Fusobacterium and Streptococcus being among the most differentially abundant genera between the moderate and severe COPD samples, supporting their association with COPD severity. However, the two sequencing analyses disagreed on the relative abundance of these bacteria in the two COPD groups, implicating the importance of studying the actively expressing bacteria for enriching our understanding of COPD. Though we have described the metatranscriptome profiles of the lung microbiome in moderate and severe COPD, further investigations are required to determine the functional basis underlying the relationship between the microbial species in the lungs and pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:27428540

  13. The structural bases of long-term anabiosis in non-spore-forming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzina, Natalia E.; Mulyukin, Andrey L.; Dmitriev, Vladimir V.; Nikolaev, Yury A.; Shorokhova, Anna P.; Bobkova, Yulia S.; Barinova, Ekaterina S.; Plakunov, Vladimir K.; El-Registan, Galina I.; Duda, Vitalii I.

    2006-01-01

    Peculiarities of the structural organization in non-spore-forming bacteria associated with long-term anabiosis were revealed both in laboratory cultures and in natural populations isolated from 1 3-Myr-old Eastern Siberian permafrost and tundra soil. Different advanced methods were used, including (a) high-resolution electron microscopy; (b) simulation of in situ conditions in the laboratory by varying the composition of growth medium and cultivation conditions; (c) low-temperature fractionation to isolate and concentrate microbial cells from natural soils; (d) comparative morphological analysis of microbial cells in model cultures and natural soils (in situ). Under laboratory conditions, the intense formation of resting cells by representatives of various taxa of eubacteria and halophilic archaea occurred in 2 9-month-old cultures grown in carbon-, nitrogen-, or phosphorus-limited media, in starved cell suspensions in the presence of sodium silicate, or on soil agar. Among resting cells, we revealed cystlike forms having a complicated structure and common features. These included a thick capsule; a thickened and multiprofile cell wall; the presence of large intramembrane particles on PF- and EF-fracture surfaces; fine-grained or lumpy cytoplasm; and a condensed nucleoid. The general morphological properties, ultrastructural organization, physiological features of cystlike cells, and their ability to germinate under the appropriate conditions suggest the existence of constitutive dormancy in non-spore-forming bacteria. It was found that the majority of microorganisms in permafrost and tundra soil are cystlike cells, very similar to those in laboratory cultures. Anabiotic (resting) cystlike cells are responsible for the survival of non-spore-formers in extreme Earth habitats and may be regarded as possible analogs of extraterrestrial forms of microbial life.

  14. JACKETED FUEL ELEMENTS FOR GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.; Wigner, E.P.; Creutz, E.C.

    1959-05-12

    Fuel elements for a heterogeneous, fluid cooled, graphite moderated reactor are described. The fuel elements are comprised of a body of natural uranium hermetically sealed in a jacket of corrosion resistant material. The jacket, which may be aluminum or some other material which is non-fissionable and of a type having a low neutron capture cross-section, acts as a barrier between the fissioning isotope and the coolant or moderator or both. The jacket minimizes the tendency of the moderator and coolant to become radioactive and/or contaminated by fission fragments from the fissioning isotope.

  15. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  16. [Pseudomonas genus bacteria on weeds].

    PubMed

    Gvozdiak, R I; Iakovleva, L M; Pasichnik, L A; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown in the work that the weeds (couch-grass and ryegrass) may be affected by bacterial diseases in natural conditions, Pseudomonas genus bacteria being their agents. The isolated bacteria are highly-aggressive in respect of the host-plant and a wide range of cultivated plants: wheat, rye, oats, barley, apple-tree and pear-tree. In contrast to highly aggressive bacteria isolated from the affected weeds, bacteria-epi phytes isolated from formally healthy plants (common amaranth, orache, flat-leaved spurge, field sow thistle, matricary, common coltsfoot, narrow-leaved vetch) and identified as P. syringae pv. coronafaciens, were characterized by weak aggression. A wide range of ecological niches of bacteria evidently promote their revival and distribution everywhere in nature.

  17. Response of the extremely halophilic Halococcus dombrowskii strain H4 to UV radiation and space conditions in the EXPOSE -ADAPT project on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Grosbacher, Michael; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2010-05-01

    The international project ADAPT focuses on the response of different microorganisms to outer space conditions. In 2007, the European Space Agency (ESA) has installed the Columbus laboratory and the exposure facility EXPOSE-E on the International Space Station (ISS). One of the microorganisms that were exposed for 18 months on the ISS is Halococcus dombrowskii strain H4, an extremely halophilic archaeon which was isolated from about 250 million years old alpine salt deposits (1). Ground experiments with Hcc. dombrowskii included irradiation with different wavelengths and doses of UV, using a Hg low pressure lamp, a solar simulator SOL2 (both at the DLR, Cologne) and a Mars UV simulation lamp (2). Cells were embedded in halite crystals which were formed on quartz discs by evaporation of high salt buffers. Methods for analyzing the effects of exposure on Hcc. dombrowskii include the estimation of colony forming units (CFUs), staining for viability with the BacLight LIVE/DEAD kit (2), establishing long term liquid cultures and determination of the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) with specific antibodies (3). Counting of viable (green) and dead (red) cells showed an apparent preservation of viability following exposure to about 21 kJ/m2 in ground experiments, but the calculated D37 (dose of 37 % survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii was about 400 kJ/m2 in salt crystals (2). CPDs were detected in about 6-8% of cells of Hcc. dombrowskii following exposure to a dose of 3000 kJ/m2 (200-400 nm). Preliminary results with the samples of Hcc. dombrowskii from the ISS suggested preservation of cellular morphology and stainability with the fluorescent dyes of the LIVE/DEAD kit, as well as formation of CPDs in about 2-3 % of the cells. The determination of the survival of cells by measuring proliferation requires months of incubation; data can be expected in May or June 2010. (1) Stan-Lotter H, Pfaffenhuemer M, Legat A, Busse H-J, Radax C, Gruber C (2002) Halococcus

  18. TMD Evolution at Moderate Hard Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Ted; Collins, John C.

    2016-01-01

    We summarize some of our recent work on non-perturbative transverse momentum dependent (TMD) evolution, emphasizing aspects that are necessary for dealing with moderately low scale processes like semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  19. Sociomicrobiology and pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Joao B.

    2015-01-01

    The study of microbial pathogenesis has been primarily a reductionist science since Koch's principles. Reductionist approaches are essential to identify the causal agents of infectious disease, their molecular mechanisms of action and potential drug targets, and much of medicine's success in the treatment of infectious disease comes from this approach. But many bacterial caused diseases cannot be explained by focusing on a single bacterium. Many aspects of bacterial pathogenesis will benefit from a more holistic approach that takes into account social interaction within bacteria of the same species and between different species in consortia such as the human microbiome. I discuss recent advances in the emerging discipline of sociomicrobiology and how it provides a framework to dissect microbial interactions in single and multispecies communities without compromising mechanistic detail. The study of bacterial pathogenesis can benefit greatly from incorporating concepts from other disciplines such as social evolution theory and microbial ecology where communities, their interactions with hosts and with the environment play key roles. PMID:27337482

  20. Tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Damborský, J

    1999-01-01

    Tetrachloroethene is a frequent groundwater contaminant often persisting in the subsurface environments. It is recalcitrant under aerobic conditions because it is in a highly oxidized state and is not readily susceptible to oxidation. Nevertheless, at least 15 organisms from different metabolic groups, viz. halorespirators (9), acetogens (2), methanogens (3) and facultative anaerobes (2), that are able to metabolize tetrachloroethene have been isolated as axenic cultures to-date. Some of these organisms couple dehalo-genation to energy conservation and utilize tetrachloroethene as the only source of energy while others dehalogenate tetrachloroethene fortuitously. Halorespiring organisms (halorespirators) utilize halogenated organic compounds as electron acceptors in an anaerobic respiratory process. Different organisms exhibit differences in the final products of tetrachloroethene dehalogenation, some strains convert tetrachloroethene to trichloroethene only, while others also carry out consecutive dehalogenation to dichloroethenes and vinyl chloride. Thus far, only a single organism, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes' strain 195, has been isolated which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene all the way down to ethylene. The majority of tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating organisms have been isolated only in the past few years and several of them, i.e., Dehalobacter restrictus, Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes', 'Dehalospirillum multivorans', Desulfuromonas chloroethenica, and Desulfomonile tiedjei, are representatives of new taxonomic groups. This contribution summarizes the available information regarding the axenic cultures of the tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria. The present knowledge about the isolation of these organisms, their physiological characteristics, morphology, taxonomy and their ability to dechlorinate tetrachloroethene is presented to facilitate a comprehensive comparison.

  1. Moderators of Sexual Behavior in Gay Men

    PubMed Central

    Roloff, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated factors that might moderate the association between sexual behavior desires and sexual behavior enactments in gay men. Condom eschewal, number of STIs, HIV serostatus, age, and relationship status were each hypothesized to moderate this association. An Internet survey collected data from 219 self-identifying gay men. Results indicated that sexual behavior desires and enactments were highly correlated, and of the five moderators tested, four varied this association. Condom eschewers had a stronger association between desires and enactments than condom users. Gay men with fewer STIs/STDs (excluding HIV) also had a stronger association between the two variables. HIV serostatus did not exclusively moderate the association. Rather, a three-way interaction was produced such that HIV-positive men with STIs had a stronger association between sexual behavior desires and enactments than HIV-negative men with STIs. Finally, gay men in monogamous relationships were least likely to have their desires associated with enactments. Age was not found to be a significant moderator. Overall, we concluded the moderators representing sexual health and sexual health behaviors were most influential over the enactment of sexual behavior desires. PMID:18719988

  2. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  3. Bacteria detection by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Karo, Oliver; Wahl, Alexandra; Nicol, Sven-Boris; Brachert, Julia; Lambrecht, Bernd; Spengler, Hans-Peter; Nauwelaers, Frans; Schmidt, Michael; Schneider, Christian K; Müller, Thomas H; Montag, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since bacterial infection of the recipient has become the most frequent infection risk in transfusion medicine, suitable methods for bacteria detection in blood components are of great interest. Platelet concentrates are currently the focus of attention, as they are stored under temperature conditions, which enable the multiplication of most bacteria species contaminating blood donations. Rapid methods for bacteria detection allow testing immediately before transfusion in a bed-side like manner. This approach would overcome the sampling error observed in early sampling combined with culturing of bacteria and would, at least, prevent the transfusion of highly contaminated blood components leading to acute septic shock or even death of the patient. Flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be a rapid and feasible approach for detection of bacteria in platelet concentrates. The general aim of the current study was to develop protocols for the application of this technique under routine conditions. The effect of improved test reagents on practicability and sensitivity of the method is evaluated. Furthermore, the implementation of fluorescent absolute count beads as an internal standard is demonstrated. A simplified pre-incubation procedure has been undertaken to diminish the detection limit in a pragmatic manner. Additionally, the application of bacteria detection by flow cytometry as a culture method is shown, i.e., transfer of samples from platelet concentrates into a satellite bag, incubation of the latter at 37 degrees C, and measuring the contaminating bacteria in a flow cytometer.

  4. Interactions between diatoms and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shady A; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-09-01

    Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans.

  5. Motility of Electric Cable Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces with a highly variable speed of 0.5 ± 0.3 μm s−1 (mean ± standard deviation) and time between reversals of 155 ± 108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment. IMPORTANCE This study reports on the motility of cable bacteria, capable of transmitting electrons over centimeter distances. It gives us a new insight into their behavior in sediments and explains previously puzzling findings. Cable bacteria greatly influence their environment, and this article adds significantly to the body of knowledge about this organism. PMID:27084019

  6. Comparative genomics study of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and ectoine relevant genes from Halomonas sp. TD01 revealed extensive horizontal gene transfer events and co-evolutionary relationships

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Halophilic bacteria have shown their significance in industrial production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and are gaining more attention for genetic engineering modification. Yet, little information on the genomics and PHA related genes from halophilic bacteria have been disclosed so far. Results The draft genome of moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas sp. TD01, a strain of great potential for industrial production of short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), was analyzed through computational methods to reveal the osmoregulation mechanism and the evolutionary relationship of the enzymes relevant to PHA and ectoine syntheses. Genes involved in the metabolism of PHA and osmolytes were annotated and studied in silico. Although PHA synthase, depolymerase, regulator/repressor and phasin were all involved in PHA metabolic pathways, they demonstrated different horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events between the genomes of different strains. In contrast, co-occurrence of ectoine genes in the same genome was more frequently observed, and ectoine genes were more likely under coincidental horizontal gene transfer than PHA related genes. In addition, the adjacent organization of the homologues of PHA synthase phaC1 and PHA granule binding protein phaP was conserved in the strain TD01, which was also observed in some halophiles and non-halophiles exclusively from γ-proteobacteria. In contrast to haloarchaea, the proteome of Halomonas sp. TD01 did not show obvious inclination towards acidity relative to non-halophilic Escherichia coli MG1655, which signified that Halomonas sp. TD01 preferred the accumulation of organic osmolytes to ions in order to balance the intracellular osmotic pressure with the environment. Conclusions The accessibility of genome information would facilitate research on the genetic engineering of halophilic bacteria including Halomonas sp. TD01. PMID:22040376

  7. Cytokinesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Errington, Jeffery; Daniel, Richard A.; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2003-01-01

    Work on two diverse rod-shaped bacteria, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, has defined a set of about 10 conserved proteins that are important for cell division in a wide range of eubacteria. These proteins are directed to the division site by the combination of two negative regulatory systems. Nucleoid occlusion is a poorly understood mechanism whereby the nucleoid prevents division in the cylindrical part of the cell, until chromosome segregation has occurred near midcell. The Min proteins prevent division in the nucleoid-free spaces near the cell poles in a manner that is beginning to be understood in cytological and biochemical terms. The hierarchy whereby the essential division proteins assemble at the midcell division site has been worked out for both E. coli and B. subtilis. They can be divided into essentially three classes depending on their position in the hierarchy and, to a certain extent, their subcellular localization. FtsZ is a cytosolic tubulin-like protein that polymerizes into an oligomeric structure that forms the initial ring at midcell. FtsA is another cytosolic protein that is related to actin, but its precise function is unclear. The cytoplasmic proteins are linked to the membrane by putative membrane anchor proteins, such as ZipA of E. coli and possibly EzrA of B. subtilis, which have a single membrane span but a cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. The remaining proteins are either integral membrane proteins or transmembrane proteins with their major domains outside the cell. The functions of most of these proteins are unclear with the exception of at least one penicillin-binding protein, which catalyzes a key step in cell wall synthesis in the division septum. PMID:12626683

  8. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We

  9. Genomic Analysis of the Extremely Halophilic Archaeon Halobacterium noricense CBA1132 Isolated from Solar Salt That Is an Essential Material for Fermented Foods.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seul Ki; Kim, Joon Yong; Song, Hye Seon; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Oh, Young Jun; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Lee, Dong-Gi; Choi, Jong-Soon; Yoon, Changmann; Sohn, Eunju; Rahman, Md Arif-Ur; Roh, Seong Woon; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-08-28

    The extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense is a member of the genus Halobacterium. Strain CBA1132 (= KCCM 43183, JCM 31150) was isolated from solar salt. The genome of strain CBA1132 assembled with 4 contigs, including three rRNA genes, 44 tRNA genes, and 3,208 open reading frames. Strain CBA1132 had nine putative CRISPRs and the genome contained genes encoding metal resistance determinants: copper-translocating P-type ATPase (CtpA), arsenical pump-driving ATPase (ArsA), arsenate reductase (ArsC), and arsenical resistance operon repressor (ArsR). Strain CBA1132 was related to Halobacterium noricense, with 99.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Based on the comparative genomic analysis, strain CBA1132 has distinctly evolved; moreover, essential genes related to nitrogen metabolism were only detected in the genome of strain CBA1132 among the reported genomes in the genus Halobacterium. This genome sequence of Halobacterium noricense CBA1132 may be of use in future molecular biological studies.

  10. Purification, Characterization, and Potential of Saline Waste Water Remediation of a Polyextremophilic α-Amylase from an Obligate Halophilic Aspergillus gracilis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran; Akbar, Ali; Yanwisetpakdee, Benjawan; Prasongsuk, Sehanat; Lotrakul, Pongtharin; Punnapayak, Hunsa

    2014-01-01

    An obligate halophilic Aspergillus gracilis which was isolated from a hypersaline man-made saltern from Thailand was screened for its potential of producing extracellular α-amylase in the previous studies. In this study the α-amylase was extracted and purified by the help of column chromatography using Sephadex G-100 column. Presence of amylase was verified by SDS-PAGE analysis, showing a single band of approximately 35 kDa. The specific activity of the enzyme was found to be 131.02 U/mg. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed the Vmax and Km values of 8.36 U/mg and 6.33 mg/mL, respectively. The enzyme was found to have the best activity at 5 pH, 60°C, and 30% of NaCl concentration, showing its polyextremophilic nature. The use of various additives did not show much variation in the activity of enzyme, showing its resilience against inhibitors. The enzyme, when tested for its use for synthetic waste water remediation by comparing its activity with commercial amylase in different salt concentrations showed that the α-amylase from A. gracilis was having better performance at increasing salt concentrations than the commercial one. This shows its potential to be applied in saline waste water and other low water activity effluents for bioremediation. PMID:24949415

  11. The study of organic removal efficiency and halophilic bacterial mixed liquor characteristics in a membrane bioreactor treating hypersaline produced water at varying organic loading rates.

    PubMed

    Sharghi, Elham Abdollahzadeh; Bonakdarpour, Babak

    2013-12-01

    In this study the organic pollutant removal performance and the mixed liquor characteristics of a membrane bioreactor (MBR), employing a halophilic bacterial consortium, for the treatment of hypersaline synthetic produced water - at varying organic loading rates (OLR) from 0.3 to 2.6 kg CODm(-3)d(-1) - were considered. The oil and grease (O&G) and COD removal efficiency were 95-99% and 83-93%, respectively with only transient O&G (mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and soluble microbial products accumulation being observed. With increasing OLR, in the range 0.9-2.6 kg COD m(-3)d(-1), as a result of change in both extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and zeta potential, bioflocculating ability improved but the compressibility of the flocs decreased resulting in the occurrence of EPS bulking at the highest OLR studied. The latter resulted in a change in the rheology of the mixed liquor from Newtonian to non-Newtonian and the occurrence of significant membrane fouling.

  12. Purification, characterization, and potential of saline waste water remediation of a polyextremophilic α-amylase from an obligate halophilic Aspergillus gracilis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Akbar, Ali; Yanwisetpakdee, Benjawan; Prasongsuk, Sehanat; Lotrakul, Pongtharin; Punnapayak, Hunsa

    2014-01-01

    An obligate halophilic Aspergillus gracilis which was isolated from a hypersaline man-made saltern from Thailand was screened for its potential of producing extracellular α -amylase in the previous studies. In this study the α -amylase was extracted and purified by the help of column chromatography using Sephadex G-100 column. Presence of amylase was verified by SDS-PAGE analysis, showing a single band of approximately 35 kDa. The specific activity of the enzyme was found to be 131.02 U/mg. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed the V max and K m values of 8.36 U/mg and 6.33 mg/mL, respectively. The enzyme was found to have the best activity at 5 pH, 60°C, and 30% of NaCl concentration, showing its polyextremophilic nature. The use of various additives did not show much variation in the activity of enzyme, showing its resilience against inhibitors. The enzyme, when tested for its use for synthetic waste water remediation by comparing its activity with commercial amylase in different salt concentrations showed that the α -amylase from A. gracilis was having better performance at increasing salt concentrations than the commercial one. This shows its potential to be applied in saline waste water and other low water activity effluents for bioremediation.

  13. Characterization of Halanaerobaculum tunisiense gen. nov., sp. nov., a new halophilic fermentative, strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hedi, Abdeljabbar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Sadfi, Najla; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Ollivier, Bernard; Cayol, Jean-Luc

    2009-03-01

    A new halophilic anaerobe was isolated from the hypersaline surface sediments of El-Djerid Chott, Tunisia. The isolate, designated as strain 6SANG, grew at NaCl concentrations ranging from 14 to 30%, with an optimum at 20-22%. Strain 6SANG was a non-spore-forming, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains (0.7-1 x 4-13 microm) and showed a Gram-negative-like cell wall pattern. It grew optimally at pH values between 7.2 and 7.4, but had a very broad pH range for growth (5.9-8.4). Optimum temperature for growth was 42 degrees C (range 30-50 degrees C). Strain 6SANG required yeast extract for growth on sugars. Glucose, sucrose, galactose, mannose, maltose, cellobiose, pyruvate, and starch were fermented. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, butyrate, lactate, H(2), and CO(2). The G + C ratio of the DNA was 34.3 mol%. Strain 6SANG exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 91-92% with members of the genus Halobacteroides, H. halobius being its closest phylogenetic relative. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, we propose that this bacterium be classified as a novel species of a novel genus, Halanaerobaculum tunisiense gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is 6SANG(T) (=DSM 19997(T)=JCM 15060(T)).

  14. Characterization of the Exopolysaccharide Produced by Salipiger mucosus A3T, a Halophilic Species Belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, Isolated on the Spanish Mediterranean Seaboard

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, Inmaculada; Mata, Juan Antonio; Tallon, Richard; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, María C.; Quesada, Emilia; Béjar, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the exopolysaccharide produced by the type strain of Salipiger mucosus, a species of halophilic, EPS-producing (exopolysaccharide-producing) bacterium belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria. The strain, isolated on the Mediterranean seaboard, produced a polysaccharide, mainly during its exponential growth phase but also to a lesser extent during the stationary phase. Culture parameters influenced bacterial growth and EPS production. Yield was always directly related to the quantity of biomass in the culture. The polymer is a heteropolysaccharide with a molecular mass of 250 kDa and its components are glucose (19.7%, w/w), mannose (34%, w/w), galactose (32.9%, w/w) and fucose (13.4%, w/w). Fucose and fucose-rich oligosaccharides have applications in the fields of medicine and cosmetics. The chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis of fucose-rich polysaccharides offers a new efficient way to process fucose. The exopolysaccharide in question produces a solution of very low viscosity that shows pseudoplastic behavior and emulsifying activity on several hydrophobic substrates. It also has a high capacity for binding cations and incorporating considerable quantities of sulfates, this latter feature being very unusual in bacterial polysaccharides. PMID:20948906

  15. Characterization of the exopolysaccharide produced by Salipiger mucosus A3, a halophilic species belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, isolated on the Spanish Mediterranean seaboard.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Inmaculada; Mata, Juan Antonio; Tallon, Richard; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, María C; Quesada, Emilia; Béjar, Victoria

    2010-07-30

    We have studied the exopolysaccharide produced by the type strain of Salipiger mucosus, a species of halophilic, EPS-producing (exopolysaccharide-producing) bacterium belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria. The strain, isolated on the Mediterranean seaboard, produced a polysaccharide, mainly during its exponential growth phase but also to a lesser extent during the stationary phase. Culture parameters influenced bacterial growth and EPS production. Yield was always directly related to the quantity of biomass in the culture. The polymer is a heteropolysaccharide with a molecular mass of 250 kDa and its components are glucose (19.7%, w/w), mannose (34%, w/w), galactose (32.9%, w/w) and fucose (13.4%, w/w). Fucose and fucose-rich oligosaccharides have applications in the fields of medicine and cosmetics. The chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis of fucose-rich polysaccharides offers a new efficient way to process fucose. The exopolysaccharide in question produces a solution of very low viscosity that shows pseudoplastic behavior and emulsifying activity on several hydrophobic substrates. It also has a high capacity for binding cations and incorporating considerable quantities of sulfates, this latter feature being very unusual in bacterial polysaccharides.

  16. Methanohalophilus levihalophilus sp. nov., a slightly halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen isolated from natural gas-bearing deep aquifers, and emended description of the genus Methanohalophilus.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Mochimaru, Hanako; Meng, Xian-Ying; Muramoto, Yoshiyuki; Usami, Jun; Ikeda, Hidefumi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2014-06-01

    A mesophilic, slightly halophilic, obligately methylotrophic, methanogenic archaeon, designated strain GTA13(T), was isolated from natural gas-bearing confined aquifers in the Minami-Kanto gas field, Japan. The cells were non-motile, slightly irregular cocci, 0.7-1.0 µm in diameter and occurred singly, in pairs or as small aggregates. The cells grew with tri- or dimethylamine but not with H2/CO2, formate, acetate, methanol or dimethyl sulphide. Vitamins, sodium and magnesium were required for growth. Optimal growth occurred at pH 7.0-7.5, 35 °C, 0.35-0.40 M NaCl and 15-50 mM MgCl2. The NaCl range for growth was 0.2-1.3 M. The DNA G+C content was 43.7 mol%. Strain GTA13(T) showed highest levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF-1(T) (96.4% sequence similarity) and Methanohalophilus halophilus DSM 3094(T) (96.0%). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic features, strain GTA13(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Methanohalophilus, for which the name Methanohalophilus levihalophilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GTA13(T) ( = NBRC 110099(T) = DSM 28452(T)). An emended description of the genus Methanohalophilus is also proposed.

  17. Motility enhancement of bacteria actuated microstructures using selective bacteria adhesion.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Jun; Bae, Hyeoni; Kim, Joonhwuy; Lim, Byungjik; Park, Jongoh; Park, Sukho

    2010-07-07

    Microrobots developed by the technological advances are useful for application in various fields. Nevertheless, they have limitations with respect to their actuator and motility. Our experiments aim to determine whether a bioactuator using the flagellated bacteria Serratia marcescens would enhance the motility of microrobots. In this study, we investigate that the flagellated bacteria Serratia marcescens could be utilized as actuators for SU-8 microstructures by bovine serum albumin-selective patterning. Firstly, we analyze the adherence of the bacteria to the SU-8 micro cube by selective patterning using 5% BSA. The results show that number of attached-bacteria in the uncoated side of the selectively- coated micro cube with BSA increased by 200% compared with that in all sides of the non treated micro cube. Secondly, the selectively BSA coated micro cube had 210% higher motility than the uncoated micro cube. The results revealed that the bacteria patterned to a specific site using 5% BSA significantly increase the motility of the bacteria actuated microstructure.

  18. Food reinforcement and obesity. Psychological moderators.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Leonard H; Lin, Henry; Carr, Katelyn A; Fletcher, Kelly D

    2012-02-01

    The relative reinforcing value of food (RRV(food)) provides an index of the motivation to eat. Research has shown that RRV(food) is higher in obese individuals than their non-obese peers, is associated with greater energy intake, predicts weight gain and interacts with impulsivity to predict energy intake. This study was designed to determine whether dietary restraint, dietary disinhibition or hunger moderate the effect of RRV(food) on the weight status and energy intake in 273 adults of various body mass index (BMI) levels. Hierarchical regression was used to assess the independent effects of RRV(food) on BMI and energy intake, controlling for age, sex, income, education, minority status, and RRV(reading). Results showed that greater RRV(food), but not RRV(reading), was associated with greater BMI and energy intake. Dietary disinhibition and dietary restraint moderated the relationship between RRV(food) and BMI, with dietary disinhibition being a stronger moderator of this relationship (r(2)=0.20) than dietary restraint (r(2)=0.095). In addition, dietary disinhibition moderated the effect of RRV(food) on energy intake. These results replicate the importance of RRV(food) as a predictor of obesity, and show that psychological factors moderate the effect of food reinforcement on body weight and energy intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00962117.

  19. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  20. Biopreservation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stiles, M E

    1996-10-01

    Biopreservation refers to extended storage life and enhanced safety of foods using the natural microflora and (or) their antibacterial products. Lactic acid bacteria have a major potential for use in biopreservation because they are safe to consume and during storage they naturally dominate the microflora of many foods. In milk, brined vegetables, many cereal products and meats with added carbohydrate, the growth of lactic acid bacteria produces a new food product. In raw meats and fish that are chill stored under vacuum or in an environment with elevated carbon dioxide concentration, the lactic acid bacteria become the dominant population and preserve the meat with a "hidden' fermentation. The same applies to processed meats provided that the lactic acid bacteria survive the heat treatment or they are inoculated onto the product after heat treatment. This paper reviews the current status and potential for controlled biopreservation of foods.

  1. Environmental sources of fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Ishii, Satoshi; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of the research on environmental occurrences of faecal indicator bacteria in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats under different geographic and climatic conditions, and discusses how these external sources may affect surface water quality.

  2. Halarchaeum nitratireducens sp. nov., a moderately acidophilic haloarchaeon isolated from commercial sea salt.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Hiroaki; Yamauchi, Yuto; Echigo, Akinobu; Shimane, Yasuhiro; Kamekura, Masahiro; Itoh, Takashi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Usami, Ron

    2013-11-01

    Two halophilic moderately acidophilic archaeal strains, MH1-136-2(T) and MH1-370-1 were isolated from commercial salt samples made from seawater in Japan and Indonesia, respectively. Cells of the two strains were pleomorphic and Gram-stain-negative. Strain MH1-136-2(T) was pink pigmented, while MH1-370-1 was orange-red pigmented. Strain MH1-136-2(T) was able to grow at 9-30 % (w/v) NaCl (with optimum, 21 % NaCl, w/v) at pH 4.5-6.2 (optimum, pH 5.2-5.5) and at 18-55 °C (optimum, 45 °C). Strain MH1-370-1 was able to grow at 12-30 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 18 %, w/v) at pH 4.2-6.0 (optimum, pH 5.2-5.5) and 20-50 °C (optimum, 45 °C). Strain MH1-136-2(T) required at least 1 mM Mg(2+), while MH1-370-1 required at least 10 mM for growth. Both strains reduced nitrate and nitrite under aerobic conditions. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains MH1-136-2(T) and MH1-370-1 were identical, and the closest relative was Halarchaeum rubridurum MH1-16-3(T) with 98.3 % similarity. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between these strains was 90.9 % and 92.4 % (reciprocally), while that between MH1-136-2(T) and Halarchaeum acidiphilum MH1-52-1(T), Halarchaeum salinum MH1-34-1(T) and Halarchaeum rubridurum MH1-16-3(T) was 37.7 %, 44.3 % and 41.1 % (each an average), respectively. Based on the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic analyses, it is proposed that the isolates represent a novel species of the genus Halarchaeum, for which the name Halarchaeum nitratireducens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MH1-136-2(T) ( = JCM 16331(T) = CECT 7573(T)) isolated from solar salt produced in Japan.

  3. The Mechanical World of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Persat, Alexandre; Nadell, Carey D.; Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Ingremeau, Francois; Siryaporn, Albert; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In the wild, bacteria are predominantly associated with surfaces as opposed to existing as free-swimming, isolated organisms. They are thus subject to surface-specific mechanics including hydrodynamic forces, adhesive forces, the rheology of their surroundings and transport rules that define their encounters with nutrients and signaling molecules. Here, we highlight the effects of mechanics on bacterial behaviors on surfaces at multiple length scales, from single bacteria to the development of multicellular bacterial communities such as biofilms. PMID:26000479

  4. [Nosocomial bacteria: profiles of resistance].

    PubMed

    Sow, A I

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial infections may be parasitic, mycosal or viral, but bacterial infections are more frequent. They are transmitted by hands or by oral route. This paper describes the main bacteria responsive of nosocomial infections, dominated by Staphylococcus, enterobacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The author relates natural and savage profiles of these bacterias, characterized by multiresistance due to large use of antibiotics. Knowledge of natural resistance and verification of aquired resistance permit to well lead probabilist antibiotherapy.

  5. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Youngblood, T.; Lamothe, D.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  6. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  7. The case for moderate gun control.

    PubMed

    DeGrazia, David

    2014-03-01

    In addressing the shape of appropriate gun policy, this essay assumes for the sake of discussion that there is a legal and moral right to private gun ownership. My thesis is that, against the background of this right, the most defensible policy approach in the United States would feature moderate gun control. The first section summarizes the American gun control status quo and characterizes what I call "moderate gun control." The next section states and rebuts six leading arguments against this general approach to gun policy. The section that follows presents a positive case for moderate gun control that emphasizes safety in the home and society as well as rights whose enforcement entails some limits or qualifications on the right to bear arms. A final section shows how the recommended gun regulations address legitimate purposes, rather than imposing arbitrary restrictions on gun rights, and offers concluding reflections.

  8. Isolation and Identification of Concrete Environment Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, J. M.; Anneza, L. H.; Othman, N.; Husnul, T.; Alshalif, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the isolation and molecular method for bacteria identification through PCR and DNA sequencing. Identification of the bacteria species is required in order to fully utilize the bacterium capability for precipitation of calcium carbonate in concrete. This process is to enable the addition of suitable catalyst according to the bacterium enzymatic pathway that is known through the bacteria species used. The objective of this study is to isolate, enriched and identify the bacteria species. The bacteria in this study was isolated from fresh urine and acid mine drainage water, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Enrichment of the isolated bacteria was conducted to ensure the bacteria survivability in concrete. The identification of bacteria species was done through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rRDNA sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of the bacteria was done successfully. Whereas, the results for bacteria identification showed that the isolated bacteria strains are Bacillus sp and Enterococus faecalis.

  9. Comparison of Artemia-bacteria associations in brines, laboratory cultures and the gut environment: a study based on Chilean hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Mauricio; Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Casamayor, Emilio O; Gajardo, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia (Crustacea) and a diversity of halophilic microorganisms coexist in natural brines, salterns and laboratory cultures; part of such environmental microbial diversity is represented in the gut of Artemia individuals. Bacterial diversity in these environments was assessed by 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting. Eight natural locations in Chile, where A. franciscana or A. persimilis occur, were sampled for analysis of free-living and gut-associated bacteria in water from nature and laboratory cultures. The highest ecological diversity (Shannon's index, H') was found in brines, it decreased in the gut of wild and laboratory animals, and in laboratory water. Significant differences in H' existed between brines and laboratory water, and between brines and gut of wild animals. The greatest similarity of bacterial community composition was between brines and the gut of field animals, suggesting a transient state of the gut microbiota. Sequences retrieved from DGGE patterns (n = 83) exhibited an average of 97.8% identity with 41 bacterial genera from the phyla Proteobacteria (55.4% of sequences match), Bacteroidetes (22.9%), Actinobacteria (16.9%) and Firmicutes (4.8%). Environment-exclusive genera distribution was seen in Sphingomonas and Paenibacillus (gut of field animals), Amaricoccus and Ornithinimicrobium (gut of laboratory animals), and Hydrogenophaga (water of laboratory cultures). The reported ecological and physiological capabilities of such bacteria can help to understand Artemia adaptation to natural and laboratory conditions.

  10. What's the Point of Moderation? A Discussion of the Purposes Achieved through Contemporary Moderation Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Sue; Hughes, Clair; Adie, Lenore

    2016-01-01

    An increasingly regulated higher education sector is renewing its attention to those activities referred to as "moderation" in its efforts to ensure that judgements of student achievement are based on appropriate standards. Moderation practices conducted throughout the assessment process can result in purposes identified as equity,…

  11. Moderate alcohol consumption and cognitive risk

    PubMed Central

    Neafsey, Edward J; Collins, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed 143 papers that described the relationship between moderate drinking of alcohol and some aspect of cognition. Two types of papers were found: (1) those that provided ratios of risk between drinkers and nondrinkers (74 papers in total) and (2) those that, although they did not provide such ratios, allowed cognition in drinkers to be rated as “better,” “no different,” or “worse” than cognition in nondrinkers (69 papers in total). The history of research on moderate drinking and cognition can be divided into two eras: 1977–1997 and 1998–present. Phase I (1977–1997) was the era of neuropsychological evaluation involving mostly young to middle-aged (18–50 years old) subjects. Although initial studies indicated moderate drinking impaired cognition, many later studies failed to confirm this, instead finding no difference in cognition between drinkers and nondrinkers. Phase II (1998–present) was and is the era of mental status exam evaluation involving mostly older (≥55 years old) subjects. These studies overwhelmingly found that moderate drinking either reduced or had no effect on the risk of dementia or cognitive impairment. When all the ratios of risk from all the studies in phase II providing such ratios are entered into a comprehensive meta-analysis, the average ratio of risk for cognitive risk (dementia or cognitive impairment/decline) associated with moderate “social” (not alcoholic) drinking of alcohol is 0.77, with nondrinkers as the reference group. The benefit of moderate drinking applied to all forms of dementia (dementia unspecified, Alzheimer’s disease, and vascular dementia) and to cognitive impairment (low test scores), but no significant benefit against cognitive decline (rate of decline in test scores) was found. Both light and moderate drinking provided a similar benefit, but heavy drinking was associated with nonsignificantly higher cognitive risk for dementia and cognitive impairment. Although the meta

  12. Children's Appraisal of Moderately Stressful Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Brianne; Power, Thomas; Hill, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated 2 questions: (1) do children show consistent styles of appraisal across a range of moderately stressful events?, and (2) what are the adjustment and parenting correlates of individual differences in children's appraisal style? Ninety-nine 3rd though 5th grade children and their mothers participated. For each of 6 vignettes…

  13. Detecting radiation reaction at moderate laser intensities.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Thomas; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Bulanov, Stepan S; Rykovanov, Sergey; Schroeder, Carl B; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new method of detecting radiation reaction effects in the motion of particles subjected to laser pulses of moderate intensity and long duration. The effect becomes sizable for particles that gain almost no energy through the interaction with the laser pulse. Hence, there are regions of parameter space in which radiation reaction is actually the dominant influence on charged particle motion.

  14. Subtle Cognitive Effects of Moderate Hypoxia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    difference in word fluency, word association, or lateralized lexical decision performances. In addition, Schlaepfer, Bartsch, and Fisch (1992...12,000 and 15,000 feet. Schlaepfer, T. E., Bartsch, P., & Fisch , H. U. 1992. Paradoxical effects of mild hypoxia and moderate altitude on human

  15. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  16. English Teachers' Moderating and Participating in OCPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan; Mayora, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Online Communities of Practice (OCPs) are among the most accessible tools for EFL/ESL teachers' co-construction of knowledge and self-directed learning. Despite the welcomed proliferation of EFL/ESL teachers' OCPs, concomitant research on collaboration is noticeably lagging behind. The present paper is just a preliminary look at moderation and…

  17. Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic sulfate- and arsenate-respiring bacterium from Searles Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Han, Sukkyun; Lanoil, Brian; Saltikov, Chad W.; Stolz, John F.; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    A haloalkaliphilic sulfate-respiring bacterium, strain SLSR-1, was isolated from a lactate-fed stable enrichment culture originally obtained from the extreme environment of Searles Lake, California. The isolate proved capable of growth via sulfate-reduction over a broad range of salinities (125–330 g/L), although growth was slowest at salt-saturation. Strain SLSR-1 was also capable of growth via dissimilatory arsenate-reduction and displayed an even broader range of salinity tolerance (50–330 g/L) when grown under these conditions. Strain SLSR-1 could also grow via dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. Growth experiments in the presence of high borate concentrations indicated a greater sensitivity of sulfate-reduction than arsenate-respiration to this naturally abundant anion in Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 contained genes involved in both sulfate-reduction (dsrAB) and arsenate respiration (arrA). Amplicons of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from DNA extracted from Searles Lake sediment revealed the presence of close relatives of strain SLSR-1 as part of the flora of this ecosystem despite the fact that sulfate-reduction activity could not be detected in situ. We conclude that strain SLSR-1 can only achieve growth via arsenate-reduction under the current chemical conditions prevalent at Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 is a deltaproteobacterium in the family Desulfohalobiacea of anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria, for which we propose the name Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov.

  18. Microgravity effects on magnetotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual group of iron bacteria has recently been discovered which form inclusion bodies containing a form of iron oxide known as magnetite (ferrosoferric oxide, Fe3O4.) The inclusions are of a nano-particle size, are encased within a protein envelope, and are called magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are arranged adjacent to one another and parallel to the long axis of the cell such that cells appear to contain an electron-dense string of beads. The bacteria containing magnetosomes exhibit metal reductase activity, an activity critical to element recycling in nature, and the inclusions are a means for the organism to sequester reduced iron atoms and thereby keep iron reduction stoichiometry favorable. The magnetosomes also allow the bacteria to display magnetotaxis, which is movement in response to a magnetic field, such as the north or south magnetic poles. It is presumed that the bacteria use the alignment to the earth's magnetic field to orient themselves downward towards sediments where the habitat is favorable to their growth and metabolism. The comparatively few species of these bacteria isolated in the northern and southern hemispheres respond to magnetic north and south respectively, or alternatively respond only to the magnetic pole of the hemisphere from which they were isolated. This apparent dichotomy in response to magnetism could mean that the organisms are not responding to magnetism, per se, but instead are using the magnetosomes to respond to gravity. To resolve if magnetosomes respond to gravity in addition to magnetism we have used Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, a well-studied magnetotactic bacterium isolated in the northern hemisphere, to examine magnetotactic behavior in the absence of gravity. Experiments to compare the orientation of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum to north- or south-pole magnets were conducted in normal gravity and in the microgravity environments aboard the Space Shuttle and Space Station MIR. In each of the microgravity

  19. Cold-moderator scattering kernel methods

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    An accurate representation of the scattering of neutrons by the materials used to build cold sources at neutron scattering facilities is important for the initial design and optimization of a cold source, and for the analysis of experimental results obtained using the cold source. In practice, this requires a good representation of the physics of scattering from the material, a method to convert this into observable quantities (such as scattering cross sections), and a method to use the results in a neutron transport code (such as the MCNP Monte Carlo code). At Los Alamos, the authors have been developing these capabilities over the last ten years. The final set of cold-moderator evaluations, together with evaluations for conventional moderator materials, was released in 1994. These materials have been processed into MCNP data files using the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Over the course of this work, they were able to develop a new module for NJOY called LEAPR based on the LEAP + ADDELT code from the UK as modified by D.J. Picton for cold-moderator calculations. Much of the physics for methane came from Picton`s work. The liquid hydrogen work was originally based on a code using the Young-Koppel approach that went through a number of hands in Europe (including Rolf Neef and Guy Robert). It was generalized and extended for LEAPR, and depends strongly on work by Keinert and Sax of the University of Stuttgart. Thus, their collection of cold-moderator scattering kernels is truly an international effort, and they are glad to be able to return the enhanced evaluations and processing techniques to the international community. In this paper, they give sections on the major cold moderator materials (namely, solid methane, liquid methane, and liquid hydrogen) using each section to introduce the relevant physics for that material and to show typical results.

  20. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, R.T.; Jacobs, D.R.; Singh, R.; Zuk, A.; Rosenbaum, M.; Papapanou, P.N.; Desvarieux, M.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P